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BALANCED LITERACY K-2: READING AND WRITING WORKSHOP GUIDE

MR. JOHN HOGAN SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS MRS. ANN PELUSO ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT MRS. KATHLEEN OFARRELL DIRECTOR OF ENGLISH MR. ANTHONY S. CALI PRINCIPAL, CORNWELL AVENUE SCHOOL MRS. THERESA GANLEY PRINCIPAL, GEORGE WASHINGTON SCHOOL MS. MARY KEATING PRINCIPAL, CHESTNUT STREET SCHOOL CURRICULUM WRITERS KINDERGARTEN MRS. MICHELLE SENA - CS MRS. ROBYN WAGNER - CS GRADE 2 MS. KIMBERLY BOWIE - GW MRS. MARY JANE CAPPELL - CA GRADE 4 MRS. DESIREE KARROLL - CA MRS. BONNIE MANES - CA JULY 2008 GRADE 1 MISS EDNA MESSINA - CA MRS. MARIE SWEENEY- CA GRADE 3 MS. LILI FERGUSON - GW MR. JOSEPH PAPPAS - GW GRADE 5 MRS. CARON GIBBONS - GW MS. MELISSA LUCIERE - GW

TABLE OF CONTENTS GRADES KGN-2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION READING UNITS OF STUDY MAP WRITING UNITS OF STUDY MAP READERS/WRITERS WORKSHOP FRAMEWORK
(See Chapter 9: Getting Started: The First 20 Days of Independent Reading p. 142-162 in Guiding Readers and Writers: Grades 3-6 Fountas & Pinnell)

SECTION 1 SECTION 1 SECTION 1

BALANCED LITERACY LITERARY FORMS AND GENRE SCOPE AND SEQUENCE GRAMMAR SCOPE AND SEQUENCE WORD STUDY: FUNDATIONS (K-2) KINDERGARTEN READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

SECTION 2 SECTION 3 SECTION 3 SECTION 4 SECTION 5

NYS CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS/END YEAR WRITING RUBRICS GRADE 1 READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES NYS CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS/END YEAR WRITING RUBRICS GRADE 2 READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES NYS CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS/END YEAR WRITING RUBRICS SAMPLE BLACKLINE MASTER FORMS SECTION 8 SECTION 7 SECTION 6

PROJECT DESCRIPTION The K-5 Balanced Literacy: Reading and Writing Guide is intended to help educators teach from the specific body of knowledge that students in grades K-5 must acquire in order to become highly effective users of oral and written language. The NYS Standards and Core Performance Indicators in English Language Arts form the basis for the development of the instructional units. Each unit is designed to target all components of a balanced literacy program with an emphasis on reading and writing workshop instructional strategies. Readers workshop and Writers workshop are phrases that describe a particular structure that maximizes students learning. This structure does not require prepackaged curricula or specialized materials. Instead, the workshop model relies on teachers deep understanding of the skills and strategies that reading, writing, listening and speaking demand. It acknowledges that skillful reading and writing are developed through experience, practice by explicit teaching of the habits and techniques of accomplished readers and writers, and by giving students sufficient time to practice with authentic texts. Teachers have carefully developed instructional plans that address the strengths and needs of their particular students, not based on the sequence of one-size-fits-all lessons in a textbook. In order to implement these plans effectively, teachers and students need access to lots of books in various genres matched to their interests, reading levels, and instructional goals. They also need time to confer and have opportunities for sustained reading/writing in many different genres. The content of specific reading and writing mini-lessons and titles may change each day, but teachers can always use the workshop structure to organize their planning, no matter what strategies or books they use.

WEST HEMPSTEAD UFSD Reading Curriculum Map (2008-2009)


Grade
Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
Putting It All Together. Readers Celebration

Readers Build Good Habits

Emergent Storybooks

Readers Think and Talk About Books

Readers Read Shared Reading Texts

Reading Just Right Books

Non-Fiction Strategies

Readers Build Good Habits

Readers Read Just-Right-Books and Use Print Strategies To Support Conventional Reading

Readers Use the Patterns in Their Books to Read with Accuracy, Fluency and Comprehension

Readers Read and Talk About Books to Grow Ideas: A Spotlight on Comprehension

Readers Bring Word Power to Reading As They Acquire the Print Strategies Necessary to Read Increasingly More Challenging Books Readers have strategies for monitoring for meaning, problem-solving words, and maintaining fluency: readers read with word power and build their vocabulary

Nonfiction Reading Strategies and Reading Centers: Readers Read and Think about Sets of Texts They Gather Around an Interest

Readers Read With Fluency By Capturing the Tone of a Text, Sounding Like Characters, and Understanding the Story

Readers Care About Characters and Become Character Experts in Reading Centers

Readers Think Across Books in Reading Centers: Reading,Thinking, and Talking About Texts (Option: thematic centers i.e. friendship, or interests)

Readers Make Plans for Their Reading and Invent Their Own Reading Projects

Careful Readers Have Good Habits: Reading with Stamina, Engagement, Fluency, Accuracy, and Comprehension

Readers Use Strategies to Figure Out Words and To Understand Their Stories.

Readers Think and Talk About the Characters in Their Books and They Can Become Experts About Characters in Character Centers.

Careful Readers Build Comprehension by Reading With Fluency, and Pay Attention to the Story Elements/Caref ul Readers Monitor for Meaning as They Read.

Readers become experts about series they love by looking closely at character relationships

Nonfiction reading strategies: readers can get information and grow ideas from nonfiction texts

Readers read nonfiction (across the content areas)

Readers read just right fiction books and poetry books in theme-based centers: partners learn to grow ideas as they read a selection of related books

Find you niche as a reader; return to your old favorites, create your own reading centers, and make plans for your reading life

WEST HEMPSTEAD UFSD Reading Curriculum Map (2008-2009)


Grade
Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Launching Reading Routines

Maintaining a Varied and Independent Reading Life, and Getting Ready to Demonstrate Reading Skills on the Reading Test (TESTING FUNDAMENTALS)

ELA

Non-Fiction Reading and Independence in Reading

Reading with Close Comprehension: Fiction and Mystery

Reading with Your Mind On Fire; Readers Infer and Grow Ideas About Characters.

Fables, Myths and Legends

Launching Reading Routines

Maintaining a Varied and Independent Reading Life, and Getting Ready to Demonstrate Reading Skills on the Reading Test (TESTING FUNDAMENTALS

Reading with Your Mind On Fire; ELA Readers Infer and Grow Ideas About Characters. Reading with Your Mind ELA On Fire; Readers Infer and Grow Ideas About Characters.

Non-fiction Reading And Independence in Reading Fiction

Reading with Close Comprehension: Genre-Based Clubs (Partnerships)

Talking and Writing About Texts to Infer and Interpret: Same-book Partners or Clubs to Support Deeper Reading

Content-Area Reading or a Return to Genre Clubs

Building a Reading Life

Launching Reading Routines

Maintaining a Varied and Independent Reading Life, and Getting Ready to Demonstrate Reading Skills on the Reading Test (TESTING FUNDAMENTALS)

Non-fiction Reading and Independence in Reading Fiction

Reading with Close Comprehension: Genre-Based Clubs (Partnerships)

Talking and Writing About Texts to Infer and Interpret: Samebook Partners or Clubs to Support Deeper Reading

Social Issue Clubs

*NOTE: GUIDED READING INSTRUCTION IS EMBEDDED THROUGHOUT EACH UNIT OF THE MAP FOUNTAS & PINNELL BENCHMARKS ARE ADMINISTERED WITH K-2 ELP IN FALL/SPRING TO INFORM TEACHERS LEVEL SPECIFIC INSTRUCTION As of 7/18/08

WEST HEMPSTEAD UFSD Writing Units of Study Curriculum Map (2008-2009)


Grade K* 1 2 3 4 5
Sept Oct Nov
Labels and Label Books Pattern and ABC Books Personal Narrative Writing for Readers Teaching Skills and Strategies

Dec
Writing for Readers: Teaching Skills and Strategies

Jan

Feb

Mar
Poetry Introduce Writers Notebook Non-Fiction

Apr
Author Study : Eric Carle

May

Jun

Launching the Writing Workshop

Small Moments Personal Narrative Writing

Non-Fiction Writing/Writing Celebration

Launching the Writing Workshop Launching the Writing Workshop Launching the Writing Workshop Launching the Writing Workshop Launching the Writing Workshop

Pattern Books

Letter Writing Writing for Readers

Poetry

Author Study Tomie DePaola Celebration Publication of Student Work Memoirs Author Study (Patricia Polacco)

Small Moments Personal Narrative Personal Narrative

Revision

Author Study (Gail Gibbons) Non-Fiction (Reports, Articles, How-to)

Non-Fiction Writing Research and Reports Biography Autobiography Interviews

Poetry

Response to Short Shared Text (Test Prep) Writing for Purpose Persuasive Essays Writing with Independence: Preparing for the Writing Tasks of State Assessment Non-Fiction Writing (Test Prep) (DBQ,CRQ) Non-Fiction How to Persuasive

ELA

Poetry

Personal Narrative

ELA

Fiction

Author Your Own Non-Fiction Unit of Study

Poetry

Author Study: Cynthia Rylandt Celebration Publication of Student Work

Personal Narrative

ELA

Biographies Autobiographies

Poetry

Author Study Roald Dahl

*In Kindergarten Writing for Readers: Teaching Skills and Strategies is incorporated in every unit throughout the year

Updated: 7/18/08

What is a Balanced Literacy Program? Teacher Directed Reading


Reading Aloud Shared Reading Guided Reading Book Clubs Literature Circles Class Literature Study Content Area Text Study Vocabulary Development Word Work

Independent Reading
Sustained Silent Reading Oral & Written Response Strategy Mini-Lessons (such as procedures, literary craft, reading/comprehension strategies, response, and conventions) Conferences Goal Setting Assessment

Teacher Directed Writing


Modeled Writing Prompted Writing Lessons on Writing Formats Informational Writing Spelling Handwriting Word Processing Conventions and Grammar

Independent Writing
Writing Workshop Mini-Lessons on Strategies Mentored Writing Research Revision Editing Conventions Publication/Sharing

A Program Framework
45 Minutes every day 60 Minutes three times/week INDEPENDENT READING
SSR+R (Sustained Silent Reading & Response

DIRECTED READING INSTRUCTION

Includes structured lessons using formats such as: Guided Reading/Book Clubs/Literature Circles Shared Reading with common texts Reading Aloud/Shared Reading Aloud Whole Class Literature Study Social Studies & Science Text Reading Instruction Vocabulary Development Word Work

60 Minutes three times/week

WRITING INSTRUCTION

Includes structured lessons, independent practice, self-selected writing, & prompted writing practice using formats such as: Writing Workshop Guided Writing/Modeled Writing Mini-Lessons Prompts & written response Word Work Grammar & Conventions Handwriting & Word Processing

Another Program Framework


90 Minutes every day READING WORKSHOP
Mini-Lesson Status of the Class Independent Reading Book Clubs Response Reading Aloud

60 Minutes three times/week

WRITING WORKSHOP
Mini-Lesson Status of the Class Independent Writing Conferencing Authors Circle

30 Minutes three times/week

WORD STUDY

Word Work Vocabulary enhancing strategies Spelling Conventions Handwriting & Word Processing

Developing A Schedule
EVERY DAY, NO MATTER WHAT
Teacher reads aloud to the class Teacher observes and notes student achievement Children read books of their choice independently Children respond to books orally Children write for authentic purposes Children practice problem solving & comprehension strategies

THREE TIMES A WEEK


Children write on topics of their choice & develop pieces of writing Some children participate in small groups for reading & writing instruction Children participate in shared reading & writing experiences Children work with words & conventions of the English language Teachers provide direct instruction in strategies for reading, writing & thinking Children participated in content area theme lessons, experiences & thinking.

ONCE A WEEK
Teachers confer with individual children about reading & writing Children create a written response to reading Children share piece of writing with others Children participate in formative spelling assessment Children explain thinking in math journals

A DAILY SCHEDULE
8:30 9:00 9:00 9:20 9:20 10:20 10:20 10:30 10:30 11:30 11:30 12:30 12:30 2:00 2:00 3:05 3:05 3:15 Gathering Time/Morning Work Morning Meeting Writing Workshop (3 times/week) Unified Arts Snack Break Content Area Studies/Class Literature Study (3 times/week) Unified Arts Recess and Lunch Hour Reading Workshop Math Workshop Afternoon Meeting/Dismissal

Balanced Literacy In The Classroom


Balanced literacy is the vehicle that we use in AISD to deliver the Language Arts TEKS. The balance in balanced literacy refers to reading and writing done to, with, and by children. This balance speaks to the amount of teacher control and student independence. Some components of balanced literacy require a higher level of teacher demonstration while other components require more student time and ownership.

Independent Reading and Writing Guided Reading and Writing Response

Word Study Demonstration Shared Reading and Writing (Interactive Writing) Time and Ownership Literature Circles

Teacher Read and Write Aloud

Amount of Independence Least Most

Read Aloud

an able reader (usually the teacher or parent) reads out loud students do not see the printed text but may see the illustrations choose text 2-3 grade levels above the reading level of the listeners model fluent reading, advanced sentence structure, and vocabulary introduce new forms such as poetry and the classics develop story sense limit time; make read-aloud a teaching event

Read Aloud
Before Introduction Why choose this book? Tie book to experience Clarify potentially difficult concepts During Use expressive voice Show illustrations Share personal experiences Predict, question Accept and value comments from children Answer all questions Talk about authors ideas and viewpoint After Continue discussing predictions Share life experiences Make connections Make books available to children Allow children to respond through activities that grow out of their interests

Write Aloud
an able writer (usually the teacher or parent) writing on an overhead, blackboard, or chart paper talking out loud about the process of writing model decision making on choice of topic to write about model writing process and decision making, capital letters, punctuation, and spacing introduce new conventions of print and new forms of writing model editing techniques and art of conveying a message limit time; this is a direct teach event

Shared Writing
teachers holds the pen and writes on a surface large enough for all children to see teacher models writing process and decision making about conventions used children contribute to and experience the composition process writing is a negotiated process with topics, meanings, and choices of words jointly decided by students and teacher develops understandings of concepts about print allows children to examine print details closely shared writing material becomes reading materials that are relevant and interesting to children (poems, charts, wall stories, daily news)

Interactive Writing
students and teacher compose, write and revise text together by sharing the pen assists students in learning how to record oral language demonstrates concepts about print, lettersound relationships, and syllabication demonstrates use of high-frequency words, word families, endings, and slow articulation of words demonstrates rereading of text to help maintain meaning students reread finished text in centers or independent reading

Shared Reading
teacher reads text, inviting students to join in the reading teacher models strategies in context text must be visible to students: big books, charts, poster, overheads, basal develops concepts about print and language text presents supports and challenges models repeated readings

Word Study
daily, direct and explicit letter and word work presented in context or isolation fun, manipulative supports good spelling and proofreading provides opportunity to practice high frequency words uses word families, onsets and rimes, patterns word walls and word wall activities

Guided Reading
students read a text at their instructional level (supports and challenges) in a small group teacher provides an introduction and support as needed teacher does not read the text each student has a copy of the text strategies are practiced in context discussion supports comprehension provides opportunity for the teacher to assess and diagnose beginning readers use quiet voices to read aloud at their own rate this is not choral reading or round-robin reading

Guided Writing
teacher provides topic or purpose for writing student(s) compose written text teacher provides guidance and support as needed writing strategies practiced in the process of writing for a purpose provides opportunity to assess and diagnose individually or in groups editing conferences and response groups provide support for expanding ideas, and conveying meaning to an audience

Critical Attributes of Literature Circles


group of children discussing a book set read the book independently or with their peers heterogeneously grouped focuses on student interest comprehension strategies addressed reaction, reflection, response

Critical Attributes of Independent Reading and Writing


students choose and read books at their independent reading level for a sustained period of time each day students select purposes and topics for writing students practice strategies demonstrated in shared and guided reading and writing students build self-esteem and competency as readers and writers students share their work by reading to others, conferences, retellings, or publishing

Critical Attributes of Learning Centers


to build upon what children already know and are able to do to provide enjoyable, successful experiences in learning to read and write to interact in meaningful, purposeful ways with literacy to encourage interactions with language and print at each childs individual level to connect with literacy in a nonfragmented way to create and display literacy for a printrich environment to extend the students natural language to foster thoughtful processes about learning to read and write to meet the needs of students with different learning styles

to encourage students organizational skills and responsibility for learning materials to teach students how to work cooperatively or collaboratively with others to assist students in learning through the context of social relationships to facilitate flexible small group and guided reading instruction

Critical Attributes of Management of Learning Centers


Center materials should be well organized and clearly labeled Special consideration should be given to the flow of traffic from one center to another Materials in each center should be available and easy to access Display space in centers should be available for placing students completed work especially for large art-type projects Storage space should be provided for ongoing and completed student work Learning centers should have ongoing routines that are taught to the children Centers should be introduced one at a time to the students with time to practice using the center

Learning center materials may be changed according to student interest or a specific learning goal Each center should have an adequate but not overabundant supply of materials Quiet and noisier activities should be separated from noisier activities

Reading List
Select a book to read. Enter the title and author on your reading list. When you have completed it, write the genre and the date. If you have abandoned it, write an (A) and the date you abandoned it in the date column. Note whether the book was easy (E), just right (JR), or a difficult (D) book for you.
#
Title Author
Genre Code Date Completed E, JR, D

2002 by I.C. Fountas and G.S. Pinnell, Readers Notebook, NH: Heinemann

Assessment Checklist for Launching the Writing Workshop


Names
T O / X taught must teach soon saw evidence that writer can do saw more evidence that writer can do

x M o n i t o r i n g C h i l d re n s P ro g re s s x R e c o r d i n g Yo u r T e a c h i n g

Goals Attitude Planning Independence Genre Purpose Productivity


Writer generates topics without resistance. Writer assumes the identity of Im an author! Writer chooses paper that is appropriate.

Writer makes the transition from the minilesson to writing. Writer cycles through the process with independence, starting a new piece when the last is done. Writers text conveys either a story or information. Writer knows writing conveys meaning. He creates coherent oral (or written) text to accompany pictures. Writer is socialized into the norms and mores of a writing workshop, carrying on productively for 2030 minutes. Writers marks show growing concepts of print (top to bottom, alphabet letters, etc.). Writer writes labels, sentences, or stories using sound-letter correspondence, etc., to do so.

Graphophonics

Writer has strategies for spelling unfamiliar words (at least stretches out a word, then hears and records initial or dominant sound). Writer revises by adding details into pictures/ text and by adding more pages to text.

Writing Process Qualities of Good Writing Reading

Writer uses resources appropriately to help with spelling. Writer tries to make his marks on the page match his mental image. Writer talks about the value of details. Writer identifies print and understands its function in different texts.

May be copied for single classroom use. 2003 by Lucy Calkins and Beth Neville, from Resources for Primary Writing, Units of Study for Primary Writing: A Yearlong Curriculum, Lucy Calkins, Heinemann: Portsmouth, NH

Early Primary Reading Workshop Model


Shared Reading (15 minutes) With all of the students gathered together, shared reading provides a gathering activity to begin the workshop that models the effective strategies which will be used independently. As a common mini-lesson, shared reading offers an excellent opportunity to introduce, model, and practice strategies with the entire class. Following the traditional shared reading model (see Parkes, 2000, among others) the teacher begins by reading an old favorite or two. Then, over the course of a week, a new text is introduced and practiced providing the context for any number of lessons that can be taught to support emergent readers. Independent Reading (20 minutes) The children keep book boxes which contain self-selected books as well as those selected by the teacher and some that are introduced at book clubs. Independent reading time is essential for developing readers. Children greatly benefit from opportunities to practice their reading by themselves. This time may not be silent reading, as most primary age children need to read orally. This develops word identification strategies as well as fluency. Meeting (10 minutes) The children gather with their books and announce the titles of those they read during independent reading time. The teacher records at least one title on a chart which he uses for record keeping and assessment. He may also invite the children to respond briefly about their books. Then, centers and book clubs are announced and the children sign up for their activities for the day. Book Clubs and Literacy Centers (40 minutes) Following a traditional format for guided reading (see Taberski, 2000, among others) the teacher meets with book clubs, small groups of students (no more than 5,) to read a common text and practice common needs. The teacher selects the common text based on its ability to address the intended instruction as well as its level of readability and comprehension. Groups are not permanent and are based on immediate needs. During the lesson, the teacher prepares the students for reading by accessing schema, providing background, and exploring key vocabulary. They preview the text through its pictures, talking about the story and using its vocabulary in conversation. Some word work helps to introduce, practice and reinforce work identification strategies that will support the reading of the text at hand as well as the entire reading process. When ready, the children read the text independently, usually out loud, while seated with the other members of their book club. The teacher is present, listening carefully, in order to add support where needed. After the children have all finished, a brief but meaningful response to the text is generated. Typically, a teacher meets with two groups every day. He frequently monitors each child through individual conferences, during which he assesses text reading as well as comprehension. As students become more sophisticated readers, the nature of the book club may change from an emphasis on strategy to one of content. When not in a book club, the other children are involved in literacy centers. These provide independent activities that will further support a childs ability to read independently. They also provide a purposeful structure which allows the teacher to work with small groups while the others are engaged in meaningful work. The children rotate through the centers at approximately 12-minute intervals, and all children are expected to participate in every center at least once during the week. Five to six different centers are offered each week. Centers typically include: independent reading, readers theater, research, book selection, storyboard retelling, story maps, response journal writing, and word work. Successful centers directly compliment the strategies being taught and reinforced during shared reading and book clubs. Read Aloud (15 minutes) While this is not the only time the teacher reads aloud during the day, reading workshop provides a regularly scheduled opportunity to model and reinforce successful reading strategies. The teacher reads to the whole class from a variety of texts to provide a strong literary background from which the children may draw upon later in life. Interaction during the read aloud is expected, as it promotes the development of story language. Reading aloud also provides a comfortable, warm closure to a typically busy reading workshop.

Reading Workshop Format


Mini-Lesson (5-10 minutes) Lesson topics are determined by the needs of the class as well as the curriculum. Lessons are brief, whole group, and often involve both teacher and student modeling. Topics vary, but typically address the following: procedures, literary craft, reading and comprehension strategies, response, and conventions. Atwell (1998) and Serafini (2005) offer a number of practical model mini-lessons that are easily adaptable. Status of the Class (2-5 minutes at the beginning of silent reading) As the children select new books or retrieve ones they are still reading from their book boxes, the teacher asks each student what they will be reading. He records the title and page number on a chart. This provides an excellent opportunity for a brief conference with every child about their reading and the books they have chosen. It also provides a reliable assessment tool by which the teacher can monitor self-selection and provide guidance when necessary. Silent Reading (minimum of 30 minutes) Once the children have selected their books and conferred with the teacher, they are expected to read silently and independently. While many primary age children vocalize while reading and may need the support of reading orally with a partner, silent independent reading remains the goal. When children finish reading a book, they record it in their reading logs, return it to the classroom library, and select another book to read. Conferences & Book Clubs (during silent reading) Silent reading provides the teacher with guaranteed time to meet with individuals and small groups for assessment, guidance, remediation, and enrichment. During a conference, the teacher meets with individual children to talk about their reading and offer brief individual instruction in an informal conversation that may last from 8-10 minutes. Conferences focus on the individual needs of every child, so no two conferences are alike, although the conversation always surrounds books the child has recently been reading. Occasionally, the teacher groups 4 or 5 children according to their instructional needs and forms a book club. The teacher is then able to address these needs with a common text following a lesson structure that involves preparation for reading, independent reading, and response. Most often, book clubs meet over the course of two or more days. As children become more sophisticated readers, the book club format becomes increasingly independent. Response (10-15 minutes) The children are invited to respond to their reading in both oral and written ways. Every day the children meet with a friend for book talks, brief conversations that share reactions and responses to reading. About once a week, the children write more formal responses in journals or traditional book reviews. The children write independently and freely, although the teacher occasionally provides a prompt to guide the response. They are also encouraged to discover interesting new words and record them in a special vocabulary notebook. Connections between reading and writing are encouraged. Written responses are always shared with peers and the teacher in order to maintain purpose and audience. Read Aloud (20 minutes) The teacher reads orally and invites active listening and participation from the children. Longer, more diverse, and more complicated texts are selected to provide a rich experience of literature. This provides an excellent opportunity for additional modeling of reading and response strategies. It also offers closure for the reading workshop within the community.

West Hempstead Union Free School District Grade Level Scope and Sequence LITERARY FORMS/GENRE
LITERARY FORMS/GENRE Nursery Rhymes Poetry Fairy Tales Picture Books Plays/Readers Theater Fables Biography/Autobiography Folktales Mystery Realistic Fiction Historical Fiction Legends/Tall Tales Fantasy Mythology Non-narrative/non-fiction How To Books All About Books Interviews Literary Essay Persuasive Essay Memoir/Personal Narrative/Small Moments Informational Articles Diaries/Journals Photo Essay Friendly/Business Letters Focus Grade Level Unit of Study Kindergarten ALL Kindergarten & First ALL Third Grade Fourth Grade Third Grade Third Grade Third Grade Fourth & Fifth Grades Fourth & Fifth Grades Sixth Grade ALL Kindergarten & First Second & Third Second & Fifth Fourth, Sixth Third through Sixth ALL Fourth & Fifth Fifth Fifth & Sixth K D D D D E E E E 1 M D D D D D E E 2 D M D D D E E E E E D M D D E E D E E E D 3 D D D M D D D E E E E D M M M D D D E E E D 4 D D D M M M D D D E E D M M M D D D D E E D 5 D D M M M M M D D M E E D M M D D D D D D E D 6 D D M M M M M M M M E D D D M D D D M M E D

E D D D E D E E E

E E D D D E D E E E E

E Exposure (without formal instruction) D Direct Instruction (with formal lessons) M Maintenance (application/reteach when necessary)

Draft 7/08

West Hempstead Union Free School District


Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar Scope and Sequence
MECHANICS
Abbreviations acronyms address abbreviations common abbreviations Initialisms (CD, DVD, TV) Capitalization abbreviations days, months, holidays first words (of sentences) geographic names historical events names of people official names (business, official products) organizations particular sections of the country proper nouns proper adjectives races, languages, nationalities, religions school subjects titles titles used as names words used as names Plurals Adding an s compound nouns irregular spelling nouns ending in ch, sh, s, x, and z nouns ending in f or fe nouns ending in ful nouns ending in o nouns ending in y plurals that do not change (deer, moose, buffalo)

K 1 2 3 4 5
E E D D M D D M E E E E D E D D D D D E D D M E D E E D D D D D E E D D D D D E D E E E E E E E E E E D D D D D D D M M M M D M D D D M D E M M M E M M E M M M M D M M M M M D D D M M M M D D M M M M M D

6
E M M E M M M M D M M M M M D D D M M M M M D M M M M M D

E E E

D M M E D D D D D M D D M E D D D D D M E E D

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the discretion of the teacher. E = Exposure
7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue to reinforce as needed)

West Hempstead Union Free School District


Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar Scope and Sequence
PUNCTUATION
Apostrophes in contractions in place of omitted letters or numbers to express time or amount to form plural possessives to form possessives with indefinite pronouns to form singular possessives to form some plurals to show shared possession Colons after salutations (business letter) as a formal introduction (of a quote) between numbers in time to introduce lists Commas between items in a series in compound sentences in dates and addresses in direct address in letter writing to keep numbers clear to separate equal adjectives to separate introductory clauses and phrases to set off appositives (his teacher, Ms. Chin,) to set off dialogue to set off explanatory phrases to set off interjections to set off interruptions to set off nonrestrictive phrases and clauses to set off titles or initials Dashes for emphasis to indicate interrupted speech to indicate a sudden break Ellipses to show omitted words to show pauses

K 1 2 3 4 5
D D D M D D E E D D E E D D M D D E E E D D M E D M E D E E D D E D E E E E D D D D D D D E D D D D M M D D D D D D M M M D D M M M D D M M M M M M M M D D D M D D D

6
M M M D D M M M D M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M D D M M M E M 2

E E E

E D D E E E

E D E D E D E E E E E D D M

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the discretion of the teacher. E = Exposure
7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue to reinforce as needed)

West Hempstead Union Free School District


Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar Scope and Sequence
PUNCTUATION
Exclamation Points to express strong feelings Hyphens in compound words to create new words to divide words to form adjectives to join letters to words (e-mail, u-turn) Italics and Underlining in titles Parenthesis to add information Periods in abbreviations after initials as decimal points at end of sentences Question Marks at end of direct questions at end of indirect questions tag questions (., isnt it? ., arent you?) to show doubt Quotation Marks for quotations within quotations for special words placement of punctuation to punctuate titles to set off long quoted material to set off quoted material to set off a speakers exact words Semicolons to join two independent clauses to separate groups that contain commas with conjunctive adverbs

K 1 2 3 4 5
E D D D M M D D D D E D E E E E D E M M M D M

6
M M M M D M M M M M D M M D M M E M M M D E M E M E

E D D D M E E D D M E D D E D D D D D D M M D M M M D M

D D M M M D D D M E D E D D D E E D D M E E M

E D D D

E E E M

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the discretion of the teacher. E = Exposure
7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue to reinforce as needed)

West Hempstead Union Free School District


Mechanics, Punctuation, and Grammar Scope and Sequence
GRAMMAR
Parts of Speech noun verb pronoun pronoun with clear antecedent adjective preposition Understanding Sentences introductory phrases prepositional phrases Transition words Compound sentences Tense agreement Subject/verb agreement Interjections Homonyms Synonyms Antonyms

K 1 2 3 4 5 6
E D D D D D E D D D D D E E D D D D D D E D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

D D E E E E

D D D D D D D D D D D

*Exposure may precede direct instruction at any grade level at the discretion of the teacher. E = Exposure
7-08

D = Direct Instruction M = Maintenance (continue to reinforce as needed)

Anne McGrath
7/28/2008 1

It is important to teach students letter shapes, names and sounds so that they can use letters to develop phonemic awareness. Phonemic awareness is the ability to focus on and manipulate phonemes in spoken words. Phoneme manipulation with letters helped normal developing readers and at risk readers acquire phonemic better than phonemic awareness instruction without letters

The results of many studies concluded that explicit, systematic phonics instruction is a valuable and essential part of a successful reading program. Nation Reading Panel Report

Underlying Principles for Successful Instruction


Structured Language Basis ( ability to manipulate
phonemes however, this alone is not a reading program).

Multi-sensory, Explicit, Systematic


(The hallmark of a systematic phonics approach or program is that a sequential set of phonics elements is delineated and these elements are taught explicitly.)

Review and Reinforcement

Fundations is recommended as part of a total literacy solution, including a literature-based language arts program and a Wilson Reading System intervention and intensive program.
7/28/2008 4

Who Is This System Designed For ?


Wilson Fundations for K-3 is a phonological/phonemic awareness, phonics and spelling program for the general education classroom. Fundations is based upon the Wilson Reading System principles and serves as a prevention program to help reduce reading and spelling failure. Rather than completely replace core curriculum, Fundations provides the research-validated strategies that complement installed programs to meet federal standards and serve the needs of all children.
7/28/2008 5

Fundations Bridging Phonics and Literacy


Wilson Fundations makes learning to read fun while laying down the groundwork for life-long literacy. Fundations provides children of varying learning abilities with a foundation for reading and spelling. It provides teachers with the skills and tools needed to present a structured, sequential, and cumulative phonics/spelling program using multisensory teaching techniques. As a recognized leader in multisensory language programs, Wilson brings more than a decade of systematic and explicit instruction to the K-3 classroom. Wilson Fundations provides research-based materials and strategies essential to a comprehensive reading and writing program.

Is a multi-sensory researched based program designed for students in the general education classroom.

7/28/2008

Program Highlights
Emphasis on systematic phonics and study of word structure Skills taught explicitly and systematically Instruction is cumulative and scaffolds presented skills Teachers model with Echo the owl puppet directing students to repeat sounds, words, and sentences Assessments monitor students throughout the program The manual provides direction for support staff to meet individual student needs Extensive practice provides multiple opportunities for skills application Home Support Packet encourages parental involvement

Skill Development
Each level of Fundations presents skills in a carefully structured scope and sequence.These build on previously taught skills and are brought forward cumulatively: from unit to unit, year to year. Letter Formation Phonological and Phonemic Awareness Sound Mastery Phonics Vocabulary Irregular (Trick) Word Instruction Fluency Comprehension Written Composition

Explicit Instruction
Sound/Symbol Relationship a Blending and Segmenting Syllable Structure Irregular Words
b a t

fan

tas

tic

what

Use Questioning Techniques Throughout the Lesson for Skill Reinforcement and Mastery What is a diagraph? (sh,ch,th,wh,ck) How many sounds in a diagraph? How many sounds are in the word? Where is the blend Where is the nasal a sound? (am) (an) Is there a chicken letter? (qu) What is the bonus letter?

Questioning can be effective due to direct teaching and controlled text. Examples of Errors: Tim had jet lag. (Tom) Chop (shop)
Directly question students how they can decode and spell words. Have them express what they do in order to succeed. Be sure they know what they know. (Metacognition)

How is Fundations Aligned with Reading First?


Addresses each of the five components (Phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) required by reading first.
The Florida Center for Reading Research, one of three federally funded Reading First technical centers, conducted an independent review of Fundations and its effectiveness. The analysis confirmed the alignment with reading research, that Fundations addresses each of the five components required by Reading First (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension), and noted no weaknesses in the program. Fundations is not considered a core program, however, it can be incorporated into Reading First grants as a supplemental prevention or early intervention program.

Establishing Good Habits


Breaking the guessing habit and using skills ( tapping, notebook, keywords) Breaking down words to spell rather that trying to spell from memory Spelling orally before writing, and then again when writing Proofreading independently after writing a word or sentence Reading stories silently before reading aloud Retelling stories in sequence using visualization Provide students with a strategy

Children Are Successful

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 1 Core Words the of and Rule Words sat cat mat hat rat Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters at make the /at/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 2 Core Words of a to Rule Words red fed led bed wed Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ed make the /ed/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 3 Core Words is in you Rule Words but nut cut rut hut Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ut make the /ut/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 4 Core Words you that it Rule Words not hot pot cot dot Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ot make the /ot/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 5 Core Words he for was Rule Words did hid lid kid rid Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters id make the /id/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 6 Core Words was on are Rule Words nap lap tap map cap Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ap make the /ap/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 7 Core Words as with his Rule Words get let pet met bet Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters et make the /et/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 8 Core Words with they at Rule Words hill fill grill chill will Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ill make the /ill/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 9 Core Words be this from Rule Words pig dig wig twig big Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ig make the /ig/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Name ___________ Spelling Unit 10 Core Words from I have Rule Words dug slug plug bug hug Personal Words Spelling Rule The letters ug make the /ug/ sound.

1.___________ 2.___________

Unit 1 (the, of, and)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. They saw the dog.

2. That cat is black and white.

3. Six of the boys ran.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

Unit 2 (of, a, to)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. She fed a dog.

2. She went to bed.

3. Four of the girls wed.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

Unit 3 ( in, is, you))


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. The cat is in the bed.

2. You have a red hat.

3. The boy fed the rat.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

Unit 4 ( you, that, it)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. That cat is hot.

2. You have a cot.

3. It is hot.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

*7 Unit 5 ( he, for, was)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. It was in my book.

2. The boy hid in the lid.

3. The cat is for the boy.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

*8 Unit 6 (was, on, are)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. He had a hat.

2. Are you sad?

3. She is on the boat.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

*10 Unit 7 (as, with, his)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. His pet is sitting.

2. My dad met with the man.

3. She is as tall as the bat.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

*13 Unit 9 (be, this, from)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. This twig is big.

2. Get the wig from the girl.

3. Can the pig be fat?

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

*14 Unit 10 (from, I, have)


_______________________________ _____________________ Name _______________________________

Spelling

STRETCH IT
Add words to make this sentence longer and better.

1. I have a bug.

2. That plug is from the wall.

3. I will hug.

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 1.____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ 2.___________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ 3.____________________________________________________________________________

KINDERGARTEN READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading___________________ Unit/Theme: Reading Just Right Books and Using Print Strategies Content Understandings: Using the cover to gather information. Looking for words you know on the page. Flipping through a book to figure what it may be about. Getting your mind ready to read the words. Keeping track of the story in your head. Reading leveled books. Using illustrations to help figure out words when you get stuck. Asking a partner questions about the book. Helping your partner when they get stuck. Deciding if what you read makes sense(Semantics) Fixing reading when it doesnt sound right(Syntactic) Looking at the beginning letters to help read (Graphophonic) Essential Question(s): What does the cover tell you? How do I find a book that is just right for me? How do I flip through a book to see what it is about? What tools help me figure out what the book will be about? How do I get my mind ready to read the words? What is a leveled book? What can I use to help me read words when I get stuck? How can illustrations help me in the story? How can I help a partner when they are stuck? Does what I am reading sound right? Does what I read make sense? Grade Level:____K___

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1; Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Cover Title Leveled book Illustration Information flip

Instructional Suggestions Read literature. Demonstrate looking at the cover and discuss what you see on the cover. Model how you get your mind ready for reading. Discuss how illustrations can help you read the story. Model reading and stumble on a word to ask for assistance from students. Demonstrate how you can help your partner when they are stuck. Create a chart on choosing a book that is Just Right Make a chart of the five things good readers do when they find a tricky word.

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can contribute to group discussion. Can identify the title on the cover of the book. Can discuss illustrations in the story and how it helps us read. Can help a partner when they are stuck on a word. Understand the five things that readers do when they meet a tricky word.

Suggested Unit Resources: Leveled Readers Duck on a Bike by David Shannon Professional Resources: The Art of Teaching Reading by Lucy Calkins Leveled Books For Readers by Fountas and Pinnell 25 Just Right Plays For Emergent Readers by Carol Pugliano Choose a Just Right Book by Creative Teaching Press 2

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:___Reading________________ Unit/Theme: Readers Read Shared Reading Text Content Understandings: Paying attention to the words in the story. Using early reading behaviors independently( one to one matching etc.). Thinking about what is happening in the story as you read. Looking at the beginning of a word and getting your mouth ready. Using patterns to help read books. Making sure what you read aloud matches the words on the page. Knowing that careful readers look closely at the words to help them read the story. Essential Question(s): How do I show reading behaviors independently? How do I get my mouth ready for reading? What do careful readers do? How do I make sure the words match what I am saying. How do patterns help me read books? How do careful readers look closely at a story? How can I track the print on the page? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Readers Pattern Track Match Independently Reading behavior print Instructional Suggestions Demonstrate how to look at the pictures when reading. Use familiar big books and poems. Mimic how to read the same text over and over. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can look at the pictures while reading. Can recognize familiar big books and poems. Knows where the title of the book is. 1 Grade Level:___K____

Model looking at the cover reading the title and beginning on the first page. Look at the pictures and think aloud. Model finding words on the page. Model tracking words. Have them turn to a partner and share book. Show how patterns help you read books through Nursery Rhymes and familiar text. Suggested Unit Resources: Wishy Washy Day by Joy Cowley The Gingerbread Man by Paul Galdone The Three Bears by Paul Galdone Are You My Mother P.D. Eastman Nursery Rhymes Caps For Sale by Esphyr Slobodina Who Took The Farmers Hat? By Joan Nodset The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper Professional Resources: Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 Core Knowledge Text Resources K www.mothergooserocks.com

Can show where to begin reading the story. Can find the words on the page. Can begin to track words. Can share a book with their partner. Can recognize a pattern in a Nursery Rhyme or poem.

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:______Reading_____________ Unit/Theme: Readers Think and Talk About Books: Comprehension Content Understandings: How to find interesting characters in their books. How to talk about interesting characters. How to identify the main character. Understand the elements of the story. Pay close attention to the illustrations. Making real life connections with the story or characters. Share connections you have made with the story. Recall important facts about the story. Essential Question(s): Who are the characters in the story? Why is the characters role important? How can I identify with main character? How does this story remind me of something in my life? Do the illustrations help me tell the story? What are the story elements? What is the main part of the story? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Student read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Story Main Characters Element Fact Connection Identify Comprehension Illustration Instructional Suggestions Make character charts and webs. Read literature. Demonstrate how to use postit notes to identify parts of the story. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can contribute to group discussion. Can identify characters in the story. Can identify the main character in the story. 1 Grade Level:__K_____

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Discuss how a character can relate to your life. Help readers remember what they want to share with their partners (character, main idea etc.). Think aloud during mini lesson. Listen in as you give the children time to talk about the book. Make a chart of the story elements. Discuss how to use the illustrations to help with story understanding.

Can identify the most important part of the story. Can discuss how a character can relate to your life. Can identify story elements. Can discuss the book with their partner. Can use illustrations to assist in the understanding of the text.

Suggested Unit Resources: Mrs. Wishy Washy by Joy Cowley Hairy Bear by Joy Cowley Swimmy by Leo Lionni Three Bill Goats Gruff by Paul Galdone The Little Red Hen by Paul Galdone Brave Irene by William Steig Lillies Plastic Purple Purse by Kevin Henkes Peters Chair by Ezra Jack Keats Professional Resources: Readers Workshop Handouts The Art of Teaching Reading by Lucy Calkins 2

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Reading_______________ Unit/Theme: Emergent Storybooks Content Understandings: Introduce star books. Introduce star baggies. Reading workshop spots. Creating partnerships. Sitting with a partner. Completing partner work. Partner talks. Making your voice match the characters voice. Using post-it notes to mark places in the book that bring out feelings. Story retelling. Learning how to wonder as you read. Differentiate between favorite part and important part of a story. Essential Question(s): What is a star book? What are star baggies? How do I work with a partner? How do I sit with a partner? What do I talk to my partner about? How do I use character voice? What do I use post-it notes for? What is the difference between my favorite part and an important part of a story? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Favorite Partner Wonder Instructional Suggestions Immerse students in literature to use for star books. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can identify a part in the story that makes you feel happy, sad, angry etc. 1 Grade Level:___K____

understanding. Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

Post-it notes Important Character Voice Book baggie

Establish partnerships. Can pick a star book. Demonstrate how to use a post-it note to hold a space in the book. Demonstrate matching your voice with the characters voice. Wonder aloud while you read to students. Demonstrate a story retelling. Tell the story across five fingers to help limit the story retelling to their favorite part. Model strategies using big books. Make a chart of how to choose a star book. Make a chart of what good partners look like.(Take pictures while students are working with their partner) Contribute to group discussion. Can sit with their partner properly (shoulder to shoulder, back to back or knee to knee). Can identify the most important part. Can put a star book in their baggie. Works quietly with a partner. Knows where their reading spot is. Can pay attention during mini lessons and meeting time. Can work with a partner to read and share books.

Suggested Unit Resources: Caps For Sale by Esphyr Slobodaina The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn Big Al by Andrew Clements Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes Corduroy by Don Freeman The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats Professional Resources: New York State Core Curriculum Columbia Reading and Writing

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:___Reading________________ Unit/Theme: Readers Build Good Habits Content Understandings: We are all readers. Routines and procedures. How to care for a book. How to use book bins. How to choose a book. Picture walking. Early print awareness. Reading conferences. Being a good listener. Recognize environmental print. Essential Question(s): What is readers workshop. What are the routines and procedures? How do you choose a good book? What is a picture walk? Where is the print on the page? What does a good listener look like? Where are book bins kept? What do I do when I think I am finished reading a book? What is environmental print? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read,write,listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Readers workshop Picture walk Listener Books Instructional Suggestions Introduce routines and procedures. Generate a list of rules and Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can explain rules and routines. Recognizes environmental 1 Grade Level:_____K__

Standard 2: Students will read,write,listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Bins Print Routine Environmental print

routines. Use environmental print to prove they are readers. Have students bring examples of environmental print. Take pictures of landmarks in the community that students may recognize. Demonstrate how to handle books(turn pages slowly etc.) Demonstrate how to look through books to see if they are interesting. Use pointer to show how to read from left to right. Show how to use pictures to tell a story.

print. Knows how to handle a book properly. Begins to know that print goes from left to right. Recognizes landmarks in their community. Can pick a book that interests them. Can tell a story through a picture. Knows where book bins are. Can sit quietly during reading time.

Suggested Unit Resources: Signs by Tana Hoban Environmental pictures from the neighborhood Pictures and print that students contribute School Bus by Donald Crews Professional Resources: Colombia Reading and Writing K-2 Handouts from Professional Development

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:___Reading________________ Unit/Theme: Non-fiction Strategies Content Understandings: Introducing non-fiction texts. Non-fiction books give real information. There are features that can be found in most non-fiction texts. Most non-fiction texts contain pictures. Most non-fiction texts have captions. Some non-fiction texts contain diagrams and maps. Some non-fiction texts have a table of contents. Some have a glossary. Differentiate non-fiction from fiction. Readers read non-fiction texts to gather information. Essential Question(s): What is a non-fiction text? What features can be found in most non-fiction texts? What is a table of contents? What is a glossary? What are captions? How can I differentiate between fiction and non-fiction? What do non-fiction books teach us? Why do non-fiction books have diagrams and maps? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Non-fiction Glossary Table of contents Maps Diagrams Instructional Suggestions Read non-fiction literature. Compare non-fiction and fictional texts. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can identify features of a nonfiction text. Can compare fiction to nonfiction. 1 Grade Level:____K___

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Fiction Caption Feature

Discuss what a non-fiction book is. Class chart listing non-fiction features. Show samples of a table of contents. Show samples of a glossary. Show examples of maps. Show examples of diagrams. Have students create a collage of what they know about nonfiction texts.

Knows what a table of contents looks like. Knows what a glossary looks like. Knows what a map looks like. Knows what a diagram looks like. Can contribute to group discussions.

Suggested Unit Resources: Lifecycle of a Frog by Angela Royston The Lifecyle of a Butterfly by Angela Royston Kangaroos by William John Ripple Snowy Owls by Helen Frost Camels by William John Ripple Arctic Hares by Helen Frost Crabs by Lola M. Schaefer Owls by Emily Rose Townsend Professional Resources: Picture Books for the Literacy Hour Activities for Primary Teachers by Merchant Growing Readers by Cathy Collins Columbia Reading K-2

KINDERGARTEN WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:___Writing________________ Unit/Theme:Author Study Eric Carle Content Understandings: Discovering small moments just like Eric Carle. Learning from Eric Carles writing. Noticing details in illustrations. Noticing details in the text. Studying authors as mentors. Emulating the author in ways that matter. Noticing the authors craft of writing. Making personal connections. Essential Question(s): Who is Eric Carle? Why are we studying this author? What is special about his writing? How does he engage the reader? What is his style of writing? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Listening and Speaking Standard 1: Habits Reading Standard 2: Getting the Meaning Reading Standard 3: Reading Habits Writing Standard 2: Writing Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Author Mentor Illustrations Text Craft Details Illustrator Biography Literature Style Instructional Suggestions Introduce Eric Carle by reading a biography. Display a picture of Eric Carle. Make character charts as you read a story. Read literature . Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can explain who Eric Carle is. Can identify their favorite Eric Carle book. Can contribute to discussion about Eric Carle. Can produce a writing or illustration piece related to 1 Grade Level:__K_____

Purposes and Resulting Genres

Complete art projects. Ask questions about Eric Carle and his books (wonderings). Draw or write about what you have learned about Eric Crale books. Make a chart of favorite Eric Carle books. Make a chart of what we learned about Eric Carle as an author and illustrator. Identify beginning, middle, and end of a story. Review elements of a story with a story map.

Eric Carle. Can successfully identify the beginning, middle and end of a story. Can successfully discuss the elements of a story map.

Suggested Unit Resources: Do You Want to Be My Friend? Flora and Tiger The Very Hungry Caterpillar The Very Quiet Cricket The Very Busy Spider The Very Clumsy Click Beetle Little Cloud Pancakes Pancakes Draw Me a Star Have You Seen My Cat? From Head to Toe The Very Lonely Firefly Does A Kangaroo Have A Mother Too? 2

Professional Resources: Americas Choice: Eric Carle Author Study www.EricCarle .com All About Eric Carle by Scholastic

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:_Writing__________________ Unit/Theme: Poetry Content Understandings: Seeing themselves as poets. Hearing the voices of poetry. Showing poetry through illustrations. Patterning in poems. Poets choose their own topics. Writers write in notebooks. Essential Question(s): What is a poem? Who is a poet? How do I write a poem? What makes up a poem? Do all poems rhyme? What is a writers notebook? What will I put in my writers notebook? Can I write between lines in a notebook? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 2: Students will read, write and listen for literary response. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Poem Poetry Poet Pattern Voice Rhyme Illustration Writers Notebook Instructional Suggestions Read poems from famous poets. Create poetry folders or notebooks. Write poems on chart paper. Provide opportunity for children to observe their Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can explain what a poem is. Can explain what a poet does. Can read poems they have written. Can illustrate a poem. 1 Grade Level:__K_____

surroundings to assist poetry ideas. Make a list of poetry topics and ideas. Highlight rhyming words. Introduce a writers notebook. Demonstrate how to write between the lines in a writers notebook. Have students decorate their writers notebook. Suggested Unit Resources: Mother Goose Rhymes Seasonal Poetry Classic Nursery Rhymes by Paige Weber Classic Treasury of Best-Loved Childrens Poems by Penny Dann Professional Resources: Units of Study for Primary Writing: Poetry by Lucy Calkins and Stephanie Parsons Core Knowledge Text Resources: Kindergarten Reading and Writing Grade by Grade Core Knowledge Teacher Handbook A Poem a Day (Grades K-3) by Helen H. Moore

Contribute to group discussion about poetry. Begins to write between the lines of a writers notebook.

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:__Small Moments: Personal Narrative Writing_________________ Unit/Theme: Small Moments: Personal Narrative Writing Content Understandings: Zooming on a small moment in time. Discovering one small moment. Stretching one small moment. Planning details. Focusing on the most important part. Storytelling with a partner. Writing list books Essential Question(s): What is a small moment? How do I zoom on a small moment? How do I stretch a small moment? Why are details important for small moment writing? What is the most important part of my story? What is a list book? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Writing Standard 2: Writing Purposes and Resulting Genres Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Small Moment Details Planning Focus Zoom Important Stretch List book Instructional Suggestions Read literature zooming on a small moment in the story. Taking real photographs zooming on an important part of the photo. Discuss a small moment with added details. Listen to a story from an Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can identify a small moment. Can zoom on a small moment in their written story. Can identify a small moment with a given text. Can discuss a small moment with details. 1 Grade Level:__K_____

author that stretches a moment across several pages. Stretch a small moment across your fingers. Show examples of list books. Write examples of a small moment. Suggested Unit Resources: A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats Owl Moon by Jane Yolen The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn Shortcut by Donald Crews Do Like Kyla by Angela Johnson Professional Resources: Units of Study for primary Writing: A Yearlong Curriculum by Lucy Calkins and Abby Oxenhorn Americas Choice Personal Narrative

Can tell a story across their fingers. Can successfully write a list book.

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:_Writing__________________ Unit/Theme: Writing for Readers Content Understandings: Inspiring children to write for readers. Writing with sight words. Spacing words. Learning more sight words. Using word walls. Writing more clearly. Writing for partners. Essential Question(s): Where do I find sight words? How can I write more clearly? Why is it important to space words? Why are word walls important? How do I use a word wall? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Sight word Word wall Spacing Partners Readers Instructional Suggestions Role play trying to read a piece of writing that needs to be written more clearly. Read around the room. Can read around the room. Add words to word wall. Have students attempt to read each others writing. Can use the word wall to assist writing. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can find words in the classroom to assist writing. Writes spaces between words. Grade Level:____K___

Show a piece of writing that demonstrates something he/she did to make his writing more readable. Make a chart of word writing steps. Demonstrate words that are cramped verses words with proper spacing. Have students practice using word wall during writing. Demonstrate how to read with your partner. Suggested Unit Resources: Student writing samples. Words around the classroom. Word walls Alphabet charts. Professional Resources: Units of Study for Primary Writing: A Yearlong Curriculum by Lucy Calkins and Natalie Louis New York State ELA Core Curriculum

Uses sight words to assist writing. Can work cooperatively with a partner to read their writing.

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:___Labels and Label Books________________ Unit/Theme: Labels and Label Books Content Understandings: Focus on the graphophonics in turning oral language into print. Providing an opportunity for children to focus on recording sounds they hear in words. Writing functional signs for the classroom. Moving from labeling pictures into labeling books. Reading labels after writing them. Essential Question(s): What is a label? Why are labels important? How do sounds help us write words? Where do you see labels? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Habits and Processes Students will read, write and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Labels Pictures Signs Sounds Instructional Suggestions Stretch sounds for word building/labeling. Teach how to write labels for the classroom. Demonstrate how to read labels. Show an example of a book written by a previous kindergartener. Show how a label book has 1 Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can begin to label pictures. Can read the label they have written. Can identify labels in the classroom. Can label one picture with one word on each page. Begins to stretch sounds in order to label words. Grade Level:__K_____

one word and one picture on each page. Demonstrate having difficulty stretching a label and ask students for assistance. Have students practice writing labels on a white board. Show how pictures and words match. Suggested Unit Resources: School Bus by Donald Crews Harbor by Donald Crews Rosies Walk by Pat Hutchins Signs by Tana Hoban Professional Resources: Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 Core Knowledge Kindergarten Reading and Writing Grade by Grade

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:__Writng Units_________________ Unit/Theme: Launching the Writing Workshop Content Understandings: Children see themselves as authors. Children learn the rituals and structure of a writing workshop. Understand the process of writing including choosing a topic. They will write and draw as best they can. The writer fills him or herself with an idea for writing. Using supplies independently. Telling stories in illustration. Stretching and writing words; initial sounds. Using Writing Tools; Alphabet charts, word walls etc Learning how to work independently as writers. Using pictures and words like authors do. Writers write from their heart. Essential Question(s): What is an author? What do authors do? What do writers write about? How do we choose a topic? How do we work independently as writers? Where do we find our writing supplies in the classroom? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Writing Standard 1: Habit and Processes Students will read, write, listen and speak for Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Author Writer Tools Topic Ideas Instructional Suggestions Explain that we will be writing everyday. Tell the children that they will become writers. Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Group share. Conference with teacher. Conference with a partner. 1 Grade Level:___K____

information and understanding.

Independent Illustration Alphabet Word Wall Writing Folder

Demonstrate how to write about a topic you care about. Show students what writers do when they think they are finished (add details to pictures). Demonstrate how writing tools should be used. Explain how the supply system works. Demonstrate having a picture in your mind before you begin writing. Telling a story before writing a story. Explain how to stretch sounds for word building. Demonstrate how the alphabet chart is used to help them write.

Can illustrate and explain their writing. Can contribute to discussion during the mini lesson. Can explain the process of the writing workshop model. Can successfully work independently. Can use the writing tools properly. Begin to hear the initial sounds in order to stretch words.

Suggested Unit Resources: Alphabet City by Steven T. Johnson Animal Alphabet by Burt Kitchen Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambalt My Name is Alice by Jane Bayer 26 Letters and 99 Cents by Tana Hoban Alphabatics by Suse MacDonald Curious George Learns The Alphabet by H.A. Rey

Professional Resources: Units of Study for Primary Writing: Launching the Writing Workshop by Lucy Calkins and Leah Mermelstein Colombia Reading and Writing K-2 New York State Core Curriculum ELA Core Knowledge K

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:_Writing__________________ Unit/Theme: Non-Fiction Writing Content Understandings: How to books All about books Incorporating features of how to writing Structuring all about books: Table of contents Making texts that teach Learning from each others writing Fitting information into writing Writing celebration Essential Question(s): What does non-fiction mean? Where can I find non-fiction text? What is a how to book? What is an all about book? What do I include in a how to book? What do I include in an all about book? How are how to and all about books different? What is a table of contents? How can I learn from someone elses writing? What is a writing celebration? How do I choose a piece of writing for the writing celebration? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Non-fiction Table of contents All about book How to book Instructional Suggestions Read non-fiction literature. Make a list of how to topics. Can generate a list of 1 Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Can explain what nonfiction means. Grade Level:____K___

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen and speak for social interaction.

Celebration Text

Revisit a story across your fingers to assist writing a how to book. Model writing a how to book(including listing, sketching, planning) Use an overhead projector to show features of how to writing that other authors have written . Model how to write all about books. Make a chart listing the features of an all about book. Read literature with all about features. Make a list of topics for all about writing. Choose a piece of writing they feel good about for the celebration. Celebrate with own class or another class.

how to topics. Can recognize the difference between how to and all about books. Contribute to group discussion. Can write an all about book. Can write a how to book. Can choose a piece of writing for the writing celebration.

Suggested Unit Resources: Pumpkin Pumpkin by Gene Titherton The Pumpkin Book by Gail Gibbons Apples by Gail Gibbons Owl Moon by Jane Yolen Professional Resources: Units of Study for Primary Writing: Nonfiction Writing By Lucy Calkins and Laurie Pessah 2

West Hempstead School District


Grade Level: Kindergarten ELA Content Strand:________Writing______________ Expectation: End of Year

Mechanics + Literary Expression = Published Piece Not Meeting Standards


No letters No letters on line Cannot write name No picture/text match Pictures without connection to one another Scribbling Symbol writing No sound/symbol relationship

Approaching Standards
Copying Writes letters on line Stringing letters together Left to right orientation Labels pictures Some spacing Some lowercase letters Uses first sound when sounding out words

Meeting Standards
Sentences Uses high frequency words Some punctuation Word/picture match Details in picture Spaces Book spelling Can read what he/she wrote Stretches words Uses print resources in room Some beginning/middle/ending sounds

Exceeding Standards
Voice Storybook language Punctuation Realistic details in illustrations Blends and word endings Writes stories with beginning/middle/end Revises own work

As of 4/08

NEW YORK STATE CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

KINDERGARTEN

Kindergarten Reading
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The reading competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during kindergarten are Phonological and Phonemic Awareness Identify and produce spoken words that rhyme Blend beginning sound (onset) with ending sound (rime) to form known words in rhyming word families (k-it, s-it, b-it) Count or tap the number of syllables in spoken words Isolate individual sounds within spoken words (What is the first sound in can?)Phoneme Isolation Identify the same sounds in different spoken words (What sound is the same in sit, sip, and sun?)Phoneme Identity Categorize the word in a set of three or four words that has a different sound (Which word doesnt belong: doll, dish, pill?)Phoneme Categorization Blend spoken phonemes to form words using manipulatives (e.g., counters) to represent each sound: /b/ /i/ /g/Phoneme Blending Segment spoken words into component sounds using manipulatives (e.g., counters) to represent each sound (How many sounds are there in big? Move three counters.)Phoneme Segmentation Recognize the remaining word when a phoneme is removed (What is cat without the /k/?)Phoneme Deletion Make a new word by adding a phoneme to an existing word (What word do you have if you add /s/ to mile?Phoneme Addition Substitute one phoneme for another to make a new word (The word is rug. Change /g/ to /n/. What is the new word?)Phoneme Substitution

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that kindergarten students are developing as they learn to read include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Locate and use classroom and library media center resources to acquire information, with assistance Read familiar informational texts to begin to collect data, facts, and ideas, with assistance Interpret information represented in simple charts and webs Draw on a prior experience to understand new data, facts, and ideas Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Comprehend and respond to literary texts and performances Engage in pre-reading and reading activities to - select books, tapes, and poems on the basis of personal choice/interest or teacher-selected criteria, such as a theme/topic - make connections between personal experiences and stories read - predict what might happen next in a story read aloud - retell a story, with assistance Dramatize or retell stories, using puppets, toys, and other props Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Identify and explain ideas and experiences from texts and performances Engage in pre-reading and reading activities to - identify what they know and have learned about a specific story or topic

Print Awareness Understand the purpose of print is to communicate Follow left-to-right and top-to-bottom direction when reading English Distinguish between letters and words Distinguish between print and pictures Track print by pointing to written words when texts are read aloud by self or others Identify the parts of a book and their functions (e.g., front cover, back cover, and title page) Alphabet Recognition and Phonics Recognize and name automatically all uppercase and lowercase manuscript letters Recognize that individual letters have associated sounds Recognize that the sequence of letters in written words represents the sequence of sounds in spoken words Identify some consonant letter-sound correspondences Fluency Read own name and names of family or friends Recognize and identify some sight words Read automatically a small set of highfrequency sight words (e.g., a, the, I, my, use, is, are) Read familiar kindergarten-level texts at the emergent level Background Knowledge and Vocabulary Development Learn the meaning of new words and use them in own speech Learn new words from books Use new vocabulary words to talk about life experiences Connect vocabulary and life experiences to ideas in books Use a picture dictionary to learn the meanings of words in books Comprehension Strategies Notice when sentences do not make sense Make predictions about story events Answer questions about text read aloud

- use illustrations to assist in understanding the content of a text and to anticipate what will happen next - predict what could happen next or the outcome of a story or article read aloud - change the sequence of events in a story to create a different ending, with assistance - form an opinion about the differences between events in a story and events in own life - evaluate and select books, poems, or tapes on the basis of personal choice or teacher-selected criteria, such as topic, author, and illustrations - distinguish between real and imaginary stories

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share reading experience to establish, maintain, and enhance personal relationships Respect the age, gender, and cultural traditions of the writer, with assistance Recognize the vocabulary and writing conventions (e.g., greetings and closings) of social communication, with assistance

Retell or dramatize stories or parts of stories Motivation to Read Show interest in reading a range of kindergarten-level texts from a variety of genres, such as alphabet books, stories, poems, and informational texts Read voluntarily familiar kindergartenlevel texts Show familiarity with some book titles and authors

Kindergarten Writing
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The writing competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during kindergarten are Print Awareness Use left-to-right and top-to-bottom direction when writing English Use spacing between letters and words when writing on a line Spelling Use developing knowledge of lettersound correspondences to spell independently (e.g., sound or invented spelling) Use conventional spelling to spell some common or familiar words Write correctly own first and last names and the names of some friends or family Handwriting Write legibly some uppercase and lowercase letters Composition Label drawings with letters or words Write as part of play (e.g., playing school, store, restaurant)

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that kindergarten students are developing as they learn to write include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Copy letters and words from books, magazines, signs, charts, and own dictation Write own name on pictures, drawings, paintings, and written products Draw or write facts and ideas gathered from personal experiences Use graphics such as posters to communicate information from personal experiences Maintain a portfolio of informational writings and drawings, with assistance Draw pictures to record facts from a lesson, with assistance Use resources such as a picture dictionary or word wall to find and write words, with assistance Standard 2: Students will read, write,

Write compositions that include letters or words and drawings to communicate for different purposes (e.g., tell stories, communicate feelings, provide information) Motivation to Write Write voluntarily to communicate for different purposes Share writing with others

listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Draw or write original literary texts to - create a story with a beginning, middle, and end, using pictures/drawings and some words, with assistance - create poems or jingles, using pictures/drawings and some words, with assistance Draw or write to respond to text to - express feelings about characters or events in a story - describe characters or events - list a sequence of events in a story, with assistance - retell a story Maintain a portfolio of writings and drawings in response to literature, with assistance Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Draw and/or write to express opinions and judgments to - share what they know and have learned about a theme or topic - respond in pictures or words to an experience or event shared by a classmate - depict an opinion about statements, illustrations, characters, and events in written and visual texts - compare characters and settings within and between stories - describe the differences between real and imaginary experiences, with assistance Maintain a portfolio of writings and drawings that express opinions and judgments, with assistance Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share writings and drawings with peers or adults; for example, write/draw with a partner or in a cooperative group Respect the age, gender, and culture of the recipient, with assistance Write friendly letters to others Maintain a portfolio of writings and

drawings for social interaction, with assistance

Kindergarten Listening
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The listening competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during kindergarten are Listening Listen attentively to spoken language (e.g., books read aloud, rhyming words, songs, video- and audio cassettes) Listen attentively for different purposes (e.g., to track individual words as they are spoken, to gain information) Understand and follow oral directions Listen respectfully without interrupting others

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that kindergarten students are developing as they learn to listen include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Acquire information from nonfiction text Identify words and sentences on a chart, with assistance Follow a two step direction Identify and respond to environmental sounds, such as a school bell or a fire alarm, that provide information Identify similarities in information about people, places, and events Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Listen to literary texts and performances to - appreciate and enjoy literary works - match spoken words with pictures, with assistance - recall a sequence of events from a personal experience or story - identify character and setting - respond to vivid language (e.g., nonsense words and rhymes) - identify specific people and places - distinguish between a story and a poem, with assistance Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Form an opinion or evaluate information on the basis of information in the world Form an opinion about a book or play read aloud by using established criteria, such as title and vocabulary, to judge books Recognize differences in two or more versions of a familiar story, song, or

finger play Identify messages in advertisements by listening to the words Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Respect the age, gender, and culture of the speaker Listen to friendly notes, cards, letters, and personal narratives read aloud to get to know the writer and/or classmates Listen for the tone of voice and content that signal friendly communication

Kindergarten Speaking
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The speaking competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during kindergarten are Speaking Use kindergarten-level vocabulary and grammar in own speech Speak for different purposes (e.g., share ideas or information, retell a story, dramatize an experience or event) Speak audibly Speak with speed and expression appropriate for the purpose Take turns speaking in a group

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that kindergarten students are developing as they learn to speak include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Dictate information from personal experience Report information briefly to peers and familiar adults, with assistance Connect information from personal experiences to information from nonfiction texts, with assistance Retell more than one piece of information in sequence Share observations from classroom and home Ask questions to clarify directions and/or classroom routines Respond orally to simple questions and/or directions Share information, using appropriate visual aids, such as, puppets, toys, and pictures, to illustrate a word or concept, with assistance Dramatize an experience or event Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen,

and speak for literary response and expression. Interpret words of characters in stories Engage in conversations with adults and peers regarding pictures, books, and experiences Role-play characters or events from stories Express feelings about a work of fiction or poetry Respond to stories, legends, and songs from different cultural and ethnic groups, with assistance Compare stories from personal experience with stories heard Dictate stories with a beginning, middle, and end Express the mood of a story by using a variety of words, with assistance Describe the actions of characters in a story Tell real or imaginative stories on the basis of response to illustrations Retell familiar stories Describe familiar persons, places, or objects Recite short poems, nursery rhymes, and finger plays Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Share what they know and have learned about a topic Express an opinion or judgment about a story, poem, finger play, or poster Compare characters or events in two or more stories Express an opinion about the color, form, and style of illustrations Explain personal criteria (e.g., color and pictures) for choosing a book, poem, or story Dramatize differences and similarities in characters Brainstorm to create an experience chart Compare different versions of the same story Explain why two different characters view an event differently Compare events or characters in a story with their lives, with assistance Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Participate in small or large group storytelling, singing, and finger play, in order to interact with classmates and adults in the

classroom and school environment Share favorite anecdotes, riddles, and rhymes with peers and familiar adults Respect the age, gender, and interests of the listener Discuss the content of friendly notes, cards, letters, and personal narratives, with a partner or in a small group, to get to know the writer and each other

GRADE 1 READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Care About Their Characters, Centers, Non-Fiction Special Interest (APRIL AND MAY)

**This unit is an extension of MARCHS unit. The majority of word work should have been completed by this time. Ongoing instruction (Fundations Word Work) should still be implemented daily with special attention being given to struggling students.
Content Understandings: Character development, understanding character traits and how to describe a character using colorful language. Essential Question(s): Tell me about your character? Can you describe your characters best and worst traits? Can you tell how your character is feeling by the words the author has chosen? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will revise and confirm their ideas about characters by reading a variety of books about a character or characters (example: Frog and Toad books, Arthur books) Instructional Suggestions Have fun with vocabulary Support the students growing vocabularies Using specific words (synonyms, antonyms) Dictionary skills Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Informal and formal assessments should be continuing. Nontraditional assessment methods such as character role play, becoming an expert about a certain character Create poetry about a character Incorporate activities into Reading Centers (art, music)

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will share thoughts about their character in both oral and written forms. Poetry is strongly suggested.

Write and read poems about feelings to better connect with the text Revisit texts

Public speaking Show and Tell Describe a project to a partner or small group

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will compare and contrast characters

Prove ideas by finding evidence in the text )go back to the text) Read Alouds Shared Reading

Book Reports Partner book reports Character chats Produce a form of writing based on character (riddles, poems, comic books)

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Using facts to convey a Students will talk to other students about their character. thought or idea Polite listening Acceptable social interaction Learning how to answer/ask, other students questions about a character.

Partner Book Reports Ongoing celebrations

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com

Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING Grade Level: One
NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Instructional Suggestions Suggested Assessments/ Evidence

Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will revise and confirm their ideas about characters by reading a variety of books about a character or characters (Example: Frog and Toad Books, Arthur books) Students will share thoughts about their character in both oral and written forms. Poetry is strongly suggested. Students will be comparing and contrasting characters. Students will talk to other students about their characters.

Colorful language Having fun with vocabulary Support the students growing vocabularies Using specific words (synonyms, antonyms) Dictionary skills Write and read poems about feelings to better connect with the text. Revisit texts Prove ideas by finding evidence in the text (go back to the text) Read Alouds Shared Reading Using facts to convey a thought or idea Polite listening Acceptable social interaction Learning how to answer/ask other students questions about their character.

**It is imperative that Informal assessments be done at this time.** Incorporating nontraditional assessment methods such as character role play, becoming an expert about a certain character Create poetry about a character Incorporate activities into Reading Centers (art, music) Partner book reports Character chats Produce a form of writing based on character (riddles, poems, comic books) Public Speaking: Show and Tell Describe a project

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!!

Now is a great time to incorporate BIG BOOKS and books with LARGE text.
Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com www.mandygregory.com Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Nonfiction Reading Strategies, Reading Centers, Reading with Fluency and for advanced Comprehension (FEBRUARY AND MARCHThese months do not have many new topics introduced so pace yourself accordingly to be ready for APRIL)

**This unit is an extension of Januarys unitnew ideas have been added in underlined text.
Content Understandings: Students will read a variety of nonfiction books in a variety of ways, choosing topics of interest, and utilizing nonfiction reading skills to decipher the text. Essential Question(s): Is this book a fiction or a nonfiction book? (How do you know that?) Show me a/or a partner a way to read a nonfiction text (highlighted text, insets, headings) NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students use new strategies to figure out the tricky words in their nonfiction books. Students will be introduced to the different parts of a nonfiction book and what makes this text different from other forms of writing. Students will learn new vocabulary, begin to notice punctuation and sentence structure. Students will be introduced to a higher level of independent books (quotation marks, return sweep on text) Instructional Suggestions Chart the different parts of a nonfiction book (table of contents, numbered pages, glossary, index, diagrams, labels, insets, subtitles) Teach Self Monitoring Strategies Self correction and confirmation in reading skills Expose students to colorful language (similes, idioms, metaphors) Think and Talk about Books Pair and Share Initial consonant/Final consonant sounds/final blends Initial blends and digraphs Suggested Assessments/ Evidence **It is imperative that formal assessments be done at this time.** Conferencing with students should be an integral part of each day. *Running Records *Accuracy and Fluency Checks *Self Correction Rate *as needed for struggling readers Deepening partner conversations about their books

Example: st, th Awareness of vowel sounds Trick Words Chunking Glued Sounds at, it Use simplest text on a topic for ELL students for independent reading. For better readers, use prediction as a comprehension strategy.

Become experts on a topic and share information in a variety of way (art, book report, diagram, All About Book)

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students read, think, and talk about their books with others. Students will begin to make predictions and use picture clues. Students have nonfiction leveled books in their book baskets to prepare for the next unit.

Looking for small words within big words Stretching words Fundations Word Work Readers Response: post it notes, Readers notebook, talking about books (public speaking) Sentence/Story starters for ELL students

Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Evidence that students are becoming more confident readers by the books they are choosing to read independently. Shared Reading Read Alouds

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be encouraged to revisit a book and incorporate new strategies learned.

Build on prior knowledge Continue with instructional suggestions mentioned above Using illustrations to help with decoding and unknown words Fundations Word Work Begin to use inflected endings in their speaking and writing Readers Log Readers Response Fundations Word Work Introduce short poems Move away from using Big Books (no picture support) Introduce Chapter Books for more advanced readers.

ELP Assessment F&P Benchmarks Continuous Running Records to show increased efficiency in reading. Evidence that students are reading a variety of books to show transference of knowledge. Identify more complex patterns and character behavior

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn how to effectively work with a partner.

Readers Theatre Guided Reading Strategies Fundations Word Work Bilingual charts to assist ELL learners Labeling the room Shared Reading

Continue using above cited strategies. Celebrations

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!!

Suggested books: It might be a good idea to read many books that connect to the Social Studies units of study. Be sure to include fiction as well as non fiction books that relate to the unit.

**It should be noted that Guided Reading Groups are FLEXIBLE groups and students should be rotated in and out according to observation assessments, Running Record scores, and performance during Independent Reading blocks. *It is suggested that each classroom teacher communicates with other support personal to make sure everyone is on the same page students who are pulled out of the classroom for special services. Make copies of paperwork and keep a file for these students.
(Unit Resourcescontinued) Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com www.mandygregory.com (Writers Workshop lessons, sample classroom set ups, message boards) * Very teacher friendly! Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Bring Word Power to Reading As They Acquire the Print Strategies Necessary to Read Increasingly More Challenging Books (JANUARY)

**This unit is an extension of Decembers unitnew ideas have been added in underlined text.
Content Understandings: Reestablish class rules and reassess readers to determine what kinds of print work will need to be retaught. I t also a time to deepen comprehension, strengthen fluency and have the students read more difficult books. Essential Question(s): NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students use new strategies to figure out the tricky words in their books. Students read and reread text to practice fluency and comprehension. Students will learn new vocabulary, begin to notice punctuation and sentence structure. Students will be introduced to a higher level of independent books (quotation marks, return sweep on text) Instructional Suggestions Left to Right tracking Teach Self Monitoring Strategies Self correction and confirmation in reading skills Expose students to colorful language (similes, idioms, metaphors) Think and Talk about Books Pair and Share Initial consonant/Final consonant sounds/final blends Initial blends and digraphs Example: st, th Awareness of vowel sounds Trick Words Chunking Glued Sounds at, it Suggested Assessments/ Evidence **It is imperative that informal assessments be done at this time.** Conferencing with students should be an integral part of each day. Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Self Correction Rate Fluency Identify patterns in books (CVC, CVVC) Retelling the essential parts of a book (plot, setting, character) Deepening partner conversations about their books 1

Looking for small words within big words Stretching words Fundations Word Work Readers Response: post it notes, Readers notebook, talking about books (public speaking) Sentence/Story starters for ELL students

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students read, think, and talk about their books with others. Students will begin to make predictions and use picture clues. Students have nonfiction leveled books in their book baskets to prepare for the next unit.

Build on prior knowledge Continue with instructional suggestions mentioned above Using illustrations to help with decoding and unknown words Fundations Word Work Begin to use inflected endings in their speaking and writing

Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Evidence that students are becoming more confident readers by the books they are choosing to read independently. Shared Reading Read Alouds

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be encouraged to revisit a book and incorporate new strategies learned.

Readers Log Readers Response Fundations Word Work Introduce short poems Move away from using Big Books (no picture support) Introduce Chapter Books for more advanced readers.

ELP Assessment F&P Benchmarks Continuous Running Records to show increased efficiency in reading. Evidence that students are reading a variety of books to show transference of knowledge. Identify more complex patterns and character behavior

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn how to effectively work with a partner.

Readers Theatre Guided Reading Strategies Fundations Word Work Bilingual charts to assist ELL learners Labeling the room Shared Reading

Continue using above cited strategies. Celebrations

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Suggested books: It might be a good idea to read many books that connect to the Social Studies units of study. Be sure to include fiction as well as non fiction books that relate to the unit.

*It is suggested that each classroom teacher communicates with other support personal to make sure everyone is on the same page students who are pulled out of the classroom for special services. Make copies of paperwork and keep a file for these students.

(Unit Resourcescontinued) Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com www.mandygregory.com (Writers Workshop lessons, sample classroom set ups, message boards) * Very teacher friendly! Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Read and Talk About Books to Grow Ideas: A spotlight on Comprehension (December)

**This unit is an extension of Novembers unitnew ideas have been added in underlined text.
Content Understandings: Students will become more focused on print and comprehension and how to derive more meaning from the printed text. Essential Question(s): Do you have any thoughts about this book that you wish to share? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will learn new vocabulary, begin to notice punctuation and sentence structure. Students will be introduced to a higher level of independent books (quotation marks, return sweep on text) Instructional Suggestions Think and Talk about Books Pair and Share Initial consonant/Final consonant sounds Initial blends and digraphs Example: st, th Awareness of vowel sounds Trick Words Chunking Glued Sounds at, it Looking for small words within big words Stretching words Fundations Word Work Readers Response: post it notes, Readers notebook, talking about books (public speaking) Sentence/Story starters for ELL students Suggested Assessments/ Evidence **It is imperative that formal assessments be done at this time.** Conferencing with students should be an integral part of each day. Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Self Correction Rate Fluency Identify patterns in books (CVC, CVVC) Retelling the essential parts of a book (plot, setting, character) Deepening partner conversations about their books

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students read, think, and talk about their books with others. Students will begin to make predictions and use picture clues.

Build on prior knowledge Continue with instructional suggestions mentioned above Using illustrations to help with decoding and unknown words Fundations Word Work Begin to use inflected endings in their speaking and writing

Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Evidence that students are becoming more confident readers by the books they are choosing to read independently. Shared Reading Read Alouds

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be encouraged to revisit a book and incorporate new strategies learned.

Readers Log Readers Response Fundations Word Work Introduce short poems Move away from using Big Books (no picture support) Introduce Chapter Books for more advanced readers.

ELP Assessment F&P Benchmarks Continuous Running Records to show increased efficiency in reading. Evidence that students are reading a variety of books to show transference of knowledge. Identify more complex patterns and character behavior

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn how to effectively work with a partner.

Readers Theatre Guided Reading Strategies Fundations Word Work Bilingual charts to assist ELL learners Labeling the room Shared Reading

Continue using above cited strategies. Celebrations

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Suggested books: *These books deal with sibling issues that would work well with the study of personal narratives (Writers Workshopplease see detailed Curriculum Map for Writing) Peters Chair Julius, Baby of the World Noisy Nora Baby Sister for Francis

*It is suggested that each classroom teacher communicates with other support personal to make sure everyone is on the same page students who are pulled out of the classroom for special services. Make copies of paperwork and keep a file for these students.
Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com

Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers use the Patterns in Their Books to Read with Accuracy, Fluency, and Comprehension (November)

**This unit is a clear extension of Octobers unitnew ideas have been added in bold letters.
Content Understandings: Extension of Octobers unit of study with emphasis on students strategy acquisition. Explore Pattern Books and grow ideas about them. Essential Question(s): Do you understand what you are reading? Can you talk about the book? NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Instructional Suggestions Think and Talk about Books Pair and Share Initial consonant/Final consonant sounds Awareness of vowel sounds Trick Words Chunking Glued Sounds at, it Looking for small words within big words Stretching words Fundations Word Work Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Self Correction Rate Fluency

Students will learn new vocabulary, begin to notice punctuation and sentence structure. Students will be introduced to a higher level of independent books (quotation marks, return sweep on text)

Identify patterns in books (CVC, CVVC)

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students read, think, and talk about their books with others.

Students will begin to make predictions and use picture clues.

Build on prior knowledge Continue with instructional suggestions mentioned above Using illustrations to help with decoding and unknown words Fundations Word Work

Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Evidence that students are becoming more confident readers by the books they are choosing to read independently. 1

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be encouraged to revisit a book and incorporate new strategies learned.

Readers Log Readers Response Fundations Word Work

Introduce short poems Move away from using Big Books (no picture support)

ELP Assessment F&P Benchmarks Continuous Running Records to show increased efficiency in reading. Evidence that students are reading a variety of books to show transference of knowledge.

Identify more complex patterns and character behavior

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn how to effectively work with a partner. Readers Theatre Guided Reading Strategies Fundations Word Work Bilingual charts to assist ELL learners Labeling the room Shared Reading

Continue using above cited strategies. Celebrations

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS 2

www.fundations.com

Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Read Just Right Book and Use Print Strategies to Support Conventional Reading (October) Content Understandings: Students will learn print strategies they need to use in order to read their Just Right books. Essential Question(s): How do you know this is a Just Right book? Why did you choose this book?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will get ready to read independently, learn strategies to decode new words, learn fluency, and share ideas about books.

Instructional Suggestions Think and Talk about Books Pair and Share Initial consonant/Final consonant sounds Awareness of vowel sounds Trick Words Chunking Glued Sounds at, it Looking for small words within big words Stretching words Fundations Word Work Build on prior knowledge Continue with instructional suggestions mentioned above Using illustrations to help with decoding and unknown words Fundations Word Work

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Self Correction Rate Fluency

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students read, think, and talk about their books with others.

Running Records Accuracy and Fluency Checks Evidence that students are becoming more confident readers by the books they are choosing to read independently.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be encouraged to revisit a book and incorporate new strategies learned.

Readers Log Readers Response Fundations Word Work

ELP Assessment F&P Benchmarks Continuous Running Records to show increased efficiency in reading. Evidence that students are reading a variety of books to show transference of knowledge. Continue using above cited strategies. Celebrations

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn how to effectively work with a partner.

Readers Theatre Guided Reading Strategies Fundations Word Work Bilingual charts to assist ELL learners Labeling the room Shared Reading

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com

Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school) 2

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Build Good Habits Content Understandings: Establishing rules and procedures needed for a successful Reading Workshop program. Essential Question(s): What will Readers Workshop look like in the classroom?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will learn how to make good book choices, handle books correctly, and care for the classroom library.

Instructional Suggestions Modeling proper techniques Model good reading skills.

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Evidence that books are being handled correctly. Children are making good book choices for their independent reading.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will learn how to listen to each other and share effectively as partners or in small groups.

Chart How to Buzz Effectively Pair and Share

Conferencing Readers Response

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be exposed to different genres of books (fiction, nonfiction, poetry)

T-chart of shared books both fiction and non-fiction

Students must show evidence that they can distinguish the difference between 2 types of books. 1

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn proper procedure for shared reading, read alouds, and choosing just right books

Brainstorming and eliciting ideas for a classroom chart. 100 Books Read Chart

Evidence that appropriate books are being chosen and discussed among the students. Actively engaged in reading Sustained independent reading time has increased.

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Choose Back to School books that show different scenarios. These books can serve a dual purpose by helping you establish basic classroom rules as well as a foundation for Readers Workshop. Miss Nelson is Missing Never Spit on Your Shoes Morris the Moose *Thousands of other titles available at both your school library as well as the West Hempstead library. Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: English language Arts, Author Study Version 3, Grade 1 (authors may vary) New York State Standards (available online) Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Fountas and Pinnell: Guided Reading Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: READING

Grade Level: One


Unit/Theme: Readers Make Plans for Their Reading and Invent Their Own Reading Projects (This unit is intended for

end of May and the entire month of June)


Content Understandings: Students will reflect on their progress as readers and make plans for Summer Reading Essential Question(s): Do you think you are a stronger reader than you were in September? In what ways have you grown as a reader? NYS Performance Objectives/ Concept Understandings Instructional Suggestions Assessments Standards to be Met (Vocabulary) Reading Logs Artifacts Students will begin to drive Standard 1: Students will Reading Responses Review of Writing Portfolio the curriculum by becoming read, write, listen, and speak Review of Reading Logs and more responsible readers and Reading Reflections for information and Author Studies Response journals writers. understanding. Students should have the *End of the year ELP opportunity to assume the role Standard 2: Students will evaluation of teacher to demonstrate read, write, listen, and speak *F&P Benchmarks expertise in reading and for literary response and *Final Running Records writing skills. expression. (instructional and independent levels should be recorded) Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. CELEBRATIONS! Use this time of year to Standard 4: Students will celebrate and embrace all that read, write, listen, and speak you have accomplished. Allow for social interaction. the children to truly become the center of your curriculum

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: TEACHERS CHOICE BOOKS!! Create book lists for Summer Reading. Revisit favorite books from the school year. Incorporate a Science or Social Studies theme in your classroom. Website: www.greece.k12.ny.us (lesson plans) www.wilsonlanguage.com (lesson plans), click on FUNDATIONS www.fundations.com www.mandyregory.com (Writers Workshopthink about adding a comment to the website!)

Professional Resources: AMERICAS CHOICE: Lessons: Establishing the Readers Workshop New York State Standards (available online) Teachers College Reading and Writing Project First Grade Reading Curriculum Calendar 2007/2008 DRAFT Professional Development files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder) Columbia Reading and Writing K-2 (white hard cover binder one per grade level in each school)

GRADE 1 WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Grade Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Poetry Content Understandings: Poems often convey strong feelings by creating images using non conventional writing formats.

Essential Question(s): What makes this piece of writing a poem? (non conventional writing format, expresses thoughts about a single idea or image, uses colorful and descriptive language).

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will be exposed to a variety of poems and poets to compare different styles of poetry. Students will be introduced to repetition, structures in poems, and poetry patterns. Students will turn story-like drafts into poems. Students will mimic favorite poems (style and language).

Instructional Suggestions Idea chart Graphic organizer Questions related to object or topic. Display different styles of poems on charts or overheads. Read and enjoy poems written by student colleagues as well as published poets.

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Celebration including work of students and selected poets. Example: Shared Reading Readers Theatre Tapping out a beat (music) Sketch and Stretch (art) Act out actions from a poem (physical movement)

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will be introduced to poetic terminology which would include: similes, metaphors, alliteration, repetition, and other imagery. Students will be introduced to specific poetic language such as like and as.

Encourage using vivid and colorful language when writing. Add pictures to mirror authors thoughts. Encourage students to use explicit and descriptive language in a poem.

Share completed poems by posting in the school community, having a poem reading celebration, or incorporating a broader audience (parents, siblings, other teachers)

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will compare different types of poems. Students will be able to distinguish why a text is a poem and not a story.

Comparing poems with TCharts, Graphic Organizers, Pair and Share Moments, KWL charts.

Collaboration between adult and child as an opportunity for the child to teach what they have learned about poetry.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will share a variety of poems to appreciate the language, content, and format of the poem.

Contrasting ordinary and poetic language. Use artistic impression to help interpret the theme of the poem. Take a powerful thought and use minimal words to describe your image or thought (creating poetic language)

Celebrate and continue to encourage students to create poems. Encourage students to continually edit and revise their work. *Children should be taught to discern their work and appreciate that all work does not need to be published. 2

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: Byrd Baylor and Peter Parnell, The Other Way to Listen Shel Silverstein, Where The Side Walk Ends Eloise Greenfield (her poems can be used for helping students hear the music in poetry) Langston Hughes

Professional Resources: Lucy Calkins and Stephanie Parsons: Poetry:Powerful thoughts in Tiny Packages New York State Standards Proff. Develop. Files on Writing / Reading Workshops Fountas and Pinnell: Guided Reading

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Grade Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Letter Writing Content Understandings: Students will be able to express ideas in sentence format (including demonstrative and interrogative statements). Students will be able to correctly format a letter using the date, greeting, body, closing, and signature (The five components of a letter).

Essential Question(s): Does your piece of writing look like a letter? (Does it include the 5 components? Does it have demonstrative and interrogative statements?)

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will learn the 5 components of a letter through teacher modeling, historical documents, and books that include letters ( When Jessie Crossed the Sea).

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Actual letter writing (pen pals) Students will write letters Completing templates for using correct format. letters. Students will mail their letter Letters to gain information to a pen pal.

Instructional Suggestions

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will respond appropriately to questions asked in a letter. Students will formulate an answer using complex sentences which include descriptive details.

Revision Editing Adding more details Polishing your work to make it complete.

Continue to write and respond in letter format focusing on answering all questions asked in addition to including new questions for the recipient.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will write letter. Students will proofread, edit, and rewrite if necessary.

Model letter writing Opportunities to respond to print through letter writing Mini lesson on capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure and appropriate salutations and closings.

Writing Celebration Incorporating different subject areas through the use of letter writing.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will broaden their experiences with other children by learning information through letter writing.

Continue with letter writing mini lessons increasing the level of accuracy in their written pieces.

Evidence of a first draft and final draft of a letter with needed editing and revisions.

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: When Jessie Went Across the Sea Click, Clack, Moo, Cows That Type Yours Truly, Goldilocks , Alma Flor Ada and Leslie Tyron Dear Peter Rabbit, Alma Flor Ada and Leslie Tyron Professional Resources: Lucy Calkins and Abby Oxenhorn: Personal Small Moments Narrative Writing New York State Standards Professional Development Files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple binder) Guiding K-3 Writers to Independence, Patiricia L. scharer & Gay Su Pinnell 2

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Grade Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Personal Narrative

Content Understandings: Students will take a small moment and stretch the action across several pages.

Essential Question(s): What is a small moment? How are going to stretch your moment?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will be exposed to different authors and how they stretched their moments to create personal narrative.

Instructional Suggestions Capitalize letters Sense of voice (using the letter I) Revising and Editing with a partner. Having illustrations help drive the text. Graphic Organizers 4 blocks template Graphic Organizers Vocabulary (First, Then, Next, Last, Finally) Text/Picture matching

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Using the information taught in mini-lessons students will write and read aloud their personal narrative.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will learn that personal narratives need to have a clear beginning, middle, and end.

Celebration of Writing Produce a piece of writing with clear beginning, middle, and end.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will learn to answer the question, What is the most important part of my story? and add important details and cut away others.

Proofreading Editing Revising Reviewing their own work Mini lesson on story ending (knowing when to STOP)

Listeners Response Partner Share

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will learn to enjoy listening to another students writing. Students will learn how and when to make comments on another students writing.

Introduce public speaking skills. Model proper social behavior when listening to a story: sit quietly, be respectful, hold comments. Model proper social behavior when reading a story to a group: make eye contact, share the pictures, fluency and intonation of voice.

Writing and Reading Celebration where students have the opportunity to share their work with guests.

Suggested Unit Resources: Ira Sleeps Over, Bernard Weber A Chair for My Mother, Vera Williams

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Grade Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Pattern Books Content Understandings: Students will be able to mimic a specific type of sentence pattern in a written text.

Essential Question(s): Does your story have repetitive text with a surprise ending that differs from the previous text?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will listen, share, and discuss a wide variety of pattern books. Children will learn how to identify a pattern book through rhyming words, repetitive text and surprise ending.

Instructional Suggestions Use of a booklet to show that text goes across pages. Pictures/Text match Stretching and writing words Number pages Incorporate the use of speech bubbles as a precursor to quotation marks.

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Introduce the concept of a pattern (cross curricular with math and art) Evidence of a pattern book complete with a surprise ending. Post unit talk Correctly identify a pattern book. Differentiate a pattern book from other genres of fiction writing. Actively engage in book chats describing the parts of a good pattern book.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will react to pattern books and predict possible endings.

Students will continue to use appropriate skills as modeled by the teacher.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will plan and write books with multiple pages; extending the pattern.

Introduce multi page booklets Picture boxes (comic strip form) Distinguish between a finished and an unfinished pattern book. Increase amounts of words in a pattern.

Producing a multi page booklet. Produce a variety of patterns in their finished writing.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will be able to discuss What do good writers look parts of a pattern book with a like? Following directions partner or a small group. Demonstrating good listening/speaking skills.

Share favorite part of book with classmates in a small group or with a partner.

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: ANY A LEVEL BOOK IN THE GUIDED READING LEVELED LIBRARY (Rigby and Wright Group) George Washington and Cornwell Avenue book lists Professional Resources: Lucy Calkins and Natalie Louis: Writing for Readers: Teaching Skills and Strategies New York State Standards Professional Development Files on Writing / Reading Workshops Writing Fundamentals (purple binder) Guiding K-3 Writers to Independence, Patiricia L. Scharer & Gay Su Pinnell

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Grade Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Launching the Writers Workshop Content Understandings: Students will learn the basic procedures involved in Writers Workshop to enable them to become independent writers.

Essential Question(s): What do good writers write about? How do good writers improve their writing? Do you understand how to act and behave during Writers Workshop?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will learn how to be active listeners, ask appropriate questions and apply what they have learned in their writing.

Instructional Suggestions Students will listen to stories and answer appropriate questions, and model appropriate writing behavior.

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Evidence of appropriate writing behavior during Writers Workshop.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will learn how to react to literature and make connections between texts.

Students will continue to use appropriate skills as modeled by the teacher.

Students will be able to write for an extended amount of time. Students will be able to communicate ideas using appropriate workshop language. 1

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Students will be able to successfully execute the procedures needed to implement Writers Workshop.

Observation Assessment What do good writers look like? What do good readers look like? Evidence that writing/reading tools are being used.

Students will use computer software. Producing completed works of writing in specific time frame.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students should be able to enjoy reading and writing with a partner or in a small group.

Knee to Knee talks Following directions consistently. Paired Reading Retelling/Recalling Active Listeners/Readers

Students will use age appropriate vocabulary. Students will be able to work with a partner or independently unassisted by a teacher.

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: Lillys Purple Plastic Purse Miss Nelson is Missing Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day First Day Jitters Playground Bully (following rules) Never Spit on Your Shoes (establishing rules and procedures) Professional Resources: New York State Standards (available on the internet) Professional Development Files on Writing / Reading Workshops

UNITS OF STUDY FOR TEACHING WRITING **Each classroom teacher has a set of these books Lucy Calkins and Leah Mermelstein: Launching the Writing Workshop Guiding K-3 Writers to Independence, Patricia L. Sharer & Gay Su Pinnell Writing Fundamentals (purple soft binder)

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:____Writing_______________ Level:___1____ Unit/Theme: Author Study Content Understandings: Students should be able to identify a specific authors writing style (voice). Grade

Essential Question(s): What clues can you find to let you know who wrote the book?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Students will listen to many books written by the same author. Students will begin to notice similar patterns in writing, vocabulary, and sentence structure.

Instructional Suggestions Author Note cards T-Charts for comparison Graphic organizers Readers Response

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Recreating of a specific passage from a given text. Write in the given authors style.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will listen to many books and engage in active discussion of the book. This discussion should include main idea, characters, setting, plot, connection to other text materials.

Author cards and make more complex connections to books. Create new illustrations for a given text.

Pair and Share Discussions Book Reports Readers Theatre created from a favorite book

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Teacher models and student Students will use the five mirrors proper questioning whys to understand the techniques. meaning behind the text. Example: Why does Mem Fox write about koalas? She likes them. Why? They live near her home. Why? They live in Australia. Why? Mem Fox is from Australia. Why? Authors write about what they love and Mem Fox loves Australia and she writes about her home.

Students will teach about the author to show expertise. Publish a booklet in the same style as the author being studied.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will share their thoughts and reactions about books

Pair and Share Moments Student as teacher

Writing Celebration Readers Theatre

SUGGESTED Unit Resources: The unit resources will vary for this unit based on the author that is chosen to study. It is strongly suggested to have multiple copies of many different titles by the same author.

West Hempstead School District


Grade Level: First Grade ELA Content Strand:________Writing______________ Expectation: End of Year

Mechanics + Literary Expression = Published Piece Not Meeting Standards Approaching Standards
Concept of word Beginning sound/symbol association Inconsistent use of capitals: beginning of sentence Developing use of basic punctuation: period, question mark, exclamation Correct spelling of high frequency words

Meeting Standards
Intact sound/symbol association Consistent use of capitals: I, and beginning of sentence Consistent use of basic punctuation: period, question mark, exclamation Correct usage of high frequency words Sequence/order of ideas Sense of story: inclusion of detail Differentiates between fiction and non-fiction Integrating familiar vocabulary, expressive language from read alouds, shared reading

Exceeding Standards
Proficient spelling: words are spelled with good phonemic skills Knowledge of various complex spelling patterns: e.g. ie/y Consistent use of capitals: I, proper nouns, and beginning of sentence Complex sentence patterns and punctuation: commas, quotation marks, //for contractions Transition information from graphic organizer to paragraph form Use of transitional words: first, next, last, then, etc. Inclusion of detail with rich language Capable of writing both fiction and nonfiction Advanced vocabulary

As of 4/08

West Hempstead School District


Grade Level: Second Grade ELA Content Strand:________Writing______________ Expectation: End of Year

Mechanics + Literary Expression = Published Piece Not Meeting Standards Approaching Standards Meeting Standards Exceeding Standards
Consistent use of punctuation. A wider range of punctuation should be applied i.e. quotation marks to indicate dialogue, commas to join more than one thought and other sophisticated forms of mechanics. Use of compound and complex sentences. Knowing what a paragraph is and evidence shown in writing. Noun-Verb agreement Mastery of tense, use of possession and understanding of contractions. Use of synonyms to interest the reader and reduce redundancy of word usage. Expectation of correct spelling of words that have been formally introduced and available through word walls, displays, etc. As of 4/08

NEW YORK STATE CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

GRADE 1

Grade 1 Reading
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The reading competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during grade 1 are Phonemic Awareness Count the number of syllables in a word Blend spoken sounds to form words, manipulating letters to represent each sound of most one-syllable words Segment spoken words into component sounds, manipulating letters to represent each sound of most one-syllable words Decoding Including Phonics and Structural Analysis Identify and produce letter-sound correspondences, including consonants and short and long vowels Blend sounds using knowledge of letter-sound correspondences in order to decode unfamiliar, but decodable, one-syllable grade-level words Read common word families by blending the onset (/s/) and the rime (/it/, /at/) in grade-level words (s-it, s-at) Decode grade-level words using knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, verb endings, plurals, contractions, and compounds Check accuracy of decoding using context to monitor and self-correct Print Awareness Identify parts of a book and their purposes including identification of author, illustrator, title page, table of contents, and chapter headings Fluency Sight-read automatically grade-level common, high-frequency words Sight-read automatically grade-level irregularly spelled words Sight-read automatically 300500 words including sight and decodable words (Snow, C. E., Burns, M. S., & Griffin, P. (1998). Preventing reading difficulties in young children. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, p. 81.) Use punctuation clues to read connected text

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


The grade-specific performance indicators that grade 1 students are developing as they learn to read include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Locate and use classroom and library media center resources to acquire information, with assistance Read grade-level informational texts to begin to collect data, facts, and ideas, with assistance Distinguish between texts with stories and texts with information Use a picture dictionary as a resource for vocabulary development Select books to meet informational needs, with assistance Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Comprehend and respond to imaginative texts and performances; interpret, with assistance Engage in pre-reading and reading activities to - select books, tapes, and poems on the basis of personal choice/interest or teacher-selected criteria, such as a theme/topic - predict what might happen next in a story read aloud or independently - draw conclusions from a story - identify characters, settings, and events in a story - retell a story - distinguish between what is real and what is imaginary

with expression, accuracy and fluency Read grade-level texts with decodable and irregularly spelled words at appropriate speed, accuracy and expression (target benchmark at grade 1: 71 WPM) (Davidson, M., & Towner, J. (2000). Reading Screening Test. Bellingham, WA: Applied Research and Development Center.) Background Knowledge and Vocabulary Development Study antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms to learn new grade-level vocabulary Study categories of words (e.g., animals, place names) to learn new grade-level vocabulary Study root words, prefixes, suffixes, verb endings, and plural nouns to learn new gradelevel vocabulary Connect words and ideas in books to prior knowledge Learn new words indirectly from reading books and other print sources Increase background knowledge by elaborating and integrating new vocabulary and ideas from texts Use a dictionary to learn the meanings of words Comprehension Strategies Read grade-level texts for different purposes Use comprehension strategies (predict/confirm, reread, self-correct) to clarify meaning of text Work cooperatively with peers (e.g., peer pairs or small groups) to comprehend text Use graphic or semantic organizers to organize and categorize information Ask questions in response to texts Answer simple questions (such as how? why? what if?) in response to texts Sequence events in retelling stories Summarize main ideas from informational texts Follow simple written instructions Use own perspectives and opinions to comprehend text Motivation to Read Show interest in reading a range of grade-level childrens texts from a variety of genres, such as stories, folktales, fairy tales, poems, and informational texts Read voluntarily familiar grade-level texts Show familiarity with title and author of gradelevel books

Dramatize or retell stories, using puppets, toys, and other props Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Identify, explain, and evaluate ideas, themes, and experiences from texts and performances Engage in pre-reading and reading activities to - identify what they know, want to know, and have learned about a specific story, theme, or topic - predict what could happen next or the outcome of a story or article - change the sequence of events in a story to create a different ending - compare a character in a story or article to a person with the same career or experience - evaluate and select books, poems, or tapes on the basis of personal choice or teacherselected criteria, such as theme, topic, author, and illustrations - identify the characters in a story and explain what each contributes to the events of the story - recognize different plots in books by the same author Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share reading experiences (e.g., reading together silently or aloud) to establish, maintain, and enhance personal relationships with peers or adults Respect the age, gender, and cultural traditions of the writer Recognize the vocabulary of social communication (e.g., the language of salutations and closings)

Grade 1 Writing
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The writing competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during grade 1 are Spelling Use developing knowledge of letter-sound correspondence (e.g., sound spelling or invented spelling) to spell independently grade-level decodable words, including words in word families Represent most phonemes in invented spelling, although not necessarily with conventional spellings (e.g., /k/ /a/ /t/ for cat) Use conventional spelling to spell common grade-level irregularly spelled content and highfrequency words Spell correctly three- and fourletter short vowel words Understand the difference between conventional spelling, and sound or invented spelling Handwriting Write legibly most uppercase and lowercase manuscript letters Write letters legibly when dictated Composition Write stories and informational text that establish a topic and use words that can be understood by others Write compositions, beginning to use the writing process (e.g., prewriting, drafting, revising, proofreading, editing) Use conventional capitalization and punctuation to begin and end sentences Write compositions for different purposes and include text, illustrations, and other graphics

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that grade 1 students are developing as they learn to write include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Copy words, phrases, and sentences from books, magazines, signs, charts, and own dictation Write data, facts, and ideas gathered from personal experiences Maintain a portfolio of informational writings and drawings, with assistance Take notes to record facts from lessons, with assistance - write words or draw pictures in order to capture important understandings State the main idea, with assistance Use resources such as a picture dictionary or word wall to find and write words, with assistance Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Develop original literary texts to - create a story with a beginning, middle, and end, using words that can be understood by others - create poems or jingles, using words that can be understood by others Write to respond to text to - express feelings about characters or events in one or more stories - describe characters, settings, or events - list a sequence of events in a story - retell a story, using words - identify the problem and solution in a simple story Maintain a portfolio of writings and drawings in response to literature, with assistance Use personal experiences to stimulate own writing, with assistance Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Write to express opinions and judgments to share what they know, want to know, and

Motivation to Write Write voluntarily to communicate to others Write voluntarily for different purposes (e.g., tell stories, share information, give directions, write to a friend) Share writing with others (e.g., participate in authors circle)

have learned about a theme or topic - respond in words to an experience or event shared by a classmate - depict an opinion about statements, illustrations, characters, and events in written and visual texts - compare characters, settings, and events within and between stories - describe the differences between real and imaginary experiences - describe the connections between personal experiences and ideas and information in written and visual texts Maintain a portfolio of writings and drawings that express opinions and judgments, with assistance Use prewriting tools, such as semantic webs and concept maps, to organize ideas and information, with assistance Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share the process of writing with peers or adults; for example, write with a partner or in a cooperative group Respect the age, gender, and culture of the recipient Write friendly letters to others, using salutations and closings Maintain a portfolio of writings and drawings for social interaction, with assistance

Grade 1 Listening
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The listening competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during grade 1 are Listening Listen attentively to spoken language, including grade-level books read aloud Listen attentively for different purposes Listen respectfully without interrupting when others speak Attend to a listening activity for a specified period of time

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific performance indicators that grade 1 students are developing as they learn to listen include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Acquire information from nonfiction text Identify words and sentences on a chart Follow directions involving a few steps Identify similarities and differences in information about people, places, and events

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Listen to literary texts and performances to - appreciate and enjoy literary works - match spoken words with pictures - identify a character, setting, plot - respond to vivid language - identify specific people, places, and events - distinguish between a story, a poem, and a play Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Form an opinion and evaluate information on the basis of information in the world Identify messages in advertisements by listening to the words, music, and sound effects Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Respect the age, gender, and culture of the speaker Listen to friendly notes, cards, letters, and personal narratives read aloud to get to know the writer and/or classmates and fellow listeners Listen for the tone of voice and content that signal friendly communication

Grade 1 Speaking
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The speaking competencies common to all four ELA standards in which students are making adequate progress during grade 1 are Speaking Use grade-level vocabulary and conventional grammar in own speech Speak for different purposes (e.g., share ideas or information, retell a story, dramatize an experience or event) Vary language style (e.g., formal or informal) according to purpose of communication (e.g.,

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


Specific perfromance indicators that grade 1 students are developing as they learn to speak include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Dictate information Report information to peers and familiar adults Connect information from personal experiences to information from nonfiction texts Retell multiple pieces of information in sequence; for example, retell a story Share observations from the classroom, home, or community Ask questions to clarify topics, directions,

conversation with peers or presentation to a group) Speak audibly Speak with speed and expression appropriate to the purpose and audience Take turns in conversation or speaking in a group Respond appropriately to what others are saying

and/or classroom routines Respond orally to questions and/or directions Share information using appropriate visual aids (e.g. puppets, toys, and pictures) to illustrate a word or concept Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Converse with adults and peers regarding pictures, books, and experiences Role-play characters and events from stories Express feelings about works of fiction and poetry Respond to stories, legends, and songs from different cultural and ethnic groups Compare stories from personal experience with stories heard or read Express the mood or emotion of a story by using a variety of words Retell familiar stories in a logical sequence Ask for clarification of events in a story or poem Describe familiar persons, places, or objects Recite poems and nursery rhymes Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Share what they know, want to know, and have learned about a theme or topic Express an opinion or judgment about a story, poem, poster, or advertisement Compare characters, settings, or events in two or more stories Explain personal criteria (e.g., color, pictures, and
vocabulary) for choosing a book, poem, or story

Compare and contrast different versions of the same story Explain why two different characters view the same action or event differently Compare and contrast events or characters in a story with their lives Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Participate in small or large group storytelling, in order to interact with classmates and adults in the classroom and school environment Share favorite anecdotes, riddles, and rhymes with peers and familiar adults Respect the age, gender, and culture of the listener Discuss the content of friendly notes, cards, letters, and personal narratives, with a partner or in a small group, to get to know the writer and each other

GRADE 2 READING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop__ Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: September: (Launching) Careful Readers Have Good Habits: Reading with Stamina, Engagement, Fluency, Accuracy, and Comprehension

Content Understandings: The first unit of study sets the stage for reading for the year. -Routines, procedures, and expectations for reading in second grade -Strategies for staying focused and building stamina for reading -Strategies for being a careful reader-reading just right books with accuracy, fluency and comprehension -Ways to read and talk about books with partners

Essential Question(s): How do we choose appropriate books independently? What are some decoding strategies we can use when we read? What are the structures and expectations of the reading workshop?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Routines Procedures Strategies Expectations Independent

Instructional Suggestions -Explain to the children the basic components of the reading workshop; minilesson, independent work, share time -Model how to keep track of reading using a reading log -Model how to choose just right books using the five finger test

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

-Demonstrate strategies for decoding tricky words -Model strategies for thinking about and retelling a story: stop, go back, reread, think hard -Model strategies for partnerships and sharing books with others -Explain that when good readers retell a story they include a beginning, middle, and end -Show how good readers read smoothly by paying attention to punctuation, and change of voice to reflect different characters

Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Learn the procedures and expectations for reading workshop -Choose appropriate books -Read with stamina and focus -Read for meaning and clarification -Retelling with a beginning, middle, and end -Read with fluency , phrasing, and comprehension -Use a variety of print strategies -Use accountable talk with a partner Develop the habits of a readers life

Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project 2007-2008 for Second Grade Growing Readers by Kathy Collins

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: October: Readers Use Strategies to Figure out Words and to Understand Their Stories

Content Understandings: During this unit students will focus on: -Strategies for decoding tricky words -Strategies for figuring out unfamiliar words and phrases -Strategies for monitoring for meaning and having thoughts while reading -Ways to read and talk about books with partners

Essential Question(s): What strategies can we use to spell tricky words more effectively? How can we increase our reading stamina and focus? How does rereading improve clarification of the text?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Rereading Retelling Story Elements Predicting

Instructional Suggestions -Use the title and picture to make predictions about the book -Note other books that children might have read by the same author -Model how to: track print, use pictures and illustrations, notice patterns, search for visual, syntactic, and semantic clues -Demonstrate:

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Use a variety of decoding strategies to attack unknown words -Use a variety of comprehension strategies to make sense of the story -Make predictions and use story elements to gain a better understanding of the story -Self-correct to clarify confusion -Converse with a partner about a book to improve comprehension

self-correcting, rereading, fluency, and strategies for recalling details -Use post-its to note powerful parts of the story -Use post-its to make predictions with their partner

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: November: Readers Think and Talk About the Characters in Their Books and They Become Experts About Characters in Character Centers

Content Understandings: This unit focuses on the ways we connect with, wonder about, and understand a particular characters personality, motivations, and tendencies.

Essential Question(s): How do we develop an understanding of the characters in the books we read? What inferences can we make about a character by what she/he says and does? How can we make comparisons between characters and ourselves?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Character Traits Story Elements Inference Compare Contrast Predict

Instructional Suggestions -Use classroom charts to list the physical and internal traits of characters -Use graphic organizers for various character comparisons -Pair students so they can discuss characters together -Use post-its to note patterns in character behaviors

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals Graphic Organizers

read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Identify story elements -Identifying character traits and showing evidence from the text -Make inferences about a character Compare and contrast characters to themselves and across books -Use graphic organizers and post-its to remember ideas -Predict what a character might to in the future Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: December: Careful readers build comprehension by reading with fluency, and pay attention to the story elements/ careful readers monitor for meaning as they read

Content Understandings: In this unit children will learn that most stories have certain story elements in common such as, characters, setting, problem/solution, and time change. We will teach the children that stories have a predictable structure, and accumulate through connecting scenes and chapters.

Essential Question(s): What are some strategies we need to develop to understand the story elements? How can story elements help us to understand the text better? How can we compare later parts of stories to earlier parts to improve comprehension?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Character(s) Plot Setting Problem Solution Dialogue Time Change

Instructional Suggestions -Do a shared reading to model how to read with a smooth, excited voice -Model strategies for decoding difficult words -Demonstrate how to figure out the meaning of a difficult word by asking, Does this make sense? Does it sound right? Does it look right? -Make a list of words theyve learned the meaning of, and have them copy it in their readers notebook -Create a list of punctuation

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals Graphic Organizers

Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Read with appropriate phrasing, fluency, and intonation -Self-correct errors when reading a text -Use strategies to figure out the meanings of difficult vocabulary words -Use story elements to gain a deeper understanding of the text -Reread to clarify confusion and improve comprehension -Use story elements to retell a story, and make better predictions Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

marks that the students know, and discuss what these marks tell readers to do -Role play character dialogue -Create story maps emphasize the key elements of a story

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: January: Readers Have Strategies for Monitoring for Meaning, Problem-Solving Words, and Maintaining Fluency: Readers read with word power and build their vocabulary

Content Understandings: This month you will take time to strengthen your students ability to decode tricky words, to teach strategies for dealing with unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases, and to work on partner talk. We will note students reading levels so that we can focus on print strategies needed to teach during whole class instruction

Essential Question(s): What strategies can we use to deal with unfamiliar vocabulary? What are some strategies that will help to monitor our reading for meaning? How will partner talk and read alouds help us become more fluent readers?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Tricky Words Partner Talk Vocabulary Strategies Conversations

Instructional Suggestions -Model ways that readers can make sense of the text -Show how readers can ask themselves questions as they read -Use shared reading to demonstrate phrasing, intonation, and expression -Discuss how rereading helps to improve comprehension -Use post-its notes to stop and think after reading a portion of the story -Make a chart to show how readers regain their

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Decode tricky words -Learn strategies for dealing with unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases -Work with partners to improve their comprehension of various texts -Integrate reading strategies as they come to more difficult text -Read back and read on to use context to figure out what words mean Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

comprehension when their texts get tricky or confusing

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: February: Readers Become Experts about Series They Love By Looking Closely At Characters They Love

Content Understandings: In this unit students will be examining a book series that they love. Childrens comprehension is scaffolded when the same characters and places return book after book. By teaching children to think across books, we are setting them up for working with longer multi-chapter books Essential Question(s): What are some connections about characters we can make by reading series books? How can patterns in series books increase our comprehension?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Series Traits Characters Relationships Connections

Instructional Suggestions -Model how to identify character traits by citing evidence from the text -Show comparing/contrasting between characters across books -Demonstrate how to use postits and graphic organizers to remember and plan ideas about characters -Explain how to develop theories about characters -Use a familiar book to show how a character might behave in the future

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

Students will be able to: -Make connections and comparisons about characters through reading series books -See patterns of character behavior and traits - Make predictions about what will happen, based on prior reading -Identify cause and effect -Understand character traits and make connections to their own lives -Confer with partners to discuss how characters change over time Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: March: Non-Fiction Reading Strategies: Readers can get Information and Grow Ideas from Non-Fiction Texts

Content Understandings: Students will learn more features of non-fiction text. We will teach our students strategies to deal with difficulty, envision what is happening, and use strategies to read and learn simultaneously.

Essential Question(s): What are the features of non-fiction text? How can we grow ideas and expand knowledge about a chosen topic? What are the main idea and supporting details? How do we summarize the information we have learned?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Non-Fiction Compare Contrast Main Idea Details Summarize Skim Scan

Instructional Suggestions -Start a class chart comparing fiction and non-fiction text -Use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast different kinds of non-fiction, and fiction with non-fiction -Help the students compile a list of features of non-fiction -Help children chose non0fiction topics they want to study -Use graphic organizers to help them identify main idea and detail

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

for social interaction Students will be able to: -Identify the purpose for reading non-fiction -Identify the different types of non-fiction (all-about, how-to, lists) -Compare/Contrast fiction and non-fiction text -Recognize main idea and supporting details -Use text features to get information from the book -Skim and Scan for information -Retell and summarize nonfiction text Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Unit/Theme: April: Readers Read Non-Fiction (across content areas) Grade Level:2_______

Content Understandings: This unit can focus around one of our social studies or science topics. It can also be based around a theme chosen because you have accessible books on this topic. The reading workshop will contain time for each child to work alone, with partners or small groups.

Essential Question(s): How can a variety of reading materials help us learn about a subject? How will reading deeper about a topic increase our understanding? How can we organize our information for group presentation?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Theme Topic Variety Information Fact/Opinion

Instructional Suggestions -Have your class read around a theme -Divide your class into interest-based centers -Model how to use graphic organizers to take notes and plan their writing -Show how to use headings to chunk information -Review the features of nonfiction text (heading, table of contents, index, chapters, glossary) -Have a celebration to share what was learned

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Compare ideas and conclusions from one nonfiction text to another -Deepen understanding of a particular topic by reading a variety of materials -Skim, analyze, and reread their data for the purpose of writing -Jot notes on sticky notes -Notice when they are learning something new Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: May: Readers Read Just Right Fiction Books in Theme-Based Centers: Partners Learn to Grow Ideas as They Read a Selection of Related Books Content Understandings: This unit invites you and your students to sort books into texts-that-go-together and then to become strong at talking between the texts Essential Question(s): How do certain books go together? Do you notice the similarities and differences within certain themebased books? What comprehension strategies will we use to deepen our thinking about a topic?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Retell Details Clarify Events Question

Instructional Suggestions -Model strategies proficient readers use to make sense of stories -Supply baskets, bins, or baggies to sort into themes -Design shared reading sessions that best address the needs of your class -Provide opportunities for your students to work in shared reading clubs -Work with your students to solidify concepts you have taught on a particular subject

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Running Records Reading Logs Conferencing Small Group Instruction Reading Response Journals

Students will be able to: -Explore a theme in a variety if texts -Revise ones thinking based on rereading and conversing about a text or idea -Develop ideas and theories with a partner -Identify setting and events in the story when they retell -Use time words when they retell -Use text evidence to clarify, confirm or revise when retelling -Have questions about the text they read -Wonder about the books they read Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins 2

Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Reading Workshop Grade Level:2_______ Unit/Theme: June: find Your Niche as a Reader; Return to Your Old Favorites, Create Your Own reading Centers, and Make Plans For Your Reading Life

Content Understandings: Provide your students with time to reflect on and celebrate their growth as readers, time to make plans for their summer reading, and time to invent and carry out their own independent reading studies.

Essential Question(s): How have you changed as a reader since the beginning of the year? What kind of things do you like to read? What kind of things do you tend to do as a reader? What do you want to do to get better as a reader?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Self-Reflection Self-Assessment Reading Plans Growth Progress

Instructional Suggestions -Ask class to revisit units they have studied during the year -Use graphic organizers to make reading project proposals -Model how too begin a summer project -Have a yearlong celebration

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Reading Logs Conferencing Reading Response Journals

read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Reflect on their reading growth over the year -Self-assess their reading progress over the year -Understand that good readers read all the times of their life, not just in school

Suggested Unit Resources: Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit Read Alouds Big Books Overhead Projector Leveled Libraries Charts Graphic Organizers

Professional Resources: Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for Second Grade Growing Readers by, Kathy Collins

GRADE 2 WRITING UNIT LESSON GUIDES

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Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Workshop Unit/Theme: Nonfiction Writing: Procedures and Reports Grade Level: 2

Content Understandings: In this unit children will use their writing to teach others. Students will write How-To books in which they draw and tell a sequence of steps. The second part of this unit requires the children to write one, very long All-About book on a topic of his or her choice. These books are written in chapters, and include a table of contents, diagrams, charts, etc.

Essential Question(s): How to write a How-To book? What are the features of How-To writing? What are the features of AllAbout books? How to revise and edit both How-To books and All-About books?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Nonfiction Diagrams Table of Contents Chapters Heading Labeling Information Research

Instructional Suggestions -Walk children through the steps of how to write a HowTo book -Model how to read directions to a partner for clarity -Read examples of procedural text -Study examples of All-About books -Create charts that display the features and the structure of All About books -Demonstrate how to plan out each chapter

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Writing samples Conferencing Oral Assessments Assessment Checklists Final writing pieces

Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Write and teach others how to do something -Revise words and pictures to make them more explicit -Learn and incorporate features of how-to writing -Use periods, parentheses, and colons, to edit their work -Organize information and draft chapters and a table of contents -Include facts in their writing by doing research from books on their topics

Suggested Unit Resources: Owl Moon, Apples Professional Resources: Nonfiction Writing: Procedures and Reports; Lucy Calkins and Laurie Pessah

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Workshop__ Unit/Theme: Authors as Mentors Grade Level:2_______

Content Understandings: In an author study the class explores how this author lives as a writer, the themes the author writes about, and the authors craft techniques.

Essential Question(s): What are some of the crafting techniques in Angela Johnsons books? How do we explore a new text structure from the authors perspective? What can we learn from different authors writing styles? How will we prepare for a published writing piece?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Ellipses Text Structure Research Author Mentor Comeback lines Blurbs Traits

Instructional Suggestions -Read stories aloud and make decisions about where you can add ellipses to writing -Demonstrate how to use a comeback line in your writing -Teach children that we get information both from our minds and research -Read excerpts aloud and complete charts regarding authors techniques -Show children how to weave details into each section of a piece -Explain to children that to make their writing better they

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Writing samples Conferencing Oral Assessments Assessment Checklists

read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: -Discover a small moment -Use ellipses to create dramatic tension -Revise a piece by adding research details -Study new authors and characteristics of their work -Noticing and trying a new text structure

can turn to a specific authors technique

Suggested Unit Resources: Gail Gibbons (non-fiction) Angela Johnson: Joshuas Night Whispers, The Leaving Morning, Do Like Kyla Ezra Jack Keats: The Snowy Day, Peters Chair, The Pet Show Donald Crews: Shortcut, Night at the Fair, Bigmamas Joanne Ryder: My Fathers Hands, The Snails Spell, One Small Fish

Professional Resources: Authors as Mentors ; Lucy Calkins and Amanda Hartman

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Workshop Unit/Theme: The Craft of Revision Grade Level: 2

Content Understandings: In this unit children learn that revision is a compliment to good work. They learn to use strategies combined with goals to make their writing better.

Essential Question(s): What are the basics of revision? What qualities lead to good writing? How can we prepare our writing for publication?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Dialogue Details Draft Genre Revision

Instructional Suggestions -Explain to children they will revise work that they previously published -Cite a text to show how dialogue adds to a story -Create a chart that shows the steps writers take to revise their writing -Have the class turn their revising charts into a bulletin board Set up a revision museum

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Writing samples Conferencing Guided Writing groups Published work Oral Assessments

Students will be able to: -Reread a story -Revise by adding more details, adding dialogue, or taking away -Confer about writing -Showing, not telling -Revise while writing and revise endings -Learn revision from authors Suggested Unit Resources: A Chair for my Mother, Owl Moon

Professional Resources: The Craft of Revision; Lucy Calkins and Pat Bleichman

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Workshop Unit/Theme: Writing for Readers: Teaching Skills and Strategies Grade Level: 2

Content Understandings: The goal in this unit is to spotlight the importance of spelling, punctuation and high frequency words, so that it is easier for others to read and appreciate their text.

Essential Question(s): How to inspire children to write for readers? How can children record sounds, words, and meanings? In what ways can children increase their high frequency words? In what ways can peer editing improve students writing? How to prepare for publication?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Sight Words Spacing Punctuation Capitalization Peer-Editing

Instructional Suggestions -Model a detailed story of trying to read students writing -Demonstrate how to tackle hard words by rereading frequently -Model for children how you resume writing by studying the previous days work -Show children that when they are writing they have to leave a space between words -Show children that words are categorized on the word wall according to their first letter -Explain to children that being a writing partner is a big

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence -Writing samples -Oral Assessment -Conferencing -Guided writing groups -Published writing

Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction Students will be able to: - Write for readers -Stretch and write words -Write with sight words -Put spaces between words -Use personal word walls -Add more to their stories -Write for their partners -Revise with their partners -Peer-Edit

responsibility -Model how to reread with pen in hand, fixing little things

Suggested Unit Resources: Mrs. Wishy Washy

Professional Resources: Writing for Readers: Teaching Skills and Strategies Lucy Calkins and Natalie Louis The Conferring Handbook Lucy Calkins

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area:Writing Unit/Theme: Small Moments: Personal Narrative Writing Content Understandings: Students will understand that personal narratives are chronological stories about ones life. They contain characters, a plot, and they take place in a setting. Grade Level:_2______

Essential Question(s): What is a small moment story? How do we plan detailed stories? How do we revise our stories to make them better and focus on the most important part? What are some strategies that we can use to prepare our stories for publication?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Small Moment Partnerships Details Sketching Storytelling Revising

Instructional Suggestions -Read excerpts from familiar texts -Model how to zoom in on one small part of a story -Demonstrate how writers share work with each other -Model how to plan a detailed story by saying the stories aloud before writing them. -Model how to produce stories with a beginning, middle, and end - Compare a list-like, unfocused story with one that zooms in on the most important part -Use charts to list the steps of

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Conferencing Peer Editing Writing Samples Published Piece

for social interaction -Children will understand a small moment story -Children will discover one small moment -Students will establish longterm partnerships -Children will be able to stretch one small moment -Students will learn how to stretch out sounds to write words -Understand the difference between sketching and drawing -Children will be able to plan detailed stories -Children will learn how to produce stories that have a beginning, middle, and end -Children will learn to practice storytelling with partners -Children will write words quickly by using the word

revision process

Suggested Unit Resources: Read Alouds: A Chair for My Mother, The Kissing Hand, Do Like Kyla, The Snowy Day, Owl Moon, Fireflies, Professional Resources: Small Moments: Personal Narrative Writing Lucy Calkins and Abby Oxenhorn

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Unit/Theme: Launching the Writing Workshop Grade Level: 2

Content Understandings: To introduce the children to the structures and expectations of a writing workshop so that they can carry on with independence throughout the writing process. Essential Question(s): What are the procedures and tools that are needed to work independently in a writing workshop? How do we use both writing and pictures to tell each story? How can we use details to make our stories longer and more varied? How can we use editing and revising strategies to prepare for publication?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Independent Illustrations Writing Tools Genres Editing Revising

Instructional Suggestions -Model how to choose a topic -Generate charts -Use read-aloud to illustrate a writing strategy or skill -Demonstrate how writing tools should be used

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence -Children can generate topics independently -Choose appropriate writing materials -Writing samples -Published piece -Conferencing -Peer editing

Students will be able to: -Choose a topic to write about -Add more to their story -Use supplies independently -Tell stories through illustrations -Use pictures and words like famous authors -Stretch out words by writing down the sounds they hear -Plan and write a book with several pages -Fix up and revise their writing to make it more meaningful -Share favorite parts of their writing with their peers

Suggested Unit Resources: Corduroy by Don Freeman Books by: Donald Crews Richard Scarry Professional Resources: Launching the Writing Workshop; Lucy Calkins and Leah Mermelstein

WEST HEMPSTEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT


Instructional Guide
Content Area: Writing Workshop Unit/Theme: Poetry: Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages Grade Level: 2

Content Understandings: In this genre students will practice what they have learned so far, with more independence. Teachers encourage students to live as poets and see the world with fresh eyes. We help children use figurative language to create images in their writing so that others can read and enjoy it.

Essential Question(s): How can students write poetry by seeing things with poets eyes?

NYS Performance Objectives/ Standards to be Met Standard 1- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Standard 2- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Standard 3- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Standard 4- Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction

Concept Understandings (Vocabulary) Line Breaks Patterns Repetition Compare Contrast Images Observation Metaphor

Instructional Suggestions -Contrast a poem with and without line breaks -Contrast a poem read in a robotic way and in a smooth meaningful way -Demonstrate how you find a topic in your life that is both big and small -Explain to children that poems have ingredients, such as precise words and music -Model for children the importance of using patterns in poetry -Show a poem in which the poet uses figurative language to covey a feeling -Model how poets use comparisons to show feelings

Suggested Assessments/ Evidence Writing samples Conferencing Assessment Checklists Poetry Celebration

Students will be able to: -See the concrete details of their lives in fresh ways -Experiment with poetry formats -Learn the importance of topic choice -Learn that poets convey strong feelings by creating images -Use poetic language and voice -Use patterns and repetition to support their meaning -Use comparisons and contrasts to convey a sound, image, observation , and an idea -Students will learn how to revise and edit their poetry Suggested Unit Resources: Honey I Love, and, Things, by Eloise Greenfield Something Special, by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers Pencil Sharpener, by Zoe Ryder White Safety Pin, by Valerie Worth Goldfish, by Valerie Worth Professional Resources:

- Show the children how to read their work slowly fixing errors as they go

Poetry: Powerful Thoughts in Tiny Packages Lucy Calkins and Stephanie Parsons

NEW YORK STATE CORE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

GRADE 2

Grade 2 Reading
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The reading competencies common to all four ELA standards that students are developing during grade 2 are

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

The grade-specific performance indicators that grade 2 students demonstrate as they learn to read include Decoding Including Phonics and Structural Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and Analysis Identify and produce all letter-sound understanding. Locate and use library media correspondences, including consonant resources to acquire information, with blends/digraphs and vowel assistance digraphs/diphthongs Read unfamiliar informational texts to Blend sounds using knowledge of lettercollect and interpret data, facts, and sound correspondences in order to decode ideas, with assistance unfamiliar, but decodable, multisyllabic Read and understand written directions grade-level words Locate information in a text that is Decode by analogy using knowledge of needed to solve a problem, with known words in word families to read assistance unfamiliar grade-level words (e.g., given the Identify main ideas and supporting known word boat, read coat, moat, goat) details in informational texts, with Decode grade-level words using knowledge assistance of word structure (e.g., roots, prefixes, suffixes, verb endings, plurals, contractions, Recognize and use organizational features of texts, such as page and compounds) numbers and chapter Check accuracy of decoding using context headings/subheadings, to locate to monitor and self-correct information, with assistance Print Awareness Relate data and facts from Identify book parts and their purposes informational texts to prior information including identification of author, illustrator, and experience, with assistance title page, table of contents, index, and Compare and contrast information on chapter headings one topic from two different sources, Fluency with assistance Sight-read automatically grade-level, Identify a conclusion that summarizes common, high-frequency words the main idea, with assistance Sight-read automatically grade-level texts with decodable and irregularly spelled words Select books to meet informational needs, with assistance at appropriate speed, accuracy, and expression (target benchmark at grade 2: 82 Identify and interpret facts taken from maps, graphs, charts, and other WPM) (Davidson, M., & Towner, J. (2000). visuals, with assistance Reading Screening Test. Bellingham, WA: Use graphic organizers to record Applied Research and Development significant details from informational Center.) texts, with assistance Background Knowledge and Vocabulary Standard 2: Students will read, write, Development Study antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms listen, and speak for literary response to learn new grade-level vocabulary and expression. Select literature on the basis of Study categories of words (e.g.,

transportation, sports) to learn new gradelevel vocabulary Study root words, prefixes, suffixes, verb endings, plural nouns, contractions, and compound words to learn new grade-level vocabulary Connect words and ideas in books to spoken language vocabulary and background knowledge Learn new words indirectly from reading books and other print sources. Use a dictionary to learn the meanings of words Comprehension Strategies Read grade-level texts with comprehension and for different purposes Use comprehension strategies to monitor own reading (e.g., predict/confirm, reread, self-correct) to clarify meaning of text Work cooperatively with peers (e.g., peer pairs or groups) to comprehend text Organize text information by using graphic or semantic organizers Compare and contrast similarities and differences among characters and events across stories Compare and contrast similarities and differences in information from more than one informational text Comprehend and interpret information from a variety of graphic displays including diagrams, charts, and graphs Ask questions when listening to or reading texts Answer literal, inferential, and critical/application questions after listening to or reading imaginative and informational texts Summarize main ideas and supporting details from imaginative or informational text, both orally and in writing Support point of view with text information Lead or participate in discussion about grade-level books, integrating multiple strategies (e.g., ask questions, clarify misunderstandings, support point of view, summarize information) Demonstrate comprehension of grade-level text through creative response, such as writing, drama, and oral presentation

personal needs and interests from a variety of genres and by different authors, with assistance Engage in purposeful oral reading in small and large groups Read print-based and electronic literary texts silently on a daily basis for enjoyment Recognize differences among the genres of stories, poems, and plays, with assistance Relate characters in literature to own lives, with assistance Explain the difference between fact and fiction, with assistance Use previous reading and life experiences to understand literature, with assistance Make predictions and draw conclusions and inferences about characters, with assistance Recognize the value of illustration in literary text Use specific evidence from stories to describe characters and relate sequences of events, with assistance Use knowledge of story structure and story elements to interpret stories, with assistance Use graphic organizers to record significant details to compare and contrast characters and events in stories, with assistance Summarize main ideas and supporting details from literary text, both orally and in writing, with assistance

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Evaluate the content by identifying, with assistance - the authors purpose - important and unimportant details - whether events, actions, characters, and/or setting are realistic Compare characters in literary works Judge the accuracy of content, with assistance from teachers and

Motivation to Read Show interest in a wide range of grade-level texts, including historical fiction, science fiction, folktales, fairy tales, poetry, and other imaginative and informational texts Read voluntarily for own purposes and interests Show familiarity with the title and author of grade-level books Read independently and silently

parents/caregivers Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share reading experiences to build relationships with peers or adults; for example, read together silently or aloud Respect the age, gender, position, and cultural traditions of the writer Recognize the types of language (e.g., formal and informal vocabulary) that are appropriate to social communication

Grade 2 Writing
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The writing competencies common to all four ELA standards that students are developing during grade 2 are Spelling Spell correctly previously studied words (e.g., gradelevel multisyllabic, decodable words; irregularly spelled content and high-frequency words) in writing Use spelling patterns (e.g., word families) in writing Represent all the sounds in a word when spelling independently Handwriting Write legibly all uppercase and lowercase manuscript letters Composition Write in response to the reading of imaginative and informational texts Write a variety of compositions with assistance, using different organizational patterns (e.g.,informational reports, such as compare/contrast,

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


The grade-specific performance indicators that grade 2 students demonstrate as they learn to write include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Use two sources of information in writing a report Take notes to record facts by following teacher directions, with assistance State a main idea and support it with facts, with assistance Use organizational patterns, such as time/order, for expository writing Connect personal experiences to new information from school subject areas, with assistance Use spelling resources, such as dictionaries, word walls, and/or computer software, to spell words correctly Produce clear, well-organized, short reports to demonstrate understanding of a topic Support explanations with evidence from text Maintain a portfolio that includes informational writing as a method of reviewing work with teachers and parents/caregivers, with assistance Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Develop original literary texts that - create characters, simple plot, and setting, with assistance

and sequence of events; correspondence; and imaginative stories) Write original text using the writing process (e.g., prewriting, drafting, revising, proofreading, editing) Make judgments about relevant and irrelevant content to include in writing Write sentences in logical order and use paragraphs to organize topics Use capitalization, punctuation, and spelling rules to produce final products Vary the formality of language depending on purpose of writing (e.g., friendly letter, report) Begin to convey personal voice in writing Participate in writing conferences with teachers and peers to improve own writing and that of others Motivation to Read Write voluntarily to communicate ideas and emotions to a variety of audiences Write voluntarily for different purposes (e.g., tell stories, share information, give directions) Share writing with others (e.g., participate in authors circle)

- use rhythm and rhyme to create short poems and songs, with assistance - use descriptive language Write interpretive and responsive essays that - identify the title, author, and illustrator - describe literary elements, such as plot and characters, with assistance - express a personal response to literature Create clear, well-organized responses to stories read or listened to, supporting understanding of genres, characters, and events with details from the story, with assistance Create imaginative stories and personal narratives that show development and organization, with assistance Use resources such as personal experiences to stimulate own writing Use a computer to create, research, and interpret literary texts Maintain a portfolio that includes imaginative writing as a method of reviewing work with teachers and parents/caregivers Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Use prewriting tools, such as semantic webs and concept maps, to organize ideas and information State a main idea and provide supporting details from the text Use relevant examples, such as reasons to support ideas, with assistance Express opinions and make judgments that demonstrate a personal point of view, with assistance Analyze and evaluate the authors use of plot and character in written and visual text Use effective vocabulary in expository writing, with assistance Use details from stories or informational texts to predict events Maintain a portfolio that includes written analysis and evaluation as a method of reviewing work with teachers and parents/caregivers Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Share the process of writing with peers and adults; for example, write with a partner Respect the age, gender, social position, and cultural traditions of the recipient Use the tone, vocabulary, and sentence structure of informal conversation, with assistance Maintain a portfolio that includes writing for social

interaction as a method of reviewing work with teachers and parents/caregivers

Grade 2 Listening
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The listening competencies common to all four ELA standards that students are developing during grade 2 are Listening Listen attentively to spoken language, including grade-level books read aloud Listen attentively for different purposes Listen respectfully without interrupting when others speak Attend to a listening activity for a specified period of time

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


The grade-specific performance indicators that grade 2 students demonstrate as they learn to listen include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Acquire information and/or understand procedures Identify essential details, with assistance Determine a sequence of steps given, with assistance Identify main ideas and supporting details, with assistance Interpret information by drawing on prior knowledge and experience, with assistance Collect information, with assistance Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Identify elements of character, plot, and setting to understand the authors message, with assistance Connect literary texts to previous life experiences to enhance understanding Identify the authors use of repetition and rhyme Use note taking and graphic organizers to record and organize information and ideas recalled from stories read aloud, with assistance Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Form a personal opinion about the quality of texts read aloud, on the basis of criteria, such as characters and plot Form an opinion about the message of advertisements, on the basis of the language used Distinguish between fact and opinion,

with assistance Evaluate the speakers style of delivery by using criteria such as volume and tone of voice Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Respect the age, gender, social position, and culture of the speaker Listen to friendly notes, cards, longer letters, and narratives read aloud to get to know the writer and/or classmates and fellow listeners Listen for the tone of voice and content that signal friendly communication

Grade 2 Speaking
LITERACY COMPETENCIES
The speaking competencies common to all four ELA standards that students are developing during grade 2 are Speaking Speak in response to the reading of imaginative and informational texts Use grade-level vocabulary to communicate ideas, emotions, or experiences for different purposes (e.g., share ideas about personal experience, books, or writing) Use conventional grammar in own speech Vary formality of language according to purpose (e.g., conversation with peers, presentation to adults) Speak with expression, volume, pace, and facial or body gestures appropriate to the purpose of communication, topic, and audience Take turns in conversation and respond respectfully when speaking in a group Participate in group discussions Offer feedback to others during conferences

GRADE-SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS


The grade-specific performance indicators that grade 2 students demonstrate as they learn to speak include Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. Provide simple directions Express an opinion Ask questions Summarize, with assistance Provide a sequence of steps Describe a problem and suggest a solution State a main idea with supporting examples and details, with assistance Present a short oral report, using at least one source of information, such as a person, book, magazine article, television program, or electronic text Use complete sentences, using ageand content-appropriate vocabulary Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Present original works, such as stories, poems, and plays, to classmates Describe characters Compare literary texts and performances to personal experiences

and prior knowledge, with assistance Identify cultural and ethnic features in literary texts Ask questions to clarify literary texts and performances Use complete sentences, correct verb tense, age-appropriate vocabulary, and logical order in oral presentation Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Explain the reasons for a characters actions, considering the situation Express an opinion or judgment about a character and plot in a variety of works, with assistance Discuss the impact of illustrations and titles in evaluating ideas, information, and experiences Use personal experience and knowledge to analyze new ideas Role-play to communicate an interpretation of real or imaginary people or events Ask and respond to questions Speak with appropriate rate and volume for the audience Take turns speaking in a group Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Respect the age, gender, social position, and cultural traditions of the listener when speaking Discuss the content of friendly notes, cards, letters, and personal narratives, with a partner or small group, in order to get to know the writer and each other Avoid interrupting in social conversation

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction


Student _________________________________________________ Teacher _________________________________________________ Grade ________

Recording Form
Date ___________________________

School ____________________________________________

Recording Form
Part One: Oral Reading
Place the book in front of the student. Read the title and introduction. Introduction: Brett was trying to train his puppy Ernie to obey him. Read to find out about the problems Brett had trying to teach Ernie.
Sources of Information Used

Page

Start Time

min.

sec.

Ernie Learns Level L, RW: 231 E SC

SC

M S V M S V

Brett head, day, Today learn Ernie Okay, said. for

patted saying, Ernie. youre how gave let s He the to a

his

puppy

on the

the big

Todays

going be a

to good bark. Brett dog.

happy

get

started, his he

searched instructions in He a book recalled

memor y had been

reading training. important to tell

about two

dog

things. your dog

Oneyou what to

have do.

Subtotal
Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2 1

Recording Forms

2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Summary Forms
Student _________________________________________________ Teacher _________________________________________________ Grade ________ School ____________________________________________

Annual Record of Reading Progress


Record the title and accuracy rate. Draw a circle to indicate text level. = below 90% (Levels AK) or below 95% (Levels LZ), = 90% or above (Levels AK) or 95% or above (Levels LZ)

Z Y X W V

System 2

U T S R Q P O N M L N M L K J I H G F E D C B A
2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

System 1

Book Level

Date

Title /Accuracy Rate

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Recording Form Recording Forms

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Part One: Oral Reading continued


Sources of Information Used

Page Text

E SC

SC

M S V M S V

3 have cont. good!

to

make

him

want to

to do

be

Watch

for

him Then

something and and

right. him. you

praise how

him Dad

reward I get

That s to be

good!

Subtotal End Time min. sec. Totals

Have the student finish reading the book silently.


2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Recording Form Recording Forms

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Part One: Oral Reading continued


Sources of Information Used

Page Text

E SC

SC

M S V M S V

1 Twoyou cont.

also

have

to

show

your

dog

what

to more

do.

He

tried then that

to

remember decided was Sit, He little Then all. to

and

start.

Maybe

Ernie! nudged dog Brett But

Brett the

said. and the


2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

puppy,

sat. made Ernie Brett over another just looked the to do. sit.

attempt. at him.

Then

showed how to

puppy Again, Maybe

over Ernie you

and

forgot dont

what like

sitting,

Subtotal

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Recording Form Recording Forms

Part One: Oral Reading continued


Sources of Information Used

Page Text

E SC

SC

M S V M S V

2 Brett cont. new. dog. Ernie

said. He

Let s backed he stay.

tr y

something from his

away said. He

Stay! didnt

didnt

lie

down. he

And

he

didnt

come

when

was

called. mom was Brett I you watching yelled, Ernie an said. She You from

Brett s
2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

the why I

porch. cant think

Mom, any thing?

teach forgot

important held out

step, some

Mom puppy

treats.

Subtotal

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Recording Form Recording Forms


5

Accuracy Rate

% Errors

Below 95% 13

95% 1112

96% 910

97% 68

98% 45

99% 13

100% 0

Self-Corrections

Fluency Score

Fluency Scoring Key


0 Reads primarily word-by-word with occasional but infrequent or inappropriate phrasing; no smooth or expressive interpretation, irregular pausing, and no attention to authors meaning or punctuation; no stress or inappropriate stress, and slow rate. Reads primarily in two-word phrases with some three- and four-word groups and some word-by-word reading; almost no smooth, expressive interpretation or pausing guided by authors meaning and punctuation; almost no stress or inappropriate stress, with slow rate most of the time. Reads primarily in three- or four-word phrase groups; some smooth, expressive interpretation and pausing guided by authors meaning and punctuation; mostly appropriate stress and rate with some slowdowns. Reads primarily in larger, meaningful phrases or word groups; mostly smooth, expressive interpretation and pausing guided by authors meaning and punctuation; appropriate stress and rate with only a few slowdowns.

2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Reading Rate
(Optional)

End Time Start Time Total Time Total Seconds (RW 13,860 60)

min. min. min.

sec. sec. sec.

Total Seconds

Words Per Minute (WPM) WPM

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Recording Form Recording Forms

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Part Two: Comprehension Conversation


Have a conversation with the student, noting the key understandings the student expresses. Use prompts as needed to stimulate discussion of understandings the student does not express. Score for evidence of all understandings expressedwith or without a prompt. Circle the number in the score column that reflects the level of understanding demonstrated. Teacher: Talk about what happened in this story.
Comprehension Scoring Key
0 1 2 3 Reflects no understanding of the text. Either does not respond or talks off the topic. Reflects very limited understanding of the text. Mentions a few facts or ideas but does not express the important information or ideas. Reflects partial understanding of the text. Includes important information and ideas but neglects other key understandings. Reflects excellent understanding of the text. Includes almost all important information and main ideas.

Key Understandings Within the Text


Tells significant events of the story in sequence, such as: Brett was having trouble training Ernie; Mom told him to give Ernie treats for doing the trick; Brett trained Ernie to sit and stay. Note any additional understandings:

Prompts

Score

What was the problem in this story? What did Brett do to solve his problem? What else happened?

Beyond the Text


2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Both people and dogs have to want to be good.

Tell some of the ways people and dogs are alike. What was the secret to teaching Ernie?

Giving a person or a dog a reward (treat) helps them want to be good. Brett was happy at the end of the story because he learned how to teach Ernie. Note any additional understandings:

Tell how Brett felt at the end of the story. Why did he feel that way?

Continued on next page.

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction

Recording Form Recording Forms 3 /9 /1 /10


7

Part Two: Comprehension Conversation continued


Key Understandings About the Text
The title of this book is good because Ernie did learn to sit. Brett learned that both people and animals need rewards. There was a joke at the end of the story when Brett barked a happy bark like Ernie did at the beginning. Note any additional understandings: Is this a good title for this story? Why (not)? What did Brett learn? Look at the last page. Why do you think the writer said that Brett gave a happy bark? 0 1 2

Prompts

Score

Guide to Total Score


910 Excellent Comprehension 78 Satisfactory Comprehension 56 Limited Comprehension 04 Unsatisfactory Comprehension

Subtotal Score: Add 1 for any additional understandings: Total Score:

2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Part Three: Writing About Reading (optional)


Read the writing/drawing prompt on the next page to the student. Specify the amount of time for the student to complete the task. (See Assessment Guide for more information.)

Writing About Reading


0 Reflects no understanding of the text. 1 Reflects very limited understanding of the text. 2 Reflects partial understanding of the text. 3 Reflects excellent understanding of the text.

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Recording Form Recording Forms


Student _________________________________________________________________

Ernie Learns Level L Fiction


Date ___________________________

Next, Brett wants to teach Ernie to come. Write about how you think he will do it. You can draw a sketch to go with your writing.

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Summary Forms
Teacher _________________________________________________ School _________________________________________________ Date _________________________________________________ Grade ________ Year ___________________________

Class Record Form


Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark Independent Instructional Accur. Comp. Fluency Placement Level Level Level

Student Name 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.


2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Notes

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

Summary Forms
Student _________________________________________________ Teacher _________________________________________________ Grade ________ Year ___________________________

School ____________________________________________

Bi-Annual Assessment Summary


Date Date Level % / / %

Independent Level
Accuracy Comprehension Self-Correction Fluency Rate
(optional)

Level

WPM 0 Level % / / 1 2 3 0 Level 1

WP M 2 3

Writing About Reading


(optional)

Instructional Level
Accuracy Comprehension Self-Correction Fluency Rate
(optional)

WPM 0 1 2 3 0 1

WP M 2 3

Writing About Reading


(optional)

Additional Comments

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2

2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Summary Forms
Student _________________________________________________ Teacher _________________________________________________ Grade ________ Year ___________________________

School ____________________________________________

Tri-Annual Assessment Summary


Date Date Level % / / % / Date Level %

Independent Level
Accuracy Comprehension Self-Correction Fluency Rate
(optional)

Level

WPM 0 Level % / / 1 2 3 0 Level 1

WPM 2 3 0 Level % / 1

WP M 2 3

Writing About Reading


(optional)

Instructional Level
Accuracy Comprehension
2008 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. This page may be photocopied.

Self-Correction Fluency Rate


(optional)

WPM 0 1 2 3 0 1

WPM 2 3 0 1

WP M 2 3

Writing About Reading


(optional)

Additional Comments

Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System 2