Oct 2011 | issue #07

inverse

D's NOTE E
Hello there. We’re back again, after our disappearing act this August. During the time you were scouring the NTU newsstands in our absence for something good enough to fill your insatiable need to read, we have been busily recruiting young underlings to churn out even more awesome and thoughtprovoking articles, solely to increase your viewing pleasure. We’ve brought back some of the old favourites too, like the Fashion section’s ‘Spotted’ in NTU, and Aunt Agony is back to take your inane questions. I’m sure this issue will allow you to realise just how much you have really missed us, but don’t worry, we’re back for good. Happy reading. Love, Geraldine

inverse
CHIEF EDITOR GERALDINE CHENG SUB EDITOR LEAH JOLENE TAN LAYOUT DIRECTOR ADELINE KOSIM

FEATURES EDITOR FABIAN TAN MUSIC EDITOR RACHEL LIM FASHION EDITOR SERI R.S MOVIES EDITOR SEAN LAI FOOD/TRAVEL EDITOR WINIFRED SETO

LAYOUT SHIENNY TAILAN PETRUS CAESARIO SHANNEN MADELINE CHEN MELLISA TANIASURI

Contents
Food &Travel
Lunch+Dinner under $4.50 in NTU Popsicle reviews P2 P12

Features Fashion Music

Stereotypes: How to deal, what to do, where to look

P4-5

Fashion tips; what’s hot and what’s not in NTU

P6-7

Move along, MTV Music Awards, here’s our own

P8-9

WRITERS NILAH JUMAT MELVYN LEE HUGO MORGAN BART KENNETH WEE EMMANUEL GOH BRENDA TAN CHUA JIAYI RONNIE YEO ONG SHER LI MARGUERITA KWEK TRACY MARIE LEE JUSTIN IAN CHIA WONG JIARU VICTORIA CHANG JACQUELINE TAN NAFEESA SAINI NICILETTE-CLAIRE ONG WENDY LEE DAVID LAM AMIRA ZUR

Movies

How to make your own film

P10-11

COVER PHOTO SONG MENGLU

Aunt’s Agony

Short, simple advice to your everyday problems – better than any of that crap you find in Teenage magazine

P12

ED’S NOTE PHOTO LOO HUI PING

GET IN TOUCH BLACK.HOLE.PRESS@GMAIL.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/NTU.INVERSE

October 2011 | issue #07

Food/Travel
Editor’s Note W
The Cheap Challenge: What Challenge?
? Jacqueline

Stall A) Lunch: Canteen B Yong Tau Foo

ith the opening of H&M and Singapore International Film Festival, it’s inevitable that our finances are stretched a little too thin this month and probably also the next. So this issue, a challenge was posed to three of our writers- to have two meals in school totalling below $4.50. So read on to learn our pennypinching ways and still be able to afford a run of the mill H&M dress and up your cultural capital at the same time. We’ve also included a Popsicle special that will hopefully spell the demise of the fro-yo wave and the sickeningly humid weather. Winifred

usually picks a bowlful of vegetables and tofu, with bee hoon and plain broth – and ends up paying a negligible $1.90 for a full, healthy lunch. Stall B) Dinner: Canteen B Nasi Padang

The Cheap Challenge: Possible Plus Change to Spare
? David

M

This stall is a lifesaver for struggling students who wish for a healthy and wholesome solution to their starving wallets. With a variety of ingredients to choose from – a non-fried piece starting at just $0.30 – it is no wonder a gigantic snake of a queue forms at this stall every lunch-break. Pick a few choice vegetables (I recommend the bundle of cai xin), a few meats (perhaps the everyday sausage, luncheon meat or fatty pork) and maybe even some tofu, an egg, wanton, tau pok – and you are good to go! Next, choose your preferred noodles or rice: bee hoon, kway teow or yellow noodles. Lastly, choose your form of broth. The plain broth is absolutely free, but if you fancy spicing it up – the pork rib (bak kut teh), tom yam and laksa broths are just an additional $0.50 each. On a particularly chilly day, I decided to go with the thick, oily goodness of a laksa broth, with cai xin, a sausage, a carrot, 2 slices of tau pok and a prawn wanton – all for just $2.50. My fellow thrifty friend

ondays are always plagued with retrospective vibes. You get up early in the morning, and the accumulated fatigue over the past weekend, of late parties and/ or term papers (likely the former for the majority), tears at your loins like a frenzied beast. Of course, you make it to school, as you do every Monday, with a resolution to prevent all following Mondays from experiencing the same nausea and hangovers. Not to mention the guilt of over-expenditure. You finish 5 straight hours of lectures (or at least the hand behind this pen did), and simply desire some semblance of normalcy from a crazy weekend – something non-extravagant, conventional and most importantly, cheap. Good taste would be a plus. Enter Food Connection’s Steamed Chicken Rice, a $2.20 serving of Spartan goodness. The chicken was austere and nothing to rave about. It was not too oily or dry and slightly bland, but it well suited my Monday disposition. The rice on the other hand was a fragrant affair, unlike the clumpy sort we’re accustomed to in local coffee-shops. Canteen 2’s waff les for dinner, on the other hand, made a delightful experience. The first thing that caught my attention was the absence of the synthetic pandan taste, synonymous with usual waff les and pandan cakes. This waff le actually delivered. Freshly made on the spot, the kaya waff le had just the right amount of crispiness to it. I’m quite a stickler as to how my kaya is spread over my waff les, so the fact that the spread was evenly done was a huge plus. On the overall, the waff le had neither any overpowering sensations nor blandness, and I bet my bottom dollar that the students in Hall 2 are glad that they stay right beside these. Plain waff les go at a dollar each and f lavoured ones go at $1.50.

They say “breakfast like a king and dinner like a pauper.” This saying does not ring true in the NTU context, where a full dinner is available at less than $2. The Nasi Padang stall offers a dazzling array of ingredients to choose from – from traditional Indonesian foods like rendang to the sumptuous everyday fried chicken. They have a wide selection of staples too – rice, noodles; even readymade meals like mee goreng, mee rebus, mee soto. If you are one who likes heavy foods but lacks the luxury of money, this stall should appeal to you. I picked fried spiced bee hoon with acar, sambal tofu and long beans. This meal only cost me $1.80. Verdict: In total, my 2 meals were a mere $4.30. Economical!

The Cheap Challenge: Near Impossible

I

? Nafeesa

t’s not yet the middle of semester, but we poor students are already drowning in our readings and reports. I am, personally, f loundering in thousands of lines of unintelligible Middle English poetry. To relieve our aff liction, we can repress our worries with alcohol, smoky smelly clubs or… food. Dreaded long days in school with equally long breaks can only bring about the munchies. Have a ton of spare change ready for your new best friend: the vending machine for snacks. For the sake of this article, however, I am required to shove the Oreos and chips aside for two big meals instead. Canteen B is nearest to my favourite spot for slaving away to schoolwork. With a budget of only $4.50 for two meals, I sniffed around for the best (and cheapest) deals. For lunch, I picked the Indian stall’s white rice with beef in thick spicy curry, as well as potato masala and beansprouts as the obligatory veggie side

dish. The beef was exceedingly tender, but the potato masala was a guilty carb addition to the heap of rice already piled on my plate. The dish was a total of $2.50. At 7 pm, I could hardly imagine what to have for dinner. With the constraint of the $2 budget that remained, I sadly turned away from the Western stall’s spaghetti and resignedly queued at the Malay food stall. I confess – I failed to keep to the budget. My simple (and delicious) meal of fried maggi, fried chicken and hotdogs in sambal totaled $2.30. I was sadly $0.30 over the budget. My daily bubble tea was even cruelly sacrificed for this article. Verdict: The challenge was interesting but a girl like me needs her fussy drinks and little snacks. You don’t need much convincing - it’s near impossible to have two full meals with a budget of $4.50.

Verdict: Keeping my budget under $4.50 is actually possible. Eating cheap and good is no better end to the day and start to the week.

October 2011 | issue #07

atures Fe
A
Ed’s Note
re blondes really dumb? I wouldn’t know. I have yet to meet enough authentic blondes to be able to prove or rebuke that. But one thing’s for sure - many people think so, and we’ve read, watched or heard enough “dumb blonde” jokes to compile an anthology. Having spent a total of 16 months in my freshman and sophomore years with a head full of blonde hair, I should know the stereotype of blondes – at least of bleached blonde Asians – in Singapore. Let’s see. The things I’ve heard people label me, based purely on the fair hair I had sported, include “Ah Beng”, “attention seeking” and “confident”, amongst many others. How true these comments are, I will leave my friends to judge. But my point here is that every other aspect of my person – values, achievements, personality – was completely disregarded. I had become my hair, and my hair alone. That’s where my biggest gripe with stereotypes lies. Stereotypes are essentially a predictive generalization or popular belief about specific social groups or types of individuals. But while stereotypes are usually founded in truth, they do not necessarily reflect actual similarities among people grouped within the same category. Are all Singaporeans kiasu? Perhaps most are, but definitely not all. Are all homosexuals immoral, all Christians anti-gay? Hardly the truth, really. There are churches in Singapore that embrace non-heterosexual people, while religious, and even devout homosexuals, are not uncommon. Stereotypes become a problem when they prevent us from seeing the differences between people – they reduce diverse and unique individualities into a generic trait, whether it is positive or derogatory, accurate or otherwise. Earlier this month I found myself seated behind a row of well-dressed, made-up girls in lecture. Despite the rapt attention I paid my Professor, I could not help but overhear the conversation under my nose. The girls spotted a rather voluptuous girl some rows ahead and in three sentences, deduced that she has never had a romantic partner in her life. Absurd, isn’t it? So bigger-sized people don’t have the right to love now? In the microcosm that is NTU, we encounter, interact and even perpetuate stereotypes on a daily basis. While most stereotypical comments said in passing for shits and giggles remain harmless and non-offensive, we should also understand that the truly ugly head of stereotypes can easily be reared when prejudice develops and consequently lead to more severe problems. To be a part of society, the navigation of stereotypes is necessary, and to this end, a better understanding of the latter may help. This month, our team shares our humble opinions on stereotypes and topics related, ranging from the veracity of stereotypes to the overtly-exaggerated models we have all come across in school (an article I hope makes you laugh). I hope you enjoy reading us! Warmest, F
? Kenneth

i paiNT U
mistaking flip-flops and a shirt proclaiming “Finisher of 42.195 km” as fashion statements when my classmate from Engineering sashayed into class. It is suffice to say that he made all of us look like vagrants. Similarly, some of my Chinese friends are among the most courteous and friendly people I know. My good friend from Business, though undeniably intelligent, is also extremely personable. There is none of that cutthroat and aloof demeanour that some people have come to associate with Business students. My point is this - stereotypes are as stifling as Singapore’s political climate. They give a biased and unjust representation of a population, a community and by relation, an individual. Human personality is too diverse and dynamic to be nicely shelved into a pigeonhole. The fact is, all of us have a little of the Engineering student, a smattering of the Arts student, a modicum of the Science student etc. in us. Together, you form a unique individual. So, rather than paint an all-encompassing caricature of everyone in NTU (which might in turn, lead to a few angry riots outside my hall), I find it more worthwhile to battle another prevalent stereotype - Singaporean males are short, chauvinistic and ungentlemanly. For starters, if I may unabashedly say so, I do not fit the above cliché, thank you very much.

Undeterred by a mere five weeks into my first semester in NTU, I boldly present a caricature of NTU students

I

am a Humanities and Social Sciences student. I have limp hair that is slightly reminiscent of a wet mop, enough acne scars to shame Mark Lee into oblivion, and am guilty of wearing mismatched clothes on more than one occasion. Also, I am painfully shy. There. I have broken almost every unspoken rule that HSS students have to abide by. Disappointed as I am that I will never get immortalized by N.T.U.Style, I also recognize, however, that these stereotypes – that HSS males are metrosexual, fashion-forward and expressively outspoken – are mere labels. Just like how NTU engineering students are woefully sloppy dressers, or how PRC students are loud and brash, or how NBS students are the brightest bunch in the school. (The current economic crisis can be succinctly summarized as being precipitated by a few stupid business minds.) You get my drift. Truth is, stereotypes are often constructed because humans have an obsessive need for neat categorization. We love the simplicity of seeing everything as either black or white but in doing so, we are committing a grave injustice to the individuality of human personality. Often, these stereotypes are perpetuated by a few individuals. They fit their respective labels to a T but are hardly an accurate representation of the population at large. The other day in French class, I was quietly contemplating the phenomenon of males

? Brenda

Stereotypes. A stereotype is a stereotype is a stereotype. Not.

I

t is an undeniable fact that stereotypes are a prevalent part of life and society. To prove this point, even the word “stereotype” is stereotypical; often perceived to be tagged with a negative connotation. This, however, is inaccurate because a stereotype can be also positive, as it can be negative. For both the purpose of this article and clarity’s sake, let us focus on a specific context we are familiar with – the stereotypes of students from the various faculties based on their dress sense and sartorial choices. With a sweeping glance at the outfits of the student demography, it is often too easy to mentally categorize students based on their style (or lack of ). For example, if you see a student in an over-worn tee and a pair of bermudas with slippers, which faculty will you automatically associate him with? How about a formal shirt-and-pants attire held together with a tie and completed with leather shoes? What do you make of a bunch of girls clothed in an array of bright garments with stilettoes, wedges and studded boots? Pre-conceived notions of the various faculties tells us that on one end of the spectrum, the humanities, art and social sciences students have a more f lamboyant style – opting for a fashionable and sometimes too-dressy look. On the other end, we associate science and engineering students with a simpler style, who prefer a practical, and sometimes overly-practical look. But let us push this paradigm a step further and look at it through different eyes. Why do we have stereotypes of how students in different faculties dress? Do we make it up, or are we inf luenced by a small group of students in the respective faculties who indeed dress as our stereotypes indicate, but whom cannot be said to be a representative of their entire faculty? Or are these stereotypes
October 2011 | issue #07

largely true? Does the nature of their discipline inf luence the way they dress? For all the right reasons, it can be assumed that it is necessary for business students to dress formally, for presentations or simply because of a culture (or requirement) to look presentable. After all, these are the people whom upon graduation will enter an industry that expects its professionals to be dressed formally for work. Engineering and Science students, however, have to sometimes spend prolonged periods of time in laboratories, making it perfectly sensible for them to dress simply and comfortably underneath their lab coats. Further, as most arts courses emphasize creativity and the ability to express ideas, it is naturally ref lected in the dressing style of such students, justifying the trendy clothes and vibrant colours. In its defence, stereotypes are not all just derogatory and negative. Should one take the time to delve into its depths, many stereotypes in fact entail positive aspects and can be logically explained. In the words of Aristotle, “[it] is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it”. In this day and age when we are exposed to and bombarded by so many established typecasts, it is only too easy and convenient to succumb to and embrace them. However, despite the multitude of stereotypes strewn in our faces, let us not be overwhelmed by this onslaught. Let us not blindly subscribe to such generalizations but i nstead adopt an objective mindset to view people, and to genuinely understand

Caricature
? Emmanuel

Pure humour, or an important tool for social integration and addressing social problems?

P

icture this: Young Asian girl, old Caucasian man, in varying forms of PDA (or Public Display of Affection). SNAP! You’ve got a Sarong Party Girl (or SPG) and her yellow-fevered partner. Very often, these stereotypes turn into caricatures, just like SPG “icon” Babarella (insert surname of current “ang moh boyfriend”), from the Channel 5 satirirical series, The Noose. We recognise traits such as her fake American-accented English, her penchant for Caucasian men or her love for branded goods. As it is, satires rely on our knowledge of these stereotypical traits for them to be understood and appreciated. Besides the SPG, other caricatures on the Noose include Leticia (the Filipino maid), Lulu (the Mainland Chinese hostess) and Mrs Nancy Goh (the kiasu Singaporean Aunty). Caricatures in satires are often a function of social critique; they allow people to perceive other people through humour and comedy. The mechanism of humour enables the removal of a serious socio-political context, while bringing awareness to social issues such as maid abuse or competition from foreign workers. In one episode, Leticia speaks about her friend, Imelda, who is also a maid. In the interview, Leticia describes the hellish and exaggerated working conditions that Imelda experiences, from which she is saved by a “very good” company, called the

SPCA (Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals). While we may break out in laughter and for days watch the video on loop, the hyperbolic depiction of an abused maid and her tyrant of an employer highlights a specific social problem – the need for more foreign workers’ rights one that otherwise might become mere tabloid fodder for The New Paper. Therein lies the practicality of satire in Singapore – using caricatures and the humour that they evoke, satires remind us that society needs to confront such issues, and that laughter can indeed be the best medicine. Furthermore, caricatures help bring about a common “inside joke” for a society. The issues they touch on can include trivial matters such as the lousy state of Singapore’s football or fake American/British accents used by newscasters. They allow a society, which recognises these unique quirks, to integrate and bond through such “inside jokes” – caricatures that only the particular society can understand. While we may not be inspired to pitch up posters and march through the streets, the manner of which these issues are brought up serve to remind and perhaps “enlighten” society that, as modern or progressive we may be, society is never, and will never be, perfect. The role of caricatures (and the use of humour) remains a social construct to ensure that we remember this, as a society.

and know them on an individual level. And for the record, I do not have to become a teacher just because I’m an English major.

Features
Know Anyone Like Them?
? Jiayi

THE WILD CHILD
Description: Discretion is out of the question. You commonly find photographs of them plastered all over every social medium, swallowing liquids which you may have or have not encountered in your life, partying it up like it is 2012. News of their exploits spread faster than Hurricane Katrina, and are sometimes too bizarre to believe. While this stereotype traditionally belongs to the lasses, there are, in fact, a huge population of males who subscribe to the religion of decadence, living it up like a king with many concubines, or in more plausible terms, a drug lord with questionable women aplenty. How to spot: Limp haired and groggy eyed, sometimes without the support of a bra, though on good days, a drawn up face reminiscent of frosting on cupcakes. They mostly prefer to keep within the periphery of testosterone-charged males. Also, they are mysteriously predisposed to unfathomable squeals of delight and fits of highschool-esque giggling. The men on the other hand, exude testosterone and are mostly found in the company of above mentioned females in their dormitories, doors locked, leaving us all to wonder, Why? This species is also particularly prone to huge mutated insect bites. Redeeming qualities You can live your life capriciously and dangerously through them. Also, they provide good live entertainment in hard times of academia.

THE NERD
Description: Single-mindedly accomplished in academic pursuit and may be ostentatiously clever, but often seen as the grime on the boot-heel of social life. Wilfully ignored by one and all out of universal distaste, save for the crucial periods of examinations and project submissions. You can hear the class rise in silent snickers and snorts whenever they engage in “constructive discussion”. In short, f launting their massive abyss of intellect, but usually giving an abstract answer for a simple, straightforward question. Subgroups of this stereotype live their lives in anonymity. People spend years in college with them, in a cohort of 30, without learning their names or remembering their faces. They live as invisible beings who at best, are known only by the title of “Dean’s Lister”. How to spot: Nerds are unique in their adamant rejection of the social norm of trends; their preferred choice of ratty tees and jeans remain their sole and premium attire. If you do not fall in this category yourself, you will have a natural repellence to such people. Remember to avoid quiet places conducive for studying, laboratories of any sort, and run when you hear chanting. Redeeming qualities These intensely intellectual individuals may be your sole salvation in completing your college education. Tread cautiously; offend them at your own risk.

THE JOCK
Description: This stereotype adheres perfectly to the concept of inverse proportion. Brawn (and hence that legendary sex god packs) comes at the heavy price of brainpower. In the place of the badge of intellect are medals and trophies for their numerous sporting conquests. Girls sigh and gasp, dissolving in hordes upon the sight of heaving, sweaty, virile masculinity. Alas. Beauty will forever be without brains. How to spot: Most likely to be at the gym, or often sighted running along the roads. Topless. Sit at any busstop on campus after school hours. You don’t even have to open your eyes. You know they are there when your heart starts pounding at two hundred beats a minute and you feel like you are on the verge of a heart seizure. Tips: Purse your lips, which have been tightly shut for fear that your heart leaps out. Just try not to faint as they breeze past. Redeeming qualities There are legends, and there are Legends. The Jock will set your adrenaline pumping and suddenly, you are alive again. Staring at a beautifully-sculpted body is The Universal Cure. Unproductive day in class? Mourning the demise of your GPA? Caught a cold? You don’t need a miracle. Just sit at the bus stop in front of the Innovation Centre at 6pm.

THE EYE CANDY
Description: You can’t not judge a book by its leatherbound and diamondencrusted cover. Right at the top of the social hierarchy, The Eye Candy is inexplicably easy on the eye, and emanates a steady, dispassionate calmness. Their faces? The very moulds plastic surgeons use for less-fortunate individuals. Imminently stylish and extraordinarily cool, they are the very stuff that fantasies are made of. You swoon at the very sight of them, grow nervous in conversation, dream of them many nights after and want them in your life in plausibly intimate and carnal fashion. How to spot: With this bunch, you don’t even have to try spotting. The minute they’re within a 20-metre radius, the air becomes electrically charged with excitement. Conversations drop to hushed whispers in the canteen, and you can triangulate from the gazes around you to one focal point: all eyes will be on The Eye Candy. Simply blinding, they appear like an apparition. No, you are not in heaven. Redeeming qualities A thing of beauty is a joy forever. Nuff said.

THE MEAN GIRL/GUY
Description: Mean. Through and through. People of this stereotype leave their mother’s wombs with a swivel for a neck. They possess stunning dexterity in swivelling their heads (and eyes) around to observe their surroundings. Marked by deliberateness in demeanour, people of this stereotype take grave pains to maintain an air of mystique and faux-superiority in their delusional parallel universe of social hierarchy. The social food chain, as they call it, finds them right on top. Unfortunately, they’re the only participants of that world. They reek of antagonism but are essentially harmless. They are, as the saying goes, all bark and nothing much else really. How to spot: Never seen alone, these people shrivel up when they are without their f lock. The f lock also changes quickly, for these people can’t seem to keep the few friends they have. Also, look out for tell-tale signs like shifty all-encompassing Eyes. Remember, nothing eludes. If you sniff hard enough, you may also smell something – the black heart within. Redeeming qualities In the company of such people, you become by comparison as benevolent as a cherubim. You can justifiably bask in moral superiority and no one can fault you.

THE ATTENTION SEEKER
Description: This species is exceptional as individuals of this stereotype can never coexist with others. They are walking universes the (very egocentric) world revolves around them, them, them, them, them and them alone. Be it in action, speech or thought, one can never transgress the topic of this sovereign. They have an amazing ability to turn any conversation, and I do mean any conversation, into a discourse on themselves. So heavily deluded, a 10-tonne meteor can hardly penetrate their egos. Aff licted with a high propensity for drama, they will jump on their chair shrieking in horror until all eyes are on them, when they spot a butterf ly f luttering 5 metres away. Yes, a butterf ly. Or an ant. How to spot: A horn will be duly sounded to announce their arrival. You will hear them before they come. Just a warning, it may get intense. Remember your ear plugs. When you see a person screaming “OH MY GODDDD!” when they see a friend, followed by air-kisses and/or excited jumping, you know you’re looking at an AA. Redeeming qualities On days when you’re in tutorial but have your assignments incomplete, these people come in useful. While most people have an opinion, Attention Seekers have five. They’ll be so eager to speak in class (though usually not answering the Professor’s question), you’ll never be exposed for not doing your tutorial.

Popular culture and Hollywood, among other factors, have made these stereotypes all too familiar to us. Try matching the photos to the stereotype (if you don’t score full marks you deserve a smack on the head).

Credits: Xinem, Aug 22 2009, Flickr commons
The Mean Girl

Credits: Alex Guerrero, Jun 9 2007, Flickr commons
The Jock

Credits: Katieblench, Mar 14 2011, Flickr commons
The Wild Child

Credits: Hector Alejandro, Feb 25 2010, Flickr commons
The Attention Seeker

Credits: Rodrigo Sa, Jun 10 2011, Flickr commons
The Nerd

Credits: D avid_shankbone, Jun 9 2011, Fotopedia commons
The Eyecandy
October 2011 | issue #07

? Victoria

Kate Middleton: Royally boring?
over dresses, it would seem that she is almost afraid to show too much of her personality in her clothing choices. Talk about bland and bordering on the dowdy! We reckon she might have taken too much inspiration from Queen E’s wardrobe. Until she finds a way to take a rewarding fashion risk without compromising her dignity as the Duchess of Cambridge, it remains to be seen if Kate can continue to be, in the long run, the royal fashion icon that she is made out to be.

? Seri R.S

Easy Beauty Tricks

Credits: Charles McCain, May 27 2011, Flickr commons

Credits: Audrey Pilato, May 1 2011, Flickr commons

K

ate Middleton might be everyone’s favourite royal high-street fashion representative, but does she have what it takes to be a true blue fashion icon? While her charming smile and glossy brunette hair are the envy of many, the question of whether she can ascend to style royalty with her recent fashion choices still remains to be seen. Though the Duchess has been famed for her high street style, which has inspired a great number of followers (the £95 Whistles blouse she wore for her engagement shoot was instantly sold out and renamed ‘The Kate’), her recent style picks have reflected a certain reserve. This might edge her out of the running as the fashion icon that countless fashion magazines have made her out to be.

Credits: David Shankbone, May 2009, Flickr commons

Credits: Niquinho, 16 Jun 2008, Flickr commons

Nobody does the smoldering, smoky eye look better than the very sexy Kim Kardashian. To emulate her sensuous peepers, stay away from blue hues which can make you look like you have under-eye circles, says Giorgio Armani makeup artist André Drykin. Instead, go for black, gray, and brown – or if you want “color”, dark green shadows and liners. Then, follow these steps: 1. Apply a cream concealer over your eyelid to create a smooth base for your eyeshadow. 2. Use a pencil liner (black or gray looks best) to trace your top lash-line from the inner corner to the outer. Then, use the same pencil to dot between your lower lashes. Smudge both lash-lines with a cotton swab or an eyeliner brush. 3. Sweep the eyeshadow (brown, gray and dark green all work with black or gray liner) over your lid and into your crease, blending the color up and outward, says New York City makeup artist Morgen Schick DeMann. Marie Claire recommends: Morgen Stained Glass Eye Wash in Spruce; Shiseido The Makeup Eye Shadow Brush; Cover Girl Perfect Blend Pencil in Basic Black; Origins Full Story Lush-Lash Mascara in Black. TIP: To prevent color from fading and give your lids a more shimmery finish, pat a cream shadow over the concealer on your lid first, wait five minutes, then top with a matching powder shadow.

Credits: Audrey Pilato, Aug 20 2011, Flickr commons

Yes, her royal blue Issa engagement dress was a stroke of genius – not to mention the gorgeous blue Zara dress she donned for her first postwedding appearance – but one cannot help but note the increasingly conservative fashion choices she has made since getting engaged. Considering how Kate Middleton first caught Prince William’s eye in 2002 during a charity fashion show in a bold, transparent dress, which had led to Prince William exclaiming “wow, she’s hot!”, it is evident that she has grown a penchant for a more sophisticated, chic and feminine image that more appropriately befits a Duchess. Yet, one cannot help but wonder if the Duchess is truly having fun with her present fashion choices – which so far reflect a lack of the adventure and ingenuity that she had premarriage. For Middleton at this moment, style seems to be all about coverage. From the long-sleeved outfits, high-necked blouses, modest trench coats, conservative suits, to the blazers draped

Credits: UK_repsome, Nov 16 2010, Flickr commons

Credits: Charles McCain, Apr 27 2011, Flickr common

4. Dust a lighter, neutral colour (such as ivory) over just your brow bone. 5. Finish with two coats of black mascara.

Credits: Charles LeBlanc, Feb 16 2011, Flickr commons

October 2011 | issue #07

? Jolene

Spotted Hits
Left: Nafeesa Saini, HSS Year 2 Where? “I generally get my clothes from Topshop, ASOS, New Look, Forever 21 and blogshops. My accessories are usually from vintage shops, Sungei Road’s Thieves’ Market, and the Salvation Army.” Right: Kelly Koo, HSS Year 3 Where? “My denim shirt is from Club Monaco, skirt from h&m, socks from Muji and penny loafers from Topshop. I generally shop overseas and online, and sometimes at Topshop/Zara.” Inspiration? “I’m a spontaneous dresser. People like Chloë Sevigny and Kate Bosworth inspire me.”

Misses
L: Oh my what BIG f lowers he has. This guy certainly does not shy away from his feminine beach bunny side. But hey, he certainly caught the eye of the lady nearby. R: It really is a warm, glowing tan...that the garish electric blue FBTs and jarringly contrasting green Tshirt cannot fail to draw attention to. How, otherwise, could a tan be more visibly demonstrated?

Inspiration? “My inspiration comes from street-style pictures, style icons like Sarah Jessica Parker and fashion bloggers. Most importantly, I dresses according to my mood.”

TREND
? Jiaru

Let’s talk about shoes…

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here are many things we can never get enough of… and shoes are one of them, always having a special place in our hearts. Oddly enough, finding the perfect pair for the right occasion can be challenging. Granted, sky-high heels can make a girl look sexy, but tottering around the school in 4-inch stilettos? Ugh, no (think blisters, sore feet and people staring at you). If you love your feet too much to torture them, we might have just the solution for you. As Marilyn Monroe once said, “Give a girl the right shoes, and she can conquer the world”. For those of you who usually head to school in slippers, listen up. You may think that slippers are comfortable, but they also convey sloppiness and make a bad first impression. This season, we are fortunate to welcome some very comfortable trends that will have you toss that pair of unsightly slippers to a dusty corner. Since the recent spring season, flatforms FLATFORMS

are all the rage, and it is little wonder why. Imagine flat shoes like pumps or sandals…now add platform soles and…Voila! Flatforms are a god-sent. Not only do they boost us with the extra inches in height, but they also promise our soles a wonderful experience. We can all say goodbye to tormented and sore feet! An added plus: Flatforms are casual enough for school but can still bring us to glamorous after-school parties in sheer comfort. If you are looking for something even more casual, we suggest creepers. Creepers are shoes with very thick soles, popularised by the British Teddy Boy subculture. These shoes have been (pardon the pun) creeping in and out of fashion ever since, and we sure are glad to see them make a comeback. Not only are they very wearable, creepers also make a great fashion statement. Wooden, clog-like wedges are also a good WOODEN WEDGES

substitute for stilettos. Wedges are generally more comfortable, and if you have to squeeze on trains during peak hours, we strongly recommend a good and steady pair of shoes to fight the crowd. Wooden platforms are great for our eternal summer and wedges just never go out of style! Another safe and consistent trend would be that of thick heels (in fact it should be a staple in your shoe rack!). Shoes with chunky heels allow for greater balance and also bring about a slimmer silhouette for your legs. For beginners who are not confident of wearing thin heels, chunky heels are a good start. Of course, there are still days when you wake up frantic and late, and shoes become the least of your worries. But even at these moments, when you can’t spend too much time looking for shoes to match your clothes, remember at least that your good old pumps are always versatile and trendy, so don’t go near that dusty corner where your slippers lie… CREEPERS

Credits: UggBoy<3UggGirl, Aug 5 2010, Flickr commons

Credits: skyepeale, Apr 7 2011, Flickr commons

THICK HEELS

Credits: Kristin Kokkersvold, Nov 28 2006, Flickr commons

Credits: UggBoy<3UggGirl, May 1 2010, Flickr commons

Credits: alchemica, 16 sept 2007, Wikipedia commons

Credits: kisske, Jun 3 2011, Flickr commons

October 2011 | issue #07

Music
I
Editor’s Note I Realized I Didn’t Need MTV in My Life
f life worked my way, all good songs would have equally brilliant music videos. Gotye’s latest single, “Somebody That I Used to Know” (an insistent earworm by the way) has an absolutely gorgeous video consisting of a naked man, woman and plenty of painted tessellations. Yay! Theo Hutchcraft from Hurts quirks an eyebrow in their video for “Wonderful Life”, full of strange women with stranger moves, and I die a little inside. Anyway hormonal musings aside, music videos are there to crystallize everything that is wonderful about the songs we love. We get to see our favorite people sing our favorite songs. What’s not to love about that? True, occasionally MTV and everything about that dang corporation and its ideals only serve to bring us, along with our self-esteem, down. Vevo has been having an extremely long Happy Hour with Youtube and it’s practically ripping the latter off ad by ad. But in this issue, we are very proud to present awards to some of the best music videos we reckon you really haven’t seen yet. We’re even happier to explain why MTV shouldn’t take over your life or the world. Music videos have grown up, just like how we all do eventually but they have that funny way of staying the same somehow. Can’t say for the rest of us though. Enjoy. Rachel

I

? Helda Cookie

used to love MTV. MTV was that goto channel I would flip over to during commercial breaks. An automated response, just as soon as the television show goes to a quick fading out to black, my hands already gripping the remote, fingers aiming to strike the buttons that would summon the sprites of pop culture.

sickness and in health. When you were happy, it was like “you’re awesome. good for you!” and gave you sappy pop. And when you were sad, MTV did its thing with the sappy pop again and it would make you feel instantly better. Like magic. AND THEN ONE DAY. I start noticing bit by bit that MTV was not what it seems. It began turning into this relentless entity that keeps pushing its ideals on you. MTV wanted me to get dance and get laid and fall in love (not necessarily in that order, but sometimes explicitly expressed so) but what I really wanted was to be alone with Alanis Morissette in my living room while it’s raining outside. But MTV had to ruin it all and became this total jerk ass who started being co-dependent because it made me feel like a loser when it pointed out my figure and the number of friends I text in a single day. MTV told me I could change and be whoever I wanted to be if I stuck with it. But I didn’t. It wasn’t MTV, it was me. I didn’t like MTV anymore because I couldn’t bear to watch it or hear anything about it. It was doing things I never expected it would—Justin Bieber… I could not take it anymore. I broke my gaze on the channel and I never saw the ubiquitous logo again. The last I heard of MTV,

it was wasting its time and money on fake Italians with fake tans. Such a disappointment you are, MTV.

It was especially there for me during those seemingly long moments while waiting for the OC to start. The flashing images portraying ideals and messages of western culture always had some sort of a calming effect on me. It was all I wanted to see. MTV- the channel that was there for you, for better or for worse, in

T

? Hugo

The Hugo Music Video Awards
production design feels cheap and unoriginal but this may be due to a budget constraint. Overall, this music video is highly entertaining and deserves a spot in my top 5 music video awards. very compelling and I love the fact that it was shot in Tokyo. visiting the Frank Listz Museum in Germany, which in turn reveals the origins of the title of their debuts single. Their performance is also strong, compelling and original. Finally I thought that the production design was excellent and very creative which is why this music video is 2nd on my top 5 music video list.

he recently concluded MTV music video awards 2011 held on the 28th of August at the Nokia Theatres in Los Angeles California saw the usual suspects garnering the most amounts of votes such as the video of the year by Katy Perry and Lady Gaga appearing as her alter ego Jo Calderone for Best Female Video. In light of this event, it is only appropriate that I name my Top 5 music videos. Dubbed the Hugo music video awards, it was held on the 10th of September in my room but sadly, none of the artistes managed to show up due to clashes with their schedules. A strict set of criteria was thought up by our internationally acclaimed judges which included international rock star Hugo, acclaimed movie critic Morgan and founder of indie band Stars in the Night Sky, Bart. The criteria are firstly, the relevancy of the image to the music. Secondly, the performance of the musicians and finally the quality of the production design (props, costumes, sets and design). Coming in 5th on our top 5 music video awards is Like A Boss (ft. Seth Rogen) by The Lonely Island. The fourth single from Lonely Island’s debut album Incredibad is no less funny that the other string of incredibly funny songs from this Comedy troupe compromised of Akiva Schaffer, Jorma Taccone and David Andrew Sanberg. The images are extremely relevant to the music, highly creative, entertaining with images of a giant fish and even a guest performance by actor Seth Rogen. The performance of David Sanberg in this video is great as he manages to accurately parody an obnoxious boss. Unfortunately, the

Credits: Pittaya Sroilong, Mar 23 2010, Flickr commons

Credits: Danny Wilson, Oct 14 2006, Wikipedia commons

4th on our top 5 music video awards is Read my Mind by The Killers. The six track on their second album Sam’s Town is featured in my list simply because it was shot in Tokyo, Japan. The images are extremely entertaining, they show band members Brandon Flowers, Dave Keuning, Marc Stoermer and Ronnie Vannucci Jr. having a great time in Tokyo, playing arcade games, riding different kinds of bicycles and playing with kids in a park. Their performance was strong, compelling and it attracted my attention through the whole video. The production design led by director Diane Martel did a good job with props, costumes as well as shooting part of it in downtown Shibuya district. All in all, this music video from The Killers was

Coming in 3rd on my list is Boat Behind by Kings of Convenience. What I felt when I first watched this was that I wanted to be on the road and I couldn’t stop admiring the beauty of the Norwegian countryside. The images are captured with a vintage camcorder thus it gives off a very vintage and old look which is a plus point in my opinion. The performance from this Norwegian Folk duo consisting of Erland oye and Eirik Glambek Boe was nothing original but was entertaining and consistent. Finally, the production team did a good and appropriate job with the props, costumes and location. Two thumbs up for this music video. 2nd on my list is Lisztomania by Grammy Award French rock band Phoenix compromised of Thomas Mars, Deck d’Arcy, Christian Mazaalai and Laurent Brancowitz. The images alternate between clear crispy 21st century footage and a vintage picture similar to Kings of Convenience. The images are highly entertaining as they show the 4 members

Credits: deep ghosh, 21 Nov 2008, Flickr commons

To round up my list, my favorite music video is I Will Follow You Into The Dark by one of my favorite bands Death Cab for Cutie led by vocalist Ben Gibbard. The images are simple but accurately portray the song. As Ben plays his guitar he makes a small hole on the floor but the hole grows progressively bigger and bigger as the song goes on till it practically engulfs his whole room and he himself eventually falls inside. The performance is yet again simple but effective. The production team did a great job with special effects. Furthermore, I greatly appreciated a scene shot inside the hole which makes Ben barely audible.

October 2011 | issue #07

Music

Melvyn’s Musical Baller Awards
? Melvyn

M

usic videos and their corresponding bastions of support (I’m talking about you, MTV) have perpetuated a circle jerk culture penetrating our consciousness strongly into the 90’s and stretching full well into the current decade, culmulating annually in a series of high budget award ceremonies that can only be described as self-serving, highly fashionable, and strangely complicit in favoring the “black comedic relief host” (yeah, that’s you Chris Rock). I feel that while music videos are typically chosen to fulfill certain predetermined “winning” characteristics which will then constitute awards, this is ultimately defeatist and demoralizing to losing directors and artists alike. Why must only One (in a category) win at life? Why are ‘Best Male’ and ‘Best Female’ considered important items when ‘Best Nipple Slip’ isn’t equally placed on a pedestrial? This is why I have taken upon myself, as part of an ongoing effort to Improve Society to moot a new kind of award presentation where I create awards SPECIALLY for videos who really deserve it. I thus hereby name this little presentation: Melvyn’s Musical Baller Awards Criteria are as such – the singers must be handsome/pretty, and well, that’s pretty much it. They must also be underfeatured as typically ‘award deserving’ performers, and there will generally be no discrimination to any particular genre of music. Without further ado, for the first Baller of the list, not in any particular order: #6. Most Handsome Hairdo Award Amorphis – Silent Water Holy hell, look at those locks. Watching him flaunt those locks and his equally manly voice makes one want to slather oneself with lemon sauce and violently wrap slick lemony arms around those locks of doom and shudder in a quivering sticky mess of gourmet follicles and expensive syrupy hair products. The song itself isn’t bad too, with camera pans during the soaring power vocal choruses that show off more of singer Tomi Joutsen’s glorious mane and incredibly

manly moustache. A true baller, that man is. #5. Really Epic Long-and-Inspiring-andTotally Not Boring Music Video And Song Award Dir en Grey – Vinushka Everyone at one point or another has randomly clicked on a music video in Youtube or anywhere else on the internet only to find out that the video they were watching was a lengthy tedious spectacle involving ‘real actors’ and an actual script taking up nigh half of the entire video length, WITHOUT musical accompaniment. It is with this frustrating urge to table-f lip that I have awarded with much pleasure, a music video beyond the length of 6 minutes this dubiously unattainable award to Dir en Grey. Once a Japanese visual kei band completely focused on pointless aesthetics, they now pack a powerful and cerebral sonic punch. The video accentuates the nuances in the song by interspersing pictures of the War of the Pacific as well as the tragedies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The video engaged me from start to end, and I am sure is just representative of undoubtedly countless other good lengthy videos I will never be able to discover and watch.

freaking rockets, how much more awesome can a video possibly get?

camera perched in vaguely menacing poses with their hands clasped together in prayer. Lord help me this OG has sinned bad, son. If ever there was a need to emulate an African American neighborhood and all the characteristics stereotypically pinned to one, this video is the perfect how-to. Bringing visual context to the ‘hot spots’ and ‘sounds of the police in my hood’ as was repeatedly emphasized in lyrics actually makes the sound more than just moderately decent.

#3. Craziest Senior Citizen Party EVER Award Modestep – Sunlight This is much more awesome, apparently. If the Is Tropical video featured absolutely award winning behavior in the playground, this video serves to remind us that even at the age of 80, one can still be a sick baller. Senior citizens in the front seat! Senior citizens in the backseat! Need vodka? They have their pensions for that! Need adult entertainment? Hundreds of strippers just waiting to fulfill their daddy issues on you! This video is a rally point, a war cry for all old folks out there: to stop moping around in the face of imminent death and live like a 21 year old again, only with more money and virtually zero recollection of the night before. It’s a perfect existence!

#1. Best Female Video Beyonce Knowles – Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It) Beyonce is all Woman. Her song about seizing empowerment from a failed relationship and vaguely feminist implications that women cannot be taken for granted is accentuated by a simple and powerful greyscale video of her and other women dancing their interpretation of said gender empowerment violently in moderately revealing leotards. I think this video deserves Best Female because – Beyonce Knowles – Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It) Taylor Swift – You Belong To Me I’mma let you finish, I’m really happy for you, but I just gotta say Taylor Swift is the BEST female artist there ever was!

#4. Most Titillating Depiction of Toys Award Is Tropical – The Greeks I get so jealous of the directors for this video – and I am sure many people will too, because they managed to do what every kid under the age of 8 had ever dreamt of doing – for f leshing out a real Nerf gun shootout complete with exploding limbs and copious amounts of glorious blood. It is a throwback to childhood games as well as a nod to the visual zeitgeist of our generation: the over the top action film. While such a portrayal of children brutally murdering each other with Nerf guns are undoubtedly political and social commentaries on the state of the generation, I loved this from a purely aesthetic point of view. The children acting in the video now have solid proof of adolescent bad-assery that will ensure they win at Life indefinitely. That Nerf rif le fires

#2. Most Shameless Display of African American Stereotypes Award DJ Khalid – Welcome To My Hood The title says it all. This song dangerously teeters upon the brink of generic mediocrity amidst the cesspool of aurally similar and formulaic rap songs, complete with guest appearance from Lil’ Wayne. But the video jetpacks this little gem way beyond average into surreal heights. The reason? Bling. Loads of bling, tricked out cars, big mammary touting young women dressed in extremely inappropriate fashion ‘shaking their junks’, and ‘gangstas fresh from prison’ glaring pointedly into the
October 2011 | issue #07

film
Contains nudity with/without sexual context,strong violence and may offend religious people
? Marguerita

T

wenty-one is a magic number. It is the age at which you can vote, get married, and enter casinos. You are no longer a minor at 21: if you get caught doing something illegal, you bear the full brunt of the law. In a nutshell: once you reach 21, you’re screwed. I’m kidding. But honestly, all these opening of doors and new responsibilities send me into a dizzy spell when I think about turning 21 in a month’s time. However, with every cloud there is a silver lining – R21 movies in this case. Finally, I’ll get to watch all the movies screening at the cinemas, even the naughty and gruesome ones. I tell friends who aren’t looking forward to turning 21 that they’ll finally get to watch R21 movies. Some reply that there is no way they will watch a movie with boobies and entrails to celebrate their coming-ofage. Others are indifferent towards this notion of R21 movies. And why is this so? Well, let me first digress with a confession: my favourite movie of all time is Pan’s Labyrinth. I recently found out that it’s an R21 movie. I was startled, because the first time I watched it was when I was 16. It was the uncut version that a friend had rented from the store. I

have thus realised that R21 classifications can easily be overlooked these days, ironically, while an increasing number of movies with viewership classifications are being made.

happened to good ol’ suggestive humour, as opposed to Jason Segel slapping his penis from side to side, in the afore-mentioned movie?

watching sexually or violently-graphic scenes, most particularly after watching Mulholland Drive. Sometimes, the death of Bambi’s mother is more bearable. But maybe that’s just me. As a whole, I feel that films classified as containing “mature content” are not necessarily more mature. In the end, 21 is just a number – right? At least that’s what I’ll tell myself a month from now, when I slip into post-21 depression

Credits: Jerzy Kociatkiewicz, Jul 6 2009, Flickr commons

Credits: hyku, 10 Jun 2010, Wikipedia commons

I took a look at the ten most popular R21 movies in Singapore. Nine of them are from the past ten years and four came out this year (from imdb.com). It seems that the twenty-first century is the age of R21 movies. But why are there more now than before? Part of the blame can be put on the rising popularity of R-rated romantic-comedies, such as Forgetting Sarah Marshall, where displays of sexuality are overt and excessive. Whatever

Another factor is that violence is reaching a crescendo in the twenty-first century. Take for instance, the recent Saw 3D movie which was screened in selected theatres here a few months back, where there are gory scenes that literally drill, slash, and pierce their way on screen. My sentiments on R21 films? After seeing a few without realising it, the label holds no mystique. Anyway, I’ve always felt the need to rinse my eyes with a PG Disney film after

Credits: Elena (janedoe621), Aug 5 2007, Flickr commons

Jackie Chan –100 and Counting
? Ronnie

Credits: Lee M. McCaskill, 2 Dec 2002, Wikipedia commons

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ackie Chan is unquestionably going down as one of the greatest action stars in history. The question only is: how?

man’s achievements. Jackie is one of the first Hong Kong actors to make it to Hollywood. When Jackie failed to obtain a role in 1985’s The Protector, he had refused several subsequent offers from Hollywood, for fear of being typecast into playing tasteless and stereotypical Asian-villains. With the success of Rumble in the Bronx (1995), however, Jackie managed to establish his name, and went on to co-star in Rush Hour (1998). Since then, he has been a household name in the West.

See the trailer here: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=Nr-cv3sq6Cw

Credits: Siebbi, 16 Feb 2010, Wikipedia commons

With Drunken Master (1978), Police Story (1985), and the Rush Hour series, Jackie Chan almost single-handedly revolutionized the action-comedy genre; and broke nearly every bone in his body. But let’s face it, age is catching up. In 2009, Jackie starred in Shinjuku Incident, his first dramatic role that featured no martial arts sequences. More recently, Jackie, 57, played babysitter in films like The Spy Next Door (2010) and The Karate Kid (2010). Sure, the humor is still there, but Jackie is no longer the ass-kicking, indestructible hero we know from the past. Critics have questioned his decision to take roles that force him to play second fiddle, and which also “vilify and degrade Asians”. Yet, these things do not undermine the

Credits: jkuttarkabat, Nov 11 2008, Flickr commons

Credits: asiu1990, 5 Jan 2004, Wikipedia commons

Credits: Georges Biard, 2008, Wikipedia commons

So, how will Jackie Chan be remembered for what comes next – the twilight of his career? His 100th film, 1911, might provide the answer. The film is also a tribute to the 100th anniversary of the Xinhai Revolution in China.

From the trailer, 1911 looks promising. It features conspiracy, formidable villains and, of course, lots of explosive action. Set against the historic events of China’s revolution, the movie looks more intense than Jackie’s usual light-hearted fare, but nonetheless, promises a great deal of cinematic entertainment. 1911 releases in local cinemas on 29th September 2011.
Credits: alanbob41_ Mar 26 2010, Flickr commons

October 2011 | issue #07

film
? Justin

In Time
The movie stars Justin Timberlake as Will Salas, a working-class man who slaves to stay alive, as his wages continually get lowered. With only mere hours on their counters at any given point, the majority of society literally lives from day to day. Consider the cost of a cup of coffee – a whopping four minutes – and you start to see the sinister machinations of the system. When time is subjugated, mankind is enslaved.
Credits: Caroline Bonarde Ucci, 12 Jun 2007, Wikipedia commons

infiltration into the world of the rich, hostage-taking and romance, and you have a film that strikes a good balance between visceral action sequences and intelligent storytelling. In Time additionally examines the problem of economic inequality. What happens when time itself is currency, and the rich live at everyone else’s expense? Would your conscience allow you to live, knowing that every second you breathe comes at the cost of another’s life? In Time releases in local cinemas on 27th October 2011. See the trailer here: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=6Re51joTIYA

Credits: Caroline Bonarde Ucci, 12 Jun 2007, Wikipedia commons

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ime – everyone gripes about the lack of it. You get yours for free, but all the money in the world will not buy you a second more. Imagine a future in which you could actually buy more time.

In the film In Time, a cure for old age has been found. People stop aging at 25, but to avoid overpopulation, are genetically programmed to die within a year, unless they earn more time. Being such a valuable resource, time has replaced money as the default currency. Each person has a timer built into their forearm, displaying exactly how much time they have left, down to the last second.

For the rich, minutes are mere trifles. To even enter the more affluent areas of the city costs a toll of a year. They live for centuries. And you couldn’t tell someone’s mother-in-law, wife, or daughter apart, because they all look 25. When Will Salas runs into a rich man at a bar and saves him, the man transfers his century of time to Will, and dies shortly thereafter. Will is falsely accused of the man’s murder and has to go on the run. Cue the necessary

? Sher Li

Somewhere

GOT YOUR PHONE? LET’S MAKE A VIDEO
? Tracy

t’s an exciting time. There are growing opportunities for local amateur filmmakers to develop themselves, especially in three important aspects of filmmaking: Conceptualization, execution and exposure. Conceptualization The root of any film is the story it’s telling – the script.

and its meaning. This is an effort to evoke interest in and awareness of local culture and film. Tips, guidelines and other viable resources are provided in the website. The closing date for the competition is September 30th, 2011. Execution After you have developed your story, it’s time to make the film and show it to someone.

or qualification, to send in short films to be screened on-site. It’s a comprehensive effort at collating and showcasing local indie short films in a casual, comfortable setting. It also allows room for discussion during Q and A sessions with the directors after the screening. First Take provides a platform for interaction between filmmakers and their peers, as well as a chance for them to think and speak about their work to an audience. The whole process of creating, submitting, watching, appreciating and questioning each others’ work is a great resource for filmmakers. Submissions are welcome throughout the year in several formats specified on The Substation’s official site. Entry to the screenings is free. Exposure Widen your film reference library, exhibit your work, and promote yourself as a filmmaker.

Credits: San Francisco Foghorn, Jun 24 2009, Flickr commons

Credits: San Francisco Foghorn, Aug 1 2009, Flickr commons

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omewhere was first released at the 67th Venice International Film Festival last year, where it was awarded the prize for best film by a unanimous jury. The criticallyacclaimed film, written and directed by Sofia Coppola, however, never made it to local cinema screens. The film deals with themes such as existential angst, father-daughter relationships and celebrity-hood. It tells the story of Hollywood star Johnny Marco, who struggles to find meaning in his life beyond the glitz and glamour that surrounds him. Near the start, Johnny is asked: “Who is Johnny Marco?” It’s a difficult question for him to answer. Coppola effectively decpits the ennui that traps Johnny. Moving at a slow but deliberate pace, Coppola goes to painful lengths to illustrate just how dreary Johnny’s life is. Mid-way through the film, he receives an unexpected visit from his 11 year-old daughter. As they spend time together, unfamiliar paternal feelings develop in Johnny. Slowly, his world begins to change. Like in other Coppola films, the characters take their time to unfold and grow on you. Fans of Lost in Translation will want to check this one out. While Somewhere was never locally released, it can be easily found on the internet. See the trailer here: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=nOJHhwHPw7g

Writing the City’ (http://civiclife.sg/ writingthecity/index.php/competitions/) This site hosts monthly writing competitions. The theme of the competitions explores varying concepts in storytelling and script development, such as experience, characterisation, and more. International entries are accepted, making the material culturally-vibrant. There are winning incentives, but the real draw is in the process of working towards a standard that you are comfortable with. Entries are judged by a panel of renowned writers, such as Christine Lim and Alfian Sa’at. Closing dates, useful details and guidelines are available on the webpage.
November | issue#03

Singapore’s 1st iPhone Film Festival (http:// www.iPhoneff.sg/) The iPhone Film Festival was started with the intention of allowing aspiring filmmakers who possess few resources, but great ideas and passion, to do something. It is also a platform for students with some filmmaking know-how to get back to the basics, by creating simple, guerilla-style films. The competition allows filmmakers to both study and rethink the art. The closing date for the festival is December 1st, 2011. Rules and guidelines are provided on the site.

SIFF (http://www.siff.sg/festival_about.php) The Singapore International Film Festival (SIFF) is the biggest and most prestigious local and regional film festival. The Festival features films that provide good references for novice filmmakers. The screening of both international and regional films provides a wide perspective on different cultural approaches to the craft. It includes films such as features, short films, animation, as well as documentaries. The festival takes place from September 15th to 25th. Schedules, festival information, venues, and film guides are posted on the website.

ciNE65 (http://cine65.sg/about.php) Another new short film competition, – ciNE65 encourages novice and aspiring filmmakers to explore Singaporean identity

Substation’s First Take (http:// www.substation.org/first-takeseptember/#more-7724) First Take happens every first Monday of the month at The Substation. The initiative encourages anyone, regardless of background

October 2011 | issue #07

Food/Travel
Frostbite
? Nicolette

A

Suntec City Mall, Toa Payoh and One Fullerton – with a fourth outlet opening soon at East Coast Park. What sets their frozen treats apart from those 50-cent popsicles you buy from the supermarket, is their 100% preservative-free nature. Health nuts have a reason to rejoice too, as their popsicles are packed full with Vitamin C and do not contain harmful ingredients such as gelatin and pork lard. Made from fresh fruit juice and fruit purees, Frostbite offers an array of unique, mashed up f lavours like Honeydew Strawberry, Pineapple Rambutan and Grapefruit Passionfruit. In addition to these fruity treats, those in search for something slightly decadent can look forward to premium f lavours such as Blueberry Cheesecake and Chocolate Orange. For an excellent remedy for the yearround summer we have here, opt for Frostbite’s refreshing popsicles from just

$2.50 a stick for fruit f lavours and $3.50 for premium sticks.

Aunt’s Agony: Suck It Up
? Amira

s a kid, I loved eating popsicles, especially those that left me with a tongue stained with a myriad of colors. Thus, when I chanced upon Frostbite, my childhood memories of indulging in the colourful icy blocks on sticks were immediately evoked, and I simply had to try some. Needless to say, since my first visit, I have been hooked on their delicious popsicles that are perfect for our tropical climate. Despite being just four-months old, Frostbite already has 3 outlets – at

1. I am gay but I have a girlfriend. What should I do? o Shave your ‘beard’ off. 2. Why do Singaporeans like to wear Union Jack T-Sshirts? o Because we had once been under British rule, and Singaporeans are a bunch of nostalgic people. 3. I’m currently living in a fruit-shaped house with my pet which makes weird noises. My obese best friend lives next door and I think he’s mentally-retarded. We’ve been working at a fast food restaurant for the past 10 years on minimum wage. Although I feel happy with my life, I can’t help but feel like something is missing. Can you help me out? o Spongebob, is that you? 4. My friends keep saying that Frankenstein is the monster when obviously he’s the doctor. The monster doesn’t even have a name! This annoys me so much and I keep correcting them, but they never learn! How can I finally drill it into them that Frankenstein is not the name of the monster? Help me please. o Don’t be so uptight or you’ll lose your friends. 5. I like older women, and there’s this woman 10 years older than me that I’ve been f lirting with for the past month. She just seems to take me as a friend, even though I’m positive she knows how I feel about her. What should I do? o Grow a beard. Beards always make you look older. 6. I take 2 hours to travel to school every day and I’m getting sick of travelling. As a result, I’ve been skipping classes and coming late for the classes that I do attend. My CCA points can’t qualify me for a room in any halls and I can’t afford to rent a f lat nearby. o It’s pretty obvious that the only other option you have left is to pitch a tent on the newly-renovated field. The toilets at SRC are just a mere 5-minute walk away, and you never have to worry about peak periods on public transport. Contact our residential aunt at: blackhole.press@gmail.com with your questions

Popaganda: Food from thought
? Wendy

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one are the days when the only kind of popsicles in the market are the ones that would turn your tongue bright pink and blue, and give you diabetes on top of it. The innovative folks at Popaganda have altered the meaning of popsicles as we know it, with the introduction of their artisan popsicles. These frozen desserts are not only healthy, all-natural, and allergen-free, they are delicious as well. Co-owner of eight-month-old Popaganda, Edrick Chua, says that they use organic fruits, rather than concentrates and preserved juices, which are often laden with processed sugar and additives. A natural sweetener, organic agave syrup, is added sometimes too, but only when necessary. Popaganda is so committed to providing all-natural popsicles for consumers that they even plant their own herbs. Popaganda carries more than ten f lavours, such as lemon olive oil, ginger butternut squash, avocado cacao nibs, banana dark chocolate, and kiwi watermelon. Take note however, that as

Popaganda chooses only the freshest ingredients, seasonal fruit f lavours such as lychee are not always available. It may be disappointing for diehard Popaganda fans, but the team is constantly on its feet, ready to create more f lavours whenever they can.

Lane), and The Pantry (75 Loewen Road). They charge $4 for regular popsicles, and $4.50 for premium f lavours.

While it has only been eight months since its launch, Popaganda and its popsicles have already swept the popsicleeating community off its feet. Popaganda has been spotted at Loewen Gardens’ monthly Farmers’ Market, the Mountain Bike National Championship 2011, and even at the Sakura Fest @ Singapore Flyer. These extraordinary popsicles are also stocked regularly at Cut The Mustard (1 Greendale Avenue), Lins Smoodees (China Square Central), Stranglets (7 Yong Siak Street), Whiteroom (37, Haji

Raspberry and lemon balm popsicle, with lemon balm grown straight out of their own “tiny but growing organic garden”

And if Popaganda has not impressed you enough, they can deliver too! You can contact Popaganda at hello@popaganda.com.sg or go to www.popaganda.com.sg for more details.

October 2011 | issue #07

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