1

Chapter – 4 BASELINE ENVIRONMENT      PART ONE: ­ GENERAL  4.1    INTRODUCTION 
Ethiopia  is  endowed  with  substantial  resources  particularly  limestone,  which  is  abundant  throughout  the  Blue  Nile  Valley  (The  Abay),  located  to  the  North  West  and  west  of  Addis  Ababa.  The  major  cement  manufacturing  plants  access  limestone  from  this  valley.  Recently,  there  has  been  a  remarkable  growth  in  the  economy  in  general  and construction industry in particular. Major building constructions are booming in all  the major regional towns and several major roads are under construction. As a sequel  of such infrastructural developments, the demand for cement has increased many folds.  The estimated current demand for cement is above 10.5 million tones per annum. The  annual total production capacity of the existing plants is only 1.236 million tonnes of  clinker  or  about  1.687  million  tonnes  of  Portland  Pozzolana  cement,  and  this  level  of  production restraining construction work throughout the country on top of pushing the  price  of  cement  to  unprecedented  level  beyond  any  bodies  reach.  This  incremental  demand is about 9.0 Million TPA which is 90% of the current supply. 
ETCEM is promoted by West African Cement S.A’ (WACEM) and Ethiopian entrepreneur 

Endale  Yirga    proposes  to  establish  a  green  field  cement  plant,  40  km  north  of  Addis  Ababa in Oromiya national regional state near Chancho town.    The plant will be designed to produce 0.60 Million TPA of clinker and 0.852 Million TPA  of Portland Pozzolana Cement   Ethio Cement Project is based on local raw materials available at Mugher Valley, Mulo  and Bericha area.  ETCEM  has  retained  BS  Envitech  (P)  Limited  as  its  consultant  to  prepare  Environmental  and  Social  Impact  Assessment  (ESIA)  and  Environmental  and  Social  Management  Plan  (EMP)  and  the  Resettlement  Action  Plan  (RAP)  for  the  proposed  integrated cement project.   JEMA  International  Consulting  PLC  is  the  local  counter  part  retained  to  conduct  the  baseline  survey  which  is  important  to  finalize  the  Environmental  and  Social  Impact  Assessment  (ESIA)  and  Environmental  and  Social  Management  Plan  (EMP)  and  the  Resettlement Action Plan (RAP). 
 

2 LOCATION OF THE PROJECT AREA      The  project  area  includes  the  raw  material  quarry  site  (limestone  quarry  site),  the  intermediate site, clay mining site and the plant site. The locations of each site are shown  in fig. 1 and fig. 2 with respect to different adjacent Woredas. Generally, the project area  falls with in four Woredas: Sululta, Mulo, Yaya Gulale and Ade‐a Berga (see fig.1). The ten  kilometers radius with respect to limestone quarry site and the plant site at Chancho are  also shown with pinkish colour in fig.1.     

  Figure 1        The location map of the project area.       

3

    Figure 2             a map showing the location of plant site, clay site, intermediate  site and quarry site. 

   Table 1                            Location of Raw Material Sources 
Sn  Material  Source Locality      Distance  plant (km)  30  23  30  30  from  Requirement    Ton per year   780,000  135,000  57,000  42,000 

1  2  3  4 

Limestone  Clay   Sandstone   Gypsum 

Mugher  Mulo  Mugher  Mugher 

 

   

      4.1.  water.4 4.      To  prepare  a  Post  Project  Monitoring  Program  for  checking  and  regulating  the  environmental  quality  due  to  operation  of  the  cement  plant  and  help  in  sustainable  development of the area.3.  The impacts may be adverse or beneficial.  1.2         OBJECTIVES    The over all objectives of the study is to collect socioeconomic indicators which would serve as a  bench mark against which impact of the factory’s activities will be measured over time.  . Disseminate information to the community about the project     4.     To  evaluate  the  beneficial  and  adverse  impacts  of  the  proposed  cement  manufacturing  and mining operations.  water. land and socio economic within an area of 10 km radius around the cement plant and raw  material quarry sites.1. In order to  assess  the  impacts.1.  noise.  land  and  socio‐economic  environments around 10 km radius of the plant and mine sites.      To  prepare  an  Environmental  and  Social  Management  Plan  (EMP)  detailing  control  technologies and measures to be adopted for  mitigation of adverse impacts if any. Collect  information  on  perceived  positive/negative  impacts  of  the  factory  on  the  population  and  recommendations  that  would  help  efforts  aimed  at  alleviating/minimizing  negative  impacts  3.  noise.  The main objectives of characterization are:‐   To  assess  the  existing  baseline  status  of  air.2 METHODOLOGY   Any developmental activity is expected to cause impacts on surrounding  environment during  the construction and operation phases. as a  consequence of the proposed activity. To collect and analyze information on socio‐economic status of the population that would be  affected by the construction and operation of the factory  2.3 SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY   4.1  SCOPE OF THE STUDY   The  scope  of  the  study  includes  preparation  of  Environmental  and  Social  Impact  Assessment  study  with  detailed  characterization  of  various  environmental  components  such  as  air.1.3.  a  detailed  Environmental  Impact  Assessment  study  has  been  conducted  within an area of 10 km radius around the plant and mine sites.     To  identify  and  quantify  significant  impacts  due  to  various  operations  of  cement  manufacturing  and  raw  material  production  on  various  environmental  components  through prediction of impacts.

3.  4. More households were selected from the factory and quarry site (core site) as compared to the buffer zone primarily taking into consideration that it’s the core project site that would be more affected than the buffer zone.1. A structured household survey questionnaire was administered to 1182 households out of the total 1200 targeted households.       Preparation  of  the  Environmental  and  Social  Management  Plan  (ESMP)  detailing  control  technologies  and  measures  to  be  adopted  for  mitigation  of  adverse  impacts  if  any.3 COLLECTION OF BASELINE STATUS  4.  as  a  consequence of the cement manufacturing and mining of the required raw materials.3. Woredas are districts which are responsible primarily coordinating and leading development activities at grassroots level.  They  are  outlined below.  noise. Chancho town where the factory will lie at its out skirt has more population as compared to the rural peasant associations. A total of 1200 households were targeted for data collection purpose.1. In addition to household level questionnaire community level (Woreda and PA/Kebele) semi structured questionnaire was also administered to capture community level socioeconomic variables. The data is entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).  water.     To  design  Post  Project  Monitoring  Programme  for  regulating  the  environmental  quality  during cement manufacturing and mining and help in sustainable development of the area.1   Socio – Economic Environment   The study used cluster sampling method to determine and select its sample. Data collectors were .  soil  and  socioeconomic  components  of  environment.   Identification of significant environmental parameters to study the existing status within the  impact  zone  with  respect  to  air.3.     Study  of  various  activities  of  the  proposed  integrated  project  of  plant  and  raw  material  mines to identify the areas leading to impact/change in environmental quality.      Identification/Prediction of impacts for the identified activities and to study level of impact  on various environmental elements       Evaluation  of  impacts  after  superimposing  the  predicted/quantified  scenario  over  the  baseline scenario. Besides. Kebeles/Peasant Association (Pas) are smallest administrative units in Ethiopia. One urban center and 19 rural sub PAs that would be affected by impacts of the project were covered by the study. The 4 Woreda officials were interview to obtain information on the socioeconomic profiles of the Woreda.5 Standard  procedures  involved  in  Environmental  Impact  Assessment  are  followed.

  Community elders. The training was supported by mock interviews. Women Affairs.2 Climate  Rainfall. Kebele leaders.  and  agricultural  aspects.  Cultural/Religious  affairs. To attain maximum impact and improve quality of data the training was given in a participatory way. as well as data gathering from schools and churches.  and  public  service  institutions (regular and alternative schools.      . Framers’ Training  Centers. and other socio‐economic information from various Woreda offices  focusing  on  Agriculture.  institutional services. definitions and techniques of data collection.3. clinics and veterinary health posts). DA offices. temperature. Kebele offices.  education.  Kebele  Administration  and  Rural  with  selected  elders  and  individuals  who  have  rich  experience  in  religious  affairs. Wind speed.6 recruited from Kebeles/PA that lie within core and buffer zone of project impact area.  Physico-Chemical and Biological Environment   4. The data collection thus included household survey.  land  use.  conservation  areas.  Finance. a questionnaire translated into Amharic was given to each data collector as a reference.1.    Collection  of  secondary  information  about  population.  gender  issues. In addition. a sociologist and a mining engineer as a lead investigators in collaboration with other related professionals.      The socio economic survey professional team comprises of a Demographer. key informants. wind direction data were obtained from secondary sources.  topography.  climate. Youth and Teachers representing the  community  were  selected  for  interview  to  retrieve  as  much  information  as  possible  in  various aspects of the community.   Noise Environment    Noise  monitoring  was  carried  out  at  the  various  locations  to  identify  the  impact  due  to  the  existing sources on the surroundings in the study area. focus group discussions. A two days training was given to data collectors on the data collection.  Education.      Geographical  coordinates  for  each  water  points. Data collectors were trained in concepts.3.  Water  development.

  including  birds.  Representative  soil  samples  were  collected  from  three  locations  within  10  km  radius  of  the  plant and mine sites for analysis of the characteristics.    Soil  Field surveys were conducted to identify the land use in and around 10 km radius of the sites. RPM.   Information  on  flora  and  fauna  in  the  study  area  has  been  collected  and  identified  at  the  Herbarium of Addis Ababa University.  SPM & RPM at each station has been monitored on 24 hourly basis. A series of photographs were  taken to concretize information generated during site visits and to elucidate verbal information  obtained during interview.3. NOX and CO.  identification  and  classification  were  made  through  field  observations and use of field guides for both birds and mammals. Samples from representative flora were collected for further  identification at the National Herbarium (Addis Ababa University.  4. The soil samples were analyzed at the  Laboratory of Geological survey of Ethiopia. SO2. reconnaissance  survey and detailed inventory of the vascular plant species was made by traversing the area from  east to west and from south to north.    Ambient Air Quality  The scenario of the existing Ambient air quality in the study region has been assessed  through a network of four ambient air quality stations during the study period within  an  area  of  10  km  radius  and  around  the  proposed  integrated  project.7 Water  Water samples from various locations within 10 km radius were collected for assessment of the  existing physico‐chemical and bacteriological quality.4  STUDY OF VARIOUS ACTIVITIES   Desk reviews of various operations involved in integrated project have been made in detail to  identify areas having impact on various environmental components. Department of Biology.1. CO was monitored  on 8 hourly basis. With  respect  to  wildlife. Regarding the flora.    Land Environment  Field surveys were conducted to identify the land use in and around 10 km radius of the sites.   .  The  existing  Ambient Air Quality (AAQ) status has been monitored for SPM. Department of Biology). The water samples were analyzed at the  Laboratory of Geological survey of Ethiopia.

Sc in Environ’al engineering  M.  4.  Hydrogeolgy.1 Socio Economic Environment  4. Noise level Monitoring and  Biological Resource Base (Flora and Fauna).sc in Anthropolgy  Noise Impact  Cultural.8 4.2.2.3 Traffic flow survey  4.  And their particular  CV is attached as annex 1.sc in Demogarphy   M. the details of the company profile is attached as annex 1.3.2.1.sc in Mining engineering  Ph. (Hydrometeorology. Ensermu Kelebessa  Dr.D in  Systematic Botany  Ph.5 Public Consultation      .D in Ecology/ornithology  M.2. Historical and Archeological features  4.  4.2 Physico‐chemical and Biological Env’t of the Project Area.4 Cultural. Tadesse W/mariam Gole                   Ato Gultneh Kebede  W/ro Lelise Dembi  Ato Lemeesa Mekonta  Ato Natnael  Tesfaye  Ato Deme Abera  G/Manager  Flora  Fauna  Socio economy  Socio economy  Water Environment  Qualification  M. Water quality.sc in Sociology  M. Soil Environment.hist &  Archeological  The report is divided in to Five Major sections described in part two as a detail baseline  environment.2.Sc in hydrogeology  M.5 THE BASELINE SURVEYING FIRM AND ITS PROFESSIONAL  TEAM COMPOSTION  The Jema international Consulting PLC is a company is led by Engineer Assefa Bekele  and working in the sector for the last 14 years in consulting various companies in  different sector.       Table 2       MOBILIZED PROFEESIONALS IN THE PROJECT  No  Name of the professional  Assignment   given in this  project  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Engineer Assefa Bekele  Dr.  Jema International consulting firm for this particular project mobilizes the following  professionals to execute the job described in the terms of reference.

 The  study covers both rural and urban areas with in the vicinity of the factory. One urban center and 19 rural sub PAs that would be affected by impacts  of  the  project  were  covered  by  the  study.  More  households  were  selected  from  the  factory  and  quarry site (core site) as compared to the buffer zone primarily taking into consideration that it’s  the  core  project  site  that  would  be  more  affected  than  the  buffer  zone.2.  The  4  Woreda  officials  were  interview  to  obtain  information  on  the  socioeconomic  profiles of the Woreda.  In  addition  Kebele  and  Woreda  officials  were  interviewed  to  obtain  certain  information  about  their  respective Kebeles and Woredas                  4.2. Data collectors were recruited from Kebeles/PA that lie within core and buffer zone  of  project impact area.  Chancho  town  where the factory will lie at its out skirt has more population  as compared to the rural peasant  associations.1.2.1 Household survey    The  study  used  cluster  sampling  method  to  determine  and  select  its  sample.3. To this effect this baseline socioeconomic study will collect bench mark  information on socioeconomic indicators and information on environment surrounding the plant  and mine sites and surrounding areas with in the radius of ten kilometer. To collect and analyze information on socio‐economic status of the population that would  be affected by the construction and operation of the factory  2.  Collecting  baseline  information  against  which  change  over  time  due  to  the  establishment  and  operation  of  the  factory  will  be  measured  is  paramount importance. Collect  information  on  perceived  positive/negative  impacts  of  the  factory  on  the  population and recommendations that would help efforts aimed at alleviating/minimizing  negative impacts  3.  Woredas  are  districts  which  are  responsible  primarily  coordinating  and  leading  development  activities at grassroots level.  A  total  of  1200  households  were  targeted  for  data  collection  purpose.  A  structured  household  survey  questionnaire  was  administered  to  1182  households  out  of  the  total  1200  targeted  households.1.  A two days training was given to data collectors on the data collection.  definitions  and  techniques  of  data  collection.1.3 Methodology  4.9 PART TWO  4.  1.  Besides.  This baseline survey  covers 20 sub PA/Kebeles which are assumed to be affected by the factory and its activities.2. In addition  to  household  level  questionnaire  community  level  (Woreda  and  PA/Kebele)  semi  structured  questionnaire  was  also  administered  to  capture  community  level  socioeconomic  variables.2 Objectives    The over all objectives of the study is to collect socioeconomic indicators which would serve as a  bench mark against which impact of the factory’s activities will be measured over time.1.1 : DETAIL BASELINE ENVIRONMENT  Socio – Economic Environment  4.  The  . Kebeles/Peasant Association (Pas) are smallest administrative units  in  Ethiopia.1.  The data is entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Information presented  in  this  report  stems  from  the  household  survey  and  Kebele  and  Woreda  records. Disseminate information to the community about the project       4. Introduction    Like any developmental project this project is expected to cause both positive and adverse effects  to  the  surrounding  population  and  environment.  Data  collectors  were  trained  in  concepts.2.

1.    There  are  high  forests. The annual average rainfall of the zone ranges from 800 to 1600 mm.    4. The summer rainy season lasts from June to October while spring season last  from March to May.  a  questionnaire  translated  into  Amharic was given to each data collector as a reference. It comprises twenty two Woredas (20 rural and 2 urban)  and 321 Peasant Associations. The lowest is within the gorge of Blue Nile (Abay) and the highest pick is found in Degem  area.  game  reserves.  woina  dega/sub  tropical  and  dega/highland.  Different  reports  of  Central  Statistical  Authority  were  reviewed. It has  13  zones  and  –  Woredas  (districts).553. secondary data source were collected from Woreda and  Kebele  administrative  records.3. In addition.1.    The topography of the Zone ranges from the lowest 1000 meter to 3500 meter altitude above sea  level.2.2.3.  North  Shoa  Zone  Bureau  of  Finance  and  Economic Development reports.2 PA/Kebele Level     Focus  group  discussion  of  key  informants  and  community  leaders  were  also  carried  out  in  all  Kebeles covered by the study.1 Background   . sanctuaries and area for wild life conservation in the zone. In the light of this  Woreda official(s) were interviewed  with the help of semi‐structure questionnaire.  In  addition.  there  are  no  national  parks.626. Ormia region is the largest region in Ethiopia with a total population of 26. To attain maximum impact and improve quality of  data  the  training  was  given  in  a  participatory  way.  Central  Statistical  Agency  reports.  North  shoa  zone  on  the  other  hand  has  a  population  of  1.2.  About  51%  of  the  zone  lies  between  2500  to  3000  meter  above  sea  level.4.2.  Semi structure questionnaire was administered to selected kebele/PA officials to get background  information on the population and socioeconomic activities with in the kebeles/Pas.3. Federal Ministry of publications and other material was done in  order  to  get  full  information  on  the  socioeconomic  profile  of  the  zone  and  the  four  project  Woredas in particular.487 as of July 2006 (CSA 2005).  However.10 training was supported by mock interviews.  woodland.       4. which comprises about half of the total population in the area.2.1.3 Woreda Level    Involving  Woreda  officials  as  government  wing  responsible  for  overseeing  all  development  activities  in  their  respective  administrative  boundaries  is  crucial  for  the  establishment  and  ensuring  ongoing success of the project.1.  bush  and  shrub  lands  in  the  zone  along  with  plantation  trees  that  are  protected  by  the  government  and  the  community.     The  age  distribution  of  the  population  is  characterized  by  high  proportion  of  young  age  population.       4. The zone covers an area of 12003 sq km.000.    The  zone  is  classified  in  traditional  ecology  of  kola/low  land.4 Review of Literature    Extensive  review  of  literatures  was  done  to  compare  survey  findings  with  other  zonal  and  regional  documents.1.4 Socioeconomic Profile of North Shoa Zone and Project Woredas  North Shoa zone where Ethio cement project is planned to be implemented is located in Oromia  region.    4.  The  climate  of  the  North  shoa  zone  is  characterized  by  two  rainy  seasons‐  summer and spring.      4.

1.423  39.108 hectare of land  was cultivated under cereals.11 In  2006  there  were  92  farmers’  service  cooperatives  in  the  zone  with  47.021  23.278  41873  Rural  112. Out of this 41 873 (15.3  Source: BOFED 2006 and CSA 2005    4.073.797  3511   8. Barely.  diarrhea  and  infection  of  the  skin.2 average household size.3  Household Numbers  Male   14057   3178   11224   19999  48458  Female  2365   783   1.4. wheat.156  members  and  with  capital  of  26.5  9.  The highest  basic health service coverage is in Yaya Gulele which is about 78%.  Basic  health  service  coverage  of  North  Shoa  zone  was  estimated to be 64% in 2006. 34 clinics and 77 health posts in 2006.    4. Population of the Woredas    The  total  population  in  the  four  Woredas  where  the  project  will  be  established  and  operates  is  about 360.782  53.2.889  360. 12 health centers.  Density  120.3 Health service coverage    North Shoa zone has one hospital.3  with  the  highest  household size in Mulo 9. The  most  common  diseases  in  the  area  are  respiratory  tract  infections.2  5.387 hectare of land under oil  seed.6  Mullo  52  Adea Berga  ‐  Source: BOFED 2006  . Teff.456  Total  16.3  107  213  136  576.9 and the lowest in Yaya Gulele Woreda 5.4. According to BOFED report in 2006 a  total of 512.344  129.9  million  birr.2.2. The  population density ranges from about 107 to 213 per square kilometer.370  14.    Table 3: Population and household numbers by Woreda  Woredas   Sululta  Mulo  Yaya  Gulele  AdeaBerg a*  Total  Urban  10.073  Pop.422   3.611  318.    Table 4: Basic health service coverage  Woredas  %  of  health  coverage 2006  Sululta  56  Yaya Gulele  77.974  115. This in agreement with  zonal average of 143 persons per square kilometer but very high as compared to regional average  which is about 75 persons per square  kilo meter.533 hectare under pulses and 23.  gastritis.590  3.833  35.961    13.  parasitic  diseases.9  5.510   56914  Average  HHD size  7.  It  is  through  these  cooperative  that  farmers  get  fertilizer  and  other agricultural inputs.417  67. 112. 200  Total  123. In Sululta it is 56% and 52%  in Mullo Woreda.     The health service coverage of the project Woredas various from Woreda to Woreda.1.  The  average  household  size  in  the  four  project  impact  Woredas  is  6. Maize and Sorghum and Beans are the most widely cultivated crops in  the zone.8%) are living in urban centers and the remaining in rural  areas.5  6.635  13.

4.2  30.  Out  of  the  total  number  of  students  at  secondary schools only 7.4% (FHAPCO 2006).  Thirty three percent. protected well or spring.2. Mulo and Yaya Gulele  woreda have access to improved water supply.4. According to Bureau of  Finance and Economic Development assessment the number of HIV positive persons in the zone  is increasing based on health facilities report (BOFED 2007). HIV/AIDS is one of serious health problems in the zone.4 Drinking water    The coverage of potable water supply to households in Ethiopia in general is very low.2.1. 19 percent and 31 percent of households in Sululta.5 Education and literacy rate    Oromia regional government and different stakeholders are making concerted effort in expanding  education  services  to  rural  parts  of  the  region.12     4.  As  a  result  decline  in  illiteracy  rate  has  been  witnessed  in  recent  years  (EDHS  2005).  According  to  Federal  Ministry  of  Health  National  HIV/AIDS  Prevention  and  Control  Office  Oromia’s region HIV/AIDS prevalence rate is about 2.5  ‐      4.  In  2006  there  were  382  primary  schools  and  15  secondary  schools  in  North  Shoa  zone  alone. respectively.2.233 male and 12759 female students.236  students  were  enrolled  in  primary  and  20922  students  were  enrolled  in  secondary  schools.        Table 5: Potable water coverage    Sululta  Mulo  Yaya Gulele  AdeaBerga  Source: BOFED 2006    % of population with  access  to  potable  water  33  19. Potable water supply coverage  for  the  zone  is  42  percent  (BOFED  2006).  The 2005  Ethiopian  Demographic  and  Health  Survey  shows  that  90  percent  of  urban  and  13  percent  of  rural households have access to piped water supply (EDHS 2005).1.4.4 HIV/AIDS prevalence    Like any other zones within the country. Mullo and Yaya Gulele Woredas with a total of 16.019 were girls.    Table  3  below  shows  percentage  of  households  that  have access to improved source of drinking water such as piped water. There are a total of 64 primary and 2 secondary schools  in Sululta.      4.1.  221.            .

  monastery  of  Debre  Libanos.  Blue  Nile  gorge. Another economic activity practiced in the zone include bee keeping and  rearing  of  livestock  such  as  cattle.  sheep  and  poultry  for  household  consumption  and  for  sale.      There  are  996  small  scale  industries  within  the  zone.  pulses and oil seeds that are used for consumption and for sale.6 Economy. In 2006 there were 7  investors  at  different  stage  undertaking  construction  work  for  cement  production  in  the  zone  (North Shoa zone investment cited in BOFED 2006)    .1.2.  Animals  and  their  products  are  marketed  within  the  zone  and  in  near  by  big  markets  such  as  Addis Ababa.26 square kilo meter.  Derba  water  fall. Mining and tourism    Economy of the zone is mainly dependent on agriculture.4.13           Table 6: Number of schools and students in the Woredas  #  of  schools  Sululta    Primary   37  Secondary  1  Mullo    Primary   9  Secondary    Yaya Gulele    Primary   18  Secondary  1  Adea Berga    Primary   na  Secondary  na  Source: BOFED 2006    # of students  Male  Female  7223  1101     3670  502     3281  456  na  na  5867  537  3264  282  2645  164  na  na  Total  13090  1638  6934  639  5926  620  Na  Na    4. There is no significant cash crop  production in the area. the major crops produced are cereals. Industry. The raw material is estimated to be about 427.  Portuguese  bridge  built  in  16th  century  are  some  of  the  tourist  attractions in the area    Large potential of raw materials for cement production exists in different Woredas of North Shoa  zone.

114  45.130  15.000  donkeys  in  North  Shao  zone. All Woreda capitals in the zone are accessible by road.4.       According  to  Central  Statistical  Agency  2007/2008  agricultural  survey  report  there  are  1.901  Yaya Gulelel  75. sheep/goats and donkeys.262  48. Among cereals barely is the most commonly  cultivated  crop  followed  by  wheat  and  Teff  in  terms  of  total  farmed  land  it  covers.175  .2.070  37.  The  main  type  of  agriculture in the area is cereals pulses an oil seeds.030  77.065  9.566  82.458  Adea berga  116.331  39.517  2.1  million  sheeps.102  28.    The  most  common  livestock  production includes cattle.1.020  63.7 Transport and Communication    The road network in the project area is very limited. There are all weather and dry weather roads  that link major towns in the area.    Bean  and  linseed are the other common crop types grown in the four Woredas.145  27.  250. The road network in rural parts of the zone isn’t well developed.      Table 8: Number of livestock in the project Woreda    Cattle  Sheep  Goats  Equines  Poultry                          Sululta  180.702  19.8 Type of Agriculture and Land Use    Rural  households  in  the  Woredas  have  7  to  11  hectare  of  land  holdings.  and  193.000  goats. The total  length  of  all  weather  roads  in  zone  is  about  629  kms  (300  asphalted  and  329  km  gravel).852  66.1.2. There is  one highway that passes  through  the area that links Addis Ababa to Amhara region.4.  All  capital  towns  of  the  Woredas  are  have  digital  telephone  services  with  the exception  of  Jida  and  Mulo Woredas.4  million  cattle. People in rural  parts  of  the  zone  like  most  rural  parts  of  Ethiopia  still  use  animals  like  donkeys  and  mules  to  transport goods and people from place to places.739  8.14 4.  1.    Table 7: Distribution of roads by types     Sululta  Mulo  Yaya Gulele  Adea Berga  Total    Gravel  41    24    65  Asphalt  55    15    107  Rural  0    0      Total  96    39    135  4.014  15.  Livestock  production  is  also  very  common  in  the  four  Woredas.230  Mulo  66.

5 Socioeconomic Characteristics of the Project Area    Ethio  cement  factory  will  be  established  in  Sululta  Woreda.        4. The distance between the plant and clay mining site is  about 23 kilo meter.   The plant site.  Limestone  mining  sites  are  located  in  Sululta. There is an all weather road that links the plant with mine site.  The  factory  will  have  five block of mining sites for limestone.2.  Chancho  Buba  Kebele/  Peasant  Association  which  is  adjacent  to  Chancho  town  the  capital  of  the  Woreda.5.1 Plant and mining Area  .2.321 persons. These mining sites lie in four Woredas. There is an all weather gravel road that links the clay mine site with the plant  site. Gypsum and Sand mining sites are found in Sululta Woreda and  clay Mining site is found in Mulo Woreda. three in North Shoa zone and one North West  Shoa Zones of Oromia region.1.15 4. quarry site and the road which links the quarry site to the plant site along with its  surrounding  ten  kilo  meter  radius  lies  with  in  a  total  of  about  17  Peasant  associations  (PA)/kebeles and 20 sub PA/kebeles of the Woredas.  Adea  Berga and Yaya Gulele Woredas. Chancho town has a population of 8.1. gypsum and sand which will be used as raw materials for  the factory.      The plant site is located in Sululta Woreda at the out skirt of Chancho town which is about 42 kilo  meter form Addis Ababab. It is located near to  the main asphalt road that links Addis Ababa with Amhara region.      There  are  different  blockes  of  mining  sites.  A 30 km all weather gravel road that link limestone and gypsum mining site with the plant  site is already built by the project.

9  3.2  8  Dire Sole Lega Heta  9  Chancho Buba  10  Werersa Malima  11  Gulele Gabriel     TOTAL   Mulo  Amuma Bebisa  12  Dunburi   13  Tiro Boro Deroba     Total  Yaya Gulele  14  15  16     Goda Jaba   Guyamana Kuwat   Sole Gibe   1.8  3.793 (54%) are females.7  1.4  2.16 Table 9: Population and household number residing within project core and buffer areas by sex  HHD head  Sn  PA  Sululta  Becho Kidane  1  Mehret  2  3  4  5  6  7  Handa Weizero  Ada Ginbichu  Lilo Chebeka  Derba Gulele Beresa  Eko Efo Babo  Chanch 01  Male  Female  Total  Male  Female  Total  Aver  Density  2614  1194  2675  1.772  1.01  124  210.804  1.     .473  1928  3.155  286  500  786  688  809  510  2.155 out of which 43.59  33.0  10.7  6.403  5389  3.43  223.933  31577  2652  1.4  3.62  54.9  2.44  196.500  1.362    Source: Kebele and Woreda records    Operational  definition  for  the  project  impact  area  comprises  the  plant  site.500  5429  8085  4814  5.96  191  63.475  2697  4013  2388  2.1  1.911  2992  12.7  210.088  345  1.550  730  730  81.  and  all  roads  that  link  the  two  and  ten  kilo  meter  radius  of  the  core  sites.872  2944  6.922  3.462  385  385  43.793  2.783  5936  18.008  37545  5266  2.941  69122  269  658  1351  370  `370  287     ‐        3305  18  28  37  97  180  253     ‐        613  287  686  1388  467  550  540  8000  ‐        11918  5.2  2.88  147.3  ‐        3.0  2.87  92.025  2732  4072  2426  3.6  7.007  246  246  6.8  4.6  86.040  251  251  15.3  185.753  1.9  6.550  4.344  48  82  130  12  11  10  33  5  5  781  334  582  916  700  820  520  2.576  3.7  153. The total population  residing in the PA/Kebeles that fall with the core and buffer zone of the project is about  81.78  ‐  ‐        103.401  820  750  892  2.500  1.125  8.7  TOTAL   Adea Berga  17  Dire Medale      TOTAL      345  TOTAL OF ALL PAs   37.352  680  750  658  2.449  1903  3.2  31.  The  Table  7  above shows population of the 17 Kebeles that fall under the project.  mining  site.831  6.8  2.46  258.209  2714  1.

    One  hundred  forty  four  deaths  and  423  births  were  reported  during the past one year prior to the date of the     As  rural  Ethiopia  is  mainly  patriarchal  society.  Derba  PA  with  electricity  and  drinking  water  facilities.     4.  the  population  of  the  study  area  is  mainly  male  headed. Out of which 2. Development Activities    There  are  different  development  activities  that  are  either  currently  going  on  or  planned  within  the project impact areas. Out of the total of 1177 household heads interviewed in this study 82% of them are male  .  i.2. In addition to  wind  land  dust  and  biomass  fuel  that  the  community  uses  as  source  of  energy.  The  other  is  Derba  cement  factory  currently  under  construction.e.3 Road..2 for rural households) (EDHS 2005). There are also additional all weather and dry weather gravel roads in the area. One  is  small  cement  factory  by  the  name  Abysinia  cement  factory  which  is  currently  operating.2 for urban and 5. This is similar to the national average household size of 5 persons per  household (4.1.1.1.53 are male and  the remaining are female.5.1.17   4. Similarly there isn’t electricity service in the rural side of the  project area. electricity and telephone services    There  is  one  major  asphalted  road  from  Addis  Ababa  to  Debre  Markos  that  passes  through  the  project areas.2 Baseline Environment    An  assessment  of  baseline  environment  was  conducted  with  the  purpose  of  identifying  existing  environment and key players that would affect the environment of the project area. Close to 15% households in  the project area have one or two household members.    4.2.5.  Derba  Medroc  has  supplied  the  community  around  its  project. The other source of  air pollution is emission from vehicles passing in the main road which cross the project area.  there  are  two  cement factories within the vicinity of the project area that could contribute to air pollution.  Mugeher  Cement  factory  also  contributes to environmental pollution of some of the peasant Associations. Population     The average household size of the population in the area is 5. Yaya Gulele and Adea Berga Woredas.    4.2. Some of these are    Health center construction (planned for 2009)   School construction (planned for 2009)   Development of stream for drinking water (planned for 2009)   Rural road construction (planned for 2010)   Telephone line construction (planned for 2009)   Irrigations construction (planned for 2009)   Tap water construction ( planned for 2009)   Derba Cement factory (under construction)    In addition to the above planned developmental activities key informants identified other social  infrastructure  owned  by  different  stakeholders  that  benefit  the  community.2. There is mobile network and landline  telephone service in all capital towns of Sululta. slightly higher than 40% of them have 3‐5  household members and 30% of them have 6 or 7 household members and 20% of them have 8  or  more  household  members.5.4.5.1.5. In  general the road network of the areas is under developed. The rural  side doesn’t have telephone service.

5  2.0  .6  1.  Table  8  shows  that  16  percent  of  households  are  headed  by  persons  age  less  than  30  years  old. Only 16 % of the households are female headed households.9  5.18 headed households.     Table 10: Number of household size and sex of head of household  Background characteristics  Number of Household members   =<2  3‐5  6‐7  >=8  Missing  Total  Sex of head of the household  Male  Female  System  Total    Frequency  Percent      170  497  282  225  7  1182    972  177  33  1182  14.  followed by tiny fraction 2.1  1.1  2. Ninety percent of the population speaks  Afan  Oromo.  Slightly  4  out  of  ten  household  heads between the group of 30‐45 years and close to 1 in 4 household heads are between 45 and  60 years. Ethnic composition and religious affiliation    The population in the area is predominantly Oromo (93 %).7  3.4  42.8  19.0  100.0    95. And 1 in ten of them are above age of 60 years.  Population  of  the  project  area  are  predominantly  Orthodox  Christians  (96.0    4.5.3  1.3%).7  100. There are no ethnic minorities in the area that need special protection.1  23.4 % of other religious groups. if not the only.3% of protestant and 1.2.0    82.3  100. spoken in the area. Afan Oromo  is the major language.1.4  100. This probably  reflects  on  the  traditional  gender  role  of  the  society  where  male  are  the  dominant  decision  makers  within  the  household  and  are  considered  as  head. The remaining are Amhara and other  ethnic groups.6 Language.    Table 11: Ethnic group and religion    Background characteristics  Ethnic Group   Oromo  Amhara  Other  Missing  Total  Religion  Orthodox  Protestant  Other  Missing  Total  Frequency    1063  60  20  39  1182    1123  30  16  12  1182  Percent    89.0  0.1  15.

 Nonetheless. The gap widens as they reach at high school  and above.9 888 75.1.  Six out of 10 interviewed head  of households are illiterate.2.1.5.8 166  14.0 258  21.  4.4 1182 100.5.0 42  3.0     Education  is  crucial  for  development  of  a  country  or  a  community.5 96.7 Marital status of head of households    Three out of four of household heads in the project areas are married. Close to one in five of them have elementary education.  It  has  been  noted  that  there  has  been  declining  trend  of  illiteracy  rate.0 8.0     The  gap  between  girls  and  boys  school  enrollment  is  decreasing  in  recent  years  as  a  result  of  continues effort from government and other stakeholders.  While  the  illiteracy rate has been decreasing among the youth the effort are relatively recent phenomena to  cut down the illiteracy rate significantly among adult population.8 Education      Table 13: Level of Education      Illiterate  Elementary  High school  College  Missing  Total  Frequency  Percent  709  60.1 65 5.1 28 2.2.  Nine percent of them are  single  and  close  to  one  out  of  10  of  them  are  widowed  and  about  5  percent  are  divorced.6 7  0.6 1182  100.19   4. there still exists a minor  difference between boys and girls enrollment ratio. Only 14% of  them have a high school level education.  the  government  of  Ethiopia  is  making  concerted  effort  to  expand  access  to  education.  The  study has clearly shown that divorce rate in the area is very small      Table 12: Marital status     Single  Married  Divorced  Widowed  Missing  Total      Frequency  Percent  105 8.                . about 4% of them above high school level education.  With  a  goal  of  universal  education  for  all.

8 763 64.         Traditional housing units in rural Ethiopia are characterized by round shape.1.2.6 2. In the project area close to 29 percent of housing units are mad wall and thatched  grass roof.9 Livelihood      Like most rural parts of Ethiopia the population in the project area are mostly agrarian.5 0.6 31 29 5 13 1182 2.1 100.         4.1.  About  80%  of  households  interviewed  have land holdings which they use for different purposes.2.4 1. About 2 out of three of them are mud wall and corrugated iron sheet roof. 23% of households have other off farm  income source.  daily labor and other means as livelihood. Slightly 6  out  of  ten  respondents  identified  themselves  as  farmers. mud wall and grass  thatched roof. They depend on petty trade. weaving.0    Mud wall and grass roof  Mud wall and corrugated iron sheet roof  Brick/blockade wall and corrugated iron  sheet roof  Grass roof and grass/wood wall  Other  Missing  Total  .20 Figure 3: Level of education in pie chart  Level of education Illiterate Primary Highschool College   4. which is an  indication of a shift from a more traditional housing style to modern housing type.    20 percent of households in the area don’t have land at all. Carpenter.10 Type of housing units   Table 14: Type of housing unit      Frequency Percent  341 28. petty trade and employment in the public sector by household member  are some of important off‐farm income sources of households in the area.5.5.

        Table 16: Major problems associated with source of drinking water   Problems related to drinking water  Not good for drinking/causes of water borne diseases  Too far from home/distance  Shortage of water through out the year  Seasonal shortage of water  Not good for drinking and too far from home  Frequency  138  221  137  52  Percent  12.1 240  20.1  1.  According  to  respondents  poor  quality  and  distance  from  source  of  water  are  the  two  major  problems  identified by the community.7 0.7  100.2  18.4  3.      Table 15: Source of drinking water     Tap water  Protected well/ spring  Unprotected  well/river/spring  Other  Missing  Total  Frequency  Percent  403  34.11 Water and fuel source    Safe  water  coverage  in  Ethiopia  is  at  its  rudimentary  stage. Additional 20% have protected  well  or  spring  as  source  of  drinking  water.0       The  table  below  presents  major  problems  associated  with  drinking  water  supply.2 100.  spring or river as source of drinking water.3  19.8 1.1.9  0.2.  The  remaining  population  uses  unprotected  well.5. This finding is in line with BOFED report which says  that safe water supply coverage in the zone is about 42 percent.2  4.6  12.3 516  9  14  1182  43. The community also indicated that there is also shortage of drinking  water in the area through out the year.  The  study  shows  that  only  34  %  of  households have tap water supply as a source of drinking water.6  27.21   4.0  305  Not  good  for  drinking  and  there  is  also  shortage  of  water  through out the year  21  Not  good  for  drinking  and  there  is  seasonal  shortage  of  water  5  Far from home and there is also seasonal shortage  Other  Total        36  211  1126  .

5% of the households use Kerosene as source of energy. water borne diseases.5. The prevalent diseases in the area are  infectious diseases. the health condition of the population is poor. TB. STI/HIV/AIDS and malaria (for low land  areas).12 Health    . 1 out of 10 use animal manure and close to 1 out of  them uses combination of fire wood and animal manure as source of fuel.         Figure 4: Source of fuel in pie chart  System 1% Other 1% Fire wood only 39% Fire wood and animal manure 49% Animal Manure only 9% Kerosene 1% Electricity 0%       In general.   4. diarrhea.2.1. Only 1. Four out  of 10 households fire wood as source of fuel.22   Main source of fuel for household    In  general.  about  97  %  of  the  population  in  the  area  use  fire  wood  and  animal  manure  as  the  major source of energy.

 Average land holding in the project area is 2.817  4.     Shortage of land.1.  The  average  agricultural land holdings of households in the area are 1.     Female  circumcision  and  abduction  (marriage  by  force)  are  other  harmful  traditional  practices  that  are  affecting  girls  in  the  area.110  16.183  5.  In  the  region  one  out  of  ten  married  women  got  married  by  abduction  as  compared  to  8  percent  of  women  nationally.5.644  5.  The  study  area  population  heavily  depends  on  agriculture  as  a  livelihood. high schools are located at towns/ Woreda  capitals  which  is  on  average  about  7  kilo  meter  far  away  from  most  rural  households. Parents of girls also are reluctant to send their girls to  far  away schools due  to the same reason.  pulses  and  oil  seeds.  Marriage  by  abduction  is  forcing  girls  to  abandon  their  education early in fear of being abducted.2. 2.  Even  though  no  data  is  available  at  zonal  and  Woreda  level  on  the  prevalence  of  female  circumcision it can be assumed that it is similar to the region’s prevalence rate. erratic  and inadequate rain.610  1.13 Gender    Male dominance in decision making within households is considered as a norm among population  of  the  area.608  2.23   4.        Eighty percent of households have land holdings.  Its  rain  dependence  which  is  often  erratic  has  created  problem.  Male  predominantly  are  household  heads  who  are  supposed  to  make  crucial  decisions. The residents of the area  follow  mixed  farming  where  they  practice  both  farming  and  livestock  rearing  as  means  of  livelihood. Mainly grown  crops  are  cereals.28  hectare. shortage  of  agricultural land.914  Total Farm Lands   42. Normally.660  ‐  469  Total  111.  Women’s  role  is  traditionally  limited  to  child  raising.     4.571  43. According to the 2005 Ethiopian DHS report 87 % of women in Oromia  region are circumcised This is even higher than the national average which is around 74% (EDHS  2005).  food  preparation  for  household  members and assisting in agricultural work. The type of agriculture being practiced is small scale rain fed farming.23 hectares.347  134.5.  The staple food in the area is Enjera which is a  thin bread made from flour of Teff grains.14 Agriculture  Table 17: Total land cultivated (in hectare) by type of crop    Cereals   Pulses   Oil Seeds   Spices   Vegetables   Sululta  35.  Female  circumcision  is  one  of  the  traditional  practices  that  is  harmful  to  the  health of girls in the area. shortage  of selected  seed  and  inadequate  supply  of  fertilizer  are  the  major  problems  associated  with  less  crop  production.181  17.     .142    The staple food crop of the project area is Teff.406  991  94  369  Yaya Gulele  24.589  413  61  474  Mullo  12675  3212  1082  ‐  602  Adeaberga  38.043  31.1.146  155  1.

22  0.  The  fact  that  about  40%  of  households  responded that they have faced food shortage during the last one year period prior to the survey  .01  0  0.00  0.11  1.00  0.5.2.24 Table 18: Average land cultivated per household.  animal  feeds  and  animal  diseases  are  the  most common problems related with livestock production.00  0.36  0.49  0.17    Average income and expenditure    Most households in the study area lives below poverty line as the average daily per capita income  is  below  the  recommended  poverty  line  of  one  USD.9  0.1.02  0.      4.00  1074  85  683  744  633  18  81  414  128  26  14  2  9  1  147  Type of crop  Teff  Maize  Sorghum  Wheat  Barely  Mille  Chickpea  Bean  Peas  Seasam  Nug  Pepper  Onion  Potato  Others      4.03  0.00  1.18  0.00  0.04  0.  market  for  animal  products.15   Agro forestry    Agro  forestry  practice  is  very  limited.21  0.00  0.00  1.  Chat  and coffee planting are also being practiced to a limited extent.16   Livestock Production    Livestock  production  is  widely  being  practiced.00  0.    4. production and average annual  revenue by type of crop  Cultivated  land  Average  production  Average  annual  in hectare   in quintal  revenue  0.  Widely  planted  agro  forestry  product  is  eucalyptus.1.00  0. Equines and poultry production are also widely practiced.1.02  0.00  1.01  0.5.     Table 19: Average livestock production    Mean  Count  Sum  Number  of cattle  5  1142  6017  Number  Equines  2  1142  2513  Number  of  Number  of  of  sheep/goats  poultry  5  3  1142  1142  5162  3810  Number  beehives  0  1142  285  of  Number  of  other animals  0  1142  275    Communal  grazing  is  the  most  common  type  of  animal  feeding  being  practiced  in  the  area.00  2.2.2.00  0.  The  most  common  type  of  livestock  in  the  area  are cattle and sheep/goats.01  0.  Shortage  of  grazing  land.5.08  0.00  3.

  grain  or  vegetables.  The  survey  reveals  that  households  in  area  save  about  10  percent  their  income on the average.49331  12671.316  438.25 date  reveals  how  the  population  is  vulnerable  to  poverty.2693  413.9  3.724  35.1  Median  500  0  120  0  0  0  0  0  Percent  25.3  10.4  3.  petty  trade.  about  one  thirteenth  of  their  income  is  generated  from  sale  of  animal  products.41  100.08932  7.8  4.                  .4  Income from labor family members  1116.  The  median  income  of  the  study  population  is  9060  birr  (about  1000  USD)  per  annum  per  household.5  8.1  0. Most of household’s income goes  to consumables (about 35%).089  1579.3046  Income from other sources  Financial support by family member/relative  Income from pension  Income from other off farm sources  TotaI in come  182.118  Income  from  handicrafts/trade  of  family  member  521.4  9.    The  survey  revealed  that  one  fourth  households  income  come  from  sell  of  crop.  labor  of  family  member  and  income  from  family  member employed by government contributes each close to one tenth of household income.5  1.3  0.     Table 20: Average household Income    Income from crop.721  1248.9  0.4567  1251.  which  is  fat  below  the  poverty line of 2 USD per day per person.1  8.1  12.1196  17. grain and vegetable  Income from perennial crops  Income from animal products  Income from sale of animal  Agro‐forestry products  Land rent/lease out  Petty trading  Other agricultural income  Income  from  government  employee family member  Mean  3235.516  1029.0      The table below presents households consumption expenditure. The distant second consumption expenditure of households in the  project  area  is  saving.46495  permanent  1322.015  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  9680  1.  Similarly  sale  of  animal  products.4929  176.5  9.  Clothing and social events comprises about 10 % and 7% of households  expenditure respectively.

0  0.0  682062  1130  81357  1126  9336734 1017                          .26 Table 21: Average household expenditure    Annual expenditure for consumables  Annual expenditure for human medical cares  Annual expenditure for education  Annual expenditure for clothing  Annual  expenditure  for  house  maintenance/building  Annual expenditure for energy  Annual expenditure for water  Annual expenditure for transport  Annual  expenditure  for  other  personal  requirements  Annual expenditure for taxes  Annual expenditure for debt payment  Annual expenditure for savings  Annual  expenditure  for  other  financial  matters  Annual expenditure for farm tools  Annual expenditure for farm inputs  Annual expenditure for hiring labor  Annual expenditure for land rent  Annual expenditure for food livestock  Annual expenditure for animal health  Annual expenditure for buying animals  Annual  expenditure  for  Other  agricultural  and livestock expenses  Annual  expenditure  for  social/religious  ceremonies  Annual expenditure for other cultural events  Total Expenditure      Mean  2868  383  281  800  497  259  85  253  53  140  290  862  77  114  265  210  224  495  96  336  22  604  72  9181  Sum  3258564 435294  318711  909322  560380  293990  96360  287388  60161  159230  328086  973973  86433  128076  298496  235961  252365  556725  107640  373781  24507  Valid N  1136  1137  1134  1136  1127  1136  1134  1134  1128  1134  1130  1130  1119  1119  1126  1126  1127  1124  1119  1114  1121  Median  1900  100  100  600  0  130  0  100  0  36  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  350  0  6730  Percent  34.5  2.0  1.3  7.7  3.1  1.3  0.2  4.4  3.0  3.0  3.4  9.9  1.7  3.5  10.7  6.1  0.9  4.4  0.7  6.2  2.6  1.9  100.

suhshine hours.1  Meteorology  The nearest meteorological station to the project area is that of Chancho town that has  rainfall and temperature data record.0 100. at Chancho station months   . The mean total annual rainfall based on ten years record 1997‐ 2006)  as per this meteorological station is 1460mm.2.2.  3).2.0 15.  The record on rainfall data shows that area has  uni‐modal rainfall characteristics with highest annual rainfall during the months of mid  June  to  mid  August  (see  fig.0 Jan Feb M arch April M ay June July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec M onthly mean maximum temperature in deg.  The  monthly  mean  minimum  and  mean  maximum  temperature  at  Chancho  station  is  also  shown  in  fig.0 10. temperature in deg.0 0.0 200.1.1 Hydro Meteorology  4.2.27 4.1.0 M onthly rainfall in mm at Chancho           FIG.0 Jan Feb M arch April M ay months June July Aug Sep O ct N ov D ec average valu 20.0 rainfall (m m 400.2.  relative  humidity. Another data is obtained from the station  at  Addis  Ababa. C. evaporation rates are collected from the Fiche observatory  and shown in figure 7 up to Figure 13.0 0.  annula  rainfall.  Moderate  rainfall  prevails  also  during  the  months  of  March and April.  The  Temprature.1. 5    MEAN MONTHLY RAIN FALL AT CHANCHO STATION  Monthly rainfall in mm at Chancho 500.0 300.  the  windspeed.1 HYDROMETEOROLOGY. at Chancho station M onthly mean min.            FIG.  the  annual  rainfall  from  the  year  1984  upto  2000.   4.6   MONTHLY MEAN MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE ATCHANCHO    M onthly mean M inimum and M aximum temperature in degree celcius at Chancho station 25.2. C.0 5.2. HYDROGEOLOGY AND WATER QUALITY  4.2  Physico­chemical and Biological Env’t of the Project Area.  5  AND  FIG  6.

 August and  September. 7    TEMPERATURE (OC) – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION  The area experiences higher humidity levels during the months of July.                Fig. The average relative humidity during the year is 62%.28                                          Fig.8      RELATIVE HUMIDITY (%) – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION      The average total annual rainfall recorded at Fiche station during the year for the  period 1954‐1999 is 970.3 mm       .

                  .3 m/ s.29  Fig. 10         RAINFALL (MM) – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION               The average wind speed during the year for the period 1981‐2005 as recorded at  Fiche Observatory is 2. 9    RAINFALL (MM) – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION            Fig.

     Figure 12   SUNSHINE HOURS – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION    Evaporations rates in the area range from 40 mm to 180 mm           .30   Figure 11    WINDSPEED (M/S) – FICHE OBSERVATORY STATION    Sunshine hours as recorded at Fiche Observatory vary from 7‐9 hours during most  part of the year excepting the rainy season.

  The  average  annual  rainfall  fluctuates  between  813.  vegetation.     The area is characterized by rainy months from March to October. and small rains  in February and October.31            Figure 13         EVAPORATION RATES (MM) – FICHE OBSERVATORY  STATION  The region has a tropical type of climate.  the  area  is  devoid  of  vegetation  cover  except  for  some  remnants  of  coniferous  forests  near  the  town  of  Derba  and  its  surrounding..9oC  and  7.1mm. August and September.699.          .1oC respectively. The annual and  seasonal  distribution  of  rainfall  makes  the  zone  suitable  for  agriculture. The area around the Blue Nile gorge has  also a tropical climate (10oc ‐ 25oc and 800‐1200 mm rain fall) that supports the  grass and wood savannah.    Generally.. There is a  high concentration of rainfall in June.  crops.7oC  and  8. July.  etc.22‐  1. The heavy rains are from May to September.  The  average  maximum  and  minimum  temperature  during  the  year  2007  has  been  recorded  as  20.  Thick  patches  of  Eucalyptus Plantation is grown here and there .     The  maximum  and  minimum  average  temperatures  recorded  during  the  period  1974‐2007  are  19.4  oC  respectively.

1. A       METEROLOGY AT THE PROJECT SITE  The meteorological parameters have been monitored at the plant site by purchasing and installing the cement plant meterological station from the National Metrological sation of Ethiopia.2. ETHIO CEMENT PLC METEOROLOGICAL STATION DALIY OBSERVATION Station Name:.4 Month August Year 2008 Date Time (LST) Raim fall(mm) Wind Force Remarks Direction (m/sec) 0600 X X 0700 X X 0800 SE 00 0900 0.32     4.Ethio Cemint Chancho REGION:.2.Oromiy Woreda:.1.Sululta Class:.0 SW 02 1000 NW 00 17-08-2008 1100 NE 02 1200 NE 06 1300 NE 06 1400 N 04 1500 NE 06 1600 NE 06 1700 NE 04 1800 SE 02 0600 SE 00 0700 SE 00 0800 SE 00 0900 2. The following parameters tabulated below are based on the data collected from at the proposed project site.0 SW 00 1000 NE 04 .1.0 SW 00 1000 S 02 1100 NW 04 18-08-2008 1200 N 06 1300 SW 00 1400 SW 04 1500 SW 04 1600 S 02 1700 SW 04 1800 SW 02 0600 NW 02 0700 SW 00 0800 SE 00 0900 0.

0 20-08-2008 0.0 Wind Direction NE NE N SE N NE E E SE SE SE NE NE NE SE SE NE NE NE NE NE SE SE SE E S Force (m/sec) 04 02 08 04 04 04 04 02 00 00 00 02 02 02 06 02 04 04 02 04 04 00 00 00 00 04 Remarks .33 Date 19-08-2008 Time (LST) 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 0600 0700 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 0600 0700 0800 0900 1000 Raim fall(mm) 0.

34 Date 21-08-2008 Time (LST) 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 0600 0700 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 Raim fall(mm) 0. .9 22-08-2008 Wind Direction SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE E SW SE NW NW NW S S NW SE SE Force (m/sec) 02 04 04 04 02 02 02 02 00 00 00 02 02 04 04 06 04 04 02 00 02 Remarks Observer name Abdissa Jobir Photo Ethio Cement meterological Station in the plant site.

69 NW 0.87 ESE 11.82 SE 8.0-1.04 SSW S 2.16 HRS. N NW NNW 1.77 ESE 9.7-5 5-10 SCALE 5% 10 % C = Calm Conditions in Percentage .86 S 7.35 N WINDROSE DIAGRAM NNE N 3.91 W 9.86 NNW 2.59 SW 3.91 WSW 1. 0.36 2.00 DURATION : 16 .361.90 W 30.36 W 14.09 ESE 6.82 SSE 8.99 1.09 NE 6.92 1.68 SW 1.45 WNW 0.23 WNW 1.05 NW 0.82 SW 2.82 E 9.81 E 9.36 SSW S 1.18 SSW 3.13 WNW 0.32 SE 8.14 SSE 13.41 NE 8.91 1.45 0.36 WSW 1.42 SE 20. DURATION : 08 .24 HRS.58 0.13 DURATION : 00 .95 NNW N 0.72 ENE 11.04 NE 7.05 0.41 SSE 16.96 2.23 E 8.08 HRS.81 WSW 0.36 ENE 10.19 ENE 11.7 C LEGEND >15 KMPH 10-15 NOTE : All readings are in percentage occurance of wind 1.87 NNE 2.95 NNE 4.

36 NW 0.65 DURATION : 00 .19 SSW 2.64 NE 7.37 WSW 1.29 E 9.0-1.7-5 5-10 SCALE 5% 10 % C = Calm Conditions in Percentage .24 ESE 9.09 S 3.94 SE 12. 0.13 WNW 1.06 W 1.42 ENE 11.61 1.24 HRS.36   N WINDROSE DIAGRAM N NNW 1.50 NNE 3.42 SSE 12.7 C LEGEND >15 KMPH 10-15 NOTE : All readings are in percentage occurance of wind 1.36 SW 2.73 18.

    The  major  rivers/or  streams  draining  the  area  are  Muger.1.5.      The drainage pattern and distribution of stream as well as the three‐ dimensional view of  the area is shown in fig 1.2.  Aleltu.2.1.  Regionally.  the  area  is  situated  with  in  Abay/Nile  basin.2    Hydrology    The  area  is  reach  in  surface  water  (perennial  and  intermittent  streams  and  rivers).  Labu  and  Bole.  where  as  locally  it  is  situated  with in Muger catchment/or sub basin.  Dendritic  stream  pattern  having  fourth  order  are  the  main  features  of  the  area.  The trend/or flow directions of the rivers and streams in the area is  mainly toward the north/or North West direction. and the epicenter was at  a depth of 30‐35 kilometers.5 Richter units.Shaded relief map of the project area      .  whose  maximum tremors reached the magnitude of 6.37 EARTHQUAKE FREQUENCY AND INTENSITY     The  area  of  Derba  and  Chancho  is  situated  in  an  earthquake  zone. 6 and 7.2 – 6.E.7. 2.75 Richter units.      4. The tremors were up to 6.  In  addition  to  these. of Derba in the area of Karakore  (Cambotcha).  there  are  other  streams  that  are  draining  to  the  aforementioned  rivers/or streams.    The last larger epicenter was about 150 km N.          Fig. The shaded relief map of the area is shown in fig.

 Being part of the Ethiopian central plateau.  geomorphology.  upper  sandstone.  the  main  aquifers  being  fractured  and/or  weathered  basaltic  lava  flows  and  scoraceous  basalts.2.  Where  as.1 Groundwater resources    The  area  has  ample  groundwater  potential  that  is  attributed  to  the  prevailing  hydro‐ meteorological  conditions. There are many springs having different discharges  in the area. Boreholes drilled and constructed for different purposes in  the area reveals the same situation.2 HYDROGEOLOGY    The  hydrogeology  of  an  area  is  governed  by  the  existing  geology.  Hence.  Although  it  is  not  .  the  northern  extreme  of  the  project  area.1 WATER RESOURCES      4.1.  The main aquifer for the shallow groundwater in the area is weathered and/or fractured  basaltic  lava  flow  as  well  as  alluvial  sediments  along  streams/rivers.  the  Tertiary  basaltic  lava  flows  have  significant places in the majority of the hydrogeology of the area.  it  is  reasonable  to  use  the  average  value  of  both  that  becomes about 175mm. The project area is not an exceptional to this  general principle.  Such  value  disparity  arises  from  the  methodology  applied  in  the  recharge  estimation  and  the  reliability  of  source  data.2. An exceptional spring  is that of Taltale located with in Muger valley along Lebu stream and emerging from lime  stone. The main aquicludes or barriers for the groundwater flow in the area are massive  volcanic rocks and paleosols.2. The springs are mainly controlled by geomorphology  rather  than  structure.  which  is  characterized  by  typical  Abay  valley  Mesozoic  sedimentary  sequences  that  includes  Tertiary  volcanics.  particularly  rainfall.2.  A  different  source  of  study  for  groundwater  recharge  estimation  in  the  area  indicates  the  annual  groundwater  recharge  varies  from  100mm  to  250mm. particularly Abay plateau.2.1. The valley is part of  Abay  River.  Groundwater  is  the main sources of domestic water supply both in the urban and rural parts of the area.2.2.    4.    The  main  sources  of  groundwater  recharge  in  the  area  is  precipitation.  In  line  with  this.    The  Tertiary  volcanics  in  the  area  is  characterized  by  multilayer  aquifer  systems.    The major groundwater flow direction particularly for the shallow groundwater is from  south to north though detail investigation is required to identify the detail groundwater  dynamics of the area.  geo‐morphological  and  geological  formation. There could also be local variation for groundwater flow in the area. This value is more or less similar with the value of groundwater  recharge estimation made for Ethiopian central plateau using different methods.2.1.38   4.  gypsum  and  shale  and  limestone from top to bottom.  Tertiary  volcanism  along  with  later  coming  superficial  earth  process  have  brought    the  area  to  its  present  landscape. particularly at high land  part.  hydrometeorology and lithology of the area.  particularly the intended limestone quarry site is situated with in the valley of the Muger  River and its tributaries that is in turn the tributary of the Abay River.1. The volcanic lava flows cover the majority of the groundwater recharge area at the  southern  part  of  the  project  area.  They are emerging from volcanic rocks the barrier being paleosol.

2    2    Remark    Domestic    Domestic    Domestic                        69.  Actually. Hence. the  depth to water level obviously decreases.  the  depth  to  groundwater  level  is  very  shallow  and  it  is  about  4  meters  below  ground  surface  as  measured  in  planned  clay  site. it has been tried to measure depth to water level and Electric conductivity  in  some  springs. during dry season.  Accordingly.75    1            55      0.2 Surface water resources    The Woreda is situated with in Abay River basin. depth and discharge of some wells were  not obtained during the survey work.2.  the  depth to water level depends on topography and season measurement/or observation.7.  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  Name  Easting   Northing  Derba  463204  1038645 Taltale  455826  1048067 Derba  463287  1038986 Tuto  461918  1047730 Derba  463204  1038645 Dagne Teji  HDW  462339  1031783 Gimbichu  473090  1062210 Segno  Gebeya  455620  1026514 Chancho  473911  1031930 Teshome  Ejersa HDW  463196  1032084 Mid rock  well  463700  1035400 Abisiniya  cement  469740  1028859 Rob Gebeya  466233  1031004 Chancho  WS  471304  1027754 Segno  Gebeya  455664  1027096 Segno  Gebeya  451615  1027364 Mulo  463227  1037406 Bowo  485000  1048933 Depth  62 78 62   273 324 SWL  2    4. It  was during rainy season that the measurement was taken.1. Surface water resources of the area have  also been touched under hydrology part.39 exhaustive.    4.N.  The distribution of springs and water wells in the area is shown in fig.    .2.1.  It is the usual practice by the community of the  area to use traditional hand dug wells if they do not have access to modern water supply  systems such as spring or wells installed with pumps (motorized  or on hand pump) as  sources of domestic water supply. Some of the springs in area and water wells are shown  in table 1.    Table 22: Springs & Water wells in the project area  Altitude  2427 1504 2420 2362 2416 2616 2654 2610 2543 2577 2480 2566 2585 2561 2603 2673 2466 2617 Source  BH  Spring  BH  spring  BH  HDW  BH  BH  BH  HDW  BH  BH  BH  BH  Spring  Spring  Spring  Spring              117 65               Q  (l/s)            S.2.5  Domestic  10  Domestic  1  Domestic  2  Domestic            Detail information such as depth to water level.

2.  geographical  and  geological  setting.  Each  sample  is  taken  with  a  one‐liter  polyethylene  plastic  bottle. the detail of the sample is shown in tables 2­ 4. since there could be calcium and/or  magnesium hardness problem.  two  samples  from  streams.3 WATER QUALITY    The general geological and hydrometeorological conditions of the area indicate that there  is  no  a  natural  threats  that  hampers  the  water  resources  quality  to  use  it  for  different  purposes.2.  hydrogeological  conditions.  and  intended  quarry  sites  and  plant  site  locations  have  been  taken  in  to  consideration  to  make  the  sample  representative of the area.  no  chemical treatment has been made to preserve the samples.     Natural water is sampled in view of carrying out various analyses on it.  water  samples  have been collected from different sources for the analysis of physicochemical and trace  element. In taking the water samples.  Other  than  this.                . Groundwater that is from volcanic lava flows is free from  such threats. A total of eight  samples  have  been  collected  from  different  sources:  three  samples  from  springs. a comparable result is obtained (samples coded as S­01 and  S­02.  and  three  from  well  (two  hand  dug  wells  and  one  drilled  well).1.40     4.  Where as.6. The geographical distribution of the sample is shown in fig. see table 3 & 4).  The  only  natural  limitation  for  groundwater  is  those  that  are  in  contact  with  the gypsum/shale and limestone in the Abay valley.    In  order  to  ascertain  the  indirect  approach  of  water  quality  assessment.    One  duplicate  sample  is  collected  from  spring  in  order  to  see  the  reproducibility  of  the  laboratory results. Accordingly.

41                      Figure 4.14     A map showing water sampling points     .

15      A map showing distribution of water supply schemes in the project area  .42   Figure 4.

     In  order  to  interpret  the  results  of  water  quality  analysis.  In  this  particular  interpretation  Stiff  diagram has been used as shown in fig.  The  detail  of  the  samples is shown in tables 3 – 4.  and  Ethiopian  drinking  water  quality  standard.  Accordingly.1. Water quality analysis and interpretation    The  water  samples  collected  from  field  have  been  submitted  to  the  Central  Geological  Laboratory  of  Ethiopian  Geological  Survey.  pictorial  representation/or  diagram  has  been  used. pH.    The  following  table  shows  the  result  of  the  water  quality  analysis  in  comparison  with the different standards for some parameters.1.  some basic physical parameters such as pH and EC (Electric Conductivity) have been  made. In addition to the comparison of  the  analysis  result  with  the  preset  water  quality  standard  for  different  water  use. T and Eh have been  measured  at  field  to  check  the  result  with  that  of  laboratory. The result of the water quality analysis has been  compared  with  that  of  the  preset  standards  of  different  institutions  such  as  WHO  drinking  water  standard..16.2. EC.      .43 4.3.  During  the  sample  collection some of the physical parameters such as TDS. the water is safe for agriculture and domestic supply.2.

                . the majority of the water samples are Ca‐  Mg‐ HCO3 type. Cl­. This sample is from house hold/family based hand dug well.  NO3­. The sanitary aspect of the hand dug well  was  not  attractive  being  it  is  situated  with  in  the  residence  compound  adjacent  to  the livestock’s overnight stay. Ca‐  Na‐ HCO3 type (S‐08).44 The Stiff diagram method uses a scale for concentration of ions in meq/L along the x­ axis. where as two water samples indicate Ca‐ HCO3  (S‐06) type and.    The  high  concentration  of  sodium  for  the  samples  from  the  drilled  borehole  for  Chancho town water supply (S‐08) suggests the relatively deep aquifer water in the  area is slightly different from the shallow groundwater.  and SO42­ ) are to the right of it. Samples from river/stream. Mg2+  and K+) to the left of the centerof the plotting  scale and the anions (HCO3  ­. It is shown for some of the analyzed samples in fig……    According to the results of presentation. Ca2+.  spring and shallow groundwater are all represented by Ca‐ Mg‐ HCO3 type. The ions are arranged along y­axis in such a way that the cations (Na+. Sample number 6 (S‐06) has relatively high concentration of  nitrate. The relatively  high  concentration  of Nitrate is  attributed  to  wastes  (excretes) from livestock that  was clearly observed during the field work.

2  31  24  30  <0.05  7.58  0.29  0.08  0.72    15  14  4  28  62  49  5  5    7.29  0.1  8.7  1.3  3  4  4  <0.5 3 Ethiopian Drinking water quality standards (Ethiopian guidelines specification for drinking water quality.44  0.45 Table 23: Comparison of some measured laboratory results with water use quality standards      S.07  0.15  0.94  0.27  7.05  0.41  0.  Sample code  EC (μ  S/Cm)    HCO­3    Cl­    SO4­2    F­    NO3­    Na    K    Ca    Mg    SiO2    HBO2    CO2    PH  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8      S­01  S­02  S­03  S­04  S­05  S­06  S­07  S­08  Ethiopia3  327  325  123  742  220  198  67  262    174  168  62  390  78  63  42  156    4  4  2  26  11  11  3  4  533  24  26  <1  24  14  9  <1  7  483  0.5 – 8.7  1. 2002)      .76  6.37  6.4  1.72  1.7  5.4  0.4  7.2  6  50  10  10  4  15  4  5  2  21  358  1.8  0.41  7.8    42  42  14  104  23  20  10  26    9  9  4  23  7  4  3  5    20  21  26  35  24  18  26  32    0.3  7.86  0.48  7.94  <0.15  1.N.

5 6.7  5.S)  275 275 140 647 189 175 60.1 138.  Table 25 Water quality analysis result (mg/L)    S.29  0.9 EC  (mic.7 84 391 112 106.46 Table 24 Water samples collected from the project area  No  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Item  Sample  Sample  Sample  Sample  Sample  Sample  Sample  Code  S­01  S­02  S­03  S­04  S­05  S­06  S­07  S­08  Easting  Northing  455826  1048067 455826  1048067 455826  1048067 461918  1047730 462339  1031783 463196  1032084 470678  1028189 471304  1027764 Altitude  1504 1504 1504 2362 2616 2577 2543 2555 pH  7.05  7.08  0.7 22.5 18.N.44  0.66 7.34 7.72  15  14  4  28  62  49  5  5  7.2  31  24  30  <0.37  6.  Sample  code  EC (μ  S/Cm)    HCO­3    Cl­    SO4­2    F­      NO3­    Na    K    Ca    Mg    SiO2    HBO2    CO2    PH    Remark  Duplicate  Duplicate  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  S­01  S­02  S­03  S­04  S­05  S­06  S­07  S­08  327  325  123  742  220  198  67  262  174  168  62  390  78  63  42  156  4  4  2  26  11  11  3  4  24  26  <1  24  14  9  <1  7  0.2  6  10  10  4  15  4  5  2  21  1.1 36.41  0.2 232 Source  spring  spring  stream  spring  HDW  HDW  Stream  BH  Sampling  date  21/08/2008  21/08/2008  21/08/2008            Remark  Duplicate  Duplicate  Lebu        Sibilu  Chancho  town  8  Sample    This table shows the physical parameters value measured at field during sampling.48  7.15  0.7 22.1  8.3  4  4  <0.41  7.62 Eh  (mV)  42 42 25 21 75 106 51 32 T  (0C)  22.4 18.78 7.4  1.58  0.8  0.64 8 7.27  7.15  1.4  0.8  42  42  14  104  23  20  10  26  9  9  4  23  7  4  3  5  20  21  26  35  24  18  26  32  0.4 TDS  (mg/L)  167.76              .86  0.64 7.94  0.05  0.94  <0.4  7.7 167.72  1.5 19.7  1.7 15.29  0.7  1.3 17.07  0.3  7.

  Manganese.  Lead.  In  natural  water.  The  crude  estimation  of  Total  Dissolved  Solids  (TDS)  in  water  based  on  EC  measurement  is  given  by  the  relation  ½  EC  ((s/cm) = TDS (mg/l). a solution can be acidic (pH < 7). Based on pH value.3  to  7.   .  Copper. the extreme value is being at pH = 0 (extremely acidic) and pH  = 14 (extremely alkaline). a plotted graph  is shown in fig.  K+. Silver and Nickel) analyzed are found to be less than o.  Tin.    pH    This  represents  the  negative  common  logarithm  of  hydrogen  ion  concentration  /or  activity. basic (pH  >7) or neutral (pH = 7).76 indicating that it ranges from slightly acidic to slightly basic water.  Only  few  ions  such  as  Na+.  Cadmium.  brackish  (1000­  10.  salty  (104­  105ppm).    Electrical Conductivity (EC)      These  are  two  interrelated  parameters  that  indicate  the  state  of  water  salinity:  Electrical Conductivity (EC) and Total Dissolved Solids (TDS).  and  brine  (>105ppm).  water  can  be  grouped  into  fresh  (0­1000ppm).  For the collected and analyzed water samples.  NO3­  and  Cl­  remain  in  solution  through  out  the  entire  range  of  pH  values  found  in  normal  groundwater.  Davis  (1966).  Cobalt.  The  pH  values  for  water  samples  collected  from  the  project  area  ranges  from  6.47 All  trace  elements  (Chromium. The pH value of natural water has a profound effect on the  mobility  of  many  elements.000ppm).  Zinc.  pH  is  mostly  controlled  by  carbon  dioxide­  bicarbonate­carbonate  equilibrium of the system. pH = ­log [H+]. Based on the TDS  value.1mg/L as reported  by the Laboratory of Ethiopian Geological Survey.9.

 which is the case for sample S‐03 and S‐ 07. This sample is from spring source capped for domestic water supply near  the  “intermediate  site”.  The low EC values are for surface water  (streams and river). slightly low pH value is measured for sample number 5  (S‐05). This complies with  the  fact  that  streams/rivers  have  low  duration  of  rock‐water  interaction  and  high  rate of dilution compared to groundwater sources.9.48 Fig.    Electric  conductivity  values  for  the  collected  water  samples  are  also  shown  in  the  same  figure.  This  can  be  verified  by  relatively  high  concentration  of  nitrate  (31mg/L).  Sample  number  4  (S‐04)  shows  very  high  EC  values  unlike  other  samples.      Among the sampled water. There is no a such pH value variation for other  samples as shown in fig.  chloride (26 mg/L) and sodium (15mg/L).  This  sample  has  been  taken  from  hand  dug  well  used  for  domestic  water  supply in planned clay mining area. The most likely reason for relatively high EC value  is that the spring might have in contact with domestic wastes including leakage from  latrine.          .  instead  human  interference/anthropogenic  factor  can  better  explain  the  situation.  The  spring  is  emerging from basaltic lava flow. 9 EC and pH for w ater samples in the Project area 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 S-01 S-02 S-03 S-04 S-05 S-06 S-07 S-08 800 700 600 400 300 200 100 0 500 pH value EC PH EC (μ S/Cm) Sample code Figure 16     EC and pH for water samples in the project area.  The  relatively  high  EC  value  for  this  sample  cannot  be  explained  by  the  geology/or  lithology  of  the  area.

49 Photos showing the water sources used by the community    PHOTO 1 POND                   PHOTO 2 HAND DUG WELL            .

e.    The  results  are  shown  in  Table  below.  The  three  samples collected are two from the plant site and one from the quarry site    Dire Medalie ILU DIRE llu Keteba WEGIDI MU G ER LIMESTONE MINE RI D MUGER BECHO GURANDA BECHO BECHO ABALE ILU MEDALE G E S2 Botoro Abo Mesobi Ikuyu M AD Fertoma ER O GUMBICHU Gunbichu Ada Ginbichu Becho Kidane Mihiret Ero Geja ROADS STREAMS / TANKS SETTLEMENTS Handa Weyzero Handa Weyzero Le bu l Weyzero DERBA KOTICHA MULO CATLE FARM GULELE Lemi Echo Efo Babo BERESA LIMESTONE MINE  PLANT SITE SOIL QUALITY MONITORING STATIONS TACHINYAW KEDIDA BUBISA Mulo seyo SA DIB DEGA DIB DEGA BO LE KER LILO INDEX TO ADJOINING SHEETS 0938 A4 0938 A4 0938 A4 FITAL DEBRE TSIGE LAYNYAW KEDIDA CHEBEKA GULBEKA Gulbi Maryam EFOBABO TE KE AMUMA BUBISA 0938 C2 0938 D1 DERBA 0938 D2 CHANCHO M MA CHANCHO EKO BABO EKO DEGA Buba 0938 C4 0938 D3 ADDIS ABEBA NW 0938 D4 ADDIS ABEBA NE WELEBISI AND DEBELE AMUMA DUMBRI BORO S1 PLANT ASERE MULO SENYO GEBEYA DILO DERBA TIRO KUTULE GERDAW A O AR CHANCHO DIRE OCHI Buba Goro Yaya EKA YAYA DENEBA FIG . ETHIOPIA. Red Soil .2. Black Soil and Brown  Soil  from  various  locations  within  10 km  radius  were  collected  for assessment  of  the  existing  physico‐chemical  characteristics  and  analyzed  at  the  Laboratory  of  Ethiopian  Geological  Survey. MEREWA LO CHANCHO.9 PROJECT: ETHIO CEMENT PLC. OROMIA REGION.2 SOIL ENVIRONMENT    Three Soil samples from different types of soil.2. i.3.50 4. TITLE: D ME SILO GEBETA DILO DERBA SOIL QUALITY MONITORING STATIONS The soil quality of the samples collected from the above locations is given  below                 GA .

51   Table 26 soil laboratory analysis result  FIELD NO LAB NO Chromium(Cr) Cobalt (Co) Tin (Sn) Cadmium (Cd) Zinc(Zn) Lead (Pb) Managanese(Mn) Copper (Cu) Silver (Ag) phosphorus (p) Nickel (Ni) BBH-1 11049 <20 ND <20 ND ND <20 ND <20 ND 251 <20 BBH-2 11050 <20 ND <20 ND ND <20 ND <20 ND 275 <20 BBH-3 11051 <20 ND <20 ND ND <20 ND <20 ND 259 <20   FIELD NO LAB NO Electrical conductivity in us/cm at 250 C Carbonate (CO3) Bicarbonate (HCO3) Chloride (Cl-) Sulphate (SO2 ) Floride (F) Nitrate (NO 3-) Sodium (Na) Potassium (K) Calcium (Ca) Magnesium (Mg) Silica (Sio2) Boron (HBO2) Carbondaoxide (CO2) pH BBH-1 11049 38 ND ND ND ND ND <8 100 60 100 20 ND ND ND 5.74 BBH-2 11050 80 ND ND ND ND ND <8 80 60 100 20 ND ND ND 5.16                   .79 BBH-3 11051 73 ND ND ND ND ND <8 80 40 140 40 ND ND ND 7.

  Derba  town.2.  Plant  site  and  near  to  quarry  site.2.2.  Fig 11  LUTRON SL‐4001 DIGITAL SOUND LEVEL METER    Features of the equipment                               Large LCD display. INTRODUCTION  The noise measurement have been conducted using an instrument  of SOUND LEVEL METER Lutron SL‐4001 digital instrument for the  project area of Ethio‐cement Factory which included Chancho town.52 4.1. light weight ABS-plastic housing case Small and ligh weight design allow one hand operation Low battery indicator Standard accessories: instruction manual.  Mulo  town. calibration screw driver . including a strong.3. VR is available for easy calibration Condenser microphone for high accuracy & long-term stability Max.2.3   NOISE LEVEL MONITORING  4. easy to read Frequency weighting networks are designed to meet the IEC 651 type 2 A & C weighting networks are conformity to standards time weighting (FAST & SLOW) dynamic characteristic modes AC/DC output for system expansion Built-in adj. long-lasting components.  The  noise levels at project area and in the vicinity have been measured  continuously in each site. Hold function for stored the maximum value on display Warning indicator for over and under load LCD display for low power consumption & clear read-out even in bright ambient light condition Used the durable.

    4.   The draft national standard and code of practice were released for public comment  in  November  1989.  which  may  vary  according  to  different  sound measuring instruments.  NOHSC  agreed to revise the national code to:     address the issues of consistency between the national code and national and  international noise management models.  to  a  C‐weighted  peak  sound  pressure  level.  Lpeak.53                                                                              Photo 3     The expert while monitoring the noise level. NOISE CRITERIA  World wide History of Development of National Standard    In  December  1988.  Having  considered  public  comment  on  the  draft  document.  endorsed  the  National  Strategy  for  the  Prevention  of  Occupational  Noise‐ induced  Hearing  Loss  [NOHSC:4004(1989). and to   encourage national consistency by providing an up to date and practical OHS  noise management tool.   In 2000 NOHSC amended the national standard and code of practice to update the  measurement of peak noise from an unweighted (linear) peak sound pressure level.3.  C‐weighting  measurement. and in so doing   .2.2.  NOHSC  declared  the  National  Standard  for  Occupational  Noise  [NOHSC:  1007(1993)]  and  the  National  Code  of  Practice  for  Noise  Management  and  Protection of Hearing at Work [NOHSC: 2009(1993)] in March 1992.2.peak.  concerned  about  noise‐induced  hearing  loss  as  a  major  occupational  disease.  To  further  this  strategy  NOHSC  endorsed development of a national standard and code of practice.   In 2003 NOHSC identified inconsistencies in the National Code of Practice for Noise  Management  and  Protection  of  Hearing  at  Work  [NOHSC:2009  (2000)].  LC.  the  National  Occupational  Health  and  Safety  Commission  (NOHSC). C‐weighting is a more reliable form of measurement when compared  to  the  linear  response  to  impulse  noise.

  psychologically  and  socially.  However.    The  EPA  guidelines  state  that:  The  sensitivity  to  noise  is  usually  greater  at  night‐ time than it is during the day.  repeated  noise  exposure at between 75 and 85 decibels may be a small risk to some people.  cause  tiredness.   The levels specified in the national standard are the maximum acceptable exposure  levels  for  noise  in  the  workplace. if the total noise level from  all sources is taken into account.     Ethiopia     The  “GUIDLINE  AMBIENT  ENVIRONMENT  STANDARDS  FOR  ETHIOPIA”  of  the  Ethiopian  Environmental  Protection  Authority  (EPA)  prepared  by  EPA  and  the  United  Nations  Industrial  Development  Organization  Prepared  Under  the  Ecologically  Sustainable  Industrial  Development  (ESID)  Project  US/ETH/99/068/ETHIOPIA  August  2003  and  “Occupational.  Noise  can  damage  hearing. the noise level at sensitive locations should be kept  within the following values:  Table 27   The noise level limits as per the IFC and EPA Gidelines        Limits in dB (A)   Area Code  A  B  C  Category of area  Industrial area  Commercial area  Residential area  Day time  75  65  55  Night time  70  55  45    The  Ministry  of  Labor  and  Social  Affairs  manual  indicate”  the  Noise  is  one  of  the  most  widely  and  most  frequently  experienced  problems  of  the  industrial  working  environment  and  social  living  area.  Workplace  noise  levels  lower than 85 decibels are. desirable.  interfere  with  communication. Ideally. therefore.  Health  and  Safety  Package.  reduce  efficiency  and  influence  blood  .  the  risk  becomes  greater.  annoying.  Noise  affects  human  being  physically. 1997” of the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs are used to assess noise  level measurement. With  progressively  increasing  levels.  over  long  periods. if practicable.54  reduce  the  burden  on  jurisdictional  Governments  to  develop  local  codes  of  practice or guidance material. by about 10dB (A).

55 circulation  and  cause  stress. SITE DESCRIPTION  The  Ethio  Cement  factory  plant  site  is  located  south  west  of  Chancho  town  40  km  away  from  Addis  Ababa  and  the  quarry  site  is  located  near  to  Derba  town  (23km  from  Chancho)  around  this  area  there  also  Addis  Ababa  Cement  factory  ropeway  site and one newly constructed (MIDROCK) quarry site.  The  general  area  of  the  plat  site  comprises  open  farming  properties. The aspect of the landscape is open.2.  Volume  of  different  sounds  encountered  commonly.2. expressed in dB (A)    Effect  on  Sound Level    Sound Source   Human   in dB (A)  Beings  Highly Injurious   140          Injurious        Risk  Speech  masking  Irritating          130  120    Jet engine  Rivet Hammer  Propeller plane  Rock drill  Chain Saw  Sheet metal Workshop  Heavy Truck  Heavily Trafficked Street  Saloon Car  Normal Conversation  Low Conversation  Quite Radio Music  Whispering  Quite Urban apartment  Rustling Leaves   HEARING THRESHOLD       110    100  90  80  70  60  50  40  30  20  10  0    4. The plant site is currently  under  construction.3.  expressed in dB (A) is given below     Table 28 Volume of different sounds encountered commonly.3. with significant hills and occasional  .

 Office   Number of works 92   5  Near  Rural town Population _____  Quarry  School:  1elementary  site   Activity: Farm based and pity trade  Health: clinic  Remark        During construction time there  is  Hammer.5 km away from the Chancho Town     Construction  on  going:  Workshop.56 trees. The  detail noise level data collected is attached in annex 3. pity trade. and Plant site and to quarry site over the period from  30 July 2008 to 03 August 2008 and the data is collected in 30‐minute intervals. The area is classified as rural or predominantly rural with some agricultural  activity.4.2. Site Name  Site Characteristics  No  1  Chancho  Rural town Population _____  Town  School:  1 High . Hotels  Factory  :  1  Absenya  Cement  factory(  4km  from  town)  and  1  under construction (1km from town)  2  Derba  Rural town Population _____  Town   School:  1elementary  Health: clinic   Activity: Farm based and pity trade.3.1elementary  Health: 1 Health centre  Activity: Farm based (milk production).  The  land  use  in  the  area  mainly  comprises  intermediate‐sized  farming  properties.  Guesthouse  and  workers  house. NOISE MEASURING SURVEY   Measurement Equipment  LUTRON  SL‐4001  DIGITAL  SOUND  LEVEL  METER  was  used  in  all  area  Chancho  town. One flower farm   Factory  :  1Addis  Ababa  Cement  factory  processing  plant  (ropeway)                    2 newly constructed (ropeway)   3  Mulo  Rural town Population _____  School:  1elementary  Activity: Farm based and pity trade  Health: clinic   4  Plant site  1.    It.  Measuring Sites  A summary of the sites and their characteristics is provided below:  Table 29:‐  Characteristic of project area and vicinity.  Vibrator  compressor and other sound is  create a noise in the compound        .    4. Derba town.2. Mulo town.

57   NOISE LEVELS IN THE STUDY AREA   

Dire Medalie ILU DIRE llu Keteba WEGIDI

MU

GE R

LIMESTONE MINE
RI D
MUGER

BECHO GURANDA BECHO BECHO ABALE

ILU MEDALE

G E

N2

Botoro Abo Mesobi

Ikuyu

M

AD

Fertoma

ER O

GUMBICHU Gunbichu Ada Ginbichu

Becho Kidane Mihiret Ero Geja

ROADS STREAMS / TANKS SETTLEMENTS

Handa Weyzero

Handa Weyzero

Le bu l

Weyzero

N3 DERBA
KOTICHA MULO CATLE FARM

GULELE Lemi Echo Efo Babo BERESA

LIMESTONE MINE

PLANT SITE NOISE LEVEL MONITORING STATIONS

TACHINYAW KEDIDA BUBISA
SA

N4 Mulo seyo
LILO

DIB DEGA
DIB DEGA

BO LE

LAYNYAW KEDIDA

KER

INDEX TO ADJOINING SHEETS
0938 A4 0938 A4 0938 A4
FITAL DEBRE TSIGE

CHEBEKA GULBEKA Gulbi Maryam EFOBABO

E TE K KE

AMUMA BUBISA

0938 C2

0938 D1
DERBA

0938 D2
CHANCHO

MA

CHANCHO EKO BABO EKO DEGA Buba CHANCHO DIRE DILO DERBA TIRO KUTULE
GERDA WA
RO DA
0938 C4 0938 D3
ADDIS ABEBA NW

0938 D4
ADDIS ABEBA NE

WELEBISI AND DEBELE

AMUMA DUMBRI BORO

N1

PLANT
ASERE

MULO

SENYO GEBEYA

OCHI Buba Goro Yaya

FIG - 3.4
PROJECT:

MEREWA
GA LO

CHANCHO, OROMIA REGION, ETHIOPIA.
TITLE:

ETHIO CEMENT PLC.

ME SILO GEBETA

DILO DERBA

EKA YAYA

DENEBA

NOISE LEVEL MONITORING STATIONS

58   Table 30: Summary of the noise level data on the area     1  2  3  4    Name  Chancho Town  Derba Town  Mulo  Plant site  Average Noise level  Remark  data in dB(A)  59  49  46  53         

5  Quarry site   45      The noise level data anlysis shows that the noise levels in all the area are all within  the draft Ethiopian standards as well as IFC EHS guidelines.    

REFERENCES 
1.  IFC EHS GHIDELINES  2.

GUIDLINE  AMBIENT  ENVIRONMENT  STANDARDS  FOR  ETHIOPIA”  of  the  Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) prepared by EPA and the  United  Nations  Industrial  Development  Organization  Prepared  under  the  Ecologically  Sustainable  Industrial  Development  (ESID)  Project  US/ETH/99/068/ETHIOPIA August 2003.   OCCUPATIONAL,  HEALTH  AND  SAFETY  PACKAGE,  1997  of  the  Ministry  of  Labor and Social Affairs are used to assess noise level measurement.  Renewable Power Ventures Background Noise Monitoring Report Capital  Wind Farm Document No. 505608‐TRP‐017528‐00 27 April 2005  National  Code  of  Practice  for  Noise  Management  and  Protection  of  Hearing  at  Work  [NOHSC:  2009(2004)]  3rd  Edition,  Australian  Government  National Occupational Health and Safety commission.  NATIONAL  STANDARD  FOR  OCCUPATIONAL  NOISE  [NOHSC:  1007(2000)]  2nd  Edition  Australian  Government  National  Occupational  Health  and  Safety  commission. 

3.

4.

5.

6.

       

59

4.2.2.4   AMBIENT AIR QUALITY 
  Ambient air quality of the study area has been assessed at four locations.   The summary of the ambient air quality is given below      Ambient Air Quality (g/m3)  Location Name  VALUES  SPM  RPM  SO2  NOx  A1  Plant site   78  27  <5  6.4  A2  Mine site   82  31  5.2  6.1  A3  Derba  69  23  <5  7.2  A4  Mulo  73  32  <5  5.9  Note: CO values are observed less than 1 ppm during study period.

Dire Medalie ILU DIRE llu Keteba WEGIDI

MU

GE R

LIMESTONE MINE
RI D
MUGER

BECHO GURANDA BECHO BECHO ABALE

ILU MEDALE

G E

A2

Botoro Abo Mesobi

Fertoma Ikuyu

AD ER O

GUMBICHU Gunbichu Ada Ginbichu

Becho Kidane Mihiret Ero Geja

ROADS STREAMS / TANKS SETTLEMENTS

Handa Weyzero

Handa Weyzero

M

Le b

ul

Weyzero

A3 DERBA
KOTICHA MULO CATLE FARM

GULELE Lemi Echo Efo Babo BERESA

LIMESTONE MINE

PLANT SITE AIR QUALITY MONITORING STATIONS

TACHINYAW KEDIDA BUBISA
A

A4 Mulo seyo
LILO

DIB DEGA
DIB DEGA

KER S

BO LE

INDEX TO ADJOINING SHEETS
0938 A4 0938 A4 0938 A4
FITAL DEBRE TSIGE

LAYNYAW KEDIDA

CHEBEKA GULBEKA Gulbi Maryam EFOBABO

TE K KE

AMUMA BUBISA

0938 C2

0938 D1
DERBA

0938 D2
CHANCHO

MA

CHANCHO EKO BABO EKO DEGA Buba CHANCHO DIRE DILO DERBA TIRO KUTULE
GERDA WA
O AR
0938 C4 0938 D3
ADDIS ABEBA NW

0938 D4
ADDIS ABEBA NE

WELEBISI AND DEBELE

AMUMA DUMBRI BORO

A1

PLANT
ASERE

MULO

SENYO GEBEYA

OCHI Buba Goro Yaya

FIG - 3.3
PROJECT:

ETHIO CEMENT PLC.

MEREWA
GA LO

CHANCHO, OROMIA REGION, ETHIOPIA.
TITLE:

D ME SILO GEBETA

DILO DERBA

EKA YAYA

DENEBA

AMBIENT AIR QUALITY MONITORING STATIONS

5. and    To assess if the area falls within any protected area system in the country.5   BIOLOGICAL RESOURCE BASE  ECOLOGICAL BASELINE SURVEY (FLORA.     To list the species of plants and animals.2.2. INTRODUCTION  4.2.5.  To list threatened species and assess their conservation status.2.5.1 Background  Prior to any development intervention. and for its uniquehabitats.2. including birds. PROTECTED AREAS) IN THE PROJECT CORE AREAS (QUARRY AND  PLANT SITES) OF ETHIO­CEMENT.2.2.  their  uniqueness  and  representation nationally and regionally.60 4.1. FAUNA.2 Objectives  The objectives of this study are:   To  describe  the  vegetation  and  habitat  types. which is known for its endemic  plants and animals.  4.  To evaluate the conservation value of the habitat. it is vital to assess existing conditions of the  natural  environment  and  possible  impacts  of  the  planned  interventions.1.2.  The  Ethio‐Cement  PLC  Project  area  is  located in the Central Highland Plateau of Ethiopia. since the  raw  materials  are  entirely  land  resources.  The study attempts to address questions like: What are the habitat types in the  project area? What is the current land use type? Which species of plants and animals  occur there? How many of them are endemic and threatened? Which ones have  specific habitat (specificity of species)? Or Biome restricted species? How many are  threatened? What are their threat categories? How much is the habitat represented  in the country? Regionally? How important is the habitat for conservation of  regional flora and fauna?  4.  .  Cement  production is a heavy industry and is expected to change natural habitats. specially as important bird  area. ENDEMIC AND THREATENED  SPECIES.1.

       4.  covering  all  possible land use and vegetation types.  conservation  measures  should  be  in  place  to  rescue  them  from  extinction. The Quarry  Site is located at about 75 km north of Addis Ababa. field survey and sampling of the vegetation  were conducted. Data Deficient (DD) and Not Evaluated (N).2. which are located in North Shewa Zone of  Oromia Regional State. there are 9 IUCN threat categories. Least Concern (LC).5.  the  survey  was  conducted  along  transect  lines  crossing  the  landscape  of  the  sites. namely: Extinct (EX) Extinct  in Wild (EW). Near‐ threatened (NT).2 Methods of Data Collection and Compilation  In  order  to  accomplish  the  set  objectives  of  the  study  pertaining  to  the  ecological  investigation of the Core Project Areas. Vulnerable (VU).  For  both  plants  and  animals.  2001).2.1  (IUCN.  4.  pressed  and  taken  to  the  National  Herbarium  (ETH)  for  drying  and  determination. 2. Critically Endangered (CR).2.2. The area surveyed in this study lies within 10 km radius of the planned  Quarry Site and the raw material transporting conveyor belt corridor.    . west of Chancho Town. and the Sululta Plain on the south.1 Study area  The areas that have been surveyed are Ethio‐Cement Raw Materials production  (Quarry) and Plant (Cement Plant) sites. Endangered (EN).  near  endemic  and  rare  species  of  flora  and  fauna. Both the Quarry and Plant sites are parts of  the Central Highlands of Ethiopia. 2. It is bordering with  Chancho Town on the east. near Darba and Chancho villages respectively. Sibilu River on the west. and those plant species difficult to  identify  in  the  field  were  collected. The fauna and flora were listed.5.  we  used  the  IUCN  Categories  and  Criteria  3. Accordingly. between Darba Town and  Mogor River. ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS    61   4.2.2 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION. Chancho‐Darba Road on the  north.5.    For  the  evaluation  of  the  conservation  status  of  endemic.  EN  and  VU. The Plant Site  is located at 40 km north of Addis Ababa. For  those  species  occurring  in  a  natural  habitat  and  recognized  as  CR.2 .

 (3) biome restricted assemblage. The description of the vegetation types was  based on the information compiled for the Conservation Strategy of Ethiopia and the  National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (IBC. around 78 IBA sites have been identified based on the available data  and  a  directory  was  already  published  (EWNHS.2.2.  2000.  Somali‐Masai  Biome  and  Sudan‐Guinea  Savannah  Biome.  BirdLife  International  has  developed  globally  recognized  criteria  to  evaluate  the  importance  of  site  for  conservation  of  birds  and  other  associated  fauna  and  flora. 1992). 2006).  The  conservation  value  of  the  sites  for  conservation.3 . including those of other tax (Bibby et al. while the Plant Site is  also a degraded dry evergreen montane forest and grassland complex. 1995.2.  taking  birds  as  indicators.   . was assessed using the categories and criteria.  With  regard  to  biome  assemblage.    The  nomenclature  of  plant  taxa  follows  the  published  volumes  of  the  Flora  of  Ethiopia and Eritrea (Hedberg & Edwards.5. 2004.2.  Important  Bird  Areas  are  identified  based  the  presence  of  birds  in  ether  of  the  global  categories  like:  (1)  globally threatened species. mainly  for  wetland  birds. 1989.2.  Fishpool  and  Evans.2.5.3. and wetland  (Sibilu River and wetlands adjacent to it).  known  as  important  bird  areas  (IBA)  (EWNHS.1 Vegetation and Flora  4. 2003.62 Additionally.     4. 1995.  1996). 2005).3 MAJOR FINDINGS  4.  1996.  2001). which fall within the following altitudinal  ranges. dry  evergreen montane forest and grassland complex ecosystems. birds are often used as indicators of habitat health and sites of priority  area for biodiversity conservation. Edwards et al. Hedberg et al. 1997.1.1 Vegetation of the study area  The quarry Site and conveyor belt area encompass degraded Acacia woodland.  there  are  three  in  Ethiopia:  Afrotropical  Highland  Biome. (4) presence of congregations.  For Ethiopia..5. (2) restricted range species (restricted to endemic bird  areas –EBA).

63  Short description of the vegetation of the area:‐ Quarry Site (1550‐2400 m  a.s.l.): The vegetation of the area has been categorized into three parts, based  on topographic features and dominant plant species, which are characterized  below:  a. Lower valley along Mogor River and tributaries (1550‐1800 m):  gentle slopes, dominated by agricultural land and some highly  degraded woodland dotted with some remnant trees and shrubs  (including those growing along the banks of the rivers). Major  remnant woody plant species and herbaceous plants (also grasses and  sedges) include: Ficus sur, Ficus thonningii, Acacia seyal, Acacia  sieberiana, Trema orientalis, Grewia ferruginea, Crotalaria rosenii,  Combretum molle, Agrostis lachnantha, Andropogon distachyos,  Andropogon schirensis, Anthephora pubescens, Aristida adscensionis,  Arthraxon lancifolius, Brachiaria comata, Chloris gayana, Digitaria  tenata, Digitaria velutina, Cyperus alternifolius, Cyperus fischeranus,  etc.  b. Hill  slopes  (1800‐2350):  this  part  was  formerly  covered  with  dry  evergreen montane forest, as evidenced with a few remnant trees like  Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata, Acacia pilispina, Buddleja polystachya,  Dombeya  torrida,  Maytenus  addat,  Rhus  retinorrhoea  and  Rhamnus  staddo.  Other  commonly  encountered  plants  include:  Otostegia  integrifolia,  Dodonaea  angustifolia,  Becium  grandiflorum,  Calpurnia  aurea, Saturjea punctata, Osyris quadripartita, Euclea racemosa subsp.  schimperi,  Acacia  persicifolia,  Hypoestes  forsskaolii,  Oxalis  obliquifolia  and Polygala persicariifolia.  
 

c. Upper  part  (Hill  top)  (2350‐2400):  this  part  is  gentle  slope,  and  mainly  under  intensive  cultivation  with  some  patches  of  (open  wooded) grassland used as grazing land. Major plant species include  Acacia  abyssinica,  Echinops  macrochaetus,  Maytenus  arbutifolia,  Oxygonum  sinuatum,  Scorpiurus  muricatus,  Trifolium  semipilosum, 

64 Cyanotis  barbata,  Guizotia  scabra,  Galium  spurium,  Spermacoce  sphaerostigma,  Solanum  nigrum,  Cirsium  vulgare,  Eleusine  floccifolia,  Pennisetum sphaecelatum and Commelina africana.   Short description of the vegetation of the area ‐ Plant Site (2550‐2700):  a. Wetland (Sibilu River and wetland adjacent to the river), grassland at  the foot of low hills and cultivated land (ca. 2550‐2600). Major plant  species  include:  Potamogeton  pusillus,  Potamogeton  schweifurthii,  Potamogeton  thunbergii,  Myriophyllum  spicatum,  Lagarosiphon  steudneri,  Pseudognaphalium  luteo­album,  Hebenstreitia  angolensis,  Solanecio  tuberosus,  Salvia  merjamie,  Salvia  nilotica,  Ranunculus  multifidus,  Cyanotis  barbata,  Craterostigma  pumilum,  Swertia  abyssinica,  Spergula  arvensis,  Artemisia  abyssinica,  Crinum  abyssinicum, Kniphofia insignis, Cyperus digitatus, Pennisetum villosum,  Pennisetum clandestinum, Rumex nepalensis, Carduus schimperi, Cotula  abyssinica,  marginatum,  Cynodon  dactylon,  Veronica  abyssinica,  Solanum  Euphorbia  platyphyllos,  Trifolium  semipilosum, 

Oldenlandia  monanthos,  Oxalis  obliquifolia,  Sida  schipmeriana  and  Rumex nepalensis.   b) Hilly areas and settlement (2600‐2700): this part used to be under dry  evergreen montane forest, is now with only remnants of characteristic  species like Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata, Juniperus procera, Maytenus  obscura, Maytenus arbutifolia, Cheilanthus farinosa, Buddleja polystachya,  Nuxia congesta, Acacia pilispina, Aloe debrana, Rumex nervosus, Rhamnus  staddo, Urera hypselodendron, Rosa abyssinica, Pennisetum sphaecelatum,  Kalanchoe petitiana, Laggera tomentosa and Kniphofia foliosa. Currently, it is  mainly occupied by villages and homestead plantation of Eucalyptus globulus.   

4.2.2.4.3.1.1.1  Vegetation  of  Quarry  Site:  The  study  on  the  vegetation  of  the 
Quarry  Site  resulted  in  three  types:  Acacia  dominated  woodland  which  is  now  predominantly  under  cultivation,  occupying  the  low‐lying  river  valleys  and  gentle 

65 slopes,  followed  by  scrubland  on  steep  slopes  at  middle  altitude,  and  montane  grassland  with  some  scattered  trees  at  the  upper  most  part  of  the  area.  Totally,  about  275  species  of  vascular  plants  have  been  recorded  from  the  study  area  surrounding the Quarry Site. Of these, 16 species are endemic and near endemic to  Ethiopia (the near endemic taxa extending into the highland of Eritrea). The lists of  plant  species  recorded  from  the  area  and  the  conservation  status  of  endemic  and  near endemic taxa are given in Annex 4 and Table 31 respectively.  Table 31. List of endemic and near endemic plants in the Ethio‐Cement PLC Quarry  Site and their conservation status    No.  Species and Authority(ies) names  Family  Conservation  Status  1  Aloe debrana Christian   Aloaceae  LC  2  Aloe elegans Tod.  Aloaceae  LC (Eritrea)  3  Becium grandiflorum (Lam.) Pic.Serm.  Lamiaceae  NT (Eritrea)  4  Crotalaria rosenii (Pax) Milne‐Redh. ex  Fabaceae  NT  Polhill  5  Cussonia ostinii Chiov.  Araliaceae  NT  6  Cyphostemma niveum (Schweinf.)  Vitaceae  LC (Eritrea)  Descoings  7  Impatiens rothii Hook.f.  Balsaminaceae  LC  8  Kalanchoe petitiana A. Rich.  Crassulaceae  LC (Eritrea)  9  Laggera tomentosa (A.Rich.) Sch.‐ Bip.  Asteraceae  NT  10  Leucas stachydiformis (Hochst. ex Benth.)  Lamiaceae  NT  11  Lippia adoensis Hochst. ex Walp.  Verbenaceae  LC (Eritrea)  12  Maytenus addat (Loes.) Sebsebe  Celastraceae  NT  13  Rhus sp. nov.  Anacardiaceae  CR  14  Solanum marginatum L.f.  Solanaceae  LC (Eritrea)  15  Trifolium schimperi A. Rich.  Fabaceae  NT  16  Urtica simensis Hochst. e Steud.  Urticaceae  LC  CR = Critically Endangered; NT = Near Threatened; LC = Least Concern    4.2.2.5.3.1.1.2  Vegetation  of  the  Plant  Site:  the  vegetation  of  the  Plant  Site  is  mainly  wetland,  grassland  and  cultivated  land,  and  highly  degraded  dry evergreen  montane  forest  (now  mainly  settlement  surrounded  by  Eucalyptus  globulus  plantation and some remnant trees). There are about 234 species of vascular plants,  of  which  17  are  endemic  or  near  endemic  to  Ethiopia  (the  near  endemic  species  extending into the highland of Eritrea). The lists of plant species recorded from the  area and the conservation status of endemic taxa are given in Annex 5  and Table 32 

  further  degradation  may  incur  serious  landslide  which would affect people living in the lowland. Rich. (1992). six  species also occur in Eritrea and are considered near endemic. as the species belong to the  Eastern  Afromontane  Hotspot  (CI. 1986). was assessed as Endangered (E).  One  of  the  species.    List of endemic and near‐endemic plants from the Ethio ‐ Cement PLC                          Plant Site and their conservation status  No.  However.) Sch. by Ensermu Kelbessa et  al. Rich.)  Asteraceae  LC (Eritrea)  Mesfin  6  Echinops longisetus A. ex Steud.  Crassulaceae  LC (Eritrea)  9  Kniphofia foliosa Hochst.  15  Solanecio gigas (Vatke) C.  Balsaminaceae  LC  8  Kalanchoe petitiana A. Maytenus addat.  Verbenaceae  NT (Eritrea)  14  Plectocephalus varians (A. ex Mesfin  Asteraceae  VU (Eritrea)  5  Bidens macroptera (Sch. based on the old IUCN Categories and Criteria (Davis et al.  Arecaceae  CR  4  Bidens carinata  Cuf.  Urticaceae  LC  . Jeffrey  Asteraceae  LC (Eritrea)  ex Cuf. Jeffrey  Asteraceae  LC  16  Solanum marginatum L.  2004). Rich.  have  been  assessed  as  Critically  Endangered  (CR).  Asteraceae  LC  7  Impatiens rothii Hoo.  The  Quarry  Site  does  not  belong  to  any  protected  area.    Lamiaceae  LC  2  Aloe debrana Christian  Aloaceae  LC  3  Arisaema addis­ababense Chiov.  Of  the  16  endemic  and  near  endemic  species  recorded.  2006).  Solanaceae  LC (Eritrea)  17  Urtica simensis Hochst.  Asteraceae  NT  12  Leucas stachydiformis (Hochst. the hill slopes deserve rehabilitation through physical  and  biological  means.  Species and Authority (ies) Names  Family  Conservation  Status  1  Aeollanthus abyssinicus Hochst.Rich.   Table 32. ex Benth.Bip.  the  un‐named  Rhus  species. ex Walp.f.)    Lamiaceae  NT  13  Lippia adoensis Hochst.  although  most  areas  have  been  severely  degraded  and  may not deserve protection.66 respectively.  only  one.‐ Bip.  based  on  the  IUCN  Categories  and  Criteria  (IUCN.  2001). ex Chiov.) C.f.  while  the  rest  have  already  been  assessed  as  Near  Threatened  (7  species)  or  Least  Concern  (8  species)  by  Vivero  et  al.  which  is  known  only  from  two  collections. Among  those that have been assessed as Near Threatened (NT) and Least Concern (LC). as they mainly occur  in Ethiopia with extension into the highland of Eritrea.  Otherwise.  Asphodeliaceae  LC  10  Kniphofia insignis Rendle  Asphodeliaceae  CR  11  Laggera tomentosa (A.  (2005. ex Benth.

2. Given the low  number of HB and species and absence of significant number of threatened species.5. while one  taxon was assessed as Vulnerable (VU). Although the Plant Site does not  fall within any of the protected areas in Ethiopia.67 CR = Critically Endangered. Quarry site  As  described  above.  The  list  of  endemic species  of  birds. The  checklist of all birds and the conservation status is found in Annex 6. NT = Near Threatened.2.e. out of which three were endemic.  Totally.  There  are  48  HB  species  in  Ethiopia. LC = Least  Concern    Of the 234 plant species recorded in the Ethio–Cement Plant Site.5.3.  most  are  of  Least  Concern  (LC)  according  to  IUNCN  red  list  (IUCN.2.2. it is  inhabits more threatened plant species and the wetland is very crucial for the  survival of not only the threatened plants but also for birds and other animals. 102 species of birds were recorded. which means that with the currently available information.2.  . These three taxa should be given special  attention in any development intervention.  Most  characteristic  species  of  birds  with  specific  natural  habitat  are  thought to have been lost with habitat loss.2.  Among  the  biome  assemblage  species.  HB  species and all mammals reported to occur in the area is presented in Table 33. a transect walk of at  least  7  km  along  the  conveyor  belt  route  and  Quarry  Site  was  assessed  to  record  birds.  while  one  species. Six of the taxa are near endemics with their  distribution extended into the highland of Eritrea. 14 species have been assessed as Near Threatened (NT) or Least Concern  (LC). they are not  threatened. 17 have been  found to be endemic or near endemic to Ethiopia.  i. 1. although precautionary steps may be needed not to drive them towards  the more threatened categories.  Ruppell’s  Vulture.  10  Afrotropical  Highland  Biome  (HB)  species  were  recorded  from  the  area. It is  also a major source of water and hay for the local people     4.  From  the  conservation  point  of  view. as they have already been threatened.  2007). Fauna  4.  and  the  site holds  20%  of  those.  is  Near  Threatened  (NT).3. VU = Vulnerable. compared to the Quarry Site. (2006).  The rest. Two of the strict endemic taxa  have been assessed as Critically Endangered (CR) by Vivero et al. During the study.  the  original  natural  habitat  at  the  Quarry  Site  is  highly  degraded.

  Table 33. R  LC  semirufa  8  Nectarinia tacazze  Tacazze Sunbird  R  LC  9  Corvus crassirostris  Thick‐billed Raven  E*.68 the Quarry Site does not qualify to be designated as a protected area.  1  Gyps ruppellii  Ruppell’s Vulture  R  NT  2  Francolinus erckelii  Erkel’s Francolin  R  LC  3  Streptopelia lugens  Dusky Turtle Dove  R  LC  4  Agapornis taranta  Black‐winged Love Bird E*. E‐ endemic. R  LC  5  Dendropicos  Abyssinian  R  LC  abyssinicus  Woodpecker  6  Psophocichla  Ground‐scraper Thrush  R  LC  litsipsirupa  7  Myrmecocichla  White‐winged Cliff Chat E*.  Latin Name  Vernacular Name  Remarks  IUCN  Categ. R  LC  10  Serinus citrinelloides:  African Citril  R  LC  11  Serinus tristriatus  Brown‐rumped  Seed‐ R  LC  eater  12  Serinus striolatus  Streaky Seed‐eater  R  LC  Mammals  1  Orycteropus afer  Aardvark     LC  2   Genetta Genetta  Common Genet     NT   Cercopithecus  aethiops  3  Vervet Monkey     NT  4   Papio anubis  Olive Baboon      NT   Theropithecus  5  gelada  Gelada      NT  Tragelaphus scriptus  Bushbuck     NT  6  7   Hystrix cristata  Crested Porcupine      LC   Phacochoerus  8  aethiopicus  Warthog      LC   Potamochoerus  9  larvatus  Bushpig      LC  Yellow‐spotted  Rock  10   Heterohyrax brucei  Hyrax      LC  11  Canis mesomelas  Black‐backed Jackal     LC  Abyssinian Hare     NT  12  Lepus habessinicus  Spotted Hyena     NT  13  Crocuta crocuta    IBA  Categ.     HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB     HB  HB  HB                                         . HB‐ Afrotropical Highland Biome Assemblage species)  Birds  No. List of birds with conservation significance and mammals of Quarry Site  (R‐ resident. nor does it fall  in any such area.

2.  From  IBA  site  evaluation  point  of  view.  there  are  one  Endangered  (EN)  species.  Birds  were  recorded  along  transect  line  of  ca.2.  species  found  in  the  area  is  the  White‐winged  Fluftails.5. The  globally  threatened  species.  perhaps  the  most  important  in  the  world.  2001). 1996). including those  endemic  to  Ethiopia. The lists of birds recorded. the area is rich in Afrotropical Highland Biome Assemblage.  E.  10  km  passing through the landscape covering all habitat types.2.69 4. Around 132 species were  recorded.  EN.  HB  HB  HB           HB     . 2. which is dominated by highland grassland.  The  area  is  one  of  the  few  known  breeding  sites  for  the  species.2. R  R  R  R  R  R  R  NT  LC  NT  NT  NT  LC  EN  IBA  Categ.  of  which  11  species  are  endemic.  The  site  falls  within  the  Sululta  Important  Bird  Area. R  LC  E. List of birds with conservation significance and mammals of Quarry Site  (PM‐ Palearctic migrant)  Birds  No. which is one of the 78 sites identified as priority areas for the conservation of  birds and associated habitat (EWNHS.    Table 34.  Based  on  IUCN  red  list  (IUCN. and those  of conservation importance are presented in Annnex 7 and Table 34. Plant Site  The habitat around the Plant Site is more diverse in species of birds. having 22 species  of the total 48 species of this category known to occur in the whole of Ethiopia. The grassland is still  managed for hay production without much modification than annual harvesting and  regular  grazing  by  animals.  The  majority  of  the  area  around  the  Plant  Site  is  under  its  natural cover type.  Latin Name  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Bostrychia  carunculata  Cyanochen cyanoptera  Anas undulate  Gyps africanus  Gyps ruppellii  Circus macrourus  Francolinus sephaena  Sarothrura ayresi  Vernacular Name  Wattled Ibis  Blue‐winged Goose  Yellow‐billed Duck  White‐backed  Vulture  Ruppell’s Vulture  Pallid Harrier  Crested Francolin  White‐winged  Flufftail  Remarks  IUCN  Categ.  one  Vulnerable  (VU)  and  seven  Near  Threatened  (NT)  species  of  birds  from  the  area.

 R  R  E.70 9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8              Ruogetius rougetii  Grus carunculatus  Vanellus  melanocephalus  Gallinago media  Columba albitorques  Poicephalus flavifrons  Caprimulgus  poliocephalus  Macronyx flavicollis  Psophocichla  litsipsirupa  Cercomela sordida  Parophasma galinieri  Parus leuconotus  Rouget’s Rail  E. R  R  E*. R  R  R  E. R  R  R  R                    NT  VU  LC  NT  LC  LC  LC  NT  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC  LC    LC  LC  LC  NT  NT  NT  NT  NT  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB  HB                    HB     HB     HB  HB  Abyssinian Longclaw  Ground‐scraper  Thrush  Alpine Chat  Abyssinian Catbird  White‐backed  Black  Tit  Nectarinia tacazze  Tacazze Sunbird  Corvus crassirostris  Thick‐billed Raven  Passer  griseus  Grey‐headed  swainsonii   Sparrow  Ploceus baglafecht  Baglafecht Weaver  Serinus nigriceps  Black‐headed Siskin  Serinus citrinelloides:  African Citril  Serinus tristriatus  Brown‐rumped Seed‐ eater  Serinus striolatus  Streaky Seed‐eater  Mammals    Orycteropus afer  Aardvark  Arvicanthis  Abyssinian Grass Rat  abyssinicus  Arvicanthis niloticus  African Grass Rat  Lepus starcki  Ethiopian  Highland  Hare  Lepus habessinicus  Abyssinian Hare  Crocuta crocuta  Spotted Hyena  Sylvicapra grimmia  Common Duiker   Tragelaphus scriptus  Bushbuck  . R  E. R  E*. R  R  R  E. R  Great Snipe  White‐collard Pigeon  Yellow‐fronted  Parrot  Mountain Nightjar  PM  E. R  Wattled Crane  R  Spot‐breasted Plover  E.

 A total  of  25  endemic  and  near‐endemic  species  have  been  recorded. while all the rest (15)  have been assessed as Least Concern (LC) and Near‐Threatened (NT).2.71   4. two species (Arisaema addis­ababense &  Kniphofia insignis) have been assessed as Critically Endangered (CR).  three  of  which  are  endemic  to  Ethiopia. The site is also one of the very few known habitats of an  endangered species (EN).  since  birds  are  globally  used  as  indicators  for  identification  of  priority  sites  for  biodiversity  conservation. while 17 are from the Plant Site.  .  Most  other  species  from  the  area  have  been  assessed  as  either  Near  Threatened  (NT) or Least Concern (LC).  The  endemic  species  and  most  other bird species from the area have been assessed as either Least Concern (LC) or  Near Threatened (NT). CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS    The study has revealed that the two sites are rich in the diversity of flora and fauna. and a VU species. Among the 17  endemic plant species from the Plant Site.5. Additionally.  Sixteen  of  these  endemic taxa are recorded at the Quarry Site. the site was found to be rich in Afro tropical Highland Biome  Assemblage (HB) species.  A  total  of  102  species  were  recorded  from  the  Quarry  Site  and  the  hillsides. Wattled Crane.    Regarding  the  fauna  of  the  study  sites.4.  of  which  11  are  endemic. The remaining  endemic species (14) have been assessed as Least Concern (LC) or Near Threatened  (NT).  132  species  of  birds  have  been  recorded. White‐winged Flufftail. The same is true for mammals recorded in the area. while one  species (Bidens carinata) has been assessed as Vulnerable (VU).2.     The yet to be described Rhus species has been assessed as Critically Endangered  (CR) among the 16 endemic species from the Quarry Site.  The total number of plant species recorded from the two sites is 380 of which 230  species are recorded from the Plant Site while 273 are from the Quarry Site.  it  was  focused  on  birds.     From  the  Plant  Site.

 The area drains  into Mogor River.  Because of its topography. the site has already been  identified an Important Bird Area (IBA).   The wetlands and grasslands around the proposed Cement Plant Site should  be  maintained  and  revegetated  by  ETCEM  in  its  green  belt  development  program in collaboration with the local concerned government bodies. and most parts have been converted to agricultural fields and  grazing land. It can serve as habitat  for several bird species of HB type and for the watershed protection. the following recommendations are forwarded:   The lowland part of the Quarry Site is no more important for conservation.   Photo  4  Vegetaion  cover                              Photo  5  Vegetation  cover  around                                   around quarry hillside                                 quarry on the top hillside                                                                               . which is a conservation priority area for  birds and other plant and animal species. the presence of endangered  species with restricted habitat like White‐winged Flufftail.    The hill slopes of the Quarry Site must be rehabilitated by planting trees and  increasing  vegetation  cover  for  watershed  protection  and  original  habitat  restoration. the hillside deserves rehabilitation. The hillside facing the Quarry encompasses remnants of the dry  evergreen montane forest. which is one of the tributaries of the Blue Nile. which is relatively in its natural state.   The proposed plant site has been found to be an important wetland and grassland  habitat.     Therefore.72   The study has also resulted in the recognition of the vegetation of the Quarry Site as  very highly degraded. Given the high number of HB birds. with some endemic and near endemic plant species. inhabiting several plants and birds of  conservation value.

     the common fauna /project area.              Endemic fauna /project area                                           Photo 10 Gelada baboon one of     Photo 11 Velevet monkey one of      the common  fauna /project area.73                                                            Photo  6vegetation  cover                                  Photo  7 the  flora  around  the  plant                                      around the quarry hill side               on the plateau side                                                                                                  Photo 8 Kniphofia insignis one of     Photo 9 the abysinnia long claw endemic flora  /project area.    .

 The National Herbarium (ETH). J. Sweden.H. Ethiopia and Uppsala. and Thirgood..  Edwards.J.  Sebsebe  Demissew. Putting Biodiversity on the map: global priorites for conservation. I. M.2. S. 1997b.  Ensermu  Kelbessa.  1992..  Edwards. 391. Part 1: Magnoliaceae to Flacourtiaceae. Long. Henson.. S. Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.. Gregerson. S. (eds). C. (eds).  Edwards.2.  Some   . A. (eds).J.  Zerihun  Woldu  &  Edwards.. Addis Ababa. Crosby. I.  Volume 2. Hotspots Revisited: Earth’s Biologically  Richest and Most  Endangered Terrestrial Ecoregions. UK.  Edwards. Mesfin Tadesse & Hedberg. Flora of  Ethiopia   and Eritrea.  1992..D.J.   Volume 6: Hydrocharitaceae to Arecaceae.J. UK  Davis.  J. Sebsebe Demissew & Hedberg. Flora of Ethiopia and  Eritrea. Addis Ababa. droop. Sebsebe Demissew & Hedberg. Flora of Ethiopia and  Eritrea.74   4. Cambridge. Ethiopia and Uppsala. Switzerland & Cambridge.  ICBP. Ethiopia and  Uppsala. 1995. I.J. Volume 2.J. Pp.. Uppsala University. A. Sebsebe Denmissew & Hedberg.5. 2000. 1997a. Villa‐Lobos. Johnson. Uppsala University.. REFERENCES    CI (Conservation International). S. L. (eds).  and  Zantovska... I.J. Addis Ababa University & Department of Systematic  Botany. Uppsala  University. 2004.   Part 2: Canellaceae to Euphorbiaceae. C. S.. Gland. Mesfin Tadesse. The National Herbarium (ETH). Sweden..5.  Addis Ababa.  Plants  in  danger:  What  do  we  know? IUCN...L. Leon.   Volume 6: Hydrocharitaceae to Arecaceae.. Statterfield.  S.  Bibby. Sweden. Ethiopia and Uppsala. Addis Ababa.  H. CEMEX.M. T.     Syringe. P. Addis  Ababa University & Department of Systematic Botany. Sweden. The National  Herbarium (ETH).  1986. S.  Addis Ababa University & Department of Systematic Botany. S.

  Fishpool. S.)  2001. (eds).  Hedberg. Ethiopia and Uppsala.  BirdLife  Conservation  Series 11.  Hedberg. Addis Ababa and Asmara. S. The National Herbarium (ETH).  35‐55. Pisces Publications. Ensermu Kelbessa. Flora of Ethiopia and  Eritrea. Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Friis.   Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea.  Hedberg. (eds). I.).  . Edwards.. 1989. & Edwards. Volume  4. (eds). I. 1995. I.  Hedberg.  the  status  of  some  plant  resources  in  parts  of  Tropical  Africa. Uppsala University.  (Eds.75   threatened  endemic  plants of  Ethiopia. Ethiopia and  Uppsala.  M. S. Part 1: Apiaceae to Dipsacaceae.. E. Volume 5: Gentiaceae to Cyclocheilaceae. & Edwards. Uppsala University. Ethiopia and Uppsala. 2003.  pp.  L. Sebsebe Demissew & Persson. S. The National Herbarium (ETH). Addis Ababa  University & Department of Systematic Botany. I. Important Bird Areas of Ethiopia: A first inventory. Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Sweden. Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea..  and  Evans.   Part 2: Asteraceae (Compositae)..  Botany  2000:  East  and  Central  Africa. The  National Herbarium (ETH). I.  NAPRECA  Monograph Series No. I. Sweden. Edwards.  Important  Bird  Areas  in  Africa  and  Associated  Islands:  Priority  Sites  for  Conservation. Addis Ababa. & Sileshi Nemomissa (eds).  Addis Ababa. Uppsala University.   Volume 4. Volume 3:  Pittosporaceae to Araliaceae. Ethiopia and Uppsala.  2005. Volume  7: Poaceae (Gramineae). Sweden. 2. Addis  Ababa University & Department of Systematic Botany.  Sweden.   EWNHS 1996. & Edwards. Addis Ababa. S. Addis Ababa University & Department of  Systematic Botany. 2004.  Hedberg.  ‐ In:  Sue Edwards & Zemede  Asfaw  (eds. Ethiopia and Uppsala. Addis Ababa. Addis  Ababa.  Sweden. Ethiopian Wildlife  and Natural History Society. (eds).

A & Beentje. IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria: Version 3. Cambridge. Kew. Ethiopia..  IUCN. Prepared by the IUCN  Species Survival  Commission. their Conservation and SustainableUse. National Biodiversity strategy and action plan. Royal Botanic Gardens. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Fauna& Flora  International. 761‐778.  Vivero. 2005. In: Ghazanfar. H. S. J. 2005. Addis Ababa. (eds. Taxonomy and Ecology  of African Plants. Gland. Switzerland. Addis Ababa. Progress on the Red  List of   Plants of Ethiopia and Eritrea: Conservation and biogeography of endemic  flowering taxa. Kew  Publishing. Ensermu Kelbessa and Sebsebe Demissew.  Vivero. UK.                        . IUCN. Switzerland and Cambridge. Gland.  Proceedings of the 17th AETFAT Congress. Demissew (2006). UK.L. The Red List of   Endemic Trees and Shrubs of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Ensermu Kelbessa & Sebsebe.J. 2001.  IUCN.76 IBC.L.). FDRE. Institute of  Biodiversity Conservation. J.1.. 2007. pp.

 The type of vehicles represented by each category is as shown in Table 0        .  Medium  Bus and Large Bus.  the  counts  were  made  in  three  shifts  for  eight  hours  each  that  is  the  first  shift  is  from  the  (6:00  am  to  2:00  pm)  second shift (2:00 pm to 10:00 pm) and the third shift is from (4:00 pm to 6:00 am)  for five days and night count was made for the remaining two days (6:00 pm to 6:00  am).  Heavy  Truck  and  Truck  Trailer  base  on  their  respective  load  capacity.3 TRAFFIC FLOW SURVEY    The traffic flow on the major roads around the project site has been monitored.  Land  Rover.  Passenger  vehicles  include  Car. of which one is a market day. This traffic survey has been  carried  out  from  11/07/2008  up  to  17/07/2008. The motorized traffic is further analyzed group  wise  in  terms  of  passenger  and  freight  vehicles  categorized  based  on  the  kind  of  service  rendered. two way traffic was counted in single form.   the Derba junction road is found at 2 kilometer from the Ethio cement plant site and  this location is selected as the monitoring station for both Derba road and  Addis to  Bahirdar  road.  Since  the  station  has  one  leg  or  direction.  Medium  Truck.    The traffic flow survey conducted at the Derba Junction.77 4.  The  traffic  flow  from  Addis  Ababa  to  Bahirdar  is  also  monitored  at  the  Derba  junction.2.  Derba  road  branches  off  from  the  main  road  Addis  to  Bahirdar    at  Chancho  with  a  total  of  23  km  to  Derba.     Since the volume and  composition of traffic is homogeneous throughout  this  road.     The  vehicle  classification  used  in  the  analysis  is  consistent  with  Ethiopian  Roads  Authority’s (ERA’s) vehicle classes. The  flow of traffic essentially shows a consistent pattern which will only be increased in  the  market  day  once  in  a  week. Freight vehicles group on the other hand comprises Small Truck.  Small  Bus.  Walks  and  riding  on  horse  backs  account  for  the  dominant flow even in this day.  .

   RESULTS OF THE TRAFFIC SURVEY  The raw traffic count data of the road project were processed in order to estimate  the required Average Daily Traffic (ADT) which shows the 24 hours traffic flows.6 ton load   Trucks with 12 to 24 ton load   Trucks with above 24 ton load   .5 ton load  including pickups. Station Wagons. Taxis   Land Cruisers.    The traffic count results have been converted to Average Daily Traffic (ADT) for the  road section and are given below.  Double Cabin   Bus with 12‐24 seats and  includes such vehicles as mini  bus       Freight Vehicles   Medi Bus   Large Bus   Small trucks (pickups  and Isuzus)  Medium Trucks   Heavy Trucks   Truck Trailers     4.2.78 Table 35   Vehicle classification  Vehicle group   Passenger  Vehicles       Vehicle category  Cars   Land Rover.3. Isuzu   Trucks with 3.1.             Bus with 24‐45 seats   Bus with 45 to 60 seats   Truck with up to 3. 4WD   Mini bus   Type of vehicles  Small Cars.6 to 7.

motorcycle.motorcycle                  ‐      Bus  Bus  224  40  238  24  264  16  224  17  280  21  231  27  270  22  1731  167  247  24  D/Truck   17  16  33  23  38  13  13  153  22      Addis to Bahirdar   Table 37 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00 from 2pm – 10pm  Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/12/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total   Average  Car    63  42  17  29  26  32  30  239  34  Land   Rover  90  57  37  24  31  46  34  319  46  Mini   Medi  Large  Bus  17  22  11  19  12  12  21  114  16  Pick up& Medi  D/  Isuzu  Truck  144  25  272  69  156  40  224  109  204  56  280  64  112  39  1392  402  199  57  Large   Trailer  29  37  27  24  30  24  34  205  29  Others    Cart   Cart.      Bus  Bus  168  8  183  19  130  5  146  7  146  8  168  17  112  9  1053  73  150  10  D/Truck   21  9  26  18  27  13  25  139  20  .motorcycle                ‐                                 Cart.motorcycle             Cart  Cart          Cart.lobed  Motorcycle  Cart.  Cart  Cart.79   Addis to Bahirdar   Table 36 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00 from 6AM – 2PM    Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/12/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total   Average  Car    90  46  36  33  51  38  67  361  52  Land   Rover  83  88  74  53  61  58  54  471  67  Mini   Medi  Large  Bus  43  43  30  35  43  44  24  262  37  Pick  up&  Isuzu  150  126  143  142  173  158  108  1000  143  Medi  D/  Truck  24  16  24  29  18  25  14  150  21  Large   Trailer  45  23  20  47  34  28  27  224  32  Others    Horse‐cart  Cart.Bicycle.

lobed.lobed.motorcycle         11/12/2000  155  12/12/2000  90  13/12/2000  54  14/112/2000  65  15/12/2000  81  16/12/2000  76  17/12/2000  101  Total   622  Average  89  Bus  Bus  430  50  456  45  445  23  411  30  467  34  444  46  415  32  3068  260  438  37  D/Truck   44  40  63  53  70  39  44  353  50  .lobed Cart.motorcycle Cart.motrcycle  Cart.    Lobed         ‐        Addis to Bahirdar   Table 39 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00  with in 24 hour    Car  Land   Rover  176  156  129  93  106  127  101  888  127  Mini   Medi  Large  Pick  up&  Bus  Isuzu  61  350  72  465  44  361  64  457  59  433  66  531  49  276  415  2873  59  410  Medi  D/  Truck  77  124  85  175  96  112  65  734  105  Large   Trailer  82  72  57  103  73  72  75  534  76  Date  Others    Cart  Cart.lobed  Cart.motorcycle  Cart.80   Addis to Bahirdar   Table 38 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00 from 10Pm – 6Am  Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/12/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total   Average  Car    2  2  1  3  4  6  4  22  3  Land   Rover  3  11  18  16  14  23  13  98  14  Mini   Bus  38  35  51  41  41  45  33  284  41  Medi  Bus  2  2  2  6  5  2  1  20  3  Large  Bus  1  7  3  10  4  10  4  39  6  Pick up&  Medi D/ Large   Trailer  Isuzu  Truck  D/Truck   56  28  6  8  67  39  15  12  62  21  4  10  91  37  12  32  56  22  5  9  93  23  13  20  56  12  6  14  481  182  61  105  69  26  9  15  Others             ‐  Lobed.motorcycle.lobed.

81 Derba  Table 40 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00 from 6Am – 2Pm      Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/12/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total  Average  Car    1  2  5  14  5  6  3  36  5  Land   Rover  3  0  6  0  4  6  1  20  3  Mini   Bus  21  15  32  19  72  22  8  189  27  Medi  Bus  0  1  2  1  3  6  2  15  2  Large  Bus  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  Pick up&  Medi D/ Large   Trailer  Isuzu  Truck  D/Truck   30  12  19  1  36  10  20  2  52  14  22  3  26  18  29  0  53  11  23  0  47  22  15  0  44  11  1  0  288  98  129  6  41  14  18  1  Others                        Derba  Table 41 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00  from 2Pm ­ 10Pm      Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/112/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total  Average  Car    0  2  1  4  7  3  2  19  3  Land   Rover  6  1  21  0  0  4  4  36  5  Mini   Bus  15  32  0  14  11  38  16  126  18  Medi  Bus  0  0  0  2  4  0  5  11  2  Large  Bus  0  0  19  0  0  0  0  19  3  Pick up&  Medi D/ Large   Trailer  Isuzu  Truck  D/Truck   12  3  22  0  29  27  3  0  5  24  0  0  21  25  3  0  21  1  19  0  56  15  2  2  14  4  20  0  158  99  69  2  23  14  10  0  Others                      .

82 Derba   Table 42 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00 from 10Pm – 6Am      Date    11/12/2000  12/12/2000  13/12/2000  14/12/2000  15/12/2000  16/12/2000  17/12/2000  Total  Average  Car    0  0  20  0  5  0  0  25  4  Land   Rover  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  Mini   Bus  1  4  25  6  23  13  19  91  13  Medi  Bus  0  0  0  2  0  7  0  9  1  Large  Bus  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  Pick up&  Medi D/ Large   Trailer  Isuzu  Truck  D/Truck   2  2  1  0  7  2  5  1  25  9  1  0  12  3  11  0  23  11  0  0  21  7  13  0  20  8  0  0  110  42  31  1  16  6  4  0  Others                        Derba   Table 43 Average daily traffic from date 11/12/00 up to 17/12/00  with in 24 hour    Car  Land   Rover  9  1  27  0  4  10  5  56  8  Mini   Bus  37  51  57  39  106  73  43  406  58  Medi  Bus  0  1  2  5  7  13  7  35  5  Large  Bus  0  0  19  0  0  0  0  19  3  Pick  up&  Isuzu  44  72  82  59  97  124  78  556  79  Medi  D/  Truck  17  39  47  46  23  44  23  239  34  Large   Trailer  1  3  3  0  0  2  0  9  1  Date  Others                          11/12/2000  1  12/12/2000  4  13/12/2000  26  14/112/2000  18  15/12/2000  17  16/12/2000  9  17/12/2000  5  Total  80  Average  11  D/Truck   42  28  23  43  42  30  21  229  33  .

  As  it  is  observed  the  cement  industry‘s  cement delivery trend in the country mostly trailers are used having a loading capacity  from 300‐ 400 quintals.for the construction activities of Derba Midrock and Ethio Cement. CONCLUSIONS  Ethio Cement will produce 2800 tons of cement per day to be dispatched to the market  when  the  factory  reaches  to  its  full  capacity.  If  we  consider  the  proposed  Derba  Midrock  with  a  daily  capacity  of  5600tons  per  day  and  if  we  take  the  same  assumptions.  The  Medium  and  large  dump  trucks  are currently used mainly for cement and raw material transportation of the Abyssinia  cement .83 Table  1  up  to  table  3  shows  each  shifts  traffic  flow  of  Addis  Ababa  to  Bahirdar  main  road followed by table 4 which shows the daily average of 24 hours traffic flow. To transport the 3000 tons of raw material from this area around 35  trucks will be used. Therefore totally the traffic flow in the area will reach to be more  than 315 trucks.  However  the  raw  material  transported  from  the  Derba area will use the dump trucks and 30 tons dump trucks are planned to be used  for this purpose.3.    4.  it  may  requires  around  187  trucks to deliver the cement to the market. The traffic flow of the  Derba road as it is tabulated in Table8 for the 24 hours. As it is  observed  from  Table  4  average  daily  traffic  flow  on  the  Derba  road  is  very  high  compared to the traffic flow on the Derba road as it is observed in Table 8    Table 5‐Table7 shows each shifts traffic flow of the Derba road.     .     Ethio  Cement  to  dispatch  the  cement  and  to  reach  to  the  main  road  there  is  only  2  kilometer  distance  from  the  factory. Then followed by the Mini buses and they are  basically  used  for  the  community  transportation.2.2.  Derba  Midrock.  governmental offices and Ethio Cement . Therefore if this trend is followed for the calculation and if the  minimum loading capacity is taken 93 trucks will be required to deliver the cement to  the  market. the traffic flow is currently led  by the pickup’s and Isuzu’s they are mainly carrying seeds and products of the farmers  to  the  market  the  pickups  are  used  by  companies  like  old  Mugher.

 This trend will continue and highly strengthen in constructing the remaining  23 kilometer road from Derba to Chancho.  Therefore  the  construction  of  the  road  is  changing  and  will  change  tremendously  the  livelihood of the farmers in the area. In the beginning this 8 kilometer new road  was opened by Ethio Cement and then after it is done jointly. The joint  collaboration  of  these  two  companies  is  already  started  in  the  8  kilometer  road  construction from Derba to Becho (Ethio Cement intermediate site and Derba Midrock  plant site).                                      .84 Therefore  with  the  joint  effort  of  Ethio  Cement  and  Derba  Midrock  a  standard  road  which will accommodate the above indicated traffic flow will be constructed. And the opening of this  road  create  access  to  the  community  to  transport  all  their  product  to  directly  to  the  market using Isuzu’s. previously they were enforced to transport their product through  the back of Donkeys or by shoulder carrying to the market and back from the market.

85 4.  The  present  settlement  is  dated  back  to  1974  popular  revolution  of  Ethiopia  the  abolished  ownership  of  the  land  to  private  land  owners     The coming of Meneiik administration paved way for the footing of Alagaa (aliens) into  Oromo land that intensified during Haile Sellassie (Alemayehu.      4. these and many  other  authors  have  not  questioned  the  fact  that  Oromo  are  indigenous  to  eastern  and  .2.  The  Oromo  from  one  of  those  Cushitics  groups.4. 2006). Garbi.2.  Siblu. HISTORICAL AND ARCHEOLOGICAL FEATURES  The study generally relied on qualitative methods to understand different perception  and interest and how these influence the impacted community.  ‘each  of  the  several  Oromo  groups  cherishes  descent  from  an  eponymous  ancestors  or  family  stock  named  Oromo.    Despite  all  these  people  claim  that  they  belong  to  this  land  on  which  their  and  their  ancestor’s  handhurraa (umbilical cord) was buried.   Moreover  these  researchers  noted  that  the  Oromo  suffers  from  daunting  poverty  because of government planned ‘development’ and land tenure system.    4.4   CULTURAL. The coming of  successive rulers of Ethiopia to power was not only to serve government structures.4. and mugar are the major tributary of Blue Nile.    Despite different in locating the specific area of the origin of the Oromo. the  following approaches were employed to gather. analyze.2 History of the Region  The  Oromo  are  one  of  the  ancient  groups  of  people  living  in  the  horn  of  Africa.     A number of rivers and mountain are found northwest in the environs of the study site. Particularly.2.  The  Oromo being one of the most numerous nations in Africa enjoy a homogenous culture  and  shared  common  language. 2004 and Hirpha.  history  and  descent.  The  dominant  population  of  the  area  is  Oromos  that  they  earn  living  from  mixed  agriculture  the  sole  occupation  that  absorbs  the  rapidly  growing indigenous inhabitants.  which  spread  southwards and then east and west occupying large part of the horn of Africa.  Baxter  (1983:131)  states.1 Background to the project area     According  to  the  current  administrative  structure. but  also  in  the  form  of  landlord  before  the  popular  revolution  of  1974. and interpret data:     Informal interview   Key informant interview   Observation   Secondary data review. These rivers and mountain  serve  as  ritual  (Irrechaa)  places.  the  project  area  is  situated  in  Oromia  Regional  National  State  in  Mulo  (mining  &  transit  area)  and  Sululuta  (plant  area)  districts  of  north  Shoa  Zone.

 P.  Furthermore.  entered  Africa  Via  Mombasa  and  spread  north  and  east  wards.       4.23) alliged that the  Oromo  migrated  from  Asia  and  Madagascar.86 northeastern Africa.  Irreechaa  is  attached  most  importantly  to  the  trees.  The local population has scared associations.  The Oromo traditional religion. infinite. Matimiku Yohanes at  clay material area and Egizerab plant area. Aleqa Taye (cited in Alemeyehu.3 Religion  In describing the nature of religion. crime. climb mountain  or hill or cross known ritual places.  the  mountains. He can do anything. For instance. sin and all falsehood. omnipotent.2. before they took Christianity as informants explained there are funeral  places in and around there faming and grazing land that they considered as sacred  places. before time of successive  government  lead  intervention.    Irreecha Ritual   Every  year  on  the  same  day  with  Meskele  ‘the  finding  of  the  true  cross’  at  the  end  of  September. These traditional beliefs and rituals include Ayana. In the words of the informants.  faithful  community  members  come  together  to  celebrate  Irreechaa  ritual. On the other hand places of traditional worship and residence of “Abba Ayana”  are located in and around the project intervention area. the study community predominantly believes in  Orthodox Christianity dominated with juxtaposed Oromo traditional believe and  practice. Saint Mary intermediate site.  Bartels (1995) also reaffirmed that taking Christianity or Muslim couldn’t refrain  Oromo from worshiping their Waqaa all the way through conducting ritual ceremonies  similar to their ancestors. He is  pure.  Irreecha takes place among faithful Oromos while they cross the river. and incompressible (Bartels 1995).  at  this  time  of  the  year  cows  give  better  milk  and  the  . Adbar. Atete. intolerant of injustice.   For them Waqaa is the creator of everything. Irreechaa  and Hamachisa.  According  to  informants. place of funeral at different churchs such  as Saint Medihen Alem quarry area. At the end of September rain bring to an end. source of all  life.    Their clan based social institution plays pivotal role in keeping the community to  remain intact with their indigenous religious practices as every member of the  community merely advises begotten children and others to perform the religious rituals  in order to be successful in their daily life.  and  the  lake  and  permanent  water  source.  Irreecha  (thanks  giving  and  praying  festival)  is  celebrated  annually  before  the  beginning  of  the  harvest  season. ‘Waaqeffannaa’ which is believed to  have existed since mythical times and at the same time indigenous to the study people  prevailed despite the fact that almost all the study people had taken Christianity. mud  dry and dust not aggravated.    Irreecha is celebrated at times when every plant becomes green and the environment  adjoining Malka Dire is eye‐catching.4.  Even  today  there  are  elite  still  sees  these  myths  and  fables  of  ancient world to be relevant to the present day life (Megerssa). However there is no direct impact related  with the project excep the fear for blocking access road because of mining only.

 wealthy and prosperous life. women and children descended down to the riverbank holding  chaqorsa  (grass)  and  bloomed  daises  that  grows  wild  and  wet  during  spring  by  chanting maree’o. the ritual reinforces the basic tenets of Oromo religion as  performing the Irreecha is communicating to Waqaa in response to their spiritual and  material  inquires.  it  helps  to  bring  social  harmony. In the words  of the informant obedience to safu (peace and order of Waqaa) enables them to lead  healthy.  Irreecha  pilgrimage  is  the  peace  making  ritual among the particular group and conveys solidarity among community. for  fertility  of  animals  and  plants  for  grass  to  grow  well  and  for  the  cows  to  give  milk.  they  encounter  societal  illness  unless  every thing that their ancestor’s experienced performed. cattle and crops). It is one of  . The last prayer started his praying by saying   yaa waqii sadii ebifaana sanyi  sadeen  nu  qjeelichi  meaning  God  please  favor  us  for  perpetuation  of  the  three  genes  (human being. while violating safu results in prevalence of chaos  and  disaster  and  societal  illness.    On  the  occasion  women  usually  wear  buree  (colored  dress made up of cotton). the performance of the ritual is  the integral part of their spiritual life.  During the ritual men.       They pray for improvement of crop yield.  By  reinforcing  group  norms  of  worshipers.  accidents and other unexpected occurrences is the will of Waqaa for misbehaviors by  member  of  the  family  or  community.    In  the  belief  system  of  the  community  the  most  logical  explanation  of  social  illness. the livestock have  accessed to reserved fodder after the rain stopped.    Elders with fresh memories recall that cases at which Irreecha ritual conducted when  the particular community faces disaster.  Thus. famine and war. The prayers placed their  grass across the shore of Melka touched and every body kneeled down and kissed  ground and continued praying. for cure of societal and individual illness. drought.87 bulls fattening as there is adequate grass grown in the area for which. In  sum.      The ritual involves the use of words and action to give thanks and to pray to Waqaa. when they chant for maree’o they request Waqaa to be responsive to their prayer  as every prayer is convinced Waqaa is forgiving and generous.  According  to  the  informants. Chalee (ornament) and hold sinqee (ritual stick) and okolee  (milk  container).  Baga  Booruu  Gannaa  ceetani  boaqa  birraa  geessaan  meaning  you  are  welcome  from  the  rainy  summer  season  to  sunny  spring  season.      To thank and pray to their Waqaa for his deed and to the betterment of the future is a  belief system that has long tradition among the faithful study community.  In the view of faithful community members. In such case mostly  women  go  to  Melka  (river  bank)  to  pray  to  seek  solution  from  Waqaa  for  their  inquires.    Thanks  giving  and  praying  commenced  by  three  elders.     Every  member  of  the  community  greets  each  other  by  saying.    According to the informants.

 This often practiced and  involves preparation of food and drink for the labor that the hosting person has  obtained. One pf the key informants said they have  strong  association  with  the  land  were  they  earn  living  and  buried  their  dead  as  they  have  obedience  with  ‘Dekera’  (sprit  of  the  dead).4 Mutual Help Organization  Daboo/Jigie  Daboo is task oriented traditional structures organized to pull labor for various  activities that might not be managed privately.    4. According to Taddesse  (2000) there are occasions when other considerations other than reciprocity are taken  into account. Furthermore construction of houses and fencing are some of non‐ agricultural activities that can be carried out under Daboo. Thus. It is another form of indigenous voluntary association through which  intercultural collaboration has been possible in Ethiopia primarily in urban areas  .  This  is  different  from  what  anthropologist  called  syncretism. It is one of the most well known  indigenous forms of voluntary association through which rural communities co‐operate  with each other to meet social and economic ends (Taddesse.    Tullu. The physically hand caped. 2000:2).  However  there  is  no  church  that  is  going to be demolished because of the intervention by the project. its contribution towards information dissemination  is immense as it serves as a platform where one can effortlessly equipped himself with  contemporary undertakings.     Daboo is not necessarily based on the bases of reciprocity. weeding  and harvesting.  and  burial  of  the  ancestors  before  they  take  Christianity are possibley dispossessed by the project. Member of the  study community practiced Daboo for agricultural activities such as ploughing.  It  also  serves  for  sharing  information  on  the  prevailing  situation  and  problems such as HIV/AIDS.     Iddir  Iddir is the most frequent type of community based mutual help organizations in and  around Dire area. However  they perform other ritual activities that they believe are associated with the wellbeing  of their family and success in their daily life.2.  the  study  people  are orthodox.88 the places where the study community prays and acknowledges their Waqaa for all his  did  all  the  way  through  pray  and  song.      Access to religious and Ritual places  As  we  mentioned  in  the  previous  paragraph.4.  They  openly  practice  the  ritual  and  there  are  times  at  which  their  father‐ father confessors participate with them.  The  Irreecha  persists  even  if  all  community  members  accept  Christianity.  Burka.   The social bond created by this arrangement is strong and they serve as a forum for the  exchange  of  experiences  on  timely  operations.  Malka.The ritual places such  as  Adbar.  market  information  and  weather  conditions. widow and sick and aged persons are helped  by daboo in agricultural activities and in building houses.

      .     4.  This  type  of  support  is  not  common  in  many  iddirs. Fita.2. community iddir is open to everybody regardless of  ethnic. it is  learned that the project will not affect their mutual aid organization Iddir as it is  functional where ever there is settlement. Aggrieved family that lose a member will be given the  above mentioned types of support. He further noted that even the  very poor are not necessarily excluded.   One should be able to contribute some amount of money every month         that will serve as a capital. Bodo.  In general members are expected  to contribute same amount of money per month. However these all sites are out of the mining and plant area. Committees  elected by the majority vote from members commonly manage these iddirs.     Iddirs have capital that is obtained from members’ monthly contribution. religious. It is primarily aimed to give support both financially and labour  following the incidents of death.  on  the  other  hand  iddirs  that  collect  large  amount  of  money  relatively  give  other  types  of  support  such  as  giving  support  during  times  of  sicknesses  and  robbery. ‘Dabo’  (labour contribution for agriculture) is going to be weaken as dispossession  automatically reduced land holding that decreases or ban individual farmland holding  that prohibit member of the community to mobilize additional labour.5 Previous Archaeological Research in the Area  Key  informants  consulted  during  the  field  survey  couldn’t  remember  nor  claim  location  and  stories of archaeological places except the burial. as provision is frequently made for certain  members to render services. Didibe.89 (Taddesse.4.The study  identified two distinct cultural remains. eligibility to membership depends on the byelaws.   In 1996 study was commissioned with agreement of Addis Ababa Water Supply and Sewerage  Authority stage III water supply project and Archaeology and Anthropology of CRCCH. and gender and wealth backgrounds. Birbiritu and Galiye mana  Abichu Burika. The team  recognized trace of archaeological elements at Deneba. These are megalithic and medieval cultures. such as grave digging. Iddir that demand fewer amounts of  money  from  it’s  members  only  give  support  following  the  incident  of  death. In the study  community however.    According to Taddesse (2000).  Every  one  can  be  a  member  as  far  as  he/she  fulfils the following criteria:     One should be able to pay the entrance fee that set by the members. Besides. The amount  of contribution that members give varies from  iddir to  iddir based on the type of the  service that the iddir is going to offer to its members. Irrechaa and Adbar places.   One should agree to be governed by the by laws of the iddir   One has to agree to attend the monthly meeting of the iddir                     usually is held on Sunday morning. instead of money. 2000:4). and Boru.

  Besides  the  sites  has  no  significant  importance  for  archaeological study.  Therefore  removing  graves  where  exist  to  the  new  burial  places  can  enable  to  suppress  psychological stress associated with sprit of the dead.  In  the  preceding chapter attempts have been made to asses cultural impacts of the project on  the  lives  of  the  impacted  community.    .    They  were  observed  the  stone that was used by the ancient people and tumuli with standing stone.  As  learned  from  the  discussion  with  the  key  informant  they  have  no  knowledge of observable ruined structure. customary laws and traditional land right  will  enhance  socio  psychological  wellbeing  of  the  impacted  community.  Six  archaeological  areas  were  found  concentrated  on  far  mining  and  grazing areas with plain and slope land morphology and their finding pinpoint that in  the long past people were living on those basaltic rocks. interview.        4.2.6 Arch logical Survey Result  4.7 Conclusion  Recognition of cultural and religious values.     Loss of cultural identity and community social interaction due  to the project and new  likes created with outside community   will be fully compensated.6. focus group  discussion and key informants interview and written document.  Cultural  identity  and  community  social  interactions  can  be  accessed  and  closer  integration  with  rest  community  and  provision  of  communal  infrastructure  through  compensation  can  decreases  the  probable  impacts. standing stone tools or ceramic fragments in  project area.2.1 Plant and Mining Site     The survey result revealed that there are no observable artefacts. managed part of the spaces and  left  some  trace  of  archaeological  elements  on  the  surface.  Except  the  burial  of  four  fathers  there  is  no  archaeological  site  that  is  going  to  be  impacted  by  the  project.4.90 Similarly  the  team  also  spent  some  days  in  Ochi  Luncha  to  carry  out  archaeological  ground  survey.  In  order  the  likely  cultural  impacts  induced by the project paper based its analysis on observation. For the assumed new  barriers  access  created  to  the  cultural  sites  can  be  compensated  by  created  new  and  better  access  created  by  permanent  road  and  foot  bridges  can  be  an  added  value.4.2. features.4. Therefore the excavations in the quarry site have no direct impact on the  archaeological  materials. and fossils  in  the  plant  site.     4.  The  consultant  assessed  the  likely  cultural  risk  and  impoverishment  induced  by  the  project.

8   References     Alemeyahu  Diro.  Addis  Ababa  University:School  of  Graduate  Study.    .     4.2.4.  (2004)  Oromo  Development  Conception  and  Practice:  An  Ethnographic  study  of  the  Tulama  Oromo.        Photo 13 The archeologists finding pinpointing that in the long past people were living  on those basaltic rocks in area around the Ochi luncha. Berlin. Lambert. (1990) Oromo Religion: Myths and Rites of the Western Oromo of  Ethiopia _ An Attempt to Understand.  Dietrich Reimer Verlag.91      Photo 12 The Anthropologist asking the key informant about the area.    Bartels.

  Paper  contributed  to  Ethiopia  Studies:  Ethiopia  in  Broader  Perspective Vol. II.  Gemetchu.  The Free Press.92 Baxter. Asmarom.    Legesse. 479‐485. 129‐149. (ed.    Megersa.  (2001)  The  Oromo  and  the  Ethiopian  State  Ideology  in  a  Historical  Perspective. Paul. (1983). Gada: Three Approaches to the study of African Society. Paper  Contributed to National and Self Determination in the Horn of Africa. M. (1987).) by Lewis I.  PP. New York. Addis Ababa University                                                                        . The problem of Oromo or The Problem for The Oromo?. pp.

 local government authorities. We have laid good foundation  through the public consultation process and it will ultimately be a rewarding process in  the life of the project. a more in‐depth look at stakeholder group interests. which specifies: “People have the right to full consultation  and  to  the  expression  of  their  views  in  the  planning  and  implementation  of  environmental policies and projects that affect them directly.    The process is started by identifying the project stakeholders this identification was  made as per the local regulation of the FDRE which then is the flows stakeholder  analysis.  socio‐economic. We have seen the use of  building the relationship starting form this early stage. Jema International Consult capitalize on  this issue is also by understanding that as this point is the concern of the local  stakeholders and the also the International Finance corporation (IFC).  in  response  to  the  requirements of the EPA guidelines.     As Jema International Consulting firm as it is a consulting firm engaged locally to study  the Baseline environment with the Public consultation.5.1     Introduction     Ethio Cement gives attention to the public consultation process of the stakeholder  groups  who are” external” to the core operation of the business.  This process was very difficult to implement in the project area  but we manage it by taking time to build the relationship. The answers to  these questions will provide the basis from which to build our stakeholder engagement  strategy.2.     For this reason.5:   PUBLIC CONSULTATION  4.  in  addition  to  physical  and  biological impacts.93 4. and what influence they could have on our project.  we tried to help our clients  achieve better project outcomes and we underlined the value of high‐quality  engagement through the public consultation. and for public consultation to be integrated within EIA procedures.2.”     The Environmental Policy of Ethiopia (EPE) recognizes the need for an EIA to address  social.  political  and  cultural  impacts. such as affected  communities. we highly encouraged our client Ethio Cement to be proactive in  managing this issue.  The  Environmental  Assessment  Proclamation  and  related  procedures  also  place  emphasis  on  the  need  for  public  consultation.     In the context of Ethiopia the public consultation is also addressed in the Constitution  of FDRE in describing the importance of it in connection with development projects as  per article 92 of Chapter 10.  Therefore. how they will be affected  and to what degree. a detailed Public Consultation has been carried out  as an integral part of the EIA for the proposed Cement project of Ethio Cement. non‐governmental and other local  institutions and other interested or affected parties.      .

 industry  workers. To increase public awareness and understanding of the project and its  acceptance. youths.  with  special  focus on socio economic of the project area was obtained from the Fetice Zonal Office. Communities and people located in and around the project area.  As  the  result  valuable  information  was  obtained  on  policy  and  legislation.2. Sululta.  2.    Some  relevant  information/data  on  the  general  profile  of  the  targeted  woredas  . Woreda and Kebele levels.  4. and religious representatives of the project area. Mulo Woreda administrations and  other  responsible  offices  particularly  the  respective  to  Land  Use  Department  and  Environmental  Protection  Teams. Yaya Gulele. Government officials at Regional.2    The Objective of the Public consultation     1. To identify potential negative and positive impacts of the project as well as the  associated  appropriate  remedial  measures  that  could  be  identified  through  the  participation of the people.    The Public consultation meetings were undertaken by the team of experts comprising  of socio‐economist.  Yaya  Gulele.  Chancho  Buba.94 4.        .     Discussions were also held with.    The  Identified  stakeholders are the following:‐  1.  Yaya  Gulele  and  Mulo  Woreda. The project area and the 10 kilometer study  area is found in the oromiya regional state and fall with in  North and West Shoa Zones  in  three  woredas  namely  Sululta. To include the opinion of the community and the officials that will be affected by  the project so that their views and proposals are addressed in the formulation of  mitigation and benefit enhancement measures   3. women.the  their  working  relations  and  their  vision  of  project  implementation  process.5.  Each  respected  Kebeles  officials’  were  consulted  about the project.3       The Consultative Process and Participatory Discussions    The consultative process was conducted using the participatory or involvement of both    affected and interested community groups of the project area.   Similarly. structured discussion was  held  at  Mulo. Engineers and Geologists having relevant work  experience and qualifications in the field.2. environmentalists.  etc    rural  community  with  more  than  60  members of different social groups including elders.     The first unstructured consultation process was held on July 24/11/08 was carried out  with the Fitche Zonal Land Use and Investment Promoition Head Ato Fasil Alemayhu on  matters  concerning  about  the  socio  ‐  economic  and    their  working  relations  with  the  respective  woredas  in  general  and  targeted  project  sites  of  the      Ethio  Cement  Plant  potential  in  particular.  2. during our field work mission.5. peasants.

Population increase resulting in shortage  of agricultural and grazing land.5. The survey summarizes the problems of the community and most of the  problems examined here comprise a complex and inter‐acting constraints including:    All  agree  that.  water  is  a  scarce  commodity  in  the  area.  Ato Siraj Bekelli.K.A. PRASAD.4:  Public Consultation at Regional Level Officials    Minutes of Discussion     Region:               Oromia National Regional   State    Office:                 Environmental Protection Office     Meeting Place:  At Environmental Protection Office      Date:                   29/07/08  Time:                    Morning.  Eng.95 The purpose of these discussions were to find out the perceptions of the affected and  interested groups of the immediate adjacent rural settlement and the community as a  whole towards the Ethio ‐ Cement project potential development activity together with  the potential project environmental impacts (positive & negative) and prevailing socio‐ economic situation on the respective community. Assefa Bekele. the degree of   severity  of the ecology problem seems high. JEMA International Consulting Plc      4. Environmental Impact Assessment and Eco                                                     System Department      3. From the discussions it was evident  that the adjacent rural settlement are fairly aware about the importance of this on going  activities and the advantages that could emanate by implementing the project.   Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn. Hence. Technical Director.      4. Ethio Cement PLC     5. Project Co‐ coordinator. Ethio Cement PLC    .  the  natural  resource  on  which  the  population  of  the  project  area depends is threatened by degradation of vegetation.   Mr.  all  agreed  that. Oromia Regional State Environmental Protection Office         2. Head.    The  potential  project  area  upon  which  the  cement  plant  potential  is  proposed  to  intalled is  located very close (<1km) to the existing small‐ scale Abyssnia Cment Plant  which  is  being  found  is  under  continuous  and  extensively  contaminating  the  adjacent  areas  with  dust  emission  from  the  processing  plant  creating  some  strong  negative  impression amoung the adjacent communities. 10:45 AM ‐ 12:30PM    Present:           1.    Informal discussions were also held with those knowledgeable and multi ‐disciplinary  professionals in their respective responsibilities and their opinions were used as inputs  to the study.2.  According  to  the  community  opinions.   Ato Ahemed Hussien Head. General Manager.R.

 it was learnt that.  the  EIA  baseline  data  survey  should  include  a  public participation program which provides them with an opportunity to participate in  the  environmental  impact  (negative/positive)  assessment  process  and  therefore.                              . regulations and Environmental Pollution Control). the consultant is expected to  deploy a senior sociologist/ anthropologist. 2006". the initiation taken by the Ethio ‐ Cement Plc to  further undertake particularly the baseline study including the socio ‐ economic part of  the  EIA  study  needs  were  appreciated.According  to  the  participants. and the potential study was encouraged  to be prepared in line with the available Environmental Impact Assessment Guidelines  (Proclamation.  Further  more. the consultative process was conducted with the presence of one  of the main stakeholder representatives Ato Siraj Bekelli and Ahemed Hussien Heads of  Oromia Environmental Protection Office and Environmental Impact Assessment & Eco ‐  System  Department  respectively.    Finally  the  participants  agreed  that. May. during the EIA document appraisal.  the  valuable  information  was  obtained on the existing policy and legislation. The Office of Oromia  Environmental  Protection  volunteered  and  provided  us  the  copy  of  “Guideline  Series  Documents For Reviewing Environmental Impact Study ReportS.96 Agenda    ESIA Baseline Data Survey on the Ethio Cement Project     The summary of the discussion were as follows:‐     At the Regional level.  the  initiated  ESIA  Baseline data survey programme to be undertaken was highly valued.     Some  relevant  information  on  the  general  profile  of  the  earlier  submitted  EIA  report  and its status was reviewed.  the  socio‐  economic  impact  study  must  be  carried  out  at  an  equal  depth  with  that  of  physical impact assessments study and to implement this. the  baseline data and project impacts on the socio‐economic livelihoods of the community  has been totally overlooked and thus.

  Ato Tesfaye Olana.  Ato Gadissa Adane.  Ato Tadesse Balcha.  Ato Seuyfu GogaTeshome. Woreda Education Office      6.   Sululta Woreda Administration Minute of Discussion /English Version/    Minute of Discussion /English Version/  Woreda:              Sululta Woreda Administration   Meeting Place:  At Sululta Administration Office  Date:                     6/11/2000 (E.  Ato  Theodros Mersha. Head. Ethio Cement PLC      Agenda  1.5. Sululta Woreda       2. Public Relations Officer. WHO     3.  Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn.  Similarly  the  intention  of  the  project  and  how  it  plans  to  operate  was  explained  to  the  cabinet  members  and  they  were  asked  to  express  their  impression  regarding  the  positive  aspects  that  the  project  will  bring  to  the  area.    A. Project Co ‐ ordinator. Head. JEMA International Consulting Plc   13. Dep.deputy     9.  W/ro.97 4.  Head.2.  Ato Terefe Benti. Agricultural . Youth and Sport Affairs     4. Head. Sociologist.  the  undesired impacts that might be imposed by the project and possible mitigation actions  that should be taken to avoid the anticipated negative impacts.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2.5    Public Consultation at Woreda Level Officials    The following are the Minutes translated in English and the original is annexed with this  report. Lelissie Dembi. Vice Administrator and Capacity Building     11.  Ato Girma Nurgi.  Ato Girma Syoum. Finance and Economic Development      7.  Ato Addisu Damitewu. Head. Public and Information Officer      8.  Ato Adugna Adane. Public Organizer     10.     The discussion was started with pointing out the benefits of the project for the nation as  a  whole  and  specifically  to  the  target  area  generally  the  minute  of  the  meeting  is  summarized as follows:‐  . 11:45 AM ‐ 2:10PM    Present:           1.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3.C)  Time:                    Morning.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts      Sululta is the Woreda where the factory plant is planned to be established and most of  the  raw  material  is  found.  Ato Asiye  Mohammed.  Ethio Cement Plc    12. Finance and Economic Development     5.

    Degradation of natural resource affects the eco‐system including flora and fauna.    The  Company  should  be  committed  to  support  with  potable  water.etc).  the  Company  should  give  an  employment  priority  for  the  project affected members of local community.  .   Brings new technology and experience from abroad.      3.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory      Many  school  aged  boys  and  girls  would  drop  their  school  in  seeking  of  temporary job at the factory.     Expansion of HIV/ AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. actual area measurements.  etc  particularly  the  affected  community  group  being  found  in  both  mine  and  plant  potential areas.     Implement  the  physical  soil  conservation  practices  by  constructing  cut  ‐off  drains to divert the run off water.   Reduce the cost of cement and accelerates local construction activities. and jointly with the affected group.  traditions and lifestyles of the community.  Supporting  the  development  of  infrastructure  (access  road.  and  access  road  outlets  to  the  health.              Create job opportunity for skilled and unskilled personnel. etc. income tax.98   1.   Income generation for the government in form of royalty. Kebele.  water  &  electric  supply.    The problem of boundary/ fence.  schooling. and tax collection  for  the  compensated  land  must  shortly  resolved  in  consultation  with  the  Woreda.   As  much  as  possible.   Communities’ way of living and thinking will be improved.  Stabilizing the present shortage of cement market.    2.  marketing  points.    Planning  of  training  for  unskilled  community  members  will  highly  assist  to  acquire skills. school.   Usually  the  such  investors  immediately  secure  the  land    but  don't  start  the  implementation of the project for long time keeping the farming land idle.  rent. .   Lack of support from  the community.   Noise and dust pollutions from high trucks and factory causing health problem  of workers and settlements.   Brief  all  employees  to  ensure  awareness  and  sensitivity  to  the  local  culture.  electric  power.   Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     As  much  ass  possible  the  dust    emission  released  to  air  must  completely  be  eliminated using environmental friendly technology.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project     Increases productivity and help to diversify the commercial activities of the area.

   Mullo  Woreda Administration Minute of Discussion /English Version/    Woreda:              Mullo  Woreda Administration   Meeting Place:  Mullo Woreda Administration Office   Date:                   6/12/2000 (E.  W/ro.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2. Head. Technical Director of the project. Education Office      11.  Ato Bedhadha Gela.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3. JEMA International Consulting Plc   4.   Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn.   Ato  Theodros Mersha. Public Organizer     10.   Ato Dejene Berhane.C)  Time:                    Morning. Lelissie Dembi.  Ato Feyissa Debele.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impact  First. Sociologist. It is a quarry site  .   Ato Fekadu Girma.   Ato Chairenet  Teka . Ethio Cement PLC  2. Sululta Woreda was made by  Ato Tesfaye.  Ethio Cement Plc    3. in order to give an insight for the meeting participants a brief introduction of the  cement factory that is going to be established at Chancho. Vice Woreda Administrator Capacity Building        5. Youth and Sport Affairs        7. Public Organization Office       6. Woreda Agriculture Office      8.   Ato Getahun Kebede. Head. Head. Security and Administration         9.  Ato Girma Legesse. Head. 11:30 AM     Present:           1. Mullo Woreda is one of the areas that the  company identified as source of raw material for the cement factory.  Ato Adane Homa. Head.99           B. Project Co ‐ ordinator. OPDO Office     Agenda      1.

  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts    In  order  to  prevent  the  above  mentioned  problems  the  participants  suggested  that  though  the  establishment  of  the  factory  is  a  good  insight  to  strengthen  and  enhance  government’s  strategy  in  expanding  investment  it  has  to  be  in  harmony  with  the  existing local conditions.  Accordingly.  The  degradation  which  might  result  from  the  extraction of the raw material should also be taken into consideration while working in  the area.     3.100 for  the  extraction  of  clay  soil  which  makes  the  Woreda as  important as the plant site. The local people should also be given  the  chance  to  work  for  the  factory. it will encourage the  use  of  local  resources  and  will  create  job  opportunity  for  young  and  unemployed  members of the community.  the  positive  aspects  of  the  project  mentioned  include that it will solve the vast problem of cement in the country. the cabinet members said that in order to get  space for the raw material extraction farmers will be removed from their plots that is  demarcated  for  quarry  area  and  these  farmers  who  have  been  well  established  and  have  family  to  support  will  be  highly  affected  unless  they  are  well  compensated  and  given  an  opportunity  to  work  in  the  factory  in  their  capacity.  possible  negative  impacts  it  might  pose  if  any  and  possible  mitigation  efforts  to  deter  the  negative  impacts.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   Coming to the possible negative impacts.  After  the  introduction  the  major  agendas  for  discussion  regarding  the  impacts  of  the  project  were  forwarded  to  the  meeting  attendants  as:  what  impressions  they  have  about  the  positive  impacts  that  are  anticipated  from  the  project. The farmers that will be removed from the raw material site  should be given fair compensation and they should also be very well oriented on how to  pursue their future life with the money they get. In addition. The participants finally acknowledged the importance of the investment with  the mentioned precautions properly addressed and the meeting was concluded.  The  use  of the  place  for  clay production may also require clearing of forests and this will create serious problem  on the wild life that are found in the forest.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project     The  discussion  was  facilitated  by  the  Woreda  Administrator  and  points  regarding  the  positive and negative impacts and possible measures to overcome the challenges of the  project  were  identified.      2. The deforestation will also affect the climate  of the area.     1. electricity and others and attracts other investments which will contribute to  the  development  of  the  Woreda.     .  The  company  as a  stakeholder  will  participate  in  the  development endeavors of the area through the supply of construction materials. there will be infrastructure development such  as road.

 Public organization and social affairs head  3.Chairman  2. Finance and Economic Development head.        Agenda  1. Woman affairs head. Public Information vice head.  7. Ato Abiyot Gizachew. Ato Taye Bogale.  5. W/ro Mesert Abera .  Head.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3. Ato Gasahw Seyoum. Ato Habetamu Legesse. Ato Fikadu Abay.  8.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2. Woreda Health office head.  As  .101           C. Capacity Building vice head. Youth and Sport Affairs  4.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts      Yayagulele  Woreda  vice  administrator  was  contacted  on  06/11/2000  and  explained  about the project and the need of consulting the cabinet members about the project.  6.  Yaya Gullele Woreda Administration Minute of Discussion /English Version/    Woreda:             Yaya Gullele Woreda Administration   Meeting Place:  Yaya Gullele Woreda Administration Office   Date:                     9/11/2000 (E. Ato Hebtamu Assefa. 10:00 AM ‐ 11:30PM    Present:        1. Ato Niway Wendimu. Vice Administrator and Capacity Building.C)  Time:                    Morning.

 A good example is to participate in the Green  belt  development.     .  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory      The water may be polluted. that the project will bring to the area.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project          Create job opportunity for skilled and unskilled personnel.  Construction of road connecting the area with the main asphalt road.   To create job opportunities for the affected community.The cabinet  members held meeting on 9/11/2000 E.    2.   Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     Ethio  cement  should  involve  in  the  environmental  protection  activities  in  the  area which will solve the impact.      3.   The air pollution may bring some impact on the health of the community. The minute of the meeting is attached as annex and it  is summarized as follows:‐     1.   To show commitment for infrastructural development like potable water.102 it is shown in the photo below.The vice chairman promised to call meeting.C and expressed their impression regarding the  positive aspects.   The impact  on the eco‐system including flora and fauna.   The air may be polluted   The displacement of farmers may occur. the undesired impacts that might  be imposed by the project and possible mitigation actions that should be taken to avoid  the anticipated negative impacts.  A compensation will be paid for farmers which can change their life.   Stabilizing the present shortage of cement market. electric power.water  &  electric  supply etc).  to  eliminate  the  dust    emission  released  to  the  air  using  environmental friendly technology. and access road construction.    To pay to the affected community a compensation as per the regulation.  Supporting  the  development  of  infrastructure  (  health  center  .

103           4.5.  Ato Desalegn Negera. Chair person of OPDO                4. Ethio Cement PLC.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     A) Chancho 01 Administration Office   . Kebele Manager                5. Technical Director.  Ato Bizuneh Bekele. Assefa Bekele.  Eng. JEMA International Consulting Plc                7. M.     Agenda    1. JEMA International Consulting Plc                 6. W/ro. Education Cabinet                 3.   Ato Tamirat Abebe .  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2.  Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn. Chairman of Kebele 01                2.6     Public Consultation at Kebele Level Officials    Minute of Discussion /English Version/  Woreda: Sululta   Kebele:   Chancho 01 Adminstration Office   Meeting Place:  At 01 Kebele Office  Date:      13 August 2008 (7/12/2000 E.2. G.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3. Lelissie Dembi.   Ato Mengistu Tesfaye.C)  Time:      Afternoon 3:45 PM    Present:                    1. Sociologist.

   Land  conflicts  due  to  loss  of  agricultural  land  and  as  the  result  loss  of  income  driven  from the land.   Facilitates technology transfer from abroad. water & electric power supply. etc.   Water pollution due to silting and sedimentation can increase salinity of soil.  income  tax.   Large  number  of  workers  moving  into  the  area.104   1.   Communities’ way of living and thinking will be improved. education.)    Improves social infrastructure (health.   The intensity of road traffic will increase resulting in hazards.    Reduce the existing high cost of cement and as the result the poor social class can own  their shelter at cheap costs. potable water.  Similarly. etc).    Expansion of HIV/ AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases. communication.        .  the  Abyssinian  Cement  Factory  found  adjacent  to  the  potential  cement  plant)  could  be  the  cause  of  air  born  diseases  affecting  the  respiratory  infection  of  humans.   Supports the community development through improving basic infrastructure facilities  (access road.   Saving of foreign exchange.  the  dust  particulate  could  cover  and  stick  on  agricultural  farms  and  leaves  of  the  surrounding plants with diverse effect.    Conflicts  associated  with  the  loss  of  agricultural  land  and  as  the  result  loss  of  income  driven from  land.   Revenue/  income  generation  for  the  government  in  form  of  royalty.    2. etc.   Petty  traders  and  other  business  men  will  benefit  from  the  marketing  of  different  commodities.    Land use conflicts with native cultures.   Disturbance of river affects the eco‐system including flora and fauna.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project     The  identified  positive/  beneficial  impacts  of  the  potential  project  on  the  environment  are  as  follows:   Employment opportunity for jobless citizens.     Loss  soil  causes  siltation  for  down  streams  and  accelerates  erosion  and  reduces  the  natural stability of the area . traditions and lifestyles.   Air  pollution  generating  from  dust  producing  cement  plant  (Good  example.    Noise  pollution  from  high  noise  levels    causes  health  problem  of  workers  and  settlements related to hearing from plant machinery and equipment.  rent.   Traffic congestion and hazards especially from trucks and vehicles. leading  to a severe HIV/AIDS spread among the former communities.  and  then  the  movement  in  by  other  people attracted by the economic activities by possibility of work or trade.   Disturbance of livelihood as result of displacement resulting in loss of resource.   Possible Negative Impacts (Physical and Socio Economic)      Stripping  of  vegetation  cover  causes  to  create  of  pits  and  trenches  and  loss  of  soil  fertility and destruction of wild life habitats.   The uncontrollable influx  and settlement of many non indigenous populations.  VAt.

  electric  power.  residential  houses  marketing  places.  Thus.  churches.e.   Water pond features. which are ideal places for reproduction of malaria and other water  born diseases.  Ethio  Cement  factory  along  with  the  representatives  of  the  affected  group  will  play  a  great  role  in  implementing the proper resettlement programme. Planning of training for unskilled  community members will highly assist to acquire skills.   Required  strengthening  of  the  existing  health  care  system  particularly  the  HIV/AIDS  awareness and prevention programme right from the project construction  start up.  the  Company  should  give  an  employment  priority/  opportunity   for the project affected members of local community.  access  road  outlets  to  the  health.  provide them  with  potable  water  . They should  have a voice in finding in appropriate mitigation measures. should be avoided by dewatering and refilling means.  to  cause  an  enabling  condition  in  establishing  mini  trade/  business before they spend unwisely elsewhere.   Enforce  the  implementation  of  training  of  drivers.   Implement  the  physical  soil  conservation  practices  by  constructing  cut  ‐off  drains  to  divert the run off water.    The dust emission especially from manufacturing plant and vehicular movement can be  realized  into  the  surrounding  atmosphere. The cement plant potential is much advised to be located close to the cement raw  material base.  The  formation of advisory committee  composed  of  members  from  woreda  &  kebele  administrators.  dedusting  mechanisms  for  plant  fan  and  dust  suppression  using  water  sprayer  for  disturbed  by  trucks.    The  potential  cement  plant  site  location  must  be  selected  within  the  standard  safety  zone  particularly  from  schools.   Brief  all employees to  ensure  awareness and sensitivity to the local culture.     Assist in advising the affected and those compensated population how to use the money  compensated  in resettlement programme together with how to better be organized in  groups  or  cooperatives.   All  local  communities  are  briefed  on  the  potential  hazards  and  necessary  safety  precautions.    Provide  reasonable  compensation  for  the  affected  group/  landowners      for  lost  both  agricultural and grazing lands by licensee.  etc.  marketing points.   As  much  as  possible.  schooling.    Selection  of  an  appropriate design and technology has been proposed to be considered.105 3.  speed  limits  and  proper  periodical inspections.   The native leaders/ elders should be aware of the quarry and plant operation activities  and they can assist in identifying impacts that may be particular to them.   Possible Solutions to the Potential Negative Impacts          Proposed preventing/ remedial measures to avoid the negative         environmental impacts include:   As much ass possible the dust  emission released to air must completely be eliminated  using environmental friendly technology.    The  Company  project  should  be  committed  to  support  particularly  the  affected  community group being found in both mine and plant potential areas i. etc.          .  clinic.  road  signs. traditions  and lifestyles of the community.   Educate all levels of government and affected/ interested community about the cement  raw materials mining and cement manufacturing sector activities.

  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   .   Head.  Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn.  Ato Hailu Demissie. Chairman. Boro Tiro Dorroba Kebele                      Peasant Association (PA)      2. Ethio Cement PLC. Vice Chairman. Project coordinator. JEMA International Consulting Plc      7. Boro Tiro Dorroba Kebele PA      3. Boro Tiro Dorroba Kebele PA      4. Security and Public Organizer     5. G.106              B) Boro Tiro Dorroba Administration Minute of Discussion /English Version/  Woreda:              Mullo   Kebele:                Boro Tiro Dorroba Administration Office   Meeting Place:  At Kebele Office  Date:                   13 August 2008 (7/12/200 E.   Ato Asrat Mekonen Head.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2.    Agenda    1.  Other Participants ‐ 180 ( Including men. Assefa Bekele. JEMA International Consulting Plc     8.  Ato Getachew Kebede. M. Public Relation.   Ato Getahun. Mullo Woreda Sport & Youth Affairs        6.C)  Time:                    Morning.    9.  Eng.   Ato Mekonen Dhaba. Sociologist. 10:30 AM    Present:           1. Lelissie Dembi. women and  youth )  Keble's relation to the potential cement project:  Interested (Less affected) targeted group. W/ro.

 an area which is targeted as source of clay material in Mullo Woreda.      The cabinet members reflected that the project is highly beneficial to the community in  a  way  that  it  will  create  job  opportunity  to  the  community  members  and  it  will  contribute to the growth of the locality as a result of improved infrastructure.     One of the negative impacts is that farmers will be displaced from the site that is needed  for  raw  material  production  and  unless  they  are  well  compensated  for  what  is  taken  from  them  to  lead  their  life  and  support  their  families  it  will  create  burden  on  the  community.  In  order  to  solve  this  problem  they  suggested  that  the  farmers  should  be  fairly  compensated  and  they  should  be  given  education  on  how  to  use  the  money  the  received  properly  and  support  their  families.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts       In  order  to  involve  the  community  and  lower  level  administration  in  areas  where  the  project  has  direct  impact  discussion  was  held  with  the  cabinets  of  Boro  Tiro  Doroba  Kebele.             . its possible negative implications and measures that need to  be taken to prevent the negative impacts.  They  should  also  be  given  a  chance  to  work for the factory. The major  issues  of  discussion  were  similar  to  the  others  which  are  the  positive  contributions  expected from the project.  The company is believed to support development activities that are being undertaken in  the area and also helps to attract other investments.107 3. flow of  money  and  introduction  of  new  ways  of  income  generation  through  small  businesses.

  possible  negative  impositions  and  suggested solutions to prevent the negative impacts.       .  all  the  Kebele  and  Woreda  officials  that  were  involved  in  the  meetings  were  positive  about  the  establishment  of  the  factory  in  their  locality  and  they  are  willing to support in their capacity as demanded provided that the factory management  is willing to consider and address the possible negative impacts of the project ahead of  time.     In  conclusion.  The  increase  in  the  income  of  the  area  through  money  gained  from  taxes  is  also  mentioned as an advantage.C)  Time:                  Morning.      With regard to the benefits of the project the cabinet members in both kebeles said that  it  opens  employment  opportunity  to  the  unemployed.  They  also  mentioned that it is important to ensure workers’ safety at the work place and provide  them with fair salary and benefits that will help lead descent life.  expands  diversified  local  business by creating market outlet and also contributes to the development of the area.  The  farmers  that  are  going  to  be  relocated  should  get  proper  payment  and  orientation  regarding  how  to  use  the  money  and  also  they  should  be  given  priority  during  the  employment  process  so  that  the  security  of  their  families  can  be  protected. The smock and dust  that will be released from the factory will pollute the environment and also affect plants  and  animals.  In  addition  there  are  farmers  who  are  displaced  from  their  plots  for  the  establishment  of  the  plant  and  if  these  farmers  are  not  given  the  right  compensation  and orientation on the proper use of the money the well being of their families will be at  risk.     The negative aspect of the project is that the plant is close to the town and residence of  the people and it might expose the community to health hazards. 11:45 AM ‐ 2:10PM      Similar discussion was held with Cabinets of Chancho 01 and Chancho Buba Kebeles on  positive  impacts  anticipated  form  the  project.     To  mitigate  these  possible  problems  the  factory  management  should  think  of  absorption  mechanism  for  the  smock  and  dust  instead  of  releasing  it  to  the  air. It will also have an impact on the road and bridges due to overload unless properly  used.108 C)  Chancho Buba Kebele Minute of Discussion     Woreda:              Sululta   Kebele:                Chancho Buba Kebele Adminstration Office   Meeting Place:  At Kebele Office  Date:                   4th September 2008 (29/12/200 E.

 General Manager.C)  Time:                    Morning. Ethio Cement PLC     5.  W/ro. Sociologist.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2.   Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn.  Ato Ketema Adugna. JEMA International Consulting Plc     7. Chancho Buba  Administration      3.   Ato Ashenafi  Beshadha . 2. Lelissie Dembi. Administrator and Capacity Building.7   COMMUNITY MEETINGS    A)  Minute of Discussion with the Chancho Buba community   Woreda:              Sululta   Kebele:                Chancho Buba Kebele Adminstration Office   Meeting Place:  At Chancho Buba Kebele Cabinet Office  Date:                   7/12/200 (E. Assefa Bekele.Other Participants 69 (Men. women and youth)name attched as annex         Agenda    1.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     .. Project Co ‐ ordinator.  Eng. Public Relation.   Ato Addis Metaferia. Kebele Manager      4.109           4. 11:00 AM ‐ 2:00PM    Present:       1. JEMA International Consulting Plc      6.5. Chancho Woreda      2.

 The  intention  of  the  project  and  how  it  plans  to  operate  was  explained  to  the  community  members  and  they  were  asked  to  express  their  impression  regarding  the  positive  aspects  that  the  project  will  bring  to  the  area.  the  undesired  impacts  that  might  be  imposed by the project and possible mitigation actions that should be taken to avoid the  anticipated negative impacts.110   Chanacho Buba is the Kebele where the factory plant is planned to be established.                            .     The  community  after  hearing  this  day  clarification  about  the  project  they  want  to  postponed the meeting to another day because they have an issue to discuss in the in  the presence of the woreda cabinet and therefore a meeting was scheduled to conduct  on  September  4/2008  and  they  select  four  members  of  the  community  to  attend  the  meeting with the other fifteen members who were displaced from the area.

 Chancho           Woreda      2.  Similarly. Ethio Cement PLC     9. Chancho Woreda Administration      3.  Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project   2. Ethio Cement PLC     6.   Ato Tesfaye Gezahegn.A.   Mr. Chancho Buba Kebele Administration      5. JEMA International Consulting Plc     11. communication. General Manager.  Ato Tesfaye Olana.    Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory      Air  pollution  generating  from  dust  producing  cement  plant  (Good  example.       Expected Positive Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project     The expected positive impacts of the Ethio Cement Project were summarized as follows:   Employment opportunity for jobless citizens. PRASAD. Public Relation.   Ato Endale Yirga. etc.    Reduce the existing high cost of cement and as the result the poor social class can own  their shelter at cheap costs. Chancho Woreda Administration     4    Ato Bekele Ketema Mekonen. JEMA International Consulting Plc      10.   Petty  traders  and  other  business  men  will  benefit  from  the  marketing  of  different  commodities.   Ato Addis Damtew.         Agenda  1. Vice Administrator and Capacity Building.  Ethio Cement PLC     7.  Other Participants 20 (Men 19 and woman 1)  name attched as annex.   Supports the community development through improving basic infrastructure facilities  (access road.  Mr. Technical Director. Lelissie Dembi.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     1.   Communities’ way of living and thinking will be improved.   Ato Teshome.   Income generation for the government in form of royalty. Ethio Cement PLC     8.R.    2.  rent.)    Improves social infrastructure (health. 11:00 AM ‐ 2:00PM    Present:           1. W/ro. water & electric power supply.  the  . Assefa Bekele. potable water.  Eng. income tax.   Facilitates technology transfer and experience of the developed countries. education. etc.  Possible Negative Impacts of the Ethio Cement Project Factory   3.   Savings  of foreign exchange for the country. Finance Manager. General Manager.111 B)  Minute of Discussion with the affected group and community representatives    Woreda:              Sululta   Kebele:                Chancho Buba Kebele Adminstration Office   Meeting Place:  At Chancho Buba Kebele Cabinet Office  Date:                   7/12/200 (E.  the  Abyssinian  Cement  Factory  found  adjacent  to  the  potential  cement  plant)  could  be  the  cause  of  air  born  diseases  affecting  the  respiratory  infection  of  humans. Sociologist. Y.RAO. etc). Project Co‐ coordinator.H.C)  Time:                    Morning.K.

  Large  number  of  workers  moving  into  the  area.  lack  of  communication information from Woreda Administration ".  Noise  pollution  from  high  noise  levels  causes  health  problem  of  workers  and  settlements related to hearing from plant machinery and equipment. leading  to a severe HIV/AIDS spread among the former communities.  Land  conflicts  due  to  loss  of  agricultural  land  and  as  the  result  loss  of  income  driven  from the land.                           3.  Traffic congestion and hazards especially from trucks and vehicles.  Problems  related  with  loss  of  access  to  the  grassing  land  and  adjoining  areas  for  foot  path as well as for cattle grazing.    .  Non indigenous are taking most of the jobs and dominate most of the business  One of the major concerns  of project affected persons is the inability of indigenous to  raise money to start business  Some  project affected persons complained of lack of electric power and potable water  within their communities.  Unhappiness with the measurements and inadequate payments made for compensation  of land by the company.  The uncontrollable influx  and settlement of many non indigenous populations. the survey must be done again to settle the dispute between  the ex ‐ land owners and the Company.  and  then  the  movement  in  by  other  people attracted by the economic activities by possibility of work or trade.112 dust  particulate  could  cover  and  stick  on  agricultural  farms  and  leaves  of  the  surrounding plants with diverse effect.  The  compensation  already  made  for  the  land  was  probably  still  much  below  the  replacement  cost  thus. the culture and values of their people would be  lost.  Disturbance of livelihood as result of displacement resulting in loss of resource.   Expansion of HIV/ AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases.  the  annual  land  rent/  tax  is  still  being  paid  by  us  because  of  may  be.    Non indigenous are taking of the jobs and businesses.    Most complained that " Our land has long been tranferred to the Ethio Cement Company  however.    Companies  make  a  number  of  promises  (for  example  such  as  the  existing  Abyssinian  Cement factory situated adjacent to the potential Ethio Cement plant at  < 2km) but have  not been realized.  Possible Solutions/ Remedial Measures to the Potential Negative Impacts     .   Conflicts  associated  with  the  loss  of  agricultural  land  and  as  the  result  loss  of  income  driven from  land.   .Assist to secure other farming lands in replacement for those people who lost their  farming lands along with restoring livelihoods and other benefits.  Traffic congestion and hazards especially from big trucks and vehicles. traditions and lifestyles.  it  was  requested  that  the    compensation  conditions  of  the  company rates should be adjusted upwards by at least small margin.  A few people fright that sooner or later.   Land use conflicts with native cultures.     Loss  soil  causes  siltation  for  down  streams  and  accelerates  erosion  and  reduces  the  natural stability of the area .In order to solve the problem claimed on discrepancy  measurements already made  on the land ‐ boundary.

  traditions and lifestyles of the community.  Required strengthening of the existing health care system particularly the HIV/AIDS  awareness and prevention programme right from the project construction  start up.    Even  though  the  community  raise  the  issue  Ethio  Cement  committed  to  fulfill  the  promises already made to the affected community group example potable water and  electric power supply which are being found under the implementation.   In  order  to  supplement  the  provision  of  employment  opportunity  especially  for  unskilled  persons.  The company could assist the project affected group in establishing the investments  strategy  that  leads  to  sustainable  benefits  before  they  exhaustively  finish  their  money which was paid for compensation.   Establish  a  community  investment  strategy  which  better  help  affected  and  interested    community  groups  and  propose  ideas  that  could    lead  to  sustainable  benefits as employment.113       According  to  series  of  discussion  made  with  target  group.  As  much  as  possible.  the  Company  should  give  an  employment  priority  for  the  project affected members of local community.  the  company  is  expected  to  offer  a  proper  programme  of  skills  training to deepen local employment opportunities arising from the project.           .    the  resettlements  plan  should  be  viewed  as  part  of  project  implementation  programme    to  restore  /  improve their livelihoods.   Brief  all  employees  to  ensure  awareness  and  sensitivity  to  the  local  culture.

  The company is believed to support development activities that are being undertaken in  the area and also helps to attract other investments.     One of the negative impacts is that farmers will be displaced from the site that is needed  for  raw  material  production  and  unless  they  are  well  compensated  for  what  is  taken  . 11:00 AM ‐ 2:00PM      C)  Boro Tiro Deroba Minute of Discussion    In  order  to  involve  the  community  and  lower  level  administration  in  areas  where  the  project  has  direct  impact  discussion  was  held  with  the  cabinets  of  Boro  Tiro  Doroba  Kebele.C)  Time:                    Morning. The major  issues  of  discussion  were  similar  to  the  others  which  are  the  positive  contributions  expected from the project. an area which is targeted as source of clay material in Mullo Woreda.      The cabinet members reflected that the project is highly beneficial to the community in  a  way  that  it  will  create  job  opportunity  to  the  community  members  and  it  will  contribute to the growth of the locality as a result of improved infrastructure.114   Woreda:              Sululta   Kebele:                Chancho Buba Kebele Administration Office   Meeting Place:  At Chancho Buba Kebele Cabinet Office  Date:                   7/12/200 (E. its possible negative implications and measures that need to  be taken to prevent the negative impacts. flow of  money  and  introduction  of  new  ways  of  income  generation  through  small  businesses.

  They  should  also  be  given  a  chance  to  work for the factory.115 from  them  to  lead  their  life  and  support  their  families  it  will  create  burden  on  the  community.                                                     .  In  order  to  solve  this  problem  they  suggested  that  the  farmers  should  be  fairly  compensated  and  they  should  be  given  education  on  how  to  use  the  money  the  received  properly  and  support  their  families.

116 Table 1   Total consulted groups       Sn     Consultation  Meeting  Woreda  Consultation    Kebele  Consultation      Community  Consultation  Name    Sululta Woreda  Mulo Woreda  Yaya Gulele Woreda  Sub­Total  Chancho 01  Boro Tiro Deroba  Chancho Buba  Sub­Total  Chancho Buba / round  one/  Chancho Buba / round  two/  Boro Tiro Deroba  Sub­Total    Number of  Participants  10  8  3  21  4  8  5  19  74  25  175  274  1197  Place of  Consultation  Chancho  Mulo  Fital    Chancho town  Boro  Chancho Buba    Chancho Buba  Chancho Buba  Boro    At their  specific home    Consultation  Date                            I  II      III    IV    House hold   level  Consultation      Grand Total  1511                                        .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.