(NCL) DRYING CORN - NAVAJO

12

ears fresh corn in husks

Carefully peel back husks, leaving them attached at base of corn. clean corn, removing silks. Fold husks back into position. Place on wire rack in large shallow baking pan. (Allow space between ears so air can circulate.) Bake in 325 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours. Cool. Strip off husks. Hang corn, so ears do not touch, in a dry place till kernels are dry, at least 7 days. Makes about 6 cups shelled corn. From: Elaya K Tsosie, a Native Navajo. She teaches Native American History at at two different New York State Colleges. From: Mignonne Yield: 4 servings

(NCL) REAL CANDIED CORN

2 1 1/2 1

cup cup cup

frozen corn kernels sugar water

Here is a candy recipe for ya:) I don't let the corn get too brown. I instead take it out when it's a nice gold color, drain it, roll it in the sugar, then dry it in a very low oven 150-200 degrees. You can also do pumpkin this way cut in thin strips. Add honey during the last part of the cooking to give it a more natural taste but don't boil the honey as it will make it gooey. In large skillet, combine corn, 1 cup of the sugar, and water. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally until corn is deep golden in color, about 45 to 60 minutes. Drain, then roll in remaining sugar. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet and cool. Store in a tightly sealed container or bag. Use as toppings for ice cream, in puddings, custards, of fillings, or as a substitute for nuts in baking. Oh good right out of the bag too! From: Ann Nelson Yield: 4 servings

Page 2

(NCL) SHAWNEE RECIPE FOR DRYING CORN

1

corn

Select corn that is firm but not hard. Scrape off of cob into deep pan. When pan is full, set in slow oven and bake until thoroughly heated through, an hour or more. Remove from oven and turn pone out to cool. Later crumble on drying board in the sun and when thoroughly dried, sack for winter. 1932, Roberta CAmpbell Lawson, Delaware I don't know about where all of you live, but where I'm at, you can buy roasting ears in the summer very cheap once they're past the "prime" age. Any of us can dry our own corn this way. A childhood friend's mother used to dry corn on a screen door laying across a corner of her garden wall. She covered the door with cheese cloth, spread out the corn, and covered it again with cheese cloth. I also know from experience that a heavy sprinkling of coarse ground black pepper between the door and cheese cloth and then on top of the second cheese cloth will not flavor the corn, but will discourage mice and insects from messing with your hard work! Enjoy and give it a try! From: Corn Recipes from the Indians, ISBN 0-935741-15-1, Cherokee Publications, P.O. Box 430, Cherokee NC 28719, http://www.CherokeePub.com/Books/ Nagi From: "Valerie Brestel-Ohle" <nagi@w...Date: Yield: 4 servings

ACORN BREAD

1 1 3 1 3 1 1 3

cup cup teaspoon teaspoon tablespoons cup tablespoons

cup

acorn flour

whole wheat flour (can be 3/4 cup w; heat and 1/4 cup carob f or just use a total of 2 cups acorn; flour) baking powder salt honey egg raw milk oil

Mix well and bake in a greased loaf pan for 30 to 45 minutes at 300 degrees F.

Page 3

APPALOOSA BEANS & CORN

1 1 2 2 5 1/2 1 1/2 2 1/2 1/4

T. cup cloves cups -oz. cups tsp. tsp. tsp.

oil onion, chopped garlic, minced chicken broth or water dried appaloosa beans, cooked until; tender, and drained niblet corn fresh sage, chopped salt pepper

In a large saucepan, heat oil; saut‚ onion and garlic for 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Stir in broth, beans, corn, and sage. Cook 10 to 15 minutes, or till mixture is heated through. Stir in salt and pepper. Makes 4 main-dish or 8 side-dish servings (4 cups). Preparation time: 10 minutes Cook time: About 15 to 20 minutes

ARAGI YELLOW MAIZE PUDDING

2 1/2 2 1 1 1/2 1/2 dash 3

cups Pcs cup Tsp Tsp Tsp tblsp

corn; cooked eggs evaporated milk cornstarch nutmeg Cinnamon Salt butter or margerine

Place corn in saucepan. Grease a 9' round baking pan and set aside. Melt butter or margarine in small saucepan and set aside. Mix sugar, nutmeg, salt and cinnamon with corn. Slightly beat eggs in a bowl. Add eggs to corn mixture and stir well. Put over low heat and keep stirring until heated through. Dissolve cornstarch into milk and add mixture to corn. Add vanilla and melted butter. Stir well. Pour into greased baking pan and bake at 350 degrees for 45 min. Test as done with knife inserted in middle. If dry, pudding is done.

Page 4

AZTEC CORN SOUP

1

1/4 c. butter

3 1/2 C. fresh corn; cut from cob 1 clove garlic; minced or pressed 1 C. chicken stock 2 C. milk 1 tsp. oregano leaves 4 oz. can green chilies; diced 4 oz. Monteray Jack cheese; shredded Salt 1 lg. tomato; cored and diced 1/4 C. fresh Cilantro; chopped In a 5-6 quart pan; melt butter over medium heat. Add corn and garlic; sauteing for about 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat. In a food processor or blender, whirl stock and 2 cups of the corn mixture until smooth, then add to remaining corn mixture in pan. Stirring constantly; bring milk, oregano and chilies to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and stir in cheese. Season to taste with salt. Garnish individual servings with tomato slices and cilantro leaves. Makes 4-6 servings. Yield: 6 servings

BAKED CORN
By: :Square House Museum Cookbook 2 12 6 1/4 1/4 1 2 -ounce ounces pound cup dash jalapeño cans shoe peg corn philadelphia cream cheese butter milk garlic salt peppers -- seeded

Drains cans of corn. (If smaller Green Giant Shoe Peg is used, use 3 cans.) Make a sauce of cream cheese, butter, milk and garlic salt. Heat slowly so that it will not stick. Combine with drained corn. Mince seeded peppers and add. Season to taste and place in buttered baking dish. Bake at 350°F or until lightly browned (about 30 minutes). Jalapeño (hah lah PAIN yoh)-A kind of chile pepper that is frequently used in Tex-Mex recipes. Jalapeños are dark green peppers, with flavor from medium hot to extremely hot.

Page 5

BAKED CORN

1

x

no ingredients

I am the daughter of Charles Henry Anderson and would like to include this recipe that Dad said was real close to what he had as a child on special occasions. 1 can cream style corn 1 can whole kernel corn 1 egg 1 T. Butter (melted) 1/2 cup milk 1 t. sugar 1/4 t. salt 1 stack of saltine crackers Mix first 7 ingredients well and add crushed saltine crackers. Stir and let set for about 15 minutes till crackers absorb some of the liquid. Pour into greased casserole dish and top with cracker crumbs. Bake at 350 for about 35 minutes or until all liquid is gone and top is toasty brown. We always had this at Thanksgiving, Christmas or any special day in the family. My sons love it. Dad had an Indian name for this dish but I don't remember what it was. Dorothy L. Singleton

Page 6

BAKED CORN BREAD ... OGAHAGQ'WA` WATA'`GQDA'`GWA'

The name signifies 'under the ashes cooked,' and is applied to bread baked in the embers, or on flat stones placed over the fire. as reported in samuel de Champlain's, 'Voyages of Samuel de champlain' Prince Society ed (Boston 1878-1882), this seems to have been formerly in much favour. Its disuse is probably owing to the abandonment of the open fireplace and to the general adoption of European foods. The mixture used was practically the same as for boiled bread. About three-quarters of an hour was required for cooking. As the loaves baked somewhat more quickly on top, they were turned over to be evenly done. To tell when they were finished, the cakes were tapped with the finger. If not sufficiently cooked, they felt heavy to the touch and, when done, felt lighter and more spongy. The last part of the operation was to wash them in cold water to free them from ashes or cinders, as was reported by Peter John (Onondaga) and his wife (Mohawk). The Senecas are said to have omitted the beans or berries. On the other hand, several informants at Grand River, Ontario, state specifically that beans, berries, and sometimes maple sugar were included in the baked corn bread mixture. James Adair, in 'History of the American Indians' (London, 1775), remarks about the use of a similar food among the Choctaw and Chickasaw. Mrs. John Williams (Mohawk) of Caughnawaga states that red beans used to be mixed with the paste for baked corn bread, and the whole covered with cabbage leaves or corn husks. Boiled bread is the only kind made there now. Peter John (Onondaga), Grand River, Ontario, relates that some fifty or sixty years ago a fire was frequently made in the open field, while they were harvesting or husking corn, and bread baked in the ashes in the old-fashioned manner. A single cake of this bread was said, by John Echo (Onondaga), to have formerly been placed in the coffin with a corpse. According to Peter Atkins (Mohawk) and others of Grand River, Ontario, besides the food which is set aside for the dead at wakes and which they are supposed to require for their own consumption, a little is sometimes put into the hand. This is to be thrown to a savage cat and dog which guard a bridge over which the dead have to pass. While the animals are devouring the food the dead person slips over in safety. Source: 'Iroquois Foods and Food Preparation' Memoir 86, No. 12, Anthropological Series' by F. W. Waugh, (Ottawa Government Printing Bureau, 1916) From: Robert Miles Yield: 4 servings Date: 21 Jun 98

Page 7

BAKED CORN SUPREME

1

x

no ingredients

1 15oz. can Cope's corn, drain liquid 1 heaping teaspoon sugar 1 cup scalded milk 2 eggs, well beaten Salt and Butter to taste Combine all ingredients. Bake in buttered baking dish for 40 minutes at 375°. Serves 4 to 6 NOTE:Dried corn may be used in this recipe as follows: To one cup dried corn (ground in food chopper) add 2 cups hot milk. Let stand for one hour. Add two beaten eggs, one cup milk, one teaspoon butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Mix ingredients thoroughly. Bake in buttered baking dish for 50 minutes at 375°.

BAKED OR GRILLED CORN ON THE COB

1 1 1 1/2 6

tablespoon teaspoon teaspoon cup ears

prepared mustard salt prepared horseradish pepper to taste butter or margarine, room temperatu; re of corn, husk and silk removed

Preheat oven to 375 degrees or preheat your grill. In a small bowl, combine prepared mustard, salt, prepared horseradish, pepper, and buter or margarine; spread onto corn. Wrap each piece of corn loosely in aluminum foil. Bake or grill 20 to 25 minutes or until corn is very hot. Remove from oven or grill, remove aluminum foil, and serve. Yield: makes 4 to 6 se

Page 8

BANAHA CHOCTAW CORN SHUCK BREAD

1

x

no ingredients

6 cups Corn meal Boiling water 2 teaspoons Baking soda Corn shucks Pour enough boiling water over the meal and soda mixture to make a soft dough which can be handled with the hands. Prepare 4 to 6 handfuls of corn shucks by pouring boiling water over them to cover, then strip a few shucks to make strings. Tie 2 strips together at ends. Lay an oval shaped ball of dough on shucks. Fold carefully and tie in the middle with strings. Place in large stew pot and boil 30 to 45 minutes.

Page 9

BASIC AREPA DOUGH

1

x

no ingredients

2 c Pre-cooked masa flour -(yellow or white) 1 ts Salt 3 c Water, boiling Butter; softened Arepas are simple corn cakes first made by the Indians of Colombia and Venezuela. They were an important part of their diet, like corn tortillas were to the Aztecs. Over the centuries, the poor people of Colombia and Venezuela continued to use them as inexpensive, easy-to-prepare source of nourishment. Today, these humble corn cakes are a comfort food for the rich and poor alike, a heart-warming tribute to simplicity, tradition, versatility, and good taste. Originally, arepas were made from dried corn kernels that were soaked overnight in water and lime to remove the skins, then cooked, drained and ground into masa (dough). Thanks to modern technology, a precooked harina de masa is now available at most Latin American markets. An instant masa can be made by simply mixing this corn flour (either white or yellow) with a little salt and enough boiling water to make a stiff dough. The dough is then shaped into flat round cakes of varying thicknesses, depending on the intended use, and cooked on a griddle or deep-fried. In parts of Colombia, arepas are cooked atop a flagstone slab that is first heated and then brushed with fat. Another Colombian specialty ~arepas de chocolo -- are made from fresh corn and cooked on top of banana leaves. Colombian arepas are generally thinner than their Venezuelan counterparts. The standard Venezuelan arepa looks somewhat like a flat bread roll, crispy on the outside and doughy on the inside. They can be split open and buttered, or spread with cream cheese or fresh goat cheese. Made this way, they are served for breakfast or as an accompaniment for grilled fowl, fish, meat stews, or sausages. In Venezuela, the doughy inside is sometimes scooped out, and the shell is filled with savory mixtures of ground or chopped pork, beef, ham, chicken, seafood, vegetables, or beans. They are excellent first courses. Venezuelan mandocas, for example, are cheese arepas shaped into rings and deep-fried. Another specialty is bollos pelones -balls of arepa dough stuffed with seasoned ground meat, either fried or poached in water, then served with tomato sauce. A popular snack in Colombia consists of arepas served with fresh cheese and fried chorizo (sausage). Colombians also make tasty soups using fresh masa or leftover arepas. Arepitas dulces make great desserts.

Page 10

The versatile arepa indeed proves that umpretentious food can be not only satisfying but also delicious. Directions: In a large mixing bowl, combine flour and salt. Add water, stir with a wooden spoon to make a soft dough. Let stand for 5 minutes, then knead for 3 minutes. Dough is ready to be shaped into standard arepas, or to be mixed and kneaded with other ingredients such as cheese, chicharrones (pork rind), etc. Venezuelan arepa is 3 inches in diameter, 3/4 inch thick. Columbian arepas are larger and thinner, about 4 inches in diameter, 1/4 inch thick. To make arepas, oil or wet hands lightly and shape dough into balls. Place between 2 pieces of wax paper or plastic wrap and flatten into a circle; shape the edges to form a smooth disc. To cook arepas: Heat a griddle or cast iron skillet over medium heat; grease lightly and cook arepas on both sides, turning a couple of times until a crust is formed. Colombian arepas are ready to be served at this point, spread with butter. Venezuelan arepas have to be baked in a preheated 350-degree oven for 15 minutes. To check for doneness, tap the arepa lightly ~- if a hollow sound is heard, it's ready. Split open, add butter and serve hot. Arepas freeze well if frozen while still warm. Freeze in layers separated by plastic wrap. Reheat frozen arepas wrapped in aluminum foil in a preheated 350-degree oven for 10 minutes or until heated through. Yield: 10 servings

Page 11

BLUEBERRY-CORN RELISH

1

x

no ingredients

2 ears fresh corn on the cob or 1/2 of a 10-oz. pkg. frozen whole kernel corn (1 C.) 1/4 C. chopped onion 1/4 C. vinegar 2 T. honey 2 tsp. seeded and finely chopped serrano pepper 1/4 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. ground cardomom 1/2 C. chopped jicama 1 C. fresh blueberries If using fresh ears of corn, remove husks and silks; rinse. Cut kernels from cob. (You should have 1 C. of kernels.) In a medium saucepan combine fresh or frozen corn, onion, vinegar, honey, chopped serrano pepper, salt, and cardomom. Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat. Cook, uncovered, over medium-low heat for 4 minutes or until corn is just tender. Remove from heat; cool slightly. Stir in jicama. Cover. Store in refrigerator up to 4 weeks. Just before serving, gently stir in blueberries. Serve with slotted spoon. Makes 2 cups. TRY THESE: *Toss 1/2 tsp. of finely shredded lemon peel over a cup of blueberries. Dust with powdered sugar just before serving. The combo is outstanding over lemon or mango sorbet. *Stir 1/3 C. of fresh berries into 1 C. of blueberry preserves with a pinch of cinnamon or cardomom. Serv over waffles, pancakes, or angel food cake. *Combine a big splash of orange juice with a little honey and candied ginger. Stire in blueberries. Spoon into half a seeded papaya. Like cranberries, blueberries contain compounds that may prevent urinary tract infections. These compounds keep bacteria from sticking to the wall of the urinary tract. Other Notes:<BR> jícama [HEE-kah-mah] Oten referred to as the Mexican potato , this large, bulbous root vegetable has a thin brown skin and white crunchy flesh. Its sweet, nutty flavor is good both raw and cooked. Jícama is available from November through May and can be purchased in Mexican markets and most large supermarkets. It should be stored in the refrigerator in a plastic bag and will last for about 2 weeks. When cooked, jícama retains its crisp, water chestnut-type texture. It's a fair source of vitamin C and potassium. A member of the morning glory family that hails from Mexico and South America. A cousin of the sweet potato, this underground tuber comes in two types: agua (watery juice) and leche (milky juice). Like the hot pretzels on the sidewalks of New York, jicama is a street food in its native habitat,

Page 12 sold with a squeeze of lime and a shake of fiery chili powder. Also called the yam bean root, jicama ranges in weight from a few ounces to 6 pounds. Its crispy white flesh is hidden under a fibrous dust-brown skin, which must be completely stripped off. Like potatoes, jicamas can be steamed, baked, boiled, mashed or fried. Unlike potatoes, however, they can also be eaten raw. Sliced into wide sticks, jicama makes a crunchy carrier for guacamole and highly seasoned dips. Cut up into squares, it enhances fresh fruit salad, absorbing and reflecting surrounding flavors. It is equally versatile as a cooked vegetable -- sauteed with carrots or green beans, stir-fried with chicken or shrimp, or simmered in savory stews. Low in starch and calories, jicama is satisfying, flavorful and nowhere near as strange as it looks. cardomom The oil bearing cardomom seeds come wrapped in seed pods, or capsules, wich must be broken to release the seeds' yellow oil. These seedpods are sold ground and whole. When whole, they are usually white colored, but they can be found in stores both black (meaning they've been sun dried and are deeply flavored) and green (which means they've been dried in indoor kilns and are more mildly flavored). Serrano The chile that's smaller and hotter than a Jalapeno. The Serrano's life cycle resembles a leaf's: It starts out as a bright, light to dark green chile, and turns red, brown, orange, or yellow as it ripens. Since it's the hottest chile readily available in the United States, your local grocery store should stock the Serrano. Buy them either fresh or pickled.

Page 13

BOILED CORN BREAD ... GAHA'`GU'`GWA'

corn, hulled and washed water currants, optional walnuts or butternuts, optional berries or beans, of choice After the corn has been hulled and washed, it is placed in the mortar and pounded to a meal or flour. As the pounding progresses the fine sifting basket is frequently brought into requisition. The hand is used to dip the meal out of the mortar into the sifter. The large bread pan is often set on top of the mortar and the sifter shaken in both hands. The coarser particles are thrown into a second bowl or tray and are finally dumped back into the mortar to be repounded. A hollow is next made in the flour and enough boiling water poured into it to make a stiff paste. Usage differs somewhat in this respect, cold water being used by some for mixing. The stirring paddle is often employed at first, after which the paste is kneaded with the hands. Dried huckleberries, blackberries, elderberries, strawberries, or beans may be incorporated in the mixture, beans apparently enjoying the greatest favour. The latter are previously cooked just so that they will remain whole or nearly so. Currants or raisins are sometimes used at present. Formerly the kernels of walnuts and butternuts were employed in the same way. A lump of paste is next broken off, or about a double handful. This is tossed in the hands, which are kept moistened with cold water, until it becomes rounded in form; the surplus material forms a core at one side, usually the right, and is finally broken off. The lump is now slapped back and forth between the palms, though resting rather more on the left hand; and is at the same time given a rotary motion until a disk is formed about 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 inches thick and about 7 inches in diameter. Boiling water for mixing is stated to make the cakes firmer and better to handle. No salt* nor other such ingredients are used. The loaves are immediately slid into a pot of boiling water from the paddle or from between the hands and are supported on edge by placing the paddle against them until all are in. The bread paddle, or sometimes a special circular turning paddle, is used to rotate the cakes a little when partly done, so as to cook all parts alike. An hour is usually required for cooking, though the completion of the operation is indicated when the cakes show a tendency to float, or when the steam is given out equally all over when a cake is lifted out. The bread paddle is also employed in removing the bread from the pot. When a batch is too large for the pot, some of the cakes are boiled for five or six minutes, then removed and baked in a pan in the oven. Boiled corn bread, while not light in the ordinary sense, is decidedly tasty when newly made. It may be sliced and eaten either hot or cold with butter, gravy or maple syrup. An Oneidatown informant states that it is often sliced and fried in butter as we fry cornmeal or oatmeal mush. In his book, 'Moeurs des Sauvages Ameriquains' (Paris, 1724) Volume II, p. 94, Jos. Francois Lafitau remarks of corn bread that '... nothing is heavier or more insipid; it is a mass of flour kneaded without regard to cleanliness, without either leaven or salt. They

Page 14 cover it with corn leaves and cook it in the ashes or in the kettle. They often, also, add oil, grease, beans and fruits. It is then still more disagreeable.' He admits, however, that it is best when freshly cooked. The boiling of the corn in ashes, in bread-making, was sometimes omitted. A kettleful of water was brought to the boiling point, according to an informant, Mrs. Peter John, a Mohawk woman married to an Onondaga man. The ripe corn was added and boiled until softened a little. It was then drained in the washing basket, allowed to dry slightly, then pounded, sifted, and made into flour. This kind of flour is called ganehana`-we'di`. A similar omission is found in the Huron process of bread-making as recorded by Sagard-Theodat in his book, 'Le Grand Voyage du Pays des Hurons,' Tross ed., (Paris, 1865). Loaves of corn bread were frequently carried along while travelling, though parched corn flour sweetened with maple syrup was a more popular material. The use of corn bread for this purpose is indicted in the word 'johnny-cake' from 'journey-cake.' The ash-cake, hoe-cake, and pone are other European adoptions. * Salt was evidently adopted principally during the later historical period. In 'History of the Mission of the United Brethren Among the Indians in North America' (London, 1794), pt 1, p. 65, translated by La Trobe, G. H. Loskiel describes the Iroquois attitude towards salt by stating that '... neither the Iroquois, Delaware, nor any in connexion with them, eat their meat raw, but frequently without salt, though they have it in abundance.' The fact that several old-time foods, such as corn bread, corn and bean soup, etc. are made without salt would also indicate that the usage is modern. Source: Iroquois Foods and Food Preparation, by F. W. Waugh, Ottawa Government Printing Bureau (1916), Memoir 86, No. 12, Anthropological Series Yield: 1 servings

Page 15

BOILED CORN PUDDING
By: Mme Jehane Benoit 4 2 1 1/2 2 1 1 1 1 c tb c c tb tb ts cn chicken or fish broth butter oatmeal all-purpose flour baking powder sugar salt corn niblets or lye corn egg milk Bring the chicken or fish broth to boil with the butter. Stir together the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Stir together the undrained corn niblets or lye corn, egg and milk. Add all at once to the flour mixture. Mix well. Pour by spoonfuls into the boiling broth. Lower the heat. Cover and simmer 15 to 18 minutes. Uncover and serve the thick pudding to replace potatoes. NOTES : A fish head stock is equally as good as a chicken broth. A surprising recipe I learned from a Manitoba Indian. We eat it as a lunch with green salad or coleslaw or as a vegetable with roast pork or goose. Lei's Note: I believe lye corn is called hominy in USA. Yield: 1 servings

BOILED DRY CORN

2 6 1

cups cups tbsp

dried sweet corn spring water salt

Bring water to a boil. Add dried sweet corn. Return to a boil and add salt. Continue to boil corn and add water as needed to keep water line about one quarter inch above corn. Cook until tender.

BOILED DRY CORN

2 6 1

cups cups tbsp

dried sweet corn spring water salt

Bring water to a boil. Add dried sweet corn. Return to a boil and add salt. Continue to boil corn and add water as needed to keep water line about one quarter inch above corn. Cook until tender.

Page 16

BRIDGET JONES'S NATIVE MAIZE SOUP
By: Native American Recipes by Bridget Jones 1 1/2 1 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1 c lb c c lb bay sm dried kidney beans or can kidney beans hominy maize/corn kernels smoked ham or fatback leaf sliced onion or 2-3 scallions water Soak dried beans overnight in water to make them soft. Put beans and fatback in a saucepan with enough water to reach about 2' above the beans. Cook for 1/2 hour. Add the hominy and stir. Cook for 15 minutes. Add the corn and stir. Slice onion to make rings. Push out the rings and lay them on top of the mixture. Put bay leaf on top of the onions and push under the liquid with a spoon. Cook for about 20 minutes then take bay leaf out and stir well. Cook for 1 1/2 hours more. Serve with corn bread or spoon bread. Yield: 6 servings

CATTAIL HOMINY
By: http://home.naxs.com/melaniet/Food.htm#Wild 1 1 c tb cattail buds butter salt pepper paprika chopped onion to taste *I call it thus because the taste and texture are very similar. It tastes vaguely like popcorn. Use the mature cattail heads, no longer brown and smooth, but after they have flowered and the tops are covered with white, cottony stuff. Scrape this off , rinse and dry on a paper towel, and use. Melt butter in skillet or saute pan set on medium heat. Add chopped onion and cook a couple of minutes, just to soften. Add cattail buds, and cook until soft, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add seasonings before dishing up. *variation: Add equivalent amounts of chopped green and/or red pepper plus a bit of minced garlic to the onion when sauteing. Add a dash of chili powder or cumin and a dash of oregano to seasonings. Melt sharp cheddar cheese or jack cheese over the top. Yum! Yield: yield: 4 servin

Page 17

CHATO-CORN CASSEROLE

1 1 4 5 5 1 1

lb medium large Pcs Pcs lb Pc to taste

bacon; chopped yellow onion; chopped potato; thinly sliced zucchini; sliced yellow squash; sliced corn frozen or fresh new mexico green chili; roasted and chopped salt and pepper to taste

Fry bacon in a large cast iron frying pan, add onions when bacon is nearly done. When bacon & onions are done, pour off excess oil into container for later use. Take bacon and onions out, and place aside. Pour potatoes into frying pan and brown until tender, adding extra bacon grease, if required. When potatoes are nearly done, add zucchini and yellow squash. Once squash is translucent, add corn. Return the bacon & onions, and continue to cook until corn is warmed from the rest of the mixture.

CHEROKEE CORN PUFFS

8 3 1/2 1 1/2 1/4 1/8 1/4 3

oz c. c. tsp. tsp. tsp. tsp. tsp. Pcs

frozen corn(thawed) shortning / oil for frying flour baking powder salt baking powder pepper paprika eggs; beaten stiff pl

Place shortning/oil in kettle and begin to heat slowly. Temp 350. Sift together dry ingred. Mix in eggs, corn. Drop batter from tsp. into oil. Fry until light and golden on all sides. Drain on paper towels.

Page 18

CHEROKEE SUCCOTASH

2 1 3 4 1 1 2 2 3

lb *(small cup wild salt pepper tablespoon pieces quart

fresh or dry lima beans ones are best) fresh corn cut from cob onions or pearl onions to taste to taste melted bacon fat smoked ham hock water

Soak beans if sueing dry ones, for 3-4 hours. Bring the water to a boil then add the beans. Cook at a moderate boil for 10 minutes then add the corn, ham hocks, salt & pepper, and onions. Reduce heat and cook for 1 hour on a low heat. Got this one from a friend from grad school. He is a cultural anthropologist who also happens to be a Cherokee Amerindian. His passion is cooking and this is a recipe that he assures me is genuinely ethnic to his people in North Carolina. The changes from the items *'d are his not mine. The measurements have been converted for us as well. He claims we would like to measure out a hand- ful of this and a small pinch of that. Enjoy! Yield: 6-8 servings

CHEROKEE SUCCOTASH - (IYATSUYADISUYI SELU)
By: Tsalagi recipe Directions: Shell some corn and skin it with wood ashes lye. Cook corn and beans separately, then together. If desired, you may put pieces of pumpkin in. Be sure to put the pumpkin in early enough to get done before the pot is removed from the fire.

Page 19

CORN

1

x

no ingredients

Hominy or parching corn: Parched corn and hominy has been an important crop of the Souther USA and Mexico for thousands of years. Parching or partial popping process using a microwave was developed by Carol Deppe of Corvallis, OR: put 1/3 cup kernels in a single layer on the microwave turntable with a paper plate over them, and set on high for 2.5-3 minutes. Stop when they quit popping so they don't burn. Redwood City recommends Aztec Red (160 days to corn-on-the-cob maturity). Huge red kernels, used to make traditional corn soup. Excellent for parching. Huge plants 10 ft. tall with 12" long ears and 10-12 rows of kernels on each row. Roasting or Tortilla Corns Scientific name: Zea mays Extremely old Native American varieties, mostly from the Southwest. Can be eaten as corn-on-the-cob when young, or allowed to mature and stored to be ground into flour (meal). The Hopi varieties are unique in their drought resistance and grow only 18-24" tall when stressed, but will still produce good ears. The Hopi varieties will store up to ten years at room temperature. Varieties to choose from: Cheyenne Red - red & yellow kernels (mostly red). 6' tall plants. Ears can be long or short. Hopi Blue (Sakwa-pu) - Height 4-5 ft, ears 7-9" long, 12-14 rows of kernels. Used ceremonially and to grind into flour to make blue piki bread, blue tortillas, etc. Hopi White (Qert-ca qa-er) - height 4-5 ft, 8" ears, 10 rows of kernels. Hopi Yellow (Taku-ri) - Height 4 ft, 8" ears, 10 rows of kernels Taos Blue - Height 8 ft, 10" ears, 14-16 rows of kernels Hopi Purple (Koko-ma) - Height 3-5 ft, 8" ears, 10 rows of kernels. The purple cob and kernels are used for dyeing baskets and cloth. Popping Corn Scientific name: Zea mays Grow popping corn the same as you would tortilla corn, allowing the cobs to dry on the plants. One variety listed - Popcorn Golden Corn in the Cherokee language is selu (say-loo). Anyone know what it is in other languages?

Page 20

CORN AND BEANS - (SE-LU A-SU-YI TSU-YA)

recipe Directions: Skin flour corn with lye and cook. Cook colored beans. Put the Cooked corn and beans together and cook some more. Add pumpkin if you like, cooking until pumpkin is done. Add to this a mixture of cornmeal, beaten walnuts and hickory nuts, and Enough molasses to sweeten. Cook this in an iron pot until the meal is done. Eat fresh or just after it begins to sour. This will not keep too long after it begins to sour unless the weather is cold.

CORN AND SQUASH PAWNEE

4 1 2 1 4 1/2 1/2

tbsp. large medium red cups cup cup

corn oil or butter (I understand; that buffalo suet was orginally used) yellow onions, chopped yellow squash, cubed bell pepper, roasted, seeded and; chopped (or just buy jarr jared whole pimento) whole kernel yellow sweet corn parsley, chopped fine salt and pepper to taste water or stock, if needed

This is stated by the Pawnee people as being one of their oldest dishes, despite that it has modern touches; the yellow squash is the one ingredient that they insist on, occasionally chopped nuts are added if not being served with above recipe. I and my mother both really like it as a side dish to any traditional foods of the woodlands. Warm oil or butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Quickly saute' the onion for 3 to 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the squash and chopped pepper, stirring to blend well and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Stir often to keep mixture from sticking. Add the corn, the remaining seasoning and all or some of the liquid if the mixture is sticking--add more liquid as needed. Stir well, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring once or twice. Serve hot.

Page 21

CORN AND TOMATO WITH FRIED OKRA
By: WhiteWulfsMoM@aol.com 1 2 1 1 3 1/2 1/4 1/4 cups cup cup pound tablespoons tablespoon onion, sliced thin unsalted butter oil plus additional for frying the; okra about 4 ears of corn) tomato, seeded and chopped fresh corn kernels including pulp; scraped from the cobs heavy cream water okra, rinsed well and patted dry

cornmeal seasoned with salt and pepper for coating the okra In a heavy saucepan cook the onion in the butter and 1 tablespoon of the oil over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until it is golden, add the corn, the tomato, the cream, and the water, and cook the mixture, covered, over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes. Season the corn mixture with salt and pepper and keep the mixture warm, covered. Cut the okra into 1/4-inch-thick slices, in a bowl toss it with the seasoned cornmeal, and shake it in a coarse sieve to know off the excess cornmeal. In a deep skillet heat 1/2 inch of the additional oil over moderately high heat until it is hot but not smoking and in it fry the okra in batches for 1 to 2 minutes, or until it is golden, transferring it with a slotted spoon as it is fried to paper towels to drain. Serve the corn mixture topped with the fried okra. Yield: serves 6.

CORN AND WILD RICE PUDDING
By: Emeril Lagasse, 2000 2 1 1 2/3 4 1 3 1 1/2 1/2 1/8 1/2 teaspoons teaspoon teaspoon tablespoon egg cup cup ears cup eggs yolk heavy or whipping cream milk sweet corn, blanched and kernels re; moved from cobs, about 3 cooked wild rice scallions, finely chopped or 1/3 cu; p finely chopped scallion salt cayenne pepper grated fresh nutmeg butter

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large bowl, combine egg, egg yolk, heavy cream and milk and whisk well to combine. Add all remaining ingredients except butter and mix well. Grease a 7 by 11 or 8 by 12-inch casserole with the butter. Pour custard ingredients into prepared casserole and bake uncovered for 45 minutes, or until custard is set and golden brown on the top.

Page 22

Serve warm. Yield: 6 to 8 servings

CORN BALLS (WAHUWAPA WASNA)
By: Offered by Louis Garcia Dakota Recipe ground dried corn kernals dried chokecherry or juneberry; (saskatoons) tallo or lard (or substitute water) Grind dried flour corn kernals in a hand grinder. Grind dried Chokecherry or Juneberry (Saskatoons). Mix the corn and berries together at a ratio of 4 corn to 1 berry. Put tallo in a frying pan and lightly brown the mixture. Note: The old timers at this point would put more tallo/lard in the pan. Dig into the corn mixture with the fingers and an elongated (four fingers wide) mass is formed. Thats why they call it in Dakota Wahuwapa (corn cob). Note: In English they are called Corn Balls probably because some tribes formed them into egg or ball shapes. Dry them in the sun for later storage. Yield: three - four

CORN BALLS (WAHUWAPA WASNA)

text This is an old Dakota recipe using dried corn kernels and dried Chokecherry or Juneberry (Saskatoons). Wahuwapa means 'corn cob,' the shape of the finished product.

CORN BALLS WAHUWAPA WASNA DAKOTA
By: Louis Garcia ground dried corn kernals dried chokecherry or juneberry (sas; katoons) tallo or lard (or substitute water) Grind dried flour corn kernals in a hand grinder. Grind dried Chokecherry or Juneberry (Saskatoons). Mix the corn and berries together at a ratio of 4 corn to 1 berry. Put tallo in a frying pan and lightly brown the mixture. Note: The old timers at this point would put more tallo/lard in the pan. Dig into the corn mixture with the fingers and an elongated (four fingers wide) mass is formed. Thats why they call it in Dakota Wahuwapa (corn cob). Note: In English they are called Corn Balls probably because some tribes formed them into egg or ball shapes. Dry them in the sun for later storage. Yield: servings: three

Page 23

CORN CAKES

2 2 3

coffee or tbsp

cups full of corn add 3 well beaten eggs, of cream or new milk small teacup full of flour, a little salt.

dozen ears of Corn, or more than are needed for dinner, and while warm scrape them with the corn cutter. Now put the Corn into the ice box until morning. Drop in spoonfulls into hot fat and fry to a light brown, or else cook them on a griddle iron like any other Cake.

CORN CAKES WITH FRESH CORN AND CHIVES

1

x

no ingredients

1 fresh ear of corn or 1/2 C. frozen whole kernel corn 2 T. all-purpose flour 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1 tsp. sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 1 C. boiling water 1 C. yellow cornmeal 1/4 C. milk 1 slightly beaten egg 1 T. snipped fresh chives 3 T. cooking oil 1 tsp. snipped fresh chives or cilantro (optional) 1/3 C. dairy sour cream Cut corn kernels from cob and measure 1/2 cup. In a small bowl combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl stir boiling water into cornmeal to make a stiff mush. Stir in milk until smooth; then stir in fresh or frozen corn, egg, and the 1 tablespoon chives. Add flour mixture and stir just until combined. In a large skillet heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat. Drop batter by rounded tablespoons into hot oil. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown, turning once. Transfer to a serving platter; cover and keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter, adding the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Meanwhile, if desired, stir the 1 teaspoon chives into the sour cream. Serve sour cream with the corn cakes. Makes 6 servings. Nutrition facts per serving: 215 calories, 11 g total fat, 3 g saturated fat, 42 mg cholesterol, 295 mg sodium, 25 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 4 g protein, 6% vitamin A, 2% vitamin 10% calcium, 9% iron. C,

Page 24

CORN CAKES WITH FRESH CORN AND CHIVES (MODERN)

1 2 1-1/2 1 1/2 1 1 1/4 1 1 3 1 1/3

fresh tablespoons teaspoons teaspoon teaspoon cup cup cup slightly tablespoon tablespoons teaspoon cup

ear of corn or 1/2 cup frozen whole; kernel corn all-purpose flour baking powder sugar salt boiling water yellow cornmeal milk beaten egg snipped fresh chives cooking oil snipped fresh chives or cilantro (o; ptional) dairy sour cream

Cut corn kernels from cob and measure 1/2 cup. In a small bowl combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Set aside. In a medium bowl stir boiling water into cornmeal to make a stiff mush. Stir in milk until smooth; then stir in fresh or frozen corn, egg, and the 1 tablespoon chives. Add flour mixture and stir just until combined. In a large skillet heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat. Drop batter by rounded tablespoons into hot oil. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown, turning once. Transfer to a serving platter; cover and keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter, adding the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Meanwhile, if desired, stir the 1 teaspoon chives into the sour cream. Serve sour cream with the corn cakes. Yield: 6 servings.

Page 25

CORN CASSEROLE

1

x

no ingredients

3 cups Monterey Jack or similar grated cheese 6 slices whole wheat bread torn up 1 lb canned creamed corn 1/2 cup chopped celery 1/4 cup chopped onion 1 cup corn 3 eggs beaten with: 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 6 drops Tabasco sauce 1/2 tsp dry yellow mustard Fry the onion and celery together. Layer the bread (bottom) vegetables, and cheese in an oiled casserole dish. Pour the creamed corn over the top. Then pour the egg mixture over that. Let it stand 30 minutes, then bake in a 350° oven for 1 hour, placed in a pan of hot water. As a main dish, this supplies about 40% of a day's protein requirement. By protein complementarity, the available amount can be increased to 55% by adding 3/4 cup sunflower seeds, but some people don't like crunchies in it. Yield: 5

CORN CASSEROLE

3 6 1 1/2 1/4 1 3 1/2 1/2 6 1/2

cups slices lb cup cup cup eggs tsp tsp drops tsp

monterey jack or similar grated che; ese whole wheat bread torn up canned creamed corn chopped celery chopped onion corn beaten with: salt worcestershire sauce tabasco sauce dry yellow mustard

Fry the onion and celery together. Layer the bread (bottom) vegetables, and cheese in an oiled casserole dish. Pour the creamed corn over the top. Then pour the egg mixture over that. Let it stand 30 minutes, then bake in a 350° oven for 1 hour, placed in a pan of hot water. As a main dish, this supplies about 40% of a day's protein requirement. By protein complementarity, the available amount can be increased to 55% by adding 3/4 cup sunflower seeds, but some people don't like crunchies in it. Yield: serves 4-5

Page 26

CORN CHOWDER CHEROKEE
By: Phyllis Newton (Crowwoman) 5 4 2 1 lbs cans potatoes, cut in small chunks of corn onions, diced bellpepper, diced salt & pepper sugar Cook potatoes till done, then drain and add the corn. Fry onion and bell peppers till done, then add to other mixture. Then add salt and pepper and sugar to taste. This is a thick soup good on cold days.

Georgia , Cherokee Yield: servings: three

CORN DIP

1 1 18 1

can can (1 cup) oz.pkg. or

cr. of corn of niblets corn-drained cream cheese, approx. 2 tbl. pickled jalepeno juice chopped jalepeno to taste

Mix tog. & bake 1 hr. @ 350. I also add S&P, garlic powder to the mix. Serve with Frito Scoops or tortilla chips. We like it hot so I use alot of the chopped jalepeno. Enjoyu This is Very good & easy to prepare.

Page 27

CORN FRITTERS

1 1 1/2 2 3/4 1 1 1

lg can cup teaspoons teaspoon cup cup

whole kernal corn, drain; save liquid flour baking powder salt milk egg, beaten corn liquid cooking oil powdered sugar

Mix all dry ingredients, add milk, corn and corn liquid, beaten egg, and mix well. Drop by teaspoonful into Hot oil, cook until they are golden brown. Drain on paper towels, then roll in powdered sugar.

CORN ON THE COB

6 3 1 1/2 3 3

ears tbl tsp pcs pcs

fresh corn; in husks Butter; melted chili salt limes, juiced limes; wedges water; to boil

Stand corn on end in a pot and cover with water. Remove corn and bring water to a boil. Meanwhile, pull husks down (not off) and remove corn silk. To make a handle, cut off a longish strip of husk half an inch wide. Tie it around rest of husks, like a ponytail. Trim ends neatly. Boil 1 minute, with husks out of water. To microwave: Cook corn on high for 1 minute. Then pull husks down and follow directions above to make a handle. Finish by browning corn over a grill or gas burner (color may be splotchy). Drizzle butter on corn and sprinkle with chile salt and lime juice. Serve with lime wedges.

Page 28

CORN PANNER WANTONS

1kg. shelled corn ½ kg paneer ½ kg. Flour 1 tsp. ginger-green chilli paste a pinch of baking powder salt to taste 1 tsp. oil oil for deep frying. Preparation : Mix flour, baking powder, salt and oil well. Add enough water to bind to a hard dough. Steam cook the corn till done. Crumble paneer and add to the corn. Add salt and ginger-green chilli paste. Mix well to prepare the stuffing and keep aside. Divide the dough into small portions and roll out into small puris. Place a little of the prepared stuffing of the centre of the puri and gather the puri to roll into a wanton. Fry in hot oil till done. Serve with mint chutney

CORN PATTY
By: Skydancer recipe I remember helping my Grandmother 'lye' corn to make to make hominy. It was so good fresh. She also made a cornmeal patty that was fried in a small amount of grease and was a regular part of our meals.

CORN PONE

1

x

no ingredients

Ingredients 2 cups Cornmeal 1/4 tsp. Baking soda 1 tsp. Salt 1/2 cup Shortening 3/4 cup Buttermilk 3/4 cup Milk Butter Directions

Page 29 Combine cornmeal, baking soda, and salt; cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add buttermilk and milk, stirring just until dry ingredients are moistened. Form batter into eight 1/2" thick cakes. Place on a hot, greased griddle. Bake at 400º for 15 minutes. Turn and bake an additional 15 minutes. Serve hot with butter. Yield: 8

CORN PUDDING

text Take six large milky Ears of Corn. Split the Corn down the center of each Row; cut off the Top and then scrape the Cob well. Beat two Eggs and stir them into the Corn. Add one fourth Cup of Flour, one Teaspoon of Salt and one half Teaspoon of black Pepper. Stir in one Pint of fresh Milk and mix all together thoroughly. Put in a cold buttered Pan about four Inches deep. Cover the Top with two heaping Tablespoonfuls of Butter cut in small Pieces. Bake in moderately hot Oven about one Hour. Serve hot.

CORN PUDDING

1 2 cups green corn cut from cob 1 zucchini, diced 1 small green pepper, diced

corn pudding

2 tablespoons shelled sunflower seeds or shelled roasted piñon nuts, finely chopped Blend or mash all ingredients together until milky. Bring to boil and simmer until mixture reaches a pudding-like consistency. Serve hot with butter or chile sauce.

Page 30

CORN PUDDING MODERN
By: World Wide Recipes 3 2 1 1 2 2 1/2 cups (500 ml) tbs (15 ml) cup (250 ml) tbs (30 ml) cups (500 ml) cup (125 ml) eggs corn kernels sugar salt and freshly ground pepper to t; aste bread crumbs butter, melted milk heavy cream or half-and-half

Beat the eggs until light and fluffy. Stir in the corn, sugar, salt, pepper, bread crumbs, and melted butter. Add the milk and cream and pour into a buttered 2-quart (2 L) oven-proof casserole dish. Place in a larger pan half filled with hot water and bake in a preheated 350F (180C) oven until the custard is set, 50 to 60 minutes. Yield: 4 to 6.

CORN PUDDING V

1 1 1/2 1 1

(15.25 (15 cup cup (8.5

ounce) can whole kernel corn, drain; ed ounce) can cream style corn margarine, softened sour cream ounce) package dry cornbread mix

This has become a family favorite, and a favorite at church pot-lucks. The best thing is how simple it is!1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a 2 quart casserole dish. 2 In a medium bowl, mix together the whole kernel corn, cream style corn, margarine, sour cream, and corn bread mix. Pour into the prepared casserole dish. 3 Bake for 45 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Page 31

CORN SALAD

4 3 1 1 1 3 2

pc tsp. pc pc can tbsp. tsp.

ears fresh corn olive oil green or red bell pepper, seeded an; d diced small jícama, peeled and diced pinto beans (15 oz.), rinsed and dr; ained balsamic vinegar chili powder

Estimated cooking time: under 30 minutes 1Use a serrated knife to cut kernels from corn cobs. Heat 1 teaspoon of the oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat. Cook corn kernels, stirring often, until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. 2Transfer corn to a bowl. Stir diced pepper, jícama, beans, vinegar and the remaining 2 teaspoons oil. Season with chili powder and salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. 3Serve at room temperature or chilled.

CORN SALSA

16 4 1 1/4 1/4 2 1 1/4

oz oz cup cup tablespoon tablespoon teaspoon

corn, canned, drained green chilies, canned, drain jalapeno chile * green bell pepper, chopped green onions w/tops, sliced white wine vinegar vegetable oil salt

* Jalapeno chile should be seeded and finely chopped. Mix all ingredients. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour. Makes about 2 1/3 cups salsa. Yield: 4 servings

Page 32

CORN SOUP
By: Sovereign Nation of the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana 12 1 1 2 can block 16 ears of corn salt meat diced tomatoes margarine onions

who learned this from Vickie Mora, Chitimacha Melt Margarine in pot and then sauté the onions for about 10 minutes. Add the scraped corn in the pot and cook on a low fire for about 15 minutes. Next add water to the corn and let it come to a boil, then add the diced tomatoes to the soup. Also, after you have boiled the salt meat, you may also add it to the soup. Add salt and pepper to your desire. You can leave out the diced tomatoes, if you so desire.

Note: It’s Good! Yield: servings: two s

CORN SOUP

1/2 2 3 2 2 4 1/2

lb big cups cups cups cups tsp

salt pork onions, sliced diced boiled potatoes boiling water cooked corn, fresh or canned hot milk salt, pepper to taste chopped parsley garnish

This is another one where there's a million recipes, plus the fact you can throw in whatever you have on hand. Cut pork into 1/2-inch dice, try out. Add onion, cook slowly 5-10 minutes, stirring, until transparent but not bfowned. Add potatoes, corn, boiling water, hnot milk. Season to taste, serve with garnish. Other things to throw into this soup: cooked carrots, rutabagas, turnips, leftover beans, canned tomatoes. Leftover ham, chopped. Use a broth made from any bones instead of water. To make a thicker chowder, make a roux of 2 Tbs butter and 2 of flour, frizzled, stir this into 1 cup of the milk, cook and stir until thickened. Stir this white sauce into the rest of the liquid as you add it to the vegetables. Like most soups and stews, corn soup is mostly an idea rather than a recipe. What you put in it depends on what you have. Yield: serves 6-8

Page 33

CORN SOUP ABENAKI, ODANAK
By: Bernadette 1 4 2 1 1 1 gallon oz. cups can water salt pork or bacon hominy corn kidney beans onion, chopped potato, peeled and diced

Put it all together in a pot and cook it until it's soup!!

Note: Good served with baked scone, or bannock Yield: servings: two s

CORN STICKS

1 1/2 1/3 1/2 1 1

cup cup cup Tsp cup Pc

cornmeal molasses flour Salt milk egg

Mix cornmeal, flour and salt. Add, milk, egg and lard; beat until smooth. 'Fill well-greased cornstick' pans almost to the top. Bake in a preheated 425 degree F. oven for 12 to 15 minutes. Yield: - 12. squash-p

CORN STICKS WITH JUNIPER & SAGE SEASONING

Ingredients 1 1/4 cups yellow cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. juniper ashes, sifted 1 tsp. sage ashes, sifted 1 Tbsp. honey or sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 1 egg, beaten 3 Tbsp. corn oil 1 cup milk

Page 34 Directions Preheat oven to 425º. Grease cast-iron corn-stick pans, muffin tins, or a 9-inch cast-iron skillet with oil or lard, butter, or bacon drippings. Place pans in the oven to heat. Place all of the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Beat the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients with a few rapid strokes, blending thoroughly. Remove the heated pans from the oven and spoon the batter into the sizzling pans. Place in the oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Serve hot. Yield: 24 corn sticks

CORN STUFFED PEPPERS--MODERN

4 2 1/4 2/3 1/2 1 1/2 5 1 1/2

med. c. c. tsp. c. oz. c.

sweet peppers cold water yellow cornmeal salt whole kernal corn monteray jack cheese with jalapeno; peppers, shredded spicy chili tomato sauce

Use whatever color sweet pepper you like. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a Dutch oven heat 1/2' water, slice off tops of peppers. Remove stems; finely chop enough of tops to equal 1/2 cup and set aside. Remove white ribs from inside of peppers. Add peppers to water in Dutch oven; return to boiling. Cover; cook for 3 minutes. Carefully remove the peppers with tongs; invert and drain peppers on paper towels. In medium saucepan combine 2 1/2 cups. cold water, cornmeal, and salt. Bring to boiling over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cook and stir 10 minutes. Remover from heat. Stir in corn, 1 cup of cheese (reserving the rest for later), and reserved chopped green pepper. Spread Spicy Chili Tomato Sauce in bottom of 2 quart oblong or square baking dish. Spoon cornmeal mixture into peppers; set them, filled side up, in prepared dish. Bake, loosely covered with foil, 35 minutes. Remover foil; sprinkle tops with reserved cheese. Serve each pepper with some of the sauce. Yield: 4 main dish ser

Page 35

CORN STUUFED TOMALES

1

x

no ingredients

1 1/2 cups roasted fresh corn kernels, scraped from cobs 1/2 cup milk 1 cup masa harina (Lime-water prepared cornmeal) 1 cup softened butter 1 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 2 -3 mild canned green chiles, seeded and chopped fine 1/2 cup grated Monterey jack cheese Masa harina: This is cornmeal that has been prepared with lime or wood-ash lye water. It's different from ordinary cornmeal, cooks up softer, absorbs lots of fat during its cooking, holds together better in tortillas, etc. It's available from Mexican food stores. Masa differes from cornmeal in another important way. As with hominy, the treatment by lye or lime water balances the corn's amino acids, so there is actually more available or usable form protein. Corn got a bad rap nutritionally when the invaders, not recognizing the nutritional importance of this treatment (which was universal among corn-growing tribes) skipped that step and lived off of plain ground cornmeal -- what's available to you, mostly, in stores. Many suffered from the eventually fatal nutritional deficiency disease pellagra (if became almost synonymous with poor white trash in the rural south). Properly treated and cooked, corn, which was a native dietary staple almost everywhere it grows, for 4,000 years, is as nutritious as wheat, and may be more so if what is grown in minearl-depleted soil with chemical fertilizers. Fresh corn nowadays has been bred up to be much higher in sugar -- 2 - 4 times higher -- than the colorful, traditional 4-colors corn, which is still a taste treat (and nutritional bonanza) if you can get it. To roast the fresh corn: just put them (in their husks) in a 400 degree oven for 5 minutes. Husks and silk will peel off easily. Then scrape off kernels, standing cob in a big frypan to catch them. Depending on the ears, it will take 2-4 ears to make 1 1/2 cups of kernels. Cornhusk tamale wrappers: The ones you just prepared are probably dried out and frizzeled. If you've saved and dried husks, steep them in boiling water to cover (poured over them, not cooked) while roasting and scraping the corn. Otherwise, you'll have to use foil wrappers. Simmer milk and corn for about 10 minutes. Strain the corn, reserve the milk, and puree 1/2 cup of the kernels with this milk, reserving the rest for putting in the tamale dough. Add the puree to the masa, mix vigorously with spoon and whisk. In a separate large bowl, whip the soft butter, baking powder, and salt together until very fluffy. Start adding the masa mixture about 1/4 cup (guesstimated) at a time whisking and beating vigorously after each dough addition. Spend 15 minuts at least beating the masa mix into the butter. Fold in the green chile, the remaining cup of corn kernels, and grated cheese.

Page 36 Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces, about 4 Tbsp each. Pat each piece into a rectangle on a trimmed cornhusk to form a square or rectangle, leaving a husk border at the edges of the tamale at least 1 inch. Now fold up the rectangle along the length of the cornhusks and pinch it into a roll, loosely. Roll the husk up completely around the dough roll. Tie the ends with strips of cornhusk (traditional), or string (easier). The wrapping shouldn't be totally tight, so steam can get in. Place the wrapped tamales seam-side down on the rack of any kind of steamer (wok with a rack and tight cover will do, I use big enameled cast-iron frypan with tight lid). Tamales shouldn't touch the boiling water. Steam for 30 minutes. Let cool slightly and serve (diners unwrap their own) with any kind of hot tomato or other type of sauce. Those celebrating New Corn eat it without sauce, but fat or butter is sometimes available. Yield: 8

CORN VEGETABLE PUDDING

2 1 1 2

cups small tablespoons

green corn cut from cob zucchini, diced green pepper, diced shelled sunflower seeds or shelled; roasted piñon nuts, finel chopped

Blend or mash all ingredients together until milky. Bring to boil and simmer until mixture reaches a pudding-like consistency. Serve hot with butter or chile sauce.

CORN WITH SAVORY-LIME BUTTER

4 1/4 1-1/2 1/2

ears cup tsp. tsp.

of fresh corn butter, softened snipped fresh thyme or 1/2 tsp. dri; ed thyme, crushed finely shredded lime peel

Remove the husks from corn; scrub with a stiff brush to remove silks. Rinse. Cook, uncovered, in enough lightly salted boiling water to cover for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, in a small bowl thoroughly combine the butter, thyme, and lime peel. Serve herb butter with hot corn. Store any remaining butter, covered, in the refrigerator. Yield: 4 servings.

Page 37

CORN WORMS
By: Mignonne text The one thing that I think was the neatest was about when they would shuck the fresh corn. Each of the kids would have their own little cup or bucket or something to set beside them while they shucked. Whenever they found a corn worm it would go into the bucket. This was a much coveted thing, let me tell ya. When they would all get done, then they would get to take their container of corn worms, and go roast them to eat. Now I can hear some of you already....stop that.....come on, have an open mind. Mutt (that's Martha in Tslagai) says they taste like corn, and why wouldn't they? After all they've been feasting on nothing but corn right? I thought this was a most wonderful story, and I had to then tell her about the tribe out west who collected the horno worms. The ladies would roast them and string the little tasties on a necklace which they wore out in the fields while they toiled. Whenever they got hungry all they had to do was pluck one off and eat it. They say the toasted horno worms taste similar to pop corn. Mmmm Mmmm And for those still doubting all this goodness, I can assure you that such things are not only tasty treats, but one of the most nutritous things you could ever want to eat; being extremely high in protien.

Page 38

CORN, CORN MEAL, HOMINY

Myths and Legends of the Sioux: Forgotten Ear of Corn--One of the corniest Indian legends I've ever seen, transcribed as part of the e-text project of Univrsity of Virginia library. This is a whole collection of alleged "Sioux" alleged myths most of which obviously aren't Sioux (like this one isn't). They were written up by a 19th-century Army Indian Service wife, whose grandma was Mdewakanton. Missus McG's hubby is the McGlaughlin whom Hunkpapa of Standing Rock and Mdewakanton of Minnesota and Nebraska know about. His census rolls, which "define" tribal descendants' membership for the US government have caused enormous trouble. The McGlaughlin rolls omitted legitimate Indian people McGlaughlin didn't like and included 100% whites who bribed him or were drinking buddies seeking to get Indian land allottments. Was she ignorant of that? No! She was his official interpreter, on the U.S. Army payroll. She drafted all that stuff, the government stufrf, I mean. Not much nutritional value in this here corn, and there's dozens like it there. A (white) South Dakota newspaper just loved 'em in 1916. USDA CORN NUTRIENTS--all kinds here, meal, masa harina, but no indications about dried corn traditionally treated with wood-ash lyewater or lime water to increase availability of proteins and vitamins. Nutritional Data for SUCCOTASH; (CORN AND LIMAS), CND, WITH WHOLE KERNEL CORN, SOL&LIQ--This is succotrasch from canned corn and limas; has less B and C vitamins than if you cook fresh and more sodium because of salt used in canning. Nutritional Data for HOMINY, CANNED, YELLOW--Canned hominy has little food value. In reality, the traditional preparation, with wood-ash water (up north) or lime-water (southwest and meso-America) greatly icnreased the protein available from sun-dried corn, and made its vitamin B-3 (niaacin, somewhat scarce in foods) more biologically available. This is probably true of the Mexican-style hominy in the Posole recipe, whose author says it's readily available in stores in the southwest.

Page 39

CORN, SQUASH AND CHILE TRADITIONAL SIDE DISH
By: Coleen Montoya - Albuquerque 6 4 3 3 2 1 ears fresh medium tablespoons tablespoons clove white corn green chiles green zucchini squash olive oil butter garlic, crushed salt Cut the corn off the ears. Slice chiles and chop. Slice and cube the zucchini. In a hot skillet heat olive oil. As soon as you see a small stream of smoke from the skillet, add corn, chiles, and zucchini. Saute the vegetables until tender, but still al dente. Add the butter and garlic and toss to combine. Season with salt, to taste. Yield: yield: 6 servin

CORN, SQUASH AND CHILE TRADITIONAL SIDE DISH
By: Coleen Montoya 6 4 3 3 2 1 ears fresh medium tablespoons tablespoons clove white corn green chiles green zucchini squash olive oil butter garlic, crushed salt Cut the corn off the ears. Slice chiles and chop. Slice and cube the zucchini. In a hot skillet heat olive oil. As soon as you see a small stream of smoke from the skillet, add corn, chiles, and zucchini. Saute the vegetables until tender, but still al dente. Add the butter and garlic and toss to combine. Season with salt, to taste. Note: A viewer, who may not be a professional cook, provided this recipe. The FN chefs have not tested this recipe and therefore, we cannot make representation as to the results Episode#: BF1C19 Copyright © 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All Rights Reserved Yield: 6 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 20 mi

Page 40

DRIED CORN

1

x

no ingredients

12 Ears White corn in milky stage Scrape corn with sharp knife three times. First scrape corn just to break off kernals. Second scrape remainder of corn halfway. Third scrape off rest of kernels off cob. Then use potato masher and mash all kernels until milk comes out, Take loaf pan which is about 1 1/2" deep, grease and put in all corn that has been mashed and bake in oven until all kernels are golden brown. Use low heat and bake approximately 45 minutes. When kernels are brown, let cool for about 15 minutes; then cut up and store. SOURCE:*Miriam Lee, Allegany Seneca, Iroquois Cookbook SHARED BY: Jim Bodle 10/92

DRIED CORN ('O'GOENH'SAAH') (AI)

1

x

no ingredients

12 Ears White corn in milky -stage Scrape corn with sharp knife three times. First scrape corn just to break off kernals. Second scrape remainder of corn halfway. Third scrape off rest of kernels off cob. Then use potato masher and mash all kernels until milk comes out, Take loaf pan which is about 1 1/2" deep, grease and put in all corn that has been mashed and bake in oven until all kernels are golden brown. Use low heat and bake approximately 45 minutes. When kernels are brown, let cool for about 15 minutes; then cut up and store. SOURCE:*Miriam Lee, Allegany Seneca, Iroquois Cookbook SHARED BY: Jim Bodle 10/92 Yield: 1 servings

Page 41

DRIED CORN SOUP

1 1or 2

small cups

chuck roast dried corn salt as you like it

Fill large pan with water. In it put washed, cup up roast. Add corn. Cook on low fire for two hours. This is commonly served with fry bread

DRIED CORN SOUP #2

1

x

no ingredients

Recipe by Elaya K Tsosie o 3 cups dried corn o 12 cups water o 1 1/2 lb. cubed pork (or beef) o 1 diced onion o 1 clove minced garlic o 6 crushed red chili pods o 1/2 tsp. oregano o 3 tsp. salt o 1/2 tsp. black pepper Wash dried corn thoroughly, soak overnight, drain when ready to use. Boil dried corn until tender - about 3 1/2 hr. in 6 cups water. Brown meat, add onion and garlic, saut‚ together until tender, drain off excess fat. Add pork, chili pods, oregano, salt, pepper and 6 cups water to cooked corn. Simmer for 1 hour or until the meat and corn are tender. Makes 2 quarts Note: Dried corn may be cooked in a pressure cooker for 45 minutes at about 15 lb. pressure. Yield: 1 recipe

Page 42

DRIED CORN STEW

1

x

no ingredients

Recipe by Elaya K Tsosie o 3 cups water o 1 cup dried corn (can substitute 1 cup dry garbanzo beans) o 1 pound beef stew meat o 1 cup chopped onion o 1 teaspoon salt o 1/8 teaspoon pepper In saucepan, combine water and corn (or garbanzo beans); bring to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Cover; let stand several hours. Return to boiling; simmer, covered, 1/2 more than an hour if using corn or 1 hour if using garbanzo beans for this recipe. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer, covered, until tender, about 1 1/2 hours. Season to taste. Makes 4 servings. Yield: 1 recipe

DRY CORN

1

x

no ingredients

Recipe by Elaya K Tsosie Take 12 ears fresh corn in husks Carefully peel back husks, leaving them attached at base of corn. clean corn, removing silks. Fold husks back into position. Place on wire rack in large shallow baking pan. (Allow space between ears so air can circulate.) Bake in 325 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours. Cool. Strip off husks. Hang corn, so ears do not touch, in a dry place till kernels are dry, at least 7 days. Makes about 6 cups shelled corn. Yield: 1 recipe

Page 43

FEAST DAY POSOLE
By: The Best of New Mexico Kitchens 10 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 lb ga ga lg c c tb tb tb ts beef, cooked tender can hominy water bunch carrots, sliced thin celery, diced with tops green onions, diced with tops garlic powder onion salt dried wild celery or celery salt

Rinse hominy in cold water, then put into 3-gallon kettle with 1 gallon water. Long cooking at a low simmer ensures tender corn. When it is soft but not falling apart, add meat, which as been cooked tender. Add remaining ingredients and simmer gently for 15 minutes. Correct seasoning. Wild celery can be picked in the spring and dried. It adds a special and delectable flavor. This recipe may be halved. It freezes well. The Joseph Lonewolf family of Santa Clara Pueblo makes posole this way for feast days. Yield: 1 servings

Page 44

FRESH CORN AREPAS
By: http://www.recipegoldmine.com/worldsoutham 4 1 1/2 3/4 1 1/4 medium cup cup teaspoon cup ears of corn or frozen corn kernels (defrosted) plus 1 tab; lespoon milk cornmeal(for arepas*) light brown sugar butter, softened

* Brands of areparina, such as Goya,Iberia and Pan, are sold in South American markets in the United States.Extra-fine yellow corn meal can be substituted. If using fresh ears of corn, cut kernels from the cobs with a knife or a corn kernel remover. Measure 1 1/2 cups corn kernels, reserving the extra for another use, and coarsely grind in a meat grinder or food processor. Pour the ground corn and its liquid into a large mixing bowl.(If using defrosted corn kernels, coarsely grind, then place in a large bowl and add the 1 tablespoon of milk. Stir cornmeal and brown sugar into the ground kernels and their liquid. Mix in the butter thoroughly and stir the batter until it is smooth. Spoon 1/3 cup batter into the lightly buttered cups of a standard muffin pan. Bake in a preheated 425 degree oven until the arepas are lightly browned and have set, about 30-40 minutes. Serve warm with butter, cheese or guacamole.

FRESH CORN SALAD

ears fresh sweetcorn pinch of salt 1/2 1 1 3 1 1/2 cup cup cup tablespoons tablespoon cup carrots, cut in thin rounds broccoli, cur in small florets dulse, soaked for 5 minutes and fin; ely sliced dressing: grated onion shoy pickle juice or brown rice vinegar; and water (2 parts vinegar to 1 part water) . Place the sweet corn in boiling water, add a pinch of salt and cook for 20 minutes or until soft. Retain the boiling water. 2. Remove the corn kernels from the cobs. 3. Cook the corrots for 304 minutes in the same boiling water. Take out and spread out on a plate to cool. Cook and cool the broccoli the same way. 4. Mix the corn, corrots, broccoli and dulse in a serving bowl. 5. Mix the dressing ingredients together and pour over the

Page 45 solad before serving.

FRIED CORN

1

x

no ingredients

In a heavy duty sauce pan combine: 6 ears of white corn, shucked, cut off the cob and milked (scrape the back of your knife along the cob to release any juices into sauce pan) 3 fresh jalapeno peppers, seeded, deveined, and minced 1/2 red onion, diced 1 red pepper, diced 1 orange pepper, diced 2 stalks of celery, diced 2 tablespoons real butter 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup water Sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat for five to eight minutes while stirring occasionally, until desired tenderness. This is an extremely easy Yield: 8 servings

FRIED CORN

text Well, at my house we have rows and rows of fresh new corn...so I thought I would share an old native recipe for fried corn. One of my family's favorites. Fresh corn , cut from cob and drained (Can use frozen ) tbsp. of butter salt coarse ground pepper Heat heavy skillet , cast iron is best but can use a 'wok' melt butter simmer until bubbly add corn all at once , season and stir until butter starts to brown on the pieces, serve hot ! Also good with hominy !

Page 46

FRYPAN CORN BREAN CASSEROLE

1

x

no ingredients

1/2 cup dry beans (kidney or black) 3/4 cup bean stock 1 large onion chopped 2-6 cloves garlic, minced 1 egg beaten 2 tbs corn oil 1 cup cornmeal 2 tsp baking powder 1 - 4 Tbsp chili powder 3/4 cup grated cheese 1 tomato cut up very fine a few green onions cut up 1/4 cup black olives sliced Cook beans covered, with a bay leaf, in 2 1/2 cups water so about 3/4 cup liquid will remain when they are very tender. If you bring them to a boil, then turn off the heat and let them cool off an hour, you can then boil them without soaking all night previousy. Add salt the last 15 minutes only. Fry onion and garlic in a little corn oil, in a big skillet that can go in the oven. Leave half of it in the bottom of the skillet. Mix the cornmeal, other dry ingredients, egg, beans and bean stock with the other half of fried onions/garlic. Mix thoroughly and pour into the skillet on top of the fried onion/garlic left in it. Bake at 350° for about 12 minutes, then sprinkle on cheese, olives, tomato and onion, bake 5 minutes longer. This is a fork-eating, not a pick-up corn bread. The corn and beans combine protein complementarity to make one serving about 20% of a day's protein requirement. However, you better make 2 skillets of this for your family if this is the main dish. Yield: 6

Page 47

FRYPAN CORN/BEAN FORK BREAD

1/2 3/4 1 2-6 2 1 2 1 3/4 1 1/4

cup cup large cloves tbs cup tsp cup tomato cup

dry beans (kidney or black) bean stock onion chopped garlic, minced 1 egg beaten corn oil cornmeal baking powder 4 tbsp chili powder grated cheese cut up very fine a few green onions cut up black olives sliced

Cook beans covered, with a bay leaf, in 2 1/2 cups water so about 3/4 cup liquid will remain when they are very tender. If you bring them to a boil, then turn off the heat and let them cool off an hour, you can then boil them without soaking all night previousy. Add salt the last 15 minutes only. Fry onion and garlic in a little corn oil, in a big skillet that can go in the oven. Leave half of it in the bottom of the skillet. Mix the cornmeal, other dry ingredients, egg, beans and bean stock with the other half of fried onions/garlic. Mix thoroughly and pour into the skillet on top of the fried onion/garlic left in it. Bake at 350° for about 12 minutes, then sprinkle on cheese, olives, tomato and onion, bake 5 minutes longer. This is a fork-eating, not a pick-up corn bread. The corn and beans combine protein complementarity to make one serving about 20% of a day's protein requirement. However, you better make 2 skillets of this for your family if this is the main dish. Yield: serves 4-6

GANUGE
By: Tsalagi recipe Directions: Crack thin shelled hickory nuts. Beat hull and all in the corn beater until it can be rolled into a ball. Make whatever size balls are convenient to use. Pour boiling water over this to make a thick gruel. Pour the gruel over corn and beans that have been cooked separately, then mixed together.

Page 48

GRILLED CORN
By: Jon Ghahate text I soak my corn...everything in the water...and after warming up the grill...I place them on the top rack...reduce the heat as low as possible and let them cook for 30 to 40 minutes. The aroma is sweet as well as they taste sweet(so say my family). This is a traditional way...that I hope my children will remember...like I remember with my grandmother. Enjoy good...healthy eating...

GRILLED CORN RELISH
By: Mignonne <minsrecipes@excite.com> 3 1 2 2 1 1 1/2 1/4 1/4 tablespoons tablespoon cloves ears teaspoon small cup cup teaspoon lime juice cooking oil garlic, minced corn, husked and cleaned chili powder avocado, seeded, peeled, and cut up chopped red sweet pepper snipped fresh cilantro salt

Can be used as a salsa or part of your salad. Goes well with grilled chicken or pork or for a lighter touch, roll it up in a tortilla with black beans and shredded cheese, then warm it on the grill or griddle. In a medium bowl combine lime juice, oil, and garlic. Brush corn lightly with juice mixture. Sprinkle corn with chili powder. Preheat gas grill. Reduce heat to medium. Place corn on the grill rack directly over heat. Cover and grill for 25 to 30 minutes or until corn is tender, turning occasionally. Meanwhile, add avocado, sweet pepper, cilantro, and salt to remaining lime juice mixture; toss well. Cut corn kernals from cobs and add to avocado mixture; toss well. Serve with grilled meat, poultry, or seafood. Yield: makes 2 cups (4

Page 49

GRILLED CORN WITH ANCHO-AVOCADO BUTTER
By: Pueblo 1/2 2 3 1/2 1/8 6 of tablespoons tablespoons of teaspoon ears 1 small ancho chili pepper lime juice butter or margarine, softened small avocado; seeded, peeled,chopped salt white and /or yellow sweet corn

The velvety avocado butter melts in your mouth -- corn-on-the-cob never had it so good. In a small saucepan combine ancho pepper, lime juice, and 2 tablespoons water; cook on low heat, covered, for 10 minutes or until pepper turns soft. Drain and cool. Remove stem and seeds of pepper. Finely chop pepper and combine with softened butter or margarine. Slightly mash the avocado with the salt. Stir into butter. Cover and chill or spoon into small mold or cup lined with plastic wrap; chill. Remove husks and silk from ears of corn. If desired, leave a few leaves of the husks intact for presentation. In a large saucepan cook corn, covered, in a small amount of boiling water for 5 to 7 minutes. Drain. Grill on an uncovered grill directly over medium coals for 10 minutes, turning serveral times. Remove butter from mold. Remove plastic wrap. Serve corn with ancho-avocado butter. Yield: 6 servings.

GRILLED CORN WITH CILANTRO GARLIC BUTTER

4 6 3 2-3

ears T T cloves

of corn, in the husks butter, melted cilantro, chopped minced garlic salt and pepper to taste

Strip back the corn husk, and bring together beneath the ear of corn to make sort of a handle and tie with a string. Clean all the strings off. Mix butter, cilantro and garlic. Brush on the corn and arrange on the BBQ, keeping the husks away from the fire. Medium to high heat is best. Grill the corn till browned on all sides, turning and basting while cooking. Season with salt and pepper. Enjoy!! You won't believe how good it is. I've also used flat leaf parsley and it is good as well, but the cilantro is my favorite. Yield: serves 4

Page 50

GRILL-ROASTED CORN-ON-THE-COB WITH CHILI POWDER AND LIME

6 3 2

ears tablespoons teaspoons

corn (husks on) unsalted butter mild chili powder juice from 2 fresh limes

Carefully pull the husks back from the cobs, making sure not to remove them. Pull all silk off the corn. Spread the butter in a thin layer over the corn. Lightly sprinkle the chili powder over each ear. Rub the inner husks of each ear with the lime jice. Pull the husks back over the ears and tie the tops with cotton string or a thin strip of an outer piece of the husk. Roast the ears over medium high heat on a charcoal or gas grill, turning often so they cook easily. The corn will take approximately 15-20 minutes to roast. Serve with the husks on immediately.

GRITTED CORN BREAD

6-8 3

ears boxes

corn on cob, fresh corn bread mix

Remove the husks (save them! see below) and silks. Using the coarsest holes on a regular kitchen grater, grate the corn off the cob into a bowl (save the corn AND the juice). Mix up the cornbread following the directions on the box. Stir in the grated corn and it's "milk". Pour into a greased 13x9" baking dish and bake per box directions. Because this cornbread has a higher moisture content than normal, you may have to bake it longer than the directions say. Serve hot with fresh butter. You can serve it with honey, jelly, etc., but it really doesn't need it. This is the sweetest cornbread you'll ever eat. "Gritting" was literally scraping the corn cob over something that would do the same thing as your grater. Gritted breads were made by adding ground meal to the gritted corn until a "dough" was achieved. Save those green husks! You can dry them by clothes-pinning them to a line or towel bar. Corn husks or "corn fodder" are used in a number of dishes. The silks were sometimes used as smoking material, but I don't have any info on it. Yield: 6 servings

Page 51

HIDATSA FOUR-VEGETABLES MIXED
By: Valerie Brestel-Ohle 4 4 6 1 handfuls handfuls handfuls medium-sized of beans of parched sunflower seeds of parched corn winter squash several cups water Put the beans in a saucepan and fill the pan with water to a few inches ABOVE the beans. Cover and soak the beans overnight. Boil the beans until they are tender. Add more water as needed. Cut the winter squash into chunks. Boil or steam the chunks in a separate saucepan until soft. Mash the squash. Add the mashed squash to the beans and stir them together. Grind up the sunflower seeds and corn. Add them to the squash and beans. Add water to give the mix the consistency of a stew. Boil these ingredients for about a half hour to let the flavors blend. Add more water if necessary. From 'Native American Gardening,' (ISBN 1-55591-148-X, Joseph Bruchac and Michael J. Caduto) This recipe is a good example of a 'contemporized traditional' recipe. Yield: yield: 4 servin

HOE CAKES

2 2 2 2 1

cups cups tsp tbl tbl

water corn meal Salt Butter fresh dill; chooped (opitional)

Preheat oven to 375º. Bring water to boil in a sauce pan. Add cornmeal, salt, butter, and dill (if used). Pour into buttered 8x8 inch cake pan and bake for approximately 25 minutes. Cut into squares and serve. Yield: 16 servings

Page 52

HOPI CORN STEW

1

x

no ingredients

Recipe by Elaya K Tsosie This recipe is a good way to use up a bit of leftover roast beef or ground beef. Good served with hard Pueblo style bread. o 1 cup roast beef or ground beef, chopped o 1 tbs. shortening o Salt and pepper to taste o 2 cups fresh corn, cut from cobs o 1 cup Zucchini squash, cubed o 2 cups plus 2 tbs. water o 2 tbs. cornmeal Heat shortening in a large heavy skillet. Brown meat and add salt and pepper to taste. Add squash, corn and 2 cups water. Simmer about 30 minutes, or until vegetables are almost tender. In a cup, stir together cornmeal and 2 tbs. water to make a paste. Stir thickener into stew. Stir about 5 minutes to prevent sticking. Yield: 4 servings

Page 53

HUITLACOCHE SOUP

a. 1-1/2 3 3 2 4-6 1 1 1 2 1 cups tablespoons tablespoons tablespoons drops cup small clove tablespoons cup milk flour butter or margarine worcestershire sauce tabasco sauce b. of huitlacoche (or slightly more) yellow onion garlic bland oil or margarine or ghee (cla; rified butter) chicken broth

Whirl together all ingredients in group 'A' in a blender or food processor until mixed. Cook slowly, stirring until white sauce thickens. Chop finely all solid ingredients in group 'B' and sauté until tender--add the Huitlacoche last as it cooks a little quicker. Whirl in blender or food processor with the chicken broth, add to the cream sauce, heat and enjoy. Variations: 1. Substitute PickaPeppa sauce for the Worcestershire and Tabasco sauces. 2. Add 2 Tablespoons of chopped green chilies to group 'B'. Recipe from Ellen and Tom Duffy In damp weather corn frequently becomes infected with corn smut--Ustilago maydis--which when fresh occurs as pearly gray globules and ovoids displacing the rows of kernels. They should not be used when old and dried and powdery. At this time the black interior is widely exposed and the gleaming surface gone. It may cause uterine contractions in pregnant women when old and decayed. It is considered a great delicacy in parts of Mexico and here is a soup we have developed. It is delicious with a slight gray color. (There are black spores in the fresh globules also.)

Page 54

HUMITAS

1 8 pc of fresh corn w/husks 1/2 tsp Salt 1/2 tsp black pepper 3 tbs Butter 1 tsp Sugar 1 pc Onion, chopped

ingredients:

1/4 cup Milk (evaporated is best) 1 pc Tomato peeled, chopped 2 pc Eggs, beaten Instructions: Cut corn off of the cobs. Save cobs & husks Take the largest husks, put into a pan of boiling water to soften. Heat the butter in a pan, add the onion, & cook til soft. Add the tomato, salt & pepper, & sugar and cook for 5-6 minutes. Add the corn, milk, & eggs and cook for 10 minutes. Stir constantly while this step is in progress. Remove the husks from the water and dry. Place 3 Tblspns of the corn mixture on the center of each husk. Fold the sides of the husks over to form a small package. (use 2 leaves if you need to do so) tie with string. Place cobs in the bottom of the pot of boiling water and place the humitas on top of the cobs. Cover pot for 30 minutes. Serve hot. Yield: 4 servings

Page 55

HUMITAS

8 1/2 1/2 3 1 1 1/4 1 2 teaspoon cup teaspoon teaspoon tablespoon

ears of fresh corn w/ shucks on salt fresh ground black pepper butter onion chopped sugar milk (evaporated is best) tomato peeled, seeded, & chopped eggs beaten

Cut corn off of the cobs. Save cobs & husks! Take the largest husks, put into a pan of boiling water to soften. Heat the butter in a pan, add the onion, & cook til soft. Add the tomato, salt & pepper, & sugar and cook for 5-6 minutes. Add the corn, milk, & eggs and cook for 10 minutes. Stir constantly while this step is in progress. Remove the husks from the water and dry. Place 3 Tblspns of the corn mixture on the center of each husk. Fold the sides of the husks over to form a small package. (use 2 leaves if you need to do so) tie with string. Place cobs in the bottom of the pot of boiling water and place the humitas on top of the cobs. Cover pot for 30 minutes. Serve hot! This recipe comes from the book, THE GREEN BERET GOURMET. ***NOTE*** I like to add a bit of garlic to mine. I also use the Sriracha ot Tuong hot sauce too! Yield: 4 servings

INAGAMI- PAKWEJIGAN (SOFT BREAD)

1 3/4 cups water 2/3 cup white corn flour 3/4 teaspoon salt margarine or shortening sunflower seeds Bring the water to a boil. Mix together the flour & salt. Pour the boiling water onto the dry ingredients while stirring. Continue to stir until the mixture becomes thick & uniform. Serve in a bowl topped with margarine & the sunflower seeds. Yield: 4 servings

Page 56

INDIAN CORN CASSEROLE

1 1/4 1

cup cup cup

dried sweet cor dried onions tomato powder

3 T. dried green peppers 1C. dry bread crumbs 2 T. dried cheese 1 T. shortening or margarine Reconstitute vegetables. Add seasonings. Place in casserole dish. Dot with margarine or shortening. Sprinkle with cheese and crumbs. Bake at 375 degrees F for 30-35 minutes.

INDIAN CORN CASSEROLE
By: Laura Jinkins, Texas 3 1/4 2 6 2 10 well-beaten cup tbsp. oz. (17 slices eggs all-purpose flour sugar sharp process american cheese, shre; dded oz.) cans whole kernel corn, draine; d of bacon, crisp

In a bowl, combine eggs, flour and sugar. Beat mixture thoroughly. Add cheese and corn. Crumble bacon, reserving 1/4 of it for top of casserole; add and stir until all ingredients are well mixed. Turn mixture into a 10x6x1 and 1/2 inch baking dish. Sprinkle remaining bacon on top. Bake at 350 degrees until knife inserted in center comes out clean, about 30 minutes. I usually double this recipe and bake in a 9x13 glass Pyrex dish, and leave it in the oven just a little longer. It should be cooked well enough that you can serve it in squares.

Page 57

INDIAN CORN SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

Wash and put 1 1/2 quarts of "lyed" Indian White Corn in an 8 quart pot. Fill with water 3/4 full and cover. Bring to a boil and keep at a rolling boil for 1 1/2 hours, corn should open full. You may want to cook corn a while longer . If the corn is not fully open, stir occasionally. Do not let it stick to the bottom of the pan. While the corn is cooking, cut up 1 1/2 lbs of pork shoulder butt steaks into 3/4" square pieces. Do the same with 3/4 lbs of salt pork. Place meat in a separate pan and boil for 1 hour. Water should cover pork 4" or so. Add if necessary...you will need this for stock. After the corn opens to your satisfaction or two hours maximum, remove from stove and pour through strainer. Do not rinse corn. Rinse out pot and put corn back into pot. Add the cooked pork along with the stock. Open three 1 lb cans of dark red kidney beans and add. Rinse cans, add water to cover mixture 3 inches or so. Boil mixture for another 1 1/2 to 2 hours, adding water in necessary. Stir occasionally, do not let it stick to the bottom of the pot. Serve in individual bowls, season with salt and pepper after serving. Best if eaten with homemade, warm yeast bread and freshly churned butter.

Page 58

INDIAN CORN STEW

1

x

no ingredients

Pueblo Indians often simmered large pots of meat over an open fire and added fresh vegetables, like corn and squash, to the pot 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, 1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef, 1 1/2 cups sweet green peppers (cored, seeded, and chopped), 1 large yellow onion (chopped, 1-1/2 cups), 2 cloves garlic (minced), 8 large ears of corn (kernels cut off) or 4 cups frozen corn, 1 can (14 ounces) crushed tomatoes, 4 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 teaspoon each black pepper and chili powder, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper (cayenne) or to taste, 1 medium-size zucchini or yellow summer squash, thinly sliced crosswise (2 cups) Nutritional Information 1 Serving: Calories 397, Saturated Fat 6g, Total Fat 18g, Protein 27g, Carbohydrate 37g, Fiber 1g, Sodium 337mg, Cholesterol 70mg Step 1: In a 6-quart Dutch oven, heat the oil over moderately high heat. Add the beef and cook, stirring frequently, for 8 minutes or until browned. Lower the heat, stir in the green peppers, onion, and garlic, and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Step 2: Stir in the corn, tomatoes, Worcestershire, black pepper, chili powder, salt, and red pepper and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the squash, then simmer for 5 minutes longer or until the vegetables are tender. Before Indian Corn can be used for Corn Soup it must be thoroughly dried. The corn is picked in the late fall, the husk pulled back, then braided into three foot long bunches and hung up in the barn so the crows can't get at it. Before Indian Corn (which is white :-) can be cooked into corn soup, it must first be put through a process called "lying:. Lye is an extremely strong acid found in hardwood ashes. This is what the traditional Indians used as it was abundant from their campfires. This lying process softens the outer shell somewhat and allows the two black eyes

Page 59 found on each kernel of corn to be washed off after cooking. There are very few Indians adept at preparing the dried white corn in this manner. The amount of wood ashes to be boiled with the corn is a very tricky task to accomplish properly. Too much lye will destroy the corn and too little will not do the job. Therefore we leave this to the "lyers" of the tribe. The corn is boiled with the hardwood ashes and water for about two hours. Then it is washed to remove the eyes or hulls and to rinse the corn free of lye. The Tuscarora reservation has three or four "lyers" who perform the difficult and messy task of "lying". A "lyer" will do a large amount of corn in a day depending on how many orders she has to do for the tribal members. I get my "lyed" corn from Mrs. Norton Rickard of Blacknose Spring Road. Usually I order five quarts at $3.00 per quart. I then divide it into three parts. I will freeze two of them and cook one part...about a quart and one half.

INDIAN MISH MASH

2 Lbs ground wild meat (venison or ground beef will do) 4 Tbls of lard or oil 2 medium sized onions, chopped 4 medium sized squash ( yellow or zucchini) 3 cups fresh corn, or canned 2 4-oz cans of green chilis 1 8-oz can tomatoes salt and pepper to taste In a large heavy skillet, saute onion in lard or oil until onion is wilted. Add ground meat and cook until browned. Add remaining ingredients and simmer, covered for 1 hr. Yield: 6 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 01:20

Page 60

INDIAN PUDDING

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1/2 cup corn meal 4 cups milk 1 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon ginger 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon cinnam 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup dark molass 2 cups light cream 2 cups heavy cream

Preheat oven to 275F -- very low. Combine the corn meal with one cup of milk. Scald the remaining three cups of milk in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the corn meal mixture a little at a time and cook, stirring, constantly, for 15 minutes, or until the mixture is about as thick as breakfast cereal. It is important to keep stirring to prevent lumps. Remove from heat. Combine sugar, spices and salt, stir them into the corn, mixture. Add the molasses and light cream. Pour into a greased two-quart baking dish and bake for two hours. Set aside at least an hour. Serve pudding warm with a pitcher of heavy cream to pour over each portion at the table.

INDIAN PUDDING (DURGIN PARK)

1 1

notes: n/a ingredients:

1 cup yellow granulated corn meal 1/2 cup black molasses 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup lard or butter 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 2 eggs 1/1/2 quarts hot milk Preparation Instructions: Mix all ingredients thoroughly with one-half the hot milk and bake in a hot oven until it boils. Then stir in remaining half hot milk and bake in a slow oven for five to seven hours. Bake in a stone crock, well greased inside.

Page 61

IROQUOIS BOILED CORN BREAD (GAHA GU GWA)
By: F. W. Waugh corn, hulled and washed water currants walnuts or butternuts berries or beans of choice After the corn has been hulled and washed, it is placed in the mortar and pounded to a meal or flour. As the pounding progresses the fine sifting basket is frequently brought into requisition. The hand is used to dip the meal out of the mortar into the sifter. The large bread pan is often set on top of the mortar and the sifter shaken in both hands. The coarser particles are thrown into a second bowl or tray and are finally dumped back into the mortar to be repounded. A hollow is next made in the flour and enough boiling water poured into it to make a stiff paste. Usage differs somewhat in this respect, cold water being used by some for mixing. The stirring paddle is often employed at first, after which the paste is kneaded with the hands. Dried huckleberries, blackberries, elderberries, strawberries, or beans may be incorporated in the mixture, beans apparently enjoying the greatest favour. The latter are previously cooked just so that they will remain whole or nearly so. Currants or raisins are sometimes used at present. Formerly the kernels of walnuts and butternuts were employed in the same way. A lump of paste is next broken off, or about a double handful. This is tossed in the hands, which are kept moistened with cold water, until it becomes rounded in form; the surplus material forms a core at one side, usually the right, and is finally broken off. The lump is now slapped back and forth between the palms, though resting rather more on the left hand; and is at the same time given a rotary motion until a disk is formed about 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 inches thick and about 7 inches in diameter. Boiling water for mixing is stated to make the cakes firmer and better to handle. No salt nor other such ingredients are used. The loaves are immediately slid into a pot of boiling water from the paddle or from between the hands and are supported on edge by placing the paddle against them until all are in. The bread paddle, or sometimes a special circular turning paddle, is used to rotate the cakes a little when partly done, so as to cook all parts alike. An hour is usually required for cooking, though the completion of the operation is indicated when the cakes show a tendency to float, or when the steam is given out equally all over when a cake is lifted out. The bread paddle is also employed in removing the bread from the pot. When a batch is too large for the pot, some of the cakes are boiled for five or six minutes, then removed and baked in a pan in the oven. Boiled corn bread, while not light in the ordinary sense, is decidedly tasty when newly made. It may be sliced and eaten either hot or cold

Page 62 with butter, gravy or maple syrup. An Oneidatown informant states that it is often sliced and fried in butter as we fry cornmeal or oatmeal mush. In his book, 'Moeurs des Sauvages Ameriquains' (Paris, 1724) Jos. Francois Lafitau remarks of corn bread that ' They cover it with corn leaves and cook it in the ashes or in the kettle. They often, also, add oil, grease, beans and fruits. It is best when freshly cooked. The boiling of the corn in ashes, in bread-making, was sometimes omitted. A kettleful of water was brought to the boiling point, according to a Mrs. Peter John, a Mohawk woman married to an Onondaga man. The ripe corn was added and boiled until softened a little. It was then drained in the washing basket, allowed to dry slightly, then pounded, sifted, and made into flour. This kind of flour is called ganehana`-we'di`. In the Huron process of bread-making as recorded by Sagard-Theodat in his book, 'Le Grand Voyage du Pays des Hurons,' Tross ed., (Paris, 1865) loaves of corn bread were frequently carried along while travelling, though parched corn flour sweetened with maple syrup was a more popular material. The use of corn bread for this purpose is indicted in the word 'johnny-cake' from 'journey-cake.' The ash-cake, hoe-cake, and pone are other European adoptions. Salt was evidently adopted principally during the later historical period. In 'History of the Mission of the United Brethren Among the Indians in North America' (London, 1794), translated by La Trobe, G. H. Loskiel describes the Iroquois attitude towards salt by stating that ' neither the Iroquois, Delaware, nor any in connexion with them, eat their meat raw, but frequently without salt, though they have it in abundance.' The fact that several old-time foods, such as corn bread, corn and bean soup, etc. are made without salt would also indicate that the usage is modern.

JOHNNY CAKES

1

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no ingredients

Ingredients 1 cup stone-ground cornmeal 1/2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 cup boiling water 1/2 cup medium cream or half-and-half corn oil or butter for frying Directions Mix together the first three ingredients in a medium bowl. Add the boiling water, and blend well. Thin batter with cream, but make certain it is thick and not runny. Drop batter by tablespoonfuls onto a medium-hot, well-greased griddle or

Page 63 skillet. Allow to fry for 6 minutes. Turn johnny cakes over and fry on other side for 5 minutes longer. Yield: 8-10 large john

KANATAONESTEROKHONWE (CORN BREAD)

Mix 4 cups masa jarina, 2 cups white flour, 8 oz or so cooked, drained kidney beans in large bowl. (10 cornbreads) Meanwhile you have boiled several gallons of water in a huge pot - likely your biggest one - or else this recipe won't work. Scoop boiling water into the meal and mix until you get a very thick dough, very hot and sticky - but real nice and solid - no whimpy dough here... Now - this is why only Mohawk Women can do this right...scoop up a handfull of the hot mix (keep the screaming down - it is not traditional) and using both hands, pat into a ball about the size of a softball and flatten it out just a bit, dropping it into the boiling water - when it floats, it's done and scoop them out as they get cooked. Put it in a bowl or something - it will drain a bit. While that's hot, you have braised (that's pan fried to you Lakota) a large/huge slab of red meat in a giant skillet with lots of salt and pepper then made a gallon of hot gravy from the drippings. [PG Note: The slab of meat was obtained by running through the forest and/or neighbor pasture and clobbering a large animal betwen the eyes with one of the cornbreads. A large bear might require several clobberings. A very healthful method of traditional food preparation! You get lots of healthy exercise, running away from the farmer with your dead cow (or from the bear who hung in there after being clobbered with all your ammo).] Take a bread and cut it into bitesize chunks on your plate, likewise a cut of meat and then pour gravy all over everything. Side dishes could be 2-5 pounds fried mushrooms, 5 pounds of sausages, coffee. Molson. Etonaiawen! [PG cross cultural note: These are Mohawk exclamations demanding still more to eat, commenting snidely on how slow the cornball hunters ran from the farmer with the clobbered cow, and similar traditional ritual festival exclamations.] You can check on Molson right here... The fun has just begun. The next day, fry 1/2 inch slices in drippings until brown (good with catsup) For a special serving suggestion, dip fried bread in maple syrup. [PG cross-cultural Note: Those of us less primitive than Mohawks who have been corrupted by California will pour maple syrup over sliced corncake and even use knives and forks on the resulting breakfast dish.] This stuff will keep!

Page 64 Russ Imrie Yield: 10 servings

LUBY'S SPANISH INDIAN BAKED CORN

1/4 1 1/3 1/3 1/3 1 1/4 2 1/4 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1

lb cup cup cup lb tablespoon cup can can tablespoon tablespoon teaspoon tablespoon cup

bacon, chopped into 1/2-in pieces onion, diced celery, diced green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and diced butter, plus butter, melted and divided milk cream-style corn whole kernel corn, drained jalapenos, diced pimentos, diced salt sugar corn bread muffins, crumbled and divided

In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the bacon until crisp. Add the onion, celery, and bell pepper. Saute for 2 minutes until low heat. Set aside. In a medium-size pan, melt the 1/4 pound of butter. Add the milk, corn, jalapenos, pimentos, salt, and sugar. Heat the mixture over low heat. Add the bacon/vegetable mixture and 1 cup of the corn bread muffin crumbs to the corn mixture. Heat well, stirring frequently. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square by 1 1/2-inch deep pan. Moisten the remaining corn bread muffin crumbs with the remaining butter and sprinkle on top of the corn mixture. Bake in a preheated, 350 degree F. oven until the crumbs are light brown. NOTE: According to Luby's Cafeteria spokeswoman, many Luby's managers adapt and create their own recipes, and the dishes are available only at the specific restaurant. That is the case with Spanish Indian Baked Corn, which is available at the Luby's in Pasadena, Texas on Wednesdays. Recipe: Luby's Cafeteria in Pasadena, Texas Dave Pileggi Yield: 8 servings

Page 65

MAKING HOMINY

text file I have no way to get wood (oak) ashes (and I think the southwestern kind is made in limewater), I'll give this recipe which was used up north 20 years or so ago, somebody try it with store-bought popcorn or health food co-op dried corn, see if it works, if you can get the ashes. This is the method for making hominy from traditionally sun-dried corn as done up north on Ojibwe reservations here for many years. It's from Ona Kingbired ( Red Lake). I've never tried it. Use sun-dried corn. But I'd like to know if dried pop-corn grain will work. Multicolored kernels have the most flavor. Put 2 double-handfuls of ash from oak, maple or poplar wood fires into about 2-3 quarts of water. Boil for 1 hour and let it set all night to settle the ash out. In the morning, boil dried corn in this water, strained if necessary, until the skins slip off and the corn turns bright yellow (1-2 hours).. Rinse 3 times in fresh water. This fresh hominy can now be used immediately in soups and stews. The dried corn will absorb 3-4 times its volume of water. Hominy can also be dried for storage and cooked again (it swells up about 4 times and absorbs at least 4 times its quantity of water). So, I'd like to hear from someone who can try this with wood ash and the kind of dried corn you can get in stores. Southwestern tribes made hominy by cooking the dried corn kernels in a lye water made from a mix of corn-cob ashes and powdered lime in water, I'm informed. Either way, the net effect on the nutritional value of the corn is that while some nutrients are leached out, those weren't in available forms anyway. The treatment greatly increases the amounts of usable protein, usable vitamin B (especially thiamine, rarest among vegetable sources), and adds a considerable amount of usable calcium and potassium to the resulting food. (This is probably not true of the way factory-canned hominy is made.) If corn is the staple of your diet, it is hominy you will mostly eat. White people were unaware of this, because relatively little scientific attention was given to nutrition, and no scientists were willing to learn from so-called primitive people with their so-called irrational customs. In the 1920's and '30's, there was widespread pellagra among poor whites, especially in the south. Pellagra is a serious, eventually fatal, disease caused entirely by nutritional deficiences that arise from eating diets largely of of milled cornmeal, chemical hominy, and corn-off-the-cob or canned. Corn was bum-rapped by scientific nutritionists because of the pellagra epidemic. They didn't realize that traditional people, whose diet often consisted almost entirely of corn and beans knew how to handle it to get the best food values from it.

Page 66

MANDAMIN (CORN -- SIOUX STYLE)

1/2 1/4 1/4 3 3 1

cup cup cup tablespoon each salt

corn green bell pepper, diced mild red pepper, diced oil shallots, chopped & pepper

Heat the oil and fry the peppers with the shallots for 3 minutes or so. Add the corn, salt & pepper. Cook for a further 5 to 10 minutes at low heat & serve.

1 recipe Yield: 1 recipe

MANDAMIN (CORN; SIOUX STYLE)
By: Bernard Assiniwi 1 1/2 1/4 1/4 3 3 c c c tb corn green bell pepper, diced mild red pepper, diced oil shallots, chopped salt & pepper Heat the oil & fry the peppers with the shallots for 3 minutes or so. Add the corn, salt & pepper. Cook for a further 5 to 10 minutes at low heat & serve. Yield: 1 recipe

MASA TAMALES

CREDITS:As indicated, Kahnawahke Kanienkehake (Mohawk) Russ Imrie. courtesy of his relatives on a recent visit from California to his home reserve in eastern Canada. A few kitchenary remarks from me: Masa tamales (which are steamed, rather than boiled like dumplings) take 1 part fat to 2 parts (cups) masa harina meal. 4 cups would take 2 cups bacon grease or melted butter, 1 tsp baking powder and 1 tsp salt. Russ's method will work, but the resulting dumplings will be very heavy. The addition of fat (beaten vigorously into the masa for 15 minutes), baking powder and less hot water will lighten them considerably. Of course then you can't run out into the woods and clobber an animal with one of them.....

Page 67

MESA SQUASH FRY WITH SUNFLOWER SEEDS
By: 'Native American Cooking,' by Lois Ellen Frank 1 1 2 1/2 1/2 8 8 1 1/4 green T. garlic tsp. tsp. ears sm. red c. anaheim chile sunflower oil cloves, finely chopped salt black pepper sweet yellow corn, kernels cut from; the cob zucchini or yellow squash, cut into; 2' long julienne bell pepper, diced shelled sunflower seeds

Roast the anaheim chile, then peel, seed, and coarsely chop it. In a saute pan, heat the oil over moderate heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking add the garlic, chile, salt, and pepper and cook 1 to 2 minutes, stirring constantly, to allow the flavors to blend. Add the corn, squash, and red pepper. Reduce heat and allow the vegetables to simmer about 15 minutes, until they are tender. Add the sunflower seeds and simmer another 5 minutes. Serve hot as a vegetable side dish. Yield: yield: 6 servin

MESQUITE CORNBREAD

3/4 cup cornmeal 3/4 cup white flour 1/2 cup mesquite meal 2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup yogurt 1 egg 3 Tbs honey (or mesquite syrup) 3 Tbs oil Preheat oven to 340° F. Combine dry ingredients in a medium size bowl. Beat egg in small bowl and stir in wet ingredients. Mix wet ingredients with the dry ingredients and stir 1 minute. Pour into greased 8x8" pan and bake 20-25 minutes. I make my mesquite meal every year when the beans ripen. It is a great addition to a lot of flours and to a lot of bread type stuffs.

Page 68

MODERN DAY PARCHED CORN

1

pk

frozen corn maple sugar

Take a bag of whole kernel, cut corn, frozen. Spread the frozen corn in a layer one kernel deep on an ungreased, non-stick, cookie sheet. Place this in an oven on the lowest possible setting. Let it dry for about eight hours. You will now have dried corn (which is about as hard as a rock) You probably want to do this step at your home over a weekend if you need lots for your kids. Now, to 'parch' the corn, place the dried corn in a dry, clean (no grease what so ever) metal skillet, and on a medium setting, cook (dry-roast) the corn. Use a wooden spoon to move the corn about in the skillet to keep it from burning. The corn will turn from a dull yellow to a deep brown. (AND be lots easier to chew) Place in a bowl, and while still hot, sprinkle on maple sugar (I use granulated brown sugar to save some money). Allow to cool., and break it up if it forms a cake as you want the kernels not a block. This is one of the primary foods of both Indians and frontiersmen on the trail, and it's pretty easy to make. Pvt. Dave Woolsey Cresap's Independant Rifle Company of Maryland Posted to: SavoryFare@onelist.com (Dave is a member of a Historical Re-enactment Society) Yield: yield: 4 servin

MOHAWK CORN

recipe Saute 2 cups of whole kernel corn in 3 tablespoons of butter. Add 1/2 cup of black walnuts and 1/2 teaspoon black walnut flavoring. Heat and serve.

Page 69

MOHAWK CORN SOUP
By: Aboriganal Tourism - Native Cuisine 1 300 1 liter (4 cups) ml kg (2 lb) lyed white corn or canned white hom; iny navy beans side pork or 1/2 kg side pork and s; alt pork salt and pepper to taste Place the beans in a pot. If using canned white hominy corn, rinse corn several times to remove excess salt. Cover beans with 2 inches (5 cm) water and soak overnight. In the morning cook the beans and corn in the same water until tender. Set aside. Cut up pork into small ¼ inch (1/2 cm) pieces. Place meat in a soup pot and cover with 2 inches (5 cm) of water and bring to a complete boil. Reduce heat and continue to simmer in a covered put for 2 hours or until meat is tender. Drain meat, saving the broth in a separate container. Place both meat and broth in the refrigerator until cool. Skim off fat from the broth. Add meat and broth to the beans. (For thicker soup, mash half of the beans before adding the meat and broth.) Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a mild boil and serve. Yield: 6 servings

MOHAWK INDAIN CORN

1 1/2 1 2

can teaspoon small tablespoons

kernel corn black walnut flavoring package black walnuts butter

Empty a can of corn packed in water not cream corn into a pot.Add sufficient water and heat also adding a small package of black walnuts. Then add about 1/2 teaspoon of black walnut flavoring which is avilable at most grocery stores. Heat with 2 tablespoons butter and serve.......

NATIVEWAY PARCHED CORN
By: Dabears35@aol.com as much dried corn as desired 2 tb grease or lard

Heat the grease in a pan with a lid over medium heat. Add corn carefully so it doesn't splatter. Cover and let heat, shaking pan occasionally to heat the corn evenly, and make sure it doesn't burn. The corn will almost pop like popcorn, and as long as the corn just covers the bottom of the pan, it should only take about 5 minutes to parch completely. Add salt or butter flavoring or whatever you like. Yield: yield: 1 batch

Page 70

Page 71

NEW CORN-STUFFED TAMALES

1 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1/2 2 1/2

cups cup cup cup tsp tsp -3 cup

roasted fresh corn kernels, scrape; d from cobs milk masa harina (lime-water prepared co; rnmeal) softened butter baking powder salt mild canned green chiles, seeded an; d chopped fine grated monterey jack cheese

Masa harina: This is cornmeal that has been prepared with lime or wood-ash lye water. It's different from ordinary cornmeal, cooks up softer, absorbs lots of fat during its cooking, holds together better in tortillas, etc. It's available from Mexican food stores. Masa differes from cornmeal in another important way. As with hominy, the treatment by lye or lime water balances the corn's amino acids, so there is actually more available or usable form protein. Corn got a bad rap nutritionally when the invaders, not recognizing the nutritional importance of this treatment (which was universal among corn-growing tribes) skipped that step and lived off of plain ground cornmeal -- what's available to you, mostly, in stores. Many suffered from the eventually fatal nutritional deficiency disease pellagra (if became almost synonymous with poor white trash in the rural south). Properly treated and cooked, corn, which was a native dietary staple almost everywhere it grows, for 4,000 years, is as nutritious as wheat, and may be more so if what is grown in minearl-depleted soil with chemical fertilizers. Fresh corn nowadays has been bred up to be much higher in sugar -- 2 - 4 times higher -- than the colorful, traditional 4-colors corn, which is still a taste treat (and nutritional bonanza) if you can get it. To roast the fresh corn: just put them (in their husks) in a 400 degree oven for 5 minutes. Husks and silk will peel off easily. Then scrape off kernels, standing cob in a big frypan to catch them. Depending on the ears, it will take 2-4 ears to make 1 1/2 cups of kernels. Cornhusk tamale wrappers: The ones you just prepared are probably dried out and frizzeled. If you've saved and dried husks, steep them in boiling water to cover (poured over them, not cooked) while roasting and scraping the corn. Otherwise, you'll have to use foil wrappers. Simmer milk and corn for about 10 minutes. Strain the corn, reserve the milk, and puree 1/2 cup of the kernels with this milk, reserving the rest for putting in the tamale dough. Add the puree to the masa, mix vigorously with spoon and whisk. In a separate large bowl, whip the soft butter, baking powder, and salt together until very fluffy. Start adding the masa mixture about 1/4 cup (guesstimated) at a time whisking and beating vigorously after each dough addition. Spend 15 minuts at least beating the masa mix into the butter. Fold in the green chile, the remaining cup of corn kernels, and grated cheese. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces, about 4 Tbsp each. Pat each piece into a rectangle on a trimmed cornhusk to form a square or rectangle,

Page 72 leaving a husk border at the edges of the tamale at least 1 inch. Now fold up the rectangle along the length of the cornhusks and pinch it into a roll, loosely. Roll the husk up completely around the dough roll. Tie the ends with strips of cornhusk (traditional), or string (easier). The wrapping shouldn't be totally tight, so steam can get in. Place the wrapped tamales seam-side down on the rack of any kind of steamer (wok with a rack and tight cover will do, I use big enameled cast-iron frypan with tight lid). Tamales shouldn't touch the boiling water. Steam for 30 minutes. Let cool slightly and serve (diners unwrap their own) with any kind of hot tomato or other type of sauce. Those celebrating New Corn eat it without sauce, but fat or butter is sometimes available. Yield: makes 8 tamales

NEW SUCCOTASH

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no ingredients

1 tin of white beans 1 tin of sweetcorn 200ml sour cream 1 small chili 1 onion salt, pepper, sage, garlic - cut onions in small dices, crush gralic and then put them into a saucpan until golden - add the chili cut into thin stripes (if you don't like it too hot, you should take away the small grains!) - add beans and corn, add spices - leave on small heat for about 15 min. add a bit of water - add the sour cream and heat until all is hot *If you like to, you can also ad some minced chicken after you put the ognions in the saucepan* Eat with rice, tacos or frybread.

ONEIDA CORN SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

1 C. fresh spinach, torn 2 C. whole kernal corn 1/2 C. beef, cooked and cut into small pieces 1/2 C. long grain rice 1 qt. water 3 tsp. wild rice Pepper to taste Mix in medium pot. Simmer until rice is cooked about 25-30 minutes. Yield: 1 recipe

Page 73

ONEIDA INDIAN SUCCOTASH
By: Oneida Indian Natives 1 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1/2 2 1/8 1/8 2 c. c. c. c. tsp. t. minced c. t. tsp. tsp. c. frozen corn kernels, thawed; (fresh , about 3 ears) chopped onion summer squash; chopped red bell pepper; chopped ground cumin olive oil garlic cloves defatted chicken broth fresh cilantro; chopped hot sauce ground pepper frozen baby lima beans, thawed; (or cook your own)

Place a large nonstick skillet over high heat until hot. Add corn, red pepper, onion, and cumin; saute 5 minutes until vegetables are slightly blackened. Add summer squash, olive oil, and garlic; sauteing and additional minute. Reduce heat to medium-high, add broth and remaining ingredients. Cook 3-5 minutes or until heated through, stirring frequently. Yield: 8 servings

ONEIDA INDIAN SUCCOTASH
By: Oneida Indian Natives 1 1/2 c frozen corn kernels, thawed (may use fresh corn kernels-about 3 ears) 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1/2 2 1/8 1/8 2 c c c ts tb garlic c tb ts ts c chopped onion chopped summer squash chopped red bell pepper ground cumin olive oil cloves, minced defatted chicken broth chopped fresh cilantro hot sauce ground pepper frozen baby lima beans, thawed Place a large nonstick skillet over high heat until hot. Add corn, red pepper, onion, and cumin; saute 5 minutes until vegetables are slightly blackened. Add summer squash, olive oil, and garlic; sauteing and additional minute. Reduce heat to medium-high, add broth and remaining ingredients. Cook 3-5 minutes or until heated through, stirring frequently. Yield: 8 servings

Page 74

OTTAWA HOMINY

1 Corn

x

no ingredients

Wood ashes Animal fat Alexander Henry..."found it fascinating and invaluable to watch how the Ottawas prepared hominy from the stunted variety of corn which they called maize. The dried kernels were first boiled in a caustic solution made of wood ashes and a small amount of animal fat mixed with water. In only a short time this made the outer husks of the kernels easy to remove, after which the grain would be crushed and then dried on large pieces of bark.; At this point it would have the consistency of soft, cooked rice. Most important, it would keep almost indefinitely. When mixed with a small amount of prepared fat it became a highly nutritious and surprisingly tasty dish. Henry found that a bushel of this hominy and two pounds of the prepared fat was all that an adult warrior, or one of his Canadian assistants, needed for a full month's subsistence. They did not use salt on it, nor did they eat bread with it." Alan Eckert in the Wilderness Series Yield: 1 info file

PACOLE

text file It sounds to me like you need the corn recipe, that my mother has made since I was a child, we call it Pacole, My Grandmother was Navajo and passed on this recipe! It takes white corn (one lbs.), ox tails or beef bones (3-4 lbs.), 6-7 cups of water. I use a pressure cooker and once the rocker on the pressure cooker rocks on medium high heat, cook for another 45 minutes. Relieve the pressure under a light stream of water in the sink when it is safe to open the pressure cooker place back on stove and bring to a boil, ad salt, pepper, or any seasons you prefer. This is a great winter meal! I hope this was what you were looking for!

Page 75

PARCHED CORN TRAVELLING FOOD (UNINHQ DA)
By: Iroquois Foods and Food Preparations parched corn There was apparently no more popular travelling or hunting food than this preparation in olden times. It was light, nourishing, and could be eaten either cooked or raw. It is rarely used at present, except on certain ceremonial occasions, such as False-Face Society functions. In making it, the white Tuscarora and other kinds of bread corn are employed. The ripe corn is shelled, parched slightly in the embers, as for popping, thrown into the mortar, some maple sugar added, and the whole pounded and sifted together to a rather fine meal. When intended for pudding or soups, rather than for eating raw, the maple sugar may be left out. Dried fruit, such as cherries, is said to have been pulverized with it at times. Sugar is not used when the food is intended for hunters or for athletes, as it would make them dizzy (the sugar being derived from the maple, the branches of which sway about in the wind). The uninhq da is also at times mixed up with chopped meat. It was prepared for use in several ways. It might be eaten raw in small quantities, though more than a small handful was considered dangerous without cooking, on account of its tendency to swell. On hunting expeditions or in time of war a small wooden cup or bowl was carried along. A little water was taken in this and a small amount of the meal added. When game was found or when the enemy was vanquished, it was added to the venison or other provisions secured. John Bartram, in 'Observations Made by John Bartram in His Journey From Pennsylvania to Onondaga, Oswego and the Lake Ontario in Canada' (London, 1751), notes of this food that '... about one-quarter of a pound, diluted in a pint of water, is a hearty travelling dinner.' Historical references to the food are numerous, showing conclusively its common use throughout the Iroquois and Algonkin region as reported by Robert Beverly in 'The History and Present State of Virginia' (London, 1705). In Samuel de Champlain's 'Voyages of Samuel de Champlain' (Prince Society ed., Boston, 1878-1882) he states that very dry Indian corn was used in its manufacture. It was roasted in ashes, brayed to a meal and, in preparing it for food, they cooked a large quantity of fish and meat, cut it into pieces, skimmed off the fat, and added the meal of roasted corn, cooking the whole to a thick soup. This was among the Huron and eastern Algonkins. Robert Beverly also furnishes some information: The Indians of Virginia frequently took with them on their journeys 'a Pint or Quart of Rockahomonie, that is, the finest Indian corn, parched and beaten to a powder. When they find their stomachs empty (and cannot stay the tedious Cookery of other things) they put about a spoonful of this into their Mouths, and drink a Draught of Water upon it, which stays in their stomachs.' The Seneca name for the meal is 'wade''sondak one'q,' or 'burnt corn.' Mrs. John Williams of Caughnawaga gave 'wanaha'sa o'nasde'' as a Mohawk equivalent. Memoir 86, No. 12,

Page 76 Anthropological Series' by F. W. Waugh, (Ottawa Government Printing Bureau, 1916)

Page 77

PARCHED CORN TRAVELLING FOOD ... UNINHQ'' DA`
By: Norman R. Brown 2/93 parched corn There was apparently no more popular travelling or hunting food than this preparation in olden times. It was light, nourishing, and could be eaten either cooked or raw. It is rarely used at present, except on certain ceremonial occasions, such as False-Face Society functions. In making it, the white Tuscarora and other kinds of bread corn are employed. The ripe corn is shelled, parched slightly in the embers, as for popping, thrown into the mortar, some maple sugar added, and the whole pounded and sifted together to a rather fine meal. When intended for pudding or soups, rather than for eating raw, the maple sugar may be left out. Dried fruit, such as cherries, is said to have been pulverized with it at times. Sugar is not used when the food is intended for hunters or for athletes, as it would make them dizzy (the sugar being derived from the maple, the branches of which sway about in the wind). The uninhq''da' is also at times mixed up with chopped meat. It was prepared for use in several ways. It might be eaten raw in small quantities, though more than a small handful was considered dangerous without cooking, on account of its tendency to swell. On hunting expeditions or in time of war a small wooden cup or bowl was carried along. A little water was taken in this and a small amount of the meal added. When game was found, it was added to the venison or other provisions secured. John Bartram, in 'Observations Made by John Bartram in His Journey From Pennsylvania to Onondaga, Oswego and the Lake Ontario in Canada' (London, 1751), notes of this food that 'about one-quarter of a pound, diluted in a pint of water, is a hearty travelling dinner.' Historical references to the food are numerous, showing conclusively its common use throughout the Iroquois and Algonkin region as reported by Robert Beverly in 'The History and Present State of Virginia' (London, 1705) In Samuel de Champlain's 'Voyages of Samuel de Champlain', he states that very dry Indian corn was used in its manufacture. It was roasted in ashes, brayed to a meal and, in preparing it for food, they cooked a large quantity of fish and meat, cut it into pieces, skimmed off the fat, and added the meal of roasted corn, cooking the whole to a thick soup. This was among the Huron and eastern Algonkins. In 'The History and Present State of Virginia,' Robert Beverly also furnishes some information: The Indians of Virginia frequently took with them on their journeys 'a Pint or Quart of Rockahomonie, that is, the finest Indian corn, parched and beaten to a powder. When they find their stomachs empty, they put about a spoonful of this into their Mouths, and drink a Draught of Water upon it, which stays in their stomachs.' A Tonawanda informant described its use by Seneca athletes in running. A decoction should also be prepared of the toad rush, Juncus bufonius, the fact of its growing beside the runner's pathway being considered significant. A handful of the plant is steeped in nearly a pailful of

Page 78 water. The idea is to provoke vomiting. The person using it must drink about two quarts the first time, vomit, drink the same quantity, and vomit again. The face and body are also washed with the liquid. This is done about three times during the week before the race. Only sweet milk and Indian corn bread, agwe''aw'`a''gwa' (Seneca), are to be eaten. A quantity of the scorched cornmeal is carried along to eat while running, a little being taken now and again. The Seneca name for the meal is 'wade''sondak one'q,' or 'burnt corn.' Mrs. John Williams of Caughnawaga gave 'wanaha'sa o'nasde'' as a Mohawk equivalent. Source: 'Iroquois Foods and Food Preparations by F. W. Waugh (Ottawa Government Printing Bureau, 1916)

Page 79

PARCHED CORN TRAVELLING FOOD ... UNINHQ'' DA`
By: F. W. Waugh no ingredients found There was apparently no more popular travelling or hunting food than this preparation in olden times. It was light, nourishing, and could be eaten either cooked or raw. It is rarely used at present, except on certain ceremonial occasions, such as False-Face Society functions. In making it, the white Tuscarora and other kinds of bread corn are employed. The ripe corn is shelled, parched slightly in the embers, as for popping, thrown into the mortar, some maple sugar added, and the whole pounded and sifted together to a rather fine meal. When intended for pudding or soups, rather than for eating raw, the maple sugar may be left out. Dried fruit, such as cherries, is said to have been pulverized with it at times. Sugar is not used when the food is intended for hunters or for athletes, as it would make them dizzy (the sugar being derived from the maple, the branches of which sway about in the wind). The uninhq''da' is also at times mixed up with chopped meat. It was prepared for use in several ways. It might be eaten raw in small quantities, though more than a small handful was considered dangerous without cooking, on account of its tendency to swell. On hunting expeditions or in time of war a small wooden cup or bowl was carried along. A little water was taken in this and a small amount of the meal added. When game was found or when the enemy was vanquished, it was added to the venison or other provisions secured. John Bartram, in 'Observations Made by John Bartram in His Journey From Pennsylvania to Onondaga, Oswego and the Lake Ontario in Canada' (London, 1751), at p. 71 notes of this food that '... about one-quarter of a pound, diluted in a pint of water, is a hearty travelling dinner.' Historical references to the food are numerous, showing conclusively its common use throughout the Iroquois and Algonkin region as reported by Robert Beverly in 'The History and Present State of Virginia' (London, 1705) at p. 155. At pp. 162-164 in Samuel de Champlain's 'Voyages of Samuel de Champlain' (Prince Society ed., Boston, 1878-1882) he states that very dry Indian corn was used in its manufacture. It was roasted in ashes, brayed to a meal and, in preparing it for food, they cooked a large quantity of fish and meat, cut it into pieces, skimmed off the fat, and added the meal of roasted corn, cooking the whole to a thick soup. This was among the Huron and eastern Algonkins. At p. 155 of the above-referenced 'The History and Present State of Virginia,' Robert Beverly also furnishes some information: The Indians of Virginia frequently took with them on their journeys 'a Pint or Quart of Rockahomonie, that is, the finest Indian corn, parched and beaten to a powder. When they find their stomachs empty (and cannot stay the tedious Cookery of other things) they put about a spoonful of this into their Mouths, and drink a Draught of Water upon it, which stays in their stomachs.' A Tonawanda informant described its use by Seneca athletes in running. A decoction should also be prepared of the toad rush, Juncus bufonius, the fact of its growing beside the runner's pathway being considered significant. A handful of the plant is steeped in nearly a pailful of water. The idea is to provoke vomiting. The person using it must drink about two quarts the first

Page 80 time, vomit, drink the same quantity, and vomit again. The face and body are also washed with the liquid. This is done about three times during the week before the race. Only sweet milk and Indian corn bread, agwe''aw'`a''gwa' (Seneca), are to be eaten. A quantity of the scorched cornmeal is carried along to eat while running, a little being taken now and again. The Seneca name for the meal is 'wade''sondak one'q,' or 'burnt corn.' Mrs. John Williams of Caughnawaga gave 'wanaha'sa o'nasde'' as a Mohawk equivalent. Source: 'Iroquois Foods and Food Preparations, Memoir 86, No. 12, Yield: 1 servings

PASK ALWASHA TANCHI (CORN FRITTERS)

1 1/2 2 1 1/2 3/4 1/2 2

c. whole tsp. tsp. c.

flour€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€ kernel corn salt€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€€ baking powder€€€€€€€€ milk eggs, beaten

Sift flour, and resift again with baking powder and salt.€ Combine eggs, milk and flour mixture and stir until it becomes a smooth batter.€ Mix corn into the batter, very thoroughly.€ Drop from a teaspoon into deep fat heated to 375 degrees and fry until brown.€ Can be served with syrup.€ Yield: 5 servings.

Page 81

PAWNEE CORN SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

Ingredients: Stew size beef chunks of meat; dried corn; salt and black pepper--Optional: Potatoes and Onions 1. For the amount of soup you want to make, take stew size beef chunks from the store and cut them in half. Optional: Use lean ground beef (80%+) in place of beef chunks; avoid fatty ground beef. You want a good, strong beef flavored broth or the corn soup will be sweet flavored from the corn. 2. Boil water for the amount of soup you want to prepare. 3. When water is at the boiling point, drop in the determined quantity of half-sized beef chunks of meat. Add salt and pepper to taste. 4. Boil the meat until the broth has a brownish color to it. (Meat may be tender when the broth is light but for the real meat and corn flavor, it should be cooked until the broth is brownish.) 5. Optional: While the meat is boiling, add the raw onions and raw potatoes if you choose. 6. After the broth has reached the brownish color, add the quantity of dried corn you wish to cook. Cook for 30-45 minutes until softe and tender. The dried corn will absorb the beef flavor as it cooks. For more of a taste of eating dried corn, cook the corn about 30 minutes; corn will have more firmness to it. 7. Optional: If your potatoes are already boiled, add them in the last 10-15 minutes of cooking the corn. 8. Serve Corn Soup soupy as a meal or drain the soup and serve corn and beef as a side dish. This recipe courtesy of Juanita Echo-Hawk Neconie, of the Pawnee/Otoe-Missouri tribe. Yield: 1 recipe

Page 82

POLENTA WITH SMOKE DRIED TOMATOES

2 1 1 1/2 3 1/2 1 1

cups cup tsp. cup packed oz.

course-ground yellow corn meal cold water salt pine nuts (optional) 4 cups boiling water cup grated cheddar pack of smoke-dried tomatoes grated parmesan to taste

Start by 're-plumping' the smoke-dried tomatoes. This is done by placing the tomatoes in a bowl and by adding 1 cup of boiling water. Let the tomatoes soak for 5 minutes. Pour off the excess water in to the pot in which the polenta will be cooked for added flavor. Mix together the corn meal, cold water and salt and mash into paste. Bring 3 cups of water (plus the water from soaking the tomatoes) to a rapid boil. Add the corn paste and pine nuts. Lower the heat and cook for 10 - 15 minutes, stirring frequently with wire whisk. It should be the consistency of thick breakfast cereal. Mix in the cheese. Pour mixture into a buttered casserole dish. Distribute the tomatoes evenly over the surface of the polenta and sprinkle with grated parmesan. Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes before serving. Yield: 6-8 servings

POTAWATOMI POPCORN

3 3 11/2 1/2

quarts tablespoons teaspoons to

popped popcorn melted butter or margarine poultry seasoning 3/4 teaspoon cayenne salt

Notes: Poultry seasoning may not sound native, but its principal ingredient is sage--which grows wild in the Southwest. In a large bag or bowl, mix popcorn, melted butter, poultry seasoning, cayenne, and salt to taste. Yield: 10 to 12 servin

Page 83

Preparation Time (hh:mm): 6 min

PUEBLO CORN STEW

1

x

no ingredients

Pueblo Indians often simmered large pots of meat over an open fire and added fresh vegetables, like corn and squash to the pot. 1 T. vegetable oil 1 1/2 lbs. lean ground beef 1 1/2 C. sweet green peppers,cored, seeded, and chopped 1 1/2 C. yellow onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 8 lg. ears of corn (kernels cut off) or 4 C. frozen corn 1 can (14 oz.) crushed tomatoes 4 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. each black pepper and chili powder 1/4 tsp. salt 1/8 tsp. ground red pepper (cayenne) or to taste 2 C. zucchini or yellow summer squash, thinly sliced In a 6-quart Dutch oven, heat the oil over moderately high heat. Add the beef and cook, stirring frequently, for 8 minutes or until browned. Lower the heat, stir in the green peppers, onion, and garlic, and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in the corn, tomatoes, Worcestershire, black pepper, chili powder, salt, and red pepper and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the squash, then simmer for 5 minutes longer or until the vegetables are tender. Note: 1. Before Indian Corn can be used for Corn Soup it must be thoroughly dried. The corn is picked in the late fall, the husk pulled back, then braided into three foot long bunches and hung up in the barn so the crows can't get at it. 2. Before Indian Corn can be cooked into corn soup, it must first be put through a process called "lying:. Lye is an extremely strong acid found in hardwood ashes. This is what the traditional Native Americans used as it was abundant from their campfires. This lying process softens the outer shell somewhat and allows the two black eyes found on each kernel of corn to be washed off after cooking. The amount of wood ashes to be boiled with the corn is a very tricky task to accomplish properly. Too much lye will destroy the corn and too little will not do the job. Therefore we leave this to the "lyers" of the tribe. The corn is boiled with the hardwood ashes and water for about two hours. Then it is washed to remove the eyes or hulls and to rinse the corn free of lye. The Tuscarora

Page 84 reservation has three or four "lyers" who perform the difficult and messy task of "lying". A "lyer" will do a large amount of corn in a day depending on how many orders she has to do for the tribal members. I get my "lyed" corn from Mrs. Norton Rickard of Blacknose Spring Road. Usually I order five quarts at $3.00 per quart. I then divide it into three parts. I will freeze two of them and cook one part...about a quart and one half. ~unknown author Yield: 1 recipe

PUMPKIN AND CORN DESSERT

1 2 1/2

small ears cup

pumpkin corn, cut from cob whole wheat flour sugar or honey

Peel, seed and slice pumpkin. Cover with water and simmer until tender. Place corn kernels in pie tin in 350-degree oven; bake for 15 minutes. Add corn to pumpkin. Add flour, stirring constantly over low heat until mixture thickens. Add sugar or honey to taste. Serve hot.

PUMPKIN AND CORN DESSERT

1

x

no ingredients

Pumpkin and Corn Dessert 1 small pumpkin 2 ears corn, cut from cob 1/2 cup whole wheat flour Sugar or honey Peel, seed and slice pumpkin. Cover with water and simmer until tender. Place corn kernels in pie tin in 350-degree oven; bake for 15 minutes. Add corn to pumpkin. Add flour, stirring constantly over low heat until mixture thickens. Add sugar or honey to taste. Serve hot.

Page 85

PUMPKIN CORN SOUP WITH GINGER LIME CREAM

1

3 c. corn kernels

2 Garlic cloves, finely chopped 3/4 tsp. salt 3/4 tsp. white pepper 3 C. chicken stock 3 C. cooked pumpkin GARLIC CREAM 2 Limes, juice and zest only 1 T. peeled and grated fresh ginger 1/2 C. heavy cream This simple recipe is easy to prepare.... It is a delicious, rich-bodied soup, and the Ginger Lime Cream adds a refreshing zest. ***** In a medium covered pot, cook the corn kernels with a little water until soft, about 10 minutes. In a food processor, process the corn until smooth and run through a sieve and discard the skins. Combine the corn puree, garlic, salt, white pepper, and stock in a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, add the pumpkin, and cook 10 minutes while stirring. In another saucepan cook the lime juice and ginger 2 minutes over medium heat. Remove from the heat and pour through a sieve to remove the ginger. In a bowl, combine the ginger-lime juice, the lime zest (save some for the garnish), and cream. Whip until the mixture has soft peaks. Spoon a dollop of Ginger Lime cream onto each bowl filled with soup and garnish with the remaining line zest. Serve immediately. From "Native American Cooking," by Lois Ellen Frank Yield: 6 servings

Page 86

RICE PORRIDGE AND CORN (YUMI ZHOU)

6 2 3/4 2 3 1 2

cup teaspoon cup cup tablespoon tablespoon teaspoon

water salt short grain rice corn, fresh or frozen finely chopped scallions chili bean sauce ----GARNISH---roasted sichuan peppercorns (crush; ed)

In Chinese, this is called Yumi Zhou and can be eaten for breakfast or lunch, or as part of a full dinner. BRING THE WATER TO THE BOIL in a large pot, add the salt and then the rice. Bring back to the boil, stir several times, cover loosely, and let the rice simmer for 40 minutes at the lowest possible heat. Add the corn and simmer for 20 more minutes. Stir in the scallions and chili bean sauce. Just before serving, sprinkle on the roasted ground Sichuan peppercorns. KEN HOM - PRODIGY GUEST CHEFS COOKBOOK Yield: 2 servings

Page 87

ROAST NEW CORN FOR POWWOW

1

x

no ingredients

The key to this is fresh corn from the field just that morning trucked in to the powwow ground before noon. Cut it with an 8" stem attached to the cob. A big bed of coals with a grill over it that has removable pieces so you can keep adding wood or charcoals through the afternoon. Several big tin gallon cans to hold melted butter to dip the roasted ears in. LOTS of big plastic garbage bags for the discarded husks. Pull the husks down and strip off some silk and MAKE SURE YOU GET ANY WORMS. Pull the husks back up, put the ear on the grill. Turn it a couple times. Usually about 7 - 10 minutes it's done, but this varies with the type of corn (and freshness). Husks should blacken slightly at their edges, but not turn brown. Push done ears off direct heat. When serving: pull off husks (into garbage!) and dip ear into melted butter. Wrap paper towel around stem and hand to customer. Have several sprinkle-cans of salt on counter. Don't do this if you can't get long-stemmed fresh corn; it just doesn't work. EMAIL from a corn-on-cob expert: Yes it does work! We can only order loads of it from a farmer, not control its cut. Make sure your grill is very hot, so it roasts, not steams, the corn. Don't strip off the husks, to get the silk, they come off very easy when hot. Grill the corn about 7 minutes, so the edges of the husk blacken, then holding it with a dish towel, strip off the husks and silk and dip in butter. If worried about them seeing worms, turn your back to them. Oven roasted in husks: You can roast it anywhere from 9 to 45 minutes, a lot depends on the variety. The more sugar in the corn, the less roasting time. 45 minutes at 400 degrees turns the husks all brown and dry, just beginning to burn the edges. You might strip the husks, then grill it under the broiler till it turns reddish brown, this is really roasted corn for traditional recipes. It's not dried out. The kernels scrape off the cob really easily. Microwaving corn in the husk: Again, it depends on the variety, how much sugar is in it. Also microwaves are different. Usually 7 minutes on high is about right, then strip off the husks, using a dishtowel to protect from the heat. The silk will come off easily, too. Here's a recipe for "brown corn". Bake 6 ears in husks at 400 for 15 minutes. Fry a cup of sliced mushrooms with 3 cloves garlic chopped fine in olive oil.. Then shuck the cooled-off corn and brush it with olive oil. Broil it, turning a couple times about 10 minutes till it turns light brown, then cut off the kernels. Mix corn, mushrooms, and 3 tablespoons olive oil with 2 TBS chopped cilantro, 1 tsp marjoram, and some mild chile in adobo sauce chopped fine with sauce from the can -- not more than a couple tablespoons. How much sauce how much chile -- how hot do you like it? Squeeze in juice from 1/2 lime. Stir it all up. tossing to coat it all evenly like a salad.. Add about 1/2 tsp salt (taste). Serve either hot or at room temperature (room temperature: let sit for a couple hours is better) as a relish with chicken or meat. -- From A. Nonny Moose (by request) from WI

Page 88

ROAST NEW CORN ON THE COB FOR (OUTDOOR) POWWOW

text file The key to this is fresh corn from the field just that morning trucked in to the powwow ground before noon. Cut it with an 8' stem attached to the cob. A big bed of coals with a grill over it that has removable pieces so you can keep adding wood or charcoals through the afternoon. Several big tin gallon cans to hold melted butter to dip the roasted ears in. LOTS of big plastic garbage bags for the discarded husks. Pull the husks down and strip off some silk and MAKE SURE YOU GET ANY WORMS. Pull the husks back up, put the ear on the grill. Turn it a couple times. Usually about 7 - 10 minutes it's done, but this varies with the type of corn (and freshness). Husks should blacken slightly at their edges, but not turn brown. Push done ears off direct heat. When serving: pull off husks (into garbage!) and dip ear into melted butter. Wrap paper towel around stem and hand to customer. Have several sprinkle-cans of salt on counter. Don't do this if you can't get long-stemmed fresh corn; it just doesn't work. EMAIL from a corn-on-cob expert: Yes it does work! We can only order loads of it from a farmer, not control its cut. Make sure your grill is very hot, so it roasts, not steams, the corn. Don't strip off the husks, to get the silk, they come off very easy when hot. Grill the corn about 7 minutes, so the edges of the husk blacken, then holding it with a dish towel, strip off the husks and silk and dip in butter. If worried about them seeing worms, turn your back to them. Oven roasted in husks: You can roast it anywhere from 9 to 45 minutes, a lot depends on the variety. The more sugar in the corn, the less roasting time. 45 minutes at 400 degrees turns the husks all brown and dry, just beginning to burn the edges. You might strip the husks, then grill it under the broiler till it turns reddish brown, this is really roasted corn for traditional recipes. It's not dried out. The kernels scrape off the cob really easily. Microwaving corn in the husk: Again, it depends on the variety, how much sugar is in it. Also microwaves are different. Usually 7 minutes on high is about right, then strip off the husks, using a dishtowel to protect from the heat. The silk will come off easily, too. Here's a recipe for 'brown corn'. Bake 6 ears in husks at 400 for 15 minutes. Fry a cup of sliced mushrooms with 3 cloves garlic chopped fine in olive oil.. Then shuck the cooled-off corn and brush it with olive oil. Broil it, turning a couple times about 10 minutes till it turns light brown, then cut off the kernels. Mix corn, mushrooms, and 3 tablespoons olive oil with 2 TBS chopped cilantro, 1 tsp marjoram, and some mild chile in adobo sauce chopped fine with sauce from the can -- not more than a couple tablespoons. How much sauce how much chile -- how hot do you like it? Squeeze in juice from 1/2 lime. Stir it all up. tossing to coat it all evenly like a salad.. Add about 1/2 tsp salt (taste). Serve either hot or at room temperature (room temperature: let sit for a couple hours is better) as a relish with chicken or meat. -- From A. Nonny Moose (by request) from WI

Page 89

ROASTED CORN
By: yaskwatut@yahoo.com corn The stuff in the store is selectively bred and genetically altered...it is not Our Corn. I will be glad to trade some seed for those who need it. There is a whole teaching about OUR corn, I will share what I know if you wish! As for roasting, I take the hard corn, put in a cast iron frypan and roast over a fire or in the coals of my woodstove, once it is cooled it can be ground into flour. mix with a little water and simmer for corn mush.

ROASTED CORN AND GREEN CHILI SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

Ingreadients: 6 ears fresh corn 1 large poblano chili 3 cups water 1 14 1/2-ounce can low-salt chicken broth 1 8-ounce russet potato, peeled, quartered 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1/2 cup whipping cream Cilantro sprigs Instructions: Preheat oven to 450°F. Keeping husks on corn, place corn on heavy rimmed baking sheet. Roast until corn is fragrant and husks brown, about 30 minutes. Let cool. Remove husks from corn. Cut off corn kernels and set aside. Char chili over gas flame or in broiler until blackened on all sides. Enclose in paper bag and let stand 10 minutes. Peel, seed and quarter chili. Combine 3 1/2 cups water, broth and potato in large pot. Cover partially and simmer over medium heat until potato is tender, about 20 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer potato to processor; reserve cooking liquid. Add corn, chili and chopped cilantro to processor. Puree until mixture is as smooth as possible, gradually adding most of reserved cooking liquid through feed tube. Strain corn puree through sieve into large saucepan, pressing on solids. Mix in remaining cooking liquid and cream. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Page 90 Bring soup to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Garnish with cilantro sprigs and then serve immediately. Yield: 6

ROASTED CORN AND PUMPKIN SOUP
By: Williamsburg Inn 2 1/2 1/2 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 teaspoons tablespoons clove ounces tablespoon teaspoon bunch teaspoon ears pound gallon fresh corn sliced shallots chicken stock pumpkin salt olive oil garlic crabmeat sour cream black pepper mache cider vinegar pumpkin seed oil, to taste Shuck corn and cut from the cob. Separate into 2 piles. Heat a saute pan and add 1/2 of the sliced shallots, 1 pile of corn and salt, and pan roast until golden brown. Add 1/2 quart heavy cream. Puree and pass through a sieve, getting corn puree. Saute the second pile of corn in the same manner. Add 1/2 gallon of chicken stock. Put corn stock into a blender and pass through a sieve. Put on low and simmer to reduce. Cut pumpkin in quarters. Rub with oil and garlic. Roast in a preheated 350 degree oven until tender. Remove pumpkin pulp from outer skin and puree. Add roasted pumpkin puree and corn puree to corn stock. Season with salt and pepper. Mix crabmeat with sour cream and divide equal amounts between 4 bowls. Toss mache with cider vinegar and place on top of crabmeat. Lace with soup and garnish with pumpkin seed oil. Yield: 4 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 5 min

Page 91

SALSA CORNBREAD

1

x

no ingredients

2 Tbsp. melted butter 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt Pepper to taste 1 Tbsp. honey 3 eggs, beaten until light and foamy 1/2 cup milk or buttermilk 1/2 cup whole kernel corn 1 small onion, diced 1 clove garlic, diced 1 small jalapeño pepper, diced 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes 1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated Directions Generously coat an 8- or 9-inch cast-iron skillet with butter and place it in oven while the oven preheats to 425º. Blending well, combine all of the remaining ingredients except for the cheese, which you should reserve to sprinkle over the top of the prepared batter. When the butter has melted and the skillet is thoroughly heated, removed the hot skillet from the oven and carefully pour the batter into it, spreading it out evenly. Sprinkle the cheese over the batter. Return the skillet to oven and bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven and cool for 5 minutes. Serve warm and enjoy. This recipe was selected from Enduring Harvests by E. Barrie Kavasch, Globe Pequot Press. Yield: 8-10

Page 92

SAMP

info native corn Indian corn with a rock for pounding and a larger rock for a mortar, at the Southold Indian Museum. A wooden mortar found in the 1930s in a marsh in the area of Fort Massapeag, in Massapequa. The wooden mortar is at the Garvies Point Museum in Glen Cove. MORE STORIES: >Legacy: Samp Porridge <http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/2/> HISTORY MINUTE: >Indian Corn <http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/real/r204.ram> Requires Real Player <http://www.real.com/> Dinner, and a Snack, Too Corn porridge called samp was a staple for both Indians and colonists By Michele Ingrassia Staff Writer By the time Europeans landed, there were six varieties -- white, blue, red, yellow, orange and multicolor. ``It is the common food of all,'' Dutch settler Adriaen van der Donck observed. ``Young and old eat it; and they are so well accustomed to it, and fond of it, that when they visit our people, or each other, they consider themselves neglected unless they are treated with sappaen,'' or samp. Plentiful, portable and nonperishable, corn quickly became critical to the settlers, who added European touches -- salted beef, shellfish, herbs -to the Indians' fare. ``If it were not for corn, the settlers could not have gone across the nation building a country,'' says Long Island food historian Alice Ross. Ironically, she says, it was wheat that the Dutch and English had expected to sustain them. But they soon realized that the wheat seeds they brought from the Connecticut River Valley would take years to cultivate. Of course, before the hard corn could be eaten it had to be processed. And in the days before windmills, the Indians crafted a ``samp pounder,'' an oversized mortar and pestle, to do the work. The mortar was fashioned from a three-foot tree stump that was seared and scraped until a 12- to 15-inch cavity was hollowed out. The spring pole to maneuver the pestle came from a nearby sapling, bent and poised over the mortar. The pestle itself was a long, heavy stick, rounded at the end and fastened to the spring pole. To soften the corn, kernels were soaked overnight in water and lye -- or hot ashes -- then rinsed, dried and brought to the pounder. Particularly among the settlers, autumn Saturdays on Long Island were samp days, when villagers would cart their kernels to a central

Page 93 mortar, the thump, thump, thumping lasting into the early candlelight. ``There were a great many myths to go with the pounders,'' says Ross. ``One holds that, if sailors were coming into Long Island at night or in the fog and didn't want their ship destroyed on the rocks, they would listen for the sound of corn being pounded.'' Though the settlers took many recipes from the Indians, none was more important than the recipe for samp porridge, a heavy, stick-to-the-ribs corn, bean and meat stew. On its own, it was an everyday breakfast, lunch or dinner -- even a snack in a pre-Doritos world. With salted beef, it was a Sabbath supper. Most often, though, samp was a movable feast: Started on Saturday, it would simmer on the hearth all week, altered day by day with a bit of meat here, a drop of shellfish there. No one got bored. ``By the end of the week, a popcornflavored crust had formed around the pot,'' Ross says. ``Each family member would try to lift out the whole shell without breaking it, and whoever did got a special privilege.'' Though corn myths have faded, and you won't find samp on any four-star menu, corn remains quintessential Long Island fare -albeit again more luxury than staple. Annually, says Bill Sanok of the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Riverhead, the Island grows about 18 million ears of sweet corn, each one meant to be picked and eaten before the summer sun goes down. Developed about a century ago, that delicate corn has nothing in common with the coarse, flinty food that sustained centuries of Indians and settlers. True, a hard-kerneled crop remains, but the yield is barely 3 million ears per year. What becomes of it? ``It's used,'' Sanok says, ``for feeding animals.''

Indian corn on the stalk last month at Krupski's Farm in Peconic Legacy Samp Porridge Indians and colonial settlers had hundreds of corn dishes, but before the late 1800s, no one wrote down recipes. This samp porridge, from food historian Alice Ross, is a version of the Eastern Woodlands Indians' nausamp. 1 pound beans (any type available) 1 pound yellow or white samp (hulled corn, hominy) Preserved meat, such as corned beef or salt pork Peeled and cut root vegetables to taste, such as potato, carrots, onion,

Page 94 parsley Salt and pepper to taste 1. Soak beans in water overnight.2. In the morning, put samp into a large kettle with enough water to cover by three inches. Bring to a boil, then simmer for several hours, until tender; add water and stir from time to time.3. In another pot, cook soaked beans in water for 45 minutes, or until skins slip easily.4. One hour before serving, add prepared vegetables to samp and continue cooking until tender. Add beans. Correct flavor. Serve. Note: This dish improves with age, and is better after two to three days. Long Island: Our Story <http://www.newsday.com/extras/lihistory/>

SAMP 1

info native corn samp Hominy - Dried white or yellow corn kernels with their hulls and germ removed. Also called 'samp.' Ground hominy is called 'grits.' This popular staple in the South and Southwest came to us from the Algonquin Indians. Corn broken into corse ricelike form, boiled and eaten usually with milk and sugar. Wampanoag Samp: A Eastern Native word for a thick porridge made from coarsely ground Indian corn. Samp could be cooked with nuts, berries, or vegetables.

SANTA FE CHICKEN BREAST WITH FRESH CORN

1 4 1 3 2 1

reynolds bone-in cup ears medium medium

hot bags foil bag, large size split chicken breasts wegmans santa fe marinade (in seafo; od dept) corn-on-the-cob, shucked and cut in; thirds red peppers, cubed onion, cut in eighths

Preheat grill to MEDIUM-HIGH. Pour marinade over chicken breasts; toss to coat. Transfer chicken and marinade to foil bag. Top with vegetables. Double fold open end of foil bag. Place bag on grill rack. Grill covered 30 min. Wearing oven mitts, use a sharp knife to cut open top of foil bag. Carefully fold back foil, allowing steam to escape. Options: For spicier flavor, substitute Wegmans Fajita Marinade (in Meat Dept) for Santa Fe Marinade. Yield: serves 4 Preparation Time (hh:mm): 35 mi

Page 95

SARAH'S SUCCOTASH
By: Ken Beck and Jim Clark with recipes edited by Julia M. 1 1 2 1/2 can can tablespoons cup lima beans; (16 ounce) drained whole kernel corn; (12 ounce) drained butter or margarine light cream Salt and pepper In a saucepan combine the lima beans, corn, butter, and cream. Heat through, and add salt and pepper to taste. Description: "Your party line will be abuzz with this one." Source: "Aunt Bee's Mayberry Cookbook" S(Shared by): "mclain_cj@msn.com" Copyright: "1991 Ken Beck and Jim Clark ("The Andy Griffith Show" copyright 1991 Mayberry Enterprises, Inc.)" Reposted by Goldi <gemini88@earthlink.net> 11-21-03

------------------TTFN Hugs and Blessings-Goldi May your greatest wishes be the least of your blessings. ListMom for MasterMixes at Yahoogroups.com MasterMixes Website http://christi.is.dreaming.org/MasterMixes

--Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.542 / Virus Database: 336 - Release Date: 11/18/03

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Message: 11 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:09:24 -0500 From: "Goldilocks" <gemini88@earthlink.net> Subject: Succotash #2

Page 96

Yield: 6 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

SEAFOOD CORN PUDDING

1 1 1 1 1 3/4 cup condensed milk 1-1/2 lb small shrimp, shelled Salt and pepper to taste Instructions: Preheat oven to 325F.

ingredients: 4 large ears corn 3 eggs well beaten 2 tbs melted butter 1 tsp sugar

Grease well with butter and sprinkle with cornmeal a 1-1/2 quart casserole. Set aside. Grate the fresh corn into a medium bowl. In a separate bowl beat eggs and fold into the corn. Add melted butter, sugar and condensed milk. Blend well. Add shrimp, salt and pepper, and blend well. Pour into the prepared casserole and bake in the preheated oven for 1 hour. Serve immediately. Yield: 6 servings

Page 97

SIMPLY A'MAIZE'ING CORN ICE CREAM

11/4 11/2 11/4 1/2 5 1

cups cups cups cup large teaspoon

cooked corn kernels whipping cream milk raw sugar or firmly packed light br; own sugar egg yolks vanilla

Notes: Use canned or thawed frozen corn kernels. If making ahead, store ice cream airtight in the freezer up to 1 week. To serve, soften at 5-second intervals in a microwave oven at full power (100%) before scooping into bowls. Serve with scoops of purchased chocolate sorbet or ice cream (buy 1 qt.), then top with raspberry sauce (recipe follows). 1. In a blender, purée 1 cup corn and 1/4 cup cream until very smooth. 2. Rub purée through a fine strainer into a 10- to 12-inch frying pan. Add remaining corn and cream, along with milk and sugar. Stir over high heat until bubbles form at pan rim. 3. In a small bowl, beat yolks to blend with about 1/2 cup of the hot corn mixture, then pour into the frying pan and stir over low heat until custard coats the back of a metal spoon thickly, about 9 minutes. Add vanilla. 4. Set the pan in ice water and stir often until mixture is cold, about 15 minutes. Cover and chill at least 3 hours or up to 1 day. 5. Pour cold mixture into an ice cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer's directions or until dasher is hard to turn. Yield: 1 quart Preparation Time (hh:mm): 1 hou

Page 98

SNAPPY SUCCOTASH

1 1/2 2 2 1 1/2

cups cups tablespoons dash cup

cooked or canned whole kernel corn; drained cooked or canned green lima beans; drained butter or margarine chili powder salt and pepper to taste half and half

Combine all ingredients; heat and serve. Yield: 6 servings. Source: "The Complete Holiday Cookbook" S(FORMATTED): "For MC-Cookbooks by Jerry" Copyright: "© MCMLXIX Favorite Recipe Press" Reposted by Goldi <gemini88@earthlink.net> 11-21-03

------------------TTFN Hugs and Blessings-Goldi May your greatest wishes be the least of your blessings. ListMom for MasterMixes at Yahoogroups.com MasterMixes Website http://christi.is.dreaming.org/MasterMixes

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________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Message: 13 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:07:42 -0500 From: "SunCat" <suncat@capital.net> Subject: ISO recipes I am hoping that somebody has a biscotti recipe and possibly any other cookie that is known to go with coffee. I am making up a coffee lovers basket for my sister-in-law for the

Page 99 holidays... she loves coffee and chocolate... Tatiana

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Message: 14 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:11:31 -0500 From: "Goldilocks" <gemini88@earthlink.net> Subject: Succotash (Canning) Forgot to mention that my grandmother always added onions so the first one I sent was the closest to hers. TTFN Hugs and Blessings-Goldi May your greatest wishes be the least of your blessings. ListMom for MasterMixes at Yahoogroups.com MasterMixes Website http://christi.is.dreaming.org/MasterMixes Yield: 0 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

SOUTHWESTERN GRILLED CORN

--------

----------- --

-----------------------------r parsley

1/3 c ma arine or butte 2 T snip d cilantro or

In a small saucepan melt margarine or butter. Stir in cilantro or parsley, salt, and ground red pepper. (or use a microwave safe dish and the microwave) Remove the husks from fresh ears of corn. Scrub ears with a stiff brush to remove silks. Rinse ears; pat dry with paper towels. Place each ear of corn on a piece of heavy foil. Brush ears with margarine mixture. Wrap corn securely in foil. To Cook by Direct Grill Method: Grill corn on the grill rack of a grill directly over medium to medium-high coals about 20 minutes or until kernels are tender, turning frequently as they grill to get corn that's evenly cooked. formatted by ckpenner77@hotmail.com Yield: 0 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

Page 100

SOUTHWESTERN GRILLED CORN 1
By: ckpenner77@hotmail.com 1/3 2 1/4 1/4 6 c T t t fresh margarine or butter snipped cilantro or parsley salt ground red pepper ears of corn

In a small saucepan melt margarine or butter. Stir in cilantro or parsley, salt, and ground red pepper. (or use a microwave safe dish and the microwave) Remove the husks from fresh ears of corn. Scrub ears with a stiff brush to remove silks. Rinse ears; pat dry with paper towels. Place each ear of corn on a piece of heavy foil. Brush ears with margarine mixture. Wrap corn securely in foil. To Cook by Direct Grill Method: Grill corn on the grill rack of a grill directly over medium to medium-high coals about 20 minutes or until kernels are tender, turning frequently as they grill to get corn that's evenly cooked.

SPICED CORN ON THE COB

1

x

no ingredients

Serves 2 This wonderful recipe is inspired by an idea given to me by an Indian friend. The slices of corn cob are poached in an aromatic, spicy sauce with a yogurt base, and are sumptuously delicious. It makes a complete meal if served with the simple mushroom curry. 2 large, tender corn cobs, cut into 4 pieces Vegetable oil, 3 tbs 1 small onion, finely chopped Fresh root ginger, 1 cm (½ inch) grated 1 clove of garlic, crushed Thick set yogurt, 100 g (4 oz) 1/4 tsp Salt For the spice paste: 1/2 tsp Turmeric 1/4 tsp 5-spice ½ tsp Pinch of chilli powder 3 tblsp Garam masala ½ tsp Ground coriander 1 tsp Water Mix the spices together and stir into a paste with the water. Fry the corn cob pieces in the oil until browned all over, and set aside. Then fry the onion, ginger and garlic for a few minutes until softened, and stir in the spice paste. Cook gently for 2-3 minutes and then

Page 101 stir in the yogurt gradually. Season to taste with salt and return the corn to the pan. Heat through gently and it is ready to serve. Yield: 2

SPICY CORN SOUP
By: Lois Ellen Frank 4 1 1 1 1 1 1/2 6 1 1 1/2 ears tablespoon yellow tablespoon tablespoon teaspoon teaspoon cups red cups corn, kernels scraped from the cob,; or 3 cups corn kernels ( olive oil onion, diced finely chopped garlic dried chipotle chili powder *see no; te salt black pepper chicken stock bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seede; d and diced heavy cream

*Note: Jalapenos that have been dried and then smoked are referred to as chipotles. Dried chipotle chiles can be ground into a powder and used for seasonings. This medium-size, thick fleshed chile is smoky and sweet and has a subtle, deep, rounded heat. In Santa Fe, local farmers sell fresh ground chipotle chili powder, but it is also available by mail order from the Source Guide in my cookbook; Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations. Prepare the corn by cutting the kernels from the cob. You should have approximately 3 cups of corn kernels from 4 cobs of corn. Save the corn cobs and set aside. The cobs will add additional corn flavor to the soup. In a medium-sized saucepan over medium-high heat, add the olive oil, then the onions. Saute for 3 to 4 minutes until they are translucent, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and chipotle chili powder and saute for 1 more minute. Add the corn kernels and saute for another 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Add the salt, black pepper, and chicken stock and bring to a boil. (If you have cut your corn fresh from the cob, place the reserved cobs into the saucepan at this time). Once the mixture has boiled, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent the corn kernels from burning or sticking to the bottom of the pan. While the corn soup is simmering, roast the red bell pepper. Char the skin of the pepper until it is black over an open flame or on a grill. When the skin is blistered and blackened, remove the pepper from the flame and place in a paper or plastic bag and seal. Let steam for 15 minutes. When the pepper is cool enough to handle, peel, seed, and dice it. Place the diced bell pepper into a blender with 1/2 cup of the heavy cream and blend thoroughly for 1 minute. Pour through a fine sieve and discard the contents of the sieve. Pour the red bell pepper sauce into a plastic squirt bottle and set aside. Remove the corn soup mixture from the heat, discard the corn cobs and set aside. Place the corn soup mixture in a blender and puree for 3 minutes. Pour the mixture through a sieve and discard the contents of the sieve. Return the mixture to a saucepan, add the remaining 1 cup of heavy cream, and heat, over medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Pour into bowls, garnish with some of the red pepper sauce and serve immediately. Episode#: BF1C16 Copyright © 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All Rights Reserved

Page 102

Yield: 6 servings

SUCCOTASH

1 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 1 2 1/2 2 1/8 1/8 2

cups cup cup cup tsp. tbsp. garlic cup tbsps. tsp. tsp. cups

frozen or fresh corn kernels, thawe; d chopped onion chopped summer squash chopped red bell pepper ground cumin olive oil cloves, minced defatted chicken broth chopped fresh cilantro hot sauce ground pepper frozen baby lima beans, thawed

Place a large nonstick skillet over high heat until hot. Add corn, red pepper, onion, and cumin; saut 5 minutes until vegetables are slightly blackened. Add summer squash, olive oil, and garlic; saut ing and additional minute. Reduce heat to medium-high, add broth and remaining ingredients. Cook 3-5 minutes or until heated through, stirring frequently. Yield: 8-10 1/2-cup se

Page 103

SUCCOTASH

3 1/2 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1 1/2

tablespoons cup small teaspoon cups cup cups

butter water onion; chopped black pepper lima beans heavy cream corn

In a skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until translucent. Add the beans, corn, water and pepper. Cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the cream and cook for 5 minutes more, stirring constantly. Serve hot. Serves 4-6. Source: "Corn Lovers Cook Book Edited & Compiled by Margaret M. Barrett" S(Scanned and Formatted For): "MC-Cookbooks by Mary [mnmpoms@ponyexpress.net] November, 2003" Copyright: "©1999 by Golden West Publishers; 3rd printing ©2003 ISBN 1-885590-46-6" Reposted by Goldi <gemini88@earthlink.net> 11-21-03 -------------------

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________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Message: 10 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:08:49 -0500 From: "Goldilocks" <gemini88@earthlink.net> Subject: Sarah's Succotash Yield: 4 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

Page 104

SUCCOTASH #2
By: Aunt Sammy's Radio Recipes 1931 1 4 2 1/2 2 pint ears cups cup tablespoons shelled lima beans corn; or corn; cut from cob cream; or rich milk butter; or other fat salt Simmer the beans in a small quantity of lightly salted water until almost tender. In the meantime use a sharp knife to trim off the tops of the corn kernels and scrape out the pulp with the back of the knife. Mix the corn with the beans, add the cream or milk and cook for 10 minutes, until there is no starchy flavor in the corn. Add the fat and enough salt to season, and serve. Left-over corn and cooked beans may be combined in the same way with the cream or milk, and seasoning, and heated to the boiling point before serving. Originally Posted to RecipeLu Reposted by Goldi <gemini88@earthlink.net> 11-21-03

------------------TTFN Hugs and Blessings-Goldi May your greatest wishes be the least of your blessings. ListMom for MasterMixes at Yahoogroups.com MasterMixes Website http://christi.is.dreaming.org/MasterMixes

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________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Message: 12 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 11:09:57 -0500 From: "Goldilocks" <gemini88@earthlink.net> Subject: Snappy Succotash

Page 105

Yield: 1 serving Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

SUCCOTASH (CANNING)

10 1 1/2 1 1/2

ears quarts tablespoon teaspoon

fresh corn shelled fresh lima beans plus salt; divided Boiling water

Place corn in a large Dutch oven, and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and cook 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and cool. Cook beans, uncovered, in boiling water to cover 5 minutes. Drain, and reserve liquid. Cut corn from cob; combine corn and beans. Pack into hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Pour in boiling bean liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace. (Supplement with boiling water if you don't have enough bean liquid.) Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to each pint, 1 teaspoon salt to each quart, if desired. Remove air bubbles; wipe jar rims. Cover at once with metal lids, and screw on bands. Process in pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure (240 degrees). Process pints 1 hour and quarts 1 hour and 25 minutes. NOTES : When reheating Succotash, add additional seasonings as desired. SOURCE: "Southern Living CD Cookbook" Copyright: "1987, 1994 Oxmoor House, Inc." Yield: "7 pints" Start to Finish Time: "1:30" Formatted by Dee Dee <deeurb@comcast.net> Reposted by Goldi <gemini88@earthlink.net> 11-21-03

-------------------

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________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ Yield: 28 servings Preparation Time (hh:mm): 0:00

SUCCOTASH CHOWDER
By: Joe Comiskey 1 1 1/4 1/4 2 1 1 6 1 1/4 1 1/8 md tb ts ts cn pk pk oz c c ts onion; chopped unsalted butter dried thyme celery seeds chicken broth frozen lima beans - (10 oz) frozen whole-kernel corn (10 oz) ham; diced instant potato flakes half-and-half freshly-ground black pepper

Saute onion in butter in large saucepan until tender, 3 minutes. Add thyme, celery seeds; saute 30 seconds. Add broth, lima beans, corn and ham. Boil gently for 15 minutes. Whisk in potato flakes until liquid is thickened and smooth. Gradually sir in half-and-half and pepper. Heat to serving temperature. Yield: 4 servings

SUCCOTASH RECIPE CHEROKEE COOKBOOK
By: poochietoo@aol.com text file Fry four to six strips of bacon slowly and when done add one coarsely chopped onion and 1/4 cup chopped green pepper. When the onion is golden add two cups of baby Lima beans and 2 cups of corn and simmer, covered, about ten to fifteen minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper and also butter if desired.

Page 107

SUMMER CORN PUDDING
By: Tina Ujlaki 4 1/3 1 2 2 1 1 1 ears cup teaspoon tablespoons large cup cup tablespoon of corn, shucked sugar salt all-purpose flour eggs, beaten milk heavy cream unsalted butter, melted pinch of freshly grated nutmeg 1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Lightly butter an 8-inch square glass baking dish. Stand the ears of corn in a large bowl and cut off the kernels. Add the sugar, flour and salt and toss well. 2. In a bowl, mix the eggs, milk and cream. Add this mixture to the corn, stirring until thoroughly blended. Stir in the butter. Pour the pudding into the baking dish. Set the dish in a hot water bath. Bake on the top shelf of the oven for about 40 minutes, until just set. Let cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.

SUMMER SALAD

1

x

no ingredients

Shave raw uncooked sweet corn cobs on a corn cutter into a mixing bowl, until you have enough for a family of 4- 6. Add cubed raw portobello or other mushrooms of your choice,( 1 package fresh) 1 Diced raw fresh red pepper and add a package of onion or alfalpa sprouts. Moisten with Yield: 1 recipe

Page 108

SWEET CORN CAKE

Corn husks (enough to line and cover a 3 qt. steamer basket in a double layer) 1/4 cup vegetable shortening (like Crisco) 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened 1 cup masa dough* 1 cup cold water 1 lb. corn, fresh and cut off the cob (or frozen and thawed) 1/2 cup yellow corn meal 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup heavy cream 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt

k by popular demand! Our most requested recipe! This popular dish is really more like a pudding than a cake. Serve a scoop of it freshly steamed as it loses its light, fluffy consistency when reheated in the oven. The secret to making great corn cake is in the steaming. You can try and bake the cake in a pan in the oven (inserted in a pan of water to create steam), or you can steam them on the stove in a steamer basket** as in the following recipe: oak corn husks in hot water for 30 minutes until pliable. Drain. * Place vegetable shortening and butter in a mixing bowl and beat on medium speed until mixture becomes fluffy and creamy. Add masa and mix on low speed for about 2 minutes. Add water and mix well on medium speed. * In a large mixing bowl combine the corn meal, sugar, whipping cream, baking powder and salt. Add the masa mixture and the ground corn and mix well. * To steam the corn cake, line the steamer basket with the softened corn husks. Fill with corn cake batter. Cover with more corn husks and a tea

Page 109 towel to absorb moisture. Steam on the stove for about 21/2 hours. Batter should not stick to husks when corn cake is done. If it does, it needs to steam longer. *Note on Masa: You can buy prepared masa dough at most Mexican and specialty food markets. Or you can readily purchase Masa Harina (made by Quaker Oats) which is dried corn that has been ground and treated. It is the basic ingredient used in making tamale dough (also called masa). **Note on steamers: You can also improvise a steamer by placing a rack on cans in a large stockpot or Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid.

SWEET CORN MIXTURE - (SEDI TSUYA SELU)
By: Tsalagi recipe Directions: Skin flour corn by putting it in lye. Cook the corn until it is done. Add beans and continue cooking until the beans are done. Add pumpkin and cook until it is done, then add walnut (se di) meal and a little corn meal. Add a little sugar or molasses if you'd like. Cook until the corn meal is done.

Page 110

SWEET CORN MUFFINS

1

x

no ingredients

Since I only have a six cup muffin tin I made half a cornbread recipe. 1/2 C. yellow or blue cornmeal (not mix) 1/2 C. all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking powder 2 T. sugar 2 green onions, sliced thinly corn scraped off one medium size ear of corn, partially cooked 1 egg 1/2 C. milk> 2 T. oil Measure out dry ingredient into a bowl. Add egg, oil, and milk; mixing well. Finally, stir in green onions and corn. Fill greased muffin tins to about two-thirds full. Bake at 425 degrees for twenty minutes. Note: I had just a bit of batter left and so I poured it into my skillet and fried it. It turned out somewhere between a pancake and a fritter. Thought it was pretty good though.

TA KWA A WI ( CORN MUSH )

1 1 1 Sugar or salt

1 c dried co 4 c water 1 tb shorteni

1. Grind corn in a grinder. Keep the coarse corn separate form the fine grounds. 2. Boil water and shortening in a pot. Stir in coarse corn grounds and cook until tender; then add fine corn grounds.\ 3. Stir mixture until it becomes mushy. SErve ta kwa a wi ( pronounced ta qua hawn) with sugar or salt to taste. Rose Allen, Sac and Fox Tribe, Cushing Oklahoma Smithsonian Folklife Cookbook Yield: 4 servings

Page 111

THREE SISTERS
By: Chet Day 1/4 1 1 2 1 1/4 1/8 1 2 2 1 16 2 2 16 12 2 1/4 c red tsp cloves tsp tsp tsp tsp c c -oz cups oz oz jalapeno c olive oil (or spray pan with olive; oil spray) pepper, seeded and cut into 1/4' di; ce cumin seeds (or ground cumin) minced garlic dried oregano ground cinnamon ground cloves paprika thawed frozen corn kernels winter squash (pumpkin or acorn) cu; t into 3/4' dice can (2 cups) plum tomatoes, chopped; , reserve juices vegetable broth cans black beans, drained and rinse; d salt and pepper to taste medium wide egg noodles, cooked and; drained peppers, seeded and finely minced toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds,; optional

(I use sunflower seeds. A nice crunchy addition! ) Heat 1/4 cup olive oil until hot (or spray pan with olive oil spray and heat). Add red pepper and saute for a few minutes and add the cumin seeds and saute for a few seconds until you get whiff of their aroma. Add the garlic, oregano, cinnamon, cloves and paprika and saute for a few seconds until aromatic. Add corn, winter squash, tomatoes with their juices, and the broth and bring it all to a boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until squash is almost tender. Add beans, cover and simmer until for 5 to 10 minutes until squash is completely tender. (If liquid seems to be evaporating too much, add more water.) Season to taste with salt and pepper (I leave out the salt) and spoon over the cooked noodles. Garnish with the minced jalapeno peppers and the toasted sunflower seeds. Yield: serves 4

Page 112

THREE SISTERS STORY

three sisters story Modern day agriculturists know it as the genius of the indians, who interplanted pole beans and squash with corn, using the strength of the sturdy corn stalks to support the twining beans and the shade of the spreading squash vines to trap moisture for the growing crop. Research has further revealed the additional benefits of this 'companion planting.' the bacterial colonies on the bean roots capture nitrogen from the air, some of which is released into the soil to nourish the high nitrogen needs of the corn. To Native Americans, however, the meaning of the three sisters runs deep into the physical and spiritual well-being of their people. Known as the'sustainers of life,' the Iroquois consider corn, beans and squash to be special gifts from the creator. The well-being of each crop is believed to be protected by one of the Three Sister spirits. many an indian legend has been woven around the 'Three Sisters' - sisters who would never be apart from one another sisters who should be planted together, eaten together and celebrated together. A Gift From The Oneida People From: Sam Lefkowitz Date: 15 Jan 97 Home Cooking Ä Yield: yield: 1 servin

THREE SISTERS SUCCOTASH

1 2 2 1 1 1 1

tablespoon unpeeled unpeeled cup cup cup heaping

canola oil zucchini squash, julienned summer squash, julienned fire-roasted corn kernels chopped fresh tomatoes cooked heirloom beans .(anasazi, ap; paloosa, black, buttersco calypso, tepary, chestnut lima or a; ny variety of beans) tablespoon sage pestofresh sage lea; ves for garnish

Corn, beans and squash are the principal foods of many Native American tribes. They*re called the sisters because they support one another. The corn grows tall, allowing the bean vine to twine around her stalk. The bean fixes the nitrogen in the soil, and the squash has big leaves that hold in moisture . 1. Heat canola oil in a large, nonstick skillet. Add squash, corn, tomatoes, beans and 1 heaping tablespoon of sage pesto. Toss quickly and remove from heat; do not overcook. Place in large bowl, garnish with fresh sage leaves, serve immediately. Yield: serves 8 Preparation Time (hh:mm): 20 mi

Page 113

TRADITIONAL CORN SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

Wash and put 1 1/2 quarts of "lyed" Indian White Corn in an 8 quart pot. Fill with water 3/4 full and cover. Bring to a boil and keep at a rolling boil for 1 1/2 hours, corn should open full. You may want to cook corn a while longer . If the corn is not fully open, stir occasionally. Do not let it stick to the bottom of the pan. While the corn is cooking, cut up 1 1/2 lbs of pork shoulder butt steaks into 3/4" square pieces. Do the same with 3/4 lbs of salt pork. Place meat in a separate pan and boil for 1 hour. Water should cover pork 4" or so. Add if necessary...you will need this for stock. After the corn opens to your satisfaction or two hours maximum, remove from stove and pour through strainer. Do not rinse corn. Rinse out pot and put corn back into pot. Add the cooked pork along with the stock. Open three 1 lb cans of dark red kidney beans and add. Rinse cans, add water to cover mixture 3 inches or so. Boil mixture for another 1 1/2 to 2 hours, adding water in necessary. Stir occasionally, do not let it stick to the bottom of the pot. Serve in individual bowls, season with salt and pepper after serving. Best if eaten with homemade, warm yeast bread and freshly churned butter. ~unknown author Yield: 1 recipe

WAS-NAH (CORN AND CHERRY SNACK)

1 1 c Bing cherries, seeded 1/2 lb Butter, softened 2 c Brown sugar

2 c cornmeal

To be authentic, use chokecherries in place of the Bing cherries, maple sugar or syrup in place of the sugar and buffalo kidney fat (or beef suet?) in place of the butter. Place the cornmeal on a cookie sheet and toast it in a 325 degree oven until it begins to brown. Careful -- this will not take long. Drain the cherries well and chop coarsely. Mix all ingredients together well and chill in the refrigerator. To serve, simply dish out by the tablespoonful. It is eaten like candy. Source: "The Frugal Gourmet Cooks American" by Jeff Smith. Yield: 8 servings

Page 114

ZUNI CORN SOUP

1

x

no ingredients

1 tb Corn Oil 1 c Thinly Sliced Green Onions 1 lb Boneless Lamb; Venison or -or Goat Meat; cubed 6 c Meat Broth or water; divided 4 c Corn Kernels 2 ts Ground New Mexico Red Chile Salt Fresh Cilantro Sprigs or Chopped Cilantro Heat oil in soup pot or Dutch oven. Add green onions and saute briefly. Stir in meat and 3 cups broth. Simmer about 1 hour, stirring occasionally, until meat is tender. Add remaining broth, corn, chili and salt. Simmer about 15 minutes more, until corn is tender. Serve the hot soup in bowls topped with cilantro. from: Southwest The Beautiful Yield: 4 servings

ZUNI MUSH

2 1 4

cups tsp crushed

fresh corn or no. 2 caned corn oregano coriander seeds salt to taste cornmeal as needed to thicken

Cook together until done. Serve with red chilli sauce. Usually served thin. Good with toast. Was served to the old and sick after adding brown sugar.

Page 115

ZUNI SUMMER SUCCOTASH
By: WhiteWulfsMoM@aol.com 1 3 1 4 1/2 1/4 2 2 3 4 1/4 lb cups clove mint tsp tsp cups summer ears green cup boneless lamb, cubed hot beef stock garlic, mashed leaves, crushed salt black pepper green beans squash fresh sweet corn onions, with tops shelled and crushed sunflower seeds

Gently simmer the lamb in the stock, together with the garlic, mint, salt and pepper, until it is tender, 30 to 40 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare vegetables. Remove the ends of the green beans and cut each in two. Cut squash into small cubes. Cut kernels from the corn cobs. Chop onions and their tops. Add vegetables to the meat and simmer until vegetables are tender but still crisp, 5 to 8 minutes. Stir in the sunflower seeds to thicken the broth. VARIATION:Add 6 squash blossoms to the vegetables, either whole or chopped. Add 2 green chilies, roasted, seeded and chopped. Succotash is Indian for 'hodgepodge,' 'gallimaufry,' olla podrida, meaning whatever you have on hand, depending on the season. Eliza Leslie, in her New Recipes for Cooking (1852), used dried shelled beans and hard corn for Winter Saccatash to accompany pickled pork. A typical southwestern Indian succotash retains this meaning in a stew of fresh spring or summer vegetables, enriched with spring lamb. This is the sort of stew that might be sweetened by squash blossoms or thickened, as here, with crushed sunflower seeds.

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