Lesson Plan Format Introduction to the Lesson: 1. Title of the Lesson: Bikes and Trikes 2.

Goal(s) of the Lesson: • Students will use addition and subtraction methods. • Students will understand the concept of parts of a whole. • Students will form different patterns by using the materials given. • Students will work successfully in a group setting. • Students will expand on their problem solving abilities. 3. Relationship of the Lesson to the Curriculum Framework: In the Michigan Curriculum Framework, Strand One involves the concepts of patterns, relationships and functions. We will focus on Content Standard One, which states “students recognize similarities and generalize patterns, use patterns to create models and make prediction, describe the nature of patterns and relationships, and construct representations of mathematical relationships. Specifically we will elaborate on the Elementary Standard 2, which states “students will represent and record patterns and relationships in a variety of ways, including tables, charts and pictures.” 4. Introduction to the Lesson/Rationale for the Lesson: 1. Show the students a picture of a tricycle, asking “What is this?” After they respond, discuss how they know it is a tricycle. 2. Show the students a picture of a bicycle, asking “What is this?” After they respond, ask “How is this different than a tricycle?” and discuss. 3. Explain to the students that we will be pretending to work in a factory. Ask them, “What is a factory?” Listen to students answers and discuss, clarifying any misconceptions. Tell the students, “In this particular factory, we are building both bicycles and tricycles. We can’t have any left over wheels.” 4. Introduce the objects that will be representing the wheels of the bicycles and tricycles, 20 counters. 5. Explain to the students that we have to make as many combinations of bicycles and tricycles as possible, without having any left over wheels. 6. Unit Overview: This unit is about creating combinations of twos and threes that together equal 20. The students will be working together in a small group to create these different combinations. The students will use discussion in order to help each other figure out the various solutions to the problem. Through this activity students will learn that there isn’t just one right answer.

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Lesson Plan Teacher Moves: (Steps, Learning Expected Student Activities, Teacher's Questions) Reactions Posing Problem ("Before") 1. Show the students a picture of a tricycle, asking “What is this?” After they respond, discuss how they know it is a tricycle. 2. Show the students a picture of a bicycle, asking “What is this?” After they respond, ask “How is this different than a tricycle?” and discuss. 3. Explain to the students that we will be pretending to work in a factory. Ask them, “What is a factory?” Listen to students answers and discuss, clarifying any misconceptions. Tell the students, “In this particular factory, we are building both bicycles and tricycles. We can’t have any left over wheels.” 4. Introduce the objects that will be representing the wheels of the bicycles and tricycles, 20 counters. 5. Explain to the students that we have to make as many combinations of bicycles and tricycles as possible, without having any left over wheels. • Students will respond to the questions about bicycles and tricycles by using their prior knowledge and experience. Most students will be able to identify the difference between the bikes and trikes are in the number of wheels. Students will have various opinions on what a factory is. Students will show enthusiasm in doing a handson mathematical activity.

Suggested Teacher Response (Points to highlight, support to offer, etc.) • Expand and clarify student’s responses and definitions. Give positive feedback to everyone who responds. Teacher will include all students. Teacher will be sure everyone understands and can see the counters from their area on the carpet.

~10 minutes

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Solving Problem ("During") 1. Students count the number of “wheels” in a choral fashion. 2. Teachers scaffold the students through the process of creating the first combination, in order to ensure understanding. 3. Ask the students if they have any ideas for creating bikes/trikes combinations. 4. Visually represent each student’s combination with the counters. 5. Teachers use 12 . “wheels,” and create 3 bikes and 2 tricycles. There will be 8 remaining “wheels,” of the 20 total. Teachers ask the students for suggestions on how to use the remaining “wheels.” 6. Repeat Step 3, recording each idea on a large chart. 7. After students have found all four possible combinations, stop activity. (Depending on student’s involvement). • • Students will be able to count the wheels 1-20. Students will be involved in the combination making process. Students will learn from their classmate’s ideas. Most students will come up with one combination. Some students will be unsure in their thinking. • Teachers will guide student’s thinking process. Teachers will create a comfortable risk-taking environment, and praise those taking intellectual risks. Teachers will treat right and wrong answers in the same manner (writing both right and wrong answer on the chart), Teachers will involve all students. Teachers will point to specific “wheels,” in order to make certain combinations clearer.

~15 minutes

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Comparing and Discussing ("After") 1. Teacher will review each combination on the chart. 2. We will ask students how they got to each answer. 3. We will ask, “Why does this work?” and allow all students to respond. 4. If any combinations don’t work, we will ask, “Why doesn’t this work?” and allow all students to respond. • Students will analyze each different combination. Students will learn about other thinking processes used by their classmates. Students will identify the right and wrong combinations, and know the reasoning behind it. Students will respect each others ideas. • Teachers will assist students in their critical thinking process. Teachers will allow each student to express her/his opinions on each combination. Teacher will scaffold students in order for them to recognize the various combinations.

~5-10 minutes

7. Materials Needed: We need pictures of both bicycles and tricycles to introduce the activity. We will need 20 counters that we will be using as the “wheels” of the bikes and trikes. We will also need a large piece of paper which we will be using as our “data chart” for the wheel combinations, as well as a marker.