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Greetings Alumni, Students, and Friends

of Cheyney University,
Spring is always such a beautiful time of the
year. Spring brings hope of new beginnings,
and of course, commencement.
This year, we are so proud of our students and
our graduating class. We have students who
are leaving to go to medical school, graduate
school, new jobs, and home to their families.
It has been our pleasure to help develop our
graduates into conscientious, responsible, pro-
ductive, and competitive citizens.
WE ARE PROUD OF OUR STUDENTS!
In its 170 years, Cheyney University has con-
tributed signifcantly to the intellectual capital
needs of Philadelphia, the region, and the na-
tion. It is our students who keep us focused on
the need for us to continue to seek excellence
because we are doing it for them and for the
future of our country.
In the next academic year, you will hear more
about the development of the Center for Excel-
lence in Media and Fine Arts and the develop-
ment of the Center for Excellence in Aqua-
culture Research and Applied Sciences. We
will be seeking to develop advisory councils
for both of those centers of excellence to help
us generate resources to enhance these areas
for our students. With the appropriate mix of
public and private support, Cheyney University
will emerge as a leader in the areas of its cen-
ters of excellence.
We ask that you aggressively help us support
the development of our centers of excellence.
With your support, Cheyney University will
continue to blossom and grow.
Sincerely,
Michelle Howard-Vital, Ph.D.
President
A view of Emlen Hall on the
atractve Historic Quad
of Cheyney University
COVER: Professor Madeline Murphy and guest Chef Malachi
of Metz Catering demonstrate atractve food presentaton
techniques to Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Management
students at the “Cheyney Inn & Grill” practcum lab.
Cover photo and p13 by Bev Michel, Westchester, PA
l
highlights
The
Cheyney
University
Magazine
is published for alumni,
donors, faculty, students and friends of
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.
Publisher
Michelle R. Howard-Vital
President
editor
Lisa James Goldsberry
Director of Public Relations and Marketing
Consultants & designers
Geri R. Vital and Philip Pagliaro
Web site: www.cheyney.edu
Phone: 1-800-CHEYNEY
1837 University Circle
Cheyney, PA 19319
An Evening With Dr. Cornel West
8
• one of the nation’s greatest sCholars Challenges
Young Minds at KeYstone honors aCadeMY leCture
C
on
gratulation
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C
U
C
lass of

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!
• KeYstone honors aCadeMY sCholar naMed as fulbright sCholar
• Cu students turn heads at honda all-star Challenge
• student athletes show Pride as CoMMunitY Volunteers
• Cu wolVes teaMs end season on high notes
Cheyney
PRIDE
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©

C
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p
y
r
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g
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Cheyney
Spirit 2
Cu aluMni news, aChieVeMents and CoMing eVents
student news
10
• introduCing the Cu internshiP institute
• Cu students to watCh: readY to taKe on the world
• haute Couture Meets hot Cuisine at Cu
S T A Y I N G C O N N E C T E D

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• wCub radio on the rise
• green insPirations
• faCultY & staff highlights
• Meet Cu’s new football CoaCh
• honor roll of donors
• extraordinarY aluMni:
Caring for the Present...ensuring the future
2
Cheyney
Spirit
alumni
Paul Turner
Dear Fellow Alumni:
It is again that time of the
year when universities, col-
leges and secondary schools
conduct their commence-
ment activities. During these
ceremonies, words are often
offered to the graduates to
suggest that the real educa-
tion is about to begin. All
that was learned can now
be used to navigate oneself
through the challenges of
life. The graduate is now
known as either an alumnus
or alumnae of the university
and joins a group of distinguished individuals. On
behalf of Cheyney’s National Alumni Association, I
congratulate the class of 2008 for your achievements
and welcome you to our ranks. May you experience
the best in years to come!
The terms “alumni” and “graduate” often bring to my
mind the concept that is associated with the Sankofa,
a mythical bird from West Africa. This bird, whose
body is oriented forward while looking backward, is
associated with the African message, “Se wo were
fn a wosan kofa a yenka.” The literal translation is,
“It is not taboo to go back and fetch what you forgot.”
Almost certainly, there is something that has been
forgotten, but let us not be afraid to fetch it. More
importantly, if what you forgot were the needs of
Cheyney University, you are defnitely encouraged to
retrieve it and embrace it.
Things that most alumni will never forget are the
experiences and the education they received at
Cheyney. This is evident in the endless conversa-
tions when they get together and reminisce about
old times. Experiences are not only recalled between
graduates of a common era but there seems to be a
concerted effort to participate in the occurrences of
those of another time. These are the strengthening
agents that bind us together.
Cheyney University, however, benefts little if gradu-
ates just talk about the great education they received
from attending her and of the times that were trans-
formative and wonderful. It is now time to step up
and more vigorously than ever support our Alma
Mater. “When thou callest, Alma Mater, never shalt
thou call in vain” has never meant more than it does
at the present time. We are at the juncture where
turning the corner could project us to an entirely new
level. The alumni, more than any other entity, can be
the most instrumental force in moving the university
forward. It would be comforting to Dr. Howard-Vital
if, on the eve of her inauguration, there was clear evi-
dence that she had the complete support of Cheyney’s
alumni.
In some images of the Sankofa, there is an egg either
in its mouth or resting at its feet. I suggest that this
represents birth or new life. Won’t you be part of
this, our own Sankofa, our own new birth? I encour-
age you to give of your tithes, talents, and time as
Cheyney University is reborn in this twenty-frst
century.
Yours in the Spirit of Cheyney,
Paul A. Turner
Paul A. Turner, ’62
President, National Alumni Association
The Cheyney Foundation will host its next Charity
Golf Classic on Monday, August 11, 2008 from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Penn Oaks Golf Club, 150 Penn Oaks
Drive in West Chester, PA. This event provides a ter-
rifc opportunity to get involved in sports and net-
working in the Delaware Valley region.
There will be a variety of promotional and marketing
options for companies such as signage and radio an-
nouncements. Over 150 alumni are expected to partici-
pate. Highlights of this year’s event will include a golf
clinic for beginners, a silent auction and an awards
banquet. All proceeds will beneft Cheyney University.
For more information or to be a sponsor, please contact
Barbara Daniel Cox at 215-740-8542.
An easy putt: Save the date for the
2008 Cheyney Foundation Golf Classic
3
An easy putt: Save the date for the
2008 Cheyney Foundation Golf Classic
news
We want to hear from you!
Please send information to be included in the
next issue of Cheyney University Magazine to:
Offce of Alumni Relations
Cheyney University, 1837 University Circle
P. O. Box 200, Cheyney, PA 19319-0200
Kennisha Gilbert, (‘06)
Dr. Tammy Williams, (‘92)
Dr. Nancy Fain graduated from Cheyney University in 1971. She earned a doctorate in 1981 from
Oklahoma State University. She is currently the Vice President for External Relations and Partnerships
at Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Fain has also served as associate vice president for external
relations at Kentucky State University and associate dean and assistant professor of health care sciences
at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX.
Tammy J. Williams, successfully defended her doctoral dissertation entitled, “An Analy-
sis of the Comparative Promotions and Career Processes of Men and Women Pre-, During, and
Post-U.S. Dental School Deanships,” in March, 2008, at The George Washington University. Her
dissertation was supported by the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) grant
and the American Dental Education Association, due to Dr. Williams’ research interest in higher
education administration with a focus on women in senior leadership positions at US colleges
and universities.
Dr. Williams is the principal of Community-Based Classroom, an alternative high school in
Prince George’s County, MD, and was selected as a participant in The Principals’ Center at
Harvard University in Cambridge, MA in July 2004. Dr. Williams earned her Masters of Arts
degree from Howard University in 1994 and graduated from Cheyney University in 1992.
Kennisha Gilbert, valedictorian for the class of 2006, is now in the 4th
term of Medical School at the University of Northumbria in Newcastle, England.
She was recently inducted into the Honors Society.
Dr. Philip T. K. Daniel is the William Ray and Marie Adamson Flesher endowed
Professor of Educational Administration and adjunct professor of Law at Ohio State University.
His research focuses on legal research techniques with expertise in education law, discrimina-
tion, and intellectual property including copyright, patents, and trademarks. In 1993,
Dr. Daniel received Ohio State’s highest honor for faculty, the Alumni Award for Distin-
guished Teaching, and was subsequently inducted into the university’s Academy of Distin-
guished Teaching. Dr. Daniel is the author of numerous refereed articles, book chapters, and
the co-author of Law and Public Education, Education Law and the Public Schools: A Com-
pendium. He earned his bachelor’s degree in social science from CU in 1969
with honors, his master’s and doctorate degrees in education from the Universi-
ty of Illinois and his Juris Doctorate from Northern Illinois University in 1990.
The Kirkland Family Legacy Lives on at CU
Cheyney University’s history is rich with varied traditions. Among the most
enduring are legacy families–those with many members who are CU gradu-
ates and who continue to promote its value over generations. One such tradi-
tion is the Kirkland family. Wilbur Kirkland’s (Class of 1969) four brothers
and a sister attended CU, joined by their mother after her children attended
college. In addition, Wilbur’s wife, Dr. Elaine Kirkland (Class of 1973 and
1976), earned both her undergraduate graduate degrees from CU.
The Kirkland family had eight boys and one girl. Leola, the daughter,
was the frst to attend CU and she graduated in 1968. “My father was a
southern minister and he was very protective,” said Wilbur. “So, when Leola went to Cheyney,
the next thing for me was to go and look after her.” Other family members who attended CU include
brothers Charles (class of 1973), Jack, Anzer (class of 1978),
and current State Representative Thaddeus (Class of 1991)
Kirkland, chairman of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black
Caucus. Two cousins are also CU graduates, as well as Wil-
bur’s nephew, Clarence Pearsall, Jr., who now attends CU.
=
Cheyney
Pride
student
Keystone Honors Student to Become Fulbright Scholar
Jill Telford, an English major at Cheyney University,
has been named a Fulbright Scholar. In this role, she
will serve as a teaching assistant in South Korea.
She will also work to complete her
master’s degree. A Keystone Honors
Academy Scholar, Jill is the author of
a book of poetry titled On the Verge
and was published in the bestselling
book Chicken Soup for the Teen Soul:
Real Life Stories by Real Teens.
A transfer student from Temple Univer-
sity, Jill appreciates the attention and
spirit she found at CU. “Cheyney Uni-
versity is like a family with a close-knit
bond,” she said. “I have never encoun-
tered any other university that offers so
many opportunities, such as studying abroad for free.
The professors are also great because many of them
have a passion for CU that is infectious.” Jill takes
advantage of the opportunities on campus as well, par-
ticipating in several CU groups including the Langston
Hughes Poetry Club and the Cheyney Record student
newspaper.
Among her many other honors, this Scranton, PA na-
tive received the Outstanding English Major award
from PASSHE. Jill plans to pursue her Ph.D. and to
become a university professor. She is also currently
working on a novel.
Sponsored by the U.S. Department of
State, the Fulbright Scholars Pro-
gram is the largest U.S. international
exchange program offering opportu-
nities for students, scholars, and pro-
fessionals to undertake international
graduate study, advanced research,
university teaching, and teaching in
elementary and secondary schools
worldwide. It was established in
1946 by the U.S. Congress to “en-
able the government of the United
States to increase mutual understanding between the
people of the United States and the people of other
countries.”
The Fullbright organization awarded approximately
six thousand grants in 2007, at a cost of more than
$262 million, to enable U.S. students, teachers, pro-
fessionals, and scholars to study, teach, lecture, and
conduct research in more than 155 countries, and to
enable their foreign counterparts to engage in similar
activities in the United States.
Walter Lewis took part in the Colgate Palmolive-NOBCChE (National
Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and
Chemical Engineers) undergraduate poster competition and placed third
in his category (Material Science & Biology), right on the heels of an
entry from Yale University.
His poster display was entitled: A Computational Process to Locate
IS Elements and Study Horizontal Gene Transfer in Bacterial Genomes.
Walter did his research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)
during internships in the summers of 2006 and 2007. His participa-
tion was arranged with the assistance of the Philadelphia Alliance for
Minority Participation (AMP). In addition, his research paper will be
published in their annual conference proceedings. He is also a mem-
ber of the Keystone Honors Academy and is a Humphreys Scholar.
CU Student Places in NOBCChE Competition
5
news
This spring, Cheyney University sent a varsity squad
of talented students to Orlando, Florida to com-
pete in the national championship tournament of the
Honda Cam-
pus All-Star
Challenge.
Celebrating its
18th year of
competition,
Honda Ameri-
can Motors
through the
Honda Cam-
pus All-Star
Challenge
brings together
members of
the education
community,
student partic-
ipants, alumni
and Honda
associates for
this academic
competition.
This exhilarating event showcased the academic excel-
lence of HBCU students across the country.
CU last competed in 2001, and began its re-entry into
the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge last fall with
a campus tournament involving ten teams of four
players who engaged in single-elimination rounds to
determine a campus champion. By successfully host-
ing a campus tournament with the requisite ten teams,
Cheyney University qualifed to advance to the feld
of 64 teams that competed for the national champion-
ship March 27-31, 2008 in Orlando.
Members of the winning campus team, along with
other top players at the campus level, were invited to
compete to represent CU on the varsity team. Elimi-
nations were held and out of the process, fve students
were selected for the varsity squad. Led by captain,
Homer Lane (Class of 2008, Social Relations major),
Cheyney University Competes in
Honda Campus All-Star Challenge
the other team members were Sharon Coleman (Class
of 2008, Psychology major), Chioma Ugwuegbulem
(Class of 2009, Education major), Garvin Reid (Class
of 2008, Busi-
ness Adminis-
tration major),
and Victoria
White (Class of
2009/ Psychol-
ogy major).
Dr. Tara Kent,
Dean of the
Keystone
Honors Acad-
emy, served as
campus coor-
dinator and Dr.
John Williams,
Dean of Grad-
uate and Con-
tinuing Educa-
tion Studies,
coached the
Cheyney Uni-
versity team.
The team met regularly to practice, to receive instruc-
tion and to review rules and strategies. Success with
this endeavor was truly a team effort, and faculty,
staff, and community volunteers came together to as-
sist in preparing our students.
Volunteers included faculty members Dr. Hazel Spears,
Dr. Gary Balmer and Dr. Deivy Petrescu. The team
also received assistance and valuable practical insights
from David Hogan, a local volunteer who participated
as an undergraduate in the 1990’s on a national cham-
pionship team representing perennial winner Florida
A&M University.
Since the inception of Honda Campus All Star Chal-
lenge, more than 50,000 HBCU students have partici-
pated, and Honda has awarded nearly $5 million in
grants to HBCUs. Cheyney University is proud to pre-
pare its students for national academic competitions!
The Cheyney University 2008 Honda Campus All-Star Challenge team with Chioma
Ugwuegbulem (2009, Education major); Garvin Reid (2008, Business Administra-
tion major); Victoria White (2009, Psychology major); team captain, Homer Lane
(2008, Social Relations major); and Sharon Coleman (2008, Psychology major).
ó
Cheyney
Pride
student
Members of the Cheyney University women’s tennis
team went to the Arthur Ashe Tennis Center in Phila-
delphia to participate in the Love 2 Serve program. The
Lady Wolves tennis team not
only instructed the youngsters
in tennis fundamentals, but also
served as tutors and mentors.
“The children are always excit-
ing to work with. Their enthusi-
asm fuels my creative energy in
regards to different learning ap-
proaches. Playing tennis teaches
the inner-city children that there
are a variety of sports that can
take them to a collegiate level,”
stated Hana Wilder. “I’m grate-
ful to have a positive impact on future athlete-scholars.
The junior communications major should know because
she grew up in the program.
Love 2 Serve is a community partnership initiated by
Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education (AAYTE)
program. Through partnerships with the Philadelphia
Department of Recreation, the School District of Phila-
delphia, community leaders, parents, local churches
and other non-proft organizations, CU students have
helped provide hope to impover-
ished communities in North and
Southwest Philadelphia.
Youth at the sites are provided, at
no charge, year-round tennis in-
struction, enrichment activities,
homework help, healthy meals
and life skills training. In addi-
tion, a core group of 10-12 year-
olds are transported to the state-
of-the-art Arthur Ashe Youth
Tennis Center twice each week
for additional tennis and enrich-
ment activities in its Computer Learning Center.
“Simply put, this program combined my two pas-
sions in life–tennis and children,” commented tennis
team member Rhea Miles. “Although shy at frst, the
children (and their parents) soon opened up to us and
asked us to come again and again.”
CU Tennis Team Scores Big in Love 2 Serve
Cheyney University tennis team member Hana Wilder
shares a hug with Love2Serve program partcipants.
The student athletes of
Cheyney University are
no stranger to dedicating
themselves to the good
of the community, but in
March, several members of
the track and feld team do-
nated their time to Habitat
for Humanity to help build
a house in West Chester
for one of their own.
Head coach Tony Wrice
and members of his staff
along with team mem-
bers worked on a house in
West Chester for members of the Cheyney University
family. As it turns out, the home being constructed
was for the family of Jasmine Jones, a sprinter on the
CU track team. Her mom, Cassandra Jones, works as
a project manager for Collaborative Obesity Projects
Track Teams Partner with Habitat For Humanity
and Data Manager for the
National Science Foun-
dation-Building Engage-
ment and Attainment in
Mathematics and Sciences
(NSF-BEAMS) program
at Cheyney University.
“I would like to express
my sincere gratitude
to Coach Tony and the
CU track team for vol-
unteering to help on the
construction of my new
home,” Cassandra Jones
said. “The team displayed
exemplary discipline, kindness and a genuine attitude
of helpfulness– and we had fun. I was so proud of our
Cheyney University family because they really ex-
pressed the spirit of family and the feeling of Cheyney
Pride to me! I will never forget it!”
7
news
CU Men and Lady Wolves End
Basketball Season on High Notes
Coaches Hill and Brown Named
2007-08 PSAC Coaches of the Year
Cheyney University Basketball Coaches Darryl Brown and
Cleo Hill, Jr. were named Coach of the Year by fellow coaches
in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC).
Brown, in his second year at the helm of the Lady Wolves,
posted CU’s best season in 18 years. The Lady Wolves made
the PSAC tournament and defeated West Chester University
and Kutztown University, teams they haven’t beaten in 17
years. Cheyney University ended the season with a mark of
11-16 overall and 7-5 in conference play.
Cleo Hill, Jr. has guided the men back to the NCAA Tourna-
ment. It’s the Wolves second appearance in the tournament
under Hill and Cheyney University’s 20th appearance overall.
The Wolves won the PSAC East Title and were awarded the
number one seed during the conference tournament.
Hill has also gained recognition this year as a result of the
ESPN documentary, Black Magic, which chronicles the Civil
Rights Movement through the eyes of HBCU basketball play-
ers and coaches of the era. Hill is the son of Cleo Hill, Sr.,
Winston-Salem State University and CIAA legend.
The last time a men’s and women’s Coach of the Year was
awarded to the same school was in 2005. Millersville coaches
Fred Thompson and Mary Fleig were bestowed the honor.
Ed Braswell, Robbie Simpson, Tyrone Smith, Danielle Jones and Stephanie Orji all received post
season recognition from the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) coaches. Braswell
and Simpson were named frst team All-PSAC East, and Smith was named to the second team.
Braswell and Simpson average 14.3 and 14.0 points per game respectively. Simpson, a junior
from Louisville, KY, ranks second in the conference in feld goal percentage. Braswell is the top
three-point shooter in the conference. The graduate of Olney H.S. is converting 60.9% of his at-
tempts (148-243). He has made 62 of 142 (.437). Smith leads the conference in minutes played per
game. The sophomore guard from Philadelphia’s Simon Gratz H.S. plays almost 37 minutes per
contest, ranks fourth in the conference in steals and eighth in assists. Standing only 6-2, Smith
ranks second on the team in rebounding, grabbing 6.0 boards per game.
Jones and Orji were named All-PSAC East to the frst and second team respectively. Jones, a
senior, led the Lady Wolves in scoring and to a third place fnish in the PSAC East. A Phila-
delphia native, Jones averaged just under 11 points per contest. Cheyney fnished the sea-
son with a mark of 7-5 in the conference and 11-16 overall. It was Cheyney’s best fnish in 18
years. Last season, Jones was a second team selection. Orji was named second team All-PSAC in
voting by the conference coaches. Orji, a transfer from Delaware State, averaged 7.2 points and
6.7 rebounds per contest. Orji also led the Lady Wolves in blocked shots (34) and steals (73).
Orji
Jones
Braswell
Smith
Simpson
8
by Rebekah Nesmith, CU Keystone Honors Student
Dr. Cornel West is an educator, acclaimed author, and
most notably to me, an activist for social reform. He
graduated from Harvard, and then earned a degree in
philosophy from Princeton University, where he now
The Keystone Honors Academy hosts
An Evening
teaches religion and African-American Studies. His
most well known contemporary books are Race Matters
and Democracy Matters. He has routinely challenged
the ideas of democracy, imperialism, and the systemic
dichotomy of American culture. He is well known in our
community as part of the intellectual tradition of Black
Dr. Cornel West “Unsettles” Cheyney Audience
9
Challenging
and
Profound
West reminds the CU community of
our history of strength and dignity
and the responsibility to continue
the legacy of justice and love.
civil rights leaders and educators.
Today, he is usually one of the loud-
est voices aroused in repercussion of
social injustice.
I was among several Keystone Hon-
ors students who had the opportunity
to dine with Dr. West. Standing in
Carnegie Hall on the Historic Quad,
waiting with everyone else for Dr.
West to arrive, there was a nervous
energy in the room. I thought about
how to possibly welcome someone
who has had such a vast effect on the
lives of African Americans. I asked
myself, “How would you greet Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.? How would
you receive Ida B. Wells? What can
be said to such an individual, who
has walked in the same paths as such
African Americans so paramount to
the cause and so instrumental in the
struggle of African Americans in
this country?”
Everyone who arrived wore their
excitement and anticipation of the
evening on their faces. People
crowded together to exchange stories
of a past chance meeting, confessed
how many books they owned, and
conversed about an idea that they had
read in one of his books.
Dr. West arrived, and the entire
room watched, as this man, who has
almost become synonymous with
the struggle, courteously bowed
and thanked us for coming and for
receiving him. He sincerely called us
“brothers” and “sisters,” graciously
signed books, and allowed everyone
present to take his picture. He was
perfectly, and profoundly humble,
and I was in awe of his earnest and
genuine demeanor. And not just
that…I was amazed by the fre that
animated him. It wasn’t a fre like
anger or resistance….and I was curi-
ous as to what fed this fre.
Sitting at the table with Dr. West was
like sitting with family after dinner.
We discussed politics and the state of
African Americans in this country.
He explained how it was time for the
older generation of African-Ameri-
can leaders to step aside and allow
the youth to stand up and take the
responsibility of leadership. We won-
dered who amongst our generation
would rise to take on such respon-
sibility. As we continued our con-
versation with Dr. West, it became
clear to us. We must all be the ones
to continue the legacy…the legacy
of struggle, the legacy of justice, and
as he so brilliantly phrased it, the
“legacy of love.”
Dr. West told the audience that he
came to “unsettle” us. He didn’t
want us to sit in our seats, nodding in
agreement, unaware of his message.
He came to rouse us.
It was after listening to his stirring
address in Dudley Theater to a full
house of enthusiastic Cheyney stu-
dents, faculty, and visitors that I real-
ized that this man–a soldier for jus-
tice, yet modest enough to recognize
everyman as his brother–had a fre
that arose from the core of a ferce
love; a love for justice, for traditional
African-American Christian beliefs,
and a love for his people.
He explained that when you learn,
you are changed, the “old self dies,
and the new self emerges.” I real-
ized that this “legacy of love” that
he spoke of nourishes us as we grow,
protects us when we are in danger,
and sustains us as we struggle. It is
something that we must now pass on
to every new generation!
with Dr. Cornel West
Original photo by
Senior Keystone
Honors student
Talib Hester
lu
Cheyney
Pride
student
Cheyney University is now offering you the opportunity
to move forward academically, professionally, or simply
enrich your life through a variety of courses designed to
be convenient, fascinating, and FUN!
CU In The Summer provides you an excellent opportuni-
ty to further your education, acquire new skills, explore
your potential and broaden your interests through our
academic, continuing education programs and activities.
Entrepreneurism and sports
camps and college-level aca-
demic courses will be held
at either the main campus in
Cheyney, PA, or the CU Urban Center
in the Mellon Building at 8th & Market Streets.
To see what is available, download an application and
register for camps or classes, visit www.cheyney.edu.
Make Your Summer Count at CU!
Through a funding collaboration between the Penn-
sylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE),
Title III and Target Corporation, CU has launched the
Cheyney Internship Institute this spring. Coordinated
by the Center for Career & Professional Development,
the Internship Institute plans to have 25 CU students
participating in summer internships in a variety of
industries this year. Mark Stewart joined Cheyney Uni-
versity in April as the new Internship Coordinator.
Students participating in the Internship Institute receive
a host of benefts that will help to prepare them for life
after college including a $500 stipend, access to more
than 30 online internship databases for all majors and
one-on-one professional coaching sessions. In addition,
they also have the opportunity to participate in on-cam-
pus interviews and eDiscover career assessment projects.
Internship Institute students are required to attend
Introducing the 2008 Cheyney Internship Institute
career workshops as well, on necessary topics such
as Resume Development, Goal Setting, Interviewing
Techniques, Business Etiquette & Workplace Protocols,
Career Research and Job Search, and Teamwork and
Positive Partnerships.
Current Institute participants include Anesha Edwards,
a rising junior, who will intern with the Delaware Val-
ley River Authority; Tarik Brooks, junior, who will
intern with Bucks County Courier Times; and Chioma
Ugwuegbulem who will intern in Human Resources of
Charming Shoppes this June. Student internship accom-
plishments will be recognized during CU’s frst Intern-
ship Institute graduation scheduled for fall 2008.
Technology support for the program including comput-
ers, the Optimal Resume software and access to intern-
ship websites was provided through a $5,000 grant from
the Target Corporation.
Debut of New CU Literary Journal
The Alpha Nu Rho Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International
English Honor Society, has compiled a collection of original art and
literary works contributed by CU students. Literary Voices is planned
for release in print and online this spring 2008. The publication will
feature the best poetry, short stories and art of the many excellent
student writers at CU.
One such writer, published author and Fulbright Scholar Jill Tel-
ford, not only contributed to the content, but created the cover art
as well (see story on page 6). Copies will be available through the
society’s advisor, Assistant Professor Tamara Hollins of the Com-
munication and Modern Language Department.
ll
news
Students to watch:
Fogwe Fomunyan, is medical school bound! Class of 2007, and the valedictorian
of his class, Fogwe has been admitted to the Temple University School of Medicine. Fogwe has
interviewed with a number of medical school programs, and although he has not yet decided
which school he will attend, he is a candidate for the Bond-Hill Graduate School Scholarship,
which provides recipients with full tuition, fees and books for graduate study, the average cost
of which is $140,000.
Fogwe was a member of the Keystone Honors Academy, the Student National Medical Soci-
ety, Alpha Kappa MU Honors Society, Students of All Nations, and a Building Engagement
and Attainment in Mathematics and Sciences (BEAMS) scholar. While earning his bacca-
laureate degree in chemistry, he successfully completed a Nanofabrication Manufacturing
Technologist Certifcation program through the Department of Engineering at Penn State
University. He also received an Associate Degree in Material Chemistry from Cheyney Uni-
versity. He was a recipient of the annual award for excellence of the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Chemi-
cal Society and was elected to Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges in 2007.
Brittany Fox, (class of 2008) has achieved success in academics, leadership and inter-
national study during her undergraduate experience at Cheyney University. A member of the
Keystone Honors Academy, Brittany stands out as one of CU’s best!
As a Business Administration major, Brittany has accrued an exceptional set of credentials
and has earned a sterling reputation amongst the faculty at Cheyney University. Brittany
intends to pursue a dual degree in Business Administration and International Affairs with a
focus on economic and political development. She is the frst CU student to be awarded the
Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship, which provides exposure to interna-
tional economic development and public policy issues. Brittany was also awarded the pres-
tigious Gilman Scholarship for her studies at Cambridge University in England. Brittany
has also studied in Ghana, an experience she credits with shaping her career goals.
Brittany’s academic credentials also stand out, as a she has maintained a 4.0 cumulative GPA and
has presented papers at national and local conferences on international and women’s affairs. Brittany was also a
fnalist for the 2008 Syed R. Ali-Zaidi Award for Academic Excellence, a system-wide scholarship program.
Garvin Reid, (class of 2008) has been selected to serve in the Peace Corps as a fnan-
cial advisor in sub-Saharan Africa. A Business Administration major, member of the Keystone
Honors Academy, and a Humphreys Scholar, Garvin’s academic accomplishments are com-
mendable. With his future in focus, Garvin has developed an exceptional working portfolio
while a student at Cheyney University. During the summer of his sophomore year, Garvin
served as an intern with the Washington Center, an organization that selects highly-motivated
interns for placement in government, business and the non-proft organizations.
During the summer of his junior year, Garvin served in a paid internship with in the Global
Wealth Management Program with Morgan Stanley. Garvin has also attended national con-
ferences focused on professional development, including the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship
Fund Leadership Institute, and the Fattah Conference on Higher Education. Exemplifying
Garvin’s ability to successfully manage academics with his professional interests, Garvin has
served as a student ambassador for the Thurgood Marshall College fund during his senior year, and he is also
an entrepreneur and co-owner of a student-run photography business, Y-Me.
l2
The newly formed Consumer and Applied Sciences
(CAS) Department houses the growing programs of
Fashion Merchandising and Management (FMM)
and Hospitality, Restaurant and Tourism Manage-
ment (HRTM). The program coordinators for the
two programs are Dr. Vanessa Brantley
(FMM) and Professor Madeline Murphy
(HRTM). In addition, Professor Seung
Lee is a faculty member in the HRTM
Program.
The CAS Department is located in Har-
ris Turner on the 2nd foor. The depart-
ment features the FMM Merchandis-
ing Lab and the Cheyney Inn and Grill
(HRTM Food Services Lab), formerly
the “Wolves’ Den.” Both labs utilize a
student-focused teaching philosophy
whereby learning is “applied” both in
theory and practice.
Fashion Merchandising and Manage-
ment (FMM) majors study the high-en-
ergy feld of the global apparel industry.
Students are introduced to the fast-paced
marketplace of fashion from New York to
London to Paris, and even mainland China. Courses in
the Fashion Merchandising and Management Program
prepare majors to become apparel buyers, fashion
merchandisers, apparel and textile managers, fashion
directors, consultants, and fashion industry entre-
preneurs. FMM majors have the opportunity to meet
executives from major apparel retailers and manufac-
turers, such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Jones Apparel
Group. FMM majors also learn to master universally
applicable professional business protocols and practic-
es, engage in on-site internships, and have the oppor-
tunity to visit fashion industry offces
throughout the nation and the world.
Among recent successes of the pro-
gram, senior Jason Nurse and junior
Kiasha Thornton were named Wal-Mart
Scholars for 2008 and each received a
$5,000 award from the company. Stu-
dents in the program have earned pres-
tigious internships at many top compa-
nies, including Charming Shoppes, Inc.
and Bloomingdales.
Dr. Brantley serves as the Program Co-
ordinator for the Fashion Merchandis-
ing and Management Program. She has
restructured and expanded the program
to include more corporate support and
involvement. As of Fall 2007, the FMM
Program receives support from Wal-
Mart, Inc. Two FMM Wal-Mart Schol-
ars will be announced at the annual FMM Fall 2008
Open House.
Dr. Brantley was also an invited conference speaker
for the 1st Annual Libyan Women’s Empowerment
Workshop, and an invited think-tank participant for
Representatves of Wal-Mart present FMM students Kiasha Thornton
and Jason Neuse with awards of $5,000 each for excellence in FMM.
l3
the American Association of Family and Consumer
Sciences [AAFCS] Future Search Summit. In addition,
she currently serves as the Co-Chair of the SWOT
Location Analysis Student Paper Competition which
is sponsored by the American Collegiate Retailing
Association.
She is one of only two Florida Board of Regents and
Southern Regional Education Board Doctoral Scholar-
ship recipients and the frst to earn a degree under the
program.
The undergraduate degree program in Hotel, Res-
taurant and Tourism Management is designed to
prepare students for managerial positions in the hos-
pitality industry. It provides learning experiences
that will give students the basic skills necessary to
function at the management level in the hospitality
industry.
Courses and feld experiences increase students’
awareness of job opportunities in their chosen felds.
The program has just received its frst-ever accredi-
tation from the Commission for Programs in Hospi-
tality Administration, the only professional program
at Cheyney University to earn this honor.
Faculty, staff, administrators, alumni and guests
can dine in the “Cheyney Inn and Grill” lab facility
once a week, with menus and meals prepared and
served by the students, supervised by program coor-
dinator, Professor Madeline Murphy. Guests eagerly
give the students a critique of their menu, service
and presentation. The gourmet selections range from
soups and salads to entrees such as grilled salmon,
Louisiana blackened catfsh, Chicken Creole and
Chicken Marsalis, with deserts like red velvet cake
and apple pie.
Although the food is equal to fne restaurants, prices
are kept much more affordable for the CU com-
munity, beginning at a mere $3 for lunches. Spe-
cial events can also be accommodated, such as the
High Tea recently hosted by the Cheyney University
Fashion Merchandising and Management program.
Courses include “Menu Planning and Analysis,”
“Gastronomies of the World,” “Catering,” and
“Quantity Food and Restaurant Sanitation.” The
program is now considering adding a gaming com-
ponent to its offerings for students looking to enter a
career in casino hotels and resorts.
Students in the program have gone on to gain in-
ternships and positions at many prestigious compa-
nies including Marriott International, Aramark and
the Walt Disney corporations.
Professor Madeleine Murphy, guest expert Chef Malachi from Metz
Catering and HRMM Students prepare to serve a feast ft for kings, or at
least the two PSAC Coaches of the Year, Darryl Brown and Cleo Hill, Jr.
l=
Campus
>>ConneCTions<<
S T A Y I N G C O N N E C T E D
radio
WCUB
R
I
S
E
i
s
o
n
t
h
e
A small group of students, a microphone, pho-
nograph, record albums, and an old transmitter with
an annoying 60-cycle hum—that was WCSR,
Cheyney State Radio, a low-powered car-
rier current station that reached the dormi-
tories. There was a party atmosphere as
students played music, danced and ate in
the studio–but only when the equipment
was working and when students had the
inclination to go there. Occasionally,
when students wanted to complain about
campus problems, they went into the stu-
dio and aired their grievances. Technical
problems frequently interrupted program-
ming. Dr. Clarence Harris, a professor in the
former Industrial Technology department, continu-
ally repaired the aging equipment.
That was Cheyney Radio Past.
Then Dr. Harris retired and the radio fell silent…un-
til Dr. Marlen Livezey, coordinator of the Communi-
cation Arts program, began to write grant proposals.
Finally, with the prompting of (now retired) Business
Administration department professor Juliet Sawyer,
State Representative Michael Horsey, a CU alumnus,
provided the backing, and Livezey received $93,103
from the Department of Community Economic De-
velopment to set up a campus radio station—a pro-
fessional quality station--to air on cable channel 4.
WCUB is
Cheyney Uni-
versity’s cable
radio station.
Talk, news and
music programs
air throughout
campus on cable
television,
channel 4.
Brandon
Tymous (l),
Mickey Harris
(r) prepare to go
on the air with
their radio talk
show, Section
128 .
Enter Phil Pagliaro. A Hofstra graduate hired to over-
see the Telecommunications and Media Services at
CU, Pagliaro allocated the grant money to design and
establish the studio currently housed in Vaux Hall. He
continues to manage the technical operations for the
station, which operates under the call letters WCUB,
Cheyney University Broadcasting. With a viable fa-
cility now available, Dr. Livezey began working in
earnest to prepare students to present educational pro-
gramming that other students would want to listen to.
“Make them want to know what they need to know,”
is her challenge to the student broadcasters. Now, of-
fering a mix of talk and
music, students work
in teams to produce
shows.
Each semes-
ter the number of
students trained
to operate the
equipment grows. Each semester the number of
different shows increases. Each semester the loca-
tions where the shows can be heard increases, even
reaching students in the snackbar now. Each semester
the level of professionalism also increases.
This is Cheyney Radio Present.
Looking ahead, Dr. Livezey envisions cable broadcast-
ing programs into all of Chester County but especially
the community around CU. And with a little extra
funding for more equipment, she believes students will
eventually provide digital broadcasting from Cheyney
University to everywhere in the world. “When that
happens, we can revert to our earlier call letters,
WCSR. But then,” she adds, “the letters will stand for
Cheyney SATELLITE Radio.”
Original radio programming produced
by CU students for CU students.
A
r
t
Cheyney University’s Fine Arts Honor Society, the student chapter of the National Arts and Edu-
cation Association, collaborated with Alpha Psi Omega National Theatre Honor Society, Sigma
Tau Delta International English Honor Society; Alpha Nu Rho chapter, and Cheyney Univer-
sity’s Music and Communication Arts Departments to organize a student run/faculty advised
arts appreciation week (April 14 - April 19, 2008).
The “Green Inspirations” Arts Appreciation Week (G.I. Week) included a variety of
workshops, including a theatre workshop, a vocal music workshop and a digital print
workshop. The theme for this event was “Refective Harmony.” There was also
a mask-making activity where participants created one-of-a-kind
decorative masquer- ade masks to wear and Dueling Easels,
which pit stu- dents against one another as they
attempted to interpret and transform spoken
word onto canvas.
The celebration concluded with
“The Emerald City” Masquerade
Ball and Art Gala. The purpose of
this event was to promote environ-
mental health and preservation, and
to cultivate an increased interest
in arts education and aware-
ness through; cross-curricu-
lum communication, inter-
active workshops, cultural
advancement of knowledge,
professional development,
and fostering of leadership.
In addition, the Cheyney Uni-
versity Players had their per-
formance of “A Raisin in the
Sun” during the week. Di-
rected by Theatre Professor
Jann Ellis-Scruggs, it tells
the story of the trials and
tribulations of the Younger
family.
A week-long celebration of the Arts, environmental preservation and cultural
advancement gave Cheyney students a unique interactive learning experience.
Reflective
Harmony
Green Inspirations . . .
l5
Campus
>>ConneCTions<<
S T A Y I N G C O N N E C T E D
radio
WCUB
R
I
S
E
i
s
o
n
t
h
e
A small group of students, a microphone, pho-
nograph, record albums, and an old transmitter with
an annoying 60-cycle hum—that was WCSR,
Cheyney State Radio, a low-powered car-
rier current station that reached the dormi-
tories. There was a party atmosphere as
students played music, danced and ate in
the studio–but only when the equipment
was working and when students had the
inclination to go there. Occasionally,
when students wanted to complain about
campus problems, they went into the stu-
dio and aired their grievances. Technical
problems frequently interrupted program-
ming. Dr. Clarence Harris, a professor in the
former Industrial Technology department, continu-
ally repaired the aging equipment.
That was Cheyney Radio Past.
Then Dr. Harris retired and the radio fell silent…un-
til Dr. Marlen Livezey, coordinator of the Communi-
cation Arts program, began to write grant proposals.
Finally, with the prompting of (now retired) Business
Administration department professor Juliet Sawyer,
State Representative Michael Horsey, a CU alumnus,
provided the backing, and Livezey received $93,103
from the Department of Community Economic De-
velopment to set up a campus radio station—a pro-
fessional quality station--to air on cable channel 4.
WCUB is
Cheyney Uni-
versity’s cable
radio station.
Talk, news and
music programs
air throughout
campus on cable
television,
channel 4.
Brandon
Tymous (l),
Mickey Harris
(r) prepare to go
on the air with
their radio talk
show, Section
128 .
Enter Phil Pagliaro. A Hofstra graduate hired to over-
see the Telecommunications and Media Services at
CU, Pagliaro allocated the grant money to design and
establish the studio currently housed in Vaux Hall. He
continues to manage the technical operations for the
station, which operates under the call letters WCUB,
Cheyney University Broadcasting. With a viable fa-
cility now available, Dr. Livezey began working in
earnest to prepare students to present educational pro-
gramming that other students would want to listen to.
“Make them want to know what they need to know,”
is her challenge to the student broadcasters. Now, of-
fering a mix of talk and
music, students work
in teams to produce
shows.
Each semes-
ter the number of
students trained
to operate the
equipment grows. Each semester the number of
different shows increases. Each semester the loca-
tions where the shows can be heard increases, even
reaching students in the snackbar now. Each semester
the level of professionalism also increases.
This is Cheyney Radio Present.
Looking ahead, Dr. Livezey envisions cable broadcast-
ing programs into all of Chester County but especially
the community around CU. And with a little extra
funding for more equipment, she believes students will
eventually provide digital broadcasting from Cheyney
University to everywhere in the world. “When that
happens, we can revert to our earlier call letters,
WCSR. But then,” she adds, “the letters will stand for
Cheyney SATELLITE Radio.”
Original radio programming produced
by CU students for CU students.
A
r
t
Cheyney University’s Fine Arts Honor Society, the student chapter of the National Arts and Edu-
cation Association, collaborated with Alpha Psi Omega National Theatre Honor Society, Sigma
Tau Delta International English Honor Society; Alpha Nu Rho chapter, and Cheyney Univer-
sity’s Music and Communication Arts Departments to organize a student run/faculty advised
arts appreciation week (April 14 - April 19, 2008).
The “Green Inspirations” Arts Appreciation Week (G.I. Week) included a variety of
workshops, including a theatre workshop, a vocal music workshop and a digital print
workshop. The theme for this event was “Refective Harmony.” There was also
a mask-making activity where participants created one-of-a-kind
decorative masquer- ade masks to wear and Dueling Easels,
which pit stu- dents against one another as they
attempted to interpret and transform spoken
word onto canvas.
The celebration concluded with
“The Emerald City” Masquerade
Ball and Art Gala. The purpose of
this event was to promote environ-
mental health and preservation, and
to cultivate an increased interest
in arts education and aware-
ness through; cross-curricu-
lum communication, inter-
active workshops, cultural
advancement of knowledge,
professional development,
and fostering of leadership.
In addition, the Cheyney Uni-
versity Players had their per-
formance of “A Raisin in the
Sun” during the week. Di-
rected by Theatre Professor
Jann Ellis-Scruggs, it tells
the story of the trials and
tribulations of the Younger
family.
A week-long celebration of the Arts, environmental preservation and cultural
advancement gave Cheyney students a unique interactive learning experience.
Reflective
Harmony
Green Inspirations . . .

Campus
>>ConneCTions<<
S T A Y I N G
Cheyney University is joining a national initiative
designed to encourage more African-American males
to dedicate themselves to becoming much-needed
educators. The program, named MISTER (the Men-
tors Instructing Students Towards Effective Role
Models), backed by the State Department of Educa-
tion, will offer scholarships for students who commit
to the critical, yet often-bypassed profession. State
Rep. James Roebuck, chairman of the House Edu-
cation Committee, was infuential in obtaining the
grant for CU.
Cheyney University is one of four HBCUs to join the
program, which began at South Carolina’s Clemson
University as a strategy to recruit teachers under the
direction of Dr. Roy Jones.
The mission of the program is to increase the pool of
available teachers from a broader, more diverse back-
ground particularly among the lowest-performing el-
ementary schools. Student participants are largely se-
lected from among underserved, socio-economically
disadvantaged and educationally at-risk communities.
The program will be open to all students who are
Cheyney University Receives $1 Million
“Call Me Mister” Grant to Train New Teachers
enrolled at Cheyney University, not just males. Due
to the low number of males who choose teaching as
a profession, especially African-American males, the
program is critical for providing much-needed role
models for young students.
“We plan to enroll approximately
20 students in the program,” said
Cathine Garner-Gilchrist, dean
of the School of Education at CU.
“Students who participate in the
program will receive valuable help
to prepare for the PRAXIS teacher
certifcation test.”
Qualifed students who enroll in the
Call Me MISTER program at the
University will receive a scholar-
ship, and room and board, and a sti-
pend. They will be required to stay
in the Commonwealth of Pennsyl-
vania and teach in a public elemen-
tary school.
Jones is a lecturer and project direc-
tor for the Eugene T. Moore School
of Education’s Call Me MISTER
program at Clemson University.
Previously, Dr. Jones was associate professor in the
Division of Education at Clafin University in Or-
angeburg, S.C. Dr. Jones served as chair of the Divi-
sion of Education during the period Clafin received
the distinction of becoming the frst historically black
private institution in the State to receive the National
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Educa-
tion (NCATE) accreditation. From 1990 to 1998, he
has also served as Director of Employment for the
Charleston County School District and was responsi-
ble for the district’s teacher and classifed recruitment
programs.
Throughout his career, Dr. Jones has successfully
implemented and directed numerous programs in
higher education, and has presented countless work-
shops, seminars, forums, and panel discussions sur-
rounding racial and cultural issues in education.
Cheyney University Dean of Educaton Dr. Cathine Garner-Gilchrist (2nd from right) greets
(L to R) Clafin University teacher John Howard, Call Me Mister founder Dr. Roy Jones and
feld coordinator Winston Holton of the Call Me Mister program.
l7
C O N N E C T E D
Faculty & Staff Highlights
On March 19, 2008, Art faculty member Sebronette Barnes was the guest speaker at the Frederick Douglass In-
stitute at West Chester University. Her lecture, “Poetry in Motion: Paul Laurence Dunbar and Langston Hughes
in Song,” was accompanied by Professor Barnes’ audio recording “You Can Tell the World,” which was funded
in part by a 1999 PASSHE Faculty Professional Development Grant.
Dr. Zoe Spencer, Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, recently completed
her book “Just Critiquing The Game” Mental Colonialism, Urban Genocide: How Hip Hop Destroyed The Black
Community. It was accepted for publication by University Press. The distinguished Dr. Molef Asante has re-
viewed the manuscript and written the foreword for the work. The book should be available by the Spring 2009
Semester.
Dr. Marilyn Guidry of Social & Behavioral Sciences Department presented a paper at the Association of
American Geographers Annual Meeting on April 17, 2008 in Boston, Massachusetts, entitled, “A Summary
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Availability in South and Southwest Philadelphia Neighborhoods.” This research was
sponsored by the UPS Foundation.
The Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India (ICFAI), a non-proft organization involved primarily
in imparting quality education, will publish the article, “Structuring a Supportive Environment for Women in
Higher Education,” authored by Michelle Howard-Vital, Ph.D., and Deborah A. Brunson, Ph.D., in their Pro-
fessional Reference Book: Women, Education, and Empowerment: A Global Perspective. The expected date of
publication is April, 2008. The ICFAI books are designed to meet the requirements of working executives, re-
search scholars, academicians, students of professional programs in universities around the world.
Cheyney University welcomes Jeff Braxton as head football coach for the
Cheyney Wolves. Braxton is returning to CU after his second three-year stint at
Delaware State University. Earlier in his career Braxton spent one season under
CU Coach Chris Roulhac.
Braxton’s coaching career has seen stops throughout the East. In addition to
Cheyney University and Delaware State University, the Washington D.C. native
coached at Bowie, Hofstra (1997), Towson (1998), Fordham (1999), Wesley (1993-
94), Morehouse (1994), and Tennessee State (2005). Braxton earned a B.A. in
Communication Arts from Salisbury State and a M.A. in Education in 2004, and
is a member of the American Football Coaches Association and the Fellowship of
Christian Athletes.
“I’m grateful for the opportunity,” stated the new coach as he spoke before 50
friends, family, supporters and media at the press conference. “This team is going to be disciplined, spiritual,
academically sound and competitive. We are going to be rough and tough on the feld, and I’m going to love
them off the feld. If I can get these young men to be successful on the feld, they will be successful in life.”
With Braxton as offensive coordinator, Delaware State had a school-record 32 touchdown passes in 2000. That
season, the Hornets averaged 222.9 yards per game passing and 168.5 rushing. The 2000 Hornets also exceeded
40 points in fve games, tying a school record. Braxton realizes that the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
has some of the best football that Division II has to offer. “This is a blessing and I want to thank my wife, my
family, President Howard-Vital and Director of Athletics China Jude.”
CU Wolves Welcome New Head Football Coach
Head Football Coach Jef Braxton
l8
$200,000 and above
The Tom Joyner
Foundation
$100,000 and above
Friends Fiduciary
Corporation
$50,000 to 99,000
Family Planning Council
The Cheyney University
Foundation, Inc.
Verizon Foundation
$25,000 to $49,000
KBR Foundation
The Charles E. and
Shirley S. Marshall
Charitable Trust
$15,000 to $24,999
Cheyney University
National Alumni
Association
City Capital Corporation
Craig T. Welburn
Team Clean
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
$10,000 to $14,000
Independence Foundation
$5,000 to $9,999
Christian R. and Mary F.
Lindback Foundation
Maxine S. Coleman
Roland H. Coleman
Samuel Patterson
PFPC
Geri Vital
Michelle R. Howard-Vital
$1,000 to $4,999
Wallace C. and
Earlene Arnold
Robert W. Bogle
Murleen M. Blair
Baron Brockington
Lorita P. Brockington
Hermine O. Burris
Sharon L. Cannon
Dorcas A. Carter
Martha B. J. Carter
Rodney T. Carter
Charles Colbert
Congressional Black Cau-
cus Foundation, Inc.
Elsie S. Erwin
Theodore P. Erwin
GlaxoSmithKline
Foundation
Deborah Grand Chapter
O.E.S - PHA
Gloria J. Harley
Henry C. Harper
Elizabeth Berry Holmes
Ruth Ellen Johnson
Hessie J. Jones
Wilma H. Jones
Merck Partnership for
Giving
Rev. Dr. Joseph D.
Patterson, Sr.
Ella E. Ravnell
Clarence Ravnell
Delores R. Shelton
Rich Slinkard
Barbara Stallworth
Lawrence Stallworth, Jr.
Ronald L. Stewart
The Turner Family
Catherine J. Wade
Ann Gillis Waiters
Eugene Waiters
Harold C. Whitney
Etta R. Williams
Alice G. Wootson
$500 to $999
James Bell
Betty H. Camper
Darryl L. Coates
Ronnie H. Collins
Benjamin J. Dent
Anna A. Dorsey
Edward Fitzgerald
Joewana M. Freeman
Lawrence Green
Michelle H. Hall
Magnolia J. Highsmith
Gladys C. Hill
Denise S. Horton
Gary N. Horton
Jane Jordan
Purnell W. Lawrence
Rumford T. Lockman
Janet B. Manspeaker
Eddie N. Moore
Parente Randolph, LLC
Julius Reeves
Carolyn L. Smith
Susan A. Thomas-Holder
Pamela Tiller-Reeves
Carl M. Williams
Emmanuel Witherspoon
$250 to $499
Erick K. Acolatse
Kathryn L. Anderson
George W. Banks
James V. Brown
Sue M. Byham
Charles A. Biney
Ann E. Braxton
Ernestine H. Buck
Elisabeth A. Burton
James A. Cooke
Corporate Call Center, LLC
Valerie Epps
Harding Faulk, Jr.
Stanley F. Gay
Kenneth A. Gee
Lorna D. Horsey
International Tours and
Cruises
Dolores L. Knox
Kraft Employee
Involvement Programs
Marlen Livezey
Main Line Chamber of
Commerce
Jane C. Nelson
Helen F. Nichols
Russell D. Nichols
Wallace M. Pride
Wendy L. Realer
Wayne M. Richardson
David C. Riley
Marcia Robinson
Vincent F. Ruffn
Keith N. Singletary
James C. Solomon
Gary K. Stovall
Bruce Williams
Deborah V. Williams
Glorine Wilson
University of Maryland
Eastern Shore
Lola R. Younger
Honor Roll of Donors
The following pages recognize the many gifts and pledges of alumni, faculty, staff,
friends, parents, foundations and organizations that supported Cheyney University
of Pennsylvania during the period from July 1, 2007 through March 31, 2008.
Every gift is important! The entire CU community extends its thanks and grati-
tude for your interest and support of Cheyney University.
This list includes donors who made gifts directly to Cheyney University of Penn-
sylvania. Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, we apologize
in advance for any errors or omissions. To report a discrepancy or for more infor-
mation, please contact the Annual Fund Offce at 610-399-2154. Corrections and
additional names will be printed in a future issue of Cheyney Magazine.
l9
tion skills and I learned to
think critically at CU so I
was well prepared for the
analytical skills needed to
be successful in the job.”
Roland attributes his suc-
cess to determination,
which was often tested by
a challenging and sup-
portive CU faculty. “I
played basketball and
I always knew that Dr.
Oliver was going to call
on me the day after a big
game …and that I had to
be prepared. I was com-
pletely inspired by CU
faculty and determined to
rise to the challenges they
presented.”
“The teacher educa-
tion training I received at Cheyney University” notes
Roland, “transferred nicely into my career at ACME
which began in management training and evolved
into personnel operations and labor relations. After 17
years at ACME, I was recruited to the gaming indus-
try and worked for Caesar’s for 18 years.” Starting as
the director of employee/labor relations, Mr. Coleman
quickly rose to become corporate vice president for
human resources at Caesar’s World. He later became
involved in Caesar’s Development Corporation, trav-
eling nationwide to promote gaming. He became a
registered lobbyist in Illinois. By the time he retired in
1999, Mr. Coleman headed the Caesars, Hilton & Cir-
cus Circus efforts to advance gaming worldwide and
had oversight responsibility for staffng and perfor-
mance of Caesars Palace at Sea on Crystal Cruise Lines.
Maxine spent some 8 years in marketing at Smith-
Kline and used her training background to transition
to SmithKline’s Organization Development Group,
where she served as Director. After 17 years at Smith-
Kline she was recruited to M&M Mars as Director of
the Personnel Group and quickly climbed the cor-
porate ladder, becoming Vice President of Human
Resources after the frst year of employment there.
Ms. Coleman served as a member of the senior man-
agement team at Mars, responsible for human resource
operations in the US, Canada, and Mexico until her
retirement in 2000. Ms. Coleman also served as a
Cheyney University
alumni are showing ex-
traordinary generosity
by making exceptional
fnancial commitments
to increase access to
higher education. In
2000, Maxine and Ro-
land Coleman estab-
lished the Roland H.
& Maxine S. Coleman
Endowed Scholarship
at Cheyney Univer-
sity to beneft students
majoring in business
administration. The
Colemans established
the fund to thank CU
for providing the educa-
tional foundation upon
which their careers
soared and because
they wanted to provide fnancial support to promis-
ing students who were interested in pursuing careers
in business. “It was a struggle for our parents,” notes
Roland Coleman, “and being the frst in our families to
become college-educated, we wanted to make it easier
for others.”
Kesha Cattledge, a 2007-08 recipient of the Roland
H. & Maxine S. Coleman Scholarship, notes that the
Coleman scholarship was a key part of her funding
this year. A sophomore, Kesha is confdent, now more
than ever, that she will accomplish her dream of be-
coming an accountant and owning her own business.
“As the frst in my family to attend college, my educa-
tion means a lot to the entire family. I am deeply grate-
ful to the Colemans for helping to make my education
possible.”
Maxine and Roland Coleman came to Cheyney Uni-
versity in 1961 and 1962 respectively. After four years
at Cheyney University, these two would-be teachers
went out into the world and enjoyed long and success-
ful careers in business—Roland in labor relations and
personnel operations and Maxine in marketing and in
human resources.
“When we graduated in the mid-60s we thought teach-
ing was our only option. My plan was to get a job in
private industry to pay for graduate school. I started at
SmithKline as a market research assistant and never
looked back,” notes Maxine. “I had good communica-
Caring for the Present… Ensuring the Future
(Continued on page 24)
Extraordinary CU alumni, Roland (‘66) and Maxine Coleman (‘65)
2u
$100 to $249
Harold B. Adams
Shirley S. Adams
Adedoyin Adeyiga
Ameena K. Ali
Gladstone S. Alleyne
Darrell J. Andrews
Romella J. Arnold
Arthur M. Bagley
Dongkyu Bak
Etta G. Baldwin
Sylvester J. Ballard
Eleanor A. Barnes
Crystal B. Barnett
Arthur G. Baylor
John M. Beeson
Charlotte A. Beverly
Juanita M. Blakney
Samuel Blow
Andrea H. Boseman
Clarence K. Boseman
Elizabeth B. Boston
June C. Boswell
Janice M. Boulden
Brenda E.
Braithwaite-Tyler
Cleo N. Breeze
Dolores Brooks
Charlie Brown
Julius H. Brown
Oran V. Brown
Bradley J. Buchner
Ann W. Carter
George E. Carter
Herman L. Carter
Jessie C. Cave-Plummer
Alan B. Cherry
John Choice
James J. Christmas
Marilyn A. Clark
Maxine L. Colston
Milt Colston
Fanny Jackson
Coppin Club
Bernice E. Covert
O’Jetta C. Croswell
William A. Cunningham
Vivian D. Davidson
Albert G. Davis
Kenneth R. Dorsey
Brooks F. Early
Renee A. Easley-Sudler
Jacqueline Edmond
Hattie G. English
Alicia N. Estrada
Arthur J. Evans
Marjorie Feldman
Julianna L. Ferebee
Doris C. Fletcher
Mary B. Foley
Michele Freeland
Gwendolyn M. Freeman
Helen Garrett
Kim R. George
Ethel G. Green
Eleanor V. Greer
William Griffn
Robert N. Habershaw
Donald E. Hackney
Bruce T. Haggans
Carolyn C. Hall
Wade H. Hammond
Frances W. Harold
Carol L. Harris
Eunice Harris
Joan Harris
Renee L. Harrison
Arthur L. Henry
Freddie M. Holman
Walter N. Hopewell
Jacob L. Hopper
Donna J. Howard
Lionel S. Hoye
Marilyn D. Hunt
Evelyn R. Hurt
Annabelle W. Jackson
Ernest W. Jackson
Katherine C. Jackson
Yvonne Jackson
Barbara H. Jefferson
Marcus A. Joe
Harold Johnson
John A. Johnson
Walter W. Johnson
Emmit A. Jones
Marilee K. Jones
Audrey M. Keels
Thomas E. Kelley
Webster H. Kilson
Natalie E. King
Matthew C. Knowles
Steven Lane
Kathleen H. Lacey
Ann F. Lewis
Craig S. Lewis
Gaynelle T. Lewis
Rosalind R. Lewis
Verna Liott
Vincent Liott
Edward L. Livingston
Valerie S. Love
Phyllis Magill
William R. Magill
Barbara Marshall
Clarence A. Martin
Leroy N. McCarthy
Warren McMichael
Barbara C. Merriweather
Audrey G. Miller
Patricia G. Montenegro
Joan B. Monteverde
Ruth M. Moolenaar
Sterling Morse
National Grand Encamp-
ment United Order of
Tents JRG & JU
James H. Parker
C. W. Pearson
Spencer Peng
Pennsylvania State
Employees Credit Union
Ruby L. Perkins
Kim A. Perry
Theresa P. Pitts
Denise K. Poller
Linda M. Portlock
William R. Prillerman
Wesley C. Pugh
Yvonne A. Ragin
Jagjitnar S. Ranajee
Sulister S. Ranson
James A. Realer
Fedie R. Redd
James E. Rhone
Renee M. Richardson
Jean Richerg-Womack
Stuart J. Richman
Bentley Ritter
Marva W. Ritter
Jacqueline F. Roberts
Catherine L. Robinson
Helen L. Robinson
Sidney Robinson
Doris M. Ross
Lillian Ross
Ernestine J. Rouse
Ola W. Roy
Trina Russell
Gregory L. Samuels
James J. Saxon
Corliss T. Scipio-Pearson
Second Baptist Church
of Coatesville
James L. Shelton
Brenda P. Shields
DeWitte J. Shipley
Barbara A. Simmons
Stanley A. Simpkins
James G. Slaughter
Robert T. Smallwood
Cheryl Smith
Frank A. Smith
Wayman W. Smith
Dillard R. Statham
Melvin Steals
Carole J. Stevens
Hakim Stovall
Jamal Stovall
Marcellus Strothers
Rosemarie Stuart
Henrietta J. Stukes
Denise A. Swann
Ronald L. Swann
Charmaine Swarthe-Harris
Belinda Tate
Nathaniel L. Teagle
Melvin W. Thomas
Ethelyn L. Thompson
Gregory T. Thompson
Royanne P. Thorpe
Darlene E. Tolbert
Barbara E. Townes
Beverly R. Turner
Joel A. Turner
2l
Mabel Corrinne L. Turner
Robert L. Turner
Alvin Vaughn
Charlotte A. Washington
Janyce O. Washington
Ed Weathers
A. Elmira Webb
Deborah L.
Williams-Gordon
Justine F. Winslow
Ann H. Wolfe
Walter Womack
Harold T. Woods
Daniel Whyte
Mingna Xue
Geneva J. Young
Up to $99
Barry W. Adams
Lula B. Adams
Anthony P. Adusei
Fonda L. Akins
Richard L. Allen
Diane P. Anderson
Anonymous Donor
Adrean Bailey
Chuck A. Baker
Essie L. Ballard
Delois M. Barnes
Gerard Barnes
Gladys M. Baskerville
Ola S. Bass
Sharon M. Baukman
Sandra Y. Beale
Abdelaziz Bior
Paulette Blackson-Royster
Sherry L. Blake
Hattie Bolden
Arthur F. Bowman
Pamela Bracey
Germaine J. Branch
Phyllis H. Britton
Frederick Brooks
Oran V. Brown
Terry G. Brown
Veronica R. Brown
Raymond H. Bruton
Lindsay O. Bryant
Barbara D. Burke
Dennis L. Burton
Fayetta C. Butler
Shileen K. Bynum
Selmon Choice
Karen M. Clark
Marilyn Clark
Camelia A. Cobb
Diane L. Hines-Cooper
John C. Corbin
Patricia W. Cox
Jessica P. Daniels
Anella W. Davis
Susan J. Dennis
Catherine M. Dickerson
Courtney V. Fields
Barbara Finn
Naomi E. Floyd
James W. Freeman
Ayo Maria Gooden
Arlene L. Gregory
Faith J. Green
L. Roberta Greenhowe
Andrew R. Grier
Elizabeth Guzman
Ozzie Hackett
Marion Haliburton
Andrew Haman, Jr.
Tara Hamilton
Tyrone Hampton
Leonard J. Hansford
Keith J. Harden
Caryle C. Hawkins
Gail A. Hawkins-Bush
Millage B. Holloway
Agnes L. Nicholas Horton
Fred Horton, Jr.
Gladys H. Hulsey
Vincent S. Ianni
Dolores D. Jackson
Shon P. Jeffery
Brenda K. Jenkins
Wayne Jenkins
Helen R. Joell
Andrea Johnson
Helen S. Johnson
Jacqueline L. Johnson
Ruby F. Johnson
Marcia V. Jones
Jacqueline Grundy-Kennard
John W. Kennard
Stanley P. Kaciuban
Tara Kent
John L. Klenk
Renate La Duke
Steven J. La Duke
Rosita Lake
George R. Lakey
Richard Land
James A. Larmore
Alexander Laurencin
Felecia A. Laury
Lois A. Lawton
Alesia L. Lazorisak
John H. Leary
Michael C. Lee
Roger L. Leysath
Leysath Security Firm
Hermione C. Logan
Ian E. Logan
Thomas Logan
Sara W. Lomax
Mary H. Lucas
Lois A. Maloney
Eddie J. Manning
Edwin Maxwell
E. L. McCrary-Sanders
Rachel E. McDougald
Vivian McIver
Jacquelyn McPherson
Joan A. McPherson
Jacqulyene Miller
Madeline l. Murphy
Deborah Myers-Feigel
Charlena V. Newell
Shermen Newell
Caleb O. Nwosu
Elaine Opher
Sylvester Pace
Edward L. Parker
Linda L. Parks
Kim A. Perry
Matilda A. Petty
Carlyn B. Pitts
Frances B. Polk
Booker T. Poole
Gregory M. Pugh
Linda Quearles
Erika R. Ragland-Lee
Alphonso Randolph
Beatrice Y. Rice
Sherlyn D. Satterwhite
Walter W. Scruggs
Betty Carol Sellen
Antoinette B. Simpkins
Anthony W. Spells
Harriet A. Staten
Robert W. Stevenson
Omar Stovall
Ann R. Taylor
Delores Thompson
Herbert C. Thompson
Gregory T. Thompson
Jean H. Tiller
Gregory J. Toatley
Leonore B. Triplett
Bernice E. Tripp
Annette P. Walls
Ella A. Walters
Darlena E. Ward
Carole A. Wescott
David L. White
Marlin J. White
Jacqueline Williams
Kenneth Williams
Loretta S. Williams
Laura R. Wootson
Tony Wrice
Whitney T. Yancey
Does your
employer
match your
contribution?
If you or your spouse’s
company has a matching
gift program, your gifts
to CU can double or
even triple! For more in-
formation, contact your
HR department or
Ms. Donna Howard,
610-399-2154 or by email
donnahoward@cheyney.edu.
22
In addition to gifts from individuals, Cheyney Univer-
sity also receives support from foundations, corpora-
tions, and other organizations. These generous donors
help CU maintain its historic commitment to access,
opportunity and excellence.
Accent Communications
Cheyney University National Alumni Association
City Capital Corporation
Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc.
Corporate Call Center, LLC
The Cheyney University Foundation, Inc.
Deborah Grand Chapter O.E.S - PHA
Family Planning Council
Fanny Jackson Coppin Club
Friends Fiduciary Corporation
GlaxoSmithKline Foundation
Independence Foundation
International Tours and Cruises
KBR Foundation
Kraft Employee Involvement Programs
Leysath Security Firm
Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation
Main Line Chamber of Commerce
Merck Partnership for Giving
Parente Randolph, LLC
Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union
PFPC
Second Baptist Church of Coatesville
Team Clean
The Tom Joyner Foundation
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Verizon Foundation
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Special Gifts
Listed below are gifts made in memory, appreciation
and in honor of friends and loved ones from July 1,
2007 - March 31, 2008
In Memory of James B. Johnston
Tara Hamilton
Alesia L. Lazorisak
Carolynn B. Pitts
Betty Carol Sellen
Ann H. Wolfe
Supportive Foundations,
Corporations and Other
Organizations
Gifts In Kind
Gifts in kind provide important resources and go a
long way to strengthen Cheyney University. Listed
below are donors who made gifts in kind from July 1,
2007 - March 31, 2008
Accent Communications
Intuit Incorporated
Microsoft
Mercer Redcross
MERCK
METZ
Robert Traynham, II
Colemans — (continued from page 21)
visiting professor at HBCUs as part of the National
Urban League Black Executive Exchange Program for
more than 20 years.
These days, the Colemans spend their time volunteer-
ing, participating in sports activities, and traveling
to exotic locations in South America, Antarctica, the
Baltics, and beyond. Roland is a current member of the
board and former chairman of Seabrook House, a non-
proft organization dedicated to alcohol and drug reha-
bilitation. Maxine is Chairman of the board of WAVE
(Work, Achievement, Values, Education) which helps
at-risk youth stay in school, and is secretary of LEAD
(Leadership, Education and Development), an organi-
zation dedicated to linking top minority high school
students with major corporations and business schools
in a summer business institute.
“Giving to others is our way of investing in the fu-
ture and giving through endowment provides a secure
fnancial base of support for ongoing excellence at
Cheyney University. Roland and I benefted frst-hand
from the nurturing environment and standard of excel-
lence that has come to defne a Cheyney University
education. We wanted to ensure that young people who
are interested in pursuing careers in business have the
resources they need to obtain a quality education.”
_______________________________________
The scholarship created by Roland Coleman (’66) and
Maxine (Schaffer) Coleman (‘65) is awarded annually
to one male and one female Cheyney University student
based on academic achievement and fnancial need.
For information on contributing to the general CU schol-
arship fund, creating an endowed scholarship, or con-
tributing to an existing endowment fund, contact Donna
Howard in the Offce of Institutional Advancement at 610-
399-2154 or online at donnahoward@cheyney.edu.
23
CU Foundation Donates $50,000 for 2007-08 Year
Irving Bailey, president
of the Cheyney University
Foundation, presented a
$50,000 check to Presi-
dent Michelle Howard-
Vital and the CU com-
munity in September
2007 to help with the
strategic development of
signifcant relationships,
professional development,
and special initiatives of
the university that can-
not be funded from state
funds. Dr. Howard-Vital
expressed gratitude to the
Foundation for the sig-
nifcant contribution and
pledged to work collabor-
atively with the CU Foun-
dation to increase the
university’s endowment.
Congressman Sestak Brings $1.25 Million to CU
Congressman Joe Sestak (D-PA) demonstrated his
continuing support for Cheyney University when he
responded to President Howard-Vital’s appeal for as-
sistance by adding a $1,250,000 earmark for the uni-
versity’s George Washington Carver Science Center in
the Federal Energy and Water Appropriations Bill in
the US House of Representatives.
“The funds will be used to improve the infrastructure
and capacity of the Center in order to better prepare
underrepresented minorities in Science, Technology,
Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
disciplines,” President Vital said. “The
facility has not been updated since its
initial construction in 1967 and needs
to provide a more optimal environ-
ment for studying science, math and
technology.”
“By investing in the program we will
ensure that more minorities go into
science, engineering and mathemat-
ics,” said Congressman Sestak. “This
money will help improve the facilities
at Cheyney University and will encour-
age more students to pursue careers in these impor-
tant felds.”
The $1.25 million dollar earmark is part of a larger
appropriations package signed into law by President
Bush on December 26, 2007. For Cheyney University
to be considered for the earmarked fund, a sponsoring
legislator was needed. After recently visiting the uni-
versity and conferring with administration, Congress-
man Sestak stepped forward and included Cheyney
University in the appropriations bill.
2=
President Michelle Howard-Vital has launched a President’s Schol-
ars Scholarship Campaign with the goal of generating ten full
scholarships each year for talented students who are academically
capable, but financially unable to attend Cheyney University. These
awards will be four-year scholarships for students who excel in a
variety of areas such as music, art, hotel and restaurant manage-
ment, theatre, geographic information systems, and fashion mer-
chandising and management.
There are so many talented students who do not pursue college be-
cause they do not have sufficient funds to pay for college. President
Howard-Vital asks alumni, businesses, banks, and foundations to
contribute to the development of a well-educated talent pool for the
region and the nation by funding a $18,000 per year, full scholar-
ship for one student.
If you would like to pledge a scholarship or discuss your company’s
support for this program, please contact Dr. Michelle Howard-Vital
at 610-399-2220.
President Howard-Vital
calls upon community to
fund President’s Scholars
Scholarships

Football
August 30 BowieState,WadeWilsonClassic
Home 1:00pm
September 6 Mercyhurst Home 1:00pm
September 13 Gannon Home 1:00pm
September 20 C.W.Post Home 1:00pm
September 27 EStroudsburgAway 6:00pm
October 4 Kutztown Home 1:00pm
October 11 Millersville Away 1:00pm
October 18 Bloomsburg
HomecomingHome 1:00pm
October 25 WestChester Away 1:00pm
November 1 Shippensburg Away 1:00pm
November 8 Clarion Away 1:00pm
Volleyball
September 2 Kutztown Away
September 6 LockHaven Away
September 9 Shippensburg Home
September 16 EastStroudsburg Home
September 23 Millersville Home
September 25 WestChester Away
October 3 RegionalCrossover Away
October 4 RegionalCrossover Away
October 7 Kutztown Home
October 14 LockHaven Home
October 21 Shippensburg Away
October 23 EastStroudsburg Away
October 28 WestChester Away
November 4 Millersville Away
Cross Country
August 30 DelawareValley Away
September 6 Ursinus Away
September 13 CedarCrest Away
September 20 PhiladelphiaMetro Away
September 27 BelmontClassic Away
October 4 GoldeyBeacom Away
October 11 Cabrini Away
October 18 Cheyney Invitatonal Home
October 25 PSACChampionship TBA
November 1 NCAAEastRegional TBA
* Note: Athletc events are subject to change.
For most current informaton and details,
please visit the CU athletcs at
www.cheyney.edu.GoWOLVES!
Fall 2008 Cheyney University Athletic Schedule
Mark your calendar now to
be sure you don’t miss
any of the events during
Inauguration Week!
Show your support for
your Alma Mater when
Dr. Michelle Howard-Vital
is formally sworn in as
the eleventh president of
Cheyney University!
Inauguration Week will
include many exciting
special events from
October 5th through
October 11th, 2008.
The Investiture
Ceremony will take place on
Friday, October 10th, and the Inaugural Ball is scheduled for
the evening of October 11th at Longwood Gardens. Special hotel rates will be made available,
as well as transportation for elderly and disabled. During the Inaugural Week, performances,
festivals, exhibits, concerts and more activities are planned. Sponsoring opportunities for some
of these events are available! For further information, watch the Cheyney University web site
at www.cheyney.edu, or contact Ms. Sharon Cannon at 610•399•2057. It will be memorable!
P
l
a
n

t
o

B
E

t
h
e
r
e
!

President’s Cabinet
Michelle R. Howard-Vital, Ph.D., President
Bernadette Carter, Ed.D., Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs
Charles Colbert, Ed.D., Vice President for Finance and Administration
Valerie Epps, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs and Student Life
Eric Almonte, J.D., Executive Associate to the President
Barbara A. Simmons, J.D., Assistant to the President for Internal Relations and Social Equity
Cathine Garner-Gilchrist, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education
Tara Kent, Ph.D., Dean of the Keystone Honors Academy
Janet Manspeaker, Ph.D., Interim Dean of Arts and Sciences
Lut Nero, Ph.D., Dean of the Leslie Pinckney Hill Library
John Williams, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education
Sharon Cannon, M.Ed., Executive Director of Economic and Workforce Development Center
CounCil of trustees
Robert W. Bogle, Chairman
Dongkyu Bak
Lynette Brown-Sow
Lorna D. Horsey
Gary N. Horton
Senator Vincent J. Hughes
Chioma Ugwuegbulem
Robert Traynham, II
Samuel Patterson
Reverend Dr. Joseph D. Patterson, Sr.
Robert Wonderling
PASSHE Chancellor Judy Hample,
Ex Offcio
ensuring
the
future
university foundation
Irvin D. Bailey, Chairman
James E. Andrews, Vice Chair
Richard Sims, Treasurer
Elsie Erwin, Secretary
David B. Alston
Rodney T. Carter, Esq.
Theodore P. Erwin
Willie F. Johnson
Wilbur L. Kirkland
Carmen Martinez-Skinner
Samuel Patterson
President Michelle R. Howard-Vital, Ph.D.,
Ex Offcio
Board of Governors
Kenneth M. Jarin, Chairman
Aaron A. Walton, Vice Chair
C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni, Vice Chair
Representative Matthew E. Baker
Paul S. Dlugolecki
Daniel P. Elby
Ryan Gebely
Representative Michael K. Hanna
Senator Vincent J. Hughes
Marie Conley Lammando
Kim E. Lyttle
Joshua A. O’Brien
Christine J. Toretti Olson
Guido M. Pichini
Governor Edward G. Rendell
Senator James J. Rhoades
Gerald L. Zahorchak
1837 University Circle
P. O. Box 200
Cheyney, PA 19319-0200