 If   If 

x→c

lim f (x) = 0,
x→c

and if lim g(x) = 0, 
x→c

then lim

f (x) g(x)

x→c

= ±∞.

lim f (x) = 0,
x→c

and if lim g(x) = 0, 
x→0

then anything can happen:

lim

x2 x x x x2 x4

= lim x = 0,
x→0 x→0

x→0

lim

= lim 1 = 1, = lim 1 x2 = ∞,

x→0

lim

x→0

There are two approaches: Cancellation: lim x2 − 1 x−1 = lim (x + 1)(x − 1) x−1 = lim x + 1 = 2
x→1

x→1

x→1

and L’Hospital’s Rule: lim x2 − 1 x−1 = lim 2x 1 = 2.

x→1

x→1

L’Hospital’s Rule

0 0

Version

:

 If either f or g increases or decreases,        if f (x) approaches 0,   if g(x) approaches 0, and     f (x)   if   g (x) approaches L,  f (x) g(x) as x approaches c(±),

then

also approaches L.

An Old Example:

x→0

lim

sin x x sin 5x x

= lim

cos x 1

x→0

= 1.

Another Example:

x→0

lim

= lim

5 cos 5x 1 1

x→0

= 5.

Still Another Example:

x→1

lim

= lim x = 1. x→1 1 x−1

ln x

A Warning:

x→0

lim

4x + 3

2x + 5 5 4 lim = 2. x→0 2

=

3

has nothing to do with

A Proof, for a limited hypothesis: If f and g are differentiable (and thus continuous) at c, if f (c) = g(c) = 0, and if g (c) = 0, then f (x) = f (c) + f (c) + o(1) (x − c) = f (c) + o(1) (x − c)

g(x) = g(c) + g (c) + o(1) (x − c) = f (x) g(x) = g (c) + o(1) (x − c) f (c) + o(1) (x − c) g (c) + o(1) (x − c) = f (c) + o(1) g (c) + o(1) = f (c) g (c) + o(1)

A Double Application of L’Hospital’s Rule: lim 1 + x − ex x(ex ex ex − 1) xex xex 1 1 − ex −1+ −ex + ex → → → 0 0 0 0 −1 2 1 − ex

x→0

x→0

lim lim

x→0

+

Since

→ − , then so does x . x + + 2 e − 1 + xe 1 + x − ex 1 1 − ex . → − , then so does Since x x x − 1) e − 1 + xe 2 x(e ex ex xex

−ex

x→1

lim

1

= lim

ln x x−1 x − 1 − x ln x (x − 1) ln x

x 0 0

x→1

1 − ln x − 1 = lim x−1 x→1 ln x + x −x ln x = lim x→1 x ln x + x − 1 − ln x − 1 = = lim x→1 ln x + 1 + 1

→ − . 2 1 1

0 0

Since this last limit exists and equals − , so do the rest. 2

To evaluate a 1∞ or a ∞0 limit, work first on its logarithm: a x a a x ln lim 1 + = lim ln 1 + = lim x ln 1 + x→∞ x→∞ x→∞ x x x a ln 1 + 0 x → = lim 1 x→∞ 0 1 1+ = lim
x→∞

x a· x − 1 −

a x2

x→∞

lim

1+

a x

x

x2 a = lim a = a, x→∞ 1+ x = ea

then unlog

L’Hospital’s Rule

∞ ∞

Version

:

if g(x) approaches ∞, and      f (x)  if  approaches L, as x approaches c(±),  g (x) f (x) also approaches L. then g(x)

 If either f or g increases or decreases,       if f (x) approaches ∞,  

ln lim

x→0+

xx = lim

x→0+

ln xx = lim ln x 1

x→0+

x ln x

→0·∞ 1 x 1 − 2 x

= lim

x→0+

∞ ∞

= lim

x→0+

x = lim (−x) = 0
x→0+ x→0+

lim

xx = e 0 = 1 1 ln x

1 x = lim = = 0, For a > 0, lim a a x→∞ x→∞ axa−1 x ax yielding ln x = o(xa), for any a > 0, as x → ∞.

For b > 0,

u→∞

lim

ub eu

= = = =

x→∞

lim

(ln x)b x ln x x
1 b

b

x→∞

lim

x→∞ b

lim

ln x x
1 b

b

0

= 0, yielding ub = o(eu), for any b > 0, as u → ∞.

x→∞

lim

ln 1 −

1 x

csc

1 x

= lim

u→0+

ln (1 − u) csc u ln (1 − u) sin u 1 − −1 1−u = = −1 cos u 1

= lim

u→0+

= lim

u→0+

Special case: For positive integers n, lim ln 1 − 1 n csc 1 n = −1

n→∞

x→∞

lim x b − 1

1 x

b −1 = lim 1 x→∞ x bu · ln b 1

1 x

=

u→0+

lim

bu − 1 u

=

u→0+

lim

= ln b

Special case: For positive integers n, lim n b − 1
1 n

n→∞

= ln b

ln lim | sec x |cos x π
x→ 2

= lim ln | sec x |cos x π
x→ 2

= lim cos x ln | sec x | π
x→ 2

= − lim cos x ln | cos x | π
x→ 2

= − lim u ln |u | (→ 0 · ∞)
u→0

ln u = − lim 1 u→0 u 1 = − lim
u→0

∞ ∞

or

= − lim

u→0

u 1 ln u

0 0

u 1 − 2 u

=

u→0

lim u = 0

x→ 2

lim | sec x |cos x = e0 π

= 1

0 Assume WOLG that the function g is increasing, so that an inverse h = g −1 exists. Since y = g(x) approaches 0 as x approaches c, h(y) = x also approaches c, as y approaches 0. 1 1 = , equals . The inverse’s derivative, h (y) = dy dy g (x) dx f (x) approaches L, as x approaches c, we have Since g (x) f (x) f (h(y)) d f (h(y)) = f (h(y))h (y) = = dy g (x) g (x) dx also approaching L, as y approaches 0.

Proof of L’Hospital’s Rule

0

Version

:

For any positive , when |x − c| < a certain δ, we have d < f (h(y)) < L+ L− 2 dy 2 Now take an x1 properly between x and c, and let y1 equal g(x1), so that x1 = h(y1). (Remember that y equals g(x) and that x equals h(y).) The Mean Value Theorem Corollary yields: L− L− 2 2 < < f (h(y)) − f (h(y1)) y − y1 f (x) − f (x1) g(x) − g(x1) < L+ < L+ 2 2

The Mean Value Theorem Corollary yields: L− 2 < f (x) − f (x1) g(x) − g(x1) f (x) − 0 g(x) − 0 < L+ 2

Let x1 approach c, so that f (x1) and g(x1) can approach 0. L− Thus < L− f (x) g(x) 2 ≤ ≤ L+ 2 < L+

approaches L.

∞ As before, assume WOLG that g is increasing, so that an inverse h = g −1 exists. Since y = g(x) approaches ∞, as x approaches c−, h(y) = x also approaches c−, as y approaches ∞. 1 1 = , equals . The inverse’s derivative, h (y) = dy dy g (x) dx f (x) approaches L, as x approaches c−, we have Since g (x) f (x) f (h(y)) d f (h(y)) = f (h(y))h (y) = = dy g (x) g (x) dx also approaching L, as y approaches ∞.

Proof of L’Hospital’s Rule

Version, for Left-hand Limits :

For any positive , when c − δ < x < c for a certain δ, we have d < f (h(y)) < L+ L− 2 dy 2 Now take an x1 such that c − δ < x1 < x < c, let y1 equal g(x1), so that x1 = h(y1). (Remember that y equals g(x) and that x equals h(y).) The Mean Value Theorem Corollary yields: L− L− 2 2 < < f (h(y)) − f (h(y1)) y − y1 f (x) − f (x1) g(x) − g(x1) < L+ < L+ 2 2

The Mean Value Theorem Corollary yields: f (x) − f (x1) L− < <L+ , 2 g(x) − g(x1) 2 f (x1) 1− f (x) f (x) <L+ , · L− < g(x1) 2 g(x) 2 1− g(x) 1 − g(x1) 1 − g(x1) f (x) g(x) g(x) L− < L+ < , · · f (x1) f (x1) 2 g(x) 2 1 − f (x) 1 − f (x) As x approaches even closer to c, and as f (x) and g(x) become larger and larger, we obtain f (x) ≤L+ <L+ , L− <L− ≤ 2 g(x) 2 f (x) and approaches L. g(x)

Notes: In cases where f (x) → ∞, it is sufficient to replace the

g (x) (L − )s with M ’s, to replace the (L − 2 )s with (M + 1)’s and to forget about the L + inequalities on the right sides. In cases where f (x) → −∞, it is sufficient to replace the

g (x) (L + )s with −M ’s, to replace the (L + 2 )s with (−M − 1)’s and to forget about the L − inequalities on the left sides. It is important that either f or g be increasing or decreasing, here. Otherwise, L’Hospital’s Theorem may not hold, as the following counterexample shows.

Counterexample: Let f (x) equal x + sin 2x ,

2 4 which approaches ∞ as x approaches ∞.

Let g(x) equal

x

2 4 which also approaches ∞ as x approaches ∞.

+

sin 2x

esin x,

Now

f (x) g(x)

equals e−sin x, which has no limit, while

f (x) g (x)

1 2

+

cos 2x 2 x 2

=
1 2

+

cos 2x 2

esin x + cos2x

+

sin 2x 4

esin x cos x

= cos2x esin x + =

x 2

+

sin 2x 4

esin x cos x

cos x cos x esin x +
x 2

+

sin 2x 4

esin x

approaches 0, as x approaches ∞.

For a counterexample as u approaches c, replace each x on the last two slides with 1 u−c .

(It will not be a very pretty sight, typographically.)

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