Windows Storage Server 2008 R2

Architecture and Deployment White Paper
Version 1.0

Published: February 2011

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Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................ 1 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Overview .................................................... 3 Comparing Windows Server Operating System Storage Offerings .................. 3 Comparing Windows Storage Server with Windows Server ..................... 3 Identifying Windows Storage Server Features ....................................... 4 What’s New in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 .................................. 5 Comparing Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 with Windows Server 2008 R2 ................................................................................................ 8 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Editions ................................................10 Identifying Storage Challenges ................................................................12 Identify Scalability Storage Challenges ................................................12 Identify Availability Storage Challenges ...............................................13 Identify Security Storage Challenges ..................................................14 Identify Manageability Storage Challenges ..........................................14 Identify Data Recovery Storage Challenges .........................................14 Identifying Windows Storage Server Solution Benefits ................................14 Identifying Scalability Benefits ...........................................................15 Identifying Availability Benefits ..........................................................15 Identifying Security Benefits ..............................................................16 Identifying Manageability Benefits ......................................................16 Identifying Data Recovery Benefits .....................................................18 Exploring Windows Storage Server Features and Capabilities ............................19 Providing Access to File Services Workloads ..............................................20 Supporting File Services Workloads Using CIFS, SMB, or SMB2 ..............20 Supporting File Services Workloads Using NFS .....................................21 Supporting File Services Workloads Using WebDAV ..............................22 Supporting File Services Workloads Using Windows SharePoint Services ..........................................................................................23 Providing Access to iSCSI Block I/O Workloads ..........................................23 Supporting iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target ...............................................................................24 Supporting iSCSI Boot ......................................................................27 Providing Access to Web Services Workloads .............................................30 Providing Access to FTP Services Workloads ..............................................31 Providing Access to Print Services Workloads ............................................31 Providing Reduction in Power Consumption ...............................................33 Improve the Power Efficiency of Individual Servers ...............................33 Processor Power Management ............................................................33 Storage Power Management ..............................................................34 Additional Power Saving Features .......................................................35 Performing Highly Automated Installations ................................................35 Managing Windows Storage Server ................................................................36 Management Tools for All Workloads ........................................................36 Managing Power Consumption for All Workloads ........................................37

..............................................................................55 Benefits of Performing Full Volume Recovery Using LUN Resynchronization ..51 Using Windows Server Backup to Protect Data...............................46 Managing Web Services Workloads ...................................................................................................41 Managing Single Instance Storage ...................61 Securing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads ........................................................37 In-Band Power Metering and Budgeting .............................................................43 Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads ...........59 Securing File Services Workloads ..68 Creating Highly-Available iSCSI Initiators .............................................................45 Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Windows PowerShell .................56 Using System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 to Protect Data ...................70 Improving Availability of Web Services Workloads .................................................................59 Securing Windows Storage Server for All Workloads .....................................................38 Managing File Services Using Share and Storage Management ....................65 Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads ....................................54 Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and LUN Swap ..........41 Managing DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication ...........................................................53 Using LUN Resynchronization to Protect Data ...............................................................................................................................49 Protecting Windows Storage Server Workload Data .....................................................58 Using the PrintBRM.............45 Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads .........67 Creating Highly-Available iSCSI Targets .......................................51 Using Shadow Copies of Shared Folders to Protect Data .....63 Securing Print Services Workloads .........................................................................exe Tool to Backup IIS Configuration ........................................................................58 Securing Windows Storage Server Workloads ..........44 Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads .......................ii Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Remote Manageability of Power Policy....................38 Managing File Services Workloads .....................56 Using DFS Replication to Protect Data ........................................................................................................................exe Tool to Backup Printer Information .............................................................................54 Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and Traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service ..............................................................56 Using Automated System Recovery to Protect Data ............65 Improving Availability of File Services Workloads ..............................72 Improving Availability of Print Services Workloads ..38 Managing File Services Using File Server Resource Manager .........................................................................64 Improving Availability of Windows Storage Server Workloads...........................................47 Managing Print Services Workloads .........................62 Securing Web Services Workloads...........57 Using Virtual Disk Snapshots to Protect Data ....................................52 Using the Volume Shadow Copy Service to Protect Data ....................................................................................................57 Using the Appcmd....73 ......................................55 Process for Performing Full Volume Recovery Using LUN Resynchronization ................................................................

.......................................................................................................... 113 Creating Solutions for Heterogeneous Environments .......78 Review Improvements in the SMB2 Protocol ...........................................85 Improving Performance for Branch Offices Using BranchCache ..............................96 Using Windows Storage Server in a Stand-Alone NAS Configuration .................................1 in Windows Server 2008 R2 ........ 120 More Information .....................................................................................................................96 Using Windows Storage Server in a Highly-Available NAS Configuration .............................................98 Using Windows Storage Server in iSCSI Block I/O Configuration ...........................................................77 Improving Performance and Scalability for File Services Workloads .......................... 115 Creating Virtualization Solutions ........................................................................................ 101 Creating Highly-Available Solutions ....... 119 Conclusion ........................................90 Review I/O Storage Test Results ..94 Identify Methods for Improving Web Services Workload Performance and Scalability ..........................................................90 Identify Methods for Improving iSCSI Block I/O Workload Performance and Scalability ................................................ 113 Creating Application Consolidation Solutions ..................74 Improvements in Processor and Memory Capacity ..............74 Improving Performance and Scalability for All Workloads .................. 118 Creating iSCSI Boot Solutions ............... 110 Creating Small to Medium Business Solutions ................87 Improving Performance for Folder Redirection and Offline Files .. 100 Creating Branch Office Solutions ...............94 Improving Performance and Scalability for Print Workloads ........................ 120 ....................................................................................................93 Improving Performance and Scalability for Web Services Workloads .......................96 Overview of Windows Storage Server Configurations .............................................82 Reviewing Performance Improvements in SMB Version 2..................74 Improvements in the Next Generation TCP/IP Protocol .. 116 Running Virtual Machines on Windows Storage Server ........ 116 Connecting Virtual Machines to iSCSI LUNs.......................................................................................79 Review SMB-based File Services Workload Test Results........90 Improving Performance and Scalability for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads ...............................................94 Review Web Services Workload Test Results ............................................ 114 Creating Unified Storage Solutions ..iii Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Improving Performance and Scalability for Windows Storage Server Solutions ...........76 Reduction in Processor Utilization for I/O Operations ...........................................................................97 Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration .................................................................................75 Improvements in Network Adapter Performance................................................................................................................... 109 Creating Solutions for Storage Consolidation ......................................................95 Windows Storage Server Deployment Scenarios ..............................

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 Web services.0. Windows Storage Server extends the file services in Windows Server by providing addition storage features not found in Windows Server. deploy.  iSCSI Block storage services.  Print services.Introduction Windows® Storage Server 2008 R2 is the latest in the Windows Storage Server family of products and is based on the technologies and features found in Windows Server® 2008 R2. including file services. see Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV). Web services. and print services workloads. and share ideas and information. Windows Storage Server is only available through Microsoft Partners. and highly-available storage solutions. Provides access to files using the Server Message Block (SMB) version 2. which supports check-in and check-out features. SMB2 provides a superset of the features found in CIFS and provides improved performance and reliability over previous versions of SMB. Windows Storage Server provides solutions that complement the file services provided by Windows Server. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) protocols. which can be accessed using HTTP. The most common feature is to store files in document libraries. unless otherwise specified. For more information about Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials. This white paper is intended for IT professionals who design.0.  Virtualization services. WebDAV. Provides the ability to run up to two virtual machines on an appliance. Provides remote network attached storage that appears as a disk logical unit number (LUN) to other computers. Windows Storage Server provides a unified solution for the following workloads:  Files services. The following table lists some of the problems and pain points that organizations have with network attached storage appliances. such as Common Internet File System (CIFS) or Network File System (NFS). Line Printer Daemon (LPD) services. purchasing Windows Storage Server bundled with partner appliances can be more cost effective than purchasing Windows Server and a server computer separately. version control. and file history. Provides access to printers using Microsoft print services. Note This white paper focuses on all Windows Storage Server editions except for Windows® Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials. In addition to providing extended features. Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials provides entrylevel solutions intended for use in organizations with 24 or less computers. These services also provide high-performance access to remote disk LUNs using the iSCSI industry standard and can act as an iSCSI initiator or an iSCSI target. use email efficiently and effectively. scalable. Provides access to files managed by the appliance for computers using file access protocols. Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS). This white paper describes the features and technologies in Windows Storage Server. Provides the ability to share documents. and how Windows Storage Server appliances address them. Windows Storage Server refers to Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. NFS version 3. Provides access to Web-based content and services. and how to create secure. Note In this white paper. and operate storage solutions. Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 is built on Windows Server 2008 to create efficient and effective storage solutions. track tasks.  Windows® SharePoint® Services. extensible. Microsoft OEM partners offer specialized hardware and additional software components to create network attached storage appliances. which are connected using the Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) standard. depending on the Windows Storage Server edition. iSCSI block input/output (I/O). . or Internet printing services. or FTP.

Distributed File System (DFS). Provides Windows Server Backup as part of Windows Storage Server. and Microsoft® Forefront®. Ongoing operations and maintenance is labor intensive. Network Attached Storage Appliance Problems and Pain Points Problem or pain point Windows Storage Server solution Dedicated or limited function Provides servicing of multiple workloads on highly appliance. Supports a wide variety of security products and technologies. and Network Load Balancing for improved availability and fault tolerance in addition to the hardware fault tolerance features provided by Microsoft OEM partners. availability. and the server software supports extensibility using any application programming interfaces (APIs) supported by Windows Server 2008. and from Microsoft partners. Limited customization and extensibility. Designed to work "better together" with Windows operating systems. Provides a set of software update management technologies and products for any sized organization. Lack of comprehensive software update management. Many of the management consoles can be customized to include Microsoft OEM partner branding. Minimal or no integration with existing authentication and authorization system. to provide optimal security. and supports other disaster recovery products from Microsoft. Takes advantage of the breadth and depth of the software and hardware products provided by other vendors that are provided for Windows Server 2008. such as System Center Data Protection Manager. . Loosely integrated with clients that consume the services. including Windows Update. Implements nonstandard or proprietary protocols or services. including BitLocker® Drive Encryption. Uses familiar Windows Server management consoles. and Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager. and manageability. Management of workloads. including Windows Vista® and Windows® 7.2 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 1. Integrates with Active Directory® Doman Services (AD DS) and Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services. scalability. Limited disaster recovery. Supports industry standard protocols and services that provide interoperability in heterogeneous environments. Many on-going operations and management tasks can also be automated using System Center Configuration Manager or System Center Operations Manager. Windows Software Update Services (WSUS). Limited protection of information stored on the appliance. extensible Microsoft OEM vendor hardware platforms. Limited breadth of vendor support. Limited provisions for failover or fault tolerant configurations. NTFS permissions. Supports Windows Server Failover Clusters. performance. Share permissions.

 Automation of administration tasks using Windows PowerShell™.3 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Overview Windows Storage Server is optimized for file workloads and includes additional technologies. This overview of Windows Storage Server includes the following topics:  Comparing Windows Server operating system storage offerings. and easy to manage. These optimizations provide enhanced features and performance not found in the general purpose Windows Server operating systems. Windows Server includes Microsoft file and print services. Windows Storage Server is a member of the Windows Sever operating system family that is built on Windows Server. Comparing Windows Server Operating System Storage Offerings Each current Windows® operating system provides some level of storage services.  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 editions. Windows Server® operating systems have been providing storage solutions since their introduction. DHCP Server.  Identifying the features that are new to Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. Deduplication of files is a specific form of compression provided by the SIS feature that combines redundant files into a single instance of the file.  Comparing Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 with Windows Server 2008 R2. DFS-N.  Identifying the features that are unique to Windows Storage Server. However. secure. full screen remote desktop control of storage server administration using Web RDP. DFS-R. This comparison of Windows Server operating system storage offerings includes:  Comparing Windows Storage Server with Window Server. such as Active Directory® Domain Services. such as deduplication of files using the Single Instance Storage (SIS) feature. each of these Windows operating systems has different storage capabilities and features. and then replaces the files with reparse points (links) to the single instance. and support for web applications running Internet Information Services (IIS). because Windows Storage Server is based on Windows Server. see the “Comparing Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 with Windows Server 2008 R2” section in this white paper. scalable. Comparing Windows Storage Server with Windows Server Windows Server operating systems are a family of general purpose operating systems that provide a platform for running IT services and applications that are highly-available. Network Access Protection. As a general purpose operating system. . For a more detailed description of the differences between these operating systems.  Identifying Windows Storage Server solution benefits.  Tightly integrated with Windows infrastructure services. However. it shares all the benefits of Window Server. or Direct Access.  Identifying Storage challenges. including:  A common application programming interface. to provide a unified storage solution. and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. but is optimized for storage solutions.  Efficient management of shared resources using familiar Windows management consoles and command-line utilities.

Consolidate file services and iSCSI block I/O on one appliance Provides file services for an existing SAN solution by acting as a SAN gateway. Table 2 lists the reasons for selecting Windows Storage Server or Windows Server as your storage solution. In other instances. Provides file deduplicaton using SIS. such as file services and domain controller on the same computer. Reasons to Select Windows Storage Server or Windows Server Solution Windows Storage Server Why select this solution      Windows Server      Provides iSCSI block I/O storage for application storage scenarios. as described in the “Step 2: Customize the end user installation experience for the usage scenario” section in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 OEM Deployment Guide. Installs on existing computers. such as Initial Configuration Tasks window. . Table 2. Windows Server many have distinct advantages over Windows Storage Server. Runs applications on the same computer.4 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper There are many instances in which Windows Storage Server provides a more costeffective and efficient storage solution than Windows Server. Runs more than two virtual machines in a Microsoft Hyper-V™ environment. Provides additional installation and configuration options. such as database services or messaging services.  The ability to function as an iSCSI target using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3. Potentially lowers deployment cost than Windows Server when new hardware is required. Provides multiple roles on the same computer. Identifying Windows Storage Server Features Windows Storage Server includes the following features that are not included in Windows Server:  Deduplication of files using Single Instance Storage (SIS) v2 as described in the section “Managing Single Instance Storage” in this white paper.  Full-screen remote desktop management using Windows Internet Explorer® or any web browser that supports Java using the WebRDP feature as described in the “Management Tools for All Workloads” section in this white paper.3 as described in the section “Supporting iSCSI Block I/O Workloads using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target” in this white paper.  The ability to extend the Windows user experience for commonly used management tools.

New or Improved Features in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Feature DFS replication (DFS-R) Description Supports up to 16 simultaneous replication streams. see the following sections in this white paper:  “Managing DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication”  “Creating Branch Office Solutions” Provides locally cached copies of files to reduce network utilization between locations. Table 3. iSCSI Software Target 3. which minimizes administrative effort. For more information. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Supporting iSCSI Block I/O Workloads using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target”  “Creating iSCSI Boot Solutions” DFS namespace (DFS-N) improvements Branch cache hosted cache mode SMB2 file access improvements Unmapped UNIX User Access (UUUA) for NFS file services. Supports replication to and from failover clusters. For more information. see the following sections in this white paper:  “Managing DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication”  “Using DFS Replication to Protect Data”  “Creating Branch Office Solutions” Scales to support up to 60. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Supporting Files Services Workloads Using NFS”  “Securing Files Services Workloads” Improved performance for iSCSI block I/O workloads and support for differencing VHDs used in iSCSI boot solutions. For more information. see the following sections in this white paper:  “Improving Performance for Branch Offices Using Branch Cache”  “Creating Branch Office Solutions” Dramatic reduction in network utilization for accessing files.000 domain-based namespaces and improvements in fault tolerances. For more information.3 . For more information.5 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper What’s New in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Table 3 lists the new or improved features in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 that did not exist in previous versions of Windows Storage Server. Provides read-only access to replica copies of data. NFS client user identities use automatically generated Windows SIDs to access NFS shares. For more information. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Review Improvements in the SMB Protocol”  “Creating Branch Office Solutions” Reduced administrative effort for providing and monitoring access to NFS shares.

In addition. Performance and manageability for FTP services have been improved. Automation of repetitive administrative tasks using Windows PowerShell Remote management using WebRDP Client. For more information. For more information. the Cluster Name and Domain Join Wizard and the Cluster Validation and Setup Wizard. see the “Reduction in Processor Utilization for I/O Operations” section in this white paper. see “Providing Access to FTP Services Workloads” section in this white paper. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Improving Availability of File Services Workloads”  “Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads” Windows PowerShell providers are included for Single Instance Storage and iSCSI block I/O workloads. the power management features can be configured using Group Policy settings.6 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature Simplified deployment for two node clusters Description Reduced administrative effort for installing and configuring a failover cluster using two appliances using the Initial Configuration Tasks window. and increased memory capacity. such as processor power consumption. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Managing Single Instance Storage Using Windows PowerShell”  “Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Windows PowerShell” IT pros can remotely perform full-screen remote desktop management using Internet Explorer or any web browser that supports Java. For more information. see the following sections in this whitepaper:  “Providing Reduction in Power Consumption”  “Management Tools for All Workloads” Overall performance enhancements due to operating system optimization. Dramatic reduction in power consumption due to improvements in system resource power management. 64-bit processor support. see the “Management Tools for All Workloads” section in this white paper. For more information. For more information. For more information. see the following sections in this white paper:  “Improvements in Processor and Memory Capacity”  “Improving Performance for Branch Offices Using Branch Cache” Performance for I/O operations has been dramatically improved. Power consumption and power management Performance and memory capacity I/O performance FTP services .

see the following sections in this white paper:  “Managing Single Instance Storage Using Windows PowerShell”  “Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Windows PowerShell” Unattended installation and Storage settings can be configured at installation time configuration of storage using the unattended installation. which allows files to be managed based on their classification. and reduced effort for developing a backup extension. For more information. see the “Using the Volume Shadow Copy Service to Protect Data”” section in this white paper. see the “Using LUN Resynchronization to Protect Data” section in this white paper. For more information. LUN resynchronization can be used to provide faster recovery in some disaster recovery scenarios. supports concurrent restores. For more information. which facilitates fully settings automated installations. For more information. Windows Server Backup Windows Server Backup provides improved features for performing backup and recovery scenarios.7 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature Description Windows File Classification Management of files has been improved though the infrastructure Windows File Classification Infrastructure. LUN resynchronization Volume Shadow Copy Service improvements . For more information. see “Managing File Services Workloads Using File Classification Infrastructure” in this white paper. Provides snapshots of volumes virtual hard disks (VHDs). For more information. see “Performing Highly Automated Installations” in this white paper. see “Using Windows Server Backup to Protect Data” section in this white paper. Windows PowerShell Windows PowerShell support has been improved for helping to automate storage management tasks. The classification of files is defined by IT administrators.

) Internet Printing Client LPR Port Monitor Microsoft file services based on SMB2 Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ) Multipath I/O Network File System (NFS) Peer Name Resolution Protocol Remote Assistance Remove Desktop Connection Remote Differential Compression Remote Server Admin Tools RPC Over HTTP Proxy Simple TCP/IP Services SNMP Subsystem for UNIX-Based Applications (SUA) Telnet Server TFTP Client Windows Biometric Framework Windows Firewall with Advanced Security Windows Network Load Balancing Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE) Windows PowerShell Windows Process Activation Server .0  BitLocker Drive Encryption Note BitLocker Drive Encryption does not work with failover clusters.                                  BITS Server Extensions Desktop Experience DFS Namespace DFS Replication DHCP Server Failover Clustering Note Failover clustering is available only in the Enterprise edition of Windows Storage Server 2008 R2.NET 3. File Server Resource Manager (FSRM) Full Text Search Group Policy Management Console Integration with Windows Server ecosystems (including backup software.8 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Comparing Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 with Windows Server 2008 R2 The following lists features and technologies common to both Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 R2:  Administration Tools  Microsoft . and antivirus software.

9 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  Windows Server Backup Note Windows Server Backup does not work with failover clusters and does not support volumes larger than 2 terabytes. there are some differences between the two products.  Windows Server Migration Tools  WS-Management  Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) Although Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 is based on the features and technologies in Windows Server 2008 R2. Table 4 lists the feature and technology differences between the two products. Windows Server 2008 R2 Retail channels Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Microsoft OEM partners     Optionally performed by Microsoft OEM partners .3. Supports full screen remote desktop management using Web RDP. Optimized for file services workloads. Table 4. Supports acting as an iSCSI target using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3. Supports customized branding of user interface. Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Differences Feature or technology Availability to organizations. Supports deduplication of files using Single Instance Storage (SIS).

iSCSI block I/O services. BranchCache in hosted cache mode. Hardware RAID supported. Table 5 lists the capabilities of Windows Storage Server.  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Standard. Workgroup provides support for less than 25 users who require access to file services using Microsoft file services or NFS. BitLocker Drive Encryption    Workgroup 64-bit 4 32 GB 2 6 Any  Workgroup 25     Standard 64-bit 4 32 GB Unlimited Any Any  Standard Unlimited     Enterprise 64-bit 8 2 terabyte Unlimited Any Any  Enterprise Unlimited        . and Web services workloads. Maximum number of network adapters. DFS replication.  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Enterprise. and Web services workloads. Maximum number of processor sockets. iSCSI block I/O services. Enterprise is an advanced platform that provides more cost-effective and reliable support for mission-critical workloads. Table 5. Type of disk adapters supported. which provides key functionality to support any sized business and IT storage challenge. NFS. File Classification Infrastructure. Maximum amount of memory. Enterprise provides support for an unlimited number of users with maximum faulttolerance and scalability provided in a Windows Storage Server product. Capabilities Maximum number of simultaneous users supported. Use the information in Table 5 to identify which Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 edition is best suited for your organization. is available in the following editions:  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Workgroup. print services. deduplication of files using Single Instance Storage. Deduplication of files using SIS. and the support level for the capabilities in each edition of the product. Comparison of Windows Storage Editions Maximum system resources support Capabilities Supported processor architecture.10 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Editions Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. Standard provides support for an unlimited number of users who require access to file services using Microsoft file services or NFS. print services. Workgroup is an entry-level technology foundation also targeted at small business owners and IT generalists supporting small businesses. File Services Resource Manager. Number of disks supported.

Windows Management Instrumentation. OEM customization of user interface and experience. Hyper-V guest support. . Windows Server Backup. see the section. Fax services. Number of printers supported for Print Services workloads. Multipath I/O.11 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Capabilities Microsoft iSCSI Target Software. "Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Specifications" later in this white paper. Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services. AD DS read-only domain controller. Domain name system (DNS). Workgroup Optional Standard Optional Enterprise Optional Failover clusters. Note Some Microsoft partners include the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target by default. DHCP Server services. Domain membership. Windows Search services.      Any    1 Any             2 Any           For more information about the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target specifications.

 Identify manageability challenges in storage solutions. upgrade to higher capacity disks. Data must be accessible by users on an on-demand basis for a high percentage of the time. Table 6 lists the categories of storage challenges that most organizations experience. compromise. in a decentralized structure an administrator can . and it should be protected from any single point of failure.  Compatibility with storage networking solutions.12 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Identifying Storage Challenges IT pros face most of the same storage challenges. and servers. However. it can be difficult to make the data accessible to others. Even when sharing is enabled. data is increasingly dispersed throughout a company.  Identify security challenges in storage solutions. This is an especially troublesome problem with data stored on desktops — without file sharing enabled on these computers. and where to find them. Data must remain free from corruption. When an administrator finds that these hard disk drives are getting too full. Business requirements determine the challenges that an organization must solve to provide a comprehensive storage solution. remote users. and inadvertent user error. Table 6.  Underutilization of storage resources. regardless of the size of their organization. unauthorized access. Data must be easy to manage and maintain for local users. or purchase additional computers that each have more hard disks. Many organizations must adhere to data retention regulatory requirements to not keep data older than a defined age. Data must be recoverable in the event of a disaster.  Identify data recovery challenges in storage solutions. the simplest solutions to increase storage capacity are: add more hard drives. workstations. making it difficult for users to know what resources exist. policy-driven processes and procedures. there is no effective mechanism to determine exactly where information is stored or which version of a document is the most up-todate. Scalability storage challenges include:  Decentralized of data. Security Manageability Data recovery Identify storage solution challenges by performing the following steps:  Identify scalability challenges in storage solutions. Identify Scalability Storage Challenges Internal or external hard disks are the most common way to store data on desktops. Finding the appropriate solution requires careful optimization of an enterprise-wide storage plan. or branch offices using highly-automated.  Identify availability challenges in storage solutions. Decentralization of Data As the number of systems increase. Storage Challenge Categories Category Scalability Availability Description Data must be accessible in a timely manner based on the response times defined in your Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

You can also create more sophisticated. Compatibility with Storage Networking Solutions The best storage solutions not only meet today’s storage needs. Anticipating growth and implementing storage solutions that scale with growth remains a problem. other storage mediums with the end result being consolidated management flow for administrators and a consistent experience for users. As data is centralized. But. Fault tolerance can be achieved through redundancy of hardware components. such as network attached storage (NAS) and storage area networks (SANs). high latency WAN links. thus space may be available on one server. users still have the problem of not being able to find the data that they need — or in some cases even knowing that it exists. Some computers inevitably exceed their storage capacity. Effective storage planning requires accurate predictions of which users and applications will require more storage capacity. Hard Disk Redundancy Hard disk redundancy can be achieved using RAID types such as RAID 10. Adding more servers does not eliminate the problem of inefficient utilization of storage space between servers. network interconnects. while others have excess capacity but no means to effectively share those resources. directly attached storage tends to scale poorly over the long term. Unfortunately. parity-based configurations that spread multiple data over multiple drives. Migrating a company’s critical data to a centralized server can help the situation. Storage remains local to each server. storage interconnects. and ensuring that the data is protected well enough to meet requirements. mechanisms need to be put in place to ensure data availability so that user productivity is not negatively affected. and offer services for. Storage solutions must be able to integrate with. and is one way to ensure highly available data.13 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper face many hurdles when building and applying a consistent policy to the type and age of data that is stored. as more servers are added to increase storage capacity (and to provide redundancy in the event of hardware failure). because the data can be readily shared across the network. or RAID 6. The availability storage challenges include:  Hard disk redundancy. but capacity exceeded on another. In this case. Underutilization of Storage Resources Storage that is directly attached to a server is made available to other computers on the network through the operating system’s sharing capabilities. Failure in any of a number of hardware components — storage devices. motherboards and power supplies — can result in a temporary or permanent loss of data. Identify Availability Storage Challenges Businesses rely on making their services and information available for access. processors. These parity-based approaches can provide protection from a disk failure through the maintenance of checksum information.  Server redundancy. . organizations can experience bandwidth bottlenecks as users in remote locations attempt to access data in a central location via potentially slow. 24x7. and those resources must be provisioned before disk capacity is exceeded. cabling. year-round. they also scale well with more advanced storage solutions. Hard disks using the same RAID controller can be combined to provide a fault tolerance disk configuration using RAID subsystems. RAID 5.

In addition. and for that reason. Hard disks must be backed up by the individual user. remote users must be able to access the data through remote access connections. Identify Manageability Storage Challenges System administration can become enormously complex. where it can be properly backed up. and database servers. The benefits to creating storage solutions using Windows Storage Server include:  Scalability  Availability  Security  Manageability  Data recovery . Access to the data must be secured for users on the organization’s intranet. The most common means of protecting data from these problems is through tape backups and restores. Security in depth is required in terms of multi-level and multi-factor security in instances where the data is highly confidential. such as My Documents to a network location while keeping a cached version of the data on the user’s local machine. and disasters. extranets. Users are redirected to another computer without any loss of services. With Failover Clustering. system administrators strongly advocate storing critical documents and data on a server. user error. Identify Security Storage Challenges Preventing unauthorized access to confidential data requires tight integration between file services and identity management systems. although many organizations require multiple platforms to support various applications. applications remain online. or another operating system. Administrators are responsible for managing file. This redirection can also ensure data availability even when the computer is not connected to the network. and for clustering those servers to ensure effective performance and high availability. However. application. Identify Data Recovery Storage Challenges System administrators must protect data not only from hardware failure. web. UNIX. even if a server goes down. Technologies such as folder redirection combined with Offline Files can help users store data on servers by redirecting key folders. Most of these advantages are available because Windows Storage Server is based on Windows Server 2008 R2. especially in midsize and large organizations. Finally. Identifying Windows Storage Server Solution Benefits Network attached storage appliances running Windows Storage Server have a number of advantages compared to other network attached storage appliances.14 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Server Redundancy Failover clustering allows two or more computer systems to perform and be managed as a single system. these solutions provide only partial protection. demand is increasing to share data among users whether they are running Windows. but also from data corruption. users are rarely effective in performing regular backups. IT pros have to help ensure the strongest possible security while allowing users the access they require to data. or the Internet. Unfortunately.

The Distributed File System Replication (DFSR) service controls replication and synchronization of data using Remote Differential Compression (RDC) that only replicates modifications to a file. You can select the failover priority by configuring the load-balancing policies for your storage solution. Identifying Availability Benefits The following are the availability benefits provided by Windows Storage Server:  Failover clustering. resulting in less bandwidth used for replication and. line of business. Distributed File System (DFS) simplifies the user’s process of locating and accessing files distributed across an organization.  Processor scaling. This data can be made highly available in a transparent manner using the Distributed File System Namespace.000-link target limit that previously existed. Duplicate files are transparently replaced with file system links to the single copy retained in the SIS Common Store — saving significant capacity. the secondary component takes over in a process that is seamless to the application running on the server. and custom applications that sometimes require highly reliable. Windows Storage Server supports hot-add of processors. . therefore. memory. and hot-replace of processors and memory on x64-based and Itanium-based systems which support DHP.15 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Identifying Scalability Benefits The following are the scalability benefits provided by Windows Storage Server:  Increasing the Effectiveness of File Sharing.  Dynamic hardware partitioning. Once enabled. Windows Storage Server includes support for fault tolerate memory synchronization.  Improved fault tolerance between servers and storage. Windows Server® 2003 introduced the ability to accommodate multiple DFS root directories on each server. including fans and power supplies and processors and RAM that runs in lockstep together. WHEA has been enhanced to support Machine Check Architecture (MCA) error recovery. On a dynamically partitionable server. When multiple paths exist between servers and storage. Fault-tolerant servers contain redundant hardware. Failover clustering can help you build redundancy into your network and eliminate single points of failure.  Windows Hardware Error Architecture (WHEA). Those modifications are compressed during transmission. In addition. partition units can be added or replaced without restarting the operating system. Windows Storage Server can scale up to 256 logical processors to meet the demands of business-critical servers supporting large databases. ensuring access to the nearest available copy of the data at the lowest cost.  Reduces storage requirements. and this capability has been maintained in Windows Server 2008 R2. and to provide support for Access Based Enumeration (ABE) on DFS Namespaces. The Single Instance Storage feature in Windows Storage Server helps optimize storage capacity using built-in file deduplication. scalable servers. DFS only displays items in the namespace and folders that the user has access to. Windows Storage Server can failover to an alternate path if the primary path fails. With the release of Windows Server 2008 R2. protection and recovery by Single Instance Store-aware backup solutions can significantly reduce backup windows and recovery times. offering the ability to contain and recover from several types of multi-bit ECC errors in memory and cache without operating system or application interruption. Single Instance Storage actively compares and eliminates identical files on selected volumes.  Fault tolerant hardware. faster synchronization. If a primary component fails. It is no longer necessary to add an additional server for each additional DFS root directory. DFS has been enhanced to remove the 5. and I/O host bridges. DFS also offers closest site selection.

the iSCSI configuration). you can take advantage of your expertise with Windows Server. and federated domains using Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS). such as System Center Operations Manager. and operate storage solutions. In addition.  Manages and operates your storage solution using your existing processes and procedures. This familiarity dramatically can help reduce your learning curve so that you can quickly and efficiently plan.16 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  Improved recovery from configuration errors. Comprehensive Microsoft support for Windows Server products and the extensive community of partners and peers help you resolve storage-related issues with less effort. and with less effort. In the event of a subsequent configuration failure. Windows Storage Server allows you to take configuration snapshots of the storage subsystem (for example. NTFS permissions.  Resolves support issues faster. multi-vendor storage device management required a system administrator to manage each device independently and to use a different vendor-supplied interface to do so — all of which adds another layer of complexity to the system administrator’s job. Identifying Security Benefits The following are the security benefits provided by Windows Storage Server:  Secures digital assets. you can manage and operate Windows Storage Server using other products.  Seamlessly integrates with your existing Windows IT infrastructure. Because Windows Storage Server is based on Windows Server 2008 R2. can be used to access resources shared by Windows Storage Server. Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS).  Easily extends storage solutions. such as Microsoft Forefront. The broad range of well documented APIs and scripting languages can help you customize Windows Storage Server to meet your organization's requirements. the Storage Manager for SANs. Identifying Manageability Benefits The following are the manageability benefits provided by Windows Storage Server:  Reduces time to realize efficient management. Windows Server 2008 R2 contains a number of management interfaces for SAN hardware. more precisely. and IPsec. An error in the configuration of the storage subsystem can negatively affect storage availability. In addition. In addition. This helps protect your existing investment while developing custom processes and procedures. Windows Storage Server integrates easily with existing Windows IT infrastructure services. you can quickly restore the configuration to a previous version. You can manage and operate Windows Storage Server using the same IT processes and procedures that are currently used to manage Windows Server 2008 R2. many of the Microsoft management products. For example.  Integrates with existing identity management systems. You can easily extend the features and services provided by Windows Storage Server using the large number of products and services provided by Microsoft partners or by developing your own solution. You can use the same extensive security products and technologies found in Windows Server 2008 to secure Windows Storage Server. build. Windows Firewall with Advanced Security. . such as System Center Configuration Manager or System Center Operations Manager 2007. Identities from AD DS. Much of this existing knowledge is integrated in the product or available online.  Manages multi-vendor storage more effectively. such as AD DS. deploy. include knowledge from the product groups at Microsoft to help provide you with accurate and relevant information to resolve support issues. Forefront Identity Manager (FIM) 2010 also can be used to synchronize identities from other identity systems. You can also use Microsoft and partner products to further strengthen the security of your storage solutions. This level of integration also helps minimize any infrastructure remediation that may be required to deploy and operate your storage solution. In past versions of Windows Server. such as BitLocker Drive Encryption.

Enhancements include:  Administrators can now control volume mounting to protect volumes from unintentional access. Web services. These tools help protect the integrity of your existing data while ensuring the current user permissions and security configuration is transferred to Windows Storage Server. You can use the same set of tools and process to manage all the workloads supported by Windows Storage Server. many Microsoft partners produce products to help in migrating workloads to Windows Server products. You can automate repetitive administrative tasks using Windows PowerShell scripts in Windows Storage Server. The Windows Storage Server 2008 operating system is a multi-purpose server designed to handle a diverse set of server roles. You can also centrally manage many of the Windows Storage Server configuration settings using Group Policy. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target component in Windows Storage Server allows you to create iSCSI disk LUNs. and print services workloads using the well-known management consoles and utilities in Windows Storage Server. . You can manage file services.17 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper       Migrates from other storage solutions to Windows Storage Server. Reduces administration effort for storage solutions. In addition. you can draw on the large number of existing scripts developed by the partner and peer communities to further reduce the time required to achieve automation. SAN technology based on IP also removes the physical limitations of moving data associated with Fibre Channel. using available iSCSI initiators. iSCSI block I/O services. Windows Storage Server 2008 is a network-attached storage (NAS) operating system. such as Linux. including file and print. In addition. which in turn helps lower total cost of ownership (TCO) especially in complex multivendor storage environments. such as Microsoft® Exchange Server 2010 running on a Windows Server operating system. instead of using a different set of management tools for each workload. Provides centralized storage for applications. Disk LUNs can be remotely mounted by application servers. using the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator or application servers running other operating systems. such as System Center Configuration Manager or System Center Operations Manager. Takes advantage of existing network infrastructure for SAN storage.  SAN Host Bus Adapter (HBA) interoperability has been simplified with the SAN MMC management snap-in. The integrated storage services available in Windows Server and Windows Storage Server 2008 have been enhanced in Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. The Windows Storage Server 2008 platform now provides better support for SANs. You can migrate workloads from existing Windows Server operating systems to Windows Storage Server using highly-automated migration tools. Provides unified solution to storage management and operations. iSCSI technology helps bring the advantages of storage area networking (SAN) to midsize and small businesses that otherwise could not afford the extra cost and management of running a separate Fibre Channel network. Robust storage solutions. Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 make it easier to manage and maintain disks. rather than having to install a separate Fibre Channel network. and new features have been added aimed at helping businesses control storage management costs and increase availability of data. For example. Windows support for iSCSI technology allows users to connect computers to consolidated storage devices using existing Ethernet technologies. web. storing Exchange Server and virtual server data and directory services. such as the File Server Migration Tools.  Fibre Channel and iSCSI SANs handling has been improved. built on Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system technologies. remote desktop. For example. you can use other Microsoft products to further automate the administration of Windows Storage Server.

 Manages backups and restores more effectively. Making data highly available throughout an organization requires data redundancy. As organizations produce more information. deployment. backing up data becomes an increasingly time intensive and potentially disruptive operation. because only the changes to the data are saved. shadow copies take up little disk space. Moreover. Microsoft Solution Accelerators. Your IT organization and users are less likely to experience difficulties in using and operating Windows Storage Server because they are already familiar with Windows Server. With VSS. The Shadow Copy for Shared Folders feature of the new Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) enables users to easily restore their own deleted files without IT intervention.  Windows Server backup tools. Because Windows Storage Server is based on Windows Server. In the case of catastrophic system failures — cases in which all operating system information is lost and the server is effectively stripped down to bare metal — Automated System Recovery makes possible rapid restore of the system’s original state. Identifying Data Recovery Benefits The following are the data recovery benefits provided by Windows Storage Server:  Easier data recovery. and best practice guidance to help make certain that the planning. which can centrally store the snapshot information. thus adding availability to the data. This capability can be extended with technologies like System Center Data Protection Manager (DPM). and ongoing operations of Windows Storage Server succeed. . Windows Storage Server can failover to an alternate path if the primary path fails. separate from the originating server. thus making unnecessary the disruptive practice of shutting down applications during backup to prevent data consistency issues. These can be responsible for flushing buffers and getting data on a disk in a consistent state that is suitable to back up. The accidental deletion or overwriting of files has long been the bane of system administrators charged with the time-intensive and costly task of locating and restoring single files from tape.18 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  Minimizes storage solution adoption risk. enabling companies to make copies of necessary data. The VSS process ensures data integrity though the utilization of VSS writers. you can minimize the risk of adoption for your new storage solution. You can select the failover priority by configuring the load-balancing policies for your storage solution  Windows Recovery Environment. open file backups are enabled. When multiple paths exist between servers and storage. VSS allows administrators to schedule regular copies of data stored on disk. You can use many of the existing tools. The Windows Recovery Environment in Windows Storage Server is a partial version of the operating system and a set of tools that you can use to perform operating system or full server recoveries.

Figure 1. These features and capabilities allow Windows Storage Server to act as a unified platform to manage various workloads. as illustrated in Figure 1. Workloads supported by Window Storage Server .19 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Exploring Windows Storage Server Features and Capabilities Windows Storage Server includes a rich set of features and capabilities to help service multiple workloads. unlike dedicated or single function network attached storage appliances.

SMB. Some network access storage appliances that are not running Windows Storage Server implement generic CIFS-based file services that implement only older versions of SMB and lack the performance advantages and improved reliability of SMB2. or SMB2 The SMB2 protocol in Windows Storage Server provides access to files and folders for client computers using the SMB or CIFS protocols.20 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper These features and capabilities help you provide access to:  File services workloads.  Providing access to FTP services workloads. or production environments. including the following workloads:  Hyper-V  Microsoft SQL Server®  Microsoft Exchange Server  iSCSI boot  Providing access to Web services workloads. Windows-based client computers use the SMB protocol while other operating systems typically use the CIFS protocol.  Print services workloads This section includes the following topics:  Providing access to file services workloads.  Web services workloads.  Providing access to iSCSI block I/O workloads in development. Select this protocol to support homogeneous or heterogeneous environments that contain:  Windows-based computers that use Client for Microsoft Networks to access file services workloads using the SMB protocol.  Providing access to print services workloads. For more information about the improvements available in SMB2. as illustrated in Figure 1. SMB. which is highly-optimized for use with Windows 7. or SMB2  NFS  WebDAV  Windows SharePoint® Services Supporting File Services Workloads Using CIFS.  iSCSI block I/O workloads. see the "Review Improvements in File Services" section later in this white paper. Windows Storage Server can support file services workloads in homogeneous Windows network environments or heterogeneous network environments with a variety of operating systems. Providing Access to File Services Workloads File services workloads allow computers to access files and folders stored on network access storage appliances. and the prior versions of SMB for previous Windows operating systems.  Computers running other operating systems that access file services workloads using the CIFS protocol. The File Services server role in Windows Storage Server supports both SMB2. Windows Storage Server provides support for homogeneous or heterogeneous file services workloads using the following protocols or features:  CIFS. test. .

the Identity Management for UNIX Active Directory schema extension includes the UNIX user identifier (UID) and group identifier (GID) fields. This method allows users to access shared resources using automatically generated Windows Security Identifiers (SIDs) based on the UNIX UID and GID. This method allows all unmapped users to access shared resources using a common anonymous account is configurable. The NFS protocol allows any NFS client computer to access files and folders managed by Windows Storage Server using version 2 and version 3 of the NFS protocol. For computers running Windows. In addition.0 with the Services for Network File System role service. Note The Server for NFS component supports NFS version 2. For more information about installing and configuring the Services for Network File System role service. download NFS Account Mapping in Windows Server 2008 R2. This enables Server for NFS and Client for NFS to look up Windows-to-UNIX user account mappings directly from AD DS or AD LDS. For more information about enabling identity (account) mapping for Services for NFS. A computer running an NFS client can mount the NFS exported folder into the local file system of the operating system running on the computer. the NFS client allows access to the NFS exported folder using a universal naming convention (UNC) path or by mapping the NFS exported folder to a drive letter.0 and version 3. . and a number of command-line tools for managing it. UNIX Version Support The Services for NFS supports the following versions of UNIX:  Sun Microsystems Solaris version 9  Red Hat Linux version 9  IBM AIX version 5L 5. NFS Authentication The Server for NFS component can use Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) or Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS) for mapped identity management. see Services for NFS Step-by-Step Guide for Windows Server 2008. In Windows Storage Server. This component includes the Services for NFS snap-in. The Services for Network File System role service includes the following components:  Server for NFS. This component allows a computer running Windows Storage Server and Client for NFS to access NFS mount points on NFS servers. Select this protocol to support heterogeneous environments that contain computers running an NFS client that access file services workloads using the NFS protocol.2  Hewlett Packard HP-UX version 11i The Server for NFS component allows you to share a folder as a NFS exported folder (also known as a NFS shared folder).21 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Supporting File Services Workloads Using NFS Windows Storage Server supports access to file services workloads using the NFS protocol version 3. Windows Server 2008. The Server for NFS component is required to support file services workloads using NFS. Server for NFS can support unmapped user access using:  Unmapped UNIX User Access.  Client for NFS.  Anonymous access. This component allows a computer running Windows Storage Server and Server for NFS to service NFS client computer requests.0. and later Windows Server operating systems.

thereby .5 for IIS 7. Also. The WebDAV extension module is available as a separate download at WebDAV 7.5 can be enabled at the site level. Administrators can configure Server for NFS to ignore case sensitivity when returning directory and file names.5 supports per-URL authoring rules. The differences between Windows and non-Windows filenames include the following:  Case sensitivity.22 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Non-Windows and Windows File Names Many of the conventions used for naming files and directories on non-Windows systems differ from those used by Windows.) character. and includes the following improvements:  Integration with IIS 7. These authoring rules are separate from the IIS 7. For more information.  Hidden files. Non-Windows file systems do not use letters to identify drives. see Configure Case Sensitivity for File and Folder Names. Administrators can specify how characters in directory and file names will be converted when files are shared between Server for NFS and client computers.0 has a new administration interface and configuration store.5 of the WebDAV extension module for Internet Information Services (IIS) 7. By default. Other operating systems also include a WebDAV redirector. the administrator creates a file that defines how these characters are to be mapped. Server for NFS does not create files with names beginning with a period as hidden files in the Windows file system. By default. WebDAV 7. In contrast. file names can be case sensitive.0.) character are hidden. Previous versions of WebDAV only allowed you to enable WebDAV at the server level. a file stored on NTFS cannot contain the colon (:) character because that character separates the drive letter from the rest of the path in a fully qualified path name. For example. Server for NFS is case-sensitive when matching directory. which provides support for homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Files can be hidden on both non-Windows and Windows computers.0 (x64). but are not case sensitive. Every file system reserves characters for use in path and command syntax.0. the new WebDAV extension module integrates with the Internet Information Services Manager console to provide ease of administration. IIS 7. In the case of Windows computers. Client computers running a WebDAV redirector can access file services workloads using the WebDAV protocol. Depending on the operating system. Non-Windows file systems simply do not list files whose names begin with a period (. The new WebDAV extension module is tightly integrated with this new design. Windows computers preserve the case. WebDAV 7. Supporting File Services Workloads Using WebDAV The WebDAV protocol is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol that enables file management over any IP network. contain special characters.  Special characters. All current Windows operating systems include a WebDAV redirector. Most UNIX-like non-Windows file systems are case-sensitive when handling directory and file names.5 is the latest version of WebDAV for Windows Storage Server. For more information. and then specifies where Server for NFS can find the file containing the character map. To accomplish this.and file-access requests to directories and files in its shared directories.  Per-site Configuration. or be hidden from users. allowing you to specify custom WebDAV security settings on a per-URL basis. This setting can be turned off by administrators to ensure that files whose names begin with a period (.0 per-URL authorization rules.  Per-URL Security Settings. files are hidden by setting a special attribute for the file. it preserves the case of the names of directories and files when creating files on behalf of NFS client computers. so colon characters are valid in non-Windows file names. see Nfsadmin. Windows Storage Server includes version 7. WebDAV 7.

Document libraries include the ability to check in and check out files to help maintain version control. In addition. Windows SharePoint Services include a number of collaboration features. .0. but the feature specific to file services is the document library feature. Client computers can access the document libraries using either protocol. Microsoft Office System client applications. such as a SAN. iSCSI block I/O workloads include both a server component (iSCSI target) and a client component (iSCSI initiator).0 support on Windows Storage Server. such as SQL Server® 2008 or Exchange Server 2010.23 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper allowing one set of security settings for normal HTTP requests. as illustrated in Figure 2. Windows Storage Server is used to connect to external iSCSI targets. For more information about providing Windows SharePoint Services 3. see Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3. support opening and saving files to document libraries directly within the application. Also. which allows you to easily restore a previous version of a file and track version history. As an iSCSI target. Windows Storage Server can be an iSCSI. see WebDAV for IIS 7. or Fibre Channel initiator based on the type of storage being accessed. Providing Access to iSCSI Block I/O Workloads iSCSI block I/O workloads are another type of workload provided by most network access storage appliances. Serial Attached SCSI (SAS). For more information about providing WebDAV support on Windows Storage Server. and a separate set of security settings for WebDAV requests. such as Microsoft Word 2007 or Excel® 2007. see the section "Using Windows Storage Server as a NAS Gateway in Solutions. you can configure document libraries to retain a specified number of versions for each file in the document library. Computers running Windows can also access the document libraries through Windows Explorer. Supporting File Services Workloads Using Windows SharePoint Services Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3. Select this protocol to support heterogeneous environments that contain computers running WebDAV redirectors that need to access the file services workloads using the HTTP or HTTPS protocol. Windows Storage Server is used to support iSCSI block IO workloads for applications." later in this white paper. As an iSCSI initiator. Note When Windows Storage Server is deployed in a NAS gateway scenario.0 allows users to collaborate with each other using either HTTP or HTTPS. For more information.0.

3 in Windows Storage Server.3.24 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 2. Windows Storage Server can function as an iSCSI target (the server component) or an iSCSI initiator (the client component). These specifications are applicable to all Windows Storage Server editions that include Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. For more information about the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. This allows a large number of configuration options for iSCSI block I/O workload solutions. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. see Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3. and Enterprise editions.3 available for Windows Storage Server provides iSCSI target functionality. . Note Some Microsoft partners include the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target by default. Standard.3. Supporting iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3.3 is the latest version of the iSCSI target software and is an optional component in Window Storage Server Workgroup. iSCSI block I/O workloads supported by Windows Storage Server Windows Storage Server supports iSCSI block I/O workloads using the iSCSI standard. Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Specifications Table 7 lists the specifications for the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3.3.

Maximum number of virtual disk per iSCSI target instance. IPsec. Support for Single or Multipath IO Connections for Non-Clustered or Clustered Configurations Specification Windows Server 2008 (multipath I/O connection) Windows Server 2008 (single path I/O connection) Windows Server 2008 (multipath I/O connection) Windows Server 2003 (single path I/O connection) Nonclustered Supported Supported Supported Supported Clustered Supported Limited * Limited * Limited* * There is limited support for iSCSI initiators or iSCSI targets in clustered configurations of Windows Server 2003 when connected to the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. see the section "Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads.3 Specifications Specification Maximum number of iSCSI target instances per appliance. Maximum number of virtual disks or snapshots that can be locally mounted by the appliance. Table 8. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator includes a multipath I/O Device Specific Module (DSM) for the Microsoft Multipath I/O (MPIO) in Windows Server. Jumbo frames. For more information about multipath I/O. we recommend to use Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 in clustered configurations when connecting to the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. iSCSI offload. Multipath I/O connections allow for improved fault-tolerance and performance for iSCSI block I/O workloads. Failures on the iSCSI network path may result in delayed failover and recovery times. Value 64 128 128 512 32 (or 4 per cluster node) 64 16 64 Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Windows Storage Server includes support for single path and multipath I/O connections to nonclustered and clustered configurations. For these reasons. TCP offload. Maximum number of iSCSI initiators per appliance." later in this white paper. Table 8 lists the support for the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target with single or multipath I/O connections when connecting to nonclustered or clustered configurations. Maximum number of snapshots per virtual disk. Maximum number of virtual disks per appliance. Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Version 3.25 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 7. Failures for non-network related issues have been tested with acceptable recovery times. . Maximum number of iSCSI initiators that can connect to the same iSCSI target instance. IPv6. IPv4. Maximum number of iSCSI initiator sessions that can connect to the same iSCSI target instance.

.x.3 includes a hardware provider for:  Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS). The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider is required to create transportable snapshots of iSCSI virtual disks and application-consistent snapshots from iSCSI initiators.3.x. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider version 3. Prior versions of the hardware providers are not supported by Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. and for creating volumes on those disks.  Virtual Disk Service (VDS).26 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Note The limitation for iSCSI initiators or iSCSI targets in clustered configurations of Windows Server 2003 is specific to Microsoft iSCSI Software Target usage.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows Server 2008 R2.  32-bit or 64-bit versions of Windows Server® 2003 SP2.  64-bit versions of Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. and Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider.00.3 and Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider version 3.07 and 2.  Qlogic initiator QLE4062C-SP. Install the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider on each iSCSI initiator computer running a storage management application (such as the Microsoft Storage Manager for SANs) that uses the hardware provider to manage storage The most recent version of these hardware provider APIs is Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider version 3. Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Support for VSS and VDS Providers Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3.08 in Windows Server 2003. Note Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. VDS provides an end-to-end solution for managing storage hardware and disks.3 of the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider.  SUSE Enterprise Linux iSCSI Initiator version 10. Install this hardware provider on the computer running the iSCSI initiator and the computer that is to perform backups.3 supports the following iSCSI initiators:  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator 2.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux iSCSI Initiator version 5.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows Vista. Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Support for iSCSI Initiators Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows Server 2008 SP1 and SP2.3 supports only version 3. iSCSI snapshots are created using VSS and a storage array with a hardware provider designed for use with VSS. firmware 3. VDS is a set of APIs that provides a single interface for managing disks.  64-bit versions of Windows Storage Server 2008. The backup software must support transporting snapshots.3 and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider version 3. VSS is a set of APIs that implement a framework to allow volume backups to be performed while applications on a system continue to write to the volumes.24.3.01.  32-bit or 64-bit versions of Windows Server 2008 SP1.3 support the following operating systems:  Windows Server 2008 R2. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider is required to manage virtual disks on a storage subsystem.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows 7. Customers using a different iSCSI target should refer to the storage array vendor for supported configurations.

Independent Hardware Vendors implementing iSCSI boot support in their firmware need to use the table headers defined in this specification to enable the passing of boot critical parameters to the Windows operating system.  Network boot program software that provides iSCSI boot capability. The components in this phase include:  Int 13. firmware on the host bus adapter. This phase is performed by the firmware on the network adapter.3:  Any Windows client operating system.3. and Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider version 3. The Windows Boot Manager is configured to boot using LUNs that are accessible through the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. The BIOS function used to access disk boot functions.  Windows. These functions are redirected to the virtual disk stored on Windows Storage Server. iSCSI Boot Firmware Table (iBFT) is a block of information containing parameters needed to boot Windows Server 2003 and later versions of Windows using the iSCSI protocol and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. iSCSI boot support is provided on diskless computers using one of the following methods:  Network adapters that support iSCSI boot capability. is divided into the following phases:  Pre-boot. Supporting iSCSI Boot iSCSI boot allows diskless computers (computers without local disk) to boot over the network. Universal Network Device Interface (UNDI) is an application programming interface (API) for network interface cards (NIC) used by the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) protocol. and Windows® 7. This phase of the process is used to initiate the Window iSCSI boot process.  iSCSI host bus adapters that support iSCSI boot capability.  iBFT. including Windows® XP. . For network boot programs. Figure 3. or network boot program. Table 9 lists the components in an iSCSI boot solution using Windows Storage Server and provides a brief description of the purpose for each component.27 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper The following operating systems are not supported by Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider version 3. iSCSI boot process for Windows operating systems For iSCSI boot-enabled network adapters and host bus adapters. see iSCSI Boot Firmware Table (iBFT).  32-bit version of Windows Storage Server 2008. all the necessary preboot phase components are in firmware on the adapter. depending on the method used for the diskless computer. This phase of the process is performed by the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. these components are provided by the partner providing the program. Windows Vista. The iSCSI boot process for Windows operating systems. For more information.  UNDI. as illustrated in Figure 3.

Differencing virtual disks can be used for multiple computers based on the same fixed virtual disk. . Figure 4 illustrates how diskless computers can boot from virtual disk files (. Virtual disk iSCSI connection in diskless computer DHCP server Trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) server Provides download of boot image to target computer when the virtual disk cannot be directly accessed using the iSCSI connection in the diskless computer. The TFTP server is not required for network adapters that support iSCSI boot or an iSCSI host bus adapter. which can be any one of the following:  Network adapter that supports iSCSI boot. Note The TFTP server is required only if you are using iSCSI boot software that requires a TFTP server. Virtual disk files (. However. The iSCSI boot process and Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator can access these virtual disks during the boot process.vhd files) stored on Windows Storage Server using a network boot program that provides iSCSI boot capability. Note The DHCP server is optional if the network adapter supports IP and iSCSI boot configuration or if you are using an iSCSI host bus adapter. The diskless computer requires an iSCSI connection to Windows Storage Server. This allows for fast deployment and recovery of diskless computers.vhd files) stored on Windows Storage Server.  iSCSI boot software.28 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 9. the DHCP is practical requirement for any scalable requirement. Components in an iSCSI Boot Solution Using Windows Storage Server Component Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Description Provides iSCSI block I/O access to virtual disks stored on Windows Storage Server.  iSCSI host bus adapter. Provides IP configuration for iSCSI boot using network adapters using DHCP reservation that is configured for BOOTP support.

The TFTP Server provides a PXE boot image to the diskless computer. iSCSI boot process from Windows Storage Server DHCP and TFTP services can be provided by Windows Storage Server or Windows Server. The DHCP Server sends IP configuration information to the diskless client. 4. The diskless client computer requests a Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) boot image from the TFPT Server. 2. As illustrated in Figure 4. The diskless computer establishes a connection with Windows Storage Server and connects to a virtual disk stored on Windows Storage Server. 5. the diskless computer can boot from a virtual disks stored on Windows Storage Server using the following steps for a network boot program: 1.29 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 4. . 3. The diskless client computer requests IP configuration from the DHCP Server.

07 or 2. The diskless computer boots from Differencing Virtual Disk . A differencing virtual disk is a virtual disk type that is based on a fixed or expandable virtual disk. . which is the iSCSI LUN specified in the configuration for the computer. The Windows operating system starts. Windows Storage Server provides support for homogeneous or heterogeneous Web services workloads using the protocols listed in Table 10. 8.3 supports iSCSI boot for the following iSCSI initiators:  Any Windows operating system running Microsoft iSCSI Initiator version 2.x  PCI-E network iSCSI Initiator adapter  Broadcom network adapter  qLogic iSCSI host bus adapter  Netboot software For more information about iSCSI boot in Windows operating systems. Web services workloads allow users to access Web-based content stored on Windows Storage Server appliances. see:  Microsoft iSCSI Boot Step-by-Step Guide.08  Red Hat Enterprise Linux iSCSI Initiator version 5. Windows Storage Server supports Web services workloads.  The “Creating iSCSI Boot Solutions” section later in this white paper.x  SUSE Enterprise Linux version 10. Providing Access to Web Services Workloads Unlike most network access storage appliances. the operating system on the parent virtual disk stays in its original state for quick recovery or for quickly creating more boot images based on additional differencing virtual disks. Any subsequent writes to the differencing disk are written to the differencing virtual disk and the parent virtual disk is not modified.  About VHD.B that is stored on Windows Storage Server. Using this method. you can create clean-install system boot operating system virtual disk as a parent. Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. For example. Windows Storage Server can support Web services workloads in homogeneous Windows network environments or heterogeneous network environments that include a variety of operating system. and create a differencing virtual disk as the current virtual disk for the diskless computer. 7. You can use separate virtual disks for each diskless computer or you can use differencing virtual disks. All subsequent disk I/O is performed using iSCSI I/O to the virtual disk stored on Windows Storage Server.30 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper 6.

 Simplified file transfer. for the same files and folders accessed using any of the file services workloads protocols. upload or download. Print services workloads allow users to access printers managed by Windows Storage Server appliances. With the new FTP server. FTP sub statuses. but includes additional security protection of using secure sockets layer (SSL) encryption between clients and Windows Storage Server. This allows you to provide FTP and Web content from the same website simply by binding an FTP site to a website.  The foundation for the WebDAV protocol used in accessing file services workloads. This allows administrators to perform common administrative tasks within one common administration console. The new FTP server includes support for:  Improved security by supporting FTP over secure sockets layer (SSL).  Provides support for the Internet Printing role service. unique tracking for FTP sessions. which can be essential in some heterogeneous environments. HTTPS FTP Providing Access to FTP Services Workloads Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 includes FTP services that offer the following improvements:  Reduced administrative effort for FTP server services. and more. or from a command line. This allows you to create multiple FTP sites that use the same IP address. but are differentiated by using unique virtual host names. a mapped drive.  Reduced effort for support and troubleshooting FTP–related issues. you can specify a.  Improved integration with web-based applications and services.  Support of extended character sets by including UTF8 support. Windows Storage Server can support . Provides the same level of support as HTTP. using the same folders that can be accessed using any of the file services workloads protocols. Providing Access to Print Services Workloads Another advantage to using Windows Storage Server appliances is the ability to support print services workloads. virtual host name for an FTP site.31 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 10. a UNC path. Provides a simplified file transfer. Improved logging that now supports all FTP-related traffic. Protocols Supported for Web Services Workloads Protocol HTTP Support description Provides:  Access to traditional Web-based content accessed through Web browsers. which can be essential in some heterogeneous environments. The new FTP server is fully integrated with the IIS 7. download only.  Extended support for Internet standards.5 administration interface and configuration store.  The foundation for Web-based remote administration using Terminal Services Web Access. an additional detail field in FTP logs.  Extended IP addressing features provided by IPv6. File transfer can be performed using Windows® Internet Explorer®.

or as an MMC snap-in. the removal of the role service does. typically used in heterogeneous environments or to print over the Internet. an inbound firewall exception for TCP port 515 is created. The LDP Service is an optional Print Services role service. However. Provides support for computers that run an Internet Printing client. Although the installation of the Print Server role service does not require a system restart. the TCP/IP Print Server service is also stopped — and you must restart it manually. If you are supporting only Windows-based computers that are printing with your homogeneous environment. Select this Print Server role service to support LPR clients in heterogeneous environments. Print Server Role Services Supported for Print Services Workloads Role Service Print Server Support description Provides support for Windows-based computers running Client for Microsoft Networks. The Print Server role service is a mandatory role service for the Print Services role.32 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper print services workloads in homogeneous Windows network environments or heterogeneous network environments that include a variety of operating system. see Print Management. In order to install the Internet Printing role service. the installation of the service does require a restart of the Print Spooler service.  Printer management in Windows Storage Server. The LPD Service installs and starts the TCP/IP Print Server (LPDSVC) service which is implemented in lpdsvc. When the Print Server role is installed.dll. When the LPD Service is installed. The Print Management Console (PMC) is then accessible from Server Manager. . select only this role service. Line Printer Daemon (LPD) Service Internet Printing For more information about:  The Print Services server role. Select this Print Server role service to support any print services workloads in Windows Storage Server. If the Print Spooler service is stopped or restarted after the LPD Service is installed. see Print and Document Services. the Print Services Tools Remote Server Administration Tool feature is also installed. Windows Storage Server provides support for homogeneous or heterogeneous print services workloads using the Print Server role services listed in Table 11. Select the Printer Server role services when clients must print to printers using the only HTTP protocol. which is done automatically during installation. Internet Printing provides access to shared printers using the Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) that is encapsulated in HTTP. typically used in heterogeneous environments. There is no configuration necessary for the LPD service. Administrative Tools. Provides support for computers that run Line Printer Remote (LPR). Table 11. the Print Services and Web Server roles must also be installed.

many data centers are constrained by the number of computers they can support in their data center by the actual power available to the data center. It now provides the ability to fine-tune the processor’s speed and power consumption to match . than before. In addition to the cost-saving associated with reducing power consumption. which demonstrate that many servers that operate within a range of utilization levels will benefit from the improved power efficiency of Windows Server 2008 R2. from idle up to 100 percent utilization. power consumption is of paramount importance. Figure 5.33 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Providing Reduction in Power Consumption With the proliferation of physical computers in data centers. Power savings with Windows Storage Server Processor Power Management The PPM engine in Windows Storage Server has been rewritten and improved. Therefore. Improve the Power Efficiency of Individual Servers Windows Storage Server helps improve the power efficiency of individual servers through a variety of incremental improvements. Window Storage Server includes the following improvements to reduce power consumption:  Reduced power usage of individual servers by including:  A new PPM engine. To quantify the power savings.  Storage power management. average utilization for many servers is 5 to 15 percent.  Additional incremental power saving features. Throughput was gradually throttled up across the utilization range of the systems. Figure 5shows the results. reducing your power consumption also allows you to support more physical computers while using the same amount of power. or less power. Measuring power usage only when hardware is fully utilized does not reflect real-world usage. and budget power usage across the system. Microsoft measured power consumption of Windows Storage Server 2003 and Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 using a representative online transaction processing (OLTP) workload. manage.  The ability to measure.

 Support for “remove on delete”.34 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper current demands. Windows Storage Server includes support for storage devices that work with solid state drives that can power down unused RAM when a file system deletes files. This feature is integrated with the power management framework to use the new power states (partial and active). Windows Storage Server greatly improves access to storage on SANs. the system activates the idle processor cores to handle the increased processing requirements. . The workloads of every logical core in a server are tracked relative to all the others. The workloads of cores that are not fully utilized can be suspended. thus saving power. which has a higher storage-capacity-topower-consumption ratio than a typical server. Keeping the unutilized cores in an idle state reduces system power consumption. Core parking is a feature that enables Windows Storage Server to reduce multi-core processor power consumption by consolidating processing onto fewer processor cores and suspending the inactive cores. Windows Storage Server provides asynchronous notification of drive media changes. because any server can have access to the available storage on the SAN. This means that commands are not repeatedly sent to check for media changes. and also adds the following enhancements:  ATA Slumber feature. New parameters for PPM — which administrators can configure — further improve power efficiency.  Optimized link power management for SATA disks. which means less communication with the drive and less power consumption. Windows Server Storage also supports the ability to boot from a SAN. and their workloads then shifted to alternate cores. which eliminates the need for local hard disks (local storage) in the individual server computers and decreases power consumption as a result.  Asynchronous notification of media change for optical devices. Storage Power Management Another strategy for reducing power used by individual servers is to centralize their storage by using a Storage Area Network (SAN). When additional processing power is required. as shown in Figure 6. A SAN also makes more efficient use of the available disk space. This feature helps reduce power usage for managing the communication bus link between the hard disk and the chipset.

. creating partitions. in which the processor consumes very little energy but requires time to return to an operational state.) The amount of background work that is performed by the operating system has also been reduced in Windows Storage Server.35 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 6.xml file. or formatting partitions. Servers without local storage that each consume less power Additional Power Saving Features Windows Storage Server includes Intelligent Timer Tick Distribution (or Tick Skipping). However. as well as your physical systems. non-timer interrupts will still activate sleeping processors. with C3 set as the deepest-sleep state and C0 as the operating state) by not activating the CPU unnecessarily. such as creating a RAID set. This feature extends processor idle or deep C-states (processor sleep states within the ACPI specification. This also allows processors to better utilize the deep C-states. other processors are signaled only as necessary.xml file to run Windows PowerShell scripts or any command-line program that can used to perform storage configuration tasks. creating LUNs. thus saving power. Performing Highly Automated Installations You can automate the storage subsystem configuration settings in Windows Storage Server by customizing the Windows Storage Server Unattend. OEMs can configure the FirstLogonCommand attribute in the Unattend. One processor handles the periodic system timer tick. You can take advantage of most of these technologies in virtualization scenarios to maximize the power efficiency of your virtualized environments. The benefit of this automation is that the storage configuration requires minimal or no configuration by IT pros.

some configuration is required to identify the appliance to other computing resources on your network.  Management of Print services workloads. Group Policy provides an infrastructure for centralized configuration management of Windows Storage Server. Server Manager in Windows Storage Server provides a single source for managing a server's identity and system information. For more information. identifying problems with server role configuration. Description of Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 7. see Server Manager. For more information about Server Manager. and technologies for managing all workloads:  Initial Configuration Tasks window. You make the initial connection to Windows Storage Server using Internet Explorer and the Terminal Services Web Access Web site. Management Tools for All Workloads Windows Storage Server supports the following tools. which opens immediately after the operating system installation is complete. For more information.36 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Managing Windows Storage Server You can manage Windows Storage Server using the management features in each of the following areas:  Management tools for all workloads.  Group Policy. For more information. You can complete these tasks by using commands in the Initial Configuration Tasks window. and customize the appliance by adding server roles and features.  Management of power consumption for all workloads. see Terminal Services in Windows Server 2008. see Group Policy. see Windows Server Initial Configuration Tasks. You can remotely manage Windows Storage Server using the Remote Desktop Connection feature. This feature requires the Remote Desktop Client to be installed on the computer used to manage Windows Storage Server.  Remote Desktop Services Web Connection. features. see Terminal Services Web Access (TS Web Access). enable administrators to perform tasks on the appliance.  Remote Desktop Services Connection.  Microsoft Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT).  Management of Web services workloads. and the feature uses the remote desktop protocol (RDP) to communicate with Windows Storage Server. and Remote Server Administration Tools Pack. Then you connect to Windows Storage Server using the Microsoft ActiveX® control included in Remote Desktop Client version 6. and you also can use it to manage 32-bit or 64-bit versions of Windows Storage Server.  Management of iSCSI block I/O workloads. displaying server status. and before deploying the new appliance in your enterprise. secure the appliance.  Server Manager. You can use Group Policy on any Windows Storage Server appliance that is a member of an Active Directory domain. see Description of Windows Server 2008 Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows Vista Service Pack 1. For more information about RSAT. . and the applications and services running on Windows Storage Server. You can run RSAT on 32-bit or 64-bit Windows operating systems. After installing Windows Storage Server. This feature requires only Internet Explorer to be installed on the computer used to manage Windows Storage Server.1 and later versions. RSAT allows you to remotely manage roles and features in Windows Storage Server from a computer running Windows Vista SP1 or a later Windows operating system. For more information about the Initial Configuration Tasks window.  Management of file services workloads. and managing all roles installed on the server.

both locally and remotely across the enterprise. WMI. Storage Manager for SANs snap-in. . exposes the data that is gathered to users. Diskraid command-line tool. only hardware platform support. which provide the ability to manage Group Policy from the Windows PowerShell command line and to run Windows PowerShell scripts during logon and startup. providing a powerful and convenient way to capture and report information about power consumption.NET Framework and is designed to help you automate the administration of Windows Storage Server. such as the Diskpart command-line tool. IT workers responsible for power management can control power policies and receive power condition events. just as if you were locally logged on to the host and using a local command prompt. and scripts in the remote command console session. root\cimv2\power. For more information.37 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper    Windows PowerShell. which enables code and scripts to query power data on compliant systems. and the applications and services that run on Windows Storage Server. A vast library of existing Windows PowerShell scripts reduces the effort and learning curve for using Windows PowerShell to automate administrative tasks. see Windows PowerShell. both locally and remotely. additional policy settings. Remote Manageability of Power Policy Key in Windows Storage Server is the greatly enhanced ability to measure. Windows PowerShell is a task-based command-line shell and scripting language designed especially for system administration. For more information. there are new features in Group Policy for Windows Storage Server. the infrastructure for management data and operations on Windows-based operating systems. Power metering and budgeting in Windows Storage Server require no additional drivers or hardware changes. or management tools in a manner that is compliant with the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF) management profiles. Windows PowerShell is built on the Microsoft . providing them with the data they need to make informed and timely power management decisions. You can use any Telnet client to create a remote command console session on a Windows Storage Server appliance. Microsoft storage partners develop VDS hardware providers that allow management of their storage solutions. ensuring interoperability across the entire IT environment. and in turn making power consumption data an actionable metric. Telnet. VDS. Managing Power Consumption for All Workloads Windows Storage Server also helps you better measure and manage power consumption. or the Share and Storage Management console. This is useful for IT administrators who use WMI queries in scripts to monitor and administer their infrastructure. scripts. For centralized power policy management. including an improved user interface. through Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). Windows Storage Server supports the configuration of power policy. You can manage storage with VDS hardware providers using VDS-enabled management tools. and budget energy usage for individual servers and across the entire server environment. manage. see Telnet. You can run command-line programs. Windows Storage Server provides a new power namespace. You can perform disk management for any of the workloads using VDSenabled management tools. Microsoft is pursuing an ACPI standards-based approach to the features that provide these capabilities. and Windows PowerShell™ cmdlets for Group Policy. In conjunction with server OEMs.

or in a more likely scenario. Microsoft recommends a collaborative model between the server platform and the operating system for power metering and budgeting (the process that lets administrators set power limits. An administrator can use the performance monitor on a server to view the moment-bymoment power consumption. The WMI namespace additions for power meters and supplies mean that the user mode power service can provide data to the WMI namespace. prevent users from saving specific file types to the server. and the files themselves. or caps. on datacenter components as small as a single server). Based on the information gathered. File Server Resource Manager not only helps you efficiently control and monitor existing storage resources from a central location. Now that power consumption is measurable. . Fewer physical machines can lead to reduced costs through lower hardware and energy costs and through reduced management overhead. and this means power data can be queried by Microsoft System Center and other management tools to budget and monitor power usage across the entire IT environment. You manage file services workloads running on Windows Storage Server by using:  File Server Resource Manager. Managing File Services Using File Server Resource Manager File Server Resource Manager is a suite of tools in Windows Storage Server that enables you to place storage limits on volumes and folders. it also aids in the planning and implementation of future changes to the storage infrastructure.  Single Instance Storage management tools. and Storage Reports With the File Server Resource Manager snap-in. the folder structure to store the files. Another set of metrics can be used for virtualization and consolidation. The server platform reports information in-band to the Windows Storage Server through the use of ACPI. the workloads of underutilized servers can be consolidated onto a smaller number of better-utilized physical machines using live migration (the ability to move virtual machines between servers with virtually no downtime) with Hyper-V. An administrator can set power budgets for the servers and the system. Managing File Services Workloads Managing file services workloads includes managing disk volumes. it becomes an actionable metric for IT staff when appropriate hardware support is available. Set soft or hard space limits on a volume or folder tree. and generate comprehensive storage reports. and can configure the system so that it automatically takes action when the budget is exceeded. you can perform three tasks to manage storage resources on local or remote servers:  Quota management.  DFS management tools. Unauthorized File Types. You can create and apply quota templates with standard quota properties. Managing Disk Usage Quotas. the IT administrator can write a script or use Microsoft® System Center to centrally collect and monitor power consumption data across the datacenter.  Share and Storage Management.38 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper In-Band Power Metering and Budgeting The new power features introduce new opportunities for managing power consumption.

 Notify content owners when a file management task is going to be performed on their content. The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to:  Centrally define policy-based classification of the files stored in your intranet. and patterns of storage use. and mitigate risks. Policy-based Classification of Files One of the key advantages to the Windows File Classification Infrastructure is the ability to centrally manage the classification of the files by establishing classification policies . or through a command-line interface.  Storage reports management. see File Server Resource Manager. and other common IT operations tasks.  Are no longer essential to automatically remove the files from servers. You need to be able to centrally categorize these files and then perform IT file operations based on the classification of the files. Generate built-in reports to track quota usage.  Perform file management tasks based on the file classification that you define. more affordable storage solutions. or date of the file. the user storing the files is the only individual who has any knowledge of the information stored in the files and other characteristics about the files.  Are not accessed frequently to move the files to slower. You can use the Windows File Classification Infrastructure to identify files that:  Contain sensitive information on servers with lower security to move the files to servers with higher security.  Contain sensitive information to encrypt those files. size.  Generate reports about the types of information stored in the files in your intranet. The File Classification Infrastructure feature is also managed with the File Services Resource Manager snap-in. you cannot rely on the user to properly determine the proper classification of information. You can create and apply screening templates with standard file exclusions. Because users store files on a network shared with little or no restrictions. data archival schedule. The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to establish policies for classifying files and then performing common administrative tasks based on the classification.  Require different backup schedules to back up the files accordingly. rather than on only simple information such as the location. such as sensitivity or criticality of the information in them. The Windows File Classification Infrastructure in Windows Storage Server provides insight into your data to help you manage your data more effectively. Define filtering rules that monitor or block attempts by users to save certain file types on a volume or folder tree.  Create or purchase custom file management solutions based on the Windows File Classification Infrastructure. Even with this knowledge.  Require different backup solutions based on the sensitivity of the information in the files. Managing File Services Workloads Using File Classification Infrastructure Managing data stored on file services is usually challenging because of the sheer number of files being stored on network shared folders.39 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  File screening management. reduce costs. but is covered separately in the “Managing File Services Workloads Using File Classification Infrastructure” section in this white paper. For more information. You can also apply quota and file screening policies when you provision a shared folder. file screening activity.

For example. Without classification of the files. the content owners can be notified in advance and given the opportunity to prevent the files from being archived or deleted. optionally re-evaluate files that are already classified. You can automatically delete data by using policies based on data age or classification properties to free valuable storage space and intelligently reduce storage demand growth. The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to generate reports in multiple formats that can provide statistical information about the files stored on each file server. date. The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to automate any file management task by using the file classifications you establish for your organization. Execute custom commands based on age. ordered lists. and run classification rules. For example. File Owner Notification of File Management Tasks Another feature of the Windows File Classification Infrastructure that reduces your administrative effort is the ability to send notifications to content owners when an automated file management task runs.  When running a classification rule. And the extensible nature of the Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to integrate with existing messaging systems or information portals. numbered. Improved Development of File Management Tasks You can extend the file management features of the Windows File Classification Infrastructure by creating your own custom file management solution or purchasing a file management solution from an independent software vendor. You can use the Windows File Classification Infrastructure to help you perform common file management tasks. The architecture of the Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows the use of any supported development . location or other classification categories. update. IT administrators are able to automatically move data based on policies for either centralizing the location of sensitive data or for moving data to a less expensive storage resource. when files become old enough to be automatically expired.40 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper using the File Services Resource Manager snap-in. Each rule assigns a single predefined property and value to files within a specified directory. there is minimal information that can be used to help identify the usage of the files. or add the value to properties that support multiple values. Reporting on Information Stored in Files Most IT organizations have no easy method of providing information about the types of files that are stored and managed. and string values. You can use the reporting infrastructure to generate information that can be used by another application (such as a comma separated variable format text file that could be imported into Microsoft® Excel®). You can choose to overwrite existing classification values. based on installed classification plug-ins.  Custom Tasks. Property types can include Boolean. including:  Grooming of data. the sensitivity of the files. File Management Tasks The Windows File Classification Infrastructure allows you to perform file management tasks based on the classifications that you define using the File Services Resource Manager snap-in. and other relevant information about the files.  Create. This centralized approach allows you to classify user files without requiring their intervention. which can be assigned to files on a per-server basis by running classification rules. You can also select the method for notification based on the type of file management task being performed. You can use the Windows File Classification Infrastructure to:  Define classification properties and values.

or on storage subsystems that have a VDS Hardware Provider using Share and Storage Management. This structure . This architecture allows you to select the level of programming sophistication required to automate your file management tasks. Each vendor supplies the VDS Hardware Provider. you could write Windows PowerShell scripts to manage files based on the classifications you define for your organization. which can be installed and configured for use in Windows Storage Server.  Manage the local NTFS permissions for the folder or volume you will be sharing. Managing DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication The Distributed File System (DFS) technologies offer wide area network (WAN)-friendly replication as well as simplified.  If File Server Resource Manager is installed. For example. apply storage quotas to the new shared resource. You can configure shared folders for SMB or NFS protocols and DFS settings using Share and Storage Management.41 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper environments for Windows Storage Server including Windows PowerShell and Microsoft Visual Basic® Scripting Edition (VBScript).  Stop the sharing of a folder or volume.  Delete a volume.  Access disk tools for error checking.  Change volume properties like compression. For more information about Share and Storage Management.  Manage NFS-based access permissions for the shared resource.  See which users are currently accessing a folder or a file and disconnect a user if necessary. defragmentation.  Specify the network sharing protocol used to access the shared resource.  Format a volume. and backup. offline availability and indexing. highly-available access to geographically dispersed files. Managing File Services Using Share and Storage Management Share and Storage Management in Windows Storage Server provides a centralized location for you to perform:  Shared resource management. DFS Namespaces lets you group shared folders located on different servers into one or more logically structured namespaces. You can manage storage on disks available on your server. security.  Publish the shared resource to a DFS namespace. Each namespace appears to users as a single shared folder with a series of subfolders. You can perform the following tasks using this tool:  Extend the size of a volume. You can perform the following tasks using this tool:  Specify the folder or volume that you want to share or create a new folder to share. and offline access to files in the shared resource. and create file screens to limit the type of files that can be stored in it. such as the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider. see Overview of Share and Storage Management.  Manage the share access permissions. user limits. The technologies in DFS include the following:  DFS Namespaces.  Multi-vendor storage management.

exe You also can use DFS to replicate files and folders in geographically dispersed environments so that users have a local copy of the files and folders. For example. DFS Replication is an efficient. RDC detects insertions.  The DFS Management snap-in from the Administrative Tools folder.  For more information about DFS Replication. In addition.  Managing DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication. DFS Replication uses a new compression algorithm known as remote differential compression (RDC). . see DFS Management.42 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper increases availability and automatically connects users to shared folders in the same AD DS site.exe  DfsrAdmin. as well as AD DS SYSVOL folder replication in domains that use the Windows Server 2008 domain functional level. For more information. see the section "Using DFS Replication to Protect Data. removals. you can use read-only DFS Replication to publish data from a head office to branch offices where users in the branch office should not change the data. Read-only DFS Replication is a secure method for replicating data where read-only access is required to the data.  Using DFS to replicate file services workloads for disaster recovery scenarios. which replaces the File Replication Service (FRS) as the replication engine for DFS Namespaces. This can greatly reduce the amount of traffic transferred over limited-bandwidth networks.exe  DfsCmd.exe  DfsDiag. instead of routing them over WAN connections. and re-arrangements of data in files." later in this white paper. see Replication. see Distributed File System. enabling DFS Replication to replicate only the changed file blocks when files are updated. and the data is not replicated back to the head office. RDC is a "diff-over-the wire" client-server protocol that can be used to efficiently update files over a limited-bandwidth network.exe  DfsrDiag. see the following sections in this white paper:  “Securing File Services Workloads”  “Creating Branch Office Solutions” You can manage DFS Namespaces and DFS Replication using the:  The DFS Management snap-in hosted by Server Manager. such as in Branch office locations. For more information about:  DFS. when available.  Read-only DFS Replication. multiple-master replication engine that you can use to keep folders synchronized between servers across limited bandwidth network connections.  DFS Replication.  The following command line tools:  DfsUtil. you can replicate files and folders to another location using DFS for disaster recovery scenarios.

The Single Instance Storage Filter runs in kernel mode.  Managing Single Instance Storage using Sisadmin. Requires volumes to be formatted as NTFS. You can also automate the administration of Single Instance Storage using Windows PowerShell scripting or any other scripting language that supports WMI. see Single Instance Storage. see Managing SIS Using SisAdmin. The Groveler service scans the hard-disk volumes on a server for duplicate copies of files. Minimum file size supported. Ability to undo single instancing of files. Supports remote drives.exe. Supports system drives. Identifying Single Instance Storage Management Tools You can enable or disable Single Instance Storage on a volume through the Share and Storage Management console. The Groveler service runs in user-mode.43 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Managing Single Instance Storage The Single Instance Storage feature in Windows Storage Server reduces the amount of space used to store data on a volume. Supports replication of files using DFS Replication. Failover cluster support. The Single Instance Storage Filter is a file system filter service that redirects reads to the common store and performs the replacement of file pointers when users start changing a duplicate file. WMI support. Table 12. which is a hidden folder located in the root directory of the volume. The Groveler discovers duplicate files and initiates the deduplication of files. Identifying Single Instance Storage Specifications Table 12 lists the specifications for the Single Instance Storage feature in Windows Storage Server.  Single Instance Storage Filter. Identifying Single Instance Storage Architecture Single Instance Storage consists of the following components that together maintain a database of file signatures:  Groveler service. Single Instance Storage does this by replacing duplicate files with logical links that point to a single copy of the file in the SIS Common Store. Single Instance Storage Feature Specifications in Windows Storage Server Specification Maximum number of volumes per appliance. Support files with extended attributes. For more information about:  The Single Instance Storage feature.exe. Value 128 Yes Yes Yes 32 KB Yes Yes No No No No Yes . Support backup of single instance of file using Single Instance Storage APIs in sisbkup. but the primary administration tool for this feature is Sisadmin. Supports boot drives.exe.dll.

For more information about managing the Single Instance Storage feature using Windows PowerShell. Configures SIS after it has been installed on a volume. IT organizations typically realize storage savings of more than 50 percent. Displays a SIS summary report for each volume. Lists all the volumes that have SIS installed enabled. You can manage iSCSI block I/O workloads running on Windows Storage Server for the following components:  Microsoft iSCSI Software Target  Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator . Get-SisVolume. In this scenario. Enables SIS on a volume. Enable-SisVolume. Files stored in user home folders provide the most typical scenario where the larger reduction of storage usage is realized. Disables SIS on a volume. and connections to storage arrays. including the:  Spaced saved. Uninstalls SIS from a volume. build and release provides the largest reduction of storage usage.  Number of files in the SIS Common Store.  Number of linked files. Managing Single Instance Storage Using Windows PowerShell You can manage the Single Instance Storage feature using the SingleInstanceStorage module. which is included in Windows Storage Server. Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads The types of management tasks for disk block I/O workload include managing iSCSI targets. Windows PowerShell Cmdlets for Managing Single Instance storage Category SIS linked files SIS disk volumes Cmdlet and description         Get-SisLinkFile. This will cause all linked files to revert to the original file stored in the SIS common store. see Single Instance Storage Cmdlets in Windows PowerShell. For files in a software development environment.  Percentage of the volume saved. Table 13. Uninstall-SisVolume.44 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Identifying Typical Reduction in Storage Usage Using Single Instance Storage The extent to which the Single Instance Storage feature in Windows Storage Server can help reduce storage usage depends on the number of duplicate files stored on the appliance. Get-SisVolumeReport. Table 14 lists the Windows PowerShell cmdlets included in the SingleInstanceStorage module and provides a brief description of each cmdlet. Returns a list of all the linked files and the corresponding filename in the SIS Common Store. virtual disks. Set-SisVolume. IT organizations typically realize storage savings that average from 10 percent to 30 percent. Installs SIS on a volume. Install-SisVolume. In this scenario. Disable-SisVolume.

You manage iSCSI targets using the iSCSI Targets node in the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target snap-in. and the most current version of the . you assign just one iSCSI initiator to each iSCSI target. Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Using Share and Storage Management Console You can manage storage on the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target using Share and Storage Management. An iSCSI target can manage multiple virtual disks. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target includes the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider that allows LUNs on Windows Storage Server to be managed by any application that uses VDS.45 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target feature allows Windows Storage Server appliances to act as an iSCSI target. there is a potential for conflict between the computers running the iSCSI initiators. For more information about the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VDS Hardware Provider." later in this white paper. through an Ethernet network adapter. For more information about managing Microsoft iSCSI Software Target for iSCSI block I/O workloads. You manage virtual disks using the iSCSI Targets node in the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target snap-in.  Virtual disk snapshots. You can manage this feature by using the:  Microsoft iSCSI Software Target snap-in. Virtual disks are the LUNs that the computer running an iSCSI initiator uses.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3. "Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Support for VSS and VDS Providers" in this white paper. Virtual disk snapshots are point-in-time copies of virtual disks that you can use to back up active virtual disks for disaster recover scenarios or to restore a LUN to a previous state. You manage virtual disks using the Snapshots node in the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target snap-in.  Share and Storage Management console. but a virtual disk can only be managed by one iSCSI target.  Virtual disks. see the previous section. iSCSI targets are the logical endpoint to which an iSCSI initiator connects. see:  Configuring the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. For more information about Share and Storage Management. If you assign multiple iSCSI initiators to the same iSCSI target. Typically. For more information about using virtual disk snapshots for backup and in disaster recovery scenarios. The most typical reason for assigning multiple iSCSI initiators to the same iSCSI target is for shared storage in failover clusters. see Overview of Share and Storage Management. see the section "Using Virtual Disk Snapshots to Protect iSCSI Block I/O Workload Data. All current Windows operating systems support the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator.3 Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads The Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator enables you to connect Windows operating systems to an external iSCSI-based storage array. Managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Snap-in Typical tasks that you use the Microsoft iSCSI Target snap-in to perform include managing:  iSCSI targets. such as Share and Storage Management. such as the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.

and then a virtual disk can be associated with the target. Obtains the iSCSI virtual disks and their associated properties. Remove-IscsiServerTarget.3 Category iSCSI target management Cmdlet and description  New-IscsiServerTarget Creates a new iSCSI target object with the specified name. Set-IscsiVirtualDisk.3 using the MicrosoftIscsiTarget module. Windows PowerShell Cmdlets for Managing Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Version 3. Get-IscsiVirtualDisk.08. Set-IscsiServerTarget. Table 14 lists the Windows PowerShell cmdlets included in the MicrosoftIscsiTarget module and provides a brief description of each cmdlet. Modifies settings for the iSCSi target and returns the corresponding iSCSI target object if the PassThru parameter is specified. You can manage the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator by using the:  Graphical user interface in the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. Deletes an iSCSI target object." later in the white paper. The Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows Storage Server allows the server software to connect to other external iSCSIbased storage arrays. Afterwards. Afterwards. Deletes the iSCSI virtual disk object.  iSCSI Control Panel configuration utility (iSCSICPL. Obtains the iSCSI targets and their associated properties from the local server or specified computer. see the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator Step-by-Step Guide. New-IscsiVirtualDisk. Managing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Using Windows PowerShell You can manage the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. For more information about managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator.  iSCSICLI. Get-IscsiServerTarget. an iSCSI initiator can access the virtual disk after the initiator connects to the target.    Virtual disk management     . Creates a new iSCSI virtual hard disk (VHD) object with the specified file path and size.exe). An iSCSI initiator cannot access the VHD or LUN after the target is deleted. the iSCSI target can be assigned to an iSCSI initiator.46 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator is version 2. such as those described in the section "Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration. the virtual disk can be assigned to an iSCSI target. The VHD file is not deleted. Modifies the settings for the virtual disk and returns the corresponding iSCSI virtual disk object if the PassThru parameter is specified. Once a virtual disk has been assigned to a target. Remove-IscsiVirtualDisk. which is included in Windows Storage Server. Table 14.exe tool from a command line.

3 using Windows PowerShell. Table 15.  Delegate site and application configuration to nonadministrators.0 tools to manage FTP sites. site.exe. Assigns a virtual disk to an iSCSI target. Managing Web Services Workloads Web services workloads in Windows Storage Server can be managed by any of the management methods available for IIS 7. For more information. Appcmd. Use IIS 6.  For more information about managing the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target version 3. which provides consistent commands for common queries and configuration tasks. Remove-VirtualDiskTargetMapping. and to return output in text or you can use XML. or application remotely by using HTTP.exe You can manage IIS 7 using the command-line tool Appcmd. Removes the assignment between a virtual disk and iSCSI target. For more information. The virtual disk will be no longer accessible by an iSCSI initiator once the assignment is removed. Once a virtual disk has been assigned to a target. an iSCSI initiator can access the virtual disk after the initiator connects to the target. All the virtual disks assigned to the same iSCSI target will be accessible by the connected iSCSI initiator.Appcmd. see IIS Manager (IIS 7).NET in one tool.  Connect to a web server. Note You cannot use IIS Manager to manage FTP sites in IIS 7 on Windows Storage Server. reducing the complexity of learning syntax. which lets you:  Manage IIS and ASP. see PowerShell cmdlets for the Microsoft iSCSI Target 3. In addition.0. see Appcmd. and for managing Web services workloads. Tools for Managing Web Services Workloads in Windows Storage Server Tool Internet Information Services Manager snap-in Description You can manage IIS 7 using the Internet Information Services Manager snap-in.  Configure user and role authorization for sites and applications.exe. . The management tools available for managing IIS 7. you can combine commands to return more complex data about objects on your web server or to perform tasks that are more complex.0.  View health and diagnostic information that includes the ability to view currently running requests in real time. you can complete complex tasks like stopping all sites with pending requests that have been running longer than sixty seconds. are listed in Table 15.47 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Category LUN management Cmdlet and description  Add-VirtualDiskTargetMapping. For example.3.exe to configure and query objects on your web server.

Utilizing the extensible and modular architecture introduced with IIS 7. see Configuration Store (IIS 7). By blocking specific HTTP requests. see Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) in IIS 7.NET applications or adding and editing request filtering rules through a graphical user interface. Scripts using WMI Windows Storage Server includes the following features which help reduce administration. The FastCGI module. Windows Storage Server allows domain-based service accounts to have passwords that are managed by AD DS. allowing those apps to service HTTP requests directly.48 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Tool Configuration store Description You can manage IIS 7 using the XML-based configuration store that is modeled after the ASP.  Enhancements to IIS Manager.  IIS Manager UI extensions. the server administrator is the only user who has permission to view and edit the ApplicationHost. For more information.  Request Filtering. allows management of FastCGI settings while the ASP. this feature lets the core IIS Web engine to be consumed or hosted by other applications.NET configuration.config file. Available through a set of APIs. Allows you to manage any configuration section available in the configuration system. and directories.  Managed service accounts. unless they have been locked to prevent changes. such as Windows PowerShell. New features have been added to IIS Manager for the 7. web applications. WebAdministration.1. IIS configuration is stored in the ApplicationHost. These enhancements include updates to:  Configuration Editor. and manage IIS configuration and run-time data. Developers are able to service HTTP requests directly in their applications by using the hostable Web core feature.0.  Hostable Web Core. You can use WMI to build scripts for web administration. and troubleshooting effort:  Automation of common tasks through the PowerShell provider. Configuration Editor exposes several configuration settings that are not exposed elsewhere in IIS Manager. This module includes the filtering features previously found in URLScan 3. the new IIS 7.5 integrates and enhances existing extensions and allows for further enhancements and customizations in the future. The Request Filtering user interface provides a graphical user interface for configuring the Request Filtering module. applications. a collection of task-oriented cmdlets provide a simple way to manage websites. for example. These new type of accounts reduce the recurrent administrative task of having to update passwords on processes running with these accounts. and their associated objects and properties using any scripting language that supports WMI.5 supports the use of managed service accounts for application pool identities. The IIS 7 WMI provider namespace. IIS 7. For more information. web applications and web servers. The hostable . the Request Filter module helps prevent potentially harmful requests from being processed by Web applications on the server. By default. support. The Windows PowerShell Provider for IIS is a Windows PowerShell snap-in that allows you to perform IIS administrative tasks.config file and can also be distributed among Web. Settings configured at one level are inherited automatically by lower levels.NET module allows management of authorization and custom error settings. contains classes and methods that enable you to script administration of websites. In addition.config files for sites.5 release that make it possible to manage obscure settings such as those used for FastCGI and ASP.

Print Management can display more data. In IIS 7. For more information. see the Print Management Step-by-Step Guide. Print Management can also help you find printers that have an error condition by using filters.5 Web server and reporting on potential configuration issues found. see Server Manager and the Print Services Role. Failed Request Tracing for FastCGI. Enhanced auditing of changes to IIS 7. This provides logging of both reads and writes. The new Configuration Logging feature in IIS 7. PHP developers can use the FastCGI module to include IIS trace calls in their applications. Table 16. Server Manager also displays print-related events from Event Viewer and includes an instance of the Print Management snap-in. as well as logon attempts. such as toner and paper levels. Managing Print Services Workloads The Print services workloads in Windows Storage Server that the Print Server role provides can be managed by using the tools listed in Table 16. On printers that provide a web-based management interface. Tools for Managing Print Services Workloads in Windows Storage Server Tool Server Manager Description Use Server Manager to install the Print Services server role. and features.5 is a management tool that can help you reduce best practice violations by scanning an IIS 7.exe tool in a startup script (for percomputer connections) or in a logon script (for per-user connections). Use Print Management with Group Policy to automatically deploy printer connections to users or computers and install the appropriate printer drivers for computers running Windows Vista and later Windows operating systems. which can administer the local server only. The Print Management snap-in provides current details about the status of printers and print servers on the network. It can also send email notifications or run scripts when a printer or print server needs attention. Print Management snap-in Group Policy . use the PushPrinterConnections. For more information. For Windows operating systems prior to Windows Vista. which allows you to track the configuration changes made to your test and production environments.5 provides enhanced auditing of changes to IIS and application configuration. This reduces the effort required for debugging code during development and troubleshooting application errors after deployment by using IIS Failed Request Tracing. see the Print Management Step-by-Step Guide. Best Practices Analyzer (BPA). optional role services.5 and application configuration. Use Print Management to install printer connections to a group of client computers simultaneously and to monitor print queues remotely. You can access the BPA through Server Manager and Windows PowerShell. The BPA for IIS 7. For more information. file creations and more.5.49 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper    Web core feature is useful for enabling basic Web server capabilities for custom applications or for debugging applications. changes to path mappings.

and language monitors. see Printer Management Using PowerShell. see the Print Migration Tool. printer ports. and then import them on another print server that is running a Windows operating system. For more information. For more information about using Windows PowerShell to manage print services workloads. printer settings.exe command-line tool Windows PowerShell . Use Windows PowerShell to manage print services workloads. Provides the same features and functionality as the Printer Migration Wizard. Printbrm. This is an efficient way to consolidate multiple print servers or replace an older print server.50 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Tool Printer Migration Wizard Description The Printer Migration Wizard allows you to export print queues.

 The Automated System Recovery feature.  The DFS Replication feature. and the system state. files. and reduce the risk of potential data loss. .  The PrintBRM.  The Appcmd.  The LUN resynchronization capabilities.  Does not implement a method of including media rotation strategies. tools. You cannot perform backups to tape.  Does not support a centralized monitoring ability for enterprise environments.  Does not include the ability to e-mail or provide notification of the backup status report.exe tool to backup printer information.  Perform a system recovery in case of disasters like hard disk failures.  The Volume Shadow Copy Service feature. However. which is available separately.  Cannot back up shared storage in a failover cluster if the storage is moved between active nodes. which will restore your complete system onto the new hard disk by using a full server backup and the Windows Recovery Environment. support of tape storage drivers is still included in Windows Storage Server. or the system state.  The Shadow Copies of Shared Folders feature.  System Center Data Protection Manager.  Perform backups of applications like SQL Server to protect application data using VSS functionality. Using Windows Server Backup to Protect Data The Windows Server Backup feature in Windows Server 2008 R2 consists of a MMC snap-in and command-line tools that provide a solution for backup and recovery requirements. Using proper backup and disaster recovery processes. selected volumes. Features and Limitations of Windows Server Backup Features Use Windows Server Backup to:  Back up a full server (all volumes). Limitations Windows Server Backup has the following limitations:  Supports backing up only to external and internal disks. folders. Table 17 lists the features and limitations of this feature. and technologies. DVDs. and shared folders. Note In addition to the products and technologies discussed in this section. you can use most backup and disaster recovery products offered by Microsoft partners for Windows Server 2008 to protect data managed by Windows Storage Server.  Can only back up volumes 2 terabyte or less in size.  Recover volumes.exe tool to backup IIS configuration. Table 17. helps protect the data managed by Windows Storage Server. certain applications. You can protect the data managed by Windows Storage Server using:  The Windows Server Backup feature.51 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Protecting Windows Storage Server Workload Data One of the essential aspects to ongoing operations of Windows Storage Server workloads is the ability to protect the data that the server software manages.

There is a limit of 64 shadow copies per volume (when this limit is reached. consider using:  System Center Data Protection Manager 2007. contact the appropriate Microsoft partner. (The number of versions depends on how many snapshots you have created. For more information. The Shadow Copies for Shared Folders features uses the Volume Shadow Copy Service to create the file copies. the oldest shadow copy will be deleted and cannot be retrieved). You cannot enable this feature for specific shared folders and files on a volume. You can use previous versions when you want to check what has changed between the versions of a file. Accessing previous versions of files. For more information. If you accidentally delete a file. .M. Monday through Friday. With Shadow Copies of Shared Folders. Shadow Copies of Shared Folders is enabled for an entire volume. or shadow copies.)  Compare versions of a file while working." later in this white paper. is useful because you can:  Recover files that were accidentally deleted. The default configuration for this feature is as follows:  A default task is scheduled to create shadow copies at 7:00 A. Note This default task can be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. If you accidentally overwrite a file. and 12:00 P. you can recover a previous version of the file.  Only supports backup of local volumes (cannot be used to backup network shared folders). It works by taking snapshots of an entire volume at particular points in time. If your backup and recovery requirements are affected by any of the limitations listed above.  Backup and recovery solutions from Microsoft partners.  Recover from accidentally overwriting a file. This feature allows a user to restore selective files or folders from previous versions without IT assistance. see the section "Using System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 to Protect Data. Shadow copies are read-only and as such you cannot edit the contents of a shadow copy.   The default storage area is on the same volume and its size requires 10 percent of the available space.  Shadow Copies of Shared Folders. you can open a previous version and copy it to a safe location.52 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Features Limitations  Only supports backup of entire volumes (cannot be used to backup individual files and folders. see:  Shadow Copies for Shared Folders Technical Reference. Using Shadow Copies of Shared Folders to Protect Data The Shadow Copies of Shared Folders feature in Windows Storage Server is a feature in Windows Server that transparently maintains previous versions of files on selected volumes by using shadow copies. you can view shared files and folders as they existed at points of time in the past. Note For more information about the Shadow Copies of Shared Folders feature.M.

Writer Provider Source volume Storage volume . or the Diskshadow command-line tool. Table 18." "Shadow Copies of Shared Folders. Shadow Copy of Shared Folders feature.53 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Using the Volume Shadow Copy Service to Protect Data The Volume Shadow Copy Service feature in Windows Storage Server provides the ability to take point-in-time snapshots of files and is the foundation for other applications or features. For example. such as the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider. Volume Shadow Copy Service Architecture Table 18 lists the components in the Volume Shadow Copy Service architecture and how the components relate to each other. A component that creates and maintains the shadow copies. this is a database application like SQL Server or Exchange Server. or a system service like Active Directory. The volume that contains the data to be shadow copied. Figure 7. Examples include the system provider included with the Windows Storage Server operating system. the Windows Server Backup feature. System Center Data Protection Manager. such as those in the sections about "Windows Server Backup." and "Virtual Disk Snapshots" in this white paper. The volume that holds the shadow copy storage files for the system copy-on-write software provider. Figure 7 illustrates the architecture of the Volume Copy Shadow Service in Windows Storage Server. An application that requests that a volume shadow copy be taken. and the hardware providers included with storage arrays. Typically. This architecture allows the point-in-time snapshots of files stored in Windows Storage Server. Components in the Volume Shadow Copy Architecture Component Volume Shadow Copy Service Requestor Description A service that coordinates various components to create consistent shadow copies of one or more volumes. A component of an application that stores persistent information on one or more volumes that participate in shadow copy synchronization.

such as SANs. Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and Traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service Window Server 2008 R2 LUN resynchronization support is an extension of the features provided by the Volume Shadow Copy Service in Windows Server 2008 R2. see the "Hardware Providers" section of Virtual Disks and Snapshots. see Volume Shadow Copy Service Technical Reference.exe command-line tool to manage Volume Shadow Copy Services for the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. Using LUN Resynchronization to Protect Data Windows Server 2008 R2 includes support for LUN resynchronization (also known as LUN resynch or LUN revert).54 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper As described in Table 18 and illustrated in Figure 7. Performed by server computer. Note You can use DiskShadow. Performed by storage array hardware. or copies. You can also use LUN resynchronization to help quickly create duplicates of productions LUNs for use in a storage environment for backup or in test. or development environments. . The Volume Shadow Copy Services uses the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Volume Shadow Copy Service Hardware Provider to create these snapshots. Table 19. which may contain multiple volumes. Traditional volume shadow copy service Recovers only a volume. the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Volume Shadow Copy Service Hardware Provider is required to create point-in-time snapshots. of the virtual hard disks managed by the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. Typically takes less time than restoring by using traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service. LUN resynchronization uses the same application programming interfaces (APIs) that are used by the Volume Shadow Copy Service. LUN resynchronization is a method for quickly restoring volumes that takes advantage of the capabilities of storage arrays. and then restore from those shadow copies. This allows you to create shadow copies of entire LUNs. Typically takes more time than restoring by using LUN resynchronization.  Microsoft iSCSI Software Target VSS Hardware Provider. LUN resynchronization creates hardware-based shadow copies that allow you to recover a volume from an existing shadow copy of the volume. For more information about the:  Volume Shadow Copy Service. Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and Traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service LUN resynchronization Recovers entire LUN. Table 19 lists the differences between LUN resynchronization and current features in Volume Shadow Copy Service. using the inherent snapshot or copying features in the storage array.

Requires that the destination LUN exists and is usable. Destination LUN contains the same information as the source LUN. . Benefits of Performing Full Volume Recovery Using LUN Resynchronization The benefits of LUN resynchronization include the following:  Perform recovery of volumes with minimal disruption of service. The destination LUN is the target LUN that will be synchronized or swapped with the source LUN. In a LUN swap. a shadow copy version of a LUN is exchanged with the active LUN. the server hardware resources are only minimally affected. Destination LUN does not have to exist or can be unusable. The APIs used to perform LUN resynchronization are the same APIs that perform a traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service recovery. supported APIs in Windows Server 2008 R2. This allows the server to continue processing other workloads with the same performance while the LUN resynchronization process completes.  Compatibility with future improvements. This helps ensure that you can use the same tools and processes for a traditional Volume Shadow Copy Service recovery. users and applications are still able to access their data.55 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and LUN Swap LUN swap is a fast volume recovery scenario supported since the release of Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 (SP1). Because the hardware storage array is performing the resynchronization. Table 20. After the recovery of a volume using LUN resynchronization is initiated. Comparison of LUN Resynchronization and LUN Swap LUN resynchronization Source (shadow copy) LUN remains unmodified after the resynchronization completes. LUN swap Source (shadow copy) LUN becomes the active LUN and is modified. users can continue to access data on the volume while the synchronization is being performed. The source LUN is the shadow copy of the LUN that contains the data you wish to use. Although there may be a reduction in performance. Source LUN can exist on slower. Source LUN must have the same performance as the production LUN. Table 20 lists the differences between LUN resynchronization and a LUN swap. less expensive storage.  Reduce the workload while recovering volumes. and any information written during the resynchronization.  Integration with existing volume recovery methods. Must create another shadow copy to perform recovery. Because LUN resynchronization uses published. Source LUN can be used for recovery again. future versions of Windows Server will also provide support for LUN resynchronization. Contains only the information on the source LUN.

and disk partition information. 3. For example. see the section "Creating Branch Office Solutions" later in this white paper. The source and destination LUNs are identified. it does nothing to protect system software stored on the hard drive. the source LUN is unmodified and the destination LUN contains the same information as the source LUN. Using Automated System Recovery to Protect Data While backing up data to tape protects mission critical data from catastrophic events. you can use this method in branch office scenarios to create replica copies of data in the branch offices in the head office and then back up the data in the head office. plus any data that was written to the destination LUN during the LUN resynchronization process. volume requests are directed to the destination LUN. For more information about DFS Replication in branch office scenarios for data protection. . The LUN resynchronization is initiated between the source (shadow copy) and the destination LUNs. system files. The LUN resynchronization continues by performing a block-level copy from the source (shadow copy) LUN to the destination LUN. Using DFS Replication to Protect Data DFS Replication can be used as part of a centralized backup solution. ASR is tightly integrated with VSS. During the LUN resynchronization. users can access the volume using the following methods:  For read operations. this backup set is used with the ASR restore CD (which contains the necessary software and drivers to allow the restore) to rapidly restore all system setup information. volume requests are directed to the source LUN. You can make full or differential shadow copies of the LUN. and in the Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. You can use DFS Replication to create replica copies of data in a centralized location and then back up the replica copies. Note At the end of the LUN resynchronization process. you need to have a hardware shadow copy (snapshot) of the LUN. 5. You can find more information about how these steps are performed by viewing the Volume Shadow Copy Service APIs on MSDN®. Restoring the base operating system plus the backup application (the minimum required to restore backed up applications and data) is a time intensive process. The LUN resynchronization completes and all user requests are now performed from the destination LUN. With the Automated System Recovery (ASR) technology in Windows Storage Server.  For write operations. nothing remains but the bare metal. a system administrator prepares for such a disaster by saving to physical media a complete backup set of information about the how the server was configured. 4. because that information is not copied during the backup process. including any volume information. In the event of system failure. A critically damaged hard drive will lose all critical registry information. 2. The following includes the sequence of events that occur when performing a full volume restore using LUN synchronization: 1.56 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Process for Performing Full Volume Recovery Using LUN Resynchronization Before you can perform a full volume recovery using LUN synchronization. such as fire or electrical surges.

Data Protection Manager 2007 blends the best aspects of continuous data protection (CDP) to disk storage with traditional tape backup. a version of Windows PE that contains numerous troubleshooting and system resolution utilities. read-only copy of an iSCSI virtual disk. Finally. which recreates all critical volumes and restores the required data. These virtual disks offer flexible and effective storage. in addition to supporting dynamic disks. you can schedule and create snapshots of iSCSI virtual disks. Snapshots are useful for backups. Data Protection Manager 2007 combines the best aspects of CDP real-time protection with traditional tape backup/restore to provide a comprehensive disk-to-disk-to-tape data recovery solution. Windows 2008 also provides the Recovery Console that utilizes the Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE). They offer the following advantages:  Snapshots can be scheduled to be created automatically. ASR has been enhanced to support EFI system partitions. or data corruption resulting from a malicious program.  Snapshots are space-efficient because they are differential copies. To facilitate backup and recovery operations. Using Virtual Disk Snapshots to Protect Data The disks you create by using the iSCSI Software Target are iSCSI virtual disks.  Advanced technology for enterprises of all sizes. Data Protection Manager 2007 provides technically advanced and comprehensive data protection for organizations ranging in size from small business environments to enterprise environments. During a restore operation the ASR VSS writer is executed within the Windows PE environment. Data Protection Manager 2007 includes the following benefits:  Continuous data protection for Windows application and file services workloads. overwritten data. minimize the time required to create disks.  Snapshots are useful for fast system recovery of files and volumes. They can be extended to provide extra capacity on demand. Combined with Windows Server technology. In addition. enable efficient storage utilization. Microsoft Virtual Server. This change removes a previous problem in which dynamic disks were always recreated even if a restoration was not necessary.  Rapid and reliable recovery. and one-click lossless application recovery. which are files in the fixed virtual hard disk (VHD) format. Data Protection Manager 2007 was specifically designed to protect and recover files services for SQL Server. Data Protection Manager 2007 protects core Windows Server workloads by continuously capturing data changes with application-aware byte-level agents. A snapshot is a point-in-time. Data Protection Manager 2007 enables IT administrators and users to easily recover data in minutes from easily accessible disk instead of locating and restoring from less-reliable tapes. in case of accidental data deletion by a user. and Windows Server operating systems. see System Center Data Protection Manager 2007. For more information about System Center Data Protection Manager 2007. Focused on the primary Microsoft server workloads. and minimize the down time that is typically required to install new disks. Using System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 to Protect Data Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 is designed to provide and restore Windows Server applications.57 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper ASR provides a VSS Writer for the preparation of an ASR set. Exchange Server. SharePoint® Portal Server. providing an easy-to-manage and robust disk/tape back-end platform. .

For example. you need to use backup software that works with Volume Shadow Copy Service from a Microsoft partner.0 using this tool.exe Tool to Backup IIS Configuration You can protect data managed by Web services workloads using the Appcmd. see the previous section "Using the Volume Shadow Copy Service to Protect Data. Snapshots do not require that you close files or stop programs when you create them.exe tool allows you to export printer information on a periodic basis as a way of backing up a print server. To perform backups of the virtual disks. Uses for Virtual Disk Snapshots Scenario Provide disaster recovery Create a restore point Use of the virtual disk snapshots The snapshots can be saved to other appliances. For more information about the Appcmd. Most modern file systems can recover from this state. so application servers can continue servicing clients without disruption. The PrintBRM.exe tool in Windows Storage Server.  The Volume Shadow Copy Service. To create an application-consistent snapshot. see Migrate Print Servers. Using the Appcmd. You can back up the configuration files for IIS 7. Table 21. . Virtual disk snapshots require the Volume Shadow Copy Service and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Volume Shadow Copy Service Hardware Provider.exe tool in Windows Storage Server. Note Snapshots that are created on the iSCSI target server are crash consistent. the snapshot must be created from the iSCSI initiator computer by using the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Volume Shadow Copy Service Hardware Provider and other backup software that works with the Volume Shadow Copy Service. or archival media and then later used to restore the data in the event of a failure. For more information. Table 21 lists scenarios for using virtual disk snapshots. Using the PrintBRM.58 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper   Snapshots can be mounted locally or exported to facilitate backup and recovery operations. servers. see How to backup/restore IIS7 configuration." in this white paper.exe Tool to Backup Printer Information You can protect data managed by Print services workloads using the PrintBRM. For more information about:  Virtual disks and virtual disk snapshots. you could create snapshots prior to performing an upgrade to provide the ability to roll back the environment should the upgrade fail.exe tool. see Virtual Disks and Snapshots. The snapshot can be used to provide the ability to rollback services to a previous version.

included in Windows Storage Server. see the section "NTFS Permissions" in Managing Permissions for Shared Folders. NTFS permissions NTFS permissions. . encrypts data stored on hard disks. see Active Directory Domain Services Overview. Table 22 lists the features or technologies that you can use to secure Windows Storage Server. see BitLocker Drive Encryption. stolen. passwords. and is used for accessing all workloads. access to files and folders are defined by the combination of NTFS permissions and shared folder permissions. Security Features or Technologies for All Workloads Feature or technology BitLocker Drive Encryption Description BitLocker Drive Encryption. These security measures can be implemented. Table 22. For more information. For more information. Secure Windows Storage Server workloads by securing:  Windows Storage Server for all workloads  File services workloads  Disk block I/O workloads  Web services workloads  Print services workloads Securing Windows Storage Server for All Workloads Before securing specific workloads. Windows Storage Server includes all of the security features and technologies found in Windows Server.59 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Securing Windows Storage Server Workloads Windows Storage Server includes a number of features and technologies to help you secure your workloads. you can further secure your workloads using products and technologies from Microsoft partners. help prevent unauthorized local and network access to files and folders stored on NTFS volumes. In addition. NTFS permissions work with share folder permissions to help prevent unauthorized network access to files and folders stored on NTFS volumes. Note For remote or network users. This encryption helps protect the data by preventing unauthorized users from breaking Windows file and system protection on lost. For more information. regardless of the workloads running on Windows Storage Server. or inappropriately decommissioned appliances. included in Windows Storage Server. Active Directory Domain AD DS provides centralized management of credentials. Services (AD DS) accounts. This is especially important for Branch Office scenarios where the physical security may not be as strong as in a data center. secure the Windows Storage Server operating system.

access to files and folders are defined by the combination of NTFS permissions and shared folder permissions. Note For remote or network users. data confidentiality (encryption). For more information. only help prevent unauthorized network access to the files and folders stored on Windows Storage Server. helps reduce the attack surface by blocking unauthorized network traffic flowing into or out of the appliance. included in Windows Storage Server. see the section "SMB Permissions" in Managing Permissions for Shared Folders. and management solutions that are integrated with Microsoft user identity management. Specifically. see Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and IPsec. and replay protection.  Remote connectivity to Windows Storage Server using Forefront Unified Access Gateway 2010. IPsec supports network-level peer authentication. provide protection. which dramatically reduces the ongoing administrative and operations effort. Windows Firewall is also integrated with Internet Protocol Security (IPsec). data integrity.  Communication with other computers or appliances over the Internet using Forefront Threat Management Gateway 2010. IPsec. These shared folder permissions affect users accessing the files and folders using the SMB protocol. Windows Firewall with Advanced Security is integrated with Network Awareness so that it can apply security settings appropriate to the types of networks to which the computer is connected. included in Windows Storage Server. allows you to protect the communications between Windows Storage Server and other Windows operating systems. Windows operating systems. included in Windows Storage Server. available separately. you can help protect:  Windows Storage Server and other Windows-based computers or appliances that communicate with the appliance using Forefront Client Security. You can centrally manage IPsec using Group Policy. IPsec Microsoft Forefront . so that the IPsec configuration settings are integrated into the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security snap-in. For more information. and other Microsoft products.60 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature or technology Shared folder permissions Description Shared folder permission. see IPsec and Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and IPsec. Shared folder permissions work with NTFS permissions to help prevent unauthorized network access to files and folders stored on NTFS volumes. data origin authentication. and access. Windows Firewall with Advanced Security Windows Firewall with Advanced Security. For more information. Microsoft Forefront products.

Securing File Services Workloads File services workloads are secured based on the protocol that provides access to the file services workloads.exe to create client groups and to add client computers to those groups before configuring NFS share permissions. deploy. you must first install the Services for Network File System (NFS) role service using Server Manager. use NFSAdmin. see the “Creating Branch Office Solutions” section in this white paper. For more information. After installing Services for NFS. see the "NFS Permissions" section in Managing Permissions for Shared Folders. any security product that is compatible with Windows Server 2008 R2 is also compatible with Windows Storage Server 2008 R2. For more information. Note The assumption is that Windows Storage Server has been secured using the features and technologies described in the section "Securing Windows Storage Server for All Workloads. Typically. and monitor security baselines of Windows operating systems. This collection of tools and guidance are free. the Security Compliance Management Toolkit Series provides an end-to-end solution to help plan. You can manage the NFS share permissions using the Share and Storage Management snap-in. Specifically. you can use the following resources to help secure Windows Storage Server:  Microsoft Security. authoritative resources to help you to proactively plan. This is the home page for all Microsoft security products and technologies for all operating systems and products.  Security Solution Accelerators. In addition to features and technologies listed in Table 22. To use NFS permissions. Table 23 lists the file services protocols and how to secure the protocol. see "NTFS Permissions" and "SMB Permissions" sections in Managing Permissions for Shared Folders." earlier in this white paper. Table 23. Use read-only DFS Replication to provide read-only copies of file and folders to servers where only read-  NFS   . File Services Protocols and How to Secure the Protocols Protocol SMB How to secure this protocol  Use NTFS permissions and shared folder permissions to secure SMB-based access to shared resources. and operate your security infrastructure. For more information.61 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature or technology Microsoft partner products Description There are a large number of security related products and technologies that are available from Microsoft partners. NFS-based access control for a shared resource is determined based on network names and groups. Use read-only DFS Replication to provide read-only copies of file and folders to servers where only readonly access is allowed. integrate.

such as the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. you must have a RADIUS server running on your network. Table 24 lists the methods of securing the communication for the iSCSI block I/O workloads. The Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) secret is set just for the target. A separate secret is set for each target and for each initiator. Require authentication for all users that access the appliance using WebDAV. see Plan authentication settings for Web applications (Windows SharePoint Services). WebDAV  Windows SharePoint Services   Securing iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Disk block I/O workloads are secured by configuring the appropriate security between the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target and the iSCSI initiators. Table 24. see Authentication and Security Using WebDAV. Transactions between the iSCSI initiator and the RADIUS server are also authenticated through the use of a shared secret.  IPsec authentication. For more information. With this level of security. With this level of security. Encrypt all Windows SharePoint communication with the appliance using SSL. For more information. see Authentication and Security Using WebDAV. Securing Communication for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads Protocol Require authentication How to secure Require all iSCSI initiators to authenticate with the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target using one of the following methods:  One-way CHAP authentication.  Mutual CHAP authentication. the iSCSI target and the initiator authenticate each other. For more information. All initiators that want to access that target need to use the same secret to start a logon session with the target. For more information. the iSCSI initiator is authenticated by a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server. see the “Creating Branch Office Solutions” section in this white paper.  Encrypt all WebDAV communication with the appliance using secure socket layer (SSL). To use this level of security. For more information. The IPsec protocol enforces . or you must deploy one. With this level of security.  RADIUS authentication. Require authentication for all users that Windows SharePoint Server on the appliance. see Plan authentication settings for Web applications (Windows SharePoint Services).62 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Protocol How to secure this protocol only access is allowed. only the iSCSI target authenticates the initiator.

every IIS 7. Note The assumption is that Windows Storage Server has been secured using the features and technologies described in the section "Securing Windows Storage Server for All Workloads. This helps harden the security of applications and services running on IIS 7. HTTP is an insecure protocol and sends all traffic in clear text. . Note HTTPS   HTTPS is a secure protocol and does not need further protection for confidentiality. FTP is an insecure protocol and sends all traffic in clear text.5. FTP    Note IIS 7." earlier in this white paper.0 that increased security and reliability. Ensure that all HTTP connections require authentication as necessary. Note At a minimum. Isolate the network segments used for communication between the iSCSI initiators and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target by using separate physical network segments or by using virtual local area networks (VLANs).5 builds on the application pool isolation that was available with IIS 7. Ensure that all FTP connections require authentication. For more information. Allow connectivity to the appliance only from computers on your internal network.63 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Protocol How to secure authentication at the IP packet layer. Table 25. see IPsec and Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and IPsec. Encrypt all communication Protect communication between the iSCSI initiators and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target using IPsec encryption. Use IPsec to protect communication between the appliance and FTP clients. Ensure that all HTTPS connections require authentication as necessary. use one-way CHAP authentication between iSCSI initiators and the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.5 application pool now runs with a unique. see iSCSI Security. Isolate iSCSI network segments Securing Web Services Workloads Web services workloads are secured based on the protocol that provides access to the Web services workloads. Table 25 lists the Web services protocols and how to secure the protocol. Allow connectivity to the appliance only from computers on your internal network. less-privileged identity. Web Services Protocols and How to Secure the Protocols Protocol HTTP How to secure this protocol    Use the HTTPS protocol instead to provide encryption of all communication between the appliance and the clients. For more information.

Note The assumption is that Windows Storage Server has been secured using the features and technologies described in the section "Securing Windows Storage Server for All Workloads." earlier in this white paper. see Assigning Delegated Print Administrator and Printer Permission Settings in Windows Server 2008 R2. see IPsec and Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and IPsec. If required. The communication between the LPD Service and LPR clients is unsecured. Use the HTTPS protocol instead when connecting to the URL for the printer. There is no authentication available or security permissions available. For more information. Table 26. For more information. use IPsec to protect the communication between the LPD Service and LPR clients. LPD Service Internet Printing . Protect all communication between the Internet Printing clients and the appliance using SSL.64 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Securing Print Services Workloads Print services workloads are secured based on the Print Server role service that provides access to the file services workloads. For more information. see Internet Printing and Resulting Internet Communication in Windows Server 2008. Table 26 lists the Print Server role services and how to secure the role service. Print Server Role Services and How to Secure the Role Service Role service Print Server How to secure this protocol Use printer permissions to control access to the appliance running the Print Server role services using the Print Management snapin.

you can improve DFS Replication availability by running on failover clusters in Windows Storage Server. Methods for Improving File Services Workload Availability Method SMB NFS WebDAV Windows SharePoint Services Failover clusters. can be used to improve the availability of SMB-based file services workloads. Windows Storage Server provides an easy to install and configure user interface for creating a two node failover cluster. and effort required to create a two node cluster.65 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Improving Availability of Windows Storage Server Workloads High levels of availability are essential for mission-critical applications and services. You can use DFS Replication to create replica copies of shared network folders. see Failover Clusters in Windows Server 2008 and Failover Cluster Step-by-Step Guide: Configuring a Two-Node File Server Failover Cluster. Improve the availability of Windows Storage Server workloads by:  Improving File services workload availability  Improving iSCSI block I/O workload availability  Improving Web services workload availability  Improving Print services workloads availability Improving Availability of File Services Workloads The availability of file services workloads in Windows Storage Server can be improved based on the protocol used to access the file services. In addition. you can further improve the availability of your workloads using products and technologies from Microsoft partners. In addition. DFS. Windows Storage Server includes all of the high availability features and technologies found in Windows Server. Table 27 lists the methods for improving the availability for file services workload and which protocols can use that method. as illustrated in Figure 8. Failover clusters in Windows Storage Server. Then you can use DFS Namespace to provide automatic failover to replica copies of content when a local copy of the content is unavailable. Table 27. This user interface reduces the learning curve. For more information about failover clusters for file services workloads. complexity.      . The method supports read and write access to the files.

. The Network Load Balancing (NLB) feature in Windows Storage Server can be used to provide fault tolerance for file services workloads. SAS. or Fibre Channel connected storage. Note The cluster storage illustrated in Figure 8 could be provided by the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target in Windows Storage Server.   The most common method of improving the availability for file services workloads is by using failover clusters. Figure 8 illustrates a typically two-node failover cluster for file services workloads. see Network Load Balancing. see Distributed File System. PCI RAID controllers are not supported for shared storage. The shared storage in Figure 8 can be iSCSI.66 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Method SMB NFS WebDAV Windows SharePoint Services For more information. For more information about using NLB to improve availability for file services workloads. Network Load Balancing.

 Multipath I/O.67 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 8. For more information. You can use failover clusters to improve the availability for the iSCSI initiator running a Windows Server operating system or the iSCSI target running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. see Failover Clusters in Windows Server 2008 and the Failover Cluster Step-by-Step Guide: Configuring a Two-Node File Server Failover Cluster. The most common failover cluster used for iSCSI block I/O workloads is a file server failover cluster. A failover cluster is a group of independent computers that work together to increase the availability of applications and services. Multipath I/O uses physical path components — adapters. and switches — to create logical paths between the iSCSI initiator and the appliance . Typical two-node failover cluster for file services workloads Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads You can improve the availability iSCSI block I/O workloads by using a combination of the following features in Windows Server products:  Failover clustering. cables.

there is no fault tolerance depicted in the connection between the iSCSI initiator and the clustered iSCSI targets (the storage fabric). As illustrated in Figure 9. In the event that one or more of these components fails. Redundancy for iSCSI initiators on other operating systems or hardware iSCSI initiators is provided by network adapter teaming from the network adapter vendor. see Multipath I/O Overview. Note Multipath connections for Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiators is provided by the MPIO feature in Windows Server. For more information. Each iSCSI network interface card should be connected by using redundant switch infrastructures to provide continued access to storage in the event of a failure in a storage fabric component. causing the path to fail. Creating Highly-Available iSCSI Targets The highest priority in improving the availability of iSCSI block I/O workloads is to improve the availability of the appliances running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. Redundancy for file services and print services is also provided by network adapter teaming support from the network adapter vendor. This section also discusses the following combinations of failover clustering and multipath I/O features:  Creating highly-available iSCSI targets with single or multipath connections.  Creating highly-available iSCSI initiators with single or multipath connections. multipathing logic uses an alternate path for I/O so that applications running on the iSCSI initiator can still access their data. The configuration in Figure 9 helps prevent loss of iSCSI block I/O workloads in the event of a failure of one of the appliances. . you can use failover clusters to improve the availability of the appliances running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target in Windows Storage Server. However.68 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.

. The network infrastructure for the iSCSI communication between the iSCSI initiator and the clustered nodes running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target has been updated to include redundant network adapters. and network cables. switches.69 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 9. Highly-available Microsoft iSCSI Software Target with a single path connection The configuration in Figure 10 illustrates combining multipath I/O with the failover cluster solution. This redundancy in the physical connectivity helps eliminate any single point of failures due to the network infrastructure for the storage fabric used by iSCSI. such as a switch failure or a disconnected network cable.

70 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 10. Highly-available Microsoft iSCSI Software Target with multipath connections Creating Highly-Available iSCSI Initiators After improving the availability of the appliances running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. you can improve the availability of the iSCSI initiators running Windows Server operating systems. As illustrated in Figure 11. there is no fault tolerance depicted in the connection between the clustered iSCSI initiators and the clustered iSCSI targets (the storage fabric). you can use failover clusters to improve the availability of the computers or appliances running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator in Windows Server operating systems. However. The configuration in Figure 11 helps prevent loss of iSCSI block I/O workloads in the event that one of the computers or appliances running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator or Microsoft iSCSI Software Target fails. .

switches. The network infrastructure for the iSCSI communication between the clustered nodes running the iSCSI initiators and the clustered nodes running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target has been updated to include redundant network adapters. and network cables. . This redundancy in the physical connectivity helps eliminate any single point of failure due to the network infrastructure for the storage fabric used by iSCSI.71 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 11. Highly-available Microsoft iSCSI Software Target and iSCSI initiators with single path connections The configuration in Figure 12 illustrates combining multipath I/O with the failover cluster solution for the iSCSI initiators and iSCSI targets in Figure 11. such as a switch failure or a disconnected network cable.

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Figure 12. Highly-available Microsoft iSCSI Software Target and iSCSI initiators with multipath connections

Improving Availability of Web Services Workloads
The NLB feature in Windows Storage Server can be used to provide fault tolerance for Web services workloads. The assumption of this solution is that each of the appliances in the NLB cluster have identical content and are continuously synchronized (such as by DFS Replication). For more information about using NLB to improve availability for Web services workloads, see Network Load Balancing.
Note If the Web applications use a centralized SQL Server database for storing information, you can also use failover clustering to improve the availability of the database. For more information, see Getting Started with SQL Server 2008 Failover Clustering.

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Improving Availability of Print Services Workloads
Failover clusters in Windows Storage Server can be used to improve the availability of Print services workloads. Figure 13 illustrates a typically two-node failover cluster for Print services workloads.
Note The cluster storage illustrated in Figure 13 could be provided by the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target in Windows Storage Server.

Figure 13. Typical two-node failover cluster for Print services workloads This method helps prevent any print services outages due to the failure a node in the cluster. Print services outages for specific printers occur in the event of a printer failure. However, the print jobs for the printer continue to be queued until the printer failure is resolved and the printer is restored to normal operation. For more information about failover clusters for file services workloads, see Failover Clusters in Windows Server 2008 and the Failover Cluster Step-by-Step Guide: Configuring a Two-Node Print Server Failover Cluster.

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Improving Performance and Scalability for Windows Storage Server Solutions
The ability to take full advantage of the system resources of Windows Storage Server based appliance is essential to creating successful solutions. Windows Storage Server includes all of the performance and scalability features and technologies found in Windows Server 2008. In addition, you can further improve the performance and scalability of your workloads using products and technologies from Microsoft partners. Improve the performance and scalability of Windows Storage Server workloads by improving performance and scalability for:  All workloads.  File services workloads.  iSCSI block I/O workloads.  Web services workloads.  Print services workloads.

Improving Performance and Scalability for All Workloads
Windows Storage Server includes a number of technologies and features that will improve the performance and scalability for all workloads. These performance and scalability improvements are inherent in Windows Storage Server. Improve the performance and scalability for all workloads by taking advantage of the:  Improvements in processor and memory capacity.  Improvements in the Next Generation TCP/IP protocol.  Improvements in network adapter performance.  Reduction in processor utilization for I/O operations.

Improvements in Processor and Memory Capacity
The improvements in computer design have resulted in modern server computers that support an ever increasing number of processors and increased memory capacity. Current server computers are only shipping with 64-bit processors, multiple processors, and higher memory capacity than ever before. These improvements allow you to create application platforms that are able to support larger workloads, reduce rack space in your data center, reduce power consumption, provide improved reliability, and reduce your overall administrative effort.

Improved Physical Processor and Memory Resources
32-bit processors impose system resource limitations that restrict your ability to handle increased workloads without investing in additional server computers. 64-bit processors allow you to support larger workloads, while minimizing the number of physical computers in your data center. Also, server consolidation by using virtualization requires 64-bit processors to provide the processing and memory resources to support higher ratios of server consolidation. To support the increased processor performance and memory capacity provided by 64bit processors, Windows Storage Server is only available for 64-bit processor architectures. Windows Storage Server supports up to 256 logical processor cores for a single operating system instance.

the exact number of connections is vendor specific. With Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) support on both TCP peers and in the routing infrastructure. TCP peers receiving marked IP packets lower their transmission rate to ease congestion . and improves overall network performance. Microsoft included a new version of the TCP/IP protocol suite.  Reducing IP packet resending due to router congestion. CTCP also ensures that its behavior does not negatively impact other TCP connections. CTCP more aggressively increases the Send window for connections with large Receive window sizes and large bandwidth-delay products.  Automating the tuning of the maximum receive window size. Hyper-V in Windows Storage Server also supports Second-Level Address Translation (SLAT) and CPU Core Parking. and improves overall network performance. Aggressively increasing the TCP Send window size allows the maximum amount of data to be transmitted between Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista.75 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Increased Logical Processor Support Hyper-V in Windows Storage Server can support up to 64 logical processors. Offloading some of the TCP/IP protocol processing to a network adapter reduces the processor utilization associated with handling TCP/IP connections. TCP/IP offloading can be used when a server is performing heavy receive processing with less than 1.500 persistent active connections. CTCP attempts to maximize throughput on these types of connections by monitoring delay variations and losses. However. CPU Core Parking enables power savings by scheduling virtual machine execution on only some processor cores and placing the remaining processor cores in a sleep state. This increased processor support makes it possible to run even more demanding workloads on a single computer. rather than relying on the receipt of the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) error messages. For example. This feature automatically determines the value of the maximum receive window size for a connection based on the current conditions of the network.  Improving black hole router detection. and high-loss networking environments. routers experiencing congestion mark the IP packets as they forward them. The performance and scalability features in the Next Generation TCP/IP protocol suite include:  Offloading TCP/IP protocol processing to specialized network adapter hardware. high-latency. when the computer is performing a backup over the network. This feature works with the Compound TCP feature on the sender side. significantly reducing hypervisor processor time and saving about 1MB of memory per virtual machine. This feature senses when large TCP segments retransmit and automatically adjusts the Path Maximum Transmission Unit (PMTU) for the connection. SLAT uses special processor functionality available in recent Intel and AMD processors to carry out some virtual machine memory management functions.  Aggressively increasing the TCP Send windows size by using Compound TCP (CTCP). Reducing the number of retransmitted TCP segments improves the overall performance of traffic that used the TCP protocol. The Next Generation TCP/IP protocol suite includes a new set of performance enhancements to increase throughput in high-bandwidth. especially on high latency connections. also referred to as the Next Generation TCP/IP protocol suite. Optimizing the network to receive TCP data can substantially increase overall network utilization by applications. Automatically tuning the receive window size allows the maximum amount of data to be transmitted between Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista. or scale workloads to greater extremes to match changing demand. Improvements in the Next Generation TCP/IP Protocol With the introduction of Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.

Because all processors are able to process incoming network traffic.1 allows a single deferred procedure call (DPC) for each network adapter.  New Networking Features in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista.0 with RSS prevents bottlenecks for incoming network traffic. Incoming network traffic with RSS For more information about RSS. Improvements in Network Adapter Performance RSS in NDIS 6. a secure hashing mechanism. see Receive-Side Scaling Enhancements in Windows Server 2008. using RSS. Reducing IP packet resending improves the overall performance of traffic that uses the TCP protocol.76 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper and prevent segment losses.0.  Performance Enhancements in the Next Generation TCP/IP Stack. NDIS 5. . Figure 14. see:  Next Generation TCP/IP Stack. Figure 14 illustrates how the architecture of NDIS 6. all processors have available capacity and none are a bottleneck for incoming network traffic. parallel interrupts. RSS also supports dynamic load balancing. For more information about the Next Generation TCP/IP protocol suite in Windows Server 2008. Note RSS support has also been released in the scalable networking pack for Windows Server 2003. NDIS 6.0 balances the network load from a network adapter across multiple processors. and parallel DPCs. while preserving in-order delivery of messages on a per-stream basis. enables multiple DPCs on different processors for each instance of a network adapter miniport driver.

In prior versions of Windows. . Multiprocessor I/O operation without NUMA optimization Figure 16 illustrates an example of the components that might be required for processing a dynamically directed I/O completion by using NUMA I/O. or decompression of the data).77 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Reduction in Processor Utilization for I/O Operations Windows Server 2008 performs dynamic redirection of I/O interrupts and I/O completion processing to reduce overall processor utilization. if the completion processing accesses data read from the disk (for example to perform virus detection. A disk controller takes advantage of the NonUniform Memory Access (NUMA) I/O functionality in Windows Server 2008 and can use the information specified during the initiation of the I/O operation to select a processor that can most efficiently perform the necessary processing of the completed I/O. Furthermore. NUMA I/O functionality improves the hardware cache hit ratios. when the request is initiated. Figure 15 illustrates an example of the components that might be required for processing a statically directed I/O completion. the interrupt from the disk is directed to Processor 3. Figure 15. If the completion processing accesses the data read from the disk. the data will go from memory to Processor 3. and minimizes I/O completion processing time. the I/O operation is initiated on Processor 3. and the subsequent completion processing of the I/O occurs on Processor 3. the interrupt from the disk is directed to Processor 2 because of the static assignment made when the disk was detected at boot time. reduces the possibility of interrupting an application unrelated to the I/O operation. reduces the hardware interconnect activity. Processor 2 subsequently interrupts Processor 3 to indicate that the I/O operation is complete (assuming that the application waiting for the I/O is executing on Processor 3). The interrupt and subsequent completion processing of the I/O operation occurs on Processor 2. the selection of processors to interrupt and perform completion processing was statically chosen when the device was detected (similar to a round-robin order across all processors). In this example. decryption. Although the I/O operation is initiated on Processor 3. that data will have to go from memory to Processor 2 over the node interconnect and then back over the node interconnect to Processor 3 when the application starts to access the data. Disk controller drivers can make use of new application programming interfaces (APIs) that allow Windows to specify the processor on which to efficiently perform completion processing for each I/O. and the application will experience a high cache hit ratio when it accesses the data.

Identify the performance and scalability improvements for file services workloads by:  Reviewing the performance and scalability improvements in the SMB2 protocol. the selected completion processor for an I/O is ideally the same processor that initiated the I/O operation.1 in Windows Server 2008 R2.78 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper In this example. In scenarios where the system consists of only Processors 3 and 4 in a single node configuration.  Download NUMA I/O Optimizations.  Improving network performance between head offices and branch offices using the BranchCache feature. These improvements are largely due to improvements in the SMB2 protocol. Improving Performance and Scalability for File Services Workloads File services workloads in Windows Storage Server have improved performance and scalability compared to previous versions of Windows Server. . see:  The "NUMA Support" section of the "Advances in Memory Management for Windows" white paper. the I/O processing is performed on a specific processor. the fact that Processor 4 is unaffected by the I/O operation still results in performance benefits. For non-NUMA architectures. the node interconnect and all unrelated processors are unaffected by the I/O completion. For more information about NUMA support in Windows Server 2008. For NUMA architectures. Figure 16.  Reviewing performance improvements in SMB Version 2.  Reviewing SMB-based file services workload test results. Multiprocessor I/O operation with NUMA optimization The dynamic I/O completion redirection (NUMA I/O) improvements in Windows Server 2008 provide the following benefits:  Support for the Message Signaled Interrupt eXtension (MSI-X) that enables a PCI-X or PCI-Express device to use new APIs to specify a processor to complete processing of each specific I/O operation.  Better NUMA and non-NUMA processor architecture. In the current implementation. the I/O processing is localized to a NUMA node or a specific processor within the node.

each write request must wait for the write response from a previous write request.  Support for much larger buffer sizes when compared to SMB 1. write request 2 must wait for the write response from write request 1. including greater performance when servers connect to file shares over high-latency links. a common issue in the effective tuning of SMB 1. and better security through the use of mutual authentication and message signing. Review Improvements in the SMB2 Protocol Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 includes the latest version of SMB. such as Microsoft LAN Manager and Windows for Workgroups. SMB 1—the technology behind Windows Server versions prior to Windows Server 2008—was originally designed for early Windows-based network operating systems. the new version of SMB that has been redesigned for today’s complex networking environments and next-generation file servers. Figure 17 illustrates how SMB 1 processes multiple write operations between a client computer running Windows XP and a server computer running Windows Server 2003. This reduces the number of packets sent between an SMB client and server. which is optimized for greater performance over high-latency links. . SMB in Windows Server 2008 and later versions supports SMB 1 as well as SMB2. Windows includes an SMB client (the “Client for Microsoft Windows” component) and an SMB server (the “File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Windows” component). The SMB2 protocol provides a number of communication enhancements.  Support for durable handles that can withstand short interruptions in network availability.  Support for symbolic links. In SMB 1.  An increase in the restrictive constants within the protocol design to allow for scalability. For example. The SMB2 protocol features include:  Support for sending multiple SMB commands within the same packet. Examples include an increase in the number of concurrent open file handles on the server and the number of file shares that a server can have. SMB2.79 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  Improving network performance between client computers and Windows Storage Server for the folder redirection and offline files features.

The overall effect. . is that remote file operations are much faster. In SMB2. especially on high-latency network connections.80 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 17. multiple write requests can be issued before receiving a write response. Write operations in SMB 1 Figure 18 illustrates how SMB2 processes multiple write operations between a client computer running Windows Vista and a server computer running Windows Server 2008.

see the "Server Message Block 2.0" section of New Networking Features in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista. .81 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 18. Write operations in SMB2 For more information about SMB2.

This test environment emulates two geographic locations (New York and London) separated by a WAN connection. The performance gains that are illustrated in these tests are a direct result of the performance and scalability features in Windows Server 2008. Figure 19. Environment for performing File Services role tests The following tests were performed for the File Servers role:  Running the Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool (FSCT) on a high-speed network. Figure 19 illustrates the environment for tests performed over a WAN connection. The server computers running Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2003 are in New York while the client computers running Windows Vista and Windows XP are in London. Running Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool On a High-Speed Network For this test. This tool simulates a home folders file workload on a set of client computers and computes the maximum number of users a server can support based on the response time of simulated scenarios as illustrated in Figure 20.  Accessing files on a shared folder at a remote location over a WAN connection. The test results for Windows Server 2003 do not include Windows Firewall.82 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Review SMB-based File Services Workload Test Results The File Services server role is one of the most common server roles deployed. The File Services server role implements SMB-based file services. Windows Firewall imposes a minimal impact (approximately 5 percent) on network throughput. . the Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool (FSCT) was run against a server running Windows Server 2008.  Copying large files to a remote location over a WAN connection. Note The tests results reflect the performance of Windows Server 2008 with Windows Firewall enabled.

.00% 0. and modifying Microsoft Office files.00% 80.5% 11.00% 40. and processors. Table 28. Example Performance Characteristics of Appliances with Different System Resources Processor sockets Single socket Single socket Single socket Dual socket Disk configuration 4 SATA drives 10 SATA drives 10 SATA drives 24 SAS drives Raid level RAID 5 RAID 5 RAID 1+0 RAID 1+0 Users supported 600 1.83 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper 450 Number of Scenarios per Second 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 2000 2400 2800 3200 3600 4000 4400 4800 Number of users 100. The tool also provides the ability to collect performance counters such as processor.00% 50.700 5. File Services Role scalability test results The scenarios include common operations such as browsing a directory. For a given number of users accessing data on a file server. In these examples.6% 7. copying files.00% 10. Table 28 lists example performance characteristics for appliances with different system resources. and disk subsystem utilization details to help identify potential bottlenecks.000 Processor utilization 7. the appliances contained only a single or dual processor socket that is typical for these types of appliances at the time of writing.200 1.00% 30. you can expand the processor and disk resources of the appliances to support tens of thousands of users on a single appliance. memory.2% A significantly higher number of users can be supported by adding more drives.00% 20. memory.00% Average scenario throughput CPU utilization Figure 20. the tool will compute a throughput number corresponding to the average scenario per second that the server is able to sustain. As reflected by these performance characteristics.00% Procesor utilization 70.7% 5.00% 90.00% 60. The number and speed of the drives has the largest influence on the number of users who can be supported. network.

.  Opening a 2-MB Word document stored on a network shared folder in Word 2007.84 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Copying Large Files to a Remote Location Over a WAN Connection For this test. two scenarios were performed (as illustrated in Figure 21) over a simulated WAN connection. Figure 21. For both scenarios. the scenarios were performed (as illustrated in Figure 21) over a simulated WAN connection:  Opening a 47-KB Excel spreadsheet stored on a network shared folder in Excel 2007. In the chart in Figure 22.  Browsing a network shared folder that contains 50 files in Windows Explorer. the combination of Windows Vista SP1 and Windows Server 2008 provided dramatic performance improvements compared to the combination of Windows XP SP2 and Windows Server 2003 SP2. The test scenarios were performed for the combination of Windows Vista SP1 with Windows Server 2008. In all these scenarios. one 268-MB file was copied between the client computers and the server computers. In the chart in Figure 21.  Copying a 6-MB file to a network shared folder in Windows Explorer. 100 1-megabyte (MB) files were copied between the client computers and the server computers. In the second scenario. a lower length of time indicates that the file copy process occurred faster. the combination of Windows Vista SP1 and Windows Server 2008 provided dramatic performance improvements compared to the combination of Windows XP SP2 and Windows Server 2003 SP2. For this test. Remote large file copy test results Accessing Files at a Remote Location Over a WAN Connection This test series provides an indication of how typical user applications perform when accessing files and folders on network shared folders on server computers running Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2003. a lower length of time indicates that the file operation occurred faster. In the first scenario. and Windows XP SP2 with Windows Server 2003 SP2.

This improvement helps performance by sending larger SMB packets. which includes the following improvements over previous versions of SMB:  Support for large protocol data unit (PDU) and maximum transmission unit (MTU).  Improved opportunistic file locking method. Figure 23 and Figure 24 illustrate the SMB performance differences between Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 on two servers with different system resources. SMB. such as files for Microsoft Office System applications. This method helps improve application performance when opening and closing files. This improvement helps file copy operations performed remotely on network shared folders using the SMB protocol.85 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 22. a single packet can now contain thousands of directory entries. SMB packet size was limited to 64 KB. For example. This increase in packet size significantly improves the performance for file copies and directory enumerations. Remote file application test results Reviewing Performance Improvements in SMB Version 2. Previously. or SMB2 client requests.1.1 in Windows Server 2008 R2 Windows Server 2008 R2 includes a new version of SMB. In SMB version 2. . This improvement helps performance when multiple files are opened in sequence or in parallel by the same client.1.  Improved performance for file copy operations. SMB version 2. the SMB packet size can now increase up to 1 MB. The Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool (FSCT) can be used to help perform file server capacity and performance planning and troubleshooting for CIFS.

the server has the following system resources:  One processor.  16 GB of memory.  24 hard disks configured in a RAID-10 array. Figure 24. Performance results with first hardware configuration In the performance results comparison in Figure 23.86 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 23. Performance results with second hardware configuration .  One Fibre Channel host bus adapter.

1 is only supported when both computers are running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2. SMB 1 is used for file services traffic. Improving Performance for Branch Offices Using BranchCache One of the largest problems facing branch offices is how to improve the performance of accessing intranet resources in other locations. Versions of SMB Supported Between Different Windows Operating Systems Windows Vista. SMB 2. the increased system resources allow Windows Server 2008 R2 to support almost twice as many users as the system resources in Figure 23. Windows Vista Service Pack 1 and Windows Server 2008 Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SMB 1 Windows Vista Service Pack 1 and Windows Server 2008 SMB 1 Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SMB 1 SMB 1 SMB2 (v2. Typically branch offices are connected by wide area networks (WANs) that usually have slower data rates than your intranet. Table 29 shows the version of SMB used between two computers running different combinations of operating systems. Table 29.1.  96 hard disks configured in a RAID-10 array.002) SMB 1 SMB2 (v2.  Two Fibre Channel host bus adapters. the server has the following system resources:  Two processors. such as the head office or regional data centers. Reducing the network utilization on the WAN network segments provides available network bandwidth for applications and services.  72 GB memory. and prior operating systems. BranchCache Modes BranchCache supports the following operational modes:  Distributed Cache mode  Hosted Cache mode . As illustrated in Figure 24. and prior operating systems Windows Vista. if a computer running Windows XP is accessing a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2.87 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper In the performance results comparison in Figure 24.002) SMB2 (v2.002) SMB 2.1 For example. Windows Server 2003. The type of content that is cached is content returned by SMB requests and HTTP requests. The performance improvements in SMB 2.1 are realized only when both operating systems support SMB 2. Windows Server 2003. The BranchCache feature in Windows Storage Server and Windows 7 reduces the network utilization on WAN segments that connect branch offices by locally caching frequently used files on computers in the branch office.

The disadvantage to this solution is that content is cached on client computers. Client 2 requests the content from Client 1 by using the BranchCache retrieval protocol. These identifiers are transmitted by using the BranchCache-enabled protocol. This request can be transmitted over any of the BranchCache-enabled protocols. Figure 25. This request is not marked as BranchCache capable. such as SMB. messages. so it does not receive any responses. and transmits a set of identifiers that describe the chunks of content the client computer wants to download. Client 1 issues another request to the server in the head office by using the BranchCache-enabled protocol. so if the computer containing the cached content is unavailable. Client 2 issues a request for the same content that Client 1 downloaded earlier. or BITS. Client 2 verifies the data against the identifiers downloaded from the server in the head office. HTTP. a multicast protocol sent over UDP. 5. HTTP. which in turn uses WS-Discovery. Client 2 receives identifiers describing the content from the server in the head office. using fields. Client 1 issues a request for a file on a BranchCache-enabled server in the head office. such as SMB. BranchCache Distributed Cache mode The following sequence reflects how the Distributed Cache mode caches content: 1. Client 1 is the first computer in the branch to download this piece of content. or headers that are already part of the BranchCache-enabled protocol. 2. Client 2 uses the BranchCache discovery protocol to search for the content. Client 1 searches locally for a computer that has already downloaded and cached the content.88 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Distributed Cache Mode In Distributed Cache mode. The server responds. The server responds with the requested data. Client 1 transmits the content to Client 2. This search is conducted by using the BranchCache discovery protocol. The client computer indicates to the server that it is BranchCache capable. 3. Client 1 receives this request. . The client then adds this data to its local cache. or Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS). 4. and sends a response to Client 2. the content must be retrieved over the WAN connection. as illustrated in Figure 25. 6. protecting it with the BranchCache encryption scheme. content is cached on the branch on client computers running Windows 7. finds the requested content in its local cache. which in turn uses HTTP.

This request can be transmitted over any of the BranchCache-enabled protocols. . The advantage to this mode is that the server is always available. as illustrated in Figure 26. or headers that are already part of the BranchCache-enabled protocol. messages. such as SMB. A client computer can be configured to use only a single caching mode at one time. The unavailability of any client computer running Windows 7 does not affect the availability of the content cache. Client 1 advertises the newly downloaded content to the Hosted Cache server running Windows Storage Server by using the BranchCache hosted cache protocol (MS-PCHC). which in turn uses HTTP. content is cached at the branch office on client computers running Windows Server 2008 R2. BranchCache Hosted Cache mode The following sequence reflects how the Hosted Cache mode caches content: 1. or BITS. Hosted Cache Mode In Hosted Cache mode. 4. 2. The server responds. 3. The hosted cache response informs Client 1 that the target data is not available. so the cached content is always available. and transmits a set of identifiers that describe the chunks of content that the client computer wants to download. which in turn uses HTTPS. using fields. such as SMB. The server responds with the requested data. Client 1 issues a request to a BranchCache-enabled server in the head office. HTTP. or BITS. These identifiers are transmitted by using the BranchCache-enabled protocol. This request is not marked BranchCache capable. Client 1 issues another request to the server in the head office by using the BranchCache-enabled protocol. Figure 26. Client 1 requests the content from the hosted cache in the branch office by using the BranchCache retrieval protocol (MS-PCCRD). The client computer indicates to the server that it is BranchCache capable.89 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Note Hosted Cache mode and Distributed Cache mode are mutually exclusive. HTTP.

You can also manage BranchCache by using the NetSH command. Improving Performance for Folder Redirection and Offline Files Windows 7 includes the following features that allow users to provide user state virtualization:  Folder redirection.  Reviewing the results of I/O storage workload tests. A client computer can be configured to use only a single caching mode at one time. Folder redirection allows users to quickly recover from local failures of their computer. . For more information about configuring BranchCache by using the NetSH command. Windows Storage Server includes a Group Policy administrative template that you can use to administer the BranchCache configuration settings. which in turn uses HTTP. 7. see Network Shell (Netsh) Commands for BranchCache. 6. This feature allows users to store the user’s folders in a shared folder on Windows Storage Server. BranchCache Management You can configure BranchCache behavior by using Group Policy. Client 2 verifies the data by using the identifiers downloaded from the server in the head office. Client 2 receives identifiers describing the content from the server in the head office. Identify Methods for Improving iSCSI Block I/O Workload Performance and Scalability You can improve the performance and scalability for iSCSI block I/O workloads by using the following methods:  Ensure the system resources of the appliance are sufficient. Note Hosted Cache mode and Distributed Cache mode are mutually exclusive. The typical system resources that are heavily utilized by iSCSI block I/O workloads include memory. The Hosted Cache server connects to the client and downloads the recently advertised content by using the BranchCache retrieval protocol (MS-PCCRD). the client computer returns to the server in the head office and requests a download. Client 2 requests the content from the hosted cache in the branch office by using the BranchCache retrieval protocol (MS-PCCRD). Improving Performance and Scalability for iSCSI Block I/O Workloads File services workloads in Windows Storage Server have improved performance and scalability compared to previous versions of Windows Server. All of the performance features listed in this section will also improve the performance for folder redirection and offline files. This feature allows users to locally cache files stored on a shared folder on Windows Storage Server. Client 2 issues a request for the same content that Client 1 downloaded earlier. You can improve the performance and scalability for iSCSI block I/O workloads by:  Identifying methods for improving iSCSI block I/O workload performance and scalability. Both of these features require access to shared network folders on Windows Storage Server. If a client computer cannot locate content on the hosted cache server. which in turn uses HTTP. The hosted cache responds with the data.  Offline files. Users are able to modify local copies of files in the event they are disconnected from the network.90 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper 5.

Note Consult your storage vendor to determine the proper values to use with the Diskpart. Different types of workloads on the same physical network can cause overutilization and performance problems. Always size disks for performance in addition to capacity. You can configure sector alignment for physical disks using the Diskpart. segregate each type of workload to a separate physical network segment to reduce network contention. which causes performance degradation.91 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper     disk. Dedicate a physical array for each conflicting workload. Isolate different types of workloads using separate physical network segments. After ensuring the number of disks is sufficient for capacity. When encountering network utilization problems. random I/O workloads. Different types of workloads on the same physical array can degrade performance for the workloads. Although a given number of disks may have adequate storage capacity. In this example. Sector alignment helps prevent an I/O operation from spanning two tracks.vhd files. Ensure that the appliance has sufficient resources to provide adequate performance and scaling. NFS workloads. segregate each type of workload to a separate physical network segment to reduce network contention. such as sequential I/O workloads. Sector alignment allows Windows Storage Server to create partitions that align with the underlying physical disk. also ensure they are sufficient for I/O throughput. Configure sector alignment for iSCSI Target volumes and . the number may not provide sufficient I/O throughput. Isolate different types of workloads using dedicated physical arrays. When encountering network utilization problems. . or SMB workloads. and network. the Windows Storage Server solution is optimized to support Exchange Server connecting to disk LUNs on Windows Storage Server.  Isolate different types of workloads using separate physical network segments. Different types of workloads on the same physical network can cause overutilization and performance problems.exe command line tool.exe. Figure 27 illustrates a Windows Storage Server solution that has been optimized to provide improved performance and scalability.

the following optimizations were chosen:       Sufficient system resources of the Windows Storage Server appliance for the given workloads. . including iSCSI sequential I/O. Separate network segments for workload types. while the Exchange storage group logs are sequential I/O. Separate iSCSI targets that corresponds to the iSCSI sequential I/O and iSCSI random I/O. and file services access using SMB or NFS. Separate network adapters in the Exchange server to support the separate network segments. iSCSI random I/O. An optimized number of disks for disk I/O bandwidth capacity. Separate arrays dedicated to different iSCSI I/O traffic as the Exchange storage group data is random I/O.92 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 27. A Windows Storage Server solution optimized for performance For the sample scenario in Figure 27.

regardless of the server role running on the server computer.93 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper  Sector-aligned disk arrays to help prevent I/O operations from spanning multiple tracks. shown in the chart in Figure 28. For this test. Review I/O Storage Test Results The results of this test provide an indication of the improvements in disk I/O operations. Windows Server 2008 can perform more than 20 percent more disk I/O operations per second than Windows Server 2003. Figure 28. General disk I/O operation test results . the server computer had 16 dual-core processors for a total of 32 processor cores. The test result. illustrates the number of disk I/O operations per second performed by Windows Server 2008 and Window Server 2003 running on identical hardware.

and IIS 7. For more information about improving Web services workload performance and scalability. see Optimize IIS Performance (IIS 7).com processing more than an additional 100 million requests per day at the same processor utilization. IIS 7. see Configuring Output Caching in IIS 7.0 and Windows Server 2008 on the same computer resources. . you can create caching rules. For more information about how to configure compression.0 and Windows Server 2003. HTTP compression lets you make more efficient use of bandwidth and enhances the performance of sites and applications.  Reviewing Web services workload test results. unified facility for output caching by integrating the dynamic output-caching capabilities of ASP. edit existing caching rules. For more information about configuring output caching. IIS also lets you use bandwidth more effectively and efficiently by using common compression mechanisms such as Gzip and Deflate.0 on Window Server 2003. You can improve the performance and scalability for Web services workloads by:  Identifying methods for improving Web services workload performance and scalability. see Configuring HTTP Compression in IIS 7. These improvements are largely due to improvements in data compression of content and caching of content.NET with the static output-caching capabilities that were present in IIS 6. This improvement in performance results in www. Output caching allows you to manage output caching rules and to control the caching of served content. In IIS Manager.0 in Windows Storage Server have improved performance and scalability compared to previous versions of IIS and Windows Server. and configure output cache settings.0 provides a powerful.microsoft.94 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Improving Performance and Scalability for Web Services Workloads Web services workloads running on Internet Information Services (IIS) 7. You can configure HTTP compression for both static and dynamic sites.  Output Caching. Performance includes the following features:  Compression. Identify Methods for Improving Web Services Workload Performance and Scalability IIS 7.0 running on Windows Server 2008.microsoft. Review Web Services Workload Test Results These results were obtained by measuring the performance of www.com running IIS 6. The chart in Figure 29 illustrates the performance gain by running IIS 7. The results were obtained by closely monitoring the performance over a 72-hour period for both test cases.0 and Windows Server 2008 can support more than 10 percent higher throughput than IIS 6.0.

Web Services (IIS) Role test results Improving Performance and Scalability for Print Workloads Print server scalability plays a key role in the deployment of Windows Storage Server print servers. size. This section of the white paper provides information to help you size a server to meet an organization's needs by identifying and investigating primary issues and configuration details to maximize print server performance. and frequency of print jobs. .95 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 29. For more information about improving the performance and scalability of print services workloads.  The number. Some of the factors that influence print server performance and capacity include:  The number of print server clients. The maximum load and performance level of a print server greatly depends on key configuration decisions.  The number and type of printers served by the print server and the types of printer drivers each printer uses. see the Windows Print Server Scalability and Sizing Technical Overview.  The operating system version or versions on each client machine.  The types of print jobs sent to the print server.

The typical characteristics of the appliance are as follows:  The appliance has the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28 in the previous section "Running Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool On a High-Speed Network. some Microsoft partners provide additional storage in external enclosures.  The solution is based on low cost.  It can support 4 to 12 disks in the single enclosure using RAID interfaces.  Creating small. industry standard hardware that can be readily expanded. To select the appropriate deployment scenario for you. such as Just a Bunch of Disks (JBOD Disks) or RAID configurations (RAID 5 or RAID 1+0).  Creating unified storage solutions.  Creating branch office solutions.  It can create a variety of disk configurations.  Highly-available NAS. review the following:  Overview of NAS configurations. is based on a single Windows Storage Server appliance.  Creating solutions for storage consolidation.  Creating solutions for heterogeneous environments.  Creating virtualization solutions. Overview of Windows Storage Server Configurations Window Storage Server provides a wide range of storage solutions for all size organizations. Using Windows Storage Server in a Stand-Alone NAS Configuration The stand-alone NAS configuration.to medium-sized business solutions." in this white paper. illustrated in Figure 30. .  Creating iSCSI boot solutions. However.96 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Windows Storage Server Deployment Scenarios You can use Windows Storage Server to provide a wide range of storage solutions. Regardless of the solution complexity.  Creating application consolidation solutions.  NAS gateway.  The processors and storage reside in a single appliance enclosure. Windows Storage Server provides the following basic configurations:  Stand-alone network attached storage (NAS).  Creating highly-available solutions.

 The appliances are configured as nodes in a Windows failover cluster to provide higher availability. is based on two or more Windows Storage Server appliances that provide some degree of fault tolerance. .  Additional appliances can be added to the solution to provide improved scalability. Windows Storage Server stand-alone NAS configuration Using Windows Storage Server in a Highly-Available NAS Configuration The highly-available NAS configuration. The typical characteristics of the appliances are as follows:  They have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28 in the previous section "Running Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool On a High-Speed Network.  Multipath I/O connections exist between the appliances. illustrated in Figure 31." in this white paper.97 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 30.  Storage is separate from the appliance enclosure. and it is shared between two or more appliances.  New storage is included as part of the solution (existing storage is not used in the solution). Note The failover cluster in Figure 31 can be quickly and easily configured using the Initial Configuration Tasks form in Windows Storage Server.

 They connect to existing storage that supports SAN block I/O protocols. in Figure 32.98 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 31. is based on one or more Windows Storage Server appliances that provide connectivity to existing storage devices. Windows Storage Server highly-available NAS configuration Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration The NAS gateway configuration." in this white paper. The typical characteristics of the appliances are as follows:  They have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28 in the previous section "Running Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool On a High-Speed Network. .

Windows Storage Server NAS gateway configuration . and NFS file access to storage. SMB file access.99 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper   They provide an inexpensive iSCSI target. They provide highly-available configurations based on solution availability requirements. Figure 32.

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Using Windows Storage Server in iSCSI Block I/O Configuration
The iSCSI block I/O configuration, in Figure 32, is based on one or more Windows Storage Server appliances that provide iSCSI access to storage resources. The typical characteristics of the appliances are as follows:  They have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28 in the previous section "Running Microsoft File Server Capacity Tool On a High-Speed Network," in this white paper.  They can be used with any combination of the following storage configurations:  Located within the appliance.  Located within an enclosure external to the appliance.  Existing storage subsystem that supports SAN block I/O protocols.  They provide highly-available configurations based on solution availability requirements.  They provide an inexpensive iSCSI target access to storage.  They provide iSCSI boot support for diskless computers.  They integrate with DHCP and TFTP servers to provide iSCSI boot support for diskless computers.

Figure 33. Windows Storage Server iSCSI Block I/O configuration

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Creating Branch Office Solutions
In a branch office solution, an organization has a number geographically distributed branch office locations that are connected to one or more centralized head offices. Table 30 lists the types of data to manage in the branch office solution, as illustrated in Figure 34, and a description of the type of data. Table 30. Types of Data to Manage in the Branch Office Solution Type of data User folders Description Contains user home directories and user shares within the branch office in addition to the well-known Windows folders, such as Documents, Videos, Pictures, and Music. The well-known Windows folders are typically stored on the local computer, but can be stored on network shared folders using the Folder Direction feature. The Folder Redirection feature allows user folders to be stored on appliances in the branch offices and to be replicated to appliances in the head office for backup and centralized management using DFS Replication. The user folders are accessed within the branch office, but are archived in the head office. Contains content that is published from the head offices to the branch offices as read-only content. The content is a set of data that is relevant to the branch office, regardless of the region where the branch office is located, for example:  Templates, such as Word or Excel templates.  Source for software distribution files, such as files from 2007 Microsoft Office System or Windows 7. Contains content used in collaborative efforts between branch offices. The collaboration content is stored on the Windows Storage Server appliances in the head office. Users in the branch offices access the collaboration content over the WAN connections. The collaboration content can be stored in network shared folders or in Windows SharePoint Service document libraries.

Published content

Collaboration content

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Figure 34. Branch office solution for Windows Storage Server

Table 31. while the branch offices have minimal or no local IT personnel.  Centralized management of the branch office.  Consolidating of data in head office to provide centralized management.  Minimizing the utilization of the WAN connections is essential. failover clusters can be an optional part of this solution. The available network speed of the WAN connections between the head offices and the branch offices is a limited resource in terms of both available bandwidth and cost. Most of the configuration and all of the support is provided by the IT personnel in the head office. BranchCache dramatically reduces the network File services using NFS BranchCache in hosted caching mode . see the previous section "Using Windows Storage Server in a Stand-alone NAS Configuration. SMB2 helps minimize WAN network utilization because of the efficiencies provided by SMB2. The appliance in the branch office is configured for BranchCache hosted caching mode. see the section "Review Improvements in the SMB Protocol.  Stand-alone NAS appliances are used. For more information about this type of appliance.103 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper The assumptions in this scenario are:  The data centers have local IT personnel. such as Linux or the Mac OS. Centralized management of the appliances in the branch office is essential and remote administration is required. All user profile folders in the branch offices need to be copied to the head offices for centralized management. which allows the appliance to provide local caching of the collaboration content accessed using the SMB and HTTP protocols. Also. Most of the computers in the branch office are running Windows operating systems. For more information. Provides local caching of the collaboration content stored on the appliances in the head office. Table 31 lists the Windows Storage Server and Windows client operating system features used in the branch office solution and provides a brief description of the role each plays in the solution.  Users must have access to their user folders regardless of connectivity to the branch office appliance. The branch offices typically do not have local IT personnel and require assistance from the IT personnel in the head office. In addition. Mobile users need to access their user folders when they are not connected to the internal network in the branch office." in this white paper. Provides file services for computers running NFS clients. In some instances there may be computers running other operating systems." earlier in this white paper. This helps protect the user profile folders in the branch office in the event of a catastrophic disaster in the branch office location that results in the total failure of the appliance.  Computers are running mostly Windows operating systems. The solution must minimize the utilization of the WAN connection as much as possible. including the computers running Linux or Mac OS. all users need to access their user folders regardless of any scheduled maintenance of the appliance or appliance failure. such back up and data protection. depending on the availability requirements of the branch offices. Features Used In Branch Office Solutions Feature File services using SMB2 Description Provides file services for computers running Windows operating systems. Due to cost constraints and lack of local IT personnel. IT personnel in the head office must be able to manage the configuration settings of the devices and users in the branch offices.

Allows users to recover files by themselves without the assistance of IT professionals.104 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature Description utilization for accessing these files. "Improving Performance for Branch Offices Using BranchCache. Any updates to the collaboration content are automatically saved on the appliances in the head office. For more information. which:  Reduces WAN network utilization by providing local access to the files." earlier in this white paper. see:  Folder Redirection Overview. Uses DFS Replication to provide replication of files and folder structure from the head office to the branch offices. Windows Vista. This is primarily for files that are for public use and are typically read-only at the branch office. which dramatically reduces the network bandwidth utilization. see the section. This allows the head office to avoid doing backups over the WAN link. For more information. The user folders are copied to the head office for backup and centralized management functions." earlier in this white paper. The Folder Redirection feature allows the user folders to be available from any computer on the network." earlier in this white paper. Computers running Windows client operating systems are using the Folder Redirection feature to redirect the user folders to network shared folders on the appliance in the branch office. The Folder Redirection feature is available in all current Windows client operating systems. For more information. and Windows XP. see the section "Using Shadow Copies of Shared Folders to Protect Data. Read-only DFS Replicated Folders Shadow Copies of Shared Folders Folder Redirection . DFS Replication uses RDC to transmit only the changes to a file. Helps reduce the effort spent by IT personnel in data centers for recovery of files. The files and folders are set to read-only access by DFS Replication. DFS Replication Provides replication of files and folder structure from the branch offices to the head office. including Windows 7. see the section. which provides data consolidation in the head office so that all backups are performed in the head office.  Provides improved file access for users in the branch office because the files are accessed locally instead of over the WAN connection. see the section. "Using DFS Replication to Protect Data." earlier in this white paper. For more information. "Using DFS Replication to Protect Data. For more information. You can administer the Folder Redirection feature using Group Policy.

Authentication is performed using an AD DS read-only domain controller on the local appliance. any new or modified files are automatically synchronized with the network shared folders on the appliance. For more information. Computers running Windows can print to the printers in the branch office using the print services workloads provided by Windows Storage Server.  In the event the appliance is taken offline for maintenance or of an appliance failure. any new or modified files are automatically synchronized with the network shared folders on the appliance. You can administer the Offline Files feature using Group Policy. Users can continue to work on copies of the files on their local computers. see the section "Providing Access to Print Services Workloads.  Configuring Group Policy for Offline Files.  Configuring Offline Files. Mobile users may want to access their files while away from the office. see:  Understanding offline files. including Windows 7. The Offline Files feature is available in all current Windows client operating systems. see the section "Providing Access to Print Services Workloads.  The “Improving Performance for Folder Redirection and Offline Files” section in this white paper. Windows Vista.  Configuring Folder Redirection. For more information.  Working with network files when you are offline. The Offline Files feature allows users to modify local copies of their files while disconnected from the network. When users reconnect to the network." earlier in the white paper. The Offline Files feature allows users to always have access to files from network shared folder by synchronizing the contents of the network shared folder to the Offline Files cache on the user’s computer. and Windows XP. The read-only domain controller provides enhanced security by preventing unauthorized or inadvertent updates to AD DS. The Offline Files feature provides access to files:  When users are not connected to the branch office network.105 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature Description  Folder redirection overview for GPMC. For more information. Computers running Linux or Mac OS can print to the printers in the branch office using the print services workloads provided by Windows Storage Server." earlier in the white paper.  The “Improving Performance for Folder Redirection and Offline Files” section in this white paper. The local read-only domain controller also Offline Files Print Server LPD Print Services Read-only domain controller . When the appliance is restored to service.

Group Policy allows you to centrally configure the Windows Storage Server appliances and Windowsbased computers in the branch office. DNS Server Computers in the branch office can resolve DNS names using the DNS Server running on the local appliance. The local DHCP Server reduces network traffic between the head office and branch offices because DHCP configuration is performed locally. You can use File Server Resource Manager to:  Limit the amount of disk space used by using the Quota Management feature. Computers in the branch office that are configured using DHCP can be configured using the DHCP Server running on the local appliance. For more information. see File Server Resource Manager. For more information. control. Note All of these features operate transparently to users in the branch office.  Use Storage Reports to profile storage usage and trends within the branch. . Most of the features and configuration settings available in all Windows products can be configured by using Group Policy. The local DNS Server reduces network traffic between the head office and branch offices because DNS queries are resolved locally. and manage the quantity and type of data stored on Windows Storage Server 2008 R2.  Prevent storage of certain file types by using the File Screening feature.106 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Feature Description reduces network traffic between the head office and branch offices because authentication is performed locally. File Server Resource Manager allows you to understand. and they are centrally configured by the IT personnel in the head office using Group Policy. see Group Policy. DHCP Server File Server Resource Manager Group Policy Table 32 lists how to manage each type of data is accessed by users.

This feature allows for users to transparently access the published content on the appliances in the branch office or in the head office. DFS Namespace will automatically direct users to use the replica copy in the branch office. Folder Redirection. Read-only DFS Replicated Folders. Any new files or changes made to the cached copy of the files are automatically synchronized when the connection to the appliance is restored. Managing Types of Data in the Branch Office Solution Type of data User folders Managed using  Offline Files. DFS Replication replicates the user profile folders to the head office so that they can be centrally backed up and managed by the IT personnel. This feature determines which replica copy to access based on the availability of the copy and the location of the copy using Active Directory sites. The replica copies of the published content in the branch offices are maintained read-only by DFS Replication so that users in the branch office have read-only access to the replica content. DFS Replication replicates the published content stored on the head office appliances to the branch office appliances. In addition. then DFS Namespace directs the client computers to access the replica copy in the Active Directory site with the next lowest cost. DFS Namespace always preferentially directs client computers to access a local replica copy of the published content within the local site (lower cost than other sites). the Folder Redirection feature helps in fast recovery of computers because the user profile folders are not stored on the local computer. which minimizes the bandwidth utilization on the connection between the branch offices and the head office.107 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 32. If the branch office replica copy is unavailable.  Published content   . depending on the availability of the branch office appliance. which are typically stored locally on the user’s computer. Once these files are synchronized with the branch office appliances. This feature stores the user profile folders. This feature allows users to access their user profile folders when not connected to the appliance. which in this scenario is the head office. DFS Namespace. on the branch office appliance. any changes in the user profile folders are replicated to the head office using DFS Replication. When the branch office replica copy becomes available again. The head office and each of the branch offices is a separate Active Directory site. Remote Differential Compression in DFS Replication replicates only the changes to the user profile folders. After the user profile folders are stored on the branch office appliance.

network shared folders and Windows SharePoint services are used instead DFS Replication. The BranchCache feature dramatically reduces the bandwidth utilization between the head office and the branch offices when users access Web content that has already been locally cached on the appliance in the branch office. Because multiple users need to modify the content. network shared folders and SharePoint Services with the BranchCache feature provide the appropriate solution. This feature allows users to access the content from the head office appliances.  Any updates to the content from users in the branch offices. check in. This is because DFS Replication in Windows Storage Server is appropriate when only one copy of the content is centrally modified and all replica copies are read-only. This feature also supports version control. The BranchCache feature dramatically reduces the bandwidth utilization between the head office and the branch office when users access content stored on the network shared folders that has already been locally cached on the appliance in the branch office. . The SMB2 protocol dramatically reduces the bandwidth utilization between the head office and the branch offices for:  The initial local caching of the content using BranchCache. This feature allows users to access the content from the head office appliances using the HTTP or HTTPS protocol.  For the collaboration content in Table 32. and check out capabilities.108 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Type of data Collaboration content Managed using  Network shared folders. Windows SharePoint Services.

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Creating Highly-Available Solutions
In a highly-available solution, the workloads provided by Windows Storage Server must provide improved fault tolerance. Figure 35 illustrates how to create highly-available solutions using Windows Storage Server and Windows Server operating systems using Windows failover clusters and multipath I/O.

Figure 35. Highly-available solution using Windows Storage Server The key elements of the highly-available solution include:  The appliances have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28.  The application servers are configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an application server failure.

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The Windows Storage Server appliances act as iSCSI targets by running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.  The appliances are configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure.  The application servers are using the multipath I/O feature to provide redundant connections to the clustered appliances.  There are redundant network connections between the cluster application servers and the clustered appliances to provide fault tolerant network connectivity. For more information about Windows failover clustering for iSCSI targets, see the following sections earlier in this white paper:  "Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads."  "Using Windows Storage Server in a Highly-Available NAS Configuration."  "Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration." For more information about Multipath I/O for iSCSI initiators in Windows Server operating system, see the following sections earlier in this white paper:  "Improving Availability of iSCSI Block I/O Workloads."  "Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration."

Creating Solutions for Storage Consolidation
In the storage consolidation solution, all the myriad of devices providing SMB file services, NFS file services, and iSCSI block I/O are consolidated into a few, highlyavailable Windows Storage Server appliances. Typically this solution is used in medium to large organizations that want to reduce the number and types of devices in the organization. This consolidation effort can help reduce the ongoing operating effort and complexity. Figure 36 illustrates an IT environment prior to implementing the storage consolidation solution. There are a number of different computers providing file services and applications. Each computer has local storage that is used to support the services that each provides. This configuration provides inefficient storage management and usage. For example, one Exchange server may have insufficient available disk space while a file server may have many more times the available disk space than is required.

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Figure 36. IT environment prior to implementing the storage consolidation solution

Figure 37 illustrates the same IT environment after implementing the storage consolidation solution. The number of computers to be supported has been dramatically decreased, which reduces ongoing operations effort and complexity. Also, the overall availability of workloads has been improved. Because storage is centralized, the effort for ongoing storage management is dramatically reduced. And, because all storage resources are pooled, storage can be easily allocated to the appropriate computer.

IT environment after implementing the storage consolidation solution .112 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Figure 37.

Creating Small to Medium Business Solutions In small.  The appliances provide centralized storage management.0.  Providing SMB file services. which dramatically reduces the level of effort for ongoing operations and management. depending on the availability requirements of the organization. as described in the section "Using Windows Storage Server in a Stand-Alone NAS Configuration.  Typically configured as a stand-alone NAS.113 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper The key elements of the storage consolidation solution include:  The appliances have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28. Creating Solutions for Heterogeneous Environments In solutions for heterogeneous environments. the organization needs to support a variety of operating systems.to medium-sized business solution include:  The appliances have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28. The key elements of the solutions for heterogeneous environments include:  Windows Storage Server appliances that provide:  SMB file services for Windows operating systems or for other operating systems with CIFS support.  Providing NFS file services.  Centralized storage for application servers using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. The key elements of the small. help reduce the effort required for ongoing operations and management. and Internet printing.  The appliances may be configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure.  The appliances are configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure.  Access to Web-based content using IIS 7.  The appliances have redundant network connections to support the multipath I/O feature from the storage fabric.  Highly-automated management tools.  Windows print services.  The Windows Storage Server appliances are:  Acting as iSCSI targets and are running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.  Collaboration using Windows SharePoint Services. LPR print services. such as providing iSCSI LUNs for SQL Server or Exchange Server." earlier in this white paper.  The Windows Storage Server appliances provide:  SMB file services for Windows operating systems or for other operating systems with CIFS support.to medium-sized business solutions. .  NFS file services for NFS clients. such as Group Policy. the organization needs to provide multiple workloads on Windows Storage Server appliances.  There are redundant network connections between the cluster application servers and the storage fabric to provide fault tolerant network connectivity.

For more information about supported iSCSI initiators.114 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper             NFS file services for NFS clients. The appliances have redundant network connections to support the multipath I/O feature from the storage fabric. Highly-automated management tools. such as described in the section "Creating Highly-Available Solutions" earlier in this white paper. LPR print services for other operating systems. highly-available Windows Storage Server appliances.  Typically the application servers are configured in clustered configurations to improve availability. The key elements of the application consolidation solution include:  The appliances have the appropriate system resources based on the information in Table 28. The types of application servers that are consolidated include those running Exchange Server. The appliances may be configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure. For more information.  The Windows Storage Server appliances act as iSCSI targets and are running the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target. depending on the availability requirements of the organization. earlier in this white paper. see AD LDS Identity Mapping for Services for NFS. Typically this solution is used in medium to large organizations that want to increase the efficiency of storage allocation and management for application servers. such as Group Policy. AD LDS can be used to provide identity mapping for NFS file services in environments where an Active Directory infrastructure does not already exist. Windows print services for Windows operating systems. help reduce the effort required for ongoing operations and management. all the local or shared storage for the application servers in the IT environment are consolidated into a few.0. This solution is very similar to the storage consolidation solution described in the section "Creating Solutions for Storage Consolidation" and as illustrated in Figure 36 and Figure 37. This consolidation effort can help reduce the ongoing operating effort and complexity.  The appliances are configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure. which dramatically reduces the level of effort for ongoing operations and management. see the section "Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Support for iSCSI Initiators" earlier in this white paper. The appliances provide centralized storage management. Centralized storage for all operating systems that have supported iSCSI initiators using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.  The appliances have redundant network connections to support the multipath I/O feature from the storage fabric. SQL Server. Creating Application Consolidation Solutions In the application consolidation solution. There are redundant network connections between the cluster application servers and the storage fabric to provide fault tolerant network connectivity. Access to Web-based content using IIS 7. . Collaboration using Windows SharePoint Services.  There are redundant network connections between the cluster application servers and the storage fabric to provide fault tolerant network connectivity. and other application servers that have a significant dependency on storage.

see the section "Identifying Microsoft iSCSI Software Target Support for iSCSI Initiators" earlier in this white paper.  Highly-automated management tools. such as Group Policy.  Centralized storage for all operating systems that have supported iSCSI initiators using Microsoft iSCSI Software Target.  The appliances have redundant network connections to support the multipath I/O feature from the storage fabric and provide fault tolerant network connectivity. iSCSI block I/O storage. For more information about NAS gateway configurations. In this scenario. For more information.  The appliances are typically configured in a failover cluster to provide fault tolerance in the event of an appliance failure. The key elements of the solutions for heterogeneous environments include:  Windows Storage Server appliances that provide:  SMB file services for Windows operating systems or for other operating systems with CIFS support. highly-available Windows Storage Server appliances. NFS-base file services. earlier in this white paper. file and iSCSI block I/O storage services in the IT environment are consolidated into a few. This centralization of storage management helps reduce the inefficiency of storage allocation and management and helps reduce the ongoing operating effort and complexity. which dramatically reduces the level of effort for ongoing operations and management. For more information about the supported iSCSI initiators.  The appliances provide centralized storage management. and other storage connections (such as Fibre Channel or SAS). This solution is very similar to the storage consolidation solution described in the section "Creating Solutions for Storage Consolidation" and as illustrated in Figure 36 and Figure 37.  AD LDS can be used to provide identity mapping for NFS file services in environments where an Active Directory infrastructure does not already exist. or iSCSI connectivity. depending on the availability requirements of the organization. see the section "Using Windows Storage Server in a NAS Gateway Configuration" earlier in this white paper. help reduce the effort required for ongoing operations and management. the existing IT environment has separate devices provide SMB-based file services. see AD LDS Identity Mapping for Services for NFS. After implementing this scenario.  NFS file services for NFS clients. all of the storage resources in the organization are managed using Windows Storage Server.115 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Creating Unified Storage Solutions In the unified storage consolidation solution. .  NAS gateway services for existing storage solutions that do not provide SMBbased file services. NFS-based file services.

Figure 38. the physical computer is referred to as the parent partition.  Running virtual machines on Windows Storage Server. Each virtual machine is referred to as a child partition. Connecting Virtual Machines to iSCSI LUNs Virtual machines running on Hyper-V can access iSCSI LUNs using a number of different methods. Windows Storage Server runs the Microsoft iSCSI Software Target to provide iSCSI LUNs for use by virtual machines performing the Hyper-V server role in Windows Server 2008. In Hyper-V. as illustrated in Figure 38. In the virtualization solution.116 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Creating Virtualization Solutions You can create virtualized solutions using Windows Storage Server by:  Connecting virtual machines to iSCSI LUNs managed by Windows Storage Server. Windows Storage Server in virtualization solutions Table 33 lists the different methods that virtual machines can use to connect to iSCSI LUNs .

Pass-through parent partition disk Child partition iSCSI initiator direct to LUN . As illustrated in Figure 38. The iSCSI LUN is attached to the child partition and the virtual machine directly accesses the partition.  Works for all supported operating systems in the virtual machine that have a supported iSCSI initiator. the child partition connects to LUN-A.117 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Table 33.  Works for all supported operating systems in the virtual machine. regardless if the operating system supports an iSCSI initiator.vhd file for Virtual Machine C is created on the E: volume.  Allows the virtual machine to boot from the iSCSI LUN.vhd file is created on the volume that is accessed by the virtual machine. This method:  Allows multiple virtual machines to store . As illustrated in Figure 38. regardless if the operating system supports an iSCSI initiator. see Hyper-V: Using Live Migration with Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2008 R2. For more information. the parent partition formats LUN-C as E: and the . the parent partition connects to LUN-B and Virtual Machine B directly connects to the partition. However.  Supports Live Migration scenarios using Cluster Shared Volumes.  Does not natively support boot from the iSCSI LUN and requires products available from Microsoft partners to support iSCSI boot for virtual machines. This method:  Allows only one virtual machine to use the iSCSI LUN. the parent partition is also aware of the child partition using the LUN.vhd files on the same iSCSI LUN. The iSCSI LUN is attached to the parent partition and the virtual machine directly accesses the partition. Methods that Virtual Machines Can Use to Connect to iSCSI LUNs Method VHD created on parent partition volume Description The iSCSI LUN is attached to the parent partition and is formatted as an NTFS volume and assigned a drive letter in the parent partition.  Allows the virtual machine to boot from the iSCSI LUN. This method:  Allows only one virtual machine to use the iSCSI LUN. A .  Works for all supported operating systems in the virtual machine. As illustrated in Figure 38. However the parent partition is unaware of the child partition using the LUN because the child partition is directly accessing the LUN.

 Two virtual machines on Windows Storage Server Enterprise Edition.bin files. Creating a separate iSCSI target for each LUN will improve performance because each iSCSI target has its own I/O submission queue.118 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Note Performing a complete backup of the parent partition will back up iSCSI LUNs that are connected using the VHD created on parent partition method. You can run up to two virtual machines on Windows Storage Server depending on the Windows Storage Server edition. are stored on the same LUN where the .  The associated virtual machine files. It is also recommended that you create a separate iSCSI target for each LUN that you connect to the parent partition to improve performance. For example. iSCSI LUNs that are connected using the Pass-through parent partition disk or the Child partition iSCSI initiator direct to LUN methods must be backed up separately in addition to performing a complete backup of the parent partition. Running Virtual Machines on Windows Storage Server Windows Storage Server can also run the Hyper-V server role. .  There is minimal performance difference between the VHD created on parent partition and the Pass-through parent partition disk methods. you could install an instance of Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS) in a virtual machine that can be used for NFS account mapping. such as the . The recommended method is the VHD created on parent partition method for the following reasons:  Backups are complex using the Pass-through parent partition disk or the Child partition iSCSI initiator direct to LUN methods. This feature allows you to provide other services in the virtual machines running on Windows Storage Server. You can run:  One virtual machine on Windows Storage Server Standard Edition.vhd files reside using this method. This allows you to create a NFS file access solution that runs on one appliance. This reduces the complexity in providing your solution by reducing the number of physical appliances to manage and minimizes the power consumption for your solution (with the appropriate licensing).

 Thin clients in libraries or schools. There are many solutions that can take advantage of iSCSI boot. For more information about how to support iSCSI boot using Windows Storage Server. In this solution. see the “Supporting iSCSI Boot” section earlier in this white paper. Windows Storage Server in Windows HPC iSCSI Boot Deployment By using iSCSI and Windows Storage Server.  Computer nodes in Windows High-Performance Computing (HPC) Server clusters. Instead.119 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper Creating iSCSI Boot Solutions The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target in Windows Storage Server supports iSCSI boot for solutions that include diskless physical computers or virtual machines.  Interactive kiosks in retail stores. including those that provide iSCSI boot services for:  Web blades configured to support the same application in a web farm. Figure 39. the nodes in the cluster do not require a local hard disk drive to serve as a system disk. the nodes can use the storage . Figure 39 illustrates how iSCSI boot can support a Windows HPC Server cluster solution. Windows Storage Server centralizes the storage for the HPC cluster.

and operate Window Storage Server solutions in their organization. This allows for fast deployment and recovery of the nodes. The SMB2 protocol. More Information For more information. Tight integration with other Microsoft products and technologies also helps IT pros use existing infrastructure services (such as AD DS).3 Technical Library . centralized management features. Highly-efficient. industry-standard hardware to appliances or they can be scaled out by adding additional appliances. DFS Namespace. Windows Storage Server appliances can provide storage solutions that are flexible. Windows Storage Server can run file services. you can:  Deploy Windows HPC Server to 256 cluster nodes in approximately 34 minutes. print services. The high-availability features in Windows Storage Server help create mission-critical solutions that require maximum uptime. and scalability for Windows operating systems. Branch offices can be easily managed from central head offices using these management features. Solutions can be scaled up by adding costeffective.120 Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Architecture and Deployment White Paper resources on Windows Storage Server to boot Windows HPC Server over the network. and DFS Replication features in Windows Storage Server enhance performance. such as Group Policy. Web services. operations and management products (such as the System Center family of products). and the creation of shared network storage resources. disk usage quotas. A variety of Windows Storage Server appliances are available from Microsoft partners that can support entry level to enterprise level workloads. and security products (such as Microsoft Forefront products). Nodes that use the storage resources on the storage array to boot over iSCSI are called iSCSI boot nodes. help reduce the ongoing operations and management of storage solutions.to medium-sized organizations and branch offices to take advantage of a multifunction appliance. Each cluster node boots from a differencing virtual disk that is based on the same fixed virtual disk. All aspects of storage management can be centrally managed. Also. the NAS gateway capabilities extend the storage services provided by existing storage solutions. see the following resources:  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 home page. instead of dedicated or single function appliances. IT pros can quickly plan.  Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Technical Library  Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3. Because Windows Storage Server is an optimized version of Windows Server 2008 R2. The NFS file services.  Subsequently boot the 256 cluster nodes in less than 9 minutes. deploy. easier to maintain. availability. and more cost effective than other dedicated appliances or storage solutions. Conclusion Windows Storage Server provides storage solutions for all types and sizes of organizations. and iSCSI block I/O services on a single appliance. Using this solution.  Windows Storage Server blog. such as Linux or Mac OS. and iSCSI target services features in Windows Storage Server help protect investments in existing networks with other operating systems. This allows small. including filtering of content. LPR print services.

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