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INDEX

PATUMAHOE VILLAGE OCTOBER 2011 VILLAGE PLAN FINAL DRAFT REVIEW

INTENTION ..........................................................2 FOREWORD ........................................................3 BACKGROUND ................................................... 5 POPULATION STATISTICS & USE........................7 AUCKLAND COUNCIL CONSIDERATIONS ........8

VILLAGE CHARACTER.................................. 10 VILLAGE AESTHETIC .................................... 13 MULTI-USE COMMUNITY CENTRE............. 14 PLANNING ZONING ISSUES ...................... 18 TRANSPORT .................................................22 5.1 Traffic .............................................22 5.2 Walkways .......................................27 Cycleways .......................................28 5.3 5.4 Public Transport.............................29 6 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ......................... 31 6.1 Ecological corridors........................ 31 6.2 Regeneration & pest control .........34 7 HISTORY/HERITAGE....................................36 8 PARKS & RECREATIONAL LAND ................37

1 2 3 4 5

SUMMARY & TIMEFRAME................................39 APPENDIX ..........................................................45 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ....................................46 NOTES ................................................................47

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INTENTION
Ki te kahore he whakatienga ka ngaro te iwi Without foresight of vision the people will be lost Our Patumahoe village vibrant and green, Allows for the past and plans for the future Cultural and diverse with spaces for our dreams, Well planned development and sustainable schemes, Walkways and bikeways, caring and safe That is the Patumahoe village I hope to leave Whatungarongaro te tangata toi tu whenua As man disappears from sight, the land remains

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FOREWORD
This living discussion document is a village plan for the communities of Patumahoe village and Mauku. It is the development of a process that intends to provide local people with an effective voice in mapping the future of our villages in the next ten years and beyond. The process was initiated after it was apparent that despite unprecedented residential growth, community facilities and reserves were not likely to be reviewed under the (then current) Franklin District Council (FDC) plan. After this issue was raised with Franklin District Council staff and councillors, it was advised that the best method of addressing unmitigated growth in the community would be to make a submission for the LTCCP that would be adopted in June 2012. The LTCCP is a priority plan for resources and spending and covers a period of ten years. This plan is reviewed every three years, so usually changes are additions that are added to the previous plan to determine budget allocations and priorities. Following this direction, a community group was formed in October 2010 - Patumahoe Village Inc - and the committee has been working on this project since this time. Initial submissions for the LTCCP were scheduled to start in September 2011. Given the short time frame a series of consultation methods have been adopted: Community workshop initial fact-finding Questionnaires a series of paper and online documents, Online blog now replaced with community website, Newsletters delivered to RD3 & RD4 residents Street parties attended by approx 140 people, Community Open Day attended by approx 250 people, Community websites including online forum, and postings on project, Community meetings The amalgamation of our district councils has been a mixed bag. Amalgamation has meant a concerted review of all planning documents, which has created both an opportunity for a review of the situation in Patumahoe and the requirement of committee members to upskill in terms of planning trends. However, this has also meant that a strict timeline had to be followed, which required efforts and consultation to be concentrated for a shorter period of time than we would have preferred. Given that time restraint we have attempted to provide multiple means of engagement and consultation and thank all those who have participated. We welcome any comments and suggestions from our residents, property and business owners. We are also aware that many residents are not happy with current or future planned growth and are reluctant to participate in discussions due to this concern. As a group, we are concerned that the only mention of Patumahoe in strategy documents produced by Franklin District Council, Auckland Regional Council, the Auckland Council Auckland Unleashed, Local Board plan is to refer to it as a growth node. This
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submission is to ensure that any growth is done in a considered and planned manner so that the values of Patumahoe village & Mauku are protected, and even enhanced. At present, this consideration is not included in any Auckland Council strategies, and we have no effective means of providing the village community with a stakeholder position in planning and development. We encourage those who are still concerned to make their own submissions and to participate in ongoing council consultation by signing up with the Auckland Council Peoples Panel. PVI meetings are also open to the community whether you are members or not. We invite you to come along to meetings as they occur. We have endeavoured to consider the possible effects on all existing residents, property and business owners, and where possible, have favoured recommendations that have a positive impact on their property values or businesses. This Village Plan is intended to provide a framework for planning and decision making on matter concerning development, integration of established and new neighbourhoods, and protection and enhancement of community values. The document provides a guide to Auckland Council and the Local Board when considering extra growth and community spatial planning. It coordinates future development with an ongoing process of integration and measures for community enhancement, by defining an action plan of projects and strategies. As a living document it allows for future changes as priorities and concerns of village residents may often change as time passes. It is hoped that by submitting this plan for inclusion in the LTCCP, residents will have a documented record of their vision for Patumahoe village and Mauku, and that this will ensure that both communities are safeguarded against developments which will undermine the qualities that make this area special, and that work done by local government to protect and enhance the village will be undertaken in a systematic and co-ordinated manner.

Patumahoe Village Inc

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BACKGROUND
Patumahoe is an existing rural community with well established infrastructure. It is located centrally between Pukekohe and Waiuku and is with commutable distance to central Auckland. In this location it caters to a significant catchment area. It is currently serviced by a volunteer Fire Brigade and First Response unit, Superette, ITM retail outlet, a garage, a takeaway, a bakery, a hairdresser, a boutique clothes store, Arts & Crafts outlet and gallery, a Hotel, and a village bar & restaurant and several other businesses and trades. It also has a well patronised Primary School, Playcentre and a privately owned Preschool. Community clubs and organisations include: a community church, rugby club, tennis club, cricket club, bowling club and netball club along with many casual recreational clubs and groups. Existing council owned/administered reserves and facilities include: Henrys Bush native reserve located just outside residential boundary of Patumahoe, Clive Howe Bush reserve recently acquired by Auckland Council as part of subdivision process, Clive Howe Reserve active sports grounds located adjacent to Primary School, Patumahoe War Memorial Reserve active sports grounds and location of sports buildings as specified below; Buildings: Clubrooms for : Patumahoe Tennis, Patumahoe Junior Rugby & Mauku Cricket Club, Patumahoe Bowling. Patumahoe War Memorial Hall used and maintained by Patumahoe Rugby, available for community hire Mauku Victory Hall located in Mauku, available for community hire. There is also an existing operating railway line adjacent to the south of the village, where the location of a station could be a future option. Mauku is a settlement approximately 3 km from Patumahoe, which also has a local primary school (current roll: 75 pupils). It is predominantly an area of lifestyle properties and has places of interest such as Wrights Watergardens, the Mauku Falls and the historic St Brides Church, which celebrated its 150th anniversary this year. It is also in close proximity to the volunteer-run Glenbrook Vintage Railway. The Patumahoe and Mauku district has a very strong historical background, with established Maori settlements being followed by European settlers after land confiscation in the late 1800s. Patumahoe , Mauku and the surrounding areas were a place of huge significance for producing food during the war. The importance of horticulture is just as significant today, and this forms the basis of local industry. Sporting interests also play a big part in the community, particularly in the codes of Rugby, Cricket, and Tennis. The Mauku cricket club is the oldest cricket club in New
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Zealand and recently celebrated 150 years of existence, the Rugby Club also celebrated its 125th anniversary in June this year. The acknowledgement of our heritage has been one of the considerations of Patumahoe Village Inc, so that knowledge can be collated, preserved and made available for the future generations. During this process a Heritage group has been formed with this aim in mind. The district is also very fortunate in that it has retained many isolated blocks of native bush, and it is this environment that has added to the attraction of living here. The Whakaupoko Landcare Group was formed 7 years ago by a group of private landowners with a common interest in protecting the flora and fauna. The main objectives of the group have been pest control, weed control, bush regeneration and riparian plantings. Bird surveys are carried out 4 times a year, and there have been notable increases in bird activity. Recently the Whakaupoko Landcare Group has shared links with Patumahoe Village Inc, and it is another focus of our group to provide public access to some of the protected bush lots. In recent years the district has become a very popular place for cycling and walking and the Patumahoe and Mauku Halls have long been used as a base for visiting cycle clubs. It is therefore a focus of the group to ensure that any future development makes provision for these activities. Until five years ago population figures and dwelling growth within the village had remained fairly static, with little impact on the village environment or established areas. This changed in 2007 with the implementation of a long planned subdivision in a prominent location which eventually will double the number of dwellings within Patumahoe. Also, there was community realisation that the FDC District Growth Strategy aligned with the current ARC identification of Patumahoe as a growth node, meant that this increase was not a singular occurrence. With increased pressure on Franklin District (and now Auckland Council) to accommodate population growth, the planning documents would allow further residential development without a considered planning approach to the impact on the quality of life of the existing community. Patumahoe Village Inc was formed to address this situation.

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POPULATION STATISTICS & USE


Population figures are derived from national census statistics which undergo a series of adjustments to determine a value that is of use to local government. With FDC this census-adjusted figure was used for Patumahoe to determine infrastructure requirements and Parks & Reserves allocations. The most recently updated figures (Oct 2010) applied district averages and did not take into account the large scale development underway. Accordingly, these adjustments do not reflect current and future use of our community facilities and reserves. Although the infrastructure capacity limits the number of residential dwellings that can be serviced by the infrastructure network rural villages also encompass the wider area which includes households that have their own stormwater and wastewater management systems. There is also pressure on Auckland Council to provide an extra 27 dwellings a day to keep up with the current population growth and communities with existing infrastructure are the first choice for doing so. Also, because of the thriving community and business services offered by Patumahoe village the locals are not restricted even to the census boundaries. Many villagers come from Glenbrook, Mauku, Puni and beyond. So in terms of Parks & Reserves and community spaces this population figure needs to be revised. As mentioned above, Franklin District Council used its own formula to allocate Parks & Reserves, using defined population figures. The basis of their population figures is the national census, to which boundaries are applied in order to come up with the village population: 2006 Census population figures for Patumahoe are: 2,259 residents 738 Dwellings Unfortunately, due to the cancellation of 2011 Census any figures will be extrapolated from these 2006 figures rather than updated 2011 actual statistics which may have included some of the new dwellings. Using these base 2006 figures, FDC defined Patumahoe to have a population of 971 with 450 households. The catchment area of this figure is fairly limited remaining within the village residential boundaries as they have been defined. This current figure inherited from FDC by Auckland Council is misleadingly conservative, and should be discarded for use in planning until it can be replaced by an accurate reflection of village population and use. In terms of infrastructure capacity, Patumahoe connects to the Tuakau treatement plant for sewage, and an ongoing stormwater legacy project from FDC is already underway.

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AUCKLAND COUNCIL CONSIDERATIONS


Growth requirements Auckland has always been the city of choice for the majority of immigrants and job seekers. This has meant a continuous pressure for infrastructure creation and maintenance to deal with ever increasing population growth. Despite the economic recession, this growth requirement for Aucklands population is ongoing, but is now matched with further tightening of economic resources. Patumahoe village has been identified in several planning documents as a growth node, due to a variety of factors, including the existing infrastructure and services available. Auckland Plan Did you know? Auckland Council created a short video (2 min 40 sec) highlighting some of their planning criteria some of the statistics and estimates are below:
75% of the worlds population will be living in cities by 2050, o 2,600,000 will be living in Auckland. Each day in Auckland: o 64 babies are born, o 20 people die, o 20 people move to Auckland from elsewhere. 20% of Aucklanders moved here in the last five years. In the year 2030: o 330,000 Aucklanders will be 65 years or older, o 355,000 Aucklanders will be 15 years or older To cater to the 64 people increase in population each day 27 homes are required which translates to 9855 extra dwellings a year. In 2010, 3,821 dwellings were built - 584 commercial buildings We each create one tonne of landfill rubbish a year 83 million tonnes will be dumped by 2050. It is estimated that 1,160,000 days are lost to air pollution related sickeness a year which translates into 730 premature deaths. 80% of Aucklanders drive to work, 7 % travel by bus or train although there was an increase of 3.4% travelling by public transport in 2010. 35 new cars take to Aucklands roads every day 13,000 new cars per year. 88% Auckland businesses employ 5 or less people, 96% Auckland businesses employ less than 20 people And did you know 50% of foreign direct investment in NZ comes to Auckland?

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Trends The Auckland Unleashed Discussion document identifies four global megatrends:
1. 2.

globalisation and the global economy which has repositioned cities as the drivers of national economies. Paradoxically, in a globalised world the point of competitive advantage is at the local level. doing more with less - The drivers for more efficient use of resources require resolution of the apparent tension between network efficiency and responsive local government. Our new governance arrangements will help us address both through: o economies of scale where transport and other infrastructure is best managed on a regional scale; o and effective engagement at the local level through our 21 local boards; a global sense of urgency to fix the environmental problems of the modern world - In todays world, being green is a minimum standard. Global warming, pollution, peak oil, loss of biodiversity
and water scarcity are driving public concerns for action by central government, local government and the corporate world. The Auckland Plan proposes playing a leading role in promoting a low carbon footprint for Auckland. We need to lead by example in energy efficiency, in the promotion of walking, cycling and public transport, and in landfill and waste management.

3.

4. the growth of the services sector in western economies is being shaped by a second wave of innovation aimed at tailoring and targeting services . Mass
collaboration is powering the new economy There is a big opportunity for Auckland to be a global problem solver in some of these areas, especially those relating to the environment and sustainability. We develop these themes further into the document. Nationally, Auckland contributes around 35% of New Zealands GDP annually, and is one of a handful of world cities that generates more than 30% of its nations GDP. Aucklands share of the national population (33.4%) and its population growth rate (1.6% per annum), are both relatively high in international terms. The goal now is to use our strengths to improve our economic performance and contribution to the national economy. Auckland is also part of an emerging northern North Island urban and economic system a cluster of cities and towns north of Taupo (Hamilton, Tauranga and Whangarei) which have significant business and other relationships with Auckland. More than 52% of New Zealands population lives north of Taupo, with projections that the proportion will rise steadily in coming years. A number of rivers increasingly point to the need for Auckland to form a strong policy and planning development relationship with the neighbouring regions of Northland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty especially. It is timely that an inter-regional agreement for the upper North Island has been initiated to cover land use, planning, infrastructure and a range of other issues.

Auckland Council Funding Considerations & Trends The estimated cost of the amalgamation of the District Councils ranges between $120 240 million. The recent proposal by the national government addressing the issue of leaky homes in Auckland has committed the council to an exposure of at least $2.5 billion. This is likely to be only the starting figure. Future funding trends for community facilities will be concentrated on those facilities that provide a wide range of the community with access and use, and are utllised for the majority of the time available to increase benefits and reduce operating and maintenance costs. Funding trends will also be concentrated in locations with wider access than immediate community. In particular, along transport corridors and public transport networks.

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1. VILLAGE CHARACTER
Nearly all respondents mentioned that they would like the village centre to be retained and enhanced, instead of degraded, by any growth. Suggestions from participants Inclusion of village green or plaza in central area, Concentration of new retail, office or similar businesses in the central area, Hanging baskets Retention of current aesthetics in built form heritage village? Considered study of the requirement for a community centre New buildings should be of heritage style built form to reflect the history and character of the village, Should contain an open space that can accommodate a Farmers market, Current old shops along Commerce Street need to be upgraded and reverted back to retail, Village green design A space that has indoor / outdoor merging, Part of the space has no cars, Opens out / right next to some commercial space (eg bottom floor cafes etc or upper story offices), Linked closely to suitable community centre spaces, Sheltered, some greenery, some cobble areas etc, Small playground?, Completely paved area such as plaza or Italian piazza, Other considerations Any new spatial plan needs to connect any village green or centre to the existing hub which is centred around the intersection of Patumahoe Kingseat Woodhouse Mauku Roads and Commerce Street. Consideration should also be given to the impact on existing services and businesses. Franklin District Growth Strategy 2052 (2007) 7.9 Overall role and function: Patumahoe is the third largest village, accommodating 633 people. Patumahoe is likely to attract around 1.5% of population growth by 2051, growing to 1,640 people by 2051. Patumahoe has good access to Waiuku and Pukekohe, as well as other areas in Franklin District and the Auckland Region. The northern rural areas will experience significant pressure from people wanting to live in rural residential environments, and Patumahoe offers the potential for targeting growth to a northern village and increasing the population to a level that supports community facilities and a small commercial node.
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Patumahoe has a well defined central business area, at a scale appropriate to a rural village. The settlement has high amenity value because of its rural setting, compact urban form and village scale. The most significant challenge for Patumahoe is peripheral urban growth detracting from Patumahoes amenity value and encroaching on prime horticulture land. The village has a strong agricultural theme. Over time, the mix of household types is expected to change, although the small size of Patumahoe and limited range of services is unlikely to attract a significant portion of the older population. Consistent with the rest of Franklin, and indeed New Zealand-wide trends, household size is predicted to decrease. This will mean that the number of households will increase at a faster rate than the population. Lifestyle and housing choice is important to cater for a broad range of community members. Economic activity will be focused on the town centre, with the nearby horticultural industries providing a significant portion of employment. The Shape of the Future: The rural village environment is Patumahoes best feature by the surrounding horticulture present challenges, particularly the potential for reverse sensitivity. Additionally, any spread of residential lots will encroach on the high quality soils. Patumahoes urban area is reasonably compact so additional urban areas have been located to support the compact urban form. Accordingly, heactare of future urban land has been identified the south-east, in close proximity to the existing village centre. The eventual shape of Patumahoe consistent with the principles of liveable neighbourhoods (comprising a 400 m walking catchment) with the existing Business-zoned land the centre. Strengths: Strong/agricultural theme/identity Significant horticultural industries Rural village living environment High quality soils Proximity to Pukekohe for additional services not provided in Patumahoe Distinct character and identity Access to rail Established village centre Challenges: Small population base Limited retail and service sector Dependence on car-based transport Limited public transport options Population size does not support a full range of businesses and services
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18 to is

as

Note: Where to start? An increase of only 1.5% by 2051 ignores completely residential development already underway in 2007 when the report was published. 2006 census figures are also well over the 1,640 projected population figure, and more indicative given the fact that Patumahoe is the village hub for many in the surrounding areas in terms of services, education, clubs, retail and facilities. Unfortunately, it is apparent that specific attention to Patumahoe was not given, where useful information could be produced for use in future planning documents. This will be rectified by this current Village Plan.

Planning advice: Regardless of final design form a village green is an active space. To achieve this as well as encouraging pedestrians and cyclists to use the space vehicle access also should be included. Vehicles can be slowed down by use of one-way systems, use of different road surfaces etc but need to be included. Location should be as close to existing hub as possible or within a hub area designed for long-term growth. CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 1.1 Village Characteristics People have told us that they value the existing characteristics of Patumahoe village and would like to see them retained throughout any growth. Although the Franklin DGS attempted to define the identity and characteristics of Patumahoe, these aspects and values need to be community defined rather than committee or planner designed. Throughout this process we have invited comment regarding this issue and feel that this will be a continuous activity. Given the responses so far, the priority for most seems to be retaining the existing rural village feel and scale. Methods of achieving this may include: Planning growth needs to reflect the village feel and rural environment ie. limit to size of retail and commercial enterprises in the village centre, Control of type of businesses permitted in this area eg. Use of category in zoning.

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2. VILLAGE AESTHETICS
Many comments also made note of the appreciation of the current built form. Without trying to impose constraints on business or property owners, we would like consideration to be given to defining some kind of direction for developers. Suggestions from participants Retain current heritage look to the built form of the village and require new structures to follow this aesthetic, Create a boutique village that encapsulates the history of the village and encourages a continuation of community and rural life, Create plantings that reflect the rural and natural environment surrounding the residential area Put power lines underground where possible. Other considerations Without including in planning documents it is possible to provide guidelines to private property owners and developers especially within the village centre. This will enable designs and buildings to follow a defined form without requiring imposing this restriction on development. Consider the impact on existing businesses and residents when defining a point of difference. For example, when considering a boutique village, how will we ensure that basic goods and services remain reasonably priced for local residents and should we limit the size or scale of actitivities in order to maintain the connection with a working environment rather than a tourism one? Planning advice: Define your point of difference. Once this has been defined, it makes it easier to determine how to achieve this in terms of village green, built form, landscaping etc. It can be used in any brief for a spatial planner.

CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 2.1 Village Aesthetics As a rural village with a strong horticultural background and ancient tangata whenua ties, we believe that development and planning should reflect these histories, and include the natural environment which surrounds and supports us. Therefore our relevant point of difference is maintained by considering the following aspects during planning and development projects: Retain the feel and function of a working rural community, Encourage sympathetic built form in new buildings in central village hub, Create network of accessible natural environment within our residential areas, Design community central hub that can be used for local market days or farmers markets.

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3. MULTI-USE COMMUNITY CENTRE


The village planning project began due to a council initiated meeting regarding the future requirements of our community clubs and organisations, and the proposal of investigating a multi-use sports facility to meed those future needs. Immediately it was recognised that a multi-use centre would have the opportunity to meet those initial criteria, but also could provide further encouragement of community engagement and use, and aim to be sustainable in terms of ongoing costs and funding requirements. Suggestions from participants Rugby club changing facilities accessible from the outside, Indoor changing facilities for other activities, A gymnasium large enough for an indoor basketball or netball court, but also having the flexibility to cater for other activities such as fitness training, aerobics, gymnastics, indoor bowls, indoor cricket, martial arts etc, Perhaps a rock climbing wall at one end, A fitness centre, run as a separate commercial entity, A possible canteen or coffee shop, run as a separate commercial entity, A function room with a bar and stage, An all purpose room to cater for Arts groups, dance groups, conventions, community night classes etc, Meeting rooms which have the flexibility to accommodate varying group sizes and layouts, A commercial kitchen which can be used for functions and/or for cooking classes or demonstrations, Include Playcentre Association in feasibility study with thought of duplicate use of facility Playcentre and crche.

Other considerations Funding trends are heading towards support of multi-user centres and facilities. Also, there is more investment around higher density centres and transport corridors. While Patumahoe village is termed a rural village in planning documents, our population figure (as discussed before) has a wider catchment area in terms of recreational and social use, than an urban area with a defined geographical boundary. For this reason, we also need to identify possible stakeholders that do not live within the 7km PVI area but whose proximity would allow them to participate and use any facility that is provided. The Patumahoe Rugby Club, Mauku Cricket Club and Patumahoe Touch have recently created a clubrooms and changing facility which has addressed their immediate needs. Does this need a review for long term requirements or would they prefer to keep the status quo? Patumahoe Rugby also has utilised and maintained the Patumahoe War Memorial hall for many years, and may be comfortable with continuing this arrangement. The option of being part of multisports complex needs to be discussed amongst their administration committee to come to a conclusion.
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Locally there are three multi-sport complexes in the design process within the Franklin region: Karaka Sports Park located approx 15km away from Patumahoe village catchment includes Karaka side of Papakura motorway. Funding investigations in progress Waiuku Sports Park also located approx 15km catchment area Waiuku township and surrounding areas Bombay Multi-use Facility located approx 20 km from Patumahoe village across Southern motorway catchment area. Feasibility study already conducted. Request for council to acquire identified land in place. Franklin District Growth Strategy 2051 (2007) 7.9.3 Play: Patumahoe currently has 8.5 hectares of sports fields within the Clive Howe Road Recreation Reserve and Patumahoe Domain Gates (sic) reserves. These reserves also perform a neighbourhood park function. The Patumahoe School also has one playing field that is well used by the community. It is considered that this level of sports park provision will meet Patumahoes future requirements. An additional neighbourhood park will be required to support the projected population of 1,640 by 2051 and the location will be determined by the direction of the development Note: As mentioned previously, this allocation figure is demonstrably conservative and out of date. Patumahoe School also uses the adjacent community fields for sports activities, and as it remains a well patronised and popular school this is likely to continue. 7.9.5 Future Actions: In addition to the district-wide actions set out in Section 6, Patumahoe has a number of specific actions required: Designed-based focus 1. Establish design guidelines for the central business areas to enhance the identity and character of the town. 2. Undertake a structure plan for future urban areas, identifying roads, reserves and residential patterns and integrating this with the structure plan already contained in the Franklin District Plan. Note: The Structure Plan referred to is the current Woodhouse Road development. Planning advice: Current trend is to locate large open areas away from any community centre as it reduces the movement of residents during the day and creates a hole in the heart of the
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village. Given Patumahoes history and club importance, discussion needs to be held on whether this trend can or should be accommodated. Also, what other options are there? CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 3.1 Feasibility Study & Initial Spatial Plan We have asked the Local Board to include in the Local Board Annual Plan allocation of $60,000 to conduct a feasibility study to investigate a multi-use centre for Patumahoe. This request is in line with recommendation of the Franklin District Growth Strategy 7.9.5 Future Actions. As well as considering current clubs such as rugby, cricket, tennis, bowling and netball this study should identify and include other stakeholders eg. Heritage group, Volunteer Fire Service, Plunket, Patumahoe Community Asset Trust, Playcentre, other sporting and recreational codes, and any clubs, organisations, non-profits or businesses that may be looking for a suitable venue. Our current model of choice is Moutere Hills, in Nelson, primarily because as well as managing to coordinate all sporting codes in one facility, they extended their brief to encourage extensive use of the centre by other organisations and businesses. After five years of operation, running at a break even point (give or take $2,000) their current turnover has almost doubled from last year, and they will be making a substantial profit. A truly sustainable and beneficial community asset that has encouraged and achieved community engagement and is valued as such. We believe that a feasibility study will provide a specific direction for asset management and growth that at present is non-existent. This direction will provide information for decision making that can not only protect the current community connections, but enhance and encourage further community involvement both from planned new residents and currently unengaged ones. 3.2 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre In order to create a relevant spatial plan, it is also important that the conclusion of this study (3.1) also provides options for a basic concept spatial plan which will retain and enhance the heart of the village taking into consideration the results of the study. This consideration has been a priority for many of the respondents so far. This spatial planning will allow discussions with local community, affected landowners and council to take place with clear objectives and considerations noted. It will also help to define how to protect and maintain our community characteristics and values. The feasibility study will provide one of the key documents for spatial planning and requests for long term community facilities and funding. This process will also follow the recommendations of the Franklin District Growth Strategy 2051 (2007) which recommended that Patumahoe undertake a design based focus and produce a Structure Plan for the future urban areas, identifying road, reserves and residential patterns and integrating this with the structure plan already contained in the Franklin District Plan.
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3.3 Land acquisition for Multi-Use facility and active sports fields We have also asked the Local Board that budgetary and priority consideration be given to possible land acquisition resulting from this process. Future development contributions can then be utilised to acquire land in order to help mitigate the effects on the existing village residents.

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4. PLANNING INTENTIONS ZONING ISSUES


Population capacity figures have been discussed previously to attempt to provide numerical guidelines for community consultation and spatial plan design. There appears to be some acceptance that residential growth is inevitable, as long as it is planned and considerations are made for community places and linkages, consistent with a rural village theme. Along with the current Kingseat Road development application, other areas proposed for future growth which generally comply with the principles of liveable neighbourhoods (comprising a 400m walking catchment) are the Askew family owned Patumahoe Road properties adjoining Carter Road, and the block containing properties along the other side of Patumahoe Road, owned by Barry Stephens, Scott Gavin and Dave Puflett. While the need for additional 3 ha commercial zoning has been identified by the FDC District Growth Strategy, no location for this landuse has been identified. This may produce a scattershot result with local residents applying for resource consents throughout different locations in the village. Suggestions from participants The majority of respondents if not all would like to see retail and hospitality businesses located in the village centre, Small trades and businesses are also considered appropriate for the centre of town, Other suggestions for permissible business use include: shared office or medical spaces, consultancies and other professional services, A few respondents, including Patumahoe School, commented on the adverse effects on current residents and schoolchildren from the chicken farm located on the outskirts of the village at Patumahoe Road. This farm is compliant with required standards, but the smell can become quite strong for close neighbours and the schoolchildren depending upon wind direction and strength, Discussions are also underway between our local conservation group, Whakaupoko Landcare, Auckland Council and the neighbour adjoining the chicken farm about creating a link walkway between Clive Howe Bush reserve and wetlands and Henrys Bush. This property is on steeply sloping north facing unproductive land which added to its proximity to the village residential area makes it suitable for lifestyle block development. A condition of development could be the creation of the link walkway. Zoning should provide integration of new residential areas with established areas to retain village aesthetic values, possible location for the 3 ha of light industry or commercial landuse is alongside railway where it can act as a buffer between the railway and residential development. The adjacent sIde of the railway already has a large timberyard development. Development of this land property should also consider possible road link to Patumahoe Road. An alternative location could be along Mauku Road including the back of current businesses located in that street, However, it has also been raised that perhaps despite identification in the DGS there is no requirement in Patumahoe village for this landuse, given the close proximity of the Paerata Industrial Park and the large industrial park in proposed for Waiuku.

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Other considerations: Once again, the proposed Kingseat development and surrounding area patronage provide extra impetus for considered planning. This will directly affect residences of Patumahoe as the current residents of Kingseat frequent Pukekohe for their local amenities. Patumahoe village is directly in the middle of this thoroughfare. With increasing population in Kingseat, traffic volume will substantially increase through Patumahoe; While development of productive land has to be carefully quantified, we believe that discussions between council and landowners should investigate opportunities such as the one proposed above that provide growth opportunity without loss of viable land and community access and ecological benefits to the environment and residents. Franklin District Growth Strategy 2051 (2007) 7.9.1 Live Patumahoe has experienced moderate growth (185 people, 42%) since 1991, growing by 14 per annum on average. Because of its good proximity to Pukekohe, Waiuku and State Highway 22, as well as being located in the more desirable northern rural area, Patumahoe will continue to be a sustainable rural village. Patumahoe would be characterised by medium-low density housing typifying rural village living. Over time the mix of household types choosing to live in Patumahoe will change with 50% of households occupied by families dropping to 40% by 2051. There will be a slightly higher share of singles (25% compared with 21%) and couples (30% compared with 25%) by 2051. Residential Densities Patumahoe currently has a dwelling density of 3.5 dwellings per hectare, with a mean section size of 1,230m2. The target density for Patumahoe is 10 dwellings per hectare as this is considered to be an achievable and appropriate target for Patumahoe, while still allowing a variety of lot sizes and lifestyle opportunities. Based on this density and an average household size of 2.3 people per household, and additional 18 hectares of future residential will be required. Table 7.26 sets out estimates for Patumahoe including the total number of new dwellings required through infill or redevelopment and greenfield development. These estimates are based on existing urban boundaries and future urban areas. An increasing level of uptake has been factored into the land requirements, beginning with 43% infill uptake by 2021 and increasing to 85% by 2051. Not all residential growth can be accommodated within the current urban boundaries, even allowing for intensification of the current rural residential zone. Infill opportunities are limited by an aquifer recharge area to the south. Constraints such as versatile soils, slope, location of the acquifer and elevation were mapped in order to identify the areas suitable for urban expansion Note: All projections are estimates and given that they are applied to contestable population figures provide little or no planning guidelines for an accurate plan.
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7.9.2 Work: Patumahoe currently offers employment for 125 people (as at 2004). By 2021, employment in Patumahoe is expected to increase by 35 jobs (2004-2021 growth at 30%), providing employment for 160 people. By 2052, employment in Patumahoe is expected to increase by 100 jobs (2004-2051 growth at 80%), providing employment for 220 people. There will be moderate growth in construction, education and retail sectors manufacturing,

Patumahoe currently has 3ha of business zoned land located at the junction of Patumahoe, Woodhouse, Mauku and Kingseat Roads. Given the anticipated employment growth, Patumahoe will require a further 1 hectare by 2021, and another 2 hectares by 2051. It is recommended that all economic activity is located on sites adjacent to the existing business zoned land to provide a centre with a cohesive commercial and industrial focus. Note: It is apparent that these projections are utilising district averages and have not been individually formulated for Patumahoe. As such, they provide little or no direction for future planning processes.

Planning advice: As mentioned previously, spatial plans should intend to make the village centre as active as possible avoid large tracts of open space, and include vehicles as well as pedestrians and cyclists in village green area. Locate industry as far away from residents as possible or if location is found that adjoins the village make sure that buffer zones and practices are utilised to divide land use areas. Eg. Swales such as that in Clive Howe Road. CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS We challenge the current population figures, projections and residential and employment trends inherited from the Franklin District Growth Strategy by Auckland Council. Given the obvious lack of individual attention given to Patumahoe when compiling these figures, we believe that a specific village planning process allows for this data to be updated. 4.1 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre We would like review of community and commercial spaces of village centre, to create a village spatial plan for these areas that support and enhance the quality of life that Patumahoe village residents and businesses appreciate and value, 4.2 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush linkway We would support the plan proposed for the residential development of the properties in Patumahoe Road, as defined and agreed to by Whakaupoko Landcare, Auckland Council and those private landowners which includes the removal of the chicken farm and installation of public walkway proposed in 5.2.2.
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4.3 Village walkway/cycleway network We also support any planning strategies and proposals that provide community links throughout the village, from Patumahoe village to Mauku and opportunities to link to other networks. See 5.2.3 for possible future options and 5.3.2 for proposal for initial Patumahoe/Mauku railway corridor route. 4.4 Commercial / Industrial zoning We would like to determine whether the need identified in the DGS for commercial zoning is accurate. We would like Auckland Council to undertake the recommendation of The DGS for 7.9.5 Future Actions Business and Industrial Activity: Undertake a study of appropriate land uses for Business zoned land in the village centre. This may result in changes to the business activities permitted, along with appropriate activities and development standards in each zone. The location and use of this land should be determined through the structure planning process. If so, we would like to ensure that we have a category system that defines appropriate business type for its location. If requirement is warranted and location is identified, categories of business type should apply to any such zones within Patumahoe to ensure that only appropriate businesses are located close to the heart of the village and residential areas.

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5. TRANSPORT
5.1 TRAFFIC Most if not all respondents indicated concern over the growing number of vehicles travelling throughout the village and the speeds at which they travel, as well at the increase in both volume and speed on the surrounding rural 100km roads. Concern was also expressed on the current (and expected) use of heavy traffic that uses the village as a through way. Engine braking noise was also a problem for some residents. Narrow roads with no footpaths/shoulders make pedestrian and cycle access hazardous for both utility and recreational use. Many parents feel that they have little option but to transport children to schools, adding to key congestion areas, because of above concerns. Some noted that school bus pickups/dropoffs appeared to be in hazardous places. Without public transport, youth have no options but cars or parents. Mixed opinions on the two recently installed traffic calming crossings in Patumahoe near the school - feedback from pedestrians and cyclists is that it creates a dangerous pinch point the new slow down for school traffic islands now make walking with a pushchair more dangerous I have to go on the road to get past them young parent. Our community is missing out on health, social, recreational and economic benefits due to a transport system that is completely car centred. Current planning discussion documents (Auckland Council Unleashed discussion document, Draft Local Board Plan) have no key traffic or transport projects/priorities for the Patumahoe/Mauku area. Suggestions from participants: Speed restrictions Reduce speed in the centre of town consider new road design incorporating traffic calming features/roundabouts, Localised narrowing of roads and surface changes, Signage and heavy traffic restrictions, Heavy traffic bypass, Need pedestrian crossings, School bus stops need urgent review, Look at speed calming devices/measures Create new roads that support established businesses and take the pressure off the current single route system, Bypass corridor designed to take into account increased traffic not only from Patumahoe village growth, but planned Kingseat development,

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Other considerations: The option of diverting traffic from the village is a very controversial issue, as traffic detracts from a safe environment but on the other hand it also takes business away from the village. Franklin District Growth Strategy 2051 (2007) 7.9.4 Infrastructure Requirements Circulation Patumahoe Road, Kingseat Road, Woodhouse Road and Mauku Road will have the capacity to absorb any traffic flow increases which will arise from increased population without significantly affecting the efficiency of the local road network. Future development at Patumahoe will be concentrated rather than dispersed which will maintain a focal point for the village. The most appropriate place is the intersection of the four roads where traffic management and urban design measures could be used to create an attractive focal point. These measures will need to be planned at an early stage so that traffic management measures can be incorporated with other design principles at the outset. Traffic management measures should include parking provisions and safety measures such as pedestrian facilities and speed control. Within the village centre, traffic management can also be used to promote a sense of place and retain pedestrian connectivity. Typically within the more compact form of villages, circulation should be aimed primarily at the pedestrians needs. Due to its small size, Patumahoe is unlikely to be able to sustain an economically viable bus station and/or rail service. As the population grows, monitoring should be undertaken to check whether demand is sufficient for some modest form of public transport such as dial-a-bus which might at some future date evolve into a route linking the harbourside communities of Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach, Waiau Pa and Kingseat to Pukekohe. It is highly unlikely that an economically viable service could be established at an early stage. New residential development should incorporate existing roadways and environmental corridors to define an integrated and connected network. Note: Once again, the population figures that are used to provide this recommendation are flawed. Also, no mention is made of the planned Kingseat development of 5,000 residents and how that will impact on traffic volume, and sustainability for public transport. Changes in fuel costs and local and national government policies will also define whether public transport becomes sustainable in the future more than inaccurate population figures.

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CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 5.1.1 Traffic Calming village entrances We would like traffic calming measures to be put in place at identified locations at all four entrances to the village. This should be completed before or at the time of the Kingseat development which will have a decided impact on traffic movement in Patumahoe village. These methods should include: Change of road surface (ie to cobblestones for 3 5 metres ) to provide visual, auditory and physical indications to drivers that they are entering/leaving a residential area, Considered planting alongside this road to give a visual indication to drivers to slow down, and also reiterate the rural village aesthetic, Appropriate and locally defined welcome signs, that reinforce the notion that as drivers they are entering as guests to a village area that is specifically designed for residents not drivers, Review of recently installed traffic calming devices for Patumahoe School, which seem both functionally and aesthetically inappropriate for their location. 5.1.2 Blackspot identification and remedial works Identification and remedy of blackspots immediately, before the increase in traffic volume increases the likelihood of accidents and injury. This request has been included in out Local Board Annual Plan submission August 2010. 5.1.3 School Bus Stop review A request for a critical review of school bus stops and execution of resultant solutions or recommendations, has been included in our Local Board Annual Plan submission August 2010. 5.1.4 Transport Processes and Projects We would like all local residents and groups to be considered stakeholders in Transport projects, and PVI is willing to pass on information from organisations that are involved with any traffic process or project to keep the community informed. We also ask that our local Board, and Auckland Council support us with any interaction with Auckland Transport, other roading or transport agencies, and provide any necessary resource allocations that can address these safety issues in a cohesive and planned manner.

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WALKWAYS, CYCLEWAYS Residential growth within the village has not been met with any efforts to integrate the old established neighbourhoods with the new, or to create links within the residential environment that will encourage residents to walk or cycle as an alternative to getting in the car. Patumahoe Primary school completed the Travelwise programme in 2010 and have a comprehensive picture of the concerns and deterrents for residents and visitors in regards to transport. There are many social, health and economic benefits to creating alternative routes through the village for walkers and cyclists. The Franklin District Walking and Cycling plan (April 2010) had the vision statement Providing Franklin with safe and high quality walking and cycling opportunities and a promotion programme to encourage their use. It had a sensible set of objectives and targets. But, when you see what budget had been allocated to these projects then its clear why there is so little progress in this area. The 2009-2019 LTCCP provided $200,000 ($100,000 rural and $100,000 urban) to the improvement of pedestrian facilities and $75,000 per annum for the development of cycle facilities for the community. The current situation for pedestrians and cyclists in Franklin is described in this plan as limited and with less than 1 km of designated cycleway in Franklin then this is probably an understatement. Of the roads, only 6.1% have paths on both sides and 5.5% on one side, so 88.4 % of the districts roads have no formal space for other than vehicular users of the route. So, there appears to be a big gap between many of the excellent objectives and targets espoused in various planning documents and action on the ground. Walking and cycling are good for local business on of the experiences that cyclingfriendly towns/cities have found is that people shop closer to home, and support their neighbourhood businesses instead of driving to larger stores further away all the time. They also have more money in their pockets, as their transport costs are lower. Encouraging cycling in village and town centres and between them and surrounding areas will have positive economic benefits for our district. Franklin district is already a popular cycling destination especially for Auckland cyclists seeking quiet roads and great scenery but it could be a booming destination. For example, two of the largest cycling clubs base the majority of their rides in Franklin. Counties Manukau Cycling is an amalgamation of several other clubs over the last 30 years to become Auckland and New Zealands larges road and track cycling club. For 8 months of the year this club has weekly rides held at a variety of venues in the Franklin area. Counties Manukau Veterans Cycling club, with over 300 members, uses Franklin routes for approximately 70% of its rides. The district has a significant opportunity to become the cycling destination for Auckland city where not only Franklin and Auckland residents can enjoy safe and scenic cycling but we can attract national and international visitors. So whilst we are looking initially to develop local walking and cycling opportunities we see great benefits in developing a district wide plan that also connects to the vision of
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the wider Auckland region. At a national level, initiatives such as the New Zealand Cycle Trail offer more opportunities to link with the growth in cycling and the recent announcement by the Ministry of Economic Development of plans to expand the project to include back country routes is an opportunity going begging in our district. Developing integrated networks for utility, recreational and cycle tourism in Franklin is an exciting and real opportunity that will brin economic benefits for the wider Auckland area but the appropriate planning for routes, infrastructure, and developing a cycle-friendly culture needs to happen now. In Kennett and Turners influential Classic New Zealand Road Rides there are only two of the described 100 rides that feature parts of east Franklin leaving large areas of our unique cycling district unknown. Real commitment and a preparedness to consider new ways of designing and educating for walking and cycling are the prerequisites for long term benefits for the whole of Auckland. Suggestions from participants: Create multi-use pathway that allows safe pedestrian access between Hunter Road and the village and Patumahoe Road (from the railway line and the village). This recreational loop is in regular daily use by a variety of users, walkers, cyclists, joggers, horseriders, dog walkers etc and the two routes mentioned above are located on a 100km speed zone. This is particularly important for creating a safe pathway for children to walk to school and for other residents to access the village without having to drive, Link existing walkways in the village to create a network and extend to include and integrate new subdivisions, which should all include walkways/cycleways, Other considerations: Any identified routes should be considered with a wider network and philosophy in mind. They will also include ecological corridors, sites, and heritage locations within that network so coordination of these other planning considerations will result in a network of routes that have multiple benefits, areas and goal achievements. Also, care should be taken to include further extensions from the outskirts of the village to the surrounding areas: ie. link to Patumahoe, Kingseat etc. Franklin District Growth strategy (2007) 7.9.3 Play Any Structure Plan for Patumahoe should ensure the development of a walkway/cycleway network; largely along stormwater reserves. This network could be extended to provide access to Henrys Scenic Reserve that lies to the southeast of Patumahoe. Planning advice: Rural villages should work on bringing the outside environment in. Due to higher density developments, many village residents may find that despite living in a rural village surrounded by open spaces and native bush, access to such areas requires the use of a car to another location. Identify and protect those natural environments in and around the village that can serve multiple purposes alternative routes, ecological protection and enhancement, health and social benefits, and create functional networks for off road travel.
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CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS We ask Auckland Council to begin this process by committing planning and funding to the following projects all of which meet the recommendations for Patumahoe found in the Franklin District Growth strategy (2007): 5.2 WALKWAYS 5.2.1 Hunter Road loop walkway Patumahoe School parents group This project is currently underway. It is an initiative by local residents that aims to create a safe, concreted footpath on the Woodhouse Road and Patumahoe Road segments of the Woodhouse Road Patumahoe Road Hunter Road circuit. 5.2.2. Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush Linkway Whakaupoko Landcare, Auckland Council, private property owners and PVI The recent council acquisition of Clive Howe Bush reserve and the clearing of the existing track down to the wetlands has created an opportunity for the collaboration of several parties to benefit the community as a whole. Discussions with local property owners are taking place that may allow the wetland track to be extended to reach the Henrys Bush reserve. This would also require some landuse changes as specified in 4.2. 5.2.3. Village walkway/cycleway network We would also like support from the Local Board for our plans to create a network of routes that provide access to sites of ecological and historical significance. Identification of these routes will be aided by the input of our local conservation group, Whakaupoko Landcare and the recently formed local heritage group. Current identified possible routes are: Walkway/cycleway adjoining railway line linking Patumahoe/Mauku villages can also provide offroad access to Patumahoe Preschool on Mauku Road, Extension of Searle stormwater route to include adjoining old quarry site and bush, and possibly create connection to Kingseat Road from subdivision, Connection from railway route to Mauku Watergardens (Mauku Falls) and St Brides Anglican church (historical site). This network should aim to integrate the existing and new residential neighbourhoods, and encourage the non-vehicular movement of people within the community.

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5.3 CYCLEWAYS We ask that priority be given initially to two projects. The first is to be Stage 1 of a wider network of commuter/recreational cycle routes where roads with identified low AADT (average daily traffic volumes) are remediated to have 1.5m (approx.) sealed and marked shoulders. Clear and frequent signage would signal to motorists these shared routes. Lower speed zones should also be applied along with an education campaign. 5.3.1 Pukekohe Commuter Route Develop a commuter route from Patumahoe to Pukekohe via Patumahoe Road, Eden Road, Russell Road, Belmont Road, Factory Road into Victoria Street West. From Victoria Street a route that terminates at the new park and ride facility can then be identified with signage. Appropriate planning for cyclists will be factored in to the design of the park and ride. The second project is to be the first stage of an off-road and primarily recreational cycle trail, not only making cycling safer and more convenient, but also offering a chance to get more people physically active and families biking in safe and pleasant conditions via off-road trails. This again, would in the longer term be part of a district wide network and is centred on making use of rail corridors. 5.3.2 Patumahoe/Mauku railway corridor route Develop a walkway/cycleway adjoining the railway line linking Patumahoe and Mauku villages. From Patumahoe there is then the potential to develop the trail west towards Waiuku and so include tourist destinations such as the Glenbrook Vintage Railway. Linkages towards Pukekohe are a future development so as to link with current iniatives such as the Tuakau to Pukekohe cycleway/walkway project. This route will be part of the Village walkway/cycleway network proposed in 4.3 and 5.2.3. Co-ordination with other iniatives in the district and a long term strategy are key to the success of the above projects. We ask that Auckland Council support us with any interaction with roading or transport agencies, and provide any necessary resource allocations that can support these priorities in a cohesive and planned manner. By identifying the requirements now, any future requirements for land, accessways etc can be taken into account when opportunities arise. For instance, road shoulders can be created when roads are resealed. Future developments can fund land requirements and work costs.

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5.4 PUBLIC TRANSPORT Patumahoe village is located 12km (10min drive) from the centre of Pukekohe, but only 8km from the outskirts which are continuing to creep outwards. It is the through access to Pukekohe for many residents from the surrounding communities: Kingseat, Glenbrook, Waiau Pa, Clarks Beach, and Mauku. Without access to public transport - journeys to and from the village are taken by private or business owned vehicles, with most cyclists being recreational or sports cyclists. Walking to-from Pukekohe, while not non-existent would be very rare. Rural youth are often disadvantaged by the lack of public transport, and rely on friends or family to transport them. With the increase in the driving age, this reliance will be longer at a time when otherwise, they are becoming more independent. On the southern side of the village there is an existing operating railway which once had a Patumahoe village station. The railway has multiple trains moving freight to and from the Glenbrook Steel Mill. It connects to the main trunk line to Pukekohe at Paerata. The railway has also been extended from the Glenbook Steel Mill line by the Glenbrook Vintage Railway, which has reinstated the old branch line into Waiuku which will finally terminate at the town centre near the estuary. Suggestions from participants: If a location is identified, we would like Auckland Council to purchase land to allow for possible long term future train station. This will be included in the spatial planning aspect of Feasibility Study we have requested. We believe that Patumahoe is suitably suited for a park and ride for the following reasons: The railway that runs to the south of Patumahoe village is closely located to the residential area, and is already an operating line freight runs into Glenbrook Steel Mill and including the project by Glenbrook Vintage Railway takes the line all the way into the Waiuku township, Proposed development of 5,000 Kingseat residents will include a large number of commuters which can be served by a train station here if a cycleway link between the two villages was created with the implementation of the development any station here could be reasonably accessed by Kingseat youth without the need for vehicle licenses, Waiuku is already been prioritised as a heritage town, and has a large industrial site planned and would also benefit from a weekend commuter and weekend tourist train service to Auckland, Paerata, also planned for industrial and commercial development, is the location of the train line divergence from Papakura Pukekohe and an existing stop. If the decision is made now to ensure space for a possible Park n Ride, this could be a great future asset to the community given the expected and no longer disputed increasing cost of fuel, Many of Patumahoe and Mauku residents commute to Auckland, and a line specific to our community would not be economical or reasonable to be included as a stop on a Paerata Waiuku line would a logical decision for a service that would benefit the wider community Waiuku, Awhitu Peninsula and west Franklin,

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A train service, especially if linked to alternative transport and cycling routes would allow our younger people some autonomy regarding transport especially considering the lifting of the licensing age for drivers. Other considerations: Many cities around the world are planning public transport systems and improvements given the research regarding peak oil production and anthromorphic climate changes. City planners are also focusing on creating high-density liveable communities within prescribed urban limits. If that is the direction of Auckland Council communities on the outskirts of the city may find access to resources and improvements limited unless they are on a defined transport corridor or public transport network. Central government has also reversed transport strategies that followed overseas longterm strategies and has reinstated emphasis on road development making it difficult for local government to plan and fund alternative transport projects. Planning advice: Ensure that a location is identified and land acquisition takes place. This will allow for plans to be drawn up that have an element of future proofing about them. CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 5.4.1 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre A location for a train station will be defined by any spatial planning for the village centre, regardless of current policy and resource allocation, to ascertain the best position for future proofing and land acquisition requirement. This Initial Spatial Plan has been requested in the Local Board Annual plan August 2011 and includes considerations from 3.2 and 4.1. 5.4.2 Land acquisition Train Station location When idenfied we ask that any land acquisition include this location which until needed can be utilised as a passive reserve. We believe that this approach will ensure any transport planning (vehicles, pedestrians, cycles) can then be designed with this possibility in mind reducing future adjustment costs, increasing networking cohesion and avoiding later increased purchase prices given that the village would have expanded at that stage. 5.4.3 Policy changes for Transport In our Auckland Plan submission (May 2011) and out Local Board Annual Plan submission (August 2011) we asked Auckland Council to define a fuel price indicator or trend signal that allows them to re-prioritise the spending and subsidising of public transport, so that as economic and environmental priorities change, some flexibility is retained in local government that allows a shift in policy and spending without long delay. From a long term planning perspective there will be greater future use of public transport and provision needs to be made now for this.
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6. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
6.1 ECOLOGICAL CORRIDORS & SITES Ecological sites and corridors have been identified in Patumahoe by the use of contour maps of the village and the advice of a Low Impact Design planner from Auckland Council, Hayden Easton. We ask that the Local Board supports us with any engagement with private landowners, Whakaupoko Landcare and other agencies that will protect and enhance these sites, and encourage public access. We are encouraged by the current work underway by Whakaupoko Landcare on their Clive Howe reserve and Henrys Bush link (see below), and believe this model can be duplicated to benefit all involved - including Auckland Council. We believe that identifying these sites within our village will not only allow us to connect sites by a network of routes, but also by encouraging use, will increase the protection and enhancement of these places. We also consider that the inclusion of these routes and sites in village planning and development will bring the surrounding rural environment into the built are of the village in a natural and pleasant manner. Given the density of some of the developments, this provides residents with an opportunity to engage with the natural environment on a regular and consistent basis and is a honest feature of a rural village. Suggestions from participants: We have identified ecological corridors and sites in and around the village some of which are on private land: Summit hill observation park and creation of summit walkway to be created alongside development of Patumahoe Hill our submission already sent alongside subdivision application - we ask that provision be made to include this in reserves allocation as this summit is the highest point in the village and provides a spectacular vantage point, Extension of Searle stormwater reserve into old quarry and waterfall bush area, Inclusion of Puriri Stand of bush alongside railway 400 m from Patumahoe village in a railway route between Patumahoe and Mauku, Development of walkway through village that follows stream bed and will provide access to residents from Woodhouse Road to Patumahoe Primary School without having to travel along the road. Whakaupoko Landcare is also currently working with Auckland Council, local landowners and Patumahoe Village Inc on a project that has been included in our submission to the Local Board Annual Draft Plan.

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A copy of this proposal is shown below: Clive Howe Reserve Henrys Bush track, wetlands and link accessway Further to recent discussions with landowners on the southern boundary of Patumahoe Village and Patumahoe Village Inc agreement has been reached that in the long term (510 years) the land zoning should change from Rural (which is the present zoning) to Rural Residential or Residential zoning. The reasons for considering this change are due to the following factors; Patumahoe Village Inc has recently been active in looking at long term plans for the future direction of Patumahoe in the next 5- 20 years. One of the properties within this rezoning area is a chicken farming business. Concern from within the community is that if future growth is to occur in Patumahoe Village and its surrounding district, these types of farming operations should be in more rural areas, Adjacent to the area targeted for rezoning is a public reserve. The local Whakaupoko Landcare Group with support from the Franklin District Board has been active in developing a walkway through this reserve which would link up with Hunters Bush. The walkway would be situated on the boundary of the rezoned area. Funding would be required for fencing, boardwalk, bridge over a stream in Hunters Bush and native tree plantings. The approx cost of this project would be $30,000. Included in the rezoned area would be a small reserve which could become part of the walkway, The land in question is owned by three lifestyle block property owners. All of the properties are in close proximity to the Patumahoe community so the land in the long term is unproductive for horticultural or agricultural commercial use. Note: Copy of project contour plan included in Appendix. Other considerations Development of any routes that follow these ecological corridors and sites, should consider the overall design of a network that includes access routes and connections both within the village and beyond. Many of these will be identified by the Transport considerations named above. Planning advice: Use of QEII covenants and grants can be utilised to benefit the private landowner as well as the community, so both are served by a cooperative approach. QEII grants allow identified native bush and wetland areas to be regenerated and include public access opportunities. This approach is very relevant when discussing environmental areas that are close to residential neighbourhoods, as the opportunities for public access are more likely to be taken up.

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CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 6.1.1 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush linkway In our submission to the Local Board Annual Plan (August 2011) we supported the current Whakaupoko Landcare project: Clive Howe Reserve Henrys bush track because it results in multiple benefits to many in the community with one project and also achieves many of the criteria for our transport, natural environment, community values and planning issues with one stroke. It should also be noted, that many community responses have mentioned that they would prefer the existing chicken farm property to convert to residential in order to reduce air quality issues. The farm operates well within consent requirements, but for the improved quality of life for the local schoolchildren and residents we believe that the change of landuse would provide ongoing benefits for all for many years to come. We ask that Auckland Council and the Local Board support this project for the same reasons. 6.1.2 Village Walkway/Cycleway network Continue working with Whakaupoko Landcare, community groups and other agencies to identify ecological sites or corridors for inclusion in the final village plan and help to protect and enhance such locations.

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6.2 REGENERATION & PEST/WEED CONTROL Introduction from Andrew Sinclair Whakaupoko Landcare: The Whakaupoko Landcare group that was formed over seven years ago has recently expanded to include the Patumahoe area. There has been much work with pest control (primarily possums and rats), as despite the high rural population pest numbers were also high. There is still much to do with reducing pests to a low level and even in the Council administered reserve of Henrys Bush, pest numbers show as being very high despite continuous baiting at a neighbouring property close by. (Health and Safety issues prevent us from putting bait stations in the Public Reserve and Auckland Council has not controlled the area for some time for pests). We have established some bait stations close to the village and slo put in place a three monthly bird survey at 17 sites close to the village. All this is well documented on the village website. We have also introduced just this month a very thorough pest survey using Chew Cards using a new innovation that we have developed specifically for Landcare Groups (again, refer www.patumahoe.org.nz, Whakaupoko Landcare pages Monitoring). Up until now there has been limited free native trees available for landowners. We are reviewing what revegetation projects we become involved in for the future. The Landcare group has also been promoting the elimination of problem weeds with the main priority at this stage being Woody Nightshade. Suggestions from participants: Encourage more landowners to be involved in weed control, pest control and bird surveys, Look at other possible walkways, Look at another bush reserve in the area, Do a survey of native bush stands in the area (tree id etc). Other considerations: Considered effort on community and private land often has ongoing positive benefits for the wider community. There are many existing projects, schemes and grants available intended to make it easier to source advice and assistance in pest and weed control and regeneration activities. Planning advice: Coordinate efforts of local groups and government with schemes such as the QEII covenant scheme, which will provide resources for bush revegetation, weed and pest control and encourage public access to such areas where suitable. This is very relevant in context of a rural village where there are sites that are within close or reasonable distance to the residential area that can benefit the environment, the private landowner and ensure that a larger number of the public has the potential to access the resulting improvement.

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CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 6.2.1 Village Walkway/Cycle network Increase the use, maintenance and value of ecological sites by including them on the proposed village network of alternative routes. Resources and volunteers can be allocated to keep these areas weed and pest free. 6.2.2 Environmental improvement projects Work in coordination with other community groups and Auckland Council to improve effectiveness and scope of projects. Work alongside or in conjunction with any other organisation that has the same aims as Whakaupoko Landcare in order to educate the community and facilitate improved natural environment and public access to same.

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7. HISTORY/HERITAGE
There is a significant amount of living history still tethered to Patumahoe by the continued presence of long established families. Further back, we have significant Maori settlement and history. More recently, Patumahoe was a thriving rural community in the 1940-s and 1950s boasting facilities, clubs and services that many a modern day community would love to have. A department store, dairy, mill, several petrol stations, billiard room and hotel. Development should be sensitive to this history and background, and acknowledge and enhance this history while moving us forward. At present, there is a current project underway by local residents to relocate the Scout Hall (Mareretu Ave) to a site on the Clive Howe reserve. This relocated Hall will be available for community use, and is intended to act as a repository of local archival history items and documents. CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS 7.1 History collation & preservation PVI offers the use of the community website pages for any residents or groups interested in collating, discussing or preserving local history anecdotes, photos, documents or stories. Training or assistance will be given to those who require or request it by contacting us by mailing: P O Box 172, Patumahoe or emailing: patumahoevillage2050@gmail.com. 7.2 Village walkway/cycleway network Community information is required to determine sites of historical significance. Where possible these sites should be included in network planning, and accompanied by relevant signage or sculptures.

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8. PARKS & RECREATIONAL LAND


In order to define an accurate and reasonable land acquisition requirement, we have undertaken the following up to the present time: Contacted existing sports clubs within Patumahoe to ascertain current use figures and projected use figures for the next few decades, Reviewed and challenged current population figures used by Auckland Council for allocation of parks and reserves, Requested that our Local Board conduct a Feasibility Study to identify current, future and possible stakeholders to improve community use, and sustainable outcome.

Active sports Fields and facilities


Current reserves include: Clive Howe Reserve active sports grounds located adjacent to Primary School, Patumahoe War Memorial Reserve active sports grounds and location of sports Buildings: Clubrooms for : Patumahoe Tennis, Patumahoe Junior Rugby & Mauku Cricket Club, Patumahoe Bowling. Patumahoe War Memorial Hall used and maintained by Patumahoe Rugby, available for community hire

Passive Reserves
Current reserves include: Henrys Bush native reserve located just outside residential boundary of Patumahoe, Clive Howe Bush reserve recently acquired by Auckland Council as part of subdivision process,

Land acquisition
Land acquisition requires the coordination of input from the previously noted areas of investigation: Land acquisition for Multi-Use facility and active sports fields 3. Multi-Use Community Centre Item 3.3 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush Linkway 4. Planning Intentions - Zoning Issues Item 4.2 5.2 Walkways Item 5.2.2 6.1 Ecological Corridors & Sites Item 6.1.1 Village Walkway/Cycleway network 4. Planning Intentions- Zoning Issues Item 4.3 5.2 Walkways Item 5.2.3 6.1 Ecological Corridors & Sites Item 6.1.2 7. History/heritage Item 7.2 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre 3. Multi-Use Community Centre Item 3.2 4. Planning Intentions Zoning Issues - Item 4.1. 5.4 Public Transport Item 5.4.1
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The land acquisition requirements of each have been defined within their own categories, and have been summarised below in Conclusions.

Suggestions from participants:


Add to current reserves by negotiation/cooperation with local landowners to create network of linked ecological, access and heritage sites Support Whakaupoko Landcare in regeneration, pest and weed control projects. Acquire residential land adjoining existing fields to allow for expansion and future growth, Acquire land for designed network of walkways/cycleways or negotiate with landowners for public access to sites and locations, Include future location of train station in any spatial plan land acquisition

Other considerations:
Patumahoe War Memorial reserve has long been the home of Patumahoe Rugby and some consideration needs to be given on the weight this has over current planning advice and trends. Planning advice: Advice received from Auckland Council staff is to try and restrict new land acquisition to rural zoned properties as funding restraints make the purchase of residentially zoned land unlikely. Also, consider whether active sports grounds are desirable in the heart of the village current planning methods locate these reserves away from the centre of communities in order to encourage all-day movement and life in that important centre.

CONCLUSIONS / ACTIONS
8.1 Feasibility Study & Initial spatial plan A request for a feasibility study to determine future requirement for active sports fields, and land requirement and location for multi-use facility has been made to the Local Board in August 2011. Included in feasibility study process will be an initial spatial plan for the village centre which will help identify land acquisition priorities and requirements and act on those recommendations. 8.2 Village Walkway/Cycleway network Identify immediate and obvious land acquisition needs for Transport section and include in immediate and long-term budgets, Identify landowners and stakeholders on possible Transport routes and projects and coordinate with them to plan best outcome for network design Identify possible alternate options for active reserve land and acquire while still rurally zoned. Work with Auckland Council on spatial plan to determine whether new land acquisition can be offset by sale or rezoning of land currently owned by council

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Conclusion Village Characteristics DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Any future

Conclusion/Action from consultion 1.1 Village Characteristics (1. VILLAGE CHARACTER) People have told us that they value the existing characteristics of Patumahoe village and would like to see them retained throughout any growth.

No. 1.1

Timeframe referral ONGOING

Although the Franklin DGS attempted to define the identity and characteristics of Patumahoe, these aspects and values need to be community defined rather than committee or planner designed.

Throughout this process we have invited comment regarding this issue and feel that this will be a continuous activity. Given the responses so far, the priority for most seems to be retaining the existing rural village feel and scale.

Methods of achieving this may include: Planning growth needs to reflect the village feel and rural environment ie. limit to size of retail and commercial enterprises in the village centre, Control of type of businesses permitted in this area eg. Use of category in zoning. 2.1 ONGOING

Village Aesthetics

2.1 Village Aesthetics (2. VILLAGE AESTHETICS) As a rural village with a strong horticultural background and ancient tangata whenua ties, we believe that development and planning should reflect these histories, and include the natural environment which surrounds and supports us.

Therefore our relevant point of difference is maintained by considering the following aspects during planning and development projects: Retain the feel and function of a working rural community, Encourage sympathetic built form in new buildings in central village hub, Create network of accessible natural environment within our residential areas, Design community central hub that can be used for local market days or farmers markets. 3.1, 8.1 PRESENT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Road Any future

Feasibility Study & Initial spatial plan

3.1 Feasibility Study & Initial spatial plan (3. MULTI-USE COMMUNITY CENTRE) We have asked the Local Board to include in the Local Board Annual Plan allocation of $60,000 to conduct a feasibility study to investigate a multi-use centre for Patumahoe. This request is in line with recommendation of the Franklin District Growth Strategy - 7.9.5 Future Actions.

As well as considering current clubs such as rugby, cricket, tennis, bowling and netball this study should identify and include other stakeholders eg. Heritage group, Volunteer Fire Service, Plunket, Patumahoe Community Asset Trust, Playcentre, other sporting and recreational codes, and any clubs, organisations, non-profits or businesses that may be looking for a suitable venue.

Our current model of choice is Moutere Hills, in Nelson, primarily because as well as managing to coordinate all sporting codes in one facility, they extended their brief to encourage extensive use of the centre by other organisations and businesses. After five years of operation, running at a break even point (give or take $2,000) their current turnover has almost doubled from last year, and they will be making a substantial profit. A truly sustainable and beneficial community asset that has encouraged and achieved community engagement and is valued as such.

We believe that a feasibility study will provide a specific direction for asset management and growth that at present is nonexistent. This direction will provide information for decision making that can not only protect the current community connections, but enhance and encourage further community involvement both from planned new residents and currently unengaged ones.

8.1 Feasibility Study & Initial spatial plan (8. PARKS & RECREATIONAL LAND) A request for a feasibility study to determine future requirement for active sports fields, and land requirement and location for multi-use facility has been made to the Local Board in August 2011.

Included in feasibility study process will be an initial spatial plan for the village centre which will help identify land acquisition priorities and requirements and act on those recommendations.

Conclusion Initial Spatial Plan for village centre DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Road Carter Road residential zone Woodhouse Rd Stage 2 Woodhouse Rd residential zone Any future

Conclusion/Action from consultion 3.2 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre (3. MULTI-USE COMMUNITY CENTRE) In order to create a relevant spatial plan, it is also important that the conclusion of this study (3.1) also provides options for a basic concept spatial plan which will retain and enhance the heart of the village taking into consideration the results of the study. This consideration has been a priority for many of the respondents so far.

No. 3.2, 4.1, 5.4.1

Timeframe referral PRESENT

This spatial planning will allow discussions with local community, affected landowners and council to take place with clear objectives and considerations noted. It will also help to define how to protect and maintain our community characteristics and values. The feasibility study will provide one of the key documents for spatial planning and requests for long term community facilities and funding. This process will also follow the recommendations of the Franklin District Growth Strategy 2051 (2007) which recommended that Patumahoe undertake a design based focus and produce a Structure Plan for the future urban areas, identifying road, reserves and residential patterns and integrating this with the structure plan already contained in the Franklin District Plan.

4.1 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre (4. PLANNING ZONING ISSUES) We would like review of community and commercial spaces of village centre, to create a village spatial plan for these areas that support and enhance the quality of life that Patumahoe village residents and businesses appreciate and value,

Land acquisition Multi-Use facility active sports fields

for and

3.3

PRESENT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Carter Road residential zone 4.2, 5.2.2, 6.1.1 PRESENT LANDUSE CHANGE & DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Patumahoe Road - linkway

5.4.1 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre (5. TRANSPORT Public transport) A location for a train station will be defined by any spatial planning for the village centre, regardless of current policy and resource allocation, to ascertain the best position for future proofing and land acquisition requirement. This Initial Spatial Plan has been requested in the Local Board Annual plan August 2011 and includes considerations from 3.2 and 4.1. 3.3 Land acquisition for Multi-Use facility and active sports fields (3. MULTI-USE COMMUNITY CENTRE) We have also asked the Local Board that budgetary and priority consideration be given to possible land acquisition resulting from this process. Future development contributions can then be utilised to acquire land in order to help mitigate the effects on the existing village residents.

Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush linkway

4.2 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush linkway (4. PLANNING ZONING ISSUES) We would support the plan proposed for the residential development of the properties in Patumahoe Road, as defined and agreed to by Whakaupoko Landcare, Auckland Council and those private landowners which includes the removal of the chicken farm and installation of public walkway proposed in 5.2.2. 5.2.2. Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush Linkway(5. TRANSPORT Walkways) Whakaupoko Landcare, Auckland Council, private property owners and PVI The recent council acquisition of Clive Howe Bush reserve and the clearing of the existing track down to the wetlands has created an opportunity for the collaboration of several parties to benefit the community as a whole. Discussions with local property owners are taking place that may allow the wetland track to be extended to reach the Henrys Bush reserve. This would also require some landuse changes as specified in 4.2. 6.1.1 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush linkway (6. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Ecological corridors & sites) In our submission to the Local Board Annual Plan (August 2011) we supported the current Whakaupoko Landcare project: Clive Howe Reserve Henrys bush track because it results in multiple benefits to many in the community with one project and also achieves many of the criteria for our transport, natural environment, community values and planning issues with one stroke. It should also be noted, that many community responses have mentioned that they would prefer the existing chicken farm property to convert to residential in order to reduce air quality issues. The farm operates well within consent requirements, but for the improved quality of life for the local schoolchildren and residents we believe that the change of landuse would provide ongoing benefits for all for many years to come. We ask that Auckland Council and the Local Board support this project for the same reasons. PATUMAHOE VILLAGE PLAN OCTOBER 2011 FINAL DRAFT REVIEW Page 40

Conclusion Village walkway/cycleway network LANDUSE CHANGE & DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Patumahoe Road - linkway DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Road Carter Road residential zone Woodhouse Rd Stage 2 Woodhouse Rd residential zone Any.future

Conclusion/Action from consultion 4.3 Village walkway/cycleway network (4. PLANNING ZONING ISSUES) We also support any planning strategies and proposals that provide community links throughout the village, from Patumahoe village to Mauku and opportunities to link to other networks. See 5.2.3 for possible future options and 5.3.2 for proposal for initial Patumahoe/Mauku railway corridor route. 5.2.3. Village walkway/cycleway network (5. TRANSPORT Walkways) We would also like support from the Local Board for our plans to create a network of routes that provide access to sites of ecological and historical significance. Identification of these routes will be aided by the input of our local conservation group, Whakaupoko Landcare and the recently formed local heritage group. Current identified possible routes are: Walkway/cycleway adjoining railway line linking Patumahoe/Mauku villages can also provide offroad access to Patumahoe Preschool on Mauku Road, Extension of Searle stormwater route to include adjoining old quarry site and bush, and possibly create connection to Kingseat Road from subdivision, Connection from railway route to Mauku Watergardens (Mauku Falls) and St Brides Anglican church (historical site). This network should aim to integrate the existing and new residential neighbourhoods, and encourage the non-vehicular movement of people within the community. 6.1.2 Village Walkway/Cycleway network (6. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Ecological corridors & sites) Continue working with Whakaupoko Landcare, community groups and other agencies to identify ecological sites or corridors for inclusion in the final village plan and help to protect and enhance such locations. 6.2.1 Village Walkway/Cycle network (6. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Regeneration & Pest/Weed control) Increase the use, maintenance and value of ecological sites by including them on the proposed village network of alternative routes. Resources and volunteers can be allocated to keep these areas weed and pest free.

No. 4.3, 5.2.3, 6.1.2, 6.2.1, 7.2, 8.2

Timeframe referral PRESENT

7.2 Village walkway/cycleway network (7. HISTORY / HERITAGE) Community information is required to determine sites of historical significance. Where possible these sites should be included in network planning, and accompanied by relevant signage or sculptures.

8.2 Village Walkway/Cycleway network (8. PARKS & RECREATIONAL LAND) Identify immediate and obvious land acquisition needs for Transport section and include in immediate and long-term budgets, Identify landowners and stakeholders on possible Transport routes and projects and coordinate with them to plan best outcome for network design Identify possible alternate options for active reserve land and acquire while still rurally zoned. Work with Auckland Council on spatial plan to determine whether new land acquisition can be offset by sale or rezoning of land currently owned by council. 4.4 PRESENT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Roa Carter Road residential zone Any future

Commercial / Industrial zoning

4.4 Commercial / Industrial zoning (4. PLANNING ZONING ISSUES)

We would like to determine whether the need identified in the DGS for commercial zoning is accurate. We would like Auckland Council to undertake the recommendation of The DGS for 7.9.5 Future Actions Business and Industrial Activity: Undertake a study of appropriate land uses for Business zoned land in the village centre. This may result in changes to the business activities permitted, along with appropriate activities and development standards in each zone. The location and use of this land should be determined through the structure planning process. If so, we would like to ensure that we have a category system that defines appropriate business type for its location. If requirement is warranted and location is identified, categories of business type should apply to any such zones within Patumahoe to ensure that only appropriate businesses are located close to the heart of the village and residential areas. PATUMAHOE VILLAGE PLAN OCTOBER 2011 FINAL DRAFT REVIEW Page 41

Conclusion Traffic Calming village entrances

Conclusion/Action from consultion 5.1.1 Traffic Calming village entrances (5. TRANSPORT Traffic) We would like traffic calming measures to be put in place at identified locations at all four entrances to the village. This should be completed before or at the time of the Kingseat development which will have a decided impact on traffic movement in Patumahoe village. These methods should include: Change of road surface (ie to cobblestones for 3 5 metres ) to provide visual, auditory and physical indications to drivers that they are entering/leaving a residential area, Considered planting alongside this road to give a visual indication to drivers to slow down, and also reiterate the rural village aesthetic, Appropriate and locally defined welcome signs, that reinforce the notion that as drivers they are entering as guests to a village area that is specifically designed for residents not drivers, Review of recently installed traffic calming devices for Patumahoe School, which seem both functionally and aesthetically inappropriate for their location. 5.1.2 PRESENT

No. 5.1.1

Timeframe referral DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat village Any future ONGOING

Blackspot identification and remedial works 5.1.3

School Bus Stop review

ONGOING PRESENT

Transport Processes and Projects

5.1.4

ONGOING PRESENT ONGOING

Hunter Road loop walkway

5.1.2 Blackspot identification and remedial works (5. TRANSPORT Traffic Identification and remedy of blackspots immediately, before the increase in traffic volume increases the likelihood of accidents and injury. This request has been included in out Local Board Annual Plan submission August 2010. 5.1.3 School Bus Stop review (5. TRANSPORT Traffic A request for a critical review of school bus stops and execution of resultant solutions or recommendations, has been included in our Local Board Annual Plan submission August 2010. 5.1.4 Transport Processes and Projects (5. TRANSPORT Traffic We would like all local residents and groups to be considered stakeholders in Transport projects, and PVI is willing to pass on information from organisations that are involved with any traffic process or project to keep the community informed. We also ask that our local Board, and Auckland Council support us with any interaction with Auckland Transport, other roading or transport agencies, and provide any necessary resource allocations that can address these safety issues in a cohesive and planned manner. 5.2.1 Hunter Road loop walkway (5. TRANSPORT Walkways) Patumahoe School parents group This project is currently underway. It is an initiative by local residents that aims to create a safe, concreted footpath on the Woodhouse Road and Patumahoe Road segments of the Woodhouse Road Patumahoe Road Hunter Road circuit. 5.2.1,

Pukekohe Commuter Route

5.3.1

PRESENT LANDUSE CHANGE & DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Patumahoe Road linkway DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Woodhouse Rd residential zone ONGOING

Patumahoe/Mauku railway corridor route

5.3.1 Pukekohe Commuter Route (5. TRANSPORT Cycleways Develop a commuter route from Patumahoe to Pukekohe via Patumahoe Road, Eden Road, Russell Road, Belmont Road, Factory Road into Victoria Street West. From Victoria Street a route that terminates at the new park and ride facility can then be identified with signage. Appropriate planning for cyclists will be factored in to the design of the park and ride. 5.3.2 Patumahoe/Mauku railway corridor route (5. TRANSPORT Cycleways Develop a walkway/cycleway adjoining the railway line linking Patumahoe and Mauku villages. From Patumahoe there is then the potential to develop the trail west towards Waiuku and so include tourist destinations such as the Glenbrook Vintage Railway. Linkages towards Pukekohe are a future development so as to link with current iniatives such as the Tuakau to Pukekohe cycleway/walkway project. This route will be part of the Village walkway/cycleway network proposed in 4.3 and 5.2.3. Co-ordination with other iniatives in the district and a long term strategy are key to the success of the above projects. We ask that Auckland Council support us with any interaction with roading or transport agencies, and provide any necessary resource allocations that can support these priorities in a cohesive and planned manner. By identifying the requirements now, any future requirements for land, accessways etc can be taken into account when opportunities arise. For instance, road shoulders can be created when roads are resealed. Future developments can fund land requirements and work costs. PATUMAHOE VILLAGE PLAN OCTOBER 2011 FINAL DRAFT REVIEW Page 42

5.3.2

ONGOING

Conclusion Land acquisition Train Station location

Conclusion/Action from consultion 5.4.2 Land acquisition Train Station location (5. TRANSPORT Public transport) When idenfied we ask that any land acquisition include this location which until needed can be utilised as a passive reserve. We believe that this approach will ensure any transport planning (vehicles, pedestrians, cycles) can then be designed with this possibility in mind reducing future adjustment costs, increasing networking cohesion and avoiding later increased purchase prices given that the village would have expanded at that stage.

No. 5.4.2

Timeframe referral PRESENT

Policy changes for Transport

5.4.3 Policy changes for Transport (5. TRANSPORT Public transport) In our Auckland Plan submission (May 2011) and out Local Board Annual Plan submission (August 2011) we asked Auckland Council to define a fuel price indicator or trend signal that allows them to re-prioritise the spending and subsidising of public transport, so that as economic and environmental priorities change, some flexibility is retained in local government that allows a shift in policy and spending without long delay. From a long term planning perspective there will be greater future use of public transport and provision needs to be made now for this. 6.2.2

5.4.3

DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Road Carter Road residential zone Woodhouse Rd Stage 2 Woodhouse Rd residential zone Any future ONGOING

Environmental improvement projects

6.2.2 Environmental improvement projects (6. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Regeneration & Pest/Weed control) Work in coordination with other community groups and Auckland Council to improve effectiveness and scope of projects. Work alongside or in conjunction with any other organisation that has the same aims as Whakaupoko Landcare in order to educate the community and facilitate improved natural environment and public access to same.

ONGOING

History collation & preservation

7.1 History collation & preservation (7. HISTORY / HERITAGE) PVI offers the use of the community website pages for any residents or groups interested in collating, discussing or preserving local history anecdotes, photos, documents or stories. Training or assistance will be given to those who require or request it by contacting us by mailing: P O Box 172, Patumahoe or emailing: patumahoevillage2050@gmail.com.

7.1

ONGOING

Land acquisition

Land acquisition Land acquisition requires the coordination of input from the previously noted areas of investigation:

PRESENT ONGOING 3.3 4.2 5.2.2 6.1.1 4.3 5.2.3 6.1.2 7.2 3.2 4.1 5.4.1 DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: Kingseat Road Carter Road residential zone Woodhouse Rd Stage 2 Woodhouse Rd residential zone Any future

Land acquisition for Multi-Use facility and active sports fields 3. Multi-Use Community Centre Item 3.3 Clive Howe Bush Reserve Henrys Bush Linkway 4. Planning Intentions - Zoning Issues Item 4.2 5.2 Walkways Item 5.2.2 6.1 Ecological Corridors & Sites Item 6.1.1 Village Walkway/Cycleway network 4. Planning Intentions- Zoning Issues Item 4.3 5.2 Walkways Item 5.2.3 6.1 Ecological Corridors & Sites Item 6.1.2 7. History/heritage Item 7.2 Initial Spatial Plan for village centre 3. Multi-Use Community Centre Item 3.2 4. Planning Intentions Zoning Issues - Item 4.1. 5.4 Public Transport Item 5.4.1

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APPENDIX

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Patumahoe Village Inc wishes to acknowledge all the assistance it has had in defining the scope and preparation of this LTCCP submission. Particularly it wishes to thank: the 140 people who attended the December March street parties, the 86 residents and business owners who became members of PVI the 250 participants of the Open Day held on Sunday 15 May 2011, all those who have attended meetings or sent through comments by post or email, all the businesses who have supported development of our website and newsletters, Ron Gordon Principal, and staff of Patumahoe Primary School for the use of their equipment and support, Angela Smith Principal, and staff of Mauku Primary School for the use of their school and support, staff of the previous Franklin District Council namely Rob Harris & Jane McCartney, staff of current Auckland Council Rose Ward, Greg Lowe, Andrew Moor, Hayden Easton (previously ARC), Solomon Brett, Manoj Ragupathy, Dan & Nick from LIDIG team Chairman Andy Baker and members of the Local Board, in particular Dan Lynch, Bill Cashmore, Jan Sinclair, Megan Ranchod & Jill Naysmith our previous ARC councillor, Dianne Glenn, our current councillor, Des Morrison, our Patumahoe sports clubs for the use of their venues and participation, Joel Umali, coordinator of the Flaxroots Village Planning programme in North Auckland for his sharing of information and invitation to join his network, members of the nucleus group who have worked under considerable time restraints and seen the project through.

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NOTES

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