ENERGY TRENDS DECEMBER 2007

A NATIONAL STATISTICS PUBLICATION

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For new subscription queries please telephone:Amey on 01633 224712 or write to: Amey, 7th Floor, Clarence House, Clarence Place, Newport South Wales NP19 7AA A subscription form is also available on our Internet site www.berr.gov.uk/energy/statistics/publications/trends/index.html Energy Trends is prepared by the Energy Strategy and International Unit in BERR. More information on BERR energy publications is available at: www.berr.gov.uk/energy/statistics/publications/index.html Further information on Oil and Gas is available at: www.og.berr.gov.uk/ For enquiries please contact: Name Publication and other general (Helpdesk) enquiries on energy statistic Total energy statistics Coal and other solid fuels Natural gas consumption Gas and petroleum investment Indicative tariffs Natural gas production Petroleum production Petroleum consumption and stocks Electricity statistics Regional and local authority energy statistics Clive Sarjantson Telephone 020 7215 2698

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Chris Michaels David Bovill

2710 3839

Chris.Michaels@berr.gsi.gov.uk David.Bovill@berr.gsi.gov.uk

Suhail Siddiqui

5262

Suhail.Siddiqui@berr.gsi.gov.uk

Clive Evans

5189

Clive.Evans@berr.gsi.gov.uk

Lisa Vine Joe Ewins Jennifer Knight

6072 5190 6490

Lisa.Vine@berr.gsi.gov.uk Joe.Ewins@berr.gsi.gov.uk Jennifer.Knight@berr.gsi.gov.uk

All the above can be contacted by fax on 020 7215 2723

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Explanatory notes are to be found inside the back cover

Contents
Introduction Section 1 - Total Energy Section 2 - Solid Fuels and Derived Gases Section 3 - Oil and Oil Products Section 4 - Gas Section 5 - Electricity Section 6 - Special Features Electricity generation and supply figures for Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England, 2005 and 2006 Regional and local electricity consumption statistics for 2006 Regional and local gas consumption statistics for 2006 Regional and local estimates of non gas, non electricity and non road transport fuels in 2005 Regional and local total energy consumption statistics for 2005 The UK road transport biofuels market Statistics of the installed capacity of solar photovoltaics 2008 Update of “Energy Consumption in the UK” The future of “Energy- Its impact on the Environment and Society” Recent and forthcoming publications of interest to users of energy statistics Tables 1.1: Indigenous production of primary fuels 1.2: Inland energy consumption: primary fuel input basis 1.3: Supply and use of fuels 2.1: Supply and consumption of coal 2.2: Supply and consumption of coke oven coke, coke breeze and other manufactured solid fuels 2.3: Supply and consumption of coke oven gas, blast furnace gas, benzole and tars 3.1: Supply and use of crude oil, natural gas liquids and feedstocks 3.2: Supply and use of petroleum products 3.3: Supply and use of petroleum products - annual data 3.4: Supply and use of petroleum products - latest quarter 3.5: Demand for key petroleum products 3.6: Stocks of petroleum at end of period 3.7: Drilling activity on the UK Continental Shelf 4.1: Natural gas supply and consumption 5.1: Fuel used in electricity generation and electricity supplied 5.2: Supply and consumption of electricity List of special feature articles published in Energy Trends between June 2006 and September 2007 2 3 6 8 12 14 16 21 30 38 39 45 49 50 51 52

53 54 55 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

The cover illustration used for Energy Trends and other BERR energy statistics publications is from a photograph by David Askew. It was a winning entry in the DTI News Photographic Competition in 2002.

1

December 2007

revised data will be made available as soon as possible. September. To ensure that those who use the statistics have access to the most up-todate information. In addition to quarterly tables. Gas production was 11 per cent lower than the third quarter of 2006. The balance format shows the flow of a commodity from its sources of supply. New data are continually received and revisions to historic data made. the data collection systems operated by BERR. through to its final use.html Energy Trends does not contain information on Foreign Trade.Introduction Energy Trends and Quarterly Energy Prices are produced by the Department for Business. Gas imports increased by 31½ per cent and gas exports decreased by 25 per cent. as used in BERR’s annual Digest of UK Energy Statistics.uk/energy/statistics/source/index. The electronic versions are available free of charge from the BERR web site. The 2007 edition of the Digest was published on 26 July 2007. Oil production remained virtually unchanged when compared with the third quarter of 2006. • • • • December 2007 2 . Energy Strategy & International Unit. Gas demand was 5 per cent higher than the third quarter of 2006. Net imports of electricity were 64 per cent higher.gsi. Coal production in the third quarter of 2007 was 27 per cent higher than the third quarter of 2006. Bay 299. this is equivalent to a 2 per cent decrease when adjusted to take account of weather differences between the third quarters of 2006 and 2007. Gas supplied 1½ per cent more electricity than in the third quarter of 2006 while coal supplied 5 per cent less and nuclear 9 per cent less. December and March. The text and charts provide an analysis of the data in the tables.uk/energy/statistics/publications/dukes/page39771. Coal imports were 22½ per cent lower and generators’ demand for coal was down by 2½ per cent. The articles in Energy Trends provide in-depth information on current issues within the energy sector. The tables are mainly in commodity balance format.berr.gov. Enterprise & Regulatory Reform on a quarterly basis. Both periodicals are published concurrently in June. the main monthly tables that were published in the period up to May 2001 when Energy Trends was produced monthly. However.berr. The UK was a net importer of gas in the third quarter of 2007. continue to be updated and are also available on the BERR web site.gov.uk The main points for the third quarter of 2007: • • Total energy production was 3½ per cent lower than in the third quarter of 2006.gov. Foreign Trade and Temperatures tables are. available on the BERR web site and information on Prices can be found in the Quarterly Energy Prices publication. are in constant operation. Energy Trends includes information on energy as a whole and by individual fuels. Total primary energy consumption for energy uses was 1½ per cent higher than during the third quarter of 2006. Production from older established fields continued to decline but this decline was offset by eight new fields.html If you have any comments on Energy Trends or Quarterly Energy Prices publications please send them to: Clive Sarjantson BERR. Both sets of tables can be obtained from www.gov. The text and tables included in this publication represent a snapshot of the information available at the time of publication. The December editions cover the third quarter of the current year. Prices information is also available on our web site at www. whereas the UK was a net exporter in the same period of 2006. Temperatures and Prices. via the electronic versions of these tables.html. however. which produce this information. 1 Victoria Street London SW1H 0ET Tel: 020 7215 2698 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Clive. including the very large Buzzard field.uk/energy/statistics/publications/prices/tables/page18125.berr.Sarjantson@berr. Printed and bound copies of the 2007 Digest can be obtained from The Stationery Office and an electronic version is available on our web site at www.

Also on a seasonally adjusted and temperature corrected basis.1 per cent lower than the same period a year earlier.1 Production of indigenous primary fuels 90 80 Million tonnes of oil equivalent 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Coal P etro leum Natural Gas P rimary Electricity(1 ) • 2006 Total 2006 Q1-Q3 2007 Q1-Q3 Total production in the third quarter of 2007 was 41.0 per cent higher than in the third quarter of 2006.4 per cent.9 per cent between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter of 2007. • 2006 2007 • Q2 Q3 Q4 • Seasonally adjusted and temperature corrected annual rates.8 per cent lower but output from wind and natural flow hydro increased by 49. Total seasonally adjusted and temperature corrected consumption in the third quarter of 2007 was 2. In the third quarter of 2007 production of coal and other solid fuels was 22.7 per cent.6 per cent .6 per cent lower than in third quarter of 2006.3 per cent.4 degrees Celsius cooler than the third quarter of 2006.Total Energy Chart 1. • 3 December 2007 . average temperature during the third quarter of 2007 was 14. Production of natural gas fell by 10.0 million tonnes of oil equivalent.7 million tonnes of oil equivalent in third quarter of 2007 (temperature corrected.2 Total inland consumption (primary fuel input basis)(1) 255 Million tonnes of oil equivalent 250 245 240 235 230 225 220 215 0 Q1 (1) • 2004 2005 Total inland consumption on a primary fuel input basis was 230.2 per cent lower in the third quarter of 2007 than in the third quarter a year earlier. The seasonally adjusted annualised rate). Production of petroleum was 0. gas consumption fell by 0. On the same basis. oil consumption fell by 0. Primary electricity output was 6. Between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter of 2007 (on a seasonally adjusted and temperature corrected basis) coal and other solid fuel consumption fell by 6.9 degrees Celsius. • • • • (1) Nuclear and natural flow hydro electricity. within which nuclear electricity output was 8.Total Energy Section 1 . Chart 1. 2. gas production is declining as North Sea reserves deplete. 3.8 per cent lower.

Indigenous production continued to fall in 2007. Consumption by final users Final energy consumption shows a strong seasonal pattern with more energy being consumed in the winter months and less in the summer months.6 per cent.3 Final energy consumption by user 50 45 Million tonnes of oil equivalent 40 35 30 25 20 Industry 15 10 5 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2005 2004 2007 2006 Transport Domestic Services • Total final energy consumption increased by 2. Industrial energy consumption increased by 7. Coal and other solid fuel production was lower by 9.2 per cent Domestic sector energy consumption increased by 13.8 per cent.Total Energy Chart 1. continuing a year on year decline for each year since 1999. Petroleum accounted for 46. The remaining 7 per cent was made up by fuel use for non-energy purposes. In the third quarter of 2007 the transport sector was responsible for the largest share of final consumption at 45 per cent of all energy consumed by final users.6 per cent higher than in the corresponding period a year ago. December 2007 4 . which is 1. with total production in each quarter of 2007 to date being lower than the same quarter in 2006.4 per cent reduction in the second quarter. Pages 55-56 Production Indigenous production of energy was 9. Total inland energy consumption. Transport energy consumption decreased by 1. including agriculture.0 per cent between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter in 2007.1 per cent and petroleum production by fell 9. A year earlier the proportions were petroleum 44. consumed 11 per cent. this was followed by a 3. In the third quarter of 2007 consumption was 48. The industrial sector was responsible for a further 21 per cent.6 per cent. on a primary fuel input basis (not temperature corrected or seasonally adjusted).4 million tonnes of oil equivalent.1 per cent.. Service sector energy consumption increased by 6.1 per cent lower than in 2005.1: Indigenous production of primary fuels……………………………………………………. particularly in the domestic and service sectors.1 per cent lower in 2006 than in 2005. coal and other solid fuels 6.4 per cent • • • • Background Relevant tables 1.0 per cent).Page 54 1.. The largest contribution to this decrease in absolute terms was from natural gas (which decreased by 5.5 per cent lower than in 2005. gas production fell by 9. On a temperature corrected basis consumption in 2006 was 1.5 per cent.8 per cent. Total inland consumption In 2006 consumption of primary fuels was 1.1 per cent of total indigenous production in the third quarter of 2007 while coal and other solid fuels accounted for 8.2: Inland energy consumption: primary fuel input basis………………………………………. the domestic sector for another 17 per cent and the service industries.3: Supply and use of fuels………………………………………………………………….3 per cent.8 per cent in the first quarter of 2007 compared with the same period in 2006. and natural gas 35. Page 53 1.6 per cent.4 per cent and natural gas 38. decreased by 8.

mainly due to increases in the domestic sector (a 13.3 per cent rise).4 per cent rise) and the service sector (a 6.Total Energy Final energy consumption rose by 2.0 per cent between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter of 2007. 5 December 2007 .2 per cent rise). the industrial sector (a 7. There was a decrease in the transport sector of 1.6 per cent.

9 per cent lower than in the third quarter of 2006. largely for the power stations market. • • Chart 2. with deep mined production up 35. final consumption (as measured by disposals to final consumers) increased by 6. Note that for 2007 there has been a change of methodology in terms of the proportional allocation of coal from traders and this is the reason for the large increase in domestic sector consumption. with total coal production rising by only 4.Solid Fuels and Derived Gases Chart 2. Consumption by electricity generators was down by 2. at 13. The percentage increase from the second quarter of 2007 was not as high.Solid Fuels and Derived Gases Section 2 . Electricity generators accounted for 81 per cent of total coal use in the third quarter of 2007.3 per cent. These percentage increases are high because production was particularly low in the third quarter of 2006 due to mine closures.2 Coal consumption 20 • 16 Demand for coal in the third quarter of 2007.6 million tonnes. the same proportion as a year earlier.0 per cent in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.7 per cent lower than in the third quarter of 2006 at 9.8 per cent higher than the third quarter of 2006 at 4. Million tonnes 12 • 8 Electricity generators Generators trend (=average of 4 quarters ending) Collieries.7 million tonnes.1 Coal production and imports 14 Coal imports 12 10 Million tonnes 8 6 4 2 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 • Opencast coal Deep mined coal Provisional figures for the third quarter of 2007 show that coal production (including an estimate for slurry) was 26. Provisionally. coke ovens and other conversion industries Final consumers • 4 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 December 2007 6 . was 1.5 per cent. with consumption by the domestic sector increasing by 77 per cent and industrial consumption falling by 17.3 per cent and opencast production up 20.4 per cent. geological difficulties and other one-off factors. Imports of coal in the third quarter of 2007 were 22.6 million tonnes.1 million tonnes.6 per cent to 10. 79 per cent of the coal imported in the third quarter of 2007 (7.7 million tonnes) was steam coal.

4 per cent) higher than at the end of the third quarter of 2006 and stood at 18.1: Supply and consumption of coal………………………………………………………………Page 57 2. Deep mined production fell to a record low of 9. the trend has reversed and coal consumption by electricity generators in the third quarter of 2007 was down by 2.7 million tonnes. blast furnace gas.2: Supply and consumption of coke oven coke. This upward trend appears to have continued in 2007. an increase of 3. In 2005.3 per cent lower than in 2005.8 million tonnes (4.6 million tonnes higher than in 2004 as higher gas prices made coal more competitive for generation. but in the second and third quarters of 2007 deep mined production increased again. These closures. The rise was less strong in summer 2007 and coal stocks peaked at the same level (18. coke breeze and other manufactured solid fuels………………………………………………………….7 million tonnes. for the first time ever.3: Supply and consumption of coke oven gas.3 Coal stocks 20 18 16 14 Million tonnes 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Jul Jul Jul Jan Jan Jan Jan Oct Oct Oct Jul Apr Apr Apr Apr Oct Undistributed Other distributed Pow er stations • Coal stocks at the end of the third quarter of 2007 were 0. Deep mined production recovered towards the end of 2005 and in the first half of 2006. The seasonal rise in stocks over the summer periods of 2005 and 2006 was strong.Solid Fuels and Derived Gases Chart 2. by the end of October 2007 coal stocks had fallen back to 18.1 million tonnes.5 million tonnes) in 2006. coal import levels peaked at the end of 2006. Coal imports have reached record levels in each of the last three years. Coal consumption In 2005 coal use by electricity generators was 1.3 million tonnes on 2005.5 million tonnes higher than at the end of the third quarter of 2006 at 15. • • 2004 2005 2006 2007 Background Relevant tables 2.6 per cent compared with the third quarter of 2006. Stocks held by producers (undistributed stocks) in the third quarter of 2007 were 0. The level of coal stocks at power stations were 0.4 per cent. geological difficulties and other one-off factors continued to suppress deep mined production in the first quarter of 2007.Page 59 Coal production and imports In 2006 indigenous production of coal fell by 2. benzole and tars………. Page 58 2.4 per cent) lower than at the end of the third quarter of 2006. and 17. 7 December 2007 . opencast production exceeded deep mined production. but with demand for coal lower in the first three quarters of 2007. Provisionally. Stocks End of winter stock levels have risen over the past two years from the low levels of 2004/05.4 million tonnes. This trend continued into 2006 with the demand from electricity generators up 5. With gas prices becoming more competitive in the first half of 2007. while opencast coal production was at its lowest level since 1970. boosted by record levels of coal imports over the period.7 million tonnes) as in October 2006.8 per cent (nearly 0. it fell back in the second half of 2006 with the closure of Rossington at the end of March 2006 and the run down in production and eventual mothballing of Harworth in September 2006. The use of coal for coke making and at blast furnaces increased by 6.8 million tonnes (8.. However.0 million tonnes. Opencast production has also been on an upward trend since the third quarter of 2006 and remains higher than deep mined output.

NGLs and feedstocks in the third quarter of 2007 (by 3.0 per cent respectively.8 per cent lower than a year ago.8 million tonnes). In the nine months to September 2007 eight new fields started production.Oil and Oil Products Section 3 . • 0 -10 • -20 • -30 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 December 2007 8 .8 million tonnes).5 and 5.Oil and Oil Products Chart 3.8 and 9. similar to the third quarter of 2006 where by the UK was a net importer by 2.0 million tonnes. This includes the very large Buzzard field. NGLs and petroleum products 30 Exports Imports Net Exports 20 • Million tonnes 10 During the third quarter of 2007 the UK was a net importer of oil and oil products by 2.2 UK trade in crude oils. Total oil production (million tonnes) 8 2004 2005 • 7 6 2007 2006 5 40 Feb Aug Sep Mar May Nov Jan Jun Apr Jul Oct Dec Chart 3. Both imports and exports of petroleum products fell during the third quarter of 2007.8 million tonnes. by 13.9 million tonnes of crude oil. Without these new fields production in the third quarter of 2007 would have been 18.1 Production of crude oil and NGLs 9 • Total indigenous UK production of crude oil and NGLs in the third quarter of 2007 was virtually unchanged when compared with a year earlier. During this period these fields produced 6. Both imports and exports increased. In the third quarter of 2007 the UK was a net exporter of petroleum products (by 1. The UK was a net importer of crude oil. by 4.3 per cent respectively.

up from 40.Oil and Oil Products Chart 3. Deliveries of aviation turbine fuel were 4.2 per cent in the third quarter of 2006. DERV fuel’s share of road transport fuels in the third quarter of 2007 was 55. Motor spirit deliveries fell by 5. 2 1 Super/hypermarkets 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 4 2005 2006 2007 DERV fuel • Sales of DERV by super/hypermarket companies accounted for 37. 4 Unleaded motor spirit • • 3 2 Aviation turbine fuel • 1 • 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Chart 3.9 per cent of retail sales of petrol in the third quarter of 2007.3 Demand for key transport fuels Deliveries into consumption ( million tonnes) 6 DERV fuel 5 • Total deliveries of transport fuels were virtually unchanged in the third quarter of 2007 when compared with the third quarter of 2006.5 per cent.1 per cent lower.5 per cent compared to 52. compared with 34.8 per cent.4 Super/hypermarket shares of retail deliveries 6 Petrol 5 Million tonnes 4 • Other retailers 3 Sales of motor spirit by super/hypermarket companies accounted for 42.0 per cent of retail sales of DERV in the third quarter of 2007.9 per cent in the third quarter of 2006. 3 Million tonnes 2 Other retailers 1 Super/hypermarkets 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 9 December 2007 .1 per cent in the third quarter of 2006. Deliveries of Diesel engined road vehicle fuel (DERV) increased by 7.

stocks of crude oil and petroleum products were 1. Chart 3. However. Chart 3. aviation turbine fuel. 60 • 40 • 20 • 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Background Relevant tables 3.2 per cent lower.. compared with 3 in the corresponding quarter a year earlier.3: Supply and use of petroleum products . 3 exploration or appraisal wells were started onshore in the third quarter of 2007.latest quarter……………………………………. compared with 53 in the corresponding quarter of 2006.2: Supply and use of petroleum products……………………………………………………….6 Drilling activity on the UKCS 100 Exploration & Appraisal (Offshore) Development (Offshore) Exploration & Appraisal (Onshore) Development (Onshore) • 80 Num ber of w ells Drilling figures for the third quarter of 2007 showed a rise in the number of exploration and appraisal wells started offshore to 39 against 22 in the corresponding quarter of 2006.5 Stocks of key oil products(1) 16 14 Oil Stocks Obligation • Overall. • 12 Million tonnes 10 • 8 6 4 2 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2007 2004 2005 2006 (1) This includes motor spirit. Stocks at UKCS pipeline terminals fell by 47 per cent (half a million tonnes) in the third quarter of 2007. Crude oil and refinery process oil stocks were 4.1: Supply and use of crude oil. kerosene and fuel oils.5 combines stocks of products with the product equivalent of stocks of crude oil to give an overall level of UK stocks of key products.3 per cent higher. The number of development wells drilled offshore fell to 35.4: Supply and use of petroleum products .Page 63 3. other gas • • diesel oils. 7 development wells were drilled onshore in the third quarter of 2007.7: Drilling activity on the UK Continental Shelf………………………………………………… Page 66 December 2007 10 . natural gas liquids and feedstocks…………………………. Page 60 3.annual data……………………………………… Page 62 3.2 per cent higher at the end of the third quarter of 2007 than a year earlier.5: Demand for key petroleum products…………………………………………………………. DERV fuel. At the end of the third quarter of 2007.Page 61 3.Oil and Oil Products Chart 3.3 million tonnes in the third quarter of 2007. the UK held stocks equal to 75½ days of consumption of these key products. The same number of exploration or appraisals wells was started onshore in third quarter of 2006. and stocks of products were 1.8 million tonnes giving an overall increase of 0. crude and process oil stocks elsewhere increased by 0. compared with an obligation of 67½ days (see Background for more details).Page 64 3.6: Stocks of petroleum at end of period………………………………………………………… Page 65 3.

is to hold a total of 11 million tonnes of these products. equal to 67½ days of consumption. Demand for petroleum products Overall demand for petroleum products in the third quarter of 2007 was 1. including the very large Buzzard field.5 and 5.3 per cent respectively). Stocks of crude oil and petroleum products The UK has an obligation under EU law to maintain stocks of key oil products at or above a certain level to ensure adequate supplies would exist for any international oil supply emergency. These obligations are based on the UK's annual consumption of the key products motor spirit. Deliveries of motor spirit were lower by 5.5 above combines data on stocks of key oil products with the product equivalent of stocks of crude oil to give an overall level of UK stocks of key oil products to show how the UK is complying with these obligations at an overall level. meaning the UK remained a net importer of crude and NGLs.5 million tonnes (2. based on 2006 consumption data.2 per cent lower than in the third quarter of 2006.5 million tonnes. 11 December 2007 .Oil and Oil Products Crude oil production and trade Total UK production of crude oil and NGLs was virtually unchanged in the third quarter of 2007 when compared to the same period last year. Deliveries of aviation turbine fuel fell by 4. Therefore the economics of crude oil markets results in significant volumes of crude oil being imported into the UK. eight new fields started production. aviation fuel and other kerosenes and fuel oils. DERV fuel and other gas diesel oils. Both imports and exports of petroleum products fell.2 per cent) lower than the third quarter of 2006. however.7 million tonnes. The UK's current overall obligation. but exports decreased at a slower rate leading to the UK being a net exporter of petroleum products. DERV deliveries increased by 7. In the nine months to September 2007. These obligations are usually updated every 1st July as consumption data for the previous year are finalised.8 per cent to 5. Refinery production of petroleum products and trade The net refinery output in the third quarter of 2007 was 21.5 per cent. as indigenous UK crude oil tends to be the more valuable light/sweet type with lower sulphur levels and the relative modernity of UK refineries allows their use of less valuable or lower grade crude oil. Imports and exports of crude oil and NGLs both rose. 0.1 per cent. The majority of UK production of crude oil and NGLs is exported. The UK was a net importer of oil and oil products in the third quarter of 2007. (by 13. Chart 3.

whereas in the third quarter of 2006 the UK was a net exporter. The UK was a net importer of gas in the third quarter of 2007 by 21.0 TWh. exports of natural gas fell by 25.2 UK trade in natural gas 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 -10 Aug Dec Sep Apr • Two new import pipelines were commissioned in the fourth quarter of 2006.1 Production of natural gas 120 110 100 Production (TWh) 90 80 70 60 50 40 0 2007 2005 2006 2004 • Total indigenous UK production of natural gas in the third quarter of 2007 was 11. In the third quarter of 2007. Jul Feb Mar May O ct Jan Jun Nov Chart 4. • Trade (TWh) -20 -30 -40 -50 -60 -70 -80 -90 -100 -110 -120 -130 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Exports Imports Net Exports • December 2007 12 .3 per cent.Gas Section 4 – Gas Chart 4.2 per cent lower than in the corresponding quarter a year earlier.0 per cent and imports rose by 31. compared with the same period of 2006.

9 per cent higher than in the third quarter of 2006.3 Natural gas consumption average of four quarter ending 110 Domestic 100 90 80 70 TWh 60 50 40 30 20 • Demand for gas in the third quarter of 2007 was 5. Page 67 Gas production and trade In the third quarter of 2007. However. compared to 80 per cent a year ago..Gas Chart 4. Electricity generators Other industries • • • Heat sold 10 0 Iron and steel Other final users Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Background Relevant table 4. However gas use in the fourth quarter of 2006 rose back to the levels of 2003 and 2004 as prices fell back. Grove and Minke fields.1 per cent higher than in the third quarter of 2006. Imports of gas were 31. Imports to the UK are from Belgium. The UK currently exports gas to the Netherlands from the Markham. While much of this switchback pattern is the result of the relative prices of gas and coal. via the interconnector. commerce and agriculture consumption rose by 14.1: Natural gas supply and consumption………………………………………………………. 13 December 2007 .2 per cent lower than a year ago. rising slightly in some years and falling back in others..0 per cent higher than the level in the third quarter of 2006. In the third quarter of 2007. The UK was a net importer of gas in the third quarter of 2007 whereas the UK was a net exporter in the same period of 2006. Gas use for electricity generation was 0. Gas use in the domestic sector is particularly dependent on temperatures not only during the heating season. mainly in Combined Cycle Gas Turbine stations. Temperatures in the third quarter of 2007 were significantly lower than a year earlier. high gas prices led to the use of gas for generation levelling off after 2000. In the industrial sector gas sales were provisionally 17.0 per cent lower. when the weather can affect the amount of gas used for water heating and cooking. but also in summer. via the Langeled and Vesterled pipelines. Windermere. and Algeria. gas production was 11. In public administration. Qatar and Trinidad (liquefied natural gas). boosting domestic consumption of gas by about 15 per cent on the low levels of the third quarter of 2006. Norwegian gas accounted for 76 per cent of UK natural gas imports.2 per cent from the low levels of a year earlier. Egypt.5 per cent compared with a year earlier. This continued into early 2006. consumption in the domestic sector rose by 15. Provisionally. Gas consumption Until the middle of 2000 the growth in consumption of natural gas was dominated by growth in consumption for electricity generation. to the Irish Republic via the two Irish – UK gas interconnectors and to Belgium through the Bacton-Zeebrugge interconnector. Norway. and the Tampen Link (from Statfjord to FLAGS). while the downturn in 2005 results from generators preferring coal when prices reached very high levels at the end of the year. the 2004 growth can also be attributed to the three newest CCGT stations operating at high levels throughout the year.3 per cent higher than a year ago and exports were 25.

3% December 2007 14 . Coal use in the quarter was 2.3 percentage points.Electricity Section 5 .6 per cent (+0. renew ables and other 7.2 Electricity supplied Q3 2007 Net imports 3.2 per cent (+ 1.1% Nuclear 18. due to higher rainfall and snowfall over the winter period. 10 Million tonnes of oil equivalent Coal 8 • • 6 Gas Nuclear 4 • Oil.9% Oil.6 TWh). The supply from coal fell by 4.9% Nuclear 19.4 per cent lower than in the third quarter of 2006.8 per cent lower.1 per cent lower than in quarter 3 2006 while net imports were 64. renewables and other fuels rose by 1.5 TWh).8% • • Q3 2006 Net imports 1.0 per cent.Electricity Chart 5.7 percentage points while gas’s share rose by 0.6 per cent lower than a year earlier and nuclear sources were 8. renew ables and other 5. while from gas fired stations supply rose by 1. Indigenous supply was also 0.2% Total electricity supplied by all generators in the third quarter of 2007 was 0. 1.0 TWh) higher than a year earlier. • • Coal 29.7 percentage points. Gas use was 1.1 Fuel used for electricity generation 12 • Fuel used by generators in the third quarter of 2007 was.5 percentage points and nuclear’s share fell by 1. Oil use fell by 6. in total.3 per cent on the third quarter of 2006.2% • Gas 41.8 per cent (-1.1% Coal 31.1 per cent lower (-0. The share of oil.1 per cent up on the third quarter of 2006. Between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter of 2007 coal’s share of electricity supplied fell by 1.1 TWh) than a year earlier. The supply from nuclear stations fell by 8.3 TWh). renewable and other 2 Net imports 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Chart 5.9% Gas 41.8 per cent (-1. Hydro sources were up by 51.8% Oil.

two of the oldest nuclear stations closed at the end of December 2006 and increased coal and gas fired generation replaced these stations’ contribution. public administration.. so gas use became more attractive for generation and increased to a new record level. gas prices fell in the first quarter of 2007 and continued to fall during the second and third quarters. Page 69 Fuel use Coal prices rose in 2004. Consumption After the near absence of growth in 2002. 3 per cent higher than 2002’s previous record.2: Supply and consumption of electricity………………………………………………………. Page 68 5. Consumption in 2006 was divided 29 per cent to the domestic..1 per cent in the third quarter of 2007.Electricity Chart 5. whereas the average rate of growth over the previous 5 years had been +½ per cent per year. Fuel industries accounted for a further 8 per cent with the remaining 7½ per cent accounted for by transmission and distribution losses. the highest percentage rise since 2000. because a further rise in gas prices made coal fired generation more competitive.3 Electricity consumption 100 90 80 70 60 • Final consumption of electricity fell by 1. Generators used much more coal during 2006 as a whole. Supply from nuclear sources fell by 8 per cent in 2006 although the nuclear sector was again affected by a high level of outages for repairs and maintenance. Despite a high level of electricity imports in the third quarter of 2007. In 2006 final consumption of electricity fell by ½ per cent. 28½ per cent to industry and 27 per cent to commerce. the first fall since 1994. reversing the trend with coal use falling by 15 per cent and gas use rising 20 per cent compared with the first three quarters of 2006. rising gas prices over the later part of 2005 led to a preference for coal as the main fuel source for electricity generation.7 per cent. Additionally.1 per cent while industrial consumption of electricity fell by 1. transport and agriculture. Consumption by other final users (including transport sector use) fell by 2. Supply from the coal fired power stations of all generating companies rose by 11 per cent in 2006.1: Fuel used in electricity generation and electricity supplied………………………………. In this period temperatures were on average about 2½ degrees lower than in the third quarter of 2006. However. Domestic • TWh 50 40 30 20 10 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2004 2005 2006 2007 Commercial and Other • Industrial Background Relevant tables 5. electricity demand by final consumers grew by 1¼ per cent in 2003 but only by ¾ per cent in 2004 (although this rises to just above the 1½ per cent per year trend rate of growth when allowance is made for the change to reporting on a calendar year basis in 2004). growth in electricity demand was closer to 2 per cent. In 2005. Imports and exports of electricity from and to continental Europe are volatile with suppliers taking advantage of price differentials that have arisen during periods of extreme weather or industrial disputes. with electricity supplied from gas falling 7½ per cent to be 10 per cent below 2004’s record level. imports in the first 9 months of the year were 21 per cent lower than in the corresponding period of 2006.3 per cent. Consumption by the domestic sector rose by 1. Conversely. Supply Total electricity supplied in the UK in 2006 was ½ per cent lower than in 2005. 15 December 2007 .

4 per cent of the electricity generated in the UK was generated in Scotland. Northern Ireland trades electricity with the Republic of Ireland to which it is a net exporter. The United Kingdom figures shown in the tables in this article are taken from the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics (DUKES) 2007. Unplanned outages at nuclear stations in Scotland and Wales saw reductions in output and hence nuclear’s share of generation from 38 per cent to 26 per cent in Scotland and from 23 to 20 per cent in Wales. Wales exported the equivalent of 13.0 per cent of its generation to consumers in England in 2005. Both Scotland and Wales are net exporters of electricity with England importing electricity from both countries and from continental Europe. The increase in generation in Scotland between these two years was broadly equivalent to the increase in exports to England. but this rose to 20. 2. It also imports electricity from Scotland via the Moyle interconnector opened in 2002 but these imports are less than the net exports to the Irish Republic. Tables 1 and 2 are shown in “landscape” format at the end of the main text.4 per cent in 2006.Special feature – Sub national electricity figures Electricity generation and supply figures for Scotland. 8. 2005 and 2006. The position in 2006 is shown in Chart 1.000 250. Wales and Northern Ireland.6 of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2007. Generation and net exports In 2005 12.000 Coal Gas 100. The Chart 1: Generation by fuel in 2006 by major power producers and other generators 300. Wales.000 GWh Oil and renewables Nuclear 150.000 0 England Scotland Wales Northern Ireland December 2007 16 .2 per cent (Table 1). As before. there are confidentiality constraints that mean that some data for generation by fuel in Northern Ireland cannot be shown separately from those for England. Generation by fuel Table 2 sets out the generation of electricity by the fuel categories used in Table 5.6 per cent respectively in Scotland.9 per cent of the electricity generated there to consumers elsewhere in the UK.5 per cent.8 per cent and 2.7 per cent in Wales. falling back to 11. These percentages rose in 2006 to 13. but fell in England to 75.1 per cent in 2006.000 50.5 per cent in England. Northern Ireland and England. Introduction This article updates that published in December 2006. In 2005 Scotland exported 14. Chapter 5 and 7 and so the definitions used are identical to those in the Digest.000 Generators other than MPPs 200. 8.4 per cent in Northern Ireland and 76.

1% Northern Ireland 2. As part of its commitment to improving the quality of its statistics. Because of definitional and other differences set out in the Technical Notes to Chapter 5 of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2007.Special feature – Sub national electricity figures high price of gas in 2006 meant that gas’ share of generation in England and Wales was lower than in 2005. Northern Ireland and England so estimates have been made using the same proportions of electricity supplied as for the UK as a whole. The role of renewables is discussed in a separate section below. England 80. although some major power producers (MPPs) also operate generators that are partially CHP. In Wales 26 per cent of generation in 2006 was from coal (up from 19½ per cent) while in England the increase was from a 37 per cent share to a 40 per cent share. Renewables The share of renewables in electricity generation or sales is measured in two different ways in the UK1. In Scotland coal’s share of generation was 33 per cent. Wales. In Scotland in 2006 other generators had a 15 per cent share. Combined heat and power (CHP) forms the bulk of “Other generators” generation.7 per cent in Wales. paragraph 7.8 per cent in England. up from 25 per cent. In Northern Ireland the share of coal in generation increased by 1 percentage point. The share of generation accounted for by generators other than major power producers varies across the UK. Secondly there is the measure that is based on the Renewables Obligation (RO) (and the analogous Renewables Obligation (Scotland) .8% and Wales. there is a statistical difference between the calculated consumption and the sales data in Table 1.5 on the BERR Energy Statistics web site (see references at the end of the article). First there is the “headline” overall measure that shows the percentage of electricity generation accounted for by all renewables. and Northern Ireland and published as monthly Table 5. 17 December 2007 . Statistical differences reported in Table 1 are lower than reported in last year’s corresponding table. 2. while in England the share was 8½ per cent.4 per cent in Northern Ireland and 80.7% Scotland 10. CHP statistics for 2006 on a sub-national and regional basis were published in the September 2007 issue of Energy Trends. BERR continues to examine this statistical difference and look further at the component series to see where the differences might be arising and thus where improvements to the data might be made.1 per cent of electricity consumption in the UK was in Scotland. Consumption figures have then been calculated by deducting net transfers and losses figures from the electricity supplied figures shown in Table 1. Wales 6. in Wales 8 per cent and in Northern Ireland 4½ per cent. These show (Chart 2) that in 2006 10.8. In Northern Ireland gas accounted for around two thirds of generation.ROS) which shows the percentage of electricity sales accounted for by renewables eligible under these 1 There is also a third method used by the EU – a Renewables Directive basis – see Chapter 7 of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2007. Consumption and sales Chart 2: Electricity consumption in 2006 Transmission and distribution losses are not separately available for Scotland. 6. all little changed from the percentage shares in 2005. but in Scotland the share increased because of the large reduction in nuclear’s share of Scottish generation. Correspondingly coal’s share rose in all countries compared with 2005.4% Since 2001 separate data have been collected for sales of electricity from the England public supply system in Scotland.

3. page 26: www. Table 3 shows the overall measure for 2004.96 3.gov. all plant using renewable sources built before 1990 (unless re-furbished).56 4.92 3.14 Scotland’s and Wales’ hydro outputs in 2003 and 2006 were affected by the dryer weather that caused a 34.87 3. Northern Ireland and the regions of England in 2006” – Energy Trends September 2007.5: www.47 in 2006 which are similar to the overall renewables percentages in Table 3 December 2007 18 . 3 The corresponding percentages for the UK as a whole are 3. 3. What is known from Table 2 is that the amount of ROS eligible electricity generated in Scotland in 2006 was 16½ per cent greater than in 2005 and the amount of RO eligible electricity generated in Wales in 2006 was 23 per cent more than in 2005.gsi.99 per cent in 2005. 2005 and 2006.06 per cent in 2004. On a RO basis. but also available on the BERR web site at: www. In England the increase was 7½ per cent and in Northern Ireland 26 per cent.gov.gov.berr. 4. and 4.03 2. but it fell back to 12.42 England 2.21 per cent in 2003. Renewables statistics for 2006 on a sub-national and regional basis were published in the September 2007 issue of Energy Trends.pdf “Renewable energy in Scotland.55 Scotland 11.berr.13 12. The amount of electricity from renewable sources transferred from Scotland or Wales to England. page 16: : www.13.00. or from Scotland to Northern Ireland is not known.35 2. and energy from mixed waste combustion unless the waste is first converted to fuel using advanced conversion technology.23 4. In the UK as a whole RO eligible electricity production increased by 11 per cent.56 13. Wales.15 in 2005 and 4.berr. Table 3: Renewables percentages Overall renewables percentage 2004 2005 2006 UK 3. the percentage measure for the UK (2.uk References: Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2007.pdf 2 Specific exclusions from eligibility for the RO are existing hydro plant over 20 MW. Published for BERR by The Stationery Office £40. Northern Ireland and the regions of England in 2006” – Energy Trends September 2007. This share is very much higher than other parts of the UK can produce.3 in 20063.58 4.gov.04 Northern Ireland 2. Under the headline measure.html “Combined Heat and Power in Scotland.gov.berr.51 in 2004.4 in 2005 and 16.99 Wales 2.uk/energy/statistics/publications/dukes/page39771.5 per cent reduction in UK hydro generation in 2003 compared with 2002 and a 6.uk/energy/statistics/source/electricity/page18527.uk/files/file41460. the high proportion of natural flow hydro in Scotland took the 2005 renewables percentage to 13. The main differences are the exclusion from the RO of large-scale hydro and nonbiodegradable wastes2. However.uk/files/file41460.Special feature – Sub national electricity figures obligations.4 per cent reduction in 2006 compared with 2005.99 in 2006. In 2004 this percentage was 13.15 per cent in 2006) is not meaningful at sub-national level because electricity generated in one part of the UK can be sold in a different part of the UK.9 rising to 15.html Energy Trends monthly Table 5. Wales. in Scotland the renewables target (which is to reach 31 per cent by 2011 and 50 per cent by 2050) is expressed as generation as a proportion of gross electricity consumption (defined as generation plus transfers into Scotland less transfers out of Scotland).Janes@berr. Mike Janes Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5186 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Mike.

787 461 10.476 329.777 24.722 22.326 +1.372 1.248 19 442 350 9.326 1.643 267.656 36.838 1.649 329 7.246 34.403 109 2.212 36.924 -9.733 24.306 +86 38.859 22.636 4.203 8.265 92 8.125 -115 -781 30.608 34.896 1.777 5.711 53.322 4.628 1.609 34.321 9.299 +423 45.241 -8.975 23.744 354.672 30.141 25.145 5.914 330 7.720 328.600 5.063 +203 2006 UK total Scotland Wales 361.999 351.170 573 1.552 19.687 2.555 1.851 571 1.286 4.762 11.036 24.175 21.196 267.888 1.721 284.125 -10.609 10.282 -10.972 342. Northern Ireland and England.329 35.437 -905 1.290 35.044 GWh Northern Ireland 9.666 -7.915 -1.848 32.925 25.649 21.344 4.388 41.861 329.357 8.594 England 274. Wales.780 262.788 267.392 16.866 23.414 299.Table 1: Generation and supply of electricity in Scotland.647 +512 278.826 3.914 304.340 4.497 1.517 12.308 380 1.778 350 135 514 8.073 277 134 512 8.160 104 8.239 399 9.073 +660 41.675 23.064 +913 -778 Statistical difference between calculated consumption [A] and sales [B] Figures in this table do not sum exactly to the UK totals shown because of rounding .366 19 December 2007 30.086 268.036 905 2.600 5.259 26.152 24. 2005 and 2006 2005 Northern UK total Scotland Wales Ireland England Generated by Total generated Own use by Other generators Electricity supplied (net) by Other generators Used in pumping at pumped storage and other own use by MPPs Electricity supplied (net) by MPPs Electricity transferred to England (net of receipts) Electricity transferred to Northern Ireland (net of receipts) Electricity transferred to Europe (net of receipts) Transfers from other generators to public supply Transmission losses Distribution losses Consumption from public supply [A] Consumption by autogenerators Total Electricity consumption Electricity sales (public supply) [B] Major power producers Other generators 362.201 7.687 2.160 398.009 382 1.267 111 2.399 2.295 7.448 49.525 32.394 6.874 4.070 3.754 4.362 -13.894 1.688 21.753 23.418 286.264 7.902 328.779 22.370 18.084 2.670 398.495 35.445 27.991 339.638 18 381 325 8.576 29.378 11.736 24.601 9.113 267.

3% 8.3% 19.922 2.483 81.5% 36.3% 17.356 2.961 4.412 8.488 890 8.588 1.8% Oil 1.5% 37.617 5.139 5.826 2.638 19 253 4 277 277 19 32 299 461 10.203 105 802 231 648 49 867 9 2.914 275 867 267 1.750 3.300 2.372 4.848 51 1.212 3.116 14.670 398.7% 40.3% 3.897 7.0% 1.232 9.2% 1.227 6.925 3. 2005 and 2006 2005 UK total Scotland Major power Coal producers: Oil Gas Nuclear Thermal renewables Hydro natural flow Hydro pumped storage Total Other Coal Generators: Oil Gas Thermal renewables Other thermal Hydro natural flow Non thermal renewables Wastes Total Total generation by fuel within Renewables Hydro which: Wind.454 9.912 578 36.626 643 41.200 8.4% 20.201 41 967 60 585 68 715 11 2.9% 3.656 3.615 878 4.326 4.246 4.5% 18.291 3.141 3.853 361.141 3.5% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Shaded areas indicate where separate figures for Northern Ireland cannot be given and the data have been merged with data for England Figures in this table do not sum exactly to the UK totals shown because of rounding .0% 0.043 613 25.8% -% 1.894 2.668 32.175 1.525 30 1.9% 24.419 15.5% 35. solar Other Total Renewables eligible under the renewables obligation Percentage shares of generation: 130.399 49.096 2.9% 37.714 25 274.272 7.7% 32.023 714 6.084 53.992 13.287 714 749 2.842 176 196 2.092 556 6.3% 4.248 32 299 19 350 350 20 Coal 33.649 281 715 236 1.089 46 663 524 25.707 98.250 18. Wales.036 16.231 32.346 3.5% 21.023 29 8.010 36 226 2.6% Hydro natural flow 1.897 759 10.930 362.716 137.220 54.546 3.232 651 36.7% 19.954 2.Table 2: Generation of electricity by fuel in Scotland.787 6 19 253 399 9.681 3.576 1.2% 2.570 4 278.9% 0.799 9.0% 2.984 7.043 8.138 12.8% 2.576 Wales 8.160 398.4% 5. Northern Ireland and England.751 Wales 6.705 6.239 109.870 13.2% Other renewables 3.476 1.232 1.347 14.9% 26.0% 40.883 126.914 304.711 34.7% 25.031 11.414 299.1% Nuclear 20.1% 3.451 2.3% 17.618 2.746 3.701 286 6.286 Northern Ireland 2.8% 2.095 2.903 1.683 1.772 14.3% 0.605 4.630 3.296 9.281 43 7.3% Gas 38.795 55.296 18.1% 1.121 595 962 1.133 14.184 45.0% 46.8% 1.967 48 1.555 73 1.455 331 6.0% 0.9% 22.581 2.342 40.8% Other 1.9% 0.1% 7.609 4.464 4.409 1.0% 3.225 2.3% 9.838 34 663 8.637 75.059 UK total 146.554 Scotland 17.2% 9.448 34.1% 1.251 3.727 3.051 GWh England 117.281 595 6.926 2.912 9.5% -% 3.829 109. wave.2% 100% December 2007 2006 Northern Ireland England 2.9% 37.

the agents of the electricity suppliers who collate/aggregate electricity consumption levels for each meter. This has been conducted by BERR which replaced DTI in June 2007. To find the geographical location of each MPAN. the 22 individual unitary authorities in Wales. there are about 10. based on either an annualised advance (AA) or an estimated annual consumption (EAC). Scotland. The DAs’ systems for NHH meters work around a 14-month settlement period. and separately Wales. DAs responsible for non half hourly (NHH) meters (domestic and small commercial customers) were asked to use a standard run on their systems over the 2007 August Bank Holiday weekend to generate annualised consumption rates for the period from 30 January 2006 to 29 January 2007. NUTS1 refers to the 9 Government Office Regions in England. distributors and data aggregators. local and regional consumption estimates were compiled. the 41 individual or groups of whole/part unitary authorities and/or local enterprise company areas in Scotland. The first exercise was reported in the December 2004 edition of Energy Trends with an updated article in the March 2005 edition of Energy Trends. (and the 26 individual district unitary authorities in Northern Ireland). Consumption data for all MPANs are held on the systems of the data aggregators (DAs). 2 ECOES is the Electricity Central Online Enquiry Service 1 21 December 2007 . the information has been taken from the administrative systems of the electricity companies’ data aggregators. As before. data were collected for all electricity metering points and then aggregated for each of the sub national areas. totalling 12 UK NUTS1 regions. Gemserv provided BERR with the full address and postcode from their new on-line system ECOES 2 at the end of 2006. Once again excellent co-operation from electricity suppliers. NUTS4 refers to the 354 individual London boroughs/metropolitan districts/unitary authorities/local authority districts in England. distributors and their agents to obtain address and postcode information about each MPAN. which ensures that around 80 per cent of the data are based on AAs after 7 months and NUTS (Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics) is a hierarchical classification of spatial units that provides a breakdown of the European Union’s territory for producing regional statistics which are comparable across the EU. totalling 443 UK NUTS4 regions. Summary Estimates of final electricity consumption at both local authority (NUTS4 1 ) and government office region (NUTS1) levels assist local and regional bodies to monitor and implement the energy efficiency programmes in their own areas. that the task could be easily accommodated within the work schedules of the DAs. Gemserv is the company that provides one central access point for suppliers. The information that was provided by the data aggregators was as follows: • Consumption data. but while the quality of the data is a further improvement on that for previous years. The AA is based on actual meter readings. the statistics shown here are again classed as “experimental” while detailed comparisons are made between the four years of data to ensure that all the shortcomings of the earlier years’ data have been understood and allowed for. By merging the DAs’ consumption data with Gemserv’s postal address information. NUTS5 areas are broadly Electoral Wards. whilst the EAC is an estimate of consumption based on historical information and the profile class of the customer. The results of the second exercise were presented in an article in the December 2005 edition of Energy Trends and the results of the third in an article in the December 2006 edition of Energy Trends. (and Northern Ireland). has led to total and average consumption levels for domestic and industrial/commercial sectors being made available here. Methodology To produce 2006 annualised data at both local authority (NUTS4) and government office regional (NUTS1) levels. the services of a company called Gemserv are used. and that the costs to the electricity industry of providing the data were minimised.000 NUTS5 areas in Great Britain. Every metering point has a unique reference number called an MPAN or meter point administration number – which may have one or more meters. This ensured that the data generated were consistent.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption Regional and local electricity consumption statistics for 2006 The fourth annual exercise to collect and publish electricity consumption data at a regional and local level has now taken place.

All HH meters were allocated to Industrial and Commercial.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption approximately 92 per cent after 14 months. December 2007 22 . Where a NUTS code could not be allocated in this way. The AFPD was re-named as the NSPD (National Statistics Postcode Directory) in May 2006. around 80 per cent of NHH MPAN data collected for this exercise was based on electricity consumption taken from actual meter readings. This work resulted in reducing the number of MPANs with consumption that could not be allocated to a NUTS4 area to around 30. There are currently around 109. Inspection of the individual data showed that there were very few recognisable private addresses with consumptions over 100. it was not possible to allocate a NUTS code to around 900. In addition. Out of the 31.000 HH meters in Great Britain (up from 105. There are around 28¾ million domestic. So by generating the data for BERR in August 2007. industrial and commercial NHH MPANs in Great Britain. on occasions it was only possible to allocate a NUTS4 code but not a lower level MLSOA code.1 million records in the Gemserv dataset. changing those that started 1P to IP. any address containing a PO Box number will be assigned to the NUTS area of the Post Office sorting depot. or just post town. invalid or missing.000 MPANs did not have an MLSOA code allocated. For NHH meters the profile attached to each MPAN was also given and profiles 1 and 2 were allocated to the Domestic sector and profiles 3 to 8 to Industrial and Commercial. Any nominally domestic MPANs with consumption over 100.000 kWh cut off is known to have classified some very large domestic users to the industrial and commercial sector but this is more than outweighed by the number of small industrial and commercial consumers that will have been allocated to the domestic sector.600 of this being due to consumption being greater than 100. SHOP or HOTEL consumption was moved to the industrial and commercial category. BERR/DTI has worked its way through those Gemserv data with incomplete. Additionally. the street and post town. but a significant number between 50. In allocating MPANs to MLSOAs (or Dzones in Scotland). giving a NUTS4 code. based mainly in the south of England. was used to allocate a NUTS code. This was due to the postcode being incomplete.000 and 100. SHOP and HOTEL were not included in the search). The 100. In addition to data linked to domestic and commercial properties.000 kWh. For half hourly (HH) meters (larger commercial customers). and standardising on postcode spacing. DAs ran a simple report on their systems to give the total amount of consumption for the calendar year 2006. A number of invalid postcodes were corrected by automated methods. PLC. These changes resulted in reducing the number of unmatched Gemserv records to 323. the NSPD did not have corresponding codes for all postcodes. the data files also provided consumption levels for unmetered sites including street lighting and electricity used by the electrified railway network.000 in 2005). where the third to sixth variable of the address included text that indicated the address to be of a commercial nature by containing UNMET or UMS (ie unmetered supply) or STR (street lighting) or LAND or LLO (Landlord supply) or STAIR (staircase lighting). For the 2006 exercise the February 2007 NSPD was used. (This refinement was introduced for 2004 but for that year and 2005 only the third variable of the address was searched and LTD. For 2004 and 2005 the Gemserv data was matched against the All Fields Postcode Directory (AFPD) to obtain a NUTS5 code and the NUTS5 code was truncated to 7 characters.000 kWh (ie profile codes 1 and 2) were allocated to the industrial and commercial sector in the same way as they had been for previous years.000 records. During the last 12 months.000 kWh per year.000 meters being reallocated with around 3. for example. invalid or missing postcodes and added complete postcodes from other sources including Royal Mail’s Postcode Address File. those ending II to LL. As a result around 570. TEMP (temporary builders’ supply). LTD.000. Because allocation to NUTS area is by postcode.000. • • • For the 2003 analysis DTI used the Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) Postcode Lookup File in order to assign postcodes first to NUTS5 areas and from there to NUTS4 areas.000 kWh. PLC. In 2006 this process has resulted in 6. This is particularly important for interpretation of data at a level below that of NUTS4 such as the middle layer super output area (MLSOA) analyses described below.

There are more NUTS4 areas in Scotland than Local Authorities. such as very large sites or plant.000 domestic customers are on two-rate or three-rate meters using dynamic teleswitching to control when cheaper rate electricity is made available to consumers and these customers will have two MPANs per address. where in 2006 there was a single monopoly supplier to domestic customers. CVA users have different arrangements with their electricity suppliers to NHH and HH meter customers. A similar system (resulting in multiple MPANs per customer) is available to households in England and Wales (“Economy 10” being one example) but this is less widespread (around 800.gov. 3 23 December 2007 . there is The NUTS4 areas in Scotland do not match exactly the Scottish Local Authority Areas. Northern Ireland Electricity plc.5 TWh in the UK as a whole in 2006. holiday homes and additions to the housing stock will also lead to the number of MPANs exceeding the number of households.000 customers in total). DAs do not hold information on their systems for consumption levels for those industrial consumers. In November 2007 the electricity market was further opened so that any Northern Ireland consumer can select their supplier. Northern Ireland has been excluded because the structure of the electricity industry in Northern Ireland differs from the rest of the United Kingdom. This is because in Scotland it is estimated that some 280.uk/files/file42925. The number of domestic sector MPANs in Great Britain is larger than the number of households by about 6 per cent. Comparison with other published annual figures for 2006 Table 1 compares the total figures shown in Table 3 with corresponding electricity figures published in Chapter 5 of the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2007 (DUKES). In the analysis in the full table Scottish Local Authorities are used in place of NUTS4 giving a total of 408 local areas in Great Britain. This amounted to 24. who receive their electricity as CVA (Central Volume Allocation) users via the high voltage transmission system.uk/energy/statistics/regional/index. However. CVA consumption is particularly important in Wales and so the consumption figure for Wales in Table 3 is lower than consumption estimate given on page 25.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption Regional and local estimates of final electricity consumption data Table 3 shows the amount of electricity consumed by selected local authorities within each government office region. The local authorities within each region have been selected to show those areas with the highest and lowest average consumptions. This creates problems with disclosure. The full table showing all NUTS4 areas 3 within these regions is available on the BERR Energy statistics web site at: www. This means that the sales per MPAN figures understate consumption per household for most local authorities. Commercial and industrial customers may have more than one MPAN per site. although in Scotland there are around 19 per cent more domestic MPANs than households. After allowing for electricity not included in consumption in Table 3 (CVA and Northern Ireland). and exclude those large consumers of electricity that are connected to the high voltage lines of the transmission system. Northern Ireland and the regions of England in 2006”). Much of this “autogeneration” is from CHP schemes and an indication of the regional importance of such schemes can be obtained from an article on pages 26 to 32 of the September 2007 edition of Energy Trends (“Combined Heat and Power in Scotland.gov.berr. any consumer of more than 500 MWh per year can select its supplier from one of 6 licensed suppliers. Also excluded is electricity used by companies that generate their own electricity and consume it without it passing over the public distribution network. BERR has been in contact with Northern Ireland about extending this analysis in time for 2007 so that the whole of the United Kingdom is covered. The table is broken down by domestic and commercial/industrial customers and shows the total amount of electricity consumed in GWh and the number of customers.html www. Wales.berr. Average consumption levels for domestic and non-domestic MPANs are also provided.xls Electricity consumption not covered by the data collection exercise The consumption estimates provided here cover only Great Britain. In addition. Second homes.

Commercial and industrial sector electricity consumption is a function of both the number of commercial and industrial sites in an area and the volume of electricity they use. but some will also be due to the classification of consumption by profile class (see ‘Methodology’ section. Neath Port Talbot and Ellesmere Port and Neston) are of note because in those areas consumption is shared between fewer but larger consumers of electricity.457 kWh 4 . For Great Britain as a whole average domestic consumption per meter point in 2006 was 4.817 +4.300 kWh respectively). Some of this will be due to the overall overestimate of consumption described in the paragraph above. but also in some inner city areas such as Hackney.242 113.517 kWh in Blaenau Gwent while the highest is 7.600 332. above) with small commercial and industrial consumers classified as domestic consumers. December 2007 4 24 .063 6. the Households are not evenly distributed about this mean because households using electricity as their main source of heating will have much higher consumptions.Domestic Statistical difference GWh 117.482 kWh in South Tyneside and 3.466 kWh in Islington.500 and 11.610 (+3.5) Statistical difference Domestic sector (DUKES 2007 Table 5. Preliminary analyses The lowest average domestic electricity consumptions (which is consumption per meter point rather than per home or per household) are 3. The lowest level of industrial and commercial consumption of electricity in total volume terms is recorded in the Isles of Scilly and the Orkney Islands.3% of UK Sales) 116. However.973 8. with the West Midlands being the closest to this average in Regional terms.6 TWh that are included as non-domestic consumption in DUKES. Lewisham and Lambeth. The three areas with the highest average consumption per commercial or industrial meter point (the City of London. Leeds. Manchester. Wealden.291 kWh in the Isles of Scilly (although on a per household basis estimated average consumptions in the Orkney and Shetland Islands are higher than this at around 9.207 117.636 328.9% of GB domestic consumption) In addition the sub-national figures for domestic consumption appear to include about 4.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption a difference of around 4. Commercial centres such as Westminster. the majority of households do not use electricity as their main source of heating and the median MPAN recorded consumption of around 3. However. Torridge and the Western Isles.2 TWh or just under 1½ per cent. Some of this will be due to the fact that around 20 per cent of the data in the sub-national exercise is based on estimates rather than actual meter readings while another factor is that the NHH records run from end January 2006 to end January 2007 and not for the calendar year 2006. 3. Birmingham and Tower Hamlets (Docklands) have a high total overall volume of consumption but they also have a large number of non-domestic consumers so average consumption per commercial and industrial meter point is usually relatively low.156 317.615 kWh per year in 2006.Domestic Industrial and Commercial Total for Great Britain Plus Northern Ireland Plus Sales direct from high voltage lines (based on Ofgem data) Implied UK Sales of electricity UK Sales of electricity (DUKES 2007 Table 5. Table 1: Comparison with published UK statistics for 2006 GB Total in Table 3 .817 200. Glasgow.300 +4.2) Less Northern Ireland Domestic sector GB GB Total in Table 3 . low average consumptions are found in rural areas such as Penwith. The East.449 -3.336 (+1.

07 184.gov.355 14.156 kWh consumption per £ thousand of Gross Value Added* 286.000 10.77 179.157 23.000 kWh per Household 15.76 Wales North East Yorkshire and the Humber North West East Midlands West Midlands Scotland South West East of England South East Greater London Great Britain total (including unallocated) * This uses provisional Gross Value Added in 2005 at current basic prices (workplace based) as available at www. Chart 1: Average gas and electricity consumption per household. Wales ranks the highest and the North East the second highest with Greater London the lowest as Table 2 shows.300 kWh is the highest.19 185.794 9.statistics.452 15. on an estimated consumption per household basis Scotland’s average at over 5.uk/downloads/theme_economy/NUTS1_Tables_1-8.000 5.000 0 East of England Yorks and Humber Great Britain Scotland South East London East Midlands South West West Midlands North West North East Wales Gas Electric (Corrected chart) 25 December 2007 . in terms of electricity consumed per £ thousand of Gross Value Added.315 17. For industrial and commercial use the greatest regional volume of consumption is in Greater London and the least in the North East. However. However.xls.53 219.783 16. Table 2: Electricity consumption in 2006 in the industrial and commercial sector compared with economic activity Electricity consumption (GWh) 11. 2006 25.000 20.44 209.88 161.989 17.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption South East and the South West had the highest domestic sector averages and the North East the lowest.143 200. Table 1.67 219.14 204.827 24.18 143.632 29.8 at 3 December 2007.28 258.17 202.300 17.

In terms of numbers of MPANs unallocated the proportion has fallen from 0. although this was mainly confined to the North West region. Chart 2 similarly combines electricity and gas use per £ thousand of Gross Value Added. There were no duplicated entry problems in 2004 and 2005.2 per cent in 2003 to 3. The South West. above. Chart 1 shows regional consumption for the domestic sector on a per household basis (rather than per MPAN) using the latest available household data.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption Charts 1 and 2 illustrate the data at regional level.1 per cent in 2006.3 per cent in 2006. “PLC”. The statistical difference for domestic sector sales has fallen from 14. other unmetered usage. Although the duplicated data were removed. • The 2003 data as submitted to DTI contained duplicated entries for a large number of MPANs. • Since 2003 there has been a general improvement in the statistical differences between these data in aggregate and corresponding data published in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics. “Shop” and “Hotel” within the address fields. and usage attributable to communal areas in multi-occupied dwellings and housing estates has been extended in 2006 by identifying the words “Ltd”. The regions are shown in order of average annual consumptions but annual average gas consumptions (see article on page 30) are also given. December 2005 and March 2005 editions of Energy Trends.5 per cent unallocated in 2003. much more data have now been allocated to NUTS4 areas than in earlier years. For domestic consumers the average consumption of the unallocated MPANs in 2003 was 10½ December 2007 26 . above). 2006 700 600 kWh per £ thousand GVA 500 400 300 200 100 0 Scotland Great Britain Yorks and Humber East of England North East South West North West South East East Midlands West Midlands London Wales Electric Gas Improvements to the data since 2003 Experimental results for 2005. South East and London use proportionately more electricity than gas per unit of output on this basis. Chart 2: Industrial and commercial electricity and gas consumption per £ thousand of value added. 2004 and 2003 were published in the December 2006.7 per cent unallocated in 2005 and 6.4 per cent of UK electricity sales in 2003 to 1.8 per cent of the Great Britain total compared with 1.7 per cent in 2003 to 0. • These unallocated figures have shown a reduction in bias over the four years. Unallocated consumption accounted for 0.9 per cent in 2006 (see Table 1. In 2006 the duplicate entries resulting from one data aggregator providing data for a slightly later time period have been removed. Mostly these were MPANs for which consumption was zero and full postcodes had not been allocated. it is suspected that the resultant dataset did not adhere strictly to the specification used by other datasets in other regions. • The system for moving non domestic data to the industrial and commercial sector through identifying large non-private household use such as street lighting. The statistical difference has fallen from 3. From 2005 DTI/BERR was able to remove duplicated MPANs that can arise for new connections because of changes to building plans. The 2006 data are judged to be of better quality than those of the earlier years as the following improvements have been made: • As described in the Methodology section.

The data should not be used to infer that consumption in any particular area has gone up or down. which has avoided such discrepancies. additional checks need to be undertaken before the data can be released.459 kWh in 2006 at the Great Britain level. These analyses were produced after the Local Authority based data. Average industrial and commercial consumption per MPAN has shown a small fall from 77.628 kWh in 2004 but this fell back to 4.berr.88 million in 2006.Nadolny@berr. The excellent co-operation in this process of data aggregators and Gemserv is also acknowledged.Janes@berr.876 kWh in 2006.gov. This rose in 2004 but in 2005 fell back to less than 1½ times. For the 2005 data an analysis was produced for both electricity and gas consumption at MLSOA in England and Wales and for intermediate geography zone (IGZ) for local authorities in Scotland. new businesses or established businesses that have closed down.gsi. due to the increased risk of breaching National Statistics data disclosure rules when publishing more disaggregated information. 27 December 2007 . each year the Royal Mail introduces changes to postcodes so that areas of the country that are expanding can be better covered. but rose once again to 3 times the average in 2006. For the unallocated MPANs in the industrial and commercial sector average consumption in 2003 was almost 4 times the average consumption for all industrial and commercial MPANs (ie some very large consumers could not be allocated to a NUTS4 area). mean that changes at region and local authority level between the 2003.Special feature – Regional and local electricity consumption per cent below the average for all domestic consumers but this reduced to 8 per cent below in 2004.25 million in 2003 to 28.223 kWh in 2005 and 81. However.50 million in 2005 and 28.606 kWh in 2005 and then to 4. and Jon Williams.uk The production of this article and the associated tables is very much a team effort. It is hoped that the data will be made available in early 2008 on the BERR website at: www. which resulted in some minor discrepancies between the two data sets. BERR will be seeking to have the data classified as “National Statistics” in 2008. Annually around one million MPANs have no electricity consumption because they relate to new-build properties.gsi. 2004 and 2005 data are most likely to be due to data improvements.38 million in 2004. The total number of MPANs with non-zero electricity consumption recorded is shown to have risen from 28. a similar MLSOA/IGZ analysis was carried out simultaneously with the local authority based analysis.620 kWh in 2004 but rose to 78. As a result of the improvements that have been made. described above.gov.600 kWh in 2003 to 4.gov. Consumption information below local authority area level Following a successful pilot exercise with 6 local authorities during 2005 and 2006 BERR produced an additional analysis of the 2004 Regional and Local Authority based electricity data at middle layer super output area (MLSOA) for local authorities in England and Wales. 28. Hannah Evans. This can lead to discontinuities in the allocation of MPANs to NUTS areas via the NSPD.909 kWh in 2003 to 77.html Mike Janes Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5186 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Mike. There was a small increase in average domestic consumption per MPAN from 4.uk Emma Nadolny Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5188 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Emma. However. 5 per cent below in 2005 and 2½ per cent below in 2006. For the 2006 data.uk/energy/statistics/regional/index. Jennifer Knight. The BERR team includes Julian Prime. An article in the June 2007 edition of Energy Trends described the methodology undertaken to produce this information. The improvements to the data.

9 2.564 178 101 321 201 8.3 52.652 4.117 5.116 109.064.212 69.6 6.738 4.7 Commercial and industrial consumers Sales 2006 GWh 186 205 377 1.482 5.832 94.396 323.2 100.355 736 207 121 1.866 4.7 22.9 34.427 1.390 200.8 124.112 590 60 232 17.929 324.562 85.859 92.062 4.3 69.272.415 Average industrial and commercial consumption 83.924.2 24.3 1.025 167.018 9.2 4.934 28 .6 2.7 107.4 37.405 957 144 335 29.3 242.977 96.0 2.4 2.494 3.8 2.115 327 231 1.759 5.735 55.568 515 180 1.2 2.8 35.7 3.111 379 120 110 294 9.702 4.368 77.6 1.695.5 4.499 Number of MPANs (thousands) 33.772 36.306.9 5.148 17.927.452 275 100 972 1.208 3.9 3.192 4.9 72.454 76.9 179.3 69.173.4 2.392 42.8 48.167 122.4 1.Table 3: Selected regional and local electricity consumption statistics (experimental) December 2007 Domestic consumers Government Office Regions and selected NUTS4 Regions Blaenau Gwent Ceredigion Powys Neath Port Talbot TOTAL WALES Glasgow City Renfrewshire Orkney Islands Clackmannanshire TOTAL SCOTLAND South Tyneside Berwick-upon-Tweed Sunderland Redcar and Cleveland TOTAL NORTH EAST Barrow-in-Furness Eden Copeland Ellesmere Port & Neston TOTAL NORTH WEST Barnsley Ryedale Richmondshire North Lincolnshire TOTAL YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER Chesterfield Corby East Lindsey South Northamptonshire TOTAL EAST MIDLANDS Sales 2006 GWh 110 179 289 232 5.089.273 161.960 4.243 4.4 7.0 125.9 69.293 367 84 103 12.3 12.8 82.7 58.9 3.946 3.3 4.328.4 38.9 2.809 497 452 264 905 36.142 5.9 23.989 Number of MPANs (thousands) 2.8 62.886 3.5 89.4 62.611 72.9 4.8 37.117 240 80 455 242 4.3 All consumers Sales 2006 GWh 296 384 666 1.642 3.2 75.181 113.641 4.8 66.1 27.453.061 3.8 66.195 4.494 125 135 141 146 13.6 1.601 4.521 17.289 11.637 95.9 18.0 15.794 2.457 41.4 2.510 Number of MPANs (thousands) 31.6 31.5 70.7 5.6 27.645 42.394 3.2 34.513 270.707 4.2 94.291 82.6 360.7 15.3 26.465 1.4 228.517 5.8 32.0 25.5 334.425 4.2 3.202 26.8 24.1 1.216 3.721 532 526 746 437 23.829 3.2 132.282 118.256.853 5.260 13.2 5.315 372 316 122 759 23.2 3.6 11.113 6.4 23.0 kWh per MPAN Average domestic consumption 3.157 354 425 424 236 14.279 3.2 31.6 1.1 2.0 161.600 1.442 26.5 62.4 2.1 25.9 34.452.5 25.205 54.218 193.607 33.1 7.3 2.

701 337 155 341 172 17.291 5.251 780 2.966 4.580.5 93.827 948 569 438 2.682.291 4.2 2.6 3.966 4.902.8 61.845 5.3 4.1 9.597 81.433.6 50.644 4.673 1.456.7 7.418 169.6 All consumers Sales 2006 GWh 1.5 200.9 7.4 23.819 4.300 549 281 97 791 16.4 1.3 337.938 4.3 3.457 Average industrial and commercial consumption 81.466 4.4 62.2 2.069 152.413 64.2 45.4 69.8 37.436 221 231 184 307 11.4 2.437 4.8 29.0 3.2 2.2 28.4 18.2 64.094 180.6 39.783 2.045 43.565.9 91.878.988 18.736 771 512 281 1.444.591 5.747 34.265 1.0 2.9 2.8 68.136 658 218 548 27.624 342.341 48.209 70.143 217 235 699 540 24.9 13.2 110.700 59.3 43.632 925 8 545 122 15.4 3.0 40.658 105.758 4.324.040 712 41.1 149.8 5.148 95.525.973 318 682 342 25 13.1 4.3 1.7 68.156 Number of MPANs (thousands) 8.5 3.762 3.193 5.9 17.785 4.2 33.0 0.669 244.964 2.8 Commercial and industrial consumers Sales 2006 GWh 711 360 109 416 17.0 kWh per MPAN Average domestic consumption 3.6 2.041 369 8 262 122 11.974 3.780 4.8 86.5 11.1 92.410 200.7 20.742 42.0 26.578 77.345 4.2 2.3 29.718 29.5 53.9 415.425 4.1 93.816 Number of MPANs (thousands) 110.420 73.662 67.4 20.873 3.581 5.8 244.021 4.428 5.1 26.972 Number of MPANs (thousands) 119.7 44.0 2.181 88 117.414 51.336.5 2.267.1 30.0 39.674.812 4.2 59.4 6.664 86.801 1.0 86.951 87.4 5.499 317.272 7.100 77.149 31.3 26.6 137.7 30.4 217.7 6.294 16 807 244 26.0 3.274 43.597 163.099 28.000 25.Table 3 (continued): Selected regional and local electricity consumption statistics (experimental) Domestic consumers Government Office Regions and selected NUTS4 Regions Stoke-on-Trent Stratford-on-Avon South Shropshire North Warwickshire TOTAL WEST MIDLANDS Norwich Mid Suffolk Castle Point Thurrock TOTAL EAST OF ENGLAND Islington Barnet Hackney City of London TOTAL GREATER LONDON Wealden South Bucks Portsmouth Crawley TOTAL SOUTH EAST Swindon Isles of Scilly Restormel Weymouth and Portland TOTAL SOUTH WEST Unallocated Consumption GREAT BRITAIN Sales 2006 GWh 425 298 110 132 10.489 3.1 6.1 7.843 554 389 1.876 29 December 2007 .8 2.0 110.

xoserve delivers transportation transactional services on behalf of all the major gas network transportation companies and is therefore the custodian of the Annual Quantity (AQ) data. There were 4 NUTS4 areas in Great Britain where National Grid transmitted no gas: Isles of Scilly.000 NUTS5 areas in Great Britain. Orkney Islands and Shetland Islands. However. In addition. the 22 individual unitary authorities in Wales. Truncating the NUTS5 code to 7 characters gives the NUTS4 code. totalling 12 UK NUTS1 regions. there are about 10. Methodology The xoserve data were allocated to NUTS5 areas using the National Statistics Postcode Directory (NSPD) compiled by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is particularly important for interpretation of data at a level below that of NUTS4 such as the Middle Layer Super Output Area (MLSOA) analyses described below. missing or incorrect postcodes (just under 124.Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption Regional and local gas consumption statistics for 2006 Introduction In March 2007 DTI (whose energy responsibilities have now been absorbed by BERR) published the results of exercises covering 2004 and 2005 that converted gas consumption provided by “xoserve” into estimates of gas consumption at a regional and local level (NUTS1 and NUTS4 areas 1 ). NUTS4 refers to the 354 individual London boroughs/metropolitan districts/unitary authorities/local authority districts in England. the NSPD did not have corresponding codes for all postcodes. was due to additional data sources such as the Postcode Address File (PAF) being used to allocate data. the 41 individual or groups of whole/part unitary authorities and/or local enterprise company areas in Scotland. A corresponding dataset for 2004 has also been provided by xoserve and identical methodology was used to produce a NUTS4 level dataset. Additionally.2 million records on the xoserve and independent gas transporters databases in 2006 it was not possible to allocate a NUTS code to only a very small number of records (just 534) because of incomplete. In allocating MPRNs to MLSOAs (or Dzones in Scotland). December 2007 30 . Out of the 22. recently built properties). in 2004 more records had incomplete.000 customers and 16. These data are at Meter Point Reference Number (MPRN) level and BERR was able to use its experience of collecting and analysing the Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN) level data for electricity consumption (see article on pages 21 to 29) to organise and analyse the gas data at this disaggregated level. Because allocation to NUTS area is by postcode. This was analysed in the March 2007 article.900 GWh of consumption. NUTS1 refers to the 9 Government Office Regions in England. to avoid disclosure of data for individual customers (which confidentiality commitments did not permit) National Grid used an algorithm to combine postcode sectors. compared with the 9. In different years different postcodes were selected for amalgamation because the number of customers in a particular postcode sector may have moved above or below the amalgamation threshold. NUTS5 areas are broadly Electoral Wards. (and the 26 individual district unitary authorities in Northern Ireland). This improved matching.000) and data for some of the independent gas transporters were not available and had to be estimated using the 2005 data. The method of allocating data to NUTS areas differs from the method previously used before 2004 when the only data that BERR had access to was National Grid (Transco) data at postcode sector level and entailed apportioning data to NUTS4 areas when postcode sectors spanned more than one Local Authority. (and Northern Ireland). These independent gas transporters account for some 850. on occasions it was 1 NUTS (Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics) is a hierarchical classification of spatial units that provides a breakdown of the European Union’s territory for producing regional statistics which are comparable across the EU. missing or incorrect postcodes. Scotland. This makes comparison between years more difficult. BERR has now carried out a similar exercise for 2006 data having obtained permissions from the gas transporting companies for xoserve to release these data to BERR. and separately Wales. any address containing a PO Box number will be assigned to the NUTS area of the Post Office sorting depot. totalling 443 UK NUTS4 regions. usually. BERR has also augmented the xoserve data with data from eight groups of companies that are independent gas transporters (companies that have installed and own the local gas distribution pipelines between the National Grid network and. Eilean Siar (Western Isles).000 figure for 2005.

Further work by BERR has enabled the non-xoserve data to be allocated to NUTS4 areas and hence to regions and this is set out below in Table 1. Table 2 shows information for a selected number of NUTS4 areas. In addition. However.berr. The annual quantity (AQ) data on which the consumption for each gas meter is based is an estimate of annualised consumption between two meter readings at least 6 months apart with the closing reading taken within the period 1st April 2006 to 31st March 2007.gov. the total consumption of the NUTS4 areas given in this article represents around three fifths of the total UK gas consumption for 2006. and some large domestic consumers to the industrial/commercial sector. Regional and local estimates Table 2 (presented in “landscape” format at the end of this article) shows gas sales via the national distribution network for Scotland. The data exclude any gas passing through other transmission and distribution systems such as those owned by North Sea producers. gas that passes through the National Transmission System and then into another independently owned local distribution system before reaching consumers is included. A weather correction factor is applied (except to sites that have daily meters) so that AQ data are adjusted to normal weather conditions based on a 17 year average. not all AQs are recalculated each year. The data cannot be fully disaggregated into final consumption. The full tables showing all 408 NUTS4 areas 2 are available on the BERR Energy statistics web site at: www. energy industry use and transformation use at NUTS4 level. Of the remaining two fifths. The gas industry uses a cut off point of 73. For these reasons the data cannot be exactly aligned to data in DUKES which are calendar year and not weather corrected. mainly because gas shippers have not provided any new meter readings.html www. either through linking the meter point data to external business databases through postcode or by using information on the electricity meter point database. 2 The NUTS4 areas in Scotland do not exactly match the Scottish Local Authority Areas.berr. The data received from xoserve do not currently contain a reliable profile marker to indicate if the MPRN relates to either a domestic or industrial/commercial consumer.xls Maps showing NUTS4 areas are available from the National Statistics web site at: www. as recorded in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2007 (DUKES).gov. From this information sales per consumer have been calculated.000 MPRNs did not have an MLSOA code allocated.uk/files/file42926. BERR is continuing to investigate whether a better classification can be produced. or data on electricity which are partly calendar year and partly 30 January 2006 to 29 January 2007. almost all of it is gas supplied to power stations and other larger users through the National Transmission System but about 5 per cent is gas supplied through the transmission systems of others.statistics.uk/geography/maps.asp . Wales and the regions of England for 2006. In the analysis in the full tables Scottish Local Authorities are used in place of NUTS4 giving a total of 408 local areas in Great Britain. This incorrectly allocates many small businesses to the domestic sector. Coverage The data represent gas transported through the national distribution system that was previously wholly owned by National Grid. The data do include the two and a half thousand gas consumers whose consumptions are recorded on a daily basis (Daily Metered or DM customers). There are more NUTS4 areas in Scotland than Local Authorities. Domestic sector sales are distinguished from commercial and industrial sales and the numbers of consumers are also given. As such.200 kWh (2.uk/energy/statistics/regional/index. As a result around 200.Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption only possible to allocate a NUTS4 code but not a lower level MLSOA code. The data relate only to distribution and exclude large loads fed directly from the national transmission system (such as certain power stations and large industrial consumers).gov.500 therms) and classifies consumers below that annual consumption level as domestic consumers. However. The number of AQs carried forward is variable but is usually around 4 million. 31 December 2007 .

When comparisons are made between 2006 and data for 2004 and 2005.Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption The NUTS4 areas (local authority areas in Scotland) selected for Table 2 have been chosen to show some of the variation within the wider region.500. High average industrial and commercial consumptions tend to occur where a number of relatively large consumers dominate an area with a relatively small total number of industrial meter points.025 kWh). as can new connections to the gas network.000 0 Charts 1 and 2 illustrate the data at a regional level. Elmbridge (189.000 17. Scotland. South Buckinghamshire (24. Areas with a large number of industrial and commercial meters tend to be major commercial centres such as Birmingham. the North East of England and December 2007 32 . Chart 1: Average gas consumption per household.322) and Chiltern (24. 2006 20.000 12.194) South Buckinghamshire (190.690 kWh). Similarly new industrial and commercial establishments or the closure or run down of existing businesses can have a large effect on the average consumption in a NUTS4 area.454) and Westminster (13.000 kWh.000 15. all have an average of over 3.000 14. followed by Southwark (13.000 19.000 meter points). NUTS4s with the highest per meter point sales in 2006 are shown as well as the areas with the lowest per meter point sales. particularly if that incoming or outgoing business was a relatively large consumer.000 13. Preliminary analyses The lowest average domestic consumptions (strictly consumption per meter point rather than per home or household) in 2006 are 12.586).000 Yorks and Humber East of England Great Britain Scotland North East East Midlands North West South East London West Midlands South West Wales 10.000 11. The highest average domestic consumptions are East Renfrewshire (24. and Leeds (all with more than 5.804) – all inner city areas. Westminster. it should be recognised that in the domestic sector new housing developments can substantially change the average consumption per consumer. As a result Kings Lynn and West Norfolk. Chart 1 shows regional consumption for the domestic sector on a per household (ie per MPRN) basis.442 kWh in Tower Hamlets.000 18.058). The smallest average per meter point industrial and commercial consumptions are found in four rural areas Argyll and Bute (189. Thurrock and Selby.000 kWh per Meter 16.895) and Tandridge (192.

000 or around 2. The publication of this data has enabled councils to monitor and target small areas for further interventions as part of their local energy strategies.xls. Articles in the June 2007 and September 2007 editions of Energy Trends provide more information on the approach to producing this data. The exercise has been repeated. and is currently undergoing disclosure checking before it can be released on the BERR website. Mean and median gas consumption The dataset of consumption at MPRN level enables the distribution of gas consumptions to be examined. Of particular interest are consumptions of 73. Adding electricity consumption per thousand pounds of Gross Value Added (see article on page 21) to the corresponding gas figure. and enhance the implementation of energy efficiency programmes and reduction of CO2 emissions. Chart 2 shows that Yorkshire and the Humber and the North East of England have the highest industrial and commercial gas consumption per thousand pounds of Gross Value Added 3 at more than twice the corresponding figures for London and the South East of England. which are big electricity users. to indicate the more energy intensive regions. makes very little change to the distribution.200 kWh and below covering mainly the domestic sector but also small businesses. Middle layer super output areas are a statistical geography developed by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of the 2001 census.gov. 2006 700 600 kWh per £ thousand GVA 500 400 300 200 100 0 Yorks and Humber Great Britain East of England Scotland South West North West South East North East West Midlands East Midlands London Wales Gas Electric Middle layer super output area (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography zone (IGZ) estimates of gas consumption Following a successful pilot for extending the local authority electricity analysis to middle layer super output areas 4 DTI published 2005 gas consumption data at MLSOA for local authorities in England and Wales and at IGZ for local authorities in Scotland. Table 1.Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption Yorkshire and The Humber have the highest average gas consumptions and London and the South West of England the lowest. In Scotland.statistics. Chart 2: Industrial and commercial gas and electricity consumption per £ thousand of value added. except to raise Wales and the North East of England.8 as at 3 December 2007. 33 December 2007 . They are areas containing a minimum population of 5. a similar system has been devised called data zones. as the gas network is less widespread in Scotland.000 households.uk/downloads/theme_economy/NUTS1_Tables_1-8. In 2004 mean annual consumption per MPRN for this 3 4 Using provisional Gross Value Added in 2005 at current basic prices (workplace based) as available at www. and IGZ cover a smaller number of households than MLSOAs. MLSOA have the advantage of having more stable boundaries and are more homogenous in terms of population when compared to NUTS5 or electoral ward areas. Disclosure is a particular issue for IGZ. Gas demand in the domestic sector is very weather sensitive so this is as expected. which are combined to form Intermediate Geography Zones. above Yorkshire and the Humber. and data for 2006 has been prepared.

812 566.932 42.229 GWh was accounted for by 36 power stations and by consumers in Northern Ireland (who were supplied by a single supply company) and 96.420. Scotland.020 kWh in 2005 and to 18.129 302.829 1. This is not corrected for weather and includes statistical differences.481 57. 13. and 22.500 kWh are particular cases in point.229 96.berr.3 of DUKES 2007) xoserve GB totals as shown in Table 2 (weather corrected to standard 17 year trend) – Table 3 of March 2007 article for 2005 Implied weather correction.827 110. Gas consumption not covered by the national dataset As in the March 2007 article.604 kWh in 2005 and 16. see text above).377 GWh.172 295. Table 1: Sub-national gas consumption data for power stations and large industrial consumers 2005 Power stations and Northern Ireland: East Midlands Yorkshire and the Humber East of England London and the South East North East and North West Scotland and Northern Ireland Wales and the South West Total Large industrial consumers 5 Implied xoserve total – (calculated estimate. Table 1 gives information for the regions of England.100.806 40.150. and by the fact that the periods covered (see Coverage. The median consumptions in each of these years were lower than this at 17. Certain annual consumption values are used as defaults for meters in new properties and for meters that for other reasons had no meter readings on which to base AQs. The difference between these estimates is accounted for by the fact that the xoserve numbers are weather corrected rather than actual gas sales as reported to BERR by suppliers.240 in 2006. gas consumption in the UK amounted to 958.uk/energy/statistics/regional/regional-local-gas/page36200.gov. Wales.973 kWh in 2004 and 17.178 48.007 47. In 2006.360 63.812 GWh by around 70 large industrial sites. subject to confidentiality constraints.010. The values of 12. and Northern Ireland.Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption category was 19. according to Table 4.336 958. When these power station and large consumer figures are subtracted from total UK gas consumption the balance is close to the sum of the domestic and industrial and commercial figures shown in Table 2 (and Table 3 of the corresponding March 2007 article). BERR and xoserve have both undertaken that such commercially sensitive information would not be disclosed.787 kWh in 2006.734 62.327 597. 667. This covers more December 2007 34 . GWh 2006 20. falling to 19.588 69. the relatively small number of sites means that assigning consumptions to NUTS4 areas would disclose the gas consumption of individual sites.257 32.377 34. BERR has produced a breakdown of the remaining two fifths of gas consumption not covered by the xoserve data. High gas prices and warm weather contributed to these reductions.765 41. although some regions are combined so as not to disclose the data for individual consumers or suppliers. 15. However NUTS4 areas on the full regional and local gas tables are available on the BERR energy web site at: www. Of this. above) are slightly different. These local “peak” values were removed from the distributions before the means and medians given above were calculated.983 UK gas consumption (Table 4.3 of DUKES 2007.325 kWh.600.244 41.875 50. Clearly.759 628. it is estimated that 295.398 5 The 2005 data now include all consumers classed as unique sites by xoserve. 20.084 36.html and carry a marker to indicate that they contain either power stations or large industrial consumers. consumers than the previous National Grid/Transco classification.436 32. calendar and other statistical differences.

Special feature – Regional and local gas consumption Consultation
If you have any comments on these estimates please send them to Emma Nadolny at the email address below. Alternatively mail can be addressed to Ms Emma Nadolny, Bay 2101, 1 Victoria Street, London, SW1H 0ET. Emma Nadolny Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5188 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Emma.Nadolny@berr.gsi.gov.uk Mike Janes Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5186 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Mike.Janes@berr.gsi.gov.uk

The production of this article and the associated tables is very much a team effort. The BERR team includes Julian Prime, Jennifer Knight, Hannah Evans, and Jon Williams. The excellent co-operation in this process of xoserve and the independent gas transporters is also acknowledged.

35

December 2007

Table 2: Regional and local gas consumption statistics 2006

December 2007

Domestic consumers (1) Sales 2006 GWh 449 635 543 818 19,599 3,640 794 206 530 34,342 1,013 402 193 1,029 20,018 496 1,333 508 191 51,567 1,713 1,140 382 447 37,954 619 510 223 429 30,484 Number of MPRNs (thousands) 27.69 30.20 31.19 46.22 1,059.75 226.51 32.15 10.36 26.40 1,784.50 56.90 16.89 9.66 57.64 1,051.0 31.06 59.45 27.26 10.01 2,763.99 106.20 54.91 19.76 24.13 2,021.33 38.20 24.44 11.16 23.54 1,648.55

Commercial and industrial consumers Sales 2006 GWh 261 289 128 1,597 12,803 2,915 149 50 1,361 24,468 406 136 60 1,265 12,317 562 680 104 634 30,642 1,306 584 135 1,260 26,898 382 328 71 1,027 17,491 Number of MPRNs (thousands) 0.58 0.52 0.48 0.62 15.46 4.48 0.68 0.27 0.51 32.53 0.81 0.32 0.20 0.61 15.71 0.40 1.54 0.35 0.24 46.56 1.75 1.40 0.47 0.35 35.10 0.66 0.61 0.26 0.42 26.95

All consumers Sales 2006 GWh 710 925 671 2,414 32,401 6,555 943 256 1,891 58,811 1,420 538 253 2,295 32,335 1,059 2,013 612 852 82,209 3,020 1,724 517 1,707 64,852 1,001 838 294 1,456 47,976 Number of MPRNs (thousands) 28.27 30.72 31.67 46.83 1,075.22 230.98 32.83 10.63 26.91 1,817.03 57.70 17.21 9.86 58.25 1,066.75 31.46 61.00 27.61 10.244 2,810.54 107.95 56.31 20.23 24.48 2,056.42 38.85 25.05 11.42 23.95 1,675.50

Sales per MPRN - kWh Commercial and industrial 450,051 556,457 269,936 2,579,193 827,908 651,458 219,713 189,025 2,663,630 752,127 502,963 426,479 296,770 2,077,438 784,002 1,414,154 440,464 300,456 2,674,636 658,252 747,259 417,143 287,326 3,578,856 766,534 575,493 539,073 271,943 2,474,282 649,144

Domestic

Government Office Regions and selected NUTS4 Regions Gwynedd Blaenau Gwent Pembrokeshire Wrexham TOTAL WALES Glasgow City East Renfrewshire Argyll and Bute Moray TOTAL SCOTLAND (2) Middlesborough Castle Morpeth Alnwick Redcar and Cleveland TOTAL NORTH EAST Barrow-in-Furness Macclesfield Copeland Eden TOTAL NORTH WEST City of Kingston upon Hull Harrogate Craven Selby TOTAL YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER Lincoln Derbyshire Dales Rutland Corby TOTAL EAST MIDLANDS

16,199 21,040 17,401 17,695 18,493 16,070 24,690 19,859 20,081 19,245 17,809 23,812 20,008 17,857 19,046 15,956 22,427 18,617 19,117 18,657 16,135 20,752 19,353 18,526 18,777 16,211 20,861 20,013 18,233 18,492

36

Table 2: Regional and local gas consumption statistics 2006

Domestic consumers (1) Sales 2006 GWh Number of MPRNs (thousands)

Commercial and industrial consumers Sales 2006 GWh Number of MPRNs (thousands)

All consumers Sales 2006 GWh Number of MPRNs (thousands)

Sales per MPRN - kWh Commercial and industrial 456,179 286,400 250,731 1,244,216 621,888 563,705 224,669 239,145 4,165,737 620,768 575,678 216,886 845,857 1,167,714 446,851 487,937 190,895 189,194 1,621,577 422,413 217,293 258,929 1,831,141 3,291,683 540,173 43,252 605,218

Domestic

622 38.37 266 0.58 887 38.96 Bromsgrove 721 34.55 193 0.68 914 35.23 South Shropshire 133 7.70 38 0.15 171 7.82 East Staffordshire 693 39.23 798 0.64 1,490 39.87 TOTAL WEST MIDLANDS 36,676 2,013.38 21,172 34.05 57,848 2,047.42 Norwich 866 56.09 550 0.98 1,415 57.06 Castle Point 681 34.08 86 0.38 767 34.45 Three Rivers 695 32.29 203 0.85 897 33.14 Thurrock 894 54.44 2,649 0.64 3,543 55.07 TOTAL EAST OF ENGLAND 34,679 1,923.17 19,766 31.84 54,445 1,955.01 Tower Hamlets 918 73.76 803 1.39 1,720 75.16 Barnet 2,660 122.22 747 3.46 3,406 125.67 Greenwich 1,479 91.21 995 1.18 2,474 92.37 Newham 1,409 89.93 1,310 1.12 2,720 91.05 TOTAL GREATER LONDON 50,943 2,923.45 26,007 58.20 76,950 2,981.65 Portsmouth 1,115 75.96 528 1.08 1,644 77.04 South Bucks 594 24.41 191 1.00 785 25.41 Elmbridge 1,135 48.83 385 2.04 1,520 50.86 Swale 820 48.98 955 0.59 1,775 49.57 TOTAL SOUTH EAST 55,121 3,008.46 23,669 56.03 78,790 3,064.50 Penwith 242 17.21 59 0.27 301 17.48 East Dorset 639 32.26 101 0.39 740 32.65 Restormel 367 22.92 773 0.42 1,139 23.35 West Somerset 123 7.74 385 0.12 508 7.85 TOTAL SOUTH WEST 27,785 1,686.00 14,305 26.48 42,090 1,712.48 Unallocated 10 0.56 17 0.40 28 0.96 GREAT BRITAIN 399,179 21,884.18 229,555 379.29 628,733 22,263.48 (1) Customers with an annual consumption of less than 73,200 kWh which will include some small industrial and commercial consumers

Government Office Regions and selected NUTS4 Regions Worcester

16,196 20,852 17,313 17,658 18,216 15,441 19,978 21,518 16,414 18,032 12,442 21,760 16,218 15,672 17,426 14,689 24,322 23,239 16,744 18,322 14,056 19,799 15,991 15,909 16,480 18,455 18,241

37
December 2007

berr. Alternatively mail can be addressed to Julian Prime.gov. There are also no estimates of “heat sold” as the source data that is currently available is already heavily modelled at the UK level. and the consumption estimates should be treated as indicative. and the incorporation of point-source energy data from installations that participate in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme. industrial and domestic use of petroleum and renewables.uk/files/file42996.gov. In a similar vein.pdf www.uk/files/file41626.berr.uk/energy/statistics/regional/other/page36195. The AEA Energy and Environment report on how the estimates were compiled can be found at the following link: www.uk December 2007 38 .xls Further information on the estimates including a guidance note for data users on how to interpret the BERR local and regional energy data. The dataset covers consumption of a number of different fuel sources including coal. much of the base data for the estimates was obtained from the NAEI. non electricity and non road transport fuels in 2005 The March 2007 edition of Energy Trends contained a short article advising readers that 2004 consumption estimates of non gas. Estimates of similar data for 2005 have now been produced for BERR by AEA Energy and Environment who are responsible for the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI). robust estimates for areas below local authority level (such as Middle Layer Super Output Area) cannot be produced. Whilst methodological changes are made to improve the modelling. Users are advised not to directly compare the local authority estimates for 2003.berr.html Comments or further enquiries regarding this dataset should be addressed to Julian Prime at the email address below. 1 Victoria Street. London.gov. BERR. and therefore cannot be further disaggregated. 2004 and 2005.pdf The dataset of the 2005 estimates at local authority and government office regional levels can be found at the following link: www.gov. non electricity and non road transport at local authority (NUTS4) and regional (NUTS1) levels.Prime@berr. manufactured solid fuels.berr.gov. as consumption cannot be sensibly allocated to a NUTS4 area.Special feature – Regional and local energy consumption Regional and local estimates of non gas.gsi. the statistics are classed as experimental. Julian Prime Energy Consumption Statistics Tel: 020 7215 6178 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Julian. As with data for 2003 and 2004.uk/files/file42998. and access to the 2003 to 2005 modelled datasets is available respectively from the following web links below: www. These include more sophisticated modelling of domestic and rail consumption in Northern Ireland. it has not been possible to produce local authority estimates for petroleum consumption for aircraft and national navigation. Bay 206-212. SW1H 0ET. Users should note that for the 2005 estimates AEA have implemented some methodological changes to their modelling procedure.

1 xoserve was set up in May 2005 following the re-structuring of the gas distribution network to deliver transportation transactional services to gas shippers on behalf of the gas transporters. together with details of where additional information about the source. This applies in particular to the non-gas. the statistics presented in this article are classed as experimental. electricity. The road transport fuels figures were produced for BERR by AEA Energy and Environment using information on emissions from the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) combined with traffic flow data produced by the Department for Transport (DfT). The fuels and sectors which have not been allocated to local or regional level are shown in Table 1. When combined. which emphasised the importance of local and regional decision making in energy policy. In summary. The project was initiated following the 2003 Energy White Paper. paragraph 1. The sources and fuels which have been mapped to regional and local level are shown in Table 2. as described in Chapter 1. however BERR is working towards ensuring that full National Statistics status for the data are gained by March 2008. Due to limitations of the source data. gas in March 2007. the information from these sources covers the majority of final energy consumption in a locality. This article combines the consumption statistics for these four datasets to give total energy consumption at regional and local level in 2005. However it was recognised that it would not be meaningful to allocate energy consumption locally or regionally for some energy uses. Estimates of 2005 consumption for electricity were released in January 2007. It was not possible to model non-energy use of petroleum products and natural gas. As part of this project. The electricity statistics were produced by collecting consumption data for all electricity meters within Great Britain from the electricity suppliers and then allocating these to a NUTS4 area using the NSPD and the Postcode Address File (PAF). non-electricity and nonroad transport fuels which are heavily modelled and often based on many different sources of information. Together with the aforementioned regional information. methodology and commentary can be found. a number of local and regional datasets have been produced for 2005 (data are also available on the BERR website for 2003 and 2004).Special feature – Regional and local energy consumption Regional and local total energy consumption statistics for 2005 Introduction This article provides further details behind the 2005 estimates of total energy consumption that are published on the BERR regional energy consumption statistics website. road fuel and “other” fuels all contain a detailed description of the methodology by which the estimates were obtained. The table also gives the overall quantity of fuel consumed in these sectors together with the percentage of final energy consumption attributable to each. The remaining fuels were also modelled by AEA using spatial data produced for the NAEI. This work forms part of the BERR regional energy project set up to make available energy consumption data below national level. 39 December 2007 . in particular aviation and shipping.35 of the 2007 edition of the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics (DUKES). the gas data were obtained from xoserve1 and the independent gas transporters. and so a decision was made to exclude these uses from the analysis. some estimates at local and regional level are less robust than others. nor was it practical to allocate heat sold at local and regional level since the source for this information is already heavily modelled. road transport in June 2007 and remaining fuels in this edition of Energy Trends. Methodology The individual articles on gas. Thus the local estimates for these fuels should be treated as indicative. and at present BERR wish them to be classed as experimental. then mapped to NUTS4 areas using geographical information held on the National Statistics Postcode Directory (NSPD).

1 December 2007 40 .gov. and those obtained for combining local and regional estimates.berr.370 1. electricity consumption in Northern Ireland has been combined with the 0.pdf There are no local authority gas and electricity data for Northern Ireland as in 2005 these markets were dominated by single suppliers and any data released would be potentially disclosive.856 1. Individual reconciliations with published UK figures are contained in the relevant Energy Trends articles for the individual fuels. NAEI modelling: Remaining fuels . where appropriate adjustments for the treatment of consumption in Northern Ireland are explained. together with other definitional and technical reasons for differences between the aggregated UK figures published in the DUKES. Information for road transport and the remaining fuels have been analysed to include local authorities within Northern Ireland since the majority of these figures are modelled. Similarly. To prevent disclosure. the total gas figure for Northern Ireland has been merged with the Great Britain consumption from large industrial users and power stations.80% 0. “Miscellaneous”.BERR Regional Energy Consumption Website and this edition of Energy Trends Petroleum Petroleum Petroleum Manufactured Solid Fuels Manufactured Solid Fuels Coal Coal Renewables and waste Rail transport Industrial & commercial Domestic Industrial Domestic Industrial & commercial Domestic All sectors Commercial includes the DUKES categories “Commercial”. 2 3 Figures are taken from Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics (DUKES) 2006 Total Final Energy Consumption is taken from DUKES 2006.Special feature – Regional and local energy consumption Table 1: Fuels and sectors not included at regional and local level2 Fuel Derived gases Petroleum products Petroleum products Heat sold Consumption sector Industrial Air transport National Navigation All sectors Quantity (ktoe) 280 13. Table 1.uk/files/file41626.16% 8. and “Agriculture” Additional information on how the sub national estimates of energy consumption were compiled is available in the guidance note below for data users: www.05% 0. NAEI and DfT: Energy Trends June 2007 AEA Energy and Environment.5 per cent of total GB electricity consumption that it was not possible to allocate to a specific local authority. “Public Administration”.309 Percentage of total final energy consumption3 0.76% Table 2: Sources for further information regarding fuels and sectors modelled at regional and local level Fuel Electricity Electricity Gas Gas Petroleum Consumption sector Industrial & commercial Domestic Industrial & commercial Domestic Road transport Source of estimates and further information Data from electricity meters: Energy Trends December 2006 Data from gas meters: Energy Trends March 2007 AEA Energy and Environment.

BERR therefore advises that the total energy estimates for 2005 should not be directly compared to those for 2004 or 2003 and that the consumption estimates. The full dataset can be found at: www. As mentioned above. the electricity and gas estimates are based on real consumption data. Some of these figures were subsequently revised when the 2007 edition was published in July 2007. particularly for road transport and residual fuels should be treated as indicative.gsi. but the decision was taken not to revise the local and regional figures. For the gas figures there is the additional caveat that their industrial coverage is wider than final consumption. the consumption figures are best interpreted as indicative. better matching of post codes has significantly reduced the number of unallocated meters year on year. shows the two local authorities in each region with the highest and lowest energy consumption by fuel source or end use. It gives a summary of the full dataset which breaks down energy consumption by fuel and end use. However the total unallocated data appears in the “Northern Ireland and Unallocated” row towards the foot of the table.Prime@berr. with some energy industry use and transformation use included at NUTS4 level. For the remaining fuels analysis.uk/energy/statistics/regional/total-final/page36187. Readers are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the methodology sections of the individual articles referred to in Table 2 before attempting to interpret the combined fuel consumption results presented in this article. the data used in this report are currently classified as experimental and the methodology used in producing them is continually improving. the figures were reconciled with 2005 fuel and energy data contained within the 2006 edition of DUKES.uk 41 December 2007 .gov.gov.gsi. Where possible. Hannah Evans Energy Consumption Statistics Tel: 020 7215 2703 Fax : 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Hannah. new data taken from the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and 1 km square gas consumption statistics for the domestic sector have been used to improve the reliability of the 2005 estimates.uk Julian Prime Energy Consumption Statistics Tel: 020 7215 6178 Fax : 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Julian.gov.berr. where this is the case the figures are good quality. In each of the local authority rows.Evans@berr. For the gas and electricity data.html Data interpretation As mentioned earlier. different methodologies have been used to produce the estimates for different fuels. the rows for many local authorities will underestimate their consumption since it has not been possible to allocate some electricity and gas consumption to individual local authorities. which follows this article.Special feature – Regional and local energy consumption When preparing the regional estimates. and shows consumption in GWh and thousand tonnes of oil equivalent (ktoe). Table 3. However the road transport and “other” fuels are heavily modelled and as such could be subject to more variability at local and regional level.

1 573.5 5.8 217.0 296.1 4.2 137.9 3.7 1.3 16.240.9 124.4 106.9 12.399.7 116.2 7.7 22.4 0.2 126.4 49.4 5.7 17.032.9 483.6 82.289.5 6.6 1.258.3 5.7 153.6 14.4 70.1 Natural gas 59.3 759.0 34.1 11.0 13.679.2 315.9 1.9 4.6 13.011.5 46.0 86.2 6.7 0.0 0.4 67.6 2.498.2 422.1 1.9 181.8 89.7 1.0 888.4 153.9 1.9 754.320.0 0.7 162.9 4.4 152.201.8 1.8 205.382.0 16.3 25.6 25.0 332.8 61.6 1.7 4.5 36.6 1.3 1.3 8.0 1.8 Transport 85.1 620.5 31.9 1.1 1.8 0.3 2.6 21.2 31.4 5.2 108.361.919.5 22.2 456.537.4 954.6 82.942.1 0.6 38.1 73.203.5 14.489.702.1 0.1 39.3 566.5 Petroleum(4) 854.4 114.5 190.1 3.9 1.4 56.5 32.7 0.990.5 14.4 108.8 129.120.4 Total fuel consumption 1.2 1.561.640.4 2.6 0.0 1.981.9 1.5 42 .0 0.9 2.705.4 587.2 5.1 327.2 0.3 160.3 4.566.193.6 2.8 Renewables & waste 2.950.250.043.511.4 20.0 443.9 2.7 47.3 3.3 52.533.642.5 11.7 1.0 Manufactured (5) fuels 0.1 20.6 27.343.3 22.6 377.1 53.1 251.510.1 771.1 291.2 5.4 154.6 209.6 66.0 8.7 44.2 39.3 Domestic 92.0 276.2 2.2 178.501.4 2.4 59.1 2.5 0.3 177.2 52.0 1.5 33.907.8 6.0 40.4 126.7 82.3 18.5 1.5 59.2 4.6 42.6 111.5 422.682.2 23.5 83.8 983.6 41.6 138.0 340.9 182.8 237.4 36.1 62.6 462.8 1.980.6 3.9 19.2 1.1 159.2 1.6 December 2007 Consuming Sector (ktoe) Industry & Commercial 834.8 0.3 58.1 492.5 92.6 36.6 182.233.3 2.8 Electricity 91.1 1.8 7.252.8 42.2 53.942.2 0.6 2.062.7 266.1 281.2 0.8 298.9 0.2 0.5 160.2 0.1 46.2 198.5 6.2 22.2 3.9 99.8 567.472.8 63.6 4.3 1.1 1.678.052.6 30.3 1.3 126.8 20.2 14.2 348.400.Table 3: Selected 2005 regional and local energy consumption statistics (experimental) Fuel Consumed (ktoe) Coal(4) Selected NUTS4 Region Pembrokeshire Cardiff Blaenau Gwent Merthyr Tydfil WALES Falkirk Glasgow City Eilean Siar Orkney Islands SCOTLAND Redcar and Cleveland Stockton-on-Tees Alnwick Teesdale NORTH EAST Ellesmere Port and Neston Manchester Rossendale Barrow-in-Furness NORTH WEST North Lincolnshire Leeds Richmondshire Craven YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER 4.5 1.1 2.3 3.6 4.0 76.4 38.9 231.5 255.9 68.945.1 0.4 49.438.3 19.084.9 76.3 27.3 263.8 404.6 318.0 1.

6 136.6 163.8 4.6 368.2 0.9 393.392.3 67.0 24.Table 3 (continued): Selected 2005 regional and local energy consumption statistics (experimental) Fuel Consumed (ktoe) Coal Selected NUTS4 Region Leicester Nottingham Melton Oadby and Wigston EAST MIDLANDS Birmingham Coventry South Shropshire Oswestry WEST MIDLANDS 0.1 26.334.0 3.2 125.394.887.1 0.7 16.3 60.7 108.6 5.818.820.7 43.6 64.501.5 15.5 234.3 123.4 2.4 22.6 127.8 3.8 (4) Consuming Sector (ktoe) Renewables & waste 1.6 7.7 313.9 38.0 780.9 63.5 3.5 619.028.254.1 25.4 13.1 14.1 374.4 77.203.2 168.1 1.396.1 2.8 0.4 122.3 479.4 51.1 4.6 46.7 125.6 32.4 74.1 469.7 0.3 257.5 34.2 26.5 34.2 4.517.6 154.0 219.7 0.553.3 8.562.031.869.8 116.590.0 4.9 130.228.4 29.7 20.2 476.0 34.5 41.4 139.9 3.865.6 105.9 18.4 88.9 208.0 0.4 0.1 111.344.4 4.3 0.1 2.9 Petroleum (4) Natural gas 344.6 35.407.1 0.0 348.0 995.2 136.7 1.2 596.2 282.590.0 0.337.5 153.3 48.8 5.1 331.6 854.8 43.8 159.2 30.4 0.8 35.5 133.5 71.5 28.389.8 31.2 199.3 0.7 105.4 0.6 55.220.1 4.1 243.0 174.4 106.799.3 0.1 0.6 106.3 226.2 Transport 90.7 17.5 Manufactured fuels(5) 11.1 24.9 3.1 1.2 6.5 54.2 45.7 882.2 1.3 330.2 33.9 74.4 685.3 4.0 19.4 310.2 4.8 165.4 80.341.1 12.5 24.8 2.2 40.695.1 14.1 0.8 7.7 4.3 123.7 0.4 33.8 80.2 43 December 2007 Thurrock South Cambridgeshire Castle Point Maldon EAST ENGLAND Westminster Hillingdon Kingston upon Thames Barking and Dagenham LONDON New Forest Tonbridge and Malling Gosport Adur SOUTH EAST .1 10.4 2.5 101.7 76.9 0.6 3.5 257.6 5.7 19.4 0.9 43.414.1 4.3 0.0 93.7 25.1 172.3 23.5 0.2 17.2 0.748.0 113.7 5.7 115.1 21.5 46.3 273.2 311.6 Electricity 144.218.8 47.1 121.8 0.4 54.6 97.7 773.4 3.2 13.3 152.057.4 6.6 15.7 123.193.8 75.7 96.902.231.7 0.1 21.6 1.0 0.7 4.4 29.8 92.6 296.2 0.6 36.947.8 304.1 390.5 69.1 6.7 0.1 11.3 261.7 Domestic 231.4 Total fuel consumption 618.8 53.3 8.1 2.892.1 99.3 107.1 47.3 20.8 428.1 1.7 1.4 3.200.047.3 689.9 7.1 579.3 230.4 Industry & Commercial 297.1 55.1 3.404.6 0.2 144.9 29.193.

067.7 0....5 48..2 26.1 0...146.3 61. .069. Industry & Commercial 294.. .9 185.4 1.8 1..1 21.4 1.9 28.4 3.7 189. .2 196.9 85.363.9 288..0 1. City of South Gloucestershire Christchurch Isles of Scilly SOUTH WEST Belfast Limavady Carrickfergus Moyle 1.1 3.3 .556. Manufactured fuels(5) 0.9 . .7 . ..045.3 59.0 0.9 6.9 ... Electricity 179.1 764.697GWh shown in table 4.295.253.0 .9 86.422.6 .4 177.6 0.004...1 3.. .1 0.3 2.010.654.9 27.5 Petroleum (4) Natural gas 334. public administration.5 of DUKES 2006 (3) Figures from table 1. . .1 0.1 5. . miscellaneous (5) Includes only manufactured solid fuels and not derived gases Energy Consumption as in (3) DUKES (1) (2) . .200. .3 0.. .5 24.5 .5 39.8 131.4 148. . 205. agriculture. . .893. heat generation.1 31.038. .6 86.0 676..6 4.0 3.3 of DUKES 2006 (2) As converted from 329. . .8 28.957..1 0.. commercial. .176..3 .4 294.2 203.131..7 5. . ..1 42.7 0.4 3.842.1 15.December 2007 Table 3 (continued): Selected 2005 regional and local energy consumption statistics (experimental) Fuel Consumed (ktoe) Coal Selected NUTS4 Region Bristol.3 180. .8 57.. UK 3.6 (4) Consuming Sector (ktoe) Renewables & waste 1.6 1. .388.4 185.3 3.9 . (1) As converted from 1.7 11.4 . .. .409.228. .6 2.3 39.2 345.8 56. Domestic 298. ..1 115.943.6 2..9 0. 28.6 2.1 44 NORTHERN IRELAND Great Britain Northern Ireland and Unallocated 3..438.236. . ..0 5.903.8 1.4 0...6 0..146.649.4 60.245.4 0..1 .904.073GWh shown in table 5.0 0.1 0.... 2.0 19..1 3.3 600...9 1. .5 0.220.. . 29.2 180.553..3 39.899.7 35..3 3. energy industry use.7 1..344.8 Total fuel consumption 722. . Transport 128.1 of DUKES 2006 unless otherwise stated (4) Includes coal/petroleum (as appropriate) consumed in autogeneration..

Bioethanol .Special feature – The UK road transport biofuels market The UK road transport biofuels market Background The June 2003 edition of Energy Trends included an article titled “Recent Developments in the UK Road Fuels Industry” which provided an introduction to biofuels and set out the latest consumption data for the UK. Production relies on technological advances. Vehicle manufacturers have introduced 'flex-fuel' models designed to run on a Bioethanol E85 blend (85 per cent bioethanol 15 per cent petrol) or regular fuel. Some alternative biofuels are: • • • • Biomethanol: methanol produced from biomass. sustainability being assured and the fuel quality directive being amended to allow for higher levels of biofuels blending. Currently biodiesel and bioethanol are available as a blended product at some UK filling stations. Biogas: a fuel gas produced by the fermentation of organic matter by bacterial populations in the absence of oxygen. The next generation of biofuels can be made from non-food feedstocks. the EU agreed a new target for biofuels to account for at least 10 per cent of all automotive fuel consumption by energy content by 2020. although there is currently little demand for these vehicles in the UK. 45 December 2007 . for example straw. Whilst these are still the main fuels in terms of current consumption levels in the UK and elsewhere. In March 2007. biofuels are derived by the fermentation from starch or sugar crops (bioethanol) or derived from vegetable or animal oils (biodiesel). the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) will commence in the UK in 2008 and requires 5 per cent by volume of all fuel sold on forecourts to come from renewable sources by 2010. ETBE is used as a petrol additive to increase the octane rating and reduce knocking. Current warranties for cars allow for 5% biofuel blend in petrol and diesel.a diesel-quality fuel generally made from oily crops such as rapeseed.produced by the fermentation of plants rich in sugar/starch. other types of biofuel have emerged and could be viable in the future as road transport fuels Currently. grasses and wood. They include: • • • Biodiesel . Using biofuels as a transport fuel can help contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere and providing fuel security for the future. This tends to be a mix of 95 per cent regular petrol/diesel with 5 per cent biofuel and is labelled as E5 for petrol or B5 for diesel. This article examines the UK’s progress since then in the use of biofuels for road transport. Bio-ETBE (Ethyl-Tertio-Butyl-Ether) is produced from bioethanol. such as residues from agriculture and forestry. Two models currently in development are gasification combined with FT synthesis to produce synthetic diesel and the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material to release sugars from cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent fermentation to ethanol. As part of a wider EU commitment to reduce carbon emissions. Types of biofuel available for road transport use The earlier article highlighted two main types of biofuel currently commercially available for road transport use – Biodiesel and Bioethanol. Bio-oil: an oil fuel produced by pyrolysis (molecular decomposition of biomass through the application of heat and in the absence of air). Biohydrogen is hydrogen produced from a biomass feedstock. although this will rely upon the next generation of biofuels from non-food crops becoming viable.

378 18. Although biofuel use is increasing. The clearance volumes are reported in litres and have been converted into tonnes for the table below (Table 1).0 0.39 0. gradually growing until 2005 before increasing more sharply in 2006 to 209.00 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007* 2.8 thousand tonnes and is estimated to reach 280 thousand tonnes for 2007 as a whole.358 litres per tonne and Diesel (DERV) =1.55 0.33 0. Biodiesel clearances began in 2002 with 2.01 0.0 0.831 0.00 0.5 thousand tonnes.172 19. Bioethanol was introduced in 2005 and has increased steadily to 70.14 0.200 litres per tonne.Fuel duty paid by sales volume.uktradeinfo.05 0. Bioethanol consumption during the same period was 79.188 20. biodiesel consumption was 209.1 105.3 thousand tonnes. it still only accounts for around 1 per cent by volume of overall road transport fuel consumption in the UK (Table 1).901 18.206 17.0 20.com) .00 0.04 0.431 17.24 0.438 19. HMRC provide data in litres which have been converted into tonnes using standard conversion factors of Petrol = 1.2 thousand tonnes and is estimated to be 110 thousand tonnes for the whole of 2007.9 70.620 20.34 0. Table 1: Consumption of Biodiesel and Bioethanol in the UK Year Biodiesel Total Derv Biodiesel Bioethanol % share Total Petrol Unit: Thousand tonnes Bioethanol Total % % share biofuel share of road fuel 0.3 16.0 62.920 18.3 140.2 17.09 0.4 27. Consumption has increased further in 2007.70 1.01 0.09 0.00 0. In the nine months to September 2007.1 thousand tonnes in 2006.313 20.4 280.0 16.729 Source: HM Customs and Revenue (*includes BERR estimates for 2007 Q4) Chart 1: Biofuel Consumption in the UK 300 250 Bio-diesel Bio-ethanol Thousand Tonnes 200 150 100 50 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007* Source: HM Customs and Revenue (*includes BERR estimates for 2007 Q4) Source: HM Revenue & Customs (www. Chart 1 below illustrates the growth of biodiesel and bioethanol in the UK. December 2007 1 46 .Special feature – The UK road transport biofuels market Biofuel consumption in the UK HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) publish clearance data on the quantity of hydrocarbon oil for which excise duty has been paid and which are effectively UK consumption1.59 1.

http://epp. The study found that there were no operational bioethanol producers and therefore 70 thousand tonnes consumption in 2006 (0. BERR invited AEA Energy and Environment to conduct a study as an extension of their contract to collect and compile the UK’s renewable energy statistics.3 per cent of UK petrol consumption) must have been sourced from imports.2 million tonnes of mainly biodiesel.400 biodiesel facilities were in operation and theoretically capable of producing sufficient biofuels for the UK to be an exporter of such fuels.europa. There are a number of other European countries with either zero production or unavailable data (Chart 2).500 1.2 per cent by volume of UK diesel consumption. France was the second largest producer at 546 thousand tonnes followed by Spain (339 thousand tonnes). The estimated supply is larger than the consumption of 140 thousand tonnes (Table 1) reported by HMRC with the difference probably relating to stocks in storage or product in transit. The UK compared with other European countries In 2005 the largest European biofuel producer was Germany2 with 2.eu 47 December 2007 .eurostat.ec. equivalent to 1. Chart 2: European biofuel production in 2005 2.000 litres each per year and less than 500 tonnes in total. The study also estimated 2006 biodiesel exports to be 72 thousand tonnes and therefore implied UK supply to be 170 thousand tonnes. With sparse information on biofuel production.Special feature – The UK road transport biofuels market Biofuel production in the UK Prior to 2005 the UK produced minimal biofuels and consumption was met by imports. The study surveyed companies thought to be producing biodiesel or bioethanol in the UK with the objective to obtain an estimate of UK biofuel production in 2006. the feedstocks being used and the markets being served. all but about 60 of these facilities were small scale producing less than 5. with about half of this sourced from reprocessed vegetable oil. But the situation has moved on and although UK biofuel production has been less than other EU countries (Germany and France for example) production is increasing encouraged by the forthcoming RTFO.000 Thousand Tonnes 1. Biodiesel production was estimated to be at least 242 thousand tonnes.000 500 0 Czech Republic United Kindgom Germany Denmark France Slovakia Luxembourg Lithuania Sweden Switzerland Austria Ireland Poland Italy Latvia Spain Source: Eurostat energy statistics database 2 Source: Eurostat energy statistics database . Sweden (207 thousand tonnes) and Italy (200 thousand tonnes). However.500 2. In 2006 around 1.

Special feature – The UK road transport biofuels market Consumption follows a similar pattern to production.2 million tonnes or 4.uk Lisa Vine Strategic Analysis Team Tel: 020 7215 6072 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Lisa.1 per cent). Charanjit Ransi Strategic Analysis Team Tel: 020 7215 2718 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Charanjit. reduce the pressure for agricultural land. these technologies are in their infancy and may not be commercially available for a number of years. However. In contrast.uk December 2007 48 .Vine@berr.gsi.gov.4 thousand tonnes. Consumption in France was 485 thousand tonnes (1.2 per cent) followed by Spain 339 thousand tonnes (1. with Germany being the largest European biofuels user at 2. the UK’s share of biofuel consumption was 0. These concerns should diminish as the next generation of biofuels are developed. Sweden had the second highest proportion of biofuel consumption at 3 per cent. environmental concerns and technical issues. Chart 3: European biofuel share of road transport fuel in 2005 5 Biofuel % share of road fuel consumption 4 3 2 1 0 United Kindgom Germany Czech Republic France Slovakia Luxembourg Lithuania Sweden Austria Switzerland Ireland Poland Italy Latvia Spain Source: Eurostat Energy Statistics database Biofuel uncertainties and risks There is a degree of uncertainty about biofuels based on their economic viability. This is due to the use of lignocellulosic feedstocks which can improve carbon savings and as they do not compete with food crops.Ransi@berr. but a lower volume of 7.gov. These biofuels offer the potential to contribute to renewable.2 per cent in 2005. low-carbon energy for road transport.gsi.7 per cent by volume of overall road transport fuel.

To this end. The Government’s Photovoltaic Demonstration Programme offering grants for small. Mike Janes Energy Statistics and Analysis Tel: 020 7215 5186 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Mike.Janes@berr.4 of DUKES. revised and updated data were not available for the 2007 issue of DUKES.meaning that the market had a net growth nearly 500 kW more than it had the previous year. medium and large-scale installations.713 kW during 2005. Statistics for the installed capacity and generation from photovoltaics are given in Chapter 7 of the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics. As a review of this area was late in starting.uk 49 December 2007 . The major Government support mechanisms were either through the Major Demonstration Programme or the Low Carbon Buildings Programme.390 kW compared to an increase of 2.gov.9 MW in 2005 and this was reported in Table 7. In reality. In 2006 the annual increase in installed PV capacity was 3. However. Based on these new figures the generation of electricity from photovoltaics during 2006 will be reassessed as part of the 2007 update of the data and published in DUKES 2008.gsi.Government funding supported over three quarters of PV installations during 2006 . the predicted capacity was reduced by 1 MW in 2006 to allow for this. large levels of Government support had led to a larger than predicted number of installations . 2007 (DUKES).26 MW representing an increase of 31 per cent on the previous year rather than the reported 9 per cent decrease. This results in a total installed capacity at the end of 2006 of 14.Special feature – Installed capacity of solar photovoltaics Statistics of the installed capacity of solar photovoltaics Photovoltaics (PV) is the direct conversion of solar radiation into direct current electricity by the interaction of light with the electrons in a semiconductor device or cell. at the time when DUKES was published it had been reported that some PV installations had been taken out of use because they used earlier technologies that could no longer be economically maintained. resulted in an increase in installed capacity to 10.

uk December 2007 50 . In addition. Please contact Jennifer Knight using the email address or telephone number below by 29th February 2008 to express your views. The views of data users are welcome with regards to how useful they would find such commentary. and the format in which it should be released. industrial and service sectors. A hard copy was produced in 2002.gsi.uk/energy/statistics/publications/ecuk/page17658. and since then the consumption tables have been updated annually without any commentary and released on the internet.berr. suggestions of additional data sources that could be drawn upon to supplement the data already published or new areas that users would like to see data on are also welcome. Jennifer Knight Energy Consumption Statistics Tel: 020 7215 6490 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Jennifer. then energy consumption in the transport. The tables and 2002 commentary can be found at: www. either as an internet only publication or as a hard copy publication.Knight@berr. The information is presented in five sections covering firstly overall energy consumption. domestic.html Update in 2008 BERR are considering whether to produce updated commentary to accompany the consumption tables in 2008.Special feature – “Energy Consumption in the UK” 2008 Update of “Energy Consumption in the UK” Background “Energy Consumption in the UK” brings together statistics from a variety of sources to produce a comprehensive review of energy consumption in the UK since the 1970s.gov.gov.

In addition the 2006 update included the production of some additional annex material.gov.Knight@berr.berr. please contact Jennifer Knight using the email address or telephone number below for assistance. Hard copy publications were released in 2002 and 2005.Special feature – “Energy – Its Impact on the Environment and Society” The future of “Energy – Its Impact on the Environment and Society” Background “Energy – Its Impact on the Environment and Society” draws on statistical information from the Digest of UK Energy Statistics and other BERR and Government statistical publications to draw a picture of the key trends in energy statistics.uk/energy/environment/energy-impact/page29982. The 2002 edition was over 160 pages. In 2003. and the considerable resources required to update “Energy – Its Impact on the Environment and Society” two consultations with users were held during 2007 to determine the demand for updates. whilst the 2005 edition contained 44 pages together with an additional 250 pages of material available only on the internet. service quality issues and fuel poverty. However.gsi.uk 51 December 2007 . 2004 and 2006 some of the material was updated. However if you are having difficulty finding it. and the social impacts of domestic competition. All the material can be found at: www. response rates to these consultations were disappointing and as a result BERR have decided not to update this material in the foreseeable future. and released only on the internet.html The future Given the development of new publications such as the annual progress reports on the 2003 Energy White Paper and associated UK Energy Sector Indicators. It includes information on emissions and other environmental consequences from energy production and supply. The vast majority of information previously published in “Energy – Its Impact on the Environment and Society” is still updated elsewhere on the energy section of the BERR website.gov. Readers of the June 2007 edition of Energy Trends were invited to send in their views on the future of this publication. Jennifer Knight Energy Consumption Statistics Tel: 020 7215 6490 Fax: 020 7215 2723 E-mail: Jennifer.

detailed analysis. highlights key areas for attention during the coming year.berr. It is available on the BERR energy web site at: www.html December 2007 52 . As part of the progress report. and details the fuel poverty figures for 2005.uk/energy/fuel-poverty/strategy/index.gov. fuel poverty monitoring. annexes have also been produced on methodology. company schemes and case studies.Special feature – Recent and forthcoming publications Recent and forthcoming publications of interest to users of energy statistics Fuel Poverty The Government’s Fifth Annual Progress Report on the UK Fuel Poverty Strategy was published on 6 December 2007. The report sets out progress made since the last report.

4 46.04 18.3 -9.2 14.22r +49. Indigenous production of primary fuels Million tonnes of oil equivalent Total 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Per cent change 2006 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 2007 Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Per cent change 6 Coal1 20.1.2 97.29 0.10 20. Excludes gas flared or re-injected.3 238.27 3. Includes solid renewable sources (wood.15 0.3 127.December 2007 55 1 TOTAL ENERGY TABLE 1. landfill gas and sewage gas.9 21.9 3. straw and waste).49 3.6 18.9 84.2 2.28 3.2 Natural gas4 104.4 216. 6.52 0. Crude oil.58 0.4 196.2 3.27 0.89 -8. a small amount of renewable primary heat sources (solar. offshore and land.9 Primary electricity Wind and natural flow hydro5 Nuclear 20.1 42. 3. Includes colliery methane.37 17.6 41.8 21.5 92.7 -10.0 116. Percentage change from the most recent 3 months compared with the same period last year .3 272. plus condensates and petroleum gases derived at onshore treatment plants.8 18.7 13.67 0.8 0.1 49.39 0. geothermal etc) and an estimate for slurry.7 -9.76 +12. Includes generation by solar PV.4 17.2 104.7 104.0 Petroleum2.7 3.1 16.0 -9.1 21.7 0. 4.8 -9.16 18.2 14.6 18.23 0. Calendar months.5 19. 2.2 20.9 -0.8 81.3 +22.40 3.6 2.5 20.0 -3.13 -6.9 89.9 260.5 48.6 53 December 2007 1. 5.8 4.

0 18.6r 78.uk/files/file19317.4 3.58 0.58r 0.0 19.4 11.4 50. geothermal. For details of temperature correction see BERR energy statistics website at www. More information on the methodology used by National Grid can be found at: www.52r 0.0 19.4 92.8 19.76r +12.3r -9.5r -0.8 Total Coal Petroleum gas Nuclear flow hydro imports Seasonally adjusted and temperature corrected 6.4 95.79r 0.67r 0.9r -1.0 14. landfill gas and sewage gas.5r 43.72 0.8 20. Includes solid renewable sources (wood.6 234.0r 46.9r 15.1r 44.nationalgrid.9r 14.1 20.4r -0.1 40.23 +64. 2. straw and waste).19 0.4r 229.23 0. colliery methane.7 54 1.2r 239.72 0.9 41.7 0.9 25. 5.14 0.14r 1.com/uk/Gas/OperationalInfo/operationaldocuments/Gas+Demand+and+Supply+Forecasting+Methodology Million tonnes of oil equivalent Natural Primary electricity Wind and natural Net Primary electricity Wind and natural flow hydro4 0.7 29.5r 91. Excludes non-energy use.1 77.1r 103.31 0. Excludes gas flared or re-injected and non-energy use of gas.7 0.9 -5.5 231.0 77.9 48.67 0.19r +50. Coal.2r 95.1 -1.December 2007 1 TOTAL ENERGY TABLE 1.7 0.7r 41.6 0.38 0. 7.08 0. 8.1r 20.2 229.pdf. 9.berr.39 0.1r -6.93r 1.2 18.39r 0.1r -1.7 77. petroleum and natural gas are temperature corrected.0 42.72 0.19 0.6 74.56 0. Includes generation by solar PV. etc.3r 77. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.7r -6.1r 92.8 232.3 41.5 15.2 12.5 235.7 +5.7r -2.gov.2 73.6r 234.92 +64.1 +0.0r 77.1 -6.7 +8.) and net foreign trade and stock changes in other .3 45.52 0.1 47.64 0.2r 18. 3.9 -8.3 13.5r 96.3 3.5r 240.4r 235.8 4.3r -6.3 3.5r 232.5 18.3r +1.7r 43.5r 96.2 0. Excludes generation from pumped storage stations. Includes gas used during production.5 73.7 0.2r 230.5 +8. Seasonal and temperature adjustment factors were reassessed in December 2007.72 0.2r 42.3 73.9 100.1r 13.4 17.8 16.4 99.0 9.6r 77.9r 20.56 0.4 233.2 Inland energy consumption: primary fuel input basis Natural Coal1 Petroleum2 Total 5 Unadjusted 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Per cent change 2006 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 2007 Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Per cent change 8 solid fuels.15 0.3 64.5 3. From April 2005 National Grid have changed their methodology for calculating the temperature correction of gas.9r 100.2 gas3 Nuclear 95.6 9.9r 42.65 -9.9 8.7 90.3r 76. a small amount of renewable primary heat sources (solar.7 61.2 47.86r 0.0 75.0 18.14 0.65 -9.22r +49.29 0.4 17.9 (annualised rates) 237.10 0.6r 78.27 0.8 19.76 +12.4r +1.6 39. 4.9 98. 6. Not seasonally adjusted or temperature corrected.7r 79.7.3r 237.8r 40.3 Net imports 0.1 95.0 19.64 0.

445 -107 -54.639 -243 -97 2 -682 3.981r 14.341 (+) +85.755r -13.411 2.338 38.506 2.290 -501 -395 50.576r -489 -880r 53.539r 67.842 3.071r -405r 67.5 +1.818 149.048r 2.270 -196 -14. Stock fall (+).235 -50.548 447 6.368r 470r 8.706 -37 -9.297 17.6 +0.5 -3.492 458 7.8 +2.0 +7.1 +14.270 -100.455 2006 196.084 14.4 -1.957r 5.843 30.765r 15.173 -97 67.724 3.258 40.566 -961 -96 -33 -2.799 2006 4th quarter 48.0 +5.476r +549r -14.604 -11.355 -11.643 5.578r 33.853 -601 -616 64. Primary supply minus primary demand.270 942 47.835 8.755 -24.465 787 34.3 -3.6 -3.659 -13.857 426 6.411 15.454 35.033 73.719 8 15.867 -23.0 -4.488 -187 -8 -25 -586 4 3.3 +2.562 +589 -12.279 -23.376 3.6 -1.783r -11.181 2006 1st quarter 56.4 -2.780 45.2 -16.583 +2.7 55 December 2007 Transfers4 TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Petroleum refineries Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Patent fuel manufacture Energy industry use Losses FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Transport Domestic Other Final Users Non energy use 1.953 -189 -12.661 3.169r -478 +2.1 +11.391 5.828 +72 -14.4 -2.183 35. 2.181 -638 247.888 11.860 404 6.185 52.933 6.1 -15. For manufactured fuels differences occur occur in the rescreening of coke to breeze.242 15.6 +13.667 1.530r 445r 6.966 -602 -4.0 +10.944 -30 -12.896 -24.115 33.305 12. 4.0 -1.010 14.440 134.743 67.290 -11.055 +227 63.771 893 38.112 -25.867r 4.657r -11 3.334 5.627 831 33.128r 48.304r 2007 3rd quarter p 40.062 47.203r +577r -12.367 -51.355 -588 50.534 -328 -63 -10 -698 1 4.841r -23.197 3.3 -0.1 -6.538 3.486 -2.787 960 44.633 -14.389 +72 -15.923 38. Annual transfers should ideally be zero.741 -212 55.563 19.790 59.722 2.764 31.524 -37 50.478 -539 +2.914r 2.814 34.180r -23r 53.364 -745 -2.318 -593 -2.376r -324r -320r -46 -688 2007 2nd quarter 46.738 787 34.788 51.236 2006 2nd quarter 49.1 -8.797 -22.595 3.370 -75 247.630 477 6.773r 1.445 55.767 172. For oil and petroleum products differences arise due to small variations in the calorific values used.337r -213r -466r -47r -712r -8r 3.717 59. 11 16.4 -1.611 -24.1 +1.845 -988 84 -42 -2.869 169.213 2006 3rd quarter 42.805 15.897 14.827 243.529 440 8.676 3.098 -172 -362 -44 -667 -2.113 -75 -55.958 -155 244.806 +417 73.881 -548 +3.9 -2.8 -24.101r 7.329 -13.7 -1.521 -2.814 3rd quarter 46.8 (-) -21.2 -3.012 1.332 3.5 -5. 3. .1 (+) -4.1 -12.327 15.566 2007 1st quarter 49.535 -273 136 -29 -629 1 4.4 Percentage change between the most recent quarter and the same quarter a year earlier.575 15.628r 838r 36.556 -150 51.833 4.471 -11.4 +1.389r 15.610 -174 -138 -24 -659 2 3.2 per cent change 1 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production Imports Exports Marine bunkers Stock change 2 Primary supply Statistical difference 3 Primary demand 216.782 -215 203 -1 -680 5 3.931 5.161 20.1 TOTAL ENERGY Table 1.547r -25. stock rise (-).606 1.0 -0.627 483 10.8 +4.645 5.692 34.3a Supply and use of fuels Thousand tonnes of oil equivalent 2005 per cent change 2005 4th quarter 54.155 3.417 -2.3 +6.798 50.870 -97.003 13.

235 -6. Includes all manufactored solid fuels.000 -6.820 -12.738 8.004 3. benzole.545 561 574 6.352 179 6.067 3. Inludes colliery methane.424 -3.865 17.182 -6.457 -62 1.302 178 2.117 -224 -3.007 2.412 4.1 TOTAL ENERGY Table 1.333 20.285 -690 -23.177 209 823 77 900 900 -823 -823 77 30 28 19 - 4.192 -593 -719 -2.468 498 209 2.595 -23.029 2.859 -54 1.335 +50 24. Stock fall (+). Latest quarter is estimated from the previous year and adjusted according to average annual rate of change over the last three years.061 - 263 263 18 250 209 5 36 - 2.822 6. 4.220 - 5.305 20.590 16. Heat sold - Coal Coal December 2007 Thousand tonnes of oil equivalent 2007 Quarter 3 p 56 .533 -37 8.584 -1.412 -145 -4.736 +98 23.866 -353 1.927 -7.132 14. 5.227 8.678 158 2.117 4.444 -8.179 1 1.096 -204 -51 388 286 98 4 - 165 -24 -77 64 +2 62 -26 477 -242 -13 1.037 22.699 124 2.570 -8.893 -3. coke oven gas and blast furnace gas.686 -573 15. For oil and petroleum products differences arise due to small variations in the calorific values used.213 507 388 2. Primary supply minus primary demand.938 15.789 -501 +41 -2. 6.329 177 2.680 -544 -2. 2.256 14.595 - 6.322 -173 -2.882 -353 1. 3.412 4. tars.526 199 5.136 +687 23. Includes geothermal and solar heat.520 +756 23.635 -13.392 552 574 6.150 +1.598 -54 -1.429 -7.893 - Transfers3 TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Petroleum refineries Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Patent fuel manufacture Energy industry use Losses FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Transport Domestic Other final users Non energy use 263 263 9 256 213 5 38 - 1.117 4.392 7.402 +992 24.062 1.106 -61 -1.926 16.220 -6.021 - Primary electricity Primary electricity Heat sold SUPPLY Indigenous production Imports Exports Marine bunkers Stock change1 Primary supply Statistical difference2 Primary demand 2.459 2 1.652 -55 14.267 -4.220 -23.545 7.655 124 2.692 15.624 -166 -16 22.746 159 1.268 -187 -559 8.212 -167 -15 23.3b Supply and use of fuels 2006 Quarter 3 Manufactured 4 fuels Manufactured 4 fuels Rennewables 6 & waste 5 Rennewables 6 & waste Natural gas Natural gas Primary oil Primary oil Petroleum Products Petroleum Products Electricity 5 Electricity 269 -40 229 +65 164 +224 7.638 -418 -23.729 2.027 -391 44 217 34 260 164 58 38 - 18. Annual transfers should ideally be zero.272 4.495 -2.508 +79 15.472 1.244 209 737 77 814 814 -737 -737 77 30 28 19 - 4.706 -1 -7.345 -100 8.072 -222 -55 443 258 173 11 - 224 -68 -59 98 -7 105 -30 437 -231 -13 1.267 - 195 -56 140 -5 144 +145 7.775 -57 -1.825 -8.072 -393 53 217 57 239 140 51 47 - 18. stock rise (-). For manufactured fuels differences occur in the rescreening of coke to breeze.

405 10.192 2.482 294 53 538 405 126 7 16.2 -17.274 67.613 14.276 12.528 9.869r 1.388 2.942 137 1.077r 101 -1.831 59. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.4 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production Deepmined Opencast Other sources Imports Exports Stock change3 Total supply Statistical difference Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Patent fuel manufacture Energy industry use FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Domestic Other final users Stocks at end of period Distributed stocks Of which: Major power producers Coke ovens Undistributed stocks Total stocks 20.515 10.604 1.819 12.267 -121 67.0 -17.626 9.098 57.078 2.064 15.326 -46 13.240 128 10.696 242 -912 13.472 +60 21.6 -2. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.913r 12.4 -1.165 -53 14.194 2007 1st quarter 4.906r 9.5 -4.371 112 12.2 SOLID FUEL AND DERIVED GASES Table 2.444 8.687 103 1.792 614 39 14.0 2005 3rd quarter 4.954 2.859 90 1.061 450 5.039 266 6 2.198 1.7 (+) -1.3 -2.937 113 -2.968 536 -2.962 117 -4.129 61.920 2006 1st quarter 5.908 60 18.596 2.194 57 December 2007 1.633 1.490 243 66 1 654 500 150 4 14.696 1.497 320 68r 545r 358r 174r 14r 16.258 128 9.053r 105r +1.929r 14.199 2.802 -29 61.929 1.408 2.715 1.363 14.962 2006 4th quarter 4.132 2.489 1.3 +8.039 2.489 1.920 2006 18.678 96 +3.0 +9.101 15.626 11.235r 1.008 1.481 268 68 1 619 454 146 18 16.521 128 10.504 290 58r 688r 391r 281r 16r 15.590 2006 2nd quarter 4.478 284 73 592 463 124 5 14.474 20.722 3.757 928 15.2 +8.380 52.193 16.301 2005 4th quarter 5.924 15.879r 14.696 1.115 12.3 -8 +14.314 -91 11.572 90 1.9 +4 +6.445 490 43.313 11.260 1.304 -20 18.218 13.498 9.374 14.4 +4.807 10.462 263 78 1 591 415 169 7 11.635 449 50.1 +6.8 +35.0 +3.287 1.120 1.302 155 +769 18.597 819 17.525 898 17.877 91 1.784 15.9 -2.6 +8.625 1.412 111 11.940r 137r 1.604 1.471r 19r 12.819 12.679 752 15.563 10.706 938 17.540 80 -2.272 123 1.374 14.5 +7.784 2.121 276 3 2.4 +18.835 119 1.714 547 25 16.094 102 13.902 964 12.8 -17.445 1.781 2.201 1.922r Thousand tonnes 2007 2007 per cent 2nd 3rd quarter quarter p change 2 4.6 -1.588r -31r 17.9 -36 +10.504 955 17.9 +4 -6.917 103r 1.785 8.210 2.138 23 13.561 3.848 18.388 65.6 +10.5 -8.323 450 5.632r 17. stock rise (-).4 -25.102 123 12.5 +14.3 +20.8 +9.918 113 +1.759 13.372 12.835r 4.5 +77 (+) +5.881 18.1 -0.101 15. .329 21.203 2006 3rd quarter 3. 2. 3.597 819 17.564 1. Stock fall (+).4 +9 -22.382 18.1 Supply and consumption of coal per cent change 1 -9.807 823 18.747 +26.875 117 12.170r 13.619r 16.452r 11.506 280 72 565 430 129 6 17.456 443 -1.324 17.472 305 75 599 355 228 16 17.541 2.296 117 11.4 -10.

622 4.126 1.116 1.098 78 72 229 71 -17 1.9 -11 -1 -4 +25 286 206 18 61 864 2005 4th quarter 1.074 240 167 23 50 1.087 63 72 207 43 +68 1. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.330 1.086 244 171 13 59 918 2006 4th quarter 1.8 +1. coke breeze and other manufactured solid fuels Thousand tonnes per cent change 1 +6.455 -21 1.086 1.474 1.942 4.9 +6.086 64 62 169 29 +10 1. Stock fall (+).398r -9r 1.1 #DIV/0! -1 -2 +73 -15 +16 -1.259r 4.090 78 68 244 34 -115 1.058 1.264 -4 +5.475 1.393 1.031 1.067 4.7 +10.2 -1.2 Supply and consumption of coke oven coke.102 5 57 331 107 -82 1.069 2007 1st quarter 1. stock rise (-).126 281r 180 28 73r 1.157 258 170 20 68 1.256 -4 5.069 58 1.127 7 52 210 36 38r 1.406r -8r 1.389 -4 1.December 2007 2 SOLID FUEL AND DERIVED GASES Table 2. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.122 5 54 318 45 -48r 1.105 259 258 915 134 -147 5. 3.407r 1.0 +10.248 1.314 1. 2.058 299 203 22 74 855 2006 1st quarter 1.192 821 81 290 855 2006 4.551 -10 5.267 982 982 -8.236 1.560 4.212 1.089 273 184 28 61 1.157 1.078 67 68 267 29 -187 +5.164 1.8 +15 +1 +10 +35 2005 3rd quarter 1.361 1.358 1.067 1.1 -1.186 1.0 1.006 2007 2007 2nd 3rd quarter quarter p 1.004 180 -215 5.183 292 182 20 91 786 2006 2nd quarter 1.361 3 1.376 15r 1.222 1.183 1.474 4.069 -1.109 79 48 324 32 -151 1.074 1.236 1.213 1.086 727 80 279 1.330 1.1 (-) -17 +36 (+) 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production Coke oven coke Coke breeze Other MSF Imports Exports Stock change 3 Transfers Total supply Statistical difference Total demand TRANSFORMATION Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Energy industry use FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Domestic Stocks at end of period 4.415 1.116 278 190 19 68 803 2006 3rd quarter 1.089 1.306 -9 1.9 per cent change 2 -5.384 298 260 1.6 1.181 1. .

383 564 742 209 533 -1.169 664 506 7.676r 149 2.240 11.068 +3.998 2.848 149 2. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.599 424 1.183r 2.327 12. blast furnace gas.985 2006 28.890r 473 +15 6.125 462 +7 7.412 4.441 4.873 +53 28.061 4.2 -4.987 149 2. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.290 16.992 2.301r 796r 505 6.3 -2.5 +7.529 666 932 421 511 6.3 Supply and consumption of coke oven gas.929 2.933 2.102 -3 7.779 149 2.106 2.289 474 +23 7.2 -16.2 -40 +36 +78 +1.862 2.4 1.5 -4.096 2.2 SOLID FUEL AND DERIVED GASES Table 2.6 +4.234 1.115 11.198 -19 7.023 2.684 149 2.314 2. .491 379 1.3 -2.1 +30.220 476 +27 7.834 2.524 399 1.4 +6.131 2.238 9.010 -14 7.199 1.1 +4 +3.436 3.509 4.9 -5.469 567 977 475 503 7.075 -7 7.870 -9 6.331 -24 7.136 2.096 561 535 7.068 2.144 9.175 2.302r 768r 534 7.486 522 1.979 2.011 495 516 7.2 6.453 3.209 2.443 1.434 4.456 3.825r 2.537 2.839 11.131 2.141 2.0 -0.179 440 +5 7.880 2.828 16. 2.116 466 +18 7.267 749 518 -1.157 -25r 7.825 3.951 459 +8 6.289 -38 27.625 494 1.026 -11 7.011 2.197 -43 28.799 2.3 59 December 2007 +3.8 +1.3 6.078 479 +15 7.355 2.749 +51 27.8 +73.830 149 2.1 -0.082 3.217 2.857r 2.708r 149 2.219 1.409 4.420 453 +17 7.241 598 10.455 4.517 598 9.656 572 1.451 4.814 -11 7.037 2.070 2.784 149 2.919 149 2.3 +5. benzole and tars GWh per cent change 1 2005 3rd quarter 2005 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2006 2nd quarter 2006 3rd quarter 2006 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2007 2007 2nd 3rd quarter quarter p per cent change 2 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production Coke oven gas Blast furnace gas Benzole & tars Transfers Total supply Statistical difference Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Energy industry use Losses FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries 27.2 +1 (+) -1.

213 - -9.3 +24.701r 18.867r 665 +885r -376r 21.6 -1.992 -385 -3.461 745r -816r -562r 19. natural gas liquids and feedstocks1 2005 2005 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2006 2nd quarter 2006 3rd quarter 2006 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2007 Thousand tonnes 2007 per cent change 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production2 Crude oil NGLs3 Imports 4 2006 3rd quarter 2nd 3rd quarter quarter p per cent change 8 84.453 - 20.757 11.503 15.484 1.351 10.665 6. 4.899 1.113 20.982 - 17.734 22.390 1. 8.801 12.551 2.7 -19.213 83.9 +4. As such.113 - 19.308 17.578 69.4 -3.7 -8.532r 11.218r 19.878 19.260 576 -597 -577 20.552 13.653 12.771 580 +911 -572 21.381 12.113 20.982 20.135 - 1.974 2.8 -7.218r - 19. Foreign trade as recorded by the Petroleum Industry which may differ from the figures published by HM Revenue and Customs in the Overseas Trade Statistics.070 76.0 +27.453 21.504 - 19.337 2.218r 19.314 11.5 +19. Percentage change between the most recent quarter and the same quarter a year earlier.997 50.6 -66 86. Stocks include stocks held at refineries.251r +9r 21.8 +2.242 - 17. 2.763 1.827r 11.106 1.414 13.843 12.386 1. other industry headings have not been included in this table.885 52.836 13.4 -3.913 59.443 51.734 22.111r 1.153 13.7 +32.7 19.656 1.342 -111 21.526 +22 20.0 +8.4 -1.154r -63r 19. 5.440 2.075r 1. at oil terminals and also those held in tanks and partially loaded vessels at offshore facilities.900 504 -235 -584 22.614 21.272 21.186 12.368 +96 21. stock rise (-). Stock fall (+).504 20.242 21. 7.204 16.721 77.626 13.067 2.282 17.675 54.206r 11.242 21.801 12.663 1.266 15.3 +0.636 740 +691 -337 21.190 1.914 11.195 47.128 673 +556 -965 21.272 - -0.028 1. Data are subject to further revision as revised information on imports and exports becomes available.490 13.912r 18.213 83.094 12. this table is a summary of the activity of what is known as the Upstream oil industry.159 13. .896 11.135 86.133 12.131 -82 83.761 15.211 6.772 13.376 11.645 15. As there is no use made of primary oils and feedstocks by industries other than the oil and gas extraction and petroleum refining industries.271 824 +14 -649 20.179 7.230 16.911 -71 20.657 1.025 -87 20.4 -1.272 21.341 83.9 -1.1 Supply and use of crude oil.982 20.158 12.6 -9.December 2007 3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3.2 +1.026 1.636 -98 22. Total supply minus total demand.643 -354 -2. Mostly direct disposals to petrochemical plants.054 86.446 7.523r 12.543 58.710 18.4 +9.811 13.304 1. Natural Gas Liquids (NGLs) are condensate and petroleum gases derived at onshore treatment plants.573 11.6 -1.669 +55 21.453 21.404 10.504 20.4 -3. Includes offshore and onshore production.7 Crude oil & NGLs Feedstocks Exports4 Crude Oil & NGLs Feedstocks Stock change5 Transfers6 Total supply Statistical difference Total demand TRANSFORMATION Petroleum refineries Energy industry use 7 60 -3.250 664 -681 -543 20.734 - 20.614 21. 3.2 -8.614 - 19.850 14.135 86.151 17.798 14. 6.098 52.

980r 6. 6. 2.854 212 144 15 53 1. 5.4 +3. Foreign trade as recorded by the Petroleum Industry which may differ from the figures published by HM Revenue and Customs in the Overseas Trade Statistics.656 7.728 4.561 561 -665 -119 19.596 -167 19.722 2.764 13.903r 21.231 18.176r 1.926 1.457 2.760 2.681r 7.868 6.103 26.4 -13. .587 215 127 15 73 1.196 7.055 +1.0 -1.3 -18. Total supply minus total demand.7 +19.399 9.2 -3.6 +1.002 450 189 2.2 1. 3.5 61 December 2007 -0.7 -0.781r 12.659r 231r 161r 15 55 1.221r Thousand tonnes 2007 2007 per cent 2nd 3rd quarter quarter p change 1 21.009 2.531 14.538 2 1.634 569 -272 -144 19.2 -12.0 -15.132r 18.6 -15.860r 929r 505r 2.3 +5.725 13.510 29.557 52.238 18.3 (-) +15. stock rise (-).407 7.231 1. Mainly transfers from product to feedstock.3 -15.695r 5.752 +264 20.602 74.602 5.395 14 6.534 53.508r 511r 330r 1.504 -494 19.397 1.995 2005 3rd quarter 23.2 Supply and use of petroleum products per cent change -3.599 515 +313 -170 20.699 2006 1st quarter 20.603r -56r 19.364 2006 4th quarter 21.456 566 -498 -145 20.141 11 2.215 702 -216 -250 19.5 -0.2 -5.105 19.075 12.2 -1.248 5 1.678 -1.238 1.669 5.5 +0. Percentage change between the most recent quarter and the same quarter a year earlier.742 2006 3rd quarter 22.395 5.798 7.7 -6.782 457 367 1.160 476 +0 +156 19.409 851 268 2.397 18.953r -6r 1.101r 7. Includes refinery production and petroleum gases extracted as products during the production of oil and gas.650 248 176 15 57 1.977 980 650 61 269 5.6 +0.402 7.154 1.728 74.405 13.154 2007 1st quarter 19.910 +56 19.339r 210r 142r 15 53r 1.351 5.154 18. 4.837 -140 80.0 -1.046 -333 80.5 -5.482 289 229 15 45 1.4 +1.3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3.262 673 359 2.585 465 -39r +8 19.132r 1.563 13.488 242 167 15 60 1.386 -97 20.304 -2.367 884 295 2.835 2005 4th quarter 22.990 931 642 59 230 4.404 2 1.176r 17.160 6. Stock fall (+).105 1.389 22.736 2006 2nd quarter 21.784 953 583 2.885 +235 19.7 +94.3 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production2 Imports3 Exports3 Marine bunkers Stock change4 Transfers5 Total supply Statistical difference6 Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Blast furnaces Energy industry use Petrolem Refineries Blast Furnaces Others FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Transport Domestic Other final users Non energy use 2006 86.412 1.782 2 1.975 5 1.296r -43r 19.855 6.934 -1.1 89.782 1.412 18.998 229 155 14 60 1.828 29. Data are subject for further revision as revised information on imports and exports becomes available.661 423 456 2.237 18.297r 1r 1.2 -13.4 1 1.366 13.879 490 +710 -32 20.249 7.018r 455 +997r -2 19.2 -4.051 +60 79.1 +33.2 -2.706r 13.237 1.5 -1.4 +14.891 6.331 19 6.348 -840 -683 80.309 7.6 +0.763 221 154 15 52 1.459 -128 20.603 10.

997 -29 +15 18.640 3.218 920 1. 2.985 171 1.046 -333 80.731 18.465 19 828 504 114 - 7.538 723 402 52 269 1. Data are subject to further revision as revised information on imports and exports becomes available.103 26.841 832 1.731 18. Foreign trade as recorded by the Petroleum Industry which may differ from the figures published by HM Revenue and Customs in the Overseas Trade Statistics.800 +47 26.497 12.722 2.606 +109 12.731 - 28.063 5.083 1. bitumen.035 -283 -205 26. 7.603 10. Total supply minus total demand.760r 2.298 +22 -6 7.314 889 +284 -262 26.443 3.016 1.528 8.807 -63 3.828 29.454 86.457 2.395 14 6. Includes refinery production and petroleum gases extracted as products during the production of oil and gas.678 22.055 +1. 89.392 863 120 298 115 3.216 +68 3.358 6.368 1.750 -13 7.728 1.983 995 -256 -404 12.869 1.156 259 6.3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3.332 8.017 4.167 9.753 90 84 6 42 26. petroleum coke and other oil products.261 7.620 3.497 12. products3 Fuel oils gases2 Other Other oil1.378 3. Stock fall (+).159 -42 -26 7.977 980 650 61 269 5.377 6. lubricants.681 +143 3.277 1. propane.331 19 6.620 2.772 +42 18.431 -8 26.438 75 66 9 206 26.510 29.573 1.348 -840 -683 80.433r 20.926 1. 3.992r 141 1.374 670 314 -107 +403 4.080 8.837 -140 80.116 126 315 105 3. Includes ethane.330 5.782 1. 6.157 5. 5.166 +136 -92 3.452 1.728 74.399 9.344 24 - 9.990 931 642 59 230 4.641 - 12.9 oil1. Mainly transfers from product to feedstock.325 407 282 +24 +333 3.313 -140 -573 3.819 1.855 -331 8.050 21.557r 52.144 18.641 12.717 1.357 +16 +108 7.211 6.534 53.363 229 5.186 182 182 2.040 1.921 6.490 12 2.497 - 11. Includes naphtha.242 14 772 355 101 - 8.526 155 155 2.589 -52 12.995 21. industrial and white spirits. butane and other petroleum gases. 8.790 6.404 46 6.148 686 403 53 230 997 1.annual data Thousand tonnes 2005 Motor spirit Motor spirit Aviation turbine fuel Burning oil Gas diesel Gas diesel Total Petroleum Products Petroleum Total Petroleum Products products3 Fuel oils gases2 Aviation turbine fuel Burning oil Petroleum SUPPLY Indigenous production4 Imports5 Exports5 Marine bunkers Stock change6 Transfers 7 Total supply Statistical difference 8 Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Petroleum refineries Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Patent fuel manufacture Energy industry use FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Transport Domestic Other final users Non energy use 1.158 3.3 Supply and use of petroleum products .602 74.051 +60 79.389 22.691 4.9 December 2007 2006 62 .223 +79 18.684 -32 7.144 18.009 2.392 +119 +42 7.027 +10 4.870 3.996 3.506 52 6.397 +96 -343 12. petroleum waxes. 9.540 12 2.586 +366 -4 18.612 5.144 - 26.641 12. stock rise (-).763 1. See page 11 of September 2006 Energy Trends for a note concerning changes to this table.275 5.446 -80 7. 4.827 4.440 24 - 8.359 Includes DERV road fuel and middle distillate feedstock destined for use in the petrochemical industry.

285 432 1.868 -47 6.759 -123 1.159 +62 7.972 221 357 -64 -13 1.595 - 3. 22. Total supply minus total demand. bitumen.446 -123 +36 1.608 55 174 69 1.9 Gas diesel Oil1.563 -92 4.448 3. 6.9 Total Petroleum Products Petroleum gases2 Total Petroleum Products Other products3 Fuel oils 2007 3rd quarter p Aviation turbine fuel Burning oil Petroleum gases2 Other products3 Fuel oils SUPPLY Indigenous Production 4 Imports 5 Exports5 Marine bunkers Stock change 6 Transfers7 Total supply Statistical difference 8 Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Petroleum refineries Coke manufacture Blast furnaces Patent fuel manufacture Energy industry use FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Transport Domestic Other final users Non energy use 1. Includes naphtha.825 -9 1. propane.183 269 32 35 22 825 427 69 50 +72 +52 569 +3 566 566 198 3 360 6 - 2.470 21.398 - 6.283 1.980 1.764 13.160 6.595 3.645 +48 1. Mainly transfers from product to feedstock.477 -118 3.398 4.761 215 340 +9 1.810 330 -68 +66 775 -41 817 174 108 13 52 99 544 1 109 186 248 1 1.596 -167 19.196 63 December 2007 .216 5. See page 11 of September 2006 Energy Trends for a note concerning changes to this table.513 948 1.782 457 367 1.407 7.917 1.893 986 5.793 261 +21 -53 3.075 1.369 -29 4.231 18.304 1 1. Stock fall (+).364 5.597 39 39 534 1. 7.215 10 9 1.669 5.085 1.545 -272 1.071 337 2. stock rise (-). 8. Data are subject to further revision as revised information on imports and exports becomes available.807 1. butane and other petroleum gases.024 194 31 41 22 737 420 43 31 +83 +88 603 +13 590 589 236 354 - 2.500 +53 3.4 Supply and use of petroleum products . Foreign trade as recorded by the Petroleum Industry which may differ from the figures published by HM Revenue and Customs in the Overseas Trade Statistics.654 4. Includes ethane.710 63 97 - 1.654 264 1. petroleum waxes.561 561 -665 -119 19.531 14.latest quarter Thousand tonnes 2006 3rd quarter Motor spirit Motor spirit Aviation turbine fuel Burning oil Gas diesel Oil1.916 1.398 4.478 8 1.237 18.833 355 1.160 476 + +156 19. industrial and white spirits.395 231 -214 -16 6. 3.448 - 2.002 450 189 2.915 22 21 1 6.757 -154 +13 4. 9. 2.249 7. 4. petroleum coke and other oil products.654 - 6.294 330 -202 -138 443 -109 552 168 95 13 60 216 168 2 78 102 -13 - 1.595 3.817 602 1.763 221 154 15 52 1.448 3.097 9 7 2 3 7.504 -494 19.998 229 155 14 60 1.978 1.934 5.917 1. 5.3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3. Includes refinery production and petroleum gases extracted as products during the production of oil and gas.933 +18 +34 4.939 320 +32 -66 3.515 146 +2 -79 7. lubricants. Includes DERV road fuel and middle distillate feedstock destined for use in the petrochemical industry.211 -74 +113 1.654 596 1.882 39 39 660 1.538 2 1.654 4.

556 165 5 199 4.375 702 20 761 17.764 2.2 +14.654 4.6 +5.704 4.641 2.394r 4.144 17.757 6.551 1.730 2.612 3.gov.482 3.433 169 6 210 4.225 1.543 6.965 124 881 960 -3.936 2.773 2.979 503 32 225 246 4. ULSP is Ultra Low Sulphur Petrol introduced during the second half of 2000 and first half of 2001 as a replacement for ordinary Premium grade unleaded petrol.5 +35.7 +7.874 2.903 2.122 6.693 6.871r 644r 218r 35 391r 4. Data for sales by hypermarket companies are collected by a separate reporting system.9 -6.419 4.170 7.143r 2.651 12 2.457 1.5 (+) -0.752 172 4 156 4.055 1.710 11.1 -12.477 6.084 2.307r 1.572 6.686 46 12. www.233 19.682 2.193 828 26 940 17.091 7.549 52 12.957r 2.561 1.823 2.769 956 1.640 889 122 430 337 4.813 2.0 -2.630 4.903 6.2 +16.724 2.362 26.197 1.956 1. 5.3 +1.691 927 1. 4.See BERR web-site.594r 2.563r 4.g.061 3.699 2.331r 6.132 1.1 64 hypermarkets refiners/other traders Commercial sales Other gas diesel oil AVIATION FUELS Total sales Aviation spirit Aviation turbine fuel FUEL OIL Total Sales Light Medium Heavy 1.644 2.689 815 1.732 4.5 Demand for key petroleum products 2005 1 Thousand tonnes 2005 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2006 2nd quarter 2006 3rd quarter 2006 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2007 2nd quarter 2007 3rd quarter p per cent change 2005 MOTOR SPIRIT 2006 18.151 290 879 983 3rd quarter per cent change 2 Total sales By seller: 3 Retail sales: 4 hypermarkets refiners/other traders Commercial sales 5 By grade: 6 4-Star/Leaded/LRP Super Premium Unleaded 7 Premium Unleaded/ULSP GAS DIESEL OIL Total sales DERV fuel Retail sales: 3 4 18.456 9 3.754 2.4 -19.497 1.2 -22. to bus and coach depots.019r 1.html.657r 224r 4 228r 4.153 1.738r 5.951 2.485r 3.736 2. .062 1. e.2 +26.679 3.3 -2.7 -12.uk/energy/statistics/source/oil/page18470. Sales of leaded petrol ceased from 31st December 1999. 8 5 Monthly data for inland deliveries of oil products are available . 2.829 222 7 231 4.565 12.1 +9.595 337 29 102 205 4.3 +1.4 +1.316 536 85 266 185 4.146 11.375 4. but are consistent with the main data collected from companies.4 4.453 6.0 -4.144 1.067 10.765 26.612r 138r 4 150r 4.7 -3.831 3.255 1.007 2.240r 6.051 2.6 -4.7 -0.797 12.887 984 1.1 +7.388 1.603 8 3.796 190 7 257 4.8 +7.442 7. This includes gas diesel oil used for other purposes such as heating and middle distillate feedstock destined for use in the petrochemical industry.7 -6.326r 3.berr.358 267 4 225 4.6 +7. Commercial sales are those deliveries made direct to a consumer for use in their own business.5 -7.December 2007 3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3. 8.448 718 291 98 329 -5.7 -10. 7.332 16 3.588 8.1 -2.1 (+) (+) -4.228r 1.732 795 1. mainly for resale to final consumers.598 18 3.8 +3.4 +2.876r 5 2.2 +2.916r 1.842 2.634 5.808 2.249 1.2 +2.169 1.339r 1.811r 5. with Lead Replacement Petrol being introduced as a replacement fuel.436 10.711 20.781 4.3 -7.788 3.215 6.100 11 3.256r 1. Retail sales are those deliveries made to garages etc.399 4.453 3.993 2.3 -15. Percentage change between the most recent quarter and the same quarter a year earlier.106 1.032 1.580 421 24 190 207 4.316 1.095 1.094 5.338 4.381 3. 3.780 2.634 197 4 196 4.740 4.915 5.988 9 2.104r 747r 240r 43r 463r 4.0 +60.786 5.089 389 54 80 255 4.113r 9 3.7 -0.884r 2.559 1.917 7.5 +8.980 2.573 3. 6.731 17.536 8.

6.4 Total5 7. NGLs and process oil at UK refineries.414 +4.875 5.587 1.757 +4.0 Total products 8.426 4.563 6.7 Fuel oils 1.720 5.340 -1.648 7. Percentage change between the most recent quarter and the same quarter a year earlier.459 644 -46.490 1.5 1.4 909 1.1 Other products8 2.264 1.094 7. and others held under approved bilateral agreements are also included.051 884 920 1. burning oil.538 6.974 7.661 1.411 1.699 7.9 4.473 13.3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3.504 1.091 1.726 16.065 4.169 7.129 1. Stocks held in the national territory or elsewhere on the UKCS. .480 7.506 1.635 2.236 1.545 1. naphtha (ldf).8 773 798 620 772 642 764 786 719 837 +30. propane.923 15. Stocks held at refineries.538 8.264 +17.518 1.911 4. Aviation turbine fuel.096 13.720 -2.548 1.211 1. industrial white spirit. Stocks of crude oil in tanks and partially loaded tankers at offshore field (UKCS).634 15.113 -21.559 +0.433 1.567 8.305 4.184 15.237 987 1.200 14.391 1.091 +3.443 8. 9.693 1.2 4.0 14.132 7.057 1.398 +11. 5. Stocks of crude oil and NGLs at UKCS pipeline terminals 4.097 +1.4 Total stocks 15.673 14.051 1.6 Stocks of petroleum1 at end of period Thousand tonnes Crude oil and refinery process oil Light Refineries2 Terminals3 2003 2004 2005 2006 Per cent change 2005 2006 3rd quarter 4th quarter 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter p Per cent change 11 4.875 4. 8.548 1.640 3.671 4.163 5.186 1.061 4. Includes process oils held under approved bilateral agreements. bitumen. other petroleum gases.261 1. lubricating oil.337 13.440 1.610 1.320 1.091 883 1. Stocks of crude oil.526 -3.234 5.654 1.3 distillates6 1.274 13.067 7. Motor spirit and aviation spirit.660 8. petroleum coke and miscellaneous products.411 1.215 1.567 7.005 1.7 15.057 1.015 7.414 8.312 +8.4 7.626 4. terminals and power stations.879 +5.564 1.129 1.629 1.101 14.095 1. gas oil.5 1.166 1.619 7.063 13.875 1.140 6.766 +7.559 1.444 +1. 11.390 1.713 14.670 4.312 8. 2.509 1. petroleum wax.831 15.3 1.635 +40.911 3.262 14.726 +6.047 14.082 4.0 Petroleum products Kerosene & gas/diesel7 3.398 4.6 1.789 4.200 +8.790 3.526 1.653 -0.8 Offshore4 741 736 798 764 -3.2 Net bilaterals9 1.440 4. middle distillate feedstock (mdf) and marine diesel oil. 10.9 8. butane.460 -3.199 15. Stocks in the wholesale distribution system and certain stocks at offshore fields (UK Continental Shelf [UKCS]). DERV fuel.295 3.6 1.078 13.067 7. The difference between the stocks held abroad for UK use under approved bilateral agreements and the equivalent stocks held in the UK for foreign use.002 -9.634 14. 7.047 13. 3. Ethane.774 14.2 65 December 2007 1.5 Total stocks Stocks in UK10 14.493 1.102 1.623 14.587 1.101 1.533 7.069 1.292 4.

1 11 9 6 5 14 15 7 8 30 (+) Appraisal 63 78 69 -11.0 14 21 12 -42.3 29 41 29 -29.3 19 8 8 7 8 6 9 7 9 +12.December 2007 3 OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS Table 3. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier 2 Development 1 Onshore Exploration & Appraisal 3 8 15 +87.7 Drilling activity on the UKCS Number of wells started Offshore Exploration & Exploration 2004 2005 2006 Per cent change 2005 3rd quarter 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter p Per cent change 3 1.9 5 3 3 3 3 3 1r 7 (+) 66 . Including sidetracked wells 2.5 166 227 211 -7.5 3 3 4 2 3 6 4r 6 3 2 Development Appraisal 34 37 40 +8.0 65 46 68 57 53 33 47 58 35 -34.5 30 17 14 12 22 21 16 15 39 +77. Development wells are production or injection wells drilled after development approval has been granted. 3.

834 94.496 39.279 31.5 1.414 88.669 39.917 125.888 75.4 -10.660 -7 180.184 4.9 67 December 2007 Total demand TRANSFORMATION Electricity generation Heat generation Energy industry use Losses FINAL CONSUMPTION Iron & steel Other industries Domestic Other final users Non energy use -5.350 1.835 23.541r 345.906 20.430 186.721 2006 929.108 15.167 79.549 1.2 +14.269 2.102.128 20.056 2.152r 64.4 +15.328 96.484 86.8 +9.204 3.375r 206.856 83.966r 18.103.105 +13.811 1.514r -1.0 +0.360r 23.837 83.4 GAS Table 4.444 +1.819 35.202 -635 170.232 173.2 -5.772 356.760 22.568 8.784 24.647 79.209 227.162 +841 179.321 -51 1.518 2.671 2.8 +25.375 -11.998 328.865r 4. 3.592r 136.340 30.927 309.704 58.046.928 38.430 230.181 +1. Natural gas supply and consumption 2005 per cent change 1 3rd quarter 2005 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2006 2nd quarter 2006 3rd quarter 2006 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2007 2nd quarter 2007 3rd quarter p per cent change 2 GWh 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production Imports Exports Stock change 3 Transfers Total supply Statistical difference 1.689 350.309 2. Stock fall (+).203r 222.208 28.1.989 8.967 2.555 105.554 -1.277 6.7 +15.848r 7.055r 100.8 +18.951 46.435 -52 1.571 77.649 +960.2 +31.293 21.591 -6.533r 2.095 28.108 17.112 15.539 364.969 21.823 41.206 92.928 16.066 -27 343.805r 22.8 +0.550r 2.137 112.011r 2.1 -2.873 25.515 22. .776r -7.946r 56.3 -25.7 -1.224 9.0 -0.604 -12.257 75.756 32.789 2.058 7.029 120.2 187.158r 1.5 -2.173 -5 311.854 14.300r 114.172 135.867r 99.588 4.746 -23 358.726r 39.4 -7.686 2.1 -5.513 34.538r 1.198 179.994 2.430 285.835 -370 +5.678 -14.533 2.240 -6.321 84.280 297.159 10.3 +40.742 201.017 -15 224.964 654.194 3.554 1.8 -2.624 65.156 27.231 18.430 +5.375r 102.3 188.348 331. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.410 144.852 255.175 -471 221.421 12.850 20.046.128 22.713 2.868 9.079 76.319 66.226 4.186 67.803 +2.015r 33.9 -11.932 -15 266.784 244.701 2.122 35.322r 220.334 +6.301 2.133 54.936 18.856 1.375r 165.8 1.156 -15 221.430 237.846 1.6 -4.995 20.586 88.977 93.186r +15.500 -9.696 80.8 -6. stock rise (-).993 79.0 -5.560 384.4 -5.214 +581 -8 296.025.3 1.606 -7 170.218 3.009 107. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.588 309.735 +386.5 -2.595 -6.936 19.4 191.643 120.885 4.039 93.031 74.012 622.682 157.801r 94.852 33. 2.226 32.981 32.591 5.789 52.161 74.750 13.070r +1.

86 88.11 1.69 0.65 78.27r 8.19 0. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.43 0.65 0.96 1.74 2007 1st quarter 2007 2007 2nd 3rd per cent 2 quarter quarter p change -2. .5 -16.78 3.5 +64.83 34.95 0.13 0.02 0.72 87.36 0.92 1.2 -0.62 86.05 0.73 0.36 +10.02 0.96 0.17r 3.49 0.87 0.66 86.24 0.77 36.68 0.3 +22.08 2.20 6.79 0.December 2007 5 ELECTRICITY Table 5.6 -6.9 -15.17 2.22 7.07 0.52 382.73 1.82 42.6 -7.13 6.12 0.44 10.87 4.01 0.8 +90.46r 6.13 0.09 2006 2nd quarter 7.62 3.80 0.59 0.90 0.7 -1.87 1.7 +0.00 1.11 6.67 4.26 1.7 -0.50 2.28 40.54 0.86 0.88 0.06 0.10r 0.98 38.66 3.68 32.01 0. See note on page 14 of September 2005 Energy Trends regarding calendar differences.22 8.73 0.65 87..0 +14.36 2.25 17.17r 0.36 2.1 +10.25 20.9 -9.49r 0.14 19.11r 5.32 0.8 -23.40 107.02 0.11 0.57 0.31 0.85 4.76 0.6 +64.16 1.49 3.72 78.3 -22.59 0.25 9.98 13.4 +24.02 0.39 2.60 2006 4th quarter 9.30 0.85 1.5 -8.2 -6.87 1.90r 23.61r 43.35 0.89 0.23 20.27 0.25 21.09 0.38 6.09 0.43 26.78 75. Fuel used in electricity generation and electricity supplied per cent 2005 FUEL USED IN GENERATION Major power producers Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Hydro (natural flow) Other renewables Net imports Total major power producers Other generators Coal Oil Gas Hydro (natural flow) Other renewables Other fuels Total other generators All generating companies Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Hydro (natural flow) Other renewables Other fuels Net imports Total all generating companies ELECTRICITY SUPPLIED All generating companies Coal Oil Gas Nuclear Hydro (natural flow and net supply .42 5. Percentage change in third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.56 5.8 +56.11 0.50 3.80 35.44 2.42 18.43 3.3 21.08 0.29 7.12 25.89r 88.04 0.93 0.19 0.36 3.50r 17.54 1.01 23.8 +51.13 0.29 7.24 0.28 0.08 3.56 0.23 6.68 0.53 3.92 17.23 19.08r 19.76 40.5 +64.85 0.27 0.24 3.3 +6.09 0.63 0.6 -26.12 0.07 9.83 27.45 1.82 0.28 0.12r 101.3 -35.77 5.19 0.79 1.03 0.15 0.83 18.86 1.69 3.02 4.53 3.43 2.53 0.94 87.91 0.0 +7.09 0.62 0.19r -4.28 11.8 -7.89 0.73 0.9 -6.1 +11.77 35.80 0.6 +16.10 0.10r 3.08 3.80 0.13 0.31 2.08 0.15 7.18 0.78 0.17 0.24 4.18 0.9 +1.49 0.4 -2.12 1.24 0.23 0.24 0.13 0.72 149.26 0.64 17.2 -9.14r 0.48 Million tonnes of oil equivalent 9.31 142.42 2.96 0.0 +1.26 0.1 1.17 17.85 0.34 2.72 0.85 2.08 0.73 0.86 14.10 0.07 0.49 7.74 0.14 0.4 -7.3 +7.30 0.85 34.13 0.72 17.37 0.6 -8.72 8.93 0.09 0.5 -17.29 9.86 0.11 0.02 0.17 19.22 6.17 4.06 2.77 0.83 0.12 22.12 0.62 2006 1st 3 quarter 11.19 0.89 0.81 29.2 -9.7 -26.05 2006 3rd quarter 6.85 103.70 4.23 0.27r 17.70 18.18 0.21 3.47r 13.21 0.08 0.51 0.50 0.53 8.04 0.13 1.70 5.40 3.8 -6.9 +9.7 +13.05 5.2 -1.93 3.00 0.62 0.11 0.27 138.85 20.75 4.03 0.94 3.2 -9.7 -7.8 -26.13 0.53 2.50 0.10 1.35r 0.8 -7.44 0.28 0.65 0.08 0.10r 22.08r 0.6 -5.09 0.84 0.33 48.36 0.59 36.38 13.by pumped storage stations) Other renewables Other fuels Net imports Total all generating companies 2006 change 1 +10.89 0.48 1.32 TWh 25.2 -9.0 +10.01 11.27 0.15 15.6 -9.99 0.08 6.2 +34.81 0.72 33.63 99. 2.78 2.2 -2.25 23.1.59 17.54 2.60 2.71 0.3 +10.10 28.77 0. 3.71 2.76 1.40 3.48r 1.25 69.40 0.91 0.14 17.14 22.39 0.53 68 128.62 1.91 4.59 0.34 0.16 18.06 0.73 0.27 3.5 +6.33 28.97 6.50 6.53 0.14 5.8 -10.38 4.04 0.4 2005 3rd quarter 5..77 0.84 1.70 4.72 0.20 1.78r 0.52 0.83 25.31 0.18 7.07 0.00 0.77 0.4 31.44 0.5 +21.34 0.22 6.75 0.22 6.65 38.21 0.68 4.69 0.23 0.21 0.7 -1.18 6.27 0.32 387.14 20.06 0.1 -8.7 -0.37 0.72 2005 4th quarter 9.

BNFL British Nuclear Group..800r 23.1 FINAL CONSUMPTION 344.032 7.482 1.1 Other final users 100.647r 93.528r 92.163 2.108r 7.941r 27.5 1..386r 91.252 -1.433 7.637 30.775 9.950 101.918 +0.209 -0.403 1.0 Other sources 2. Fibrogen Ltd.713r 77.573 7.210 27. First Hydro Company.496r 89.553 95.868 -0.499 -1.242 92.2 7.073 803 990 986 916 893 1.067 +7.6 Other industries 113.9 Transfers Total supply 406.339 32.775 -0. Uskmouth Power Company.477r 1.4 Major power producers 359.598 8.557 9.621r 91. Premier Power Ltd.225 7.746 -2.181r 23.043 8.521 9.994 25.769 91..034 406. Derwent Cogeneration Ltd.458r 1.529 -0.670 -0.590 9. Barking Power Ltd.661 10.765 -2.015 8.144r 9.5 691 910 1...151 2.449 -0. EDF Energy plc.564 90.033r 93.768 109.3 Losses 30. Coolkeeragh ESB Ltd.183 105..4 9.3 23.039 106. E.704r 78. International Power plc.308 2.692 +0. Corby Power Ltd.5 Auto producers 36.743 7. At the end of December 2006 they were: AES Electric Ltd.213 26.428 +6..391 +7...792r 27.678 7..4 Transport 8.742 93.261 27.597 +1.938r 1.709 9. Rocksavage Power Company Ltd.493 +0.827 106..770 102.160 10.139 81.202 112.811 116. SELCHP Ltd.127 2.853 +31.372r 6. Spalding Energy Company Ltd.301 3.720 -1.298 9.695r 79.106r 23.165 2.6 77..437 -0.849 +16.6 793 556 900 443 648 774 819r 1.. RWE Npower plc.502 110.036 +2.657 23.8 Imports 11. Fibrothetford Ltd.377 90.461 1.091 27.1 Iron & steel 5.283 357.871 33.446 1.121 91.082 -1.210r 2..076 9.060 95. Drax Power Ltd.250 1..161 37.899r 9..311r 26.002 27. Scottish Power plc.. Seabank Power Ltd.166 +5.176r 2.170 94.468 81.839 2.248 26.198 108..459 1.0 Domestic 116.217 6.130 105. Coryton Energy Company Ltd.695 406.574 8.907 89.560 113. 3.4 Non energy use 1. Teesside Power Ltd.628r 23.540 32. Fibropower Ltd.131 +37.2 Supply and consumption of electricity 2005 2005 SUPPLY Indigenous production 3 GWh 2005 4th quarter 2006 1st quarter 2006 2nd quarter 2006 3rd quarter 2006 4th quarter 2007 1st quarter 2007 2nd quarter 2007 3rd quarter p Per cent change 2 2006 Per cent change 1 3rd quarter 398.531 80. 2.392 95. Scottish and Southern Energy plc. Centrica Energy. British Energy plc.019 5.On UK plc. Percentage change in the third quarter of 2007 compared with a year earlier.1 89.933r 3.7 26. Western Power Generation Ltd.966r 7.930 3.. Immingham CHP.5 ELECTRICITY Table 5.4 80..734 3.460 33.0 TRANSFORMATION Energy industry use 30.374 398..864 29.804 -0.5 2.1 91.210r 2.455 -2.272 34. Percentage change in 2006 compared with a year earlier.204 -1..967 26.857 342..056 114. Baglan Generation Ltd.825 92.440 92.282 -7.034 77. Companies that produce electricity from nuclear sources plus all companies whose prime purpose is the generation of electricity are included under the heading "Major Power Producers".478 23.507 104. 69 December 2007 .260 1.897 28..9 Exports 2..036r 25.063 2.270 80.186 108..9 6.5 23.410 2.9 2.928 94.667 107. RGS Energy Ltd.270 2.800r 6.043r 467 -27.161 -3.3 Statistical difference +661 +88 +571 +496 +243 -583 -53 +481 -386r -235r +617 Total demand 406.

2004 and 2005 – an update Middle layer super output area (MLSOA) and intermediate geography zone estimates of electricity and gas consumption in 2005 for Great Britain Changes in electricity generation and usage. 1976-2006 Easier access to 2005 small area electricity and gas data Predicting Fuel Poverty at the local level Natural gas: world production. generation and supply figures for Scotland. Northern Ireland and England. reserves and trade Update on DTI local and regional estimates of gas consumption in 2005 Regional and local gas consumption statistics for 2005 Regional and local use of road transport fuels 2004 UK oil industry over the past 100 years UK oil imports since 1920 Regional and local use of road transport fuels 2005 Renewable energy in 2005 Survey control report on RESTATS Renewable energy in UK regions 2005 Renewable energy in 2006 Renewable energy in UK regions 2006 CO2 March Coal September 2006 September 2006 September 2006 September 2007 Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Electricity June December December December March June 2006 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 September 2007 September 2007 Fuel Poverty June 2007 2006 2006 2007 2006 2007 2007 2007 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 Gas December December March June March June June June June September June September Petroleum (oil and oil products) Renewables December 2007 70 . Northern Ireland and England. Wales. consumption. non electricity and non road transport fuels in 2004 Regional and local total energy consumption statistics for 2004 High level indicators for regional and local energy data in 2004 The future of ‘Energy – Its impact on the Environment and Society’ Estimates of heat use in the UK CO2 emissions and energy consumption in the UK UK Coal imports 2000 to 2005 Revisions to historic coal data in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2006 CHP in UK regions 2005 CHP in UK regions 2006 High level energy indicators and quality indicators for regional and local electricity and gas estimates Regional and local electricity consumption statistics for 2005 Electricity generation and supply figures for Scotland. Wales. 2004 and 2005 Electricity transmission across Europe in 2004 Electricity.List of special feature articles published in Energy Trends between June 2006 and September 2007 Energy June December March March March June June 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 Accessing energy statistics via the DTI website Further developments relating to DTI sub national energy consumption data Regional and local estimates of non gas.

List of special feature articles published in Energy Trends between June 2006 and September 2007 continued UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) March 2007 UKCS capital expenditure survey 2006 71 December 2007 .

December 2007 72 .

000 kilowatts 1. 85 90-93. • The figures have not been adjusted for temperature or seasonal factors except where noted. Notes to tables • Figures for the latest periods and the corresponding averages (or totals) are provisional and are liable to subsequent revision.6000 105. p provisional. 41 and 45 excluding those parts of 27 relating to Iron and Steel.0025200 Terajoules GWh Million therms 0. Conversion factors 1 tonne of UK crude oil = 1 tonne = 1 gallon (UK) = 1 kilowatt (kW) = 1 megawatt (MW) = 1 gigawatt (GW) = 1 terawatt (TW) = 7. To: Thousand toe Multiply by 1 0.54609 litres 1.39683 0. 24 to 37. They are calculated from unrounded figures but are shown only as (+) or (-) when the percentage change is very large.78 1 29. totals of which the figures form a constituent part are therefore partly estimated.034121 1 Note that all factors are quoted to 5 significant figures Abbreviations CCGT LRP ATF NGLs UKCS GVA MSF Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Lead Replacement Petrol Aviation Turbine Fuel Natural gas liquids United Kingdom Continental Shelf Gross Value Added Manufactured Solid Fuels Sectoral breakdowns The categories for final consumption by user are defined by the Standard Industrial Classification 2003.4778 0.105510 11.83 9.630 277. 60-63 01. where a column or row shows ‘r’ at the beginning. r revised.023885 0. 99 Not covered by SIC 2003 .55 barrels 1. 55.000085985 0. 23. Symbols used in the tables . but not necessarily all.nil or less than half the final digit shown. More detailed information on conversion factors and calorific values is given in Annex A of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics. as follows: Fuel producers Final consumers: Iron and steel Other industry Transport & Storage Other final users Agriculture Commercial Public administration Other services Domestic 10-12. 27.51 Gigajoules 11.54 13 to 22. Quarterly figures relate to thirteen week periods except in the gas and petroleum sections where they relate to calendar quarters.53 and 27.27778 1 29.034121 1 Therms • From Thousand toe Terajoules (TJ) Gigawatt hours (GWh) Million therms To: 41. 02.307 kWh • From Tonnes of oil equivalent Gigajoules (GJ) Kilowatt hours (kWh) Therms 41.003600 0. .0094778 0.868 1 3. 40 27.630 0. excluding 27.000 kilograms 4. e estimated.000 megawatts 1. • • Conversion matrices To convert from the units on the left hand side to the units across the top multiply by the values in the table. Due to rounding the sum of the constituent items may not equal the totals. 05 50-52.023885 0. All figures relate to the United Kingdom unless otherwise indicated. of the data have been revised. 70-74 75. most.5200 Tonnes of oil equivalent Multiply by 1 0. not available.Explanatory notes General More detailed notes on the methodology used to compile the figures and data sources are included in the annual Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics. 80.868 1 0.4.000 gigawatts All conversion of fuels from original units to units of energy is carried out on the basis of the gross calorific value of the fuel.307 396.000 watts 1. Percentage changes relate to the corresponding period a year ago. 64-67..085985 2.

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