DUB

FEST
2 DAYS of
Rock and
Reggae
HOT SPOT
of the MOnTH
RJ’S REPlAYS
page 9
page 21
Issue 07 - Free! Take me! - Issue 07
Much MoRe!
Scene
PHOTOS
page 11-12
J
odi B. is a native New
Yorker who loves the
people and the warm,
sunny climate of Tucson.
She celebrates all genres of
music and appreciates the
varied, friendly arts scene in
the Old Pueblo. She loves
downtown and 4th Avenue.
Brooklyn Pizza and Sky Bar.
She’s really glad to be here! Jodi
B. studied art, enjoys writing and
loves photography, especially
photos of people. Her goal is
photo portraits that capture
your unique attractiveness...
she wants to make YOU look
good.
BSceneLive’s Jodi B. Darling
BSceneLIVe.coM 520.358.2137
1

BSceneLive

Issue #07
Ben Michaels ...................... 3-4
PitBall RecoRds ............... 5-6
a Fall to Break: CD reVIeW .... 7
DUBFeSt .................................... 9
YoU WERE SCeNe PHOTOS ... 11-12
HeatHer HarDY .............. 13-14
Kini Wadè............................. 17
UNIVerSItY peDI-CaB ................ 18
BaSketBall & Bare Feet ............ 19
BSl Hot Spot: rJ’S replaYS ...... 21
PuBLISheR - GREGG ZÌEKERT
ARt DIRectoR - RAÌNBOW BUCKÌNGHAM
fInAnce & LegAL - RÌK HOEFLÌNGER
eDItoR - CAROLYN “TROUBLE” CARY
MeDIA ReLAtIonS - STACY FORTSON
Account RePReSentAtIVe - JAMES FORD
JR. gRAPhIc ARtISt - KATÌTA BUCKÌNGHAM
WRIteRS:
BENJAMÌN BEAN ROLLÌNG
CAÌT REYNOLDS
DEBBÌE FEDERÌCO
DON MARTÌN
GREGG ZÌEKERT
JOHN MARES
KATÌTA BUCKÌNGHAM
MEL MACABRE
MOSS ORÌON
STEPHANÌE SWÌNGLE
TRE JAMES OSBORNE
PhotogRAPheRS:
BENJAMÌN BEAN ROLLÌNG
JEANNÌ NUNN
JODÌ B. DARLÌNG
ROSE PRÌCE
STACY FORTSON
FRANK RAMOS
The views and opinions expressed on
this web site or in print are solely those
of the original authors and other con-
tributors. These views and opinions do
not necessarily represent those of Gregg
Ziekert, the BSceneLive staf, and/or any/
all contributors or advertsers.
Ask us why you should
advertise your Web site
on BSceneLive.com
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ArtFare.org
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BSceneLive

Issue #07
B
en Michaels is a man who has been humbled
by life and by the mistakes he made in his. He
has overcome alcoholism, his ego of playing
for the girls, the money and the desire for fame, to get
to a place of serenity and to play music that people pay
attention to and believe in.
Onstage, behind his guitar, barefoot because it’s
comfortable, he exudes a life force that lights up his
face and aura. Sometimes shouting his lyrics into the
microphone because he wants the audience to feel what he
feels. He does not try to be entertaining, he just is. Joking
with the crowd, doing Lil Jon impressions and proclaiming
“I’ve got sweat on my guitar.
I’m rocking!”
Ben is young, at 19 years old
he has already experienced
life’s potholes, mostly by his
own doing. Unlike most young adults, he has discovered
a secret that grounds him. He spoke to me about the
spirituality he had to fnd in order to overcome his inner
demons. He accepts and reads Buddhist and Hindu
teachings, and cites Eckhart Tolle’s “The Power of Now”
as an aid in squashing the ego within. He fnds those
messages best convey to him how he can be grounded.
“Everyone is Southern Baptist back home,” he tells me,
“and I revolted against “God”. But I found it within myself.
That’s what Buddhist teachings did for me. All religion
has the same message if you think about it.” (I agree with
him.) “And the best songs come when I’m connected to
my spirituality.”
For him, music is the best way he knows to express
himself. It allows him to connect, to fnd his center in his
spirituality. After a bout with drinking and taking a look
down that long dark tunnel that led to nowhere, he had
to get sober to save himself. “I have to live my life in
hand with my spirituality.” His biggest obstacle he claims
“is my own head. Thinking too much has gotten me into
trouble in the past. I got to stay grounded here. I picked
a place on the map to move to and it was Tucson, the
polar opposite of Clemmons, North Carolina. Tucson is
exactly where I am supposed to be right now.” Showing
the Buddhist within, he says, “Things will turn out the
way they should.”
One would think, after watching, hearing and talking to
Ben, that he is a veteran of the stage, but he has only
been playing professionally
since earlier this year. His
impact is already sizeable,
earning him fans at every
venue. Most of those fans
have asked for a CD, and he is working on one. He plans
to give those CDs out for free at his shows, because of
the person he is. “This is life,” he says. “What would be
a better way to talk to people about life? Why would I
want to listen to that? I want to give back and music is
the way to do that.”
“If I can just help other people the way I was helped
through music, then I can be happy,” Ben says. He
doesn’t have to have fame, just enough money to get by.
Mentoring others would be a great accomplishment for
him. The way he says his idol, Trevor Hall, did for him.
Going through the hardest time in his life he listened to
Hall’s music, and it got him through it. He wants to be
able to do that for others.
Ben may just do that with his song “Life Up High”. It is song
written after the memorial that was held for the victims of
the January 8
th
shootings that killed 6 people and injured
13, including Representative Gabrielle Gifford’s, here in
Tucson. “I was actually angry, that it took such a tragedy
to cause people to come together. But then I went and
wrote the song in about 5 minutes.” I believe that once
By: Debbie Federico Photos by: Stacy Fortson
“If I can just help other people the
way I was helped through music then
I can be happy.” ~ Ben Michaels
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4
that song gets radio
airplay it will become
Ben’s signature song,
rocketing him onto the
radar.
His other songs
are infectious and
powerful. He really
does fnd a way to bond
with his audience. His
song “Breeze” had
no fnished second
verse, and he told the
audience that, but
played it anyways,
cueing Kevin Pierre
Tomanovich on the drum, whooping and grinning in
approval. Ben has the energy of Michael Franti, that
happiness in his songs that you can groove to. He cites
Trevor Hall, Dave Matthews, Radiohead and Matthew
Santos as his infuences. The Dave Matthews Band’s
last album, “Big Whiskey and the GrooGrux King” is
currently in his rotation.
You get the sense that Ben has worked hard at tethering
himself. Now he is in the state of being, however he will
say he is always working on it. He talked about how
music was a way to get connected. Playing at the Hotel
Congress and opening for his idol was one of the biggest
moments of inspiration for him. “I’m talking about what
Trevor means to me and people were calling my name,”
he says. “There was a hundred and forty people I didn’t
know, there to see Trevor, but they liked me.” He smiles,
“There is ego involved in that, but instead I want to be
able to relate to people in that way.” He had grabbed a
press fyer, and I kept it for safety while he played. When
I gave it back to him after the show, he went up like any
other fan to Trevor. “I had to have him sign it. My picture
is on there with his,” he said with a big smile.”
I could have talked to Ben for hours about music and
life and spirituality. I told him about my synesthesia,
something I don’t talk to many about, and realized that
he is that guy you can open up to and be yourself
with because he is himself. Behind the shy smile,
once you get past the fdgeting, you fnd one of
the most calm, open, accepting people to grace
your path. The colors that surround him are the
deepest imaginable. He could rule the world if he
wanted to, but chooses instead to use his talent
to connect and be connected to all those around
him. The happiest we can hope to be in our lives is
when living becomes effortless. But does it make
it interesting? Ben thrives on that, he wants the
simplicity but also wants to make things happen.
Ben’s moment is now,
and as humble as he is,
he would say he is getting
there. I am here to attest
that as such a powerful energy,
when he feels he is there, to that
place, he will bring the rest of us
with him.
BSceneLIVe.coM 520.358.2137
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BSceneLive

Issue #07
P
itBall Records is a full-service CD production company
for the aspiring (or established) artist. They will handle
production, recording, CD duplication, CD printing,
graphic design, management, and press relations. Oliver Saul,
owner of PitBall, says his goal is to “Help a band create an EP
or album, and to take the next steps to get that music out to
the rest of the planet!” Ensphere, Animus Divine, and Solace in
Nothing are some of the bands he is working with now. Solace
In Nothing’s six-song EP “Demons ” is the latest release from
PitBall Records.
This release was produced by PitBall, recorded at Next Door
Studios, and was mastered by TAMMIE award winner Fen Ikner.
Oliver talks about releasing the most recent PitBall EP. “I meet
Solace in Nothing in November of 2010, when they played for
one of my metal compilation shows at Pearl. I quickly became
a fan of their music and stage performances, and about two
months after that show I approached the band and asked if they would like to be a PitBall recording artist. They said
yes, and came into my studio in the beginning of 2011 to begin recording their EP. After about four months of tracking
and mixing we had the tracks ready for mastering.” Oliver adds, “I was amazed by the Drummer Mark Chico, he was
able to get the tracking for all the songs in two days. For a 17 year old to have such talent blew me away. Michael Chico,
brother of Mark, had an incredible guitar sound, which came out in the fnished production. Neko Sam, bass player for
the band, was very easy to work with and his tracking was very quick. Neko’s stage performance is a sight to be seen, he
is a professional head banger for sure. Macos Rosas, the vocalist for the band, has a strong vision for the songs, which
he writes the lyrics for. His graveyard growls and strong voice
allowed me to create some vintage vocal tracks.”
The Solace in Nothing EP demonstrates PitBall can indeed
take a CD from being only an idea in the mind of an artist,
through recording, production, and release. Oliver says about
the new release, “I would have to say that the time in the
studio allowed me to get to know the band. They showed a
great desire to perfect each and every song.“ He describes
the PitBball team effort: “PitBall Records graphic artist Dan
Agnew developed the EP art concept and worked with the
band to fnd the perfect layout for this up and coming EP. Marty
Haviik was the photographer for many of the band pictures
that are in the EP package. Gary Ranstead designed the
EP cover art.” The EP was recorded and produced by Oliver
at Next Door Studios. PitBall Records along with Big Mike
Productions will be releasing the EP Demons will be released
By: Don Martin
© Oliver Saul,
PitBall Records Spin a cd with


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on October 28, 2011 at the Rialto. Oliver says, “This EP
release show will be flled with top notch bands: Stands
with Fists, Ensphere, A Fall to Break, Indu, and Trinity.
PitBall Records was very happy to have been able to
produce this EP for the band and we look forward to
starting on the full length CD in the beginning of 2012.”
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BSceneLive

Issue #07
I
f A Fall To Break’s last CD, “September
Falls” was any indication of where this
band was heading, “Man in the Mask” has
announced it.
The title song showcases Nathan Shoemaker’s
vocal strength, and the frst two tracks have
a driving power provided by Matt Bejar on
the drums. The whole album is driven by the
crescendos of Craig Artz’s guitars and the
rapid fre dribbling repeats of Matt Bejar, with
the piece de resistance being Cody G’s guitar
solos. There is a melancholy warble to Nathan’s
voice as he belts out lyrics like “it holds like it
understands my needs/it keeps me from moving
forward/it’s times like these that I feel so weak/
and time to try and start this over/ leave it be in
the past where it all still belongs/ see the man
in the mask grows tired of all these questions/
there’s no threat/ the less that you know/the less
you must forget, except you don’t” from the third
track “Man in the Mask”. This gravity was frst
heard on “September Falls” title track, a song
based on the September 11th attacks and the
anniversary of them. The band has seemed
to temper “Man in the Mask” with that same
melancholia. They bring it home with a surprise
slow ballad, a piano-driven highlight number
titled “I’ve Died”.
Not to discount the utter extreme rock that is
blaring from my stereo. It is loud in all the right
places, with chord progressions running up
and down each track and some seriously hard-
hitting drums. Oh, there will be moshpits.
I found myself singing along after the second
listen through, realizing that this is a band that
needs some serious radio airplay. Though there’s
not quite a band that sounds like them, or they
sound similar to, they’d ft nicely between the
likes of Rise Against and Bullet for My Valentine
on KFMA. In my opinion, they are better than
most of what is played on the radio currently.
Released by XENOCIDE STUDIOS, they
recorded and mastered the album themselves.
Proudly proclaiming they are 100% self-
produced, they sound much more professional
than most others out there. There is no over-
production here, just good, natural, talent.
They are releasing their CD at The Rock on
Saturday, September 24th with CCS Crew (who
are also releasing a CD). You can pick up the
CD for $10. Having had a chance to see them
live, I can say that theirs is a live show not to be
missed.
For more information check out their Facebook
page (and like them) at: https://www.facebook.
com/afalltobreak And watch their music video
“Man in the Mask”, directed
by Tucson’s Peter Leon
(who will also be at the show
doing a live video shoot):
ht t p: / / www. yout ube. com/
watch?v=S2aJJxgZ7t8
“Man in the Mask” CD Review
By: Debbie Federico
BSceneLIVe.coM 520.358.2137
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BSceneLive

Issue #07
W
hat is Dub? Dub is commonly considered a
subgenre of music that emerged from Reggae
music in the late 1960’s, progressing over the
years to impact other genres of music, including post-punk
and rock. Dub involves removing some, or all, of the lyrics
to a song and putting the emphasis on the drum track and
bass. To those who grew up in Southern California, Dub
may possibly mean those 20 inch rims or a $20 sack of
high grade marijuana. For this occasion, Dub is all about
the infuence that the music has on all of us.
Dub Fest is double the pleasure, two nights of Reggae,
Rock, Alternative, Hip-Hop, Blues, Funk and Ska. This
extraordinary combination of music sure to please us all
is coming to the Hut in Tucson on Friday October 14th
and Saturday October 15th, 2011. Inspired by Southern
California style music and beach living lifestyle, both
nights will feature an incredible mix of local and national
acts. Friday night headliners Ballyhoo, from Aberdeen,
MD, are undeniably turning the world of music upside
down and sideways as they blur the lines between rock,
reggae, punk and pop to craft their own hybrid of music.
Playing Friday night with Ballyhoo is Echo Movement, a
seven piece band from Asbury, NJ. Echo Movement is
an American alternative/reggae band originally formed
in 2004 by brothers Stephen and David Fowler.
Saturday night features Pacifc Dub from Huntington
Beach, CA. Pacifc Dub is one of the newest, and
youngest, bands to solidify themselves as professionals
within the Reggae-Rock scene. Pacifc Dub combines
catchy choruses, heavy rock n’ roll guitar melodies,
and smooth hip-hop and reggae rhythms that add to
their coastal vibe while sharing a message of love and
peace. Also featured Saturday night is Katastro, from
Tempe, AZ. Formed in 2007, Katastro emerged from
diverse musical backgrounds to create a unique sound,
blending hip-hop, blues, jazz and rock.
DUB Fest Night 1 Lineup: Special Brownie (Tucson,
AZ), Catfsh Mustache (Mesa, AZ), Faster Than Light
(Tucson, AZ), Spartacus (Oxnard, CA), Ease Up (L.A./
San Diego, CA), Echo Movement (Asbury Park, NJ),
Skitn (Tucson, AZ), and Ballyhoo (Aberdeen, MD).
DUB Fest Night 2 Lineup: Funky Bonz (Tucson, AZ),
Faster Than Light (Tucson, AZ), Spartacus (Oxnard, CA),
Katastro (Tempe, AZ), Pacifc Dub (Huntington Beach,
CA).
Come join us at Dub Fest for an impressive two nights
of amazing live music performed by our favorite local
and national acts. Purchase your tickets at http://dubfest.
eventbrite.com/, $10 for one night or $15 for both nights.
Sponsored by Tucson Rock Alliance, Phenomenon
Concerts, and BSceneLive. Vendors will also be on hand
from Moon Smoke Shop and 420org.
featUrinG BaLLyhoo and pacific dUB
By: Stacy Fortson
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BSceneLive

Issue #07
S
he once played a secret concert in communist East
Germany before the Berlin Wall fell and is in the
Blues Hall of Fame. In her younger years she played
in the NYC subway for tips and has toured Europe several
times. She was trained as a classical symphony pianist
and violinist at the prestigious Manhattan School of Music,
but now plays blues and jazz. She has worked with the
likes of Allen Ginsberg and the legendary Sam “Bluzman”
Taylor. She won the 2011 TAMMIE for best string musician
in Tucson. Many musicians
would kill for a shot at some
of those things. So who is
this interesting person? She
is Heather Hardy, and she
lives and performs right here
in Tucson!
Reading Heather’s bio it
seems to be a chronology of
taking musical risks. Playing
in a communist country
during the cold war was
certainly a risk. Switching
from a classically trained symphony musician to a jazz/
blues artist is a risk. Playing with some of the “best of the
best” in the music world is a risk. The list goes on…
So let’s briefy hit the highlights frst. She has been playing
live music in Tucson since 1991. She calls her music soul/
blues. She says she plays “lots” of clubs and bars as well
as festivals. A little unusual, she also plays prisons and
rehab centers. She says she does this because “I love to
bring music into settings that have none. I believe there
should always be some kind of music in our environment.”
Heather was born in New Rochelle, NY, but her family
quickly moved to Westport, CT. Her father was a medical
illustrator, and her mother a teacher. The family had a
great appreciation for the musical arts, and at age six
Heather took up the piano. She says she immediately fell
in love with it, but there was more, she fell in love with
creating and performing music.
In 4th grade, the school she attended offered every student
the opportunity to study a string instrument. Heather really
wanted to play the cello, but it was too heavy for a small girl to
carry around. Her family convinced her to study the violin.
She says she absolutely fell in love with it, and with the idea
of playing in a symphony setting. She was selected for the
All-State Orchestra and the Norwalk Youth Symphony and
played with them during Jr. High and High School. In High
School she had the honor to be selected for the American
Youth Symphony and did her frst European tour with them.
After High School she applied to the Manhattan School
of Music. She auditioned on both piano and violin, and
was accepted on both but was
told she had to pick one as her
major. At frst it was the piano,
and she studied under Walter
Hautzig for a year. She did some
soul-searching and realized a
piano was fne for a symphony,
but it wasn’t exactly portable.
Heather says she is a gypsy at
heart, and needed something she
could easily carry. She decided
a violin was something you could
play with the symphony, as well
as for informal small groups on
the road. She switched her major to violin, and studied
for another two years under Raphael Bronstein, who she
calls “incredible.”
After the MSM she started playing the subways and local
parks, mostly for tips. She says this was a great opportunity
to meet other musicians, learn from them, and develop her
style. By this time she had switched from classical music
to blues/jazz. One day, playing in Washington Square
Park, she got “noticed.” She was asked to join the False
Prophets who recorded on the Alternative Tentacles label.
They were fairly well known, especially in Europe. She
joined them, and they toured Europe, Canada, and the US.
Heather talks a bit about the transition from a symphony-
trained violinist/pianist to a blues/jazz performer. “I
changed direction musically, in 1984. I really always loved
jazz and blues and I wanted to be able to improvise. But
that transition for a classical violinist is very diffcult. For me
it was a lot about loosening up and letting go, and allowing
By: Don Martin Photos by: Jodi B. Darling
JUSt who iS
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14
the music to come through me rather than from me.” She
continues, “I feel as though the violin is an extension of
myself at this point, I don’t look at it as something I like for
better or worse. It’s like breathing.”
As for her singing, she credits Sam Taylor. “Singing was
a gift given to me by the late great Sam Taylor. I had
always enjoyed singing, but I never even entertained the
thought of being a lead singer. I worked with Sam for 20
years. And from learning to sing harmonies next to him he
endlessly encouraged me to fnd my voice. I love it and am
so grateful he encouraged me. I am still always striving to
improve.”
Heather continues, “This leads me to the question of who
infuenced me most. Well, without a doubt that would be
Sam Taylor. First of all, there was no artist before, during,
or after Sam’s life that rivaled what he did. And when
you went to see Sam, or played with Sam, you were in
the Church of the Blues. Such a great band leader, such
an incredible showman, and his voice and guitar playing
moved me to chills and tears nightly. “I also feel that being
in the presence of such a great songwriter and truly getting
to see his artistic process opened my mind and heart to the
possibilities of what I could do as a writer and performer.
He was also my very best friend and on so many levels he
made me a better artist and human being.”
I always like to ask musicians about the largest and
smallest crowds they have played to. I am interested in the
answer to the small crowd question, you can learn some
things there. Are they only in it for money (large crowd) or
because they enjoy interacting with their audience (small
crowd)?
Heather nailed this one perfectly. For the record, the largest
crowd she has played to is “well over 5000” at a concert
in Poland,
with the False
Prophets on a
European tour.
The smallest
was only a few
people at the
Mint, here in
Tucson. About
this she says,
“But it’s one of
my favorite gigs.
If it’s only a small
crowd, but they
love music, then it’s
everything I need.
And most of the time
we have a great
group that comes
to hear the music
and a great group
of regulars and staff
that also love music.
I love playing there!”
As a fan of live
music that’s exactly
what I want to hear!
What does Heather get out of playing live? She puts it
this way. “When I play a show, I always receive a great
healing. Of course, the act of playing creates that. And the
experience of collaborating with other artists (my band) is
empowering. But at the shows the greatest power to me is
in seeing the audience and feeling them have a cathartic
experience. Whether they need to escape, or whether they
fnd comfort, or just dance their cares away, it is contagious
and I always feel that I receive way more than I could ever
give. Those moments of creating community give my life
purpose.”
Heather is passionate about supporting the Amity
Foundation. Amity is a nonproft which helps people
with substance abuse problems. Their latest project is
Dragonfy Village, which will include a complete resource
center for children in families having problems with
substance abuse issues.
Heather’s website is www.heatherlilmamahardy.com.
There you can keep up to date on her tour schedule, see
some live video, or download music.
The musicians Heather currently plays with are: Ed
Delucia (guitar), Larry Lee Lerma
(bass), Ralph Gilmore (drums),
Sabra Faulk (vocals), and Don
Nottingham (vocals).
Heather’s previous CD’s are
titled: “Violins” and “I Believe.”
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Issue #07
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Issue #07
I
met Kini Wadè when I walked into Plush on 4th
Avenue. I spotted the bartender and asked if he was
Kini Wade (pronouncing his last name way-ed). He
quickly corrected me on the pronunciation of his last name
as “Wah-deh” and told me it should be spelled with an
accent mark,” Wadè.”
Kini Wadè is well known for playing drums in various local
Tucson bands. He is the original founder of Tammie Hall
of Fame reggae band, Neon Prophet. He formed the
band back in 1984, but left shortly afterward to take care
of family responsibilities. He has played for The Stella’s,
Black Moon Graffti, Pro-Cell, The Low Downs, Manzanita,
Tin Roof, Wadè Connection, Moore Rockers, and has been
drumming for reggae band Planet Jam since September
2007.
I was fortunate to sit down with Kini and hear interesting
stories of his life’s journeys and travels. Kini described
himself as an “old hippie” from Meadville, PA. He told me
attended the original Woodstock in 1969, validating his
claim as a hippie to me. I continued to take notes as he
unloaded more interesting tales.
Kini is very much an iconic fgure on 4th
Avenue. Not only does he bartend at
Plush and Delectable’s, he also works
part time at the Chocolate Iguana and
is the 4th Avenue Association’s Street
Fair Stage Manager. Kini is the man
responsible for booking all of the live
entertainment at all the 4th Avenue
Street Fair’s since 1996. I asked Kini
how he landed the job with the 4th
Avenue Association and he replied,
“The people in charge at the time
noticed I had a decent sound system
and professional equipment for live
shows.”
I was very interested on his thoughts
of Tucson’s music scene and if he
thought things have progressed and evolved in a positive
way for local musicians. He believes that Tucson has
had a huge growth in population since he arrived in 1977,
and that has created more diversity and new talent to be
discovered in our community. He has seen many talented
young artists come to Tucson to attend the University of
Arizona and form new progressive bands. He believes
the younger bands will keep the music scene vibrant and
fresh. Kini did mention that the City of Tucson neglected to
build an outdoor amphitheater downtown or on 4th Avenue
somewhere. He would’ve liked to have a permanent
stage for bands to play during 2nd Saturday’s downtown
or other events on 4th Avenue.
I asked him if he enjoys the Club Crawl events on 4th
Avenue and Kini replied, “Many bars have closed their
doors to bands during club crawl. It has turned into more
of an outdoor type of festival than a club festival. Club
Crawl started out as just that…people going from club to
club to see various bands perform. Now it’s more outdoor
crawling than clubs.”
If you ever get a chance to see
Planet Jam play, stop over and say
hello to Kini Wadè. And remember
to pronounce his last name with an
accent “Wah-deh!” He will correct
you on that…trust me.
By: John Mares Photos by: Benjamin Rolling
520.358.2137 BSceneLIVe.coM
Issue #07

BSceneLive

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I met Brent years ago in the downtown scene of Tucson.
Brent is a jack of all trades, but is probably best known
as the front man of Tucson’s own BRICKTOP. The band
BRICKTOP is a staple in Tucson’s punk scene, and Brent
is a well known guy. For eight years, Brent worked at the
Vaudeville Cabaret on Congress. He and some guys from
disbanded bands got together and formed BRICKTOP.
However, he started tattooing long before Vaudeville and
BRICKTOP. In 1997/98 Brent was living in Utah and did a
tattoo apprenticeship at Boulevard Tattoo. When he came
back to Tucson in 1999, he went to work at Tattoo Artistry
with Ed Slocum. In 2000, Brent met Jim, the owner of
Fastlane Tattoos. Brent and Jim started a couple things
together, they ride choppers together with some of the
other artists in Jim’s shops, and maintained a friendship for
the past eleven years. Brent was working as a mechanic
when Jim approached him with an offer to go back to
tattooing at Fastlane. Brent accepted, and we are now
blessed with another talented artist here in Tucson. There
are two Fastlane shops now, one at 22nd St. and Wilmot,
and the other on Oracle Rd. just north of Prince. Brent
started out at the east side shop in August of 2010, and is
now working at the west side shop on Oracle. The shop is
neat, clean, organized, and has a chill vibe to it. The new
shop on Oracle also has a space in the back that is going to
be used as a retail space. Jim and Brent want to sell local
music and merchandise, and rare and hard to fnd punk
records and merchandise. The space is awesome and I
can’t wait to see it set up. Of course, BRICKTOP CDs and
merchandise will be available at the shop! BRICKTOP
currently have two CDs available: the 2003 release
“Born to Brawl” and 2011’s “Broken Bottles and Suicide
Throttles”. BRICKTOP is what we here in The T like to call
Thug Rock. If you like your punk heavy and awesome,
you’ll love BRICKTOP.
I hope I’ve given you enough incentive to go see Brent and
the rest of the talent at Fastlane. While you’re there, buy
a BRICKTOP record.
Visit Brent at:
Fastlane Tattoo
3801 N. Oracle Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85705
ph: 520.388.8282
You can also check out artwork and other shop info at:
http://fastlanetattooaz.com/
And, check out BRICKTOP at:
www.myspace.com/tucsonbricktop
www.reverbnation.com/bricktop
h t t p s : / / w w w . f a c e b o o k . c o m / p a g e s /
BRICKTOP/85220658139
U
niversity Pedi-Cabs was established by Tony
Rivera in 2011. Born in Manhattan, New York,
Tony moved to Tucson in his mid 20’s after
careers in aircraft maintenance with the US Air Force
and as a BMX racer. Tony attended Pima Community
College, studying Fitness Sport Science, then continued
his education at the U of A, getting a degree in Elementary
Education. A love of the great outdoors, combined with a
love for ftness and exercise, led Tony to form University
Pedi-Cabs. He hopes to share his love of all three with
the people who use the service. Tony draws inspiration
from Walt Disney, who would not give up until he made
his dream come to life.
University Pedi-Cabs provides the University of Arizona
and downtown Tucson areas with a unique, alternative,
eco-friendly form of transportation. University Pedi-Cabs
also conducts tours of the El Presidio historic district, 4th
Avenue, University of Arizona, and the romantic River
Walk, as well as participating in various community
functions and events.
So regardless
of whether
you just take
a ride or want
to take a tour,
r e me mb e r
Un i v e r s i t y
Pedi - Cabs,
“We Can
Take You
There”.
1

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M
y love for live music is much like
my love for basketball. Screw
the NBA, NCAA is where the
heart is. I root for the underdog; anyone
who’s lived through March Madness with
me will vouch for that. Once players
make it to true baller status (not like they
can’t/don’t get laid every night should
they choose, but I’m talking about fat
wallets here), they lose the heart and
soul they play with in college. It just isn’t
the same; in case you were wondering,
my favorite underdog team is Marquette.

So, as much fun as the big dogs are to
see, if you want to witness soul, you root
for the little guy. I originally went out to see
my buddy, local bouncer and musician “Big” John Holmes.
I’ve got mad love for anyone who keeps my ass safe at
work, especially with my big mouth. John’s set was amazing
and I am always pleasantly surprised when local musicians
not only meet but beat my expectations talent-wise. Don’t
even get me started on his choice of cover songs, Marvin
Gaye’s Sexual Healing. Awesome cover choice, it’s the
OG panty dropping song. Rock on, John Holmes, rock on!

Following my bouncin’ buddy was local up and comer
Ben Michaels. I’ve never seen him before but I hear he’s
amazing. I grab a drink and settle in for the show, smack
in front of the little bongo
drummer, Kevin. Hello
cuties! Oh, if only I was
a decade younger! The
thing I simply couldn’t
get over was adorable
Ben performing barefoot.
I simply had to know
why. Why, Ben, why?
Watching Ben open for
his mentor and idol was
a really awe-inspiring
experience, a once in
a lifetime opportunity
to live his dream. Ben
By: Stephanie Swingle Photos by: Stacy Fortson
Kande SayS:
has a certain charm in his lyrics and
the way he shares stories (getting
stranded coming home from Phoenix)
makes him easy to relate to. Watch
out world, this guy is going places!

The real underdog of the evening
was Trevor Hall, a new-to-me folk/
reggae singer hailing from South
Carolina, of all places. Trevor played
barefoot as well, which again left me
curious. Certainly there is some deep
and meaningful reason for bare feet.
I anxiously awaited the opportunity
to ask one or both performers why
they did this. Although we didn’t
bond over Lemon Drop martinis, we
eventually had a chance to chat briefy.

Once Trevor started playing, I was completely entranced.
I witnessed one of the
most musically inspired
moments of my life. There
was a point where I stood
back and absorbed every
word he sung. He closed
his eyes and poured his
heart into the microphone;
it was so intimate. The
song was Te Amo, “I want
to be your shelter and I
want you to shelter me.”
He closed his eyes and
he sung. He felt each
word he shared, none of
us were there; it was just
Trevor and his music. That moment will stay with me a
very long time. At one point I became angry because none
of my friends have turned me on
to him before now! What the heck,
music is meant to be shared!

StORy COntInueD
OnlIne
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t
here is a new live music venue on Tucson’s east
side, RJ’s Replays, located in the old Berkey’s
building. If you think RJ’s is Berkey’s II you’re
wrong, the club has been completely remodeled. Rough
wood paneling makes it a warm and comfortable place to
be, a new stage for the bands
is in the corner and a modest
dance foor has been installed.
I recently attended their grand
opening.
The frst thing you will wonder
upon entering RJ’s is if it’s a
friendly Irish pub, a sports
bar, or a live music venue. It
is actually all of those things.
RJ’s offers over 140 craft
brews sure to please the palate of any beer lover. Popular
beers are on tap, including some you wouldn’t expect, like
29 Gold Medal award- winning craft brews. The food menu
ranges from appetizers to fuller fare. There are about
30 large fat-screen TV’s on the walls and they offer all
the cable sports networks and most pay-per-view sports
broadcasts. If you want to watch a PPV boxing or wrestling
event, RJ’s is a good place to do it. RJ’s runs sports during
the day into the early evening, when they seamlessly
change to live music. This is when the fun starts!
RJ’s currently books classic rock, jazz, and cover bands,
in addition to bands that play original music. Richard, the
owner, says he will include some country bands as well, so
“people can two-step all night!” The night I was there the
place was christened by the Bryan Dean Trio. You really
can’t do much better than listen to a few sets of blistering
blues. The BDT is one of the best blues bands in the
country, and it is a pleasure to hear them.
RJ’s is laid out a bit differently than some music venues.
Some clubs pack you in so tight you think you are talking to
the table next to you. At RJ’s the tables are spaced apart,
which makes for a comfortable and casual experience. The
night I was there the service staff was very attentive, right
there the exact moment you wanted to order another drink.
RJ’s also offers two private seating areas. Intended for
people who want to sit together, there is no cover charge
for them, and full bottle service is offered.The club wants
to attract some of the U of A crowd. They could watch a
U of A football game, and then hang around for some live
music. Current students can show their Wildcat Card to
receive a discount off of any appetizer. RJ’s reach extends
beyond college kids, it extends to lovers as well. Richard
says, “This historic building
is [a place] memories can be
made.” He continues, “I have
met so many couples that
have returned to the historic
Berkey’s because this is where
they met the love of their life. I
hope that I have many more
couples meet here at this new
fun and exciting place.”
RJ’s has an interesting plan for the future. They intend to
be one of the frst clubs in town to show 3-D sports, and
their TV’s are already equipped for it. The problem is there
are not many sports which are broadcast in 3-D. Richard
says, “The last University of Arizona Wildcat football game
was broadcast in 3-D and it was amazing to watch.” He
continues, “You have to be here to see it, it‘s just like if you
were at the game.”
RJ’s is sponsoring Beerfest 2011. There you will get to
sample their signature sliders, and drink some unique craft
beers with 4000 other beer lovers.
The club is at 5769 E. Speedway Blvd. The hours of
operation are Monday – Friday, 11am – 2am. Saturday &
Sunday, 9am -2am. RJ’s opens early on Saturday for all
college ESPN Gameplan shows and on Sunday for NFL
Ticket. They have a special breakfast menu on those two
days for the early birds.
RJ’s charges a modest cover of $3 to $5 for some special
sporting and live music events. Children are welcome with
a parent or guardian until 10PM.
Karaoke is hosted from 9PM to 1AM
every Wednesday. The live music
schedule can be seen at www.
rjsreplays.com.
hot Spot of the Month
By: Don Martin Photos by: Frank Ramos

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