2012 TITLE I UNIFIED PLAN TEMPLATE District and School Information

District: PLAINFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS Chief School Administrator: ANNA BELIN-PYLES abelinp@plainfield.k12.nj.us NCLB Contact: DAWN CICCONE

Chief School Administrator E-mail:

NCLB Contact E-mail: dciccone@plainfield.k12.nj.us

School: CHARLES H. STILLMAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL The school is designated (select one): Principal: MARK A. WILLIAMS MAWILLIAMS@PLAINFIELD.K12.NJ.US  Targeted Assistance X Schoolwide Principal E-mail:

Principal Certification
The following certification must be made by the principal of the school. Note: Signatures must be kept on file at the school.  I certify that I have been included in consultations related to the priority needs of my school and participated in the completion of this Title I Unified Plan. I have been an active member of the planning committee and provided input to the school needs assessment and the selection of priority problems. I concur with the information presented herein, including the identification of programs and activities that are funded by Title I, Part A, and, if applicable, SIA, Part a.. Mark A. Williams __________________________________________ 2011________________ Principal’s Name

____________________________________________ Principal’s Signature

________9-21Date

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School NCLB Committee
Select committee members to develop the Unified Plan. Note: For continuity, some representatives from this needs assessment stakeholder committee should be included in the school-wide stakeholder group and/or the SINI plan committee. Identify the stakeholders who participated in the needs assessment and/or development of the plan. Signatures should be kept on file in the school office for review. Print off a copy of this page to obtain signatures. *Add lines as necessary.

Name Mark A. Williams Karen Gee Garrie Daniels Joseph Harris Cheryl Dotts-Garcia Patricia McEnerney Rosa Ramos Natalie Pereira Eleanor Wilson

Stakeholder Group School Staff Administrator School Staff - Teacher School Staff - Teacher School Staff - Teacher School Staff - Teacher School Staff - Teacher Consultant School Staff – Teacher School Staff – Teacher

Participated in Needs Assessment X X X X X X X X

Participated in Plan Development X X X X X X

Signature

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School NCLB Committee Meetings
List the dates of the meetings when the School NCLB Committee discussed the needs assessment and Unified Plan development. *Add rows as necessary Date 2 Tuesday of Each Month
nd

Location Stlillman Elementary school

Topic X

Agenda on File Yes No X

Minutes on File Yes No

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School’s Vision & Mission
Provide, update, or develop the school’s vision and mission statement. Refer to the Introduction for Unified Plan pages for guidance.

We, as stakeholders, support each child in all aspects of learning by: • • • • • • • Providing a rigorous educational curriculum. Catering to all abilities. Working together as a team. Promoting moral values, honesty, integrity and pride. Encouraging strong self-esteem and high personal expectations. Instilling tolerance and respect for others. Providing a safe nurturing environment.

What is the school’s vision statement?

Our wish is that the students leave with happy memories of their years here at Stillman School. Our mission, in partnership with the community, is to inspire, empower, nurture and educate our diverse student population to become productive, life learners and good citizens of a global environment.

What is the school’s mission?

Describe the process for developing or revising the school’s vision and mission.

Our vision statement was developed as a staff during our district wide professional development day on October 30, 2009.

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2012 Comprehensive Needs Assessment & Data Analysis Summary Data Collection and Analysis
Table A: Multiple Measures Analyzed by the School in the Needs Assessment Process for 2011 Programs, Strategies and Practices • Results and outcomes must be measurable. Areas Academic Achievement – Reading Academic Achievement Writing Academic Achievement Mathematics Parent Involvement Multiple Measures Analyzed Overall Measurable Results and Outcomes

READ 180 and NJASK

Read 180 – There was an average increase of 156 in lexile scores for all grade 4, 5, and 6 students who were scheduled for Read 180. NJASK – Data has not been released yet. NJASK – Data has not been released yet. Over 35% of our parents attended Back to School Night. Parents feedback indicated that more opportunities be provided to inform them of their child’s progress.
Teachers do not incorporate clusters which the data reveals to be below proficient into their daily instruction. Teachers do not provide varied levels of activities, remediation, enrichment, etc. to accommodate student learning styles.

NJASK & DIA Back to School Night, Parent Conferences & PTO Meetings

Professional Development

Extended Learning Opportunities Homeless Students with Disabilities English Language Learners

21st Century Program

Waiting on results of the 2011 NJASK
N/A

NJASK – Data has not been released yet. NJASK – Data has not been released yet. 5

Areas Economically Disadvantaged School Culture Leadership Highly Qualified Staff School-Based Youth Services

Multiple Measures Analyzed

Overall Measurable Results and Outcomes

NJASK – Data has not been released yet.

100% of our teaching staff is highly qualified. N/A

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Evaluation of 2011 Teaching and Learning Strategies & Programs
Table B: Strategies to Increase Student Achievement That Were Implemented in 2011 1 Strategy or Program 2 Content/Gro up Focus 3 Effective Yes-No 4 Documentatio n of Effectiveness 5 Measurable Outcomes

Read 180 Reading Plus Everyday Mathematics

LAL LAL Mathematics

Data not available at this time Data not available at this time Data not available at this time

To be determined To be determined To be determined

Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time

Students with Disabilities Homeless/Migrant ELL

Table C: Description of Extended Day/Year Programs Implemented in 2011 to Address Academic Deficiencies - Do not include SES programs. 1 Strategy or Program 2 Content/Gr oup Focus 3 Effectiv e Yes-No 4 Documentation of Effectiveness 5 Measurable Outcomes

21st Century

Mathematics

Data not To Be determined available at this time 7

21st Century PLEASE STATE THE MEASURABLE OUTCOME

1 Strategy or Program

2 Content/Gr oup Focus Students with
Disabilities Homeless/Migra nt ELL

3 Effectiv e

4 Documentation of Effectiveness

5 Measurable Outcomes

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Table D: Professional Development That Was Implemented in 2011 1 Strategy or Program 2 Content/Gr oup Focus 3 Effecti ve YesNo 4 Documentation of Effectiveness 5 Measurable Outcomes

Through this LAL series of workshops and modeling sessions, teachers were trained in areas such as creating practice NJASK writing prompts, poetry prompts, expository prompts, and in getting our students to use compositional risks to score higher on openended reading and writing sections
Using Data to Improve Instruction LAL Mathematics

Data not availa ble at this time

To be determined

Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time

Data not availabl e at this time Data

To be determined

Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time

Using study island to

LAL -

To be determined 9

Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this

1 strengthen targeted Strategy or areas Program of need

2 Mathematics Content/Gr oup Focus
Students with Disabilities Homeless/Migra nt ELL

3 not Effecti availabl ve e at this Yestime No

4 Documentation of Effectiveness

time

5 Measurable Outcomes

Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time Spring 2011 NJASK scores not available at this time

Table E: Parent Involvement That Was Implemented in 2011 1 Strategy or Program 2 Content/Grou p Focus 3 Effect ive YesNo 4 Documentation of Effectiveness 5 Measurable Outcomes

Back to School Night Parent – Teacher Conferences PTO Communications (Global Connect, Letters, Progress Reports)

All Content Areas All Content Areas All Content areas All Content Areas

Yes Yes Yes Yes

To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined

Spring time Spring time Spring time Spring time

2011 NJASK scores not available at this 2011 NJASK scores not available at this 2011 NJASK scores not available at this 2011 NJASK scores not available at this

Students with

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1 Strategy or Program

2 Disabilities Content/Grou p Focus Homeless/Migrant
ELL

3 Effect ive

4 Documentation of Effectiveness

5 Measurable Outcomes

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2012 Needs Assessment & Evaluation Summary
• When responding to the questions below, data from Tables A, B, C, D and E should be used.

1. Describe the process and techniques used in the needs assessment.
A needs assessment was completed by teachers in June 2011. Instructional priorities and programs implementations are based on the needs of our school. The teachers analyze their class data and assess performance of their students at various levels such as class, student groups and individual student level. NJASK, ACCESS, DRA, District Writing Assessment & District Interim Assessment results are also used as a tool to identify student strengths and weaknesses as related to the core content standards. We also use the progress indicators in the Read180 and Reading Plus Program. Student progress is checked bi-weekly by the principal and regularly by the classroom teacher.

2. Describe methods used to collect and compile data for student subgroups.
Based on the results of various sources, data is disaggregated by clusters, class rosters and targeted skills for student subgroups. The classroom, after school (21st Century Program), and SES instruction becomes data driven decision making in order to differentiate instruction for individual student needs. In addition, this data is used by the CAPA review team to prepare findings and make recommendations. We provide SES providers, Century 21 and I&RS with all related data. This data is used as a pre- and a post- in an effort to evaluate program effectiveness.

3. Explain how the data from the collection methods are valid and reliable.
The Office of Testing and Evaluation disaggregates the data by clusters in language arts, mathematics and science. Data is also disaggregated by clusters to help determine root causes. Class rosters and targeted skills are created for each grade level and classroom level. Subsequently, children are grouped according to their instructional needs and instruction is modified based on individual student needs. Teachers are required to have data chats with students designed to provide the students opportunities to participate in their learning.

4. What did the data analysis reveal regarding classroom instruction?
The data revealed that teachers need to put more inference on incorporate clusters which the data reveals to be below proficient into their daily instruction. Also, teachers do not provide varied levels of activities, remediation, enrichment, etc. to accommodate student learning styles. Differentiated instruction will be one of the target areas for professional development building wide.

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5. What did the data analysis reveal regarding professional development implemented in the previous year(s)?
The data revealed that teachers must incorporate clusters which the data reveals to be below proficient into their daily instruction. Also, teachers do not provide varied levels of activities, remediation, enrichment, etc. to accommodate student learning styles. Differentiated instruction will continue to be one of the target areas for professional development building wide.

6. How are educationally at-risk students identified in a timely manner?
The above described methods of data collection enable the district to identify at-risk students. In addition, practice tests, formatted similarly to state tests, were administered in early December. These results are analyzed by the Office of Testing and Evaluation and sent back to us in a table graph format with cluster information. This helps to further identify and address weakness at the student level. The school counselor makes contact with the students and their parents. It is explained that they have been identified as a student who is in need. The counselor then explains what areas are in need of extra support and what services are available to them free of charge.

7. How are educationally at-risk students provided with effective assistance?
It is communicated to parents what services are offered for any student they feel may need extra assistance. We have systems in place for teachers to refer students who may be in need. The school counselor works closely with any staff member and/or parent who refer any student.

8. How does the needs assessment address migrant student(s) needs?
Not Applicable

9. How does the needs assessment address homeless student(s) needs?
Not Applicable

10.

How were teachers engaged in decisions regarding the use of academic assessments to provide information on and improvement of the instructional program?

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Teachers are engaged in decisions during their common planning periods. Based on the results of the assessments, decisions are made on what clusters the team should provide more focus on. The common planning periods took place weekly.

11.

Describe the transition plan for preschool to kindergarten, if applicable.

As part of our transition plan our kindergarten teacher’s work with Master Teacher (Fantasy Ko) to learn Plan-DoReview and proper room set up. Mrs. Santiago (kindergarten teacher) sits on the kindergarten contact group, which oversees kindergarten transition. After rollover in August, we create class rosters and forward them to the kindergarten teachers. This provides teachers who come in early the opportunity to create a welcoming environment for our incoming kindergarten students. We send out welcome letters to parents letting them know who their child’s teacher is, what room and the first day of school. We have kindergarten parent orientation on back to school night (beginning August 2010, we will conduct parent orientation in August).

12. Describe the process used to select the priority problems and root causes for this plan? 13. What did the data analysis reveal regarding the root causes of subgroups not meeting AYP? 14. Describe the evaluation results regarding the status of SMART goal #1 in the action plan?
NOT APPLICABLE

15. Describe the evaluation results regarding the status of SMART goal #2 in the action plan?
NOT APPLICABLE

16. Describe the evaluation results regarding the status of SMART goal #3 in the action plan?
NOT APPLICABLE

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2012 Needs Assessment – Partially Proficient
Provide the number of students at each grade level listed below who scored partially proficient on state assessments for two years or more in Language Arts Literacy and mathematics. Language Arts Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 11 Grade 12 20082009 38 25 N/A 20092010 34 31 25 Services Provided Describe why services provided did not result in proficiency.

Mathemati cs Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 11 Grade 12

20082009 27 24 N/A

20092010 22 30 19

Services Provided

Describe why services provided did not result in proficiency.

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Selection of Priority Problems
School Needs Assessment Summary Matrix  Certification: For Title I SINIs and SW schools, Population Categories A-M have been annually assessed.
Using information from the data analysis, identify all priority problems. Select three or four priority problems to address in this plan. The selected problems should be checked in column T. When completing the matrix below, data from Tables A, B, C, D, E and the Needs Assessment Summary should be used.
Population Categories


• •

F. Youth at risk of dropping out

Priority Problem
Closing the achievement gap Early childhood education Language arts literacy and reading Mathematics Science Social studies World Languages Cross Content Workplace

Student Academic Needs

1 2 Core Curriculum Content Standards 3a 3b 3c 3d 3e 3f

X

X

X

X

S. Other (Specify)_____________

X X X X

X X X

X X X

X X

X X X

X X

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ProblemsT. Selected Priority
X X

B. Students with Disabilities

O. Perpetrators of Violence

E. Neglected / delinquent

D. Econ. disadvantaged

N. Substance abusers

R. Gifted & Talented

L. Paraprofessionals

Priority Problem #

C. Early childhood

Q. Mental health

P. Out-of-school

G. Racial/ethnic

A. All students

H. Homeless

I. Immigrant

K. Teachers

M. Parents

J. LEP

Staff Needs

Hiring, Recruiting and Retaining 5. Implementing the CCCS 9 8 7 6 4 5f 5c 5a 5e 5d 5b 12 11 10 15 16 Science Mentoring Readiness Mathematics Social studies Technology Literacy Working with parents 14 13

High Quality Professional Development

Priority Problem #

Priority Problem

Language Arts Literacy

Classroom management Using data/assess. to improve learning X X X

Highly qualified teachers Teachers in shortage areas Teachers in Math and Science Teachers to reduce class size

World Languages Cross Content Workplace Readiness

Effective classroom use of technology Standards-based assessment Instructional skills and strategies

A. All students B. Students with Disabilities C. Early childhood D. Econ. disadvantaged

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X X X

E. Neglected / delinquent F. Youth at risk of dropping out G. Racial/ethnic H. Homeless I. Immigrant J. LEP K. Teachers L. Paraprofessionals M. Parents N. Substance abusers O. Perpetrators of Violence P. Out-of-school Q. Mental health R. Gifted & Talented S. Other (Specify)_____________ Population Categories

ProblemsT. Selected Priority

Population Categories

Priority Problem
Qualified paraprofessionals Highly qualified personnel Alcohol use Drug use Tobacco use Violence Weapons Gang activity Delinquency Vandalism Suspensions, removals, or expulsions Serious or persistent discipline problems Bullying Victimization Truancy/attendance Mental health Sex/gender issues Interpersonal conflict Intergroup conflict/bias Negative peer influence School safety School climate/environment

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

Problems Identified

X

X X X X

X X

X X

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ProblemsT. Selected Priority
X

F. Youth at risk of dropping out

S. Other (Specify)_____________

B. Students with Disabilities

O. Perpetrators of Violence

E. Neglected / delinquent

D. Econ. disadvantaged

N. Substance abusers

R. Gifted & Talented

L. Paraprofessionals

Priority Problem #

C. Early childhood

Q. Mental health

P. Out-of-school

G. Racial/ethnic

A. All students

H. Homeless

I. Immigrant

K. Teachers

M. Parents

J. LEP

Leadersh ip Quality Teacher Tech. & Ed. Materials Students with Special Needs Literacy, & Adult Ed. 45 Risk factors Drop-out rate Teacher Quality Adult literacy Parent/community involvement 44 43 42 41 40 39 47 Leadership PD Leadership Network 46

Priority Problem #

Priority Problem

Technology activities Instructional/Educational Materials

A. All students B. Students with Disabilities C. Early childhood D. Econ. disadvantaged

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X

E. Neglected / delinquent F. Youth at risk of dropping out G. Racial/ethnic H. Homeless I. Immigrant J. LEP K. Teachers L. Paraprofessionals M. Parents N. Substance abusers O. Perpetrators of Violence P. Out-of-school Q. Mental health R. Gifted & Talented S. Other (Specify)_____________ Population Categories

ProblemsT. Selected Priority

Description of Priority Problems and Strategies to Address Them
• • All student subgroups not meeting AYP MUST be considered during the needs assessment process. Select at least three priority problems. Complete the information below for each priority problem checked in column T on the previous pages. Add additional sections as needed.
#1 #2

Population Category Letter & Problem Number Name of priority problem Describe the priority problem Describe the root causes of the problem
Subgroup or population addressed

A.,B.,D.,G., J., R., 3a Language Arts literacy and reading Need to increase achievement in Language Arts. Comprehensive review of all current academic data sources applied to differentiate instruction. A.,B.,D.,G., J., R., K–6 Language Arts Read 180 & Reading Plus

A.,B.,D.,G., J., R., 3b Mathematics Need to increase achievement in Mathematics Comprehensive review of all current academic data sources applied to differentiate instruction. A.,B.,D.,G., J., R., K-6 Mathematics Everyday Mathematics

Grade span Related content area missed Name of scientifically research based program/strategy/practi ce to address problem How does the program/strategy align with the NJ CCCS?

Our school will continue to use standards (NJCCCS) supported by the new standard performance standards with student work exemplars) to guide instructional practice. We will continue to administer student performance data on the DRA (K5) and NJASK to provide direction in 20

Our school will continue to use standards (NJCCCS) supported by the new standard performance standards with student work exemplars) to guide instructional practice. We will continue to administer student performance data on the DRA (K5) and NJASK to provide direction in

meeting student needs at the individual, class, grade, and/or school levels. CAPA finding or recommendation related to the priority problem
N/A

meeting student needs at the individual, class, grade, and/or school levels.
N/A

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Description of Priority Problems and Strategies to Address Them (continued)
#3 #4

Population Category Letter & Problem Number Name of priority problem Describe the priority problem Describe the root causes of the problem Subgroup or population addressed Grade span Related content area missed Name of scientifically research based program/strategy/practi ce to address problem

A., G., K. #34 Interpersonal Conflict Inability to resolve interpersonal problems and understand cultural differences. Lack of capacity to resolve conflicts. A., G., K. in grades in K – 6. K-6 LAL & Mathematics Partner and small-group learning activities are natural complements to character education, providing children with opportunities to practice cooperation, respect, teamwork, and responsibility. Children usually enjoy cooperative activities, and working with peers is a brain-friendly technique that enhances learning (Jensen, 1996). Research states that there is a direct correlation between school climate and social/academic outcomes. Not Applicable 22

How does the program/strategy align with the NJ CCCS? CAPA finding or recommendation

related to the priority problem

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Action Planning
Check Before Proceeding: • The action planning section is required for all SINIs.
• • The action plans are developed for the primary strategies and programs selected that address the priority problems. At least ten steps must be identified.

Action Plan for Strategy Related to Priority Problem #1
Name of Program, Strategy or Practice to Address Priority Problem: SMART Goal:
(Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timely)

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

Indicators of Success:

1. 2.

Description of Action Plan Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Persons Involve d

Resources Needed

Due Date Timeline

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Name of Program, Strategy or Practice to Address Priority Problem: 9 1 0 1 1 1 2

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Action Plan for Strategy Related to Priority Problem #2
Name of Program, Strategy or Practice to Address Priority Problem: SMART Goal:
(Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timely)

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

Indicators of Success:

1. 2.

Description of Action Plan Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 2

Persons Involve d

Resources Needed

Due Date Timeline

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Action Plan for Strategy Related to Priority Problem #3
Name of Program, Strategy or Practice to Address Priority Problem: Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

SMART Goal:
(Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timely)

Indicators of Success:

1. 2.

Description of Action Plan Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 2

Persons Involve d

Resources Needed

Due Date Timeline

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Plan Components for 2012
Table F: Proposed 2012 Core Strategies to Address Student Achievement Name of Strategy Reading Plus Content Area Focus Literacy Target Population( s) Grades 4 – 6 Person Responsi ble
Michelle Gonzalez Cheryl DottsGarcia Garrie Daniels Lawrence Bodine

Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes) Results of 2011 NJASK results are not available at this time.

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

An analysis was conducted to determine the relative effectiveness of Reading Plus® in producing changes in Reading Comprehension scores, as measured by Gates-MacGinitie scores. Data from all fourth grade participants was entered into repeated measures ANOVA performed on the mean Gates-MacGinitie Normal Curve Equivalent (NCE) scores for treatment (n = 26) and control (n = 77) participants separately using the pre and posttreatment scores. For this analysis, a main effect of time appeared as f (1,101) = 39.594, p < .001, but an additional interaction between Time and Group also appeared, f (1,101) = 7.071, p = .009, indicating that the Reading Plus® treatment group improved in reading significantly more than the control group on the Gates-MacGinitie Test.

Everyday Mathematics Same as above Same as above Same as above

Mathemat ics

Grades K - 6

All teachers

Results of 2010 NJASK results are not available at this time.

Scientifically research based program.

Homeless Migrant ELL Students with Disabilities

*Use an asterisk to denote new programs.

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Table G: Proposed 2012 Extended Learning Opportunities to Address Academic Deficiencies. Do not include SES. Name of Strategy Content Area Focus Target Populati on(s) Grades 4 –6 Grades 4 –6 Grade 4 Person Respons ible Teachers Principal Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes) At least 10 % increase on the student achievement growth. Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

21st Century Program

LAL Mathem atics Science

A new study by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Policy Studies Associates, Inc. finds that regular participation in high-quality afterschool programs is linked to significant gains in standardized test scores and work habits as well as reductions in behavior problems among disadvantaged students. These gains help offset the negative impact of a lack of supervision after school. The two-year study followed almost 3,000 low-income, ethnically diverse elementary and middle school students from eight states in six major metropolitan centers and six smaller urban and rural locations. About half of the young people attended high-quality afterschool programs at their schools or in their communities. (October 2007, http://www.policystudies.com/studies/youth/Promising %20Programs%20FINAL.pdf

N/A Same as above Same as Above

Homeless Migrant ELL Students with Disabilities

*Use an asterisk to denote new programs.

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Table H: Proposed 2012 Professional Development to Address Student Achievement and Priority Problems Name of Strategy Grade Level Meetings Content Area Focus Target Populati on(s) Teachers Person Responsi ble Teachers – Principal Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes) At least 85% attendance to all grade level meetings Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

Literacy/Mathematics /Science

Ongoing process that involves teachers meeting during planning time, either weekly or biweekly to examine student work on a regular basis. Reference the No Child Left Behind Act Beyond Islands of Excellence: What Districts Can Do to Improve Instruction and Achievement in All Schools, (From Learning

District sponsored workshops

Literacy/Mathematics /Science

Teachers

Social Emotional Learning

Character Education

Teachers Staff

Office of Professio nal Develop ment Teachers – Principal Teachers , Guidance Counselo r, Principal Teachers – Principal

85% of staff attend

First Alliance. 2003.) A 10% reduction in the amount of referrals & suspensions
Zins, J. E., Weissberg, R. P., Wang, M. C., & Walberg. H. J. (Eds.). (2004). Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? Issues and Practices in the Identification and Education of Gifted Students From Underrepresented Groups (RM04186)

Gifted & Talented

Literacy & Mathematics

Teachers

An increase in the number of students who are identified as gifted students.

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Name of Strategy

Content Area Focus

Target Populati on(s)
Homeless Migrant ELL Students with Disabilities

Person Responsi ble

Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes)

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

James H. Borland (2004)

*Use an asterisk to denote new programs.

Table I: Proposed 2012 Parent Involvement Strategies to Address Student Achievement and Priority Problems Name of Strategy Back to School Night Conten t Area Focus All Target Populati on(s) Staff Principal Person Responsi ble 10% increase in the number of parents who attend Back to School Night. 10% increase in the number Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes)
Nermeen E., El Nokali, Heather J. Bachman, and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal. Parent Involvement and Children's Academic and Social Development in Elementary School. Child Development, May 13 2010 DOI:

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

Back to School Night

Parent Teacher Conferences

All

Staff Principal

Nermeen E., El Nokali, Heather J. Bachman, and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal. Parent Involvement and Children's Academic and Social Development in

Parent Teacher Conferences

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Name of Strategy

Conten t Area Focus

Target Populati on(s)

Person Responsi ble of parents who attend Back to School Night. 10% increase in the number of parents who attend PTO meetings.

Indicators of Success (Measurable Evaluation Outcomes)
Elementary School. Child Development, May 13 2010 DOI:

Research Supporting Strategy
(from IES Practice Guide or What Works Clearinghouse)

Parent Teacher Organization

All

Parents Teachers Guidance Counselor Family Liaison

Nermeen E., El Nokali, Heather J. Bachman, and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal. Parent Involvement and Children's Academic and Social Development in Elementary School. Child Development, May 13 2010 DOI:

Parent Teacher Organization

N/A Same as above Same as above

Homeless Migrant ELL Students with Disabilities

*Use an asterisk to denote new programs.

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2012 Parent Involvement (PI) Narrative

1. What is the connection between PI and the priority problems identified in the needs assessment? Workshops provide parents with support to assist their children at home by introducing them to scientifically-researched best practices, testing formats, and social-emotional wellness. The support, in turn, connects homes with school in a partnership to collaboratively increase students’ academic performance. 2. Do you have a school-parent compact? Yes 3. Describe the process to ensure that parents receive and review the school-parent compact. Parents are presented the school-parent compact during back to school night. The compact is explained; the parents sign the compact, and take home a copy with them. This process is followed at every parent meeting until all compacts have been signed. The school copy with both the principal and parents’ signature is kept on file in the main office. We also have parent compacts available during parent conferences for parents who have not returned them yet. 4. Describe the process to ensure that parents receive and review the school-parent compact. Parents are presented the school-parent compact during back to school night. The compact is explained; the parents sign the compact, and take home a copy with them. This process is followed at every parent meeting until all compacts have been signed. The school copy with both the principal and parents’ signature is kept on file in the main office. We also have parent compacts available during parent conferences for parents who have not returned them yet. 5. How is student achievement data reported to the public? 34

1.) School webpage via Plainfield Public Schools website & school calendar 2.) PTO meetings, Newsletters, Global Connect; 3.) End of Year Report, Community Forum 6. What is the procedure for notifying parents if the district has not met their annual measurable objectives for Title III? 7. Identify procedures for informing parents about the school’s improvement status. A letter informing parents of the school improvement status, AYP results is sent from central office in August. 8. Identify procedures for informing parents about the school’s disaggregated assessment results. All stakeholders are notified via mail, the School District web-site, PTO meetings and Newsletters. 9. How were parents involved in the development of the Unified Plan? The parents were afforded the opportunity to be on the NCLB committee via mail and requisite PTO meetings. We only had one parent actually participate in developing the plan. 10. Identify procedures for informing a parent about their child’s student assessment results.

Once we receive any data a letter is sent home along with a copy of their child’s report. We also discuss with parents during parent/teacher conferences. 11. How were the required PI funds used in 2011? The funds were used to support PTO meetings, back to school night, parent workshops and other activities with parents

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12. How will the required PI funds be used in 2012? The funds were used to support PTO meetings, back to school night, parent workshops and other activities with parents.

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Table J-1: 2011-2012 Annual Student Targets (Use best available data from One-Year Charts). At least two measurements must be listed. GRADE SPAN & SUBGROUP
3-5

LANGUAGE ARTS
State Assessment Baseline 2012 Target

MATHEMATICS
State Assessment Baselin e
38.0 16.5 24.7

2012 Target
44.2 24.8 32,.2

GRADE SPAN: ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE OR HIGH SCHOOL Total Students with Disabilities Limited English Proficient Students White African-American Asian/Pacific Islander American Indian/Native American Hispanic Others Economically Disadvantaged Total Students with Disabilities Limited English Proficient Students White African-American Asian/Pacific Islander American Indian/Native American NJASK 2011 26.7 34.0 NJASK 2011 26.7 34.0 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 26.9 19.4 0.0 25.0 34.2 27.5 10.0 32.5 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 42.3 22.6 30.0 0.0 48.8 30.3 37.0 10.0 GRADE SPAN: GRADE 6 ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE OR HIGH SCHOOL NJASK 2011 23.7 31.3 NJASK 2011 35.7 42.1 NJASK 2011 14.1 22.7 NJASK 2011 29.1 36.2 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 25.0 5.9 9.6 32.5 15.3 18.6 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011

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GRADE SPAN & SUBGROUP
3-5
Hispanic Others Economically Disadvantaged NJASK 2011

LANGUAGE ARTS
State Assessment
NJASK 2011

MATHEMATICS
2012 Target
28.0 26.9

Baseline
20.0 18.8

State Assessment
NJASK 2011 NJASK 2011

Baselin e
26.7 18.8

2012 Target
34.0 26.9

Table J-2: 2011-2012 Annual Student Targets – Other Assessment GRADE SPAN & SUBGROUP
3-5

LANGUAGE ARTS
Other Assessment Name Baseline 2012 Target

MATHEMATICS
Other Assessment Name Baselin e 2012 Target

GRADE SPAN: ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE OR HIGH SCHOOL
Total Students with Disabilities Limited English Proficient Students White African-American Asian/Pacific Islander American Indian/Native American Hispanic Others

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GRADE SPAN & SUBGROUP
3-5 Economically Disadvantaged

LANGUAGE ARTS
Other Assessment Name Baseline 2012 Target

MATHEMATICS
Other Assessment Name Baselin e 2012 Target

GRADE SPAN: ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE OR HIGH SCHOOL
Total Students with Disabilities Limited English Proficient Students White African-American Asian/Pacific Islander American Indian/Native American Hispanic Others Economically Disadvantaged

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Highly Qualified Staff
Table K: Strategies to Attract and Retain Highly Qualified Staff
Numb er & Percen t Teachers who meet the qualifications for HQT, consistent with Title II-A Content & Focus Description of Process to Meet Highly Qualified Description of Strategy to Retain HQ Staff

The Plainfield School District offers a good tuition reimbursement program, offers opportunities within and outside the district for teachers to participate in professional development learning “best practices”. We offer a competitive salary and good benefits package.

Teachers who do not meet the qualifications for HQT, consistent with Title II-A Paraprofessionals who meet the qualifications required by NCLB (education, ParaPro test, portfolio assessment) Paraprofessionals who do not meet the qualifications required by NCLB (education, ParaPro test, portfolio assessment)

N/A
2 100 %
0 100%

N/A

N/A

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Description of Strategy To Attract HQ Staff

Individuals Responsible

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Table L: Support for Teachers Use the Table below to describe the 2012 methods for supporting teachers needing assistance with instruction and other problems. Description of Support • Lucy Calkins Units of Study Content Area Focus Literacy Writing Target Group K-6 Teachers Person Responsible TCRWP Indicators of Success (Evaluation) Increased improvement of writing in all genres. How are teachers identified? All Kindergarten – 6th Grade teachers will receive support in year 2 of Units of Study Implementation.

Reading Plus

Literacy

Grades 3 – 6

District Personnel Mark A. Williams

Table M: Support for Administrators Use the Table below to describe how leaders in schools in need of improvement are provided with support and instructional leadership. Description of Support • • Lucy Calkins Units of Study Reading Plus Content Area Focus Literacy Writing Literacy Target Group K-6 Teachers Person Responsibl e TCRWP Indicators of Success (Evaluation) Increased improvement of writing in all genres. How are administrators identified?

Grades 3 – 6 Caryn Cooper

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Student Eligibility and Selection
Table N: All Schools: Identify the multiple measures used to determine student eligibility in a targeted assistance school and the measures to identify students who need additional support in schoolwide programs. For targeted assistance schools, use the last two columns to designate if the measures are used as criteria for program entrance or exit. Measure Homele ss Migran t Students with Disabilities Economical ly Disadvanta ged
NJASK DIA, DRA & END OF UNIT ASSESSMENTS

ELL

Other SubGrou ps

Targeted Assistance Schools Entrance Criteria () Exit Criteria ()

State Assessment Other Assessments

NJASK

NJASK DIA, DRA & END OF UNIT ASSESSMENTS

NJASK DIA, DRA & END OF UNIT ASSES SMENT S ACCES S

DIA, DRA & END OF UNIT ASSESSMEN TS

English Language Proficiency Assessment Classroom Grades Teacher Recommendation

ACCESS

ACCESS

ACCESS

Report cards

Report cards

Report cards

Report cards Acade mic Interve ntion referral proces s

NOT APPLICABLE STILLMAN IS A SCHOOLWIDE SCHOOL

Academic Intervention referral process

Academic Intervention referral process

Academic Intervention referral process

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Other

Support Elements Ongoing and Sustained Technical Assistance*
1. What assistance did the NCLB committee determine it needs to implement the 2012 Unified Plan in the school’s efforts to increase academic achievement? From the district: Results from the Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 District Site Visits helped identify the areas of in need of improvement. It was also based on a needs assessment given to the staff in spring of 2011 & the 2011 NJASK results. From outside experts: From others: 2. Describe the current technical assistance offered to staff at the school. Include assistance by district level and/or outside experts, for example, skilled consultants, institutions of higher education (IHE), etc. Elizabeth Willam, consultant dual language program, Master Teacher Fantasy Ko, began working with kindergarten teachers to implement Kindergarten Learning Centers (Plan-Do-Review). Alice Alston, Rutgers Consultant, trained staff in the ESTEEM Program.

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3. How is it targeted to the priority problems identified in the needs assessment? District resources (personnel), consultants, programs (extended day) are being used to address all identified priority problems. 4. Identify the person(s) responsible for ensuring this technical assistance is provided. Caryn Cooper, Assistant Superintendent Educational Services, Yvonne Breausaux (Vice Principal, Educational Services), Gary Ottman (Business Administrator), Mark A. Williams (Principal, C.H. Stillman Elementary School).

*Technical Assistance is support offered to the school in any form necessary. It can include the development of policies, procedures and evaluation instruments, data analysis, coaching, program planning, budgeting, and the provision of specialized information. Assistance may be offered directly by district staff, the NJDOE, or an outside consultant.

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District Support (completed by LEA for SINIs only)

1. Explain why the previous school and district plans did not bring about increased student academic achievement. Lack of administrative and leadership consistency at the district and school level has led to plans and programming not being consistent for students and teachers. Budgetary concerns have forced limited utilization of some of the strategies listed in table B to improve student performance. 2. Explain how the district is supporting the school in the following areas: Providing professional development that focuses primarily on improving instruction and using data to inform instruction The Office of Assessment, Data Collection, and School Improvement in collaboration with the Office of Professional Development will continue to provide trainings on the analysis of multiple measures of data for its instructional implications and Continuous Improvement Model (CIM), which is based upon an 8 step process that relies heavily on the use of data to drive decisions relative to teaching and learning. The next phase of the training efforts for the Office of Assessment, Data Collection, and School Improvement is to increase teachers and staff literacy in assessments, more specifically expand knowledge of various ways to assess, the purpose of assessments, and what should be assessed. The Office of Professional Development will begin trainings in district for teachers and administrators of grades 3-12 in research-based best practices of Lucy Culkins Writing Units of Study. Implementing strategies grounded in scientifically based research that will strengthen instruction in core academic subjects The district conducts focus walks to review programming, instructional planning and classroom practices. The district also does not support the purchase or use of programs not grounded in research. The strategies and practices promoted within the district are:  Continuous Improvement Model (CIM)  Writing –Units of Study (Lucy Culkins)  Best Practices of Instructional Leaders and Teachers  Assessment for Learning – J. Chappius To address parent involvement, we will implement the following programs/activities:

Expanding parental involvement

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activities that support the school’s efforts to increase student achievement

Increase parent participation at both school and district level SLC (leadership program): • • • • • • • • • Bring Your Parent to School Day Career Days Parent training in both mathematics and literacy Continue with the support for Parent Empowering Parents (PEP) District and school web sites to inform parents and the community at large Newsletters/flyers frequently sent home to parents in English and Spanish School and district functions Parent Institute Parent to parent discussion groups

Reallocating the budget to fund activities that support the school’s improvement plan and are most likely to increase student achievement

The district will not reallocate funds within the NCLB budget. The allocations will remain intact for each Title. Business Operations will work collaboratively with the schools to use resources effectively and efficiently. Federal, State and Local funds, including the city tax levy for education and Federal Entitlement and Competitive Grants State and Private Grants will be allocated and/or reallocated according to guidelines to fund the activities that support the school’s improvement plan. The curriculum has been revised in all areas to reflect greater alignment to the NJCCCS and includes back-mapping and strategies on how to ensure retention of all requisite standards and CPI’s. The district is beginning to support development of the Common Core Standards lesson plans and curriculum alignment.

Ensuring that curriculum is aligned to the CCCS

Note: Provide a district description and a specific description for each SINI and/or school operating an approved Title I Schoolwide Program.

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2010-2011 Resource Allocation
Resource Allocation – Provide the following information regarding the use of the 2010-2011 funds including but not limited to 2010 SIA Part (A).
Brief Description of Strategy or Practice Implemented with Funds Amount Allocate d We are a Schoolwi de school with blended funds NOT APPLICABLE NCLB and other federal sources ABBOTT NOT APPLICABL E NOT APPLICABLE To be determined once the Spring 2011 NJASK results are received and analyzed To be determined once the Spring 2011 NJASK results are received and analyzed To be determined once the Spring 2011 NJASK results are received and analyzed To be determined once the Spring 2011 NJASK results are received NJASK SIA Amount Carried Over NOT APPLICABL E Reallocate d Use of SIA NOT APPLICABLE Outcomes as a Result of Implementing the Strategy or Practice To be determined once the Spring 2011 NJASK results are received and analyzed

Type of Funds 2010 Title I, Part A

Evidence

NJASK -Spring 2011

2010 SIA Part A Federal

State

NOT APPLICABL E NOT APPLICABL E NOT APPLICABL E

NOT APPLICABLE NOT APPLICABLE NOT APPLICABLE

NJASK

Local

City Tax Levy We are a Schoolwi de

NJASK

Other

NJASK

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school with blended funds

and analyzed

School Budget Pages
School level budget pages in Excel must be completed along with each school’s Unified Plan, identifying the following:  How the Title I, Part A school allocation is budgeted for targeted assistance schools or schools operating schoolwide programs that do not blend their funds  How the SIA, Part a allocation is budgeted for all schools receiving this award Budget Detail pages and a Budget Summary are available as an Excel program at the following location: www.nj.gov/education/grants/entitlement/nclb/. Complete the Excel budget pages for each school and upload the file to the NCLB Application on EWEG on the Title I Unified Plan upload screen. These budget pages are in addition to the Title I Unified Plan for each school required to complete a plan. Budget Detail pages must be uploaded. The signature of the Business Administrator must be kept on file at the district/school.

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Corrective Action, Restructuring, and School Improvement
•  Certification: For schools in Year 4 hold, 5, 5 hold, 6, 6 hold, 7, 7 hold, 8, 8 hold, 9, 9 hold and 10 that have had a CAPA visit. The corrective action plan, corrective actions identified in the CAPA summary report continue to be incorporated into the Unified Plan.

Corrective Action (CAPA Recommendations) Status Report
This form is completed by all schools in Year 4 and above. Schools in corrective action had to implement one or more of the following corrective actions (as identified by the district) in addition to the SINI and/or SW components. Identify which corrective action(s) will be taken and describe the implementation and how the action(s) will be incorporated with the other elements of the Title I Plan. Note: CAPA report prioritized recommendations and action plans must be incorporated into the Unified Plan. Corrective Actions (Recommendations from CAPA Report)

1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Required implementation of a new research-based curriculum or instructional program Extension of the school year or school day Replacement of staff members, not including the principal, who were relevant to the school’s low performance Significant decrease in management authority at the school level Replacement of the principal Restructuring the internal organization of the school Appointment of an outside expert to advise the school Provide, for all relevant staff, appropriate, scientifically research-based professional development that is likely to improve academic achievement of low-performing students.

Corrective actions implemented: # ________ corrective actions implemented: Correct ive Action #
1 2

Complete the table below regarding the

Description

Effectiv e Yes No

Evidence of Effectiveness

Outcomes

NOT APPLICABLE

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Correct ive Action 3
4

Description

Effectiv e

Evidence of

Outcomes

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SINI Year 5H and Above: Restructuring Implementation

 N/A

 Certification: For schools in Year 5 hold, 6, 6 hold, 7, 7 hold, 8, 8 hold, 9, 9 hold and 10 that have completed a restructuring plan, the approved restructuring plan continues to be incorporated into the Unified Plan.

Year Restructuring Plan Created: _______ The district must develop a restructuring plan for schools in Year 5. The alternative governance actions must be initiated (see below). Note: Districts must also complete the required “School Restructuring Plan,” which includes more detail on the planning process and the restructuring details www.nj.gov/njded/title1/accountability/restructure.doc. The restructuring options are as follows: 1. Implement any major restructuring of the school’s governance that is consistent with the principles of restructuring as set forth in the No Child Left Behind Act. 2. Re-open the school as a public charter school as defined by state statute and regulation (N.J.S.A. 18A:36A-1 et seq. and N.J.A.C. 6A). 3. Replace all or most of the school staff, which may include the principal, who are relevant to the school’s inability to make adequate progress (consistent with existing contractual provisions and applicable statutory protections in Title 18A). Identify the restructuring option(s) selected: ____ For schools in Year 5 hold and above, complete the table below. Add additional rows as needed. Fundamental Governance Reforms Implemented as Listed in Approved Restructuring Plan
1 2

Status of Implementation

Effecti ve Yes No

Outcomes Evidence of Effectiveness

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3 4 5

List revisions made to the original restructuring plan.

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Peer Review
Check Before Proceeding:
• • At minimum, the peer review must be completed by staff members from a school that is not in federal improvement status. Peer reviewers should have expertise in content areas and in school improvement. Peer review must contain recommendations. (The NJDOE peer review suggested process is available at
www.nj.gov/njded/title1/program/peer_review.pdf.)

• 1. Describe process used for peer review of the plan.

2. Provide the actual date and location the peer review(s) took place.

3. Provide the information below.
Peer Reviewer Name Title Affiliation Area of Expertise Principal/Leadershi p Language Arts Mathematics Special Education ELL Address

4. Provide a summary of the recommendations made by the peer review school.

5. List the specific recommendations that were incorporated into the plan as a result of the peer review.

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