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S PACE E NGINEERING P ROJECT - II (P7001R)

Preliminary Design Review

B HARANIDHARAN A SOKAN V INEEL K UMAR K ADARLA Z AHRA VAZIRI Z ANJANI

Supervisor : Alf Wikstr m o

D IVISION OF S PACE T ECHNOLOGY L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY O CTOBER 7, 2011

B.Asokan,V. Kadarla and Z.Vaziri October 7, 2011

Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement Probe

Table of Contents
1 Introduction 1.1 Document Overview . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Experiment Objectives of the Mission 1.2.1 Primary Objectives . . . . . . 1.2.2 Secondary Objectives . . . . . 1.3 Scientic Background . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 Financial Support . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6 Team Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 11 11 11 11 11 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 15

Experiment Description 2.1 Experiment Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Modes of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.1 Idle Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.2 Flight Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Hardware Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Onboard Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Ambient Pressure Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3 Ambient Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . 2.3.4 PTU Sonde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.5 ETAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.6 Magnetometer to be built . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.7 Reference Magnetometer for Calibration . . 2.3.8 Hardware block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Software Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.1 Operating System & Programming Language 2.4.2 Flight Software Design . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 TT&C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 Electronic Ground Support Equipment . . . . . . . . 2.6.1 Receiver Equipment for ETAG . . . . . . . . 2.6.2 Graphical User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 Mechanical Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.1 Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 Power System Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1 Choice of Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9 Thermal Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing Facility Launch Campaign 4.1 Experiment Preparation . . . . . . . . 4.2 Experiment Time Events during ight 4.3 Operational Data Management . . . . 4.4 Post Flight Activities . . . . . . . . . Finance details

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B.Asokan,V. Kadarla and Z.Vaziri October 7, 2011

Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement Probe

Project Planning 6.1 Work Breakdown Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conclusion And Future Work

15 15 15 16 18 19

References Appendix

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List of Figures
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Organization of the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . Experimental Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . On Board Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vaisala Radiosonde RS92 D . . . . . . . . . . . ETAG Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Equation for magnetic eld . . . . . . . . . . . Magnetic eld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flight Software Design diagram . . . . . . . . . Ground Station of ETAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structure of ATM Probe . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schematic of power circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . Experiment Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Work Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Schematic of the Onboard Computer . . . . . . . ATM Probe Gantt Chart showing current progress Duracell Battery of 9V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Saft Li-ion Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4 5 6 6 7 7 8 10 10 12 12 14 16 20 21 22 23

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List of Tables
1 2 3 Choice of the batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Financial details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Division of Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 15 16

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Introduction

The Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement (ATM) Probe shall be launched on a Stratospheric balloon as a part Student Experiment of EXUS-B program in January 2012.Through this program ATM probe shall investigate the change in turbulence of the atmosphere, the composition of the atmosphere with the sensors on board.The vision is to develop a small platform weighing less than 4 Kg including the structure and providing the provision for the payload maximum of 1.5 Kg for Scientic Experiments.This mission investigates the miniature technology for scientic experiments, rather than the purely scientic objective.

1.1

Document Overview

This document initiates with an introduction to the mission, objectives, scientic background and the support. Chapter 2 throws insight into the experimental description of the mission, beginning with the modes of the operation, Hardware design diagrams, Software design ow, Power system unit design, Payload introduction and its interfaces.Along with these Hardware & Software description, Mechanical and Thermal system design strategies are also presented. Chapter 3 gives introduction to the test facility. Launch campaign details are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 throws light in the estimated budget at the initial stage of the design. Chapter 6 explains about our work methodology and project planning until CDR stage. Furthermore, the conclusion as of now are made in Chapter 7. Last but not least, References and Appendix are listed in the end of the document.

1.2

Experiment Objectives of the Mission

The primary objectives of the experiment is to collect atmospheric turbulence data by the means of a magnetometer which will be mounted on a platform. The secondary objectives will involve analyzing data obtained by the ATM Probe. 1.2.1 Primary Objectives

The Primary Objectives shall be: To design and build a magnetometer suitable for measuring small variations in the geomagnetic eld and estimate it with the commercially off the shelf available 3-axis magnetometer. To design and build a Cube prototype weighing less than 4.0 kg in total demonstrating the low cost scientic platform. Providing provision for the experimental payload weighing to the maximum of 1.5 kg. 1.2.2 Secondary Objectives

The Secondary Objectives shall be: To analyze the data from the ATM probe, which includes wind directional data from ETAG and magnetic eld strength from magnetometer (built). To analyze the data from the PTU sonde which gives the combined measurement of pressure, temperature and humidity of the atmosphere and in turn relate them together with magnetometer parameters for the measurement of turbulence in the atmosphere.

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1.3

Scientic Background

Turbulence is among the most chaotic and unknown elds of science. The air motion in the boundary layer of the atmosphere on the earths surface is typically in the category of atmospheric turbulence. Turbulence has its advantages and disadvantages. It is important in designing airborne machines such as airplanes and balloons. If the wing area of airplanes is too big, turbulence can break it and cause fatal accidents. It also affects the vision of telescopes on earth and satellites taking pictures of earths surface experience geometric distortion and blur. However, turbulence is important in dissipating pollution, heat and water vapor. [1] Atmospheric turbulence is described as small scale, irregular motion of air in layers of the atmosphere. It strongly depends on wind direction and speed as well as geographical features such as mountains and the overall weather. On sunny days the radiation from the sun heats the air near the earths surface. The cooler air in higher levels replaces the warm air near the surface and this vertical motion as well as horizontal motion due to ups and downs on the surface E.g., mountains, creates turbulence. The irregularity of air motion peaks at midday when the solar radiation is at its maximum. [2] There have been many experiments done in order to measure atmospheric turbulence. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed Best Aircraft Turbulence Probe (BAT). It is low cost and adaptable to any plane. [3] Lockheed Martin advanced technology center has measured atmospheric turbulence over a horizontal path using black fringe wave front sensors. [4] Atmospheric turbulence has also been measured via the MST Radar at Gaddanki, India with the dualbeam method. [5] It can also be measured by means of light, sound and radio waves. [9] In our experiment we have decided to measure the vertical turbulence throughout the different layers of the atmosphere via an Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement (ATM) probe. Onboard this probe there is a magnetometer which is sensitive to very small changes in the geomagnetic eld. As the probe is descending in the atmosphere via a parachute, it will experience turbulence. The turbulence is measured by comparing the data from our magnetometer with the geomagnetic eld, showing small scale perturbations. Other sensors onboard measure pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed, wind direction and geographical features. The turbulence will then be plotted as well as these pressure, temperature, humidity and wind and we will try to nd the relationship between atmospheric turbulence and the mentioned factors.

1.4

Technical Support

The Supervisors for this project include Alf Wikstr m & Kjell Lundin, who have been yardstick in o Swedish Space Industry (Esrange Space Center, IRF) for more than three decades. Currently they are employed by Division of Space Technology, LTU as part time Faculty to supervise student projects for both balloon and rocket ights which are part of Space Engineering Project II.

1.5

Financial Support

Division of Space Technology, LTU is the primary organization for this mission.The initial funding available for the procurement of the necessary components/devices for the accomplishment of mission is 2,500 SEK.

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Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement Probe

1.6

Team Organization

The Organization of the team is as shown in the Figure 1.

Figure 1: Organization of the Team

Experiment Description

The experiment is presented here with the chapters demonstrating the overview, modes of operation, hardware design and the summary of key devices used and their budgets of mass, power and data along with the interfaces are discussed.Finally apart from these, the software design aspects and TT&C issues are also addressed.

2.1

Experiment Overview

To achieve the objectives, ATM probe has two primary segments: Main Payload (On Board Computer) and the Ground Segment (GS). A System diagram presented here explains such topology in Figure 2.

2.2

Modes of Operation

The mission has been planned to operate in two functional modes in ascent and descent times of the ATM probe on Balloon and parachute respectively. 2.2.1 Idle Mode

Idle mode is activated in ascent time of the ight, where the experiment is set to power-safe mode. In this mode, almost all active components of the payload are switched off. Only the systems running would be ambient pressure & temperature sensors for system health monitoring and GPS of the main L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY 3

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Figure 2: Experimental Overview

payload is never let power down. The communication links between ground station to the main payload is fully functional at every instant. This helps us to keep track of the pressure & temperature built interior of the structure. The Operator at the ground station can deploy the parachute if the ambient pressures and temperatures are beyond normal operational levels. 2.2.2 Flight Mode

Flight mode is activated after deployment of the parachute. Once after activation, the payload starts data acquisition from the sensors apart from those which are already in functional mode. PTU Sonde collects information of the external pressure, temperature and humidity, whereas the 3-axis magnetometer gives the input of voltages to ADC pins of the payload in correspondence to the magnetic eld experienced in its ight duration. The data will be stored in a SD card while transmitting the house keeping data to the ground station

2.3

Hardware Design

The Hardware of Payload is important to accomplish the requirements of the mission, i.e., collecting, processing and sending data on a local atmosphere to a ground station. The data acquisition and functioning of all sensors of Payload is critical for a mission to be Successful. The sensors are to be mounted on PCB and shall connect the Onboard Computer through an interface. 2.3.1 Onboard Computer

The Hardware design for this mission is based on the commercially off the shelf available MAPLE RET6 open source development board from LeafLabs, LLC is as shown in Figure 3. L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY 4

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The board is powered with a 32-bit ARM Cortex M3 microprocessor from ST Microelectronics which runs at 72 MHz.Versatile peripheral interfaces such as 2 SPI, 2 I2C, 3 USART and 15 ADC pins at 12 bit resolution made us to choose this development board. The board operates at 3.3 V and has dimension of 5.5cm 5.2cm which exactly ts in our requirement for proposed C UBE structure and low power consumption. [8]

Figure 3: On Board Computer

The schematic of the Onboard computer is as shown in the Figure 15 at the end which is listed in Appendix. 2.3.2 Ambient Pressure Sensor

The MPX 4115A pressure provides an output voltage analogous to the pressure developed, which has to be connected to one of the 15 ADC pins of the micro controller. The ADC of the controller has a resolution of 12 bit. [21] 2.3.3 Ambient Temperature Sensor

The DS1621 digital thermometer and thermostat provides 9-bit temperature readings, which indicate the temperature of the device.The Thermal alarm output TOU T , is active when the temperature of the device exceeds a user-dened temperature TH. The output remains active until the temperature drops below the user dened temperature TL, allowing for any hysteresis necessary. User-dened temperature settings are stored in nonvolatile memory so parts may be programmed prior to the insertion in the system.Temperature settings and readings are all communicated to/from the DS1621 over a simple 2-Wire serial interface. Measures temperatures from -55 C to +125 C in 0.5 C increments with a wide power supply range (2.7V to 5.5V).Converts temperature to digital word in less than 1 second. [20]

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2.3.4

PTU Sonde

Vaisala Radiosonde RS92-D provides worlds highest level of Pressure, Temperature and Humidity data (PTU). It transmits digital data on 1680 MHz band. It has built-in power and transmission capabilities. The temperature sensor has a range -90 C to +60 C. the Humidity sensor range is 0 to 100% RH. The Pressure sensor range is 1080 to 3 hPa. It has an Operating time of 135 min with its internal 9v battery. [9] Vaisala PTU Sonde is as shown in the Figure 4.

Figure 4: Vaisala Radiosonde RS92 D

2.3.5

ETAG

Esrange Throw Away GPS (ETAG) is GPS receiver plus micro controller which can be programmed to send and receive data. It contains a Fastrax iTrax03-s GPS for positioning information and an Atmega168 micro processor for running programs. ETAG I/O includes three serial ports, two for GPS and one for the micro processor, analogue / digital I/O, I2C and SPI bus. The connectors are used to program the GPS and micro processor. The parameters of ETAG can be easily changed and congured for each experiment. The ETAG can run on an internal 9V power source or use external power, since it has an inbuilt power regulator. [10] The ETAG receiver can be as shown in the Figure 5.

Figure 5: ETAG Hardware

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2.3.6

Magnetometer to be built

The turbulence will be measured by comparing the data from the magnetometer to data from the magnetic eld of the earth which should be obtained from a different source. In this way the changes the probe is experiencing in the magnetic eld indicated the movement of the probe. One would ask why the GPS data is not used. The GPS precision is about 1m and the precision we need is much smaller. The Hall effect magnetometer arrangement as shown in Figure 7 can measure very small changes which is suitable to our cause. We use three Hall effect sensors for each component (x, y, z) of the magnetic eld. The direction and magnitude of the magnetic eld is obtained by the formulas below and is also represented by Figure 6

Figure 6: Equation for magnetic eld

The Hall effect sensors to be used for the above purpose are HAL 82X from Micronas [18]. These sensors has lower mass, wide operating range (-40 C to +150 C) and low power consumption. Above all they are programmable by the supply voltages.

Figure 7: Magnetic eld

2.3.7

Reference Magnetometer for Calibration

The reference magnetometer chosen was 3-Axis Digital Compass IC, HMC5843 [19]. This is to calibrate the one we shall build part of the mission. This sensor manufactured by Honeywell is used to measure the low magnetic eld. It is conveniently small (4mm 4mm 1.3mm) and low cost. It operates with a low voltage and is a surface mount lead-less chip carrier (LCC). It is easy to assemble and compatible for battery powered applications. It has a wide magnetic eld range and can be used in strong magnetic elds. Its operating temperature is -30 C to +85 C.The communication with the Onboard computer is through I2C.

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2.3.8

Hardware block diagram

The Hardware block diagram of the entire Payload system is as shown in the Figure 8.

Figure 8: Block diagram

2.4

Software Design

The ATM probe comprises of complex tasks with regards to data acquisition of the sensors and storage process.Sophisticated Software architecture is needed to perform the data acquisition and storage of it. And even to monitor the functioning of the system. Thus, the micro-controller STM32F103xE [7] is selected to perform all the necessary tasks with dedicated power during the ight time at different heights. It runs at 72 MHz and has provision for diverse inputs (ADC, UART, I2 C, CAN, I2 S, USB and SDIO interface) to easily connect all sensors without the need of additional converters. 2.4.1 Operating System & Programming Language

Several tasks have been identied and are to be processed at same time.The tasks for example include: L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY 8

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Monitoring the System health. Acquisition of data from different sensors Storing of sensor data (on local SD-Card) Transmitting the station keeping data to the ground station For the above reasons, we have chosen a real-time operating system(RTOS) for its deterministic behavior. This means that the maximum execution time of the instruction is well known, which allows to write functions that execute the tasks in pre-calculated amount of time. After thorough investigation in the real-time operating systems available, we have chosen FreeRTOS [12] for this mission which already has porting to STM32F103xE. Programming in C along with Assembly languages is used in the Maple Integrated development Environment (IDE) [8]. 2.4.2 Flight Software Design

Flight software considers all the tasks and different modes of operation of the mission. The Flight Software design can be typically realized as shown in the form of the ow chart in Figure 9

2.5

TT&C

As of now, there is no separate ground station and transceiver system for transmitting the data from Main Payload have considered.Currently, we are investigating the communication link between the Main payload and ground system. Primarily we are thinking of implementing ZigBee communication link, but budget may be of primary concern. If somehow, we can have more funding for the modules, then functions like direct transfer of data during the ight time from the SD memory can be achieved. Which in turn lessen the chances of Payload recovery in extreme cold weather conditions.

2.6

Electronic Ground Support Equipment

The Electronic ground receiver system consists of the receiver antenna, pre amplier and the receiver. 2.6.1 Receiver Equipment for ETAG

Ground Station Antennas 2Yagi 10 dB circular connected Filter and Pre-amplier Cavity bandpass lter, 173.225 MHz,+/- 300 kHz (3 dB) Pre-amplier, 173.225 MHz, 40 dB Ground Station Receiver Yaesu FRG-9600 NBFM, rebuilt with lter and serial RS232 data output The ground station equipment of the ETAG at Esrange is as shown in the Figure 10

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Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement Probe

Figure 9: Flight Software Design diagram

Figure 10: Ground Station of ETAG

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2.6.2

Graphical User Interface

Development of data management system for environmental monitoring application. The system comprises two main components namely data logger and Graphic User Interface (GUI). Data logger could be from any standard data logger which is capable to save captured data in MMC, thumb drive or any portable storage devices while GUI is used for data interpretation. The effective data management for data logger is studied for storing huge size of data that is captured through long period of time. The GUI read the saved data in text les, interpret and display the result. The development of GUI initiated by exploring few language tools includes C++, Java, C , Python and MATLAB. After inclusive comparison made Python has been chosen due to two main features: open source and easy to implement. The GUI is capable to plot 2-D graph and interpret the graph for user understanding. In the experimental stage, four environment parameters were analyzed: temperature, humidity , pressure and magnetic eld. And relate them to the scientic goal of the experiment nding Atmospheric Turbulence and plot the results. [13]

2.7

Mechanical Design

The Main objective of the mechanical subsystem is to produce a low weight structure that will hold everything together and protect the components throughout the mission. Requirements shall be: The total mass of the experiment should not exceed 4Kg. The PTU probe and transceiver antenna should be placed such that there is no interference to its function. Provision for attaching the payload to the balloon. 2.7.1 Structure

The structure will be cube shaped, which will be divided into two parts vertically. One part will contain the ETAG and the other part will be divided horizontally into three oors. The dimensions of the cube will be 100mm100mm200mm. Threaded steel rods will be used for the columns of the structures. The oors will be made using light weight plastic plates. Such a typical structure modeled in Free CAD [13] is as shown in the Figure 11

2.8

Power System Design

Voltages required for the payload shall be both 5V and 3.3V can be obtained by a simple 3 terminal voltage regulators. LM117 / LM317 series is capable of supplying in excess of 1.5A over a 1.2V to 37V output range. These are exceptionally easy to use and they require only two external resistors to set the output voltage. [11] The schematic of the power circuit can be shown as in the Figure 12 2.8.1 Choice of Battery

Investigation into the available battery technologies and their characteristics can be shown as in Table 1. Some restrictions have been made while researching for the batteries available like operational temperature range, dimensions, rechargeable or not (easy of use while testing the Payload) and everything under the estimated budget. The datasheet for the batteries have been included at the end in the Appendix. L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY 11

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(a) Primary Structure

(b) Secondary Structure

Figure 11: Structure of ATM Probe

Figure 12: Schematic of power circuit

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Characteristics Li-ion-EY-MP9V500 Li-ion-BA 684A NiMh-Blisterx1 Voltage 9V 9V 8.4V Capacity 550mAh 6.8Ah 170mAh Weight 300gm 450gm 42gm Price in Skr 100 200 60 Table 1: Choice of the batteries

2.9

Thermal Design

Considering the environmental conditions of the ight time, such as very low temperatures and pressures. Even though the different components chosen for the experiment have an operating range of -40 C to 85 C, there is strong necessity to maintain operating temperatures of the components selected for the mission and the investigation of their placement on the respective walls of the C UBE is highly recommended. We are not really sure if we need a heater. The heater will add additional load on the battery. It may cause us to buy a even more powerful and expensive one. Further the heater will need additional hardware and a thermostat to control the temperature. So we looked at the possibility of avoiding all the above problems. The only available solution is insulation. We need to insulate the probe from the outside temperature and place the components in such a way that the little heat they produce is utilized to keep the inside temperature warm. The plan is to cover the probe with insulation blanket and place it in a styrofoam box. The plan will be tested and if it does not work then the heater circuit will be developed.

Testing Facility

The testing of the onboard electronics and the sensors shall be performed at Electronics Laboratory in the premises of Division of Space Technology, Lule University of Technology, Kiruna. Testing a the probe during ight is not possible since it will only be launched once, therefore testing sensor performance will be done by moving the probe around the university building and comparing data with real time data.

Launch Campaign

This section encompasses all tasks that are to be performed during the launch campaign.This includes launch preparation activities, experimental time during the ight, operational data management and post ight activities.

4.1

Experiment Preparation

The payload will be attached to the parachute which will then be attached to the balloon. There will be a cut off mechanism in between the balloon and the parachute. The cut off mechanism burns the link between the balloon and the parachute. The mission will be in three phases. The launch phase, when the balloon starts to leave the ground, The ascent phase in which the balloon goes up till 30000m and the descent phase in which the balloon L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY 13

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is cut off and the payload comes down with the parachute. The entire experiment has to undergo several tests before it can y. The probe has to be placed in an insulation box. The Probe has three batteries, one in ETAG, one in PTU and one for the micro controller and sensors. All batteries have to be recharged or replaced. The wireless links have to be checked before launch. The Experiment Preparation will include all standards that will be required to be done before launch. The topology is presented in Figure 13

Figure 13: Experiment Preparation

4.2

Experiment Time Events during ight

The system shall start recording, once it is woken up from the Power safe mode and shall only stop recording after its powered down completely. The expected time of the experiment, ADD (depends on parachute used).

4.3

Operational Data Management

Due to the limited available downlink data rate to the ground station, there is need for storing data onboard. All the sensor data acquired during ight time shall be stored locally on SD ash memory. The ground station software is directly connected to the Onboard Computer via transmission system.It allows continuous monitoring of the System Health and current state of the experiment during the ight time. Possible to transmit tele-commands from ground station incase of unforeseen events occurs, and recover to the experiment state.

4.4

Post Flight Activities

After the recovery of the payload, the SD memory cards containing data are retrieved by Vineel and handover it to the data analysis team. The team shall investigate into the archived data, accomplish the scientic objective of the mission and later demonstrate the result in the Final Presentation.

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Finance details

The estimated budget for the entire mission can be split into different Subsystem level requirements and are as shown in Table 2. Table 2: Financial details
System Category OBC ETAG PTU Ambient Pressure Ambient Temperature 3-Axis Magnetometer Hall Effect Sensor Voltage Regulator Miscellenous Batteries MMC Steel Rods Rectangular BOX Sheet Model Maple RET6 Esrange Vaisala MPX 4115A DS 1621 HMC5843 HAL 82X LM117 Electronics Electronics Electronics Threaded Styrofoam Plastic Quantity 1 1 1 2 2 1 5 5 100 cm Estimated Cost 487 2000 70 80 150 150 300 300 79 100 150 150 Status Ordered Ordered Ordered TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO TBO

Electrical

Mechanical

Project Planning
Design Implemantation Integration & Testing Data Analysis

The Work plan can be divided into four phases:

Thus, the work methodology can be clearly elucidated by the ow chart here below as shown in Figure 14.

6.1

Work Breakdown Structure

Participants and their role in the project is tabled tentatively here and is shown in Table 3.

6.2

Management

An updated Gantt was constructed for time management of the project and is as shown in the Figure 16 in Appendix. A red bar at the current date shows the current progress of the project.

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Figure 14: Work Methodology

Table 3: Division of Responsibilities


System Module Hardware Software Power Communication Sensors Cube GUI Hardware Software Primary V.Kadarla V.Kadarla V.Kadarla V.Kadarla Z.Vaziri B.Asokan Z.Vaziri Z.Vaziri B.Asokan Secondary B.Asokan B.Asokan Z.Vaziri B.Asokan V.Kadarla V.Kadarla B.Asokan B.Asokan Z.Vaziri

Main Payload Structure Data Analysis Magnetometer Ground Station

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Conclusion And Future Work

Once after nalizing the PDR, its due to review the progress and identify the forthcoming tasks and plan for the work that is to be carried before CDR. Project Management will focus on rening the detailed schedule and planning for construction, test and integration of the ATM probe. Conducting review meetings and monitoring the progress of the project. Electronics team must nalize the design with specic components. Test boards shall be constructed such that the software subsystem team can begin programming in parallel in with hardware construction. Mechanical team must nalize the CAD of the structure and go for ordering the structural equipments. Software team will begin programming the payload and look into ground station team along with data analysis team for the demonstration in GUI.

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References
[1] Atmospheric turbulence, http://mysite.du.edu/ etuttle/weather/turbul.html, Retrieved on : 4-10-2011 [2] Atmospheric Turbulence, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/41528/atmosphericturbulence, Retrieved on : 4-10-2011 [3] Best Aircraft Turbulence (BAT) Probe, http://www.atdd.noaa.gov/q=node/29 , Retrieved on: 4-10-2011 [4] Richard J.Tansey, Measurement of atmospheric turbulence over a horizontal path using black fringe wavefront sensor. [5] G. D. Nastrom, Measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the dual-beam width method using the MST radar at Gaddanki, India. European Geosciences Union 2004. [6] Andreas Muschinski, Measurement of atmospheric turbulence by means of light, sound and Radion waves. http://www.image.ucar.edu/public/TOY/2008/focus3/Presentations/TALKMuschinski.pdf , Retrieved on 4-10-2011 [7] ST Microelectronics, STM32FX Manual, [8] Leaabs LLC, http://leaabs.com/docs/hardware/maple-ret6.html, [9] Vaisala Corporation, PTU Radiosonde RS92 D Manual [10] Esrange Space Center, ETAG Manual [11] National Semiconductors, LM117 Manual [12] FreeRTOS for STM32, www.freertos.org [13] Open Source CAD (Free CAD), www.sourceforge.net [14] M. Amir Abas IEEE Member, M. Hilmi Fadzil, A. Khusairy Hakiim, Development of Environmental Monitoring Data Management System using OSS Python [15] M.Power http://www.batteryupgrade.se/shopBrowser.php [16] Saft Batteries, http://www.saftbatteries.com/Technologies [17] Duracell(UK), http://www.tayna.co.uk/PP3-9V-Batteries-S140-1.html [18] Micronas Corporation, HAL 82X Manual [19] Honey Sensing & Control, HMC5843 Manual [20] Maxim IC, DS1621 Manual [21] Freescale Semiconductors, MPX4115A Manual

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Appendix

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Figure 15: Schematic of the Onboard Computer

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L ULE A U NIVERSITY OF T ECHNOLOGY Figure 16: ATM Probe Gantt Chart showing current progress

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Figure 17: Duracell Battery of 9V

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Figure 18: Saft Li-ion Battery

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