You are on page 1of 16

FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E.

 Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     29 
 
3 Concepts of Stress Analysis 
3.1 Introduction 
Here the concepts of stress analysis will be stated in a finite element context.  That means that the primary 
unknown will be the (generalized) displacements.  All other items of interest will mainly depend on the 
gradient of the displacements and therefore will be less accurate than the displacements.  Stress analysis 
covers several common special cases to be mentioned later.  Here only two formulations will be considered 
initially.  They are the solid continuum form and the shell form.  Both are offered in SW Simulation.  They differ 
in that the continuum form utilizes only displacement vectors, while the shell form utilizes displacement 
vectors and infinitesimal rotation vectors at the element nodes. 
As illustrated in Figure 3‐1, the solid elements have three translational degrees of freedom (DOF) as nodal 
unknowns, for a total of 12 or 30 DOF.  The shell elements have three translational degrees of freedom as well 
as three rotational degrees of freedom, for a total of 18 or 36 DOF.  The difference in DOF types means that 
moments or couples can only be applied directly to shell models.  Solid elements require that couples be 
indirectly applied by specifying a pair of equivalent pressure distributions, or an equivalent pair of equal and 
opposite forces at two nodes on the body. 
                               
Shell node                                                    Solid node 
Figure 3‐1  Nodal degrees of freedom for frames and shells; solids and trusses 
 
Stress transfer takes place within, and on, the boundaries of a solid body.  The displacement vector, u, at any 
point in the continuum body has the units of meters [m], and its components are the primary unknowns.   The 
components of displacement are usually called u, v, and w in the x, y, and z‐directions, respectively.  Therefore, 
they imply the existence of each other, u ↔ (u, v, w).  All the displacement components vary over space.  As in 
the heat transfer case (covered later), the gradients of those components are needed but only as an 
intermediate quantity.  The displacement gradients have the units of [m/m], or are considered dimensionless.   
Unlike the heat transfer case where the gradient is used directly, in stress analysis the multiple components of 
the displacement gradients are combined into alternate forms called strains.  The strains have geometrical 
interpretations that are summarized in Figure 3‐2 for 1D and 2D geometry.   
In 1D, the normal strain is just the ratio of the change in length over the original length, ε
x
 = ∂u / ∂x.  In 2D and 
3D, both normal strains and shear strains exist.  The normal strains involve only the part of the gradient terms 
parallel to the displacement component.  In 2D they are ε

= ∂u / ∂x and ε
y
 = ∂v / ∂y.  As seen in Figure 3‐2 (b), 
they would cause a change in volume, but not a change in shape of the rectangular differential element.  A 
shear strain causes a change in shape. The total angle change (from 90 degrees) is used as the engineering 
definition of the shear strain.  The shear strains involve a combination of the components of the gradient that 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     30 
are perpendicular to the displacement component.  In 2D, the engineering shear strain is γ = (∂u / ∂y + ∂v / 
∂x), as seen in Figure 3‐2(c).  Strain has one component in 1D, three components in 2D, and six components in 
3D.  The 2D strains are commonly written as a column vector in finite element analysis, ε = (ε
x
      ε
y
     γ)
T

 
Figure 3‐2 Geometry of normal strain (a) 1D, (b) 2D, and (c) 2D shear strain 
Stress is a measure of the force per unit area acting on a plane passing through the point of interest in a body.  
The above geometrical data (the strains) will be multiplied by material properties to define a new physical 
quantity, the stress, which is directly proportional to the strains.  This is known as Hooke’s Law:  σ = E ε, (see 
Figure 3‐3 ) where the square material matrix, E, contains the elastic modulus, and Poisson’s ratio of the 
material.  The 2D stresses are written as a corresponding column vector, σ = (σ
x
    σ
y
    τ)
T
.  Unless stated 
otherwise, the applications illustrated here are assume to be in the linear range of a material property. 
The 2D and 3D stress components are shown in Figure 3‐4.  The normal and shear stresses represent the 
normal force per unit area and the tangential forces per unit area, respectively.  They have the units of 
[N/m^2], or [Pa], but are usually given in [MPa].  The generalizations of the engineering strain definitions are 
seen in Figure 3‐5.  The strain energy (or potential energy) stored in the differential material element is half 
the scalar product of the stresses and the strains.  Error estimates from stress studies are based on primarily 
on the strain energy (or strain energy density). 
 
                                            
Figure 3‐3  Hooke's Law for linear stress‐strain, σ = E ε 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     31 
 
                               
Figure 3‐4  Stress components in 2D (left) and 3D 
 
 
Figure 3‐5  Graphical representations of 3D normal strains (a) and shear strains 
3.2 Axial bar example 
The simplest available stress example is an axial bar, shown in Figure 3‐6, restrained at one end and subjected 
to an axial load, P, at the other end and the weight is neglected.   Let the length and area of the bar be denoted 
by L, and A, respectively.  Its material has an elastic modulus of E.  The axial displacement, u (x), varies linearly 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     32 
from zero at the support to a maximum of δ at the load point.  That is, u (x) = x δ/ L, so the axial strain is ε
x
 = ∂u 
/ ∂x = δ / L, which is a constant.  Likewise, the axial stress is everywhere constant, σ = E ε = E δ / L which in the 
case simply reduces to σ = P / A.  Like many other more complicated problems, the stress here does not 
depend on the material properties, but the displacement always does, o = PI EA ⁄ .  You should always 
carefully check both the deflections and stresses when validating a finite element solution. 
Since the assumed displacement is linear here, any finite element model would give exact deflection and the 
constant stress results.  However, if the load had been the distributed bar weight the exact displacement 
would be quadratic in x and the stress would be linear in x.  Then, a quadratic element mesh would give exact 
stresses and displacements everywhere, but a linear element mesh would not. 
The elastic bar is often modeled as a linear spring.  In introductory mechanics of materials the axial stiffness of 
a bar is defined as k = E A / L, where the bar has a length of L, an area A, and is constructed of a material elastic 
modulus of E. Then the above bar displacement can be written as o = P k ⁄ , like a linear spring. 
       σ = P / A,   δ = P L / E A 
Figure 3‐6 A linearly elastic bar with an axial load 
3.3 Structural mechanics 
Modern structural analysis relies extensively on the finite element method.  The most popular integral 
formulation, based on the variational calculus of Euler, is the Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy.   
Basically, it states that the displacement field that satisfies the essential displacement boundary conditions and 
minimizes the total potential energy is the one that corresponds to the state of static equilibrium.  This implies 
that displacements are our primary unknowns.  They will be interpolated in space as will their derivatives, and 
the strains.  The total potential energy, Π, is the strain energy, U, of the structure minus the mechanical work, 
W, done by the external forces.  From introductory mechanics, the mechanical work, W, done by a force is the 
scalar dot product of the force vector, F, and the displacement vector, u, at its point of application. 
The well‐known linear elastic spring will be reviewed to illustrate the concept of obtaining equilibrium 
equations from an energy formulation.  Consider a linear spring, of stiffness k, that has an applied force, F, at 
the free (right) end, and is restrained from displacement at the other (left) end.  The free end undergoes a 
displacement of Δ.  The work done by the single force is 
w = ∆
¯
° F
¯
= ∆
x
F
x
= u F. 
The spring stores potential energy due to its deformation (change in length).  Here we call that strain energy.  
That stored energy is given by 
u =
1
2
k ∆
x
2
 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     33 
Therefore, the total potential energy for the loaded spring is 
L =
1
2
k ∆
x
2
- ∆
x
F
x
 
The equation of equilibrium is obtained by minimizing this total potential energy with respect to the unknown 
displacement, ∆
x
.  That is,  
oL
o∆
x
= u =
2
2
k ∆
x
-F
x
 
This simplifies to the common single scalar equation  
k ∆
x
 = F, 
which is the well‐known equilibrium equation for a linear spring.  This example was slightly simplified, since we 
started with the condition that the left end of the spring had no displacement (an essential or Dirichlet 
boundary condition).  Next we will consider a spring where either end can be fixed or free to move.  This will 
require that you both minimize the total potential energy and impose the given displacement restraint. 
 
Figure 3‐7 The classic and general linear spring element 
Now the spring model has two end displacements, ∆
1
 and ∆
2
, and two associated axial forces, F
1
 and F
2
.  The 
net deformation of the bar is δ = ∆
2
 ‐ ∆
1
.  Denote the total vector of displacement components as 

¯
= {∆] = _

1

2

and the associated vector of forces as 
F
¯
= {F] = _
F
1
F
2

Then the mechanical work done on the spring is 
w = {∆]
1
 {F] = ∆

F

+ ∆
2
 F
2
   
Then the spring's strain energy is 
u =
1
2
{∆]
1
|k] {∆] =
1
2
k o
2

where the “spring stiffness matrix” is found to be 
|k] = k j
1 -1
-1 1
[. 
The total potential energy, Π, becomes 
L =
1
2
{∆]
1
|k] {∆] - {∆]
1
{F] =
k
2
 _

1

2
_
1
j
1 -1
-1 1
[ _

1

2
_ - _

1

2
_
1
_
F
1
F
2
_ . 
Note that each term has the units of energy, i.e. force times length.  The matrix equations of equilibrium come 
from satisfying the displacement restraint and the minimization of the total potential energy with respect to 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     34 
each and every displacement component. The minimization requires that the partial derivative of all the 
displacements vanish: 
ðL
ð{∆]
= {u] , or  
ðL
ð∆
]
= u
]
, ] = 1, 2 . 
That represents the first stage system of algebraic equations of equilibrium for the elastic system: 
k j
1 -1
-1 1
[ _

1

2
_ = _
F
1
F
2
_ . 
These two symmetric equations do not yet reflect the presence of any essential boundary condition on the 
displacements.  Therefore, no unique solution exists for the two displacements due to applied forces (the axial 
RBM has not been eliminated).  Mathematically, this is clear because the square matrix has a zero determinate 
and cannot be inverted.  If all of the displacements are known, you can find the applied forces.  For example, if 
you had a rigid body translation of ∆
1
= ∆
2
 = C where C is an arbitrary constant you clearly get F
1
= F
2
= 0.  If you 
stretch the spring by two equal and opposite displacements; ∆
1
= ‐C, ∆
2
 = C and the first row of the matrix 
equations gives F
1
= ‐2 k C. The second row gives F
2
 = 2 k C, which is equal and opposite to F
1
, as expected.  
Usually, you know some of the displacements and some of the forces.  Then you have to manipulate the matrix 
equilibrium system to put it in the form of a standard linear algebraic system where a known square matrix 
multiplied by a vector of unknowns is equal to a known vector: |A]{x] = {b].
3.4 Equilibrium of restrained systems 
Like the original spring problem, now assume the right force, F
2
, is known, and the left displacement, ∆
1
, has a 
given (restrained) value, say ∆
given
.  Then, the above matrix equation represents two unique equilibrium 
equations for two unknowns, the displacement ∆
2
and the reaction force F
1
.  That makes this linear algebraic 
system look strange because there are unknowns on both sides of the equals, “=”.  You could (but usually do 
not) correct that by re‐arranging the equation system (not done in practice).  First, multiply the first column of 
the stiffness matrix by the known ∆
given
 value and move it to the right side: 
j
u -k
u k
[ _
u

2
_ = _
F
1
F
2
_ -]
k
-k
¿ ∆
g|uen
 
and then move the unknown reaction, F
1
, to the left side
 
j
-1 -k
u k
[ _
F
1

2
_ = _
u
F
2
_ -]
k
-k
¿ ∆
g|uen
 . 
Now you have the usual form of a linear system of equations where the right side is a known vector and the 
left side is the product of a known square matrix times a vector of unknowns.  Since both the energy 
minimization and the displacement restraints have been combined you now have a unique set of equations for 
the unknown displacements and the unknown restraint reactions.  Inverting the 2 by 2 matrix gives the exact 
solution: 
_
F
1

2
_ =
1
-k
j
k k
u -1
[ __
u
F
2
_ -]
k
-k
¿ ∆
g|uen

_
F
1

2
_ = _
-F
2
F
2
k + ∆
g|uen


so that F
1
= ‐F
2  
always, as expected.  If ∆
given
 = 0, as originally stated, then the end displacement is ∆
2
= F
2
k ⁄ .  
This sort of re‐arrangement of the matrix terms is not done in practice because it destroys the symmetry of the 
original equations.  Algorithms for numerically solving such systems rely on symmetry to reduce both the 
required storage size and the operations count. They are very important when solving thousands of equations. 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     35 
3.5 General equilibrium matrix partitions 
The above small example gives insight to the most general form of the algebraic system resulting from only 
minimizing the total potential energy: a singular matrix system with more unknowns than equations. That is 
because there is not a unique equilibrium solution to the problem until you also apply the essential (Dirichlet) 
boundary conditions on the displacements. The algebraic system can be written in a general partitioned matrix 
form that more clearly defines what must be done to reduce the system to a solvable form by utilizing 
essential boundary conditions. 
For an elastic system of any size, the full, symmetric matrix equations obtained by minimizing the energy can 
always be rearranged into the following partitioned matrix form: 
_
K
uu
K
ug
K
gu
K
gg
_ _

u

g
_ = _
F
g
F
u

where ∆
u
represents the unknown nodal displacements, and ∆
g
represents the given essential boundary values 
(restraints, or fixtures) of the other displacements. The stiffness sub‐matrices K
uu
and K
gg
 are square, whereas 
K
ug
and K
gu
 are rectangular.  In a finite element formulation all of the coefficients in the K matrices are known. 
The resultant applied nodal loads are in sub‐vector F
g
 and the F
u
terms represent the unknown generalized 
reactions forces associated with essential boundary conditions. This means that after the enforcement of the 
essential boundary conditions the actual remaining unknowns are ∆
u
and F
u
.  Only then does the net number 
of unknowns correspond to the number of equations. But, they must be re‐arranged before all the remaining 
unknowns can be computed. 
Here, for simplicity, it has been assumed that the equations have been numbered in a manner that places rows 
associated with the given displacements (essential boundary conditions) at the end of the system equations. 
The above matrix relations can be rewritten as two sets of matrix identities: 
K
uu

u
+ K
ug

g
= F
g
 
K
gu

u
+ K
gg

g
= F
u

The first identity can be solved for the unknown displacements, ∆
u
, by putting it in the standard linear 
equation form by moving the known product K
ug

g
 to the right side.  Most books on numerical analysis 
assume that you have reduced the system to this smaller, nonsingular form (K
uu
 ) before trying to solve the 
system.  Inverting the smaller non‐singular square matrix yields the unique equilibrium displacement field: 

u
= K
uu
-1
 (F
g
- K
ug

g
). 
The remaining reaction forces can then be recovered, if desired, from the second matrix identity: 
F
u
= K
gu

u
+ K
gg

g

In most applications, these reaction data have physical meanings that are important in their own right, or 
useful in validating the solution. However, this part of the calculation is optional.  
3.6 Structural Component Failure 
Structural components can be determined to fail by various modes determined by buckling, deflection, natural 
frequency, strain, or stress.  Strain or stress failure criteria are different depending on whether they are 
considered as brittle or ductile materials.  The difference between brittle and ductile material behaviors is 
determined by their response to a uniaxial stress‐strain test, as in Figure 3‐8.  You need to know what class of 
material is being used.  SW Simulation, and most finite element systems, default to assuming a ductile material 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     36 
and display the distortional energy failure theory which is usually called the Von Mises stress, or effective 
stress, even though it is actually a scalar.  A brittle material requires the use of a higher factor of safety. 
 
Figure 3‐8  Axial stress‐strain experimental results 
3.7 Factor of Safety 
All aspects of a design have some degree of uncertainty, as does how the design will actually be utilized.  For 
all the reasons cited above, you must always employ a Factor of Safety (FOS).  Some designers refer to it as the 
factor of ignorance.   Remember that a FOS of unity means that failure is eminent; it does not mean that a part 
or assembly is safe.  In practice you should try to justify 1 < FOS < 8.  Several consistent approaches for 
computing a FOS are given in mechanical design books [9].  They should be supplemented with the additional 
uncertainties that come from a FEA.  Many authors suggest that the factor of safety should be computed as 
the product of terms that are all ¸ 1.  There is a factor for the certainty of the restraint location and type; the 
certainty of the load region, type, and value; a material factor; a dynamic loading factor; a cyclic (fatigue) load 
factor; and an additional factor if failure is likely to result in human injury.  Various professional organizations 
and standards organizations set minimum values for the factor of safety.  For example, the standard for lifting 
hoists and elevators require a minimum FOS of 4, because their failure would involve the clear risk of injuring 
or killing people.  As a guide, consider the FOS as a product of factors:  F0S = ∏ F
k
n
k=1
= F
1
F
2
F
3
…F
n
. A set 
of typical factors is given inTable 3‐1. 
 
Table 3‐1 Factors to consider when evaluating a design (each ¸ 1) 
k  Type  Comments 
1  Consequences  Will loss be okay, critical or fatal 
2  Environment  Room‐ambient or harsh chemicals present 
3  Failure theory  Is a part clearly brittle, ductile, or unknown 
4  Fatigue  Does the design experience more that ten cycles of use 
5  Geometry of Part  Not uncertain, if from a CAD system 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     37 
6  Geometry of Mesh  Defeaturing can introduce errors.  Element sizes and location 
are important.  Looking like the part is not enough. 
7  Loading  Are loads precise or do they come from wave action, etc. 
8  Material data  Is the material well known, or validated by tests 
9  Reliability  Must the reliability of the design be high 
10  Restraints  Designs are greatly influenced by assumed supports 
11  Stresses  Was stress concentration considered, or shock loads 
3.8 Element Type Selection 
Even with today’s advances in computing power you seem never to have enough computational resources to 
solve all the problems that present themselves.  Frequently solid elements are not the best choice for 
computational efficiency.  The analysts should learn when other element types can be valid or when they can 
be utilized to validate a study carried out with a different element type.  SW Simulation offers a small element 
library that includes bars, trusses, beams, frames, thin plates and shells, thick plates and shells, and solid 
elements.  There are also special connector elements called rigid links or multipoint constraints. 
The shells and solid elements are considered to be continuum elements.  The plate elements are a special case 
of flat shells with no initial curvature.  Solid element formulations include the stresses in all directions.  Shells 
are a mathematical simplification of solids of special shape.  Thin shells (like thin beams) do not consider the 
stress in the direction perpendicular to the shell surface.  Thick shells (like deep beams) do consider the 
stresses through the thickness on the shell, in the direction normal to the middle surface, and account for 
transverse shear deformations. 
Let h denote the typical thickness of a component while its typical length is denoted by L.  The thickness to 
length ratio, h/L, gives some guidance as to when a particular element type is valid for an analysis.  When h/L is 
large shear deformation is at its maximum importance and you should be using solid elements.  Conversely, 
when h/L is very small transverse shear deformation is not important and thin shell elements are probably the 
most cost effective element choice.  In the intermediate range of h/L the thick shell elements will be most cost 
effective.  The thick shells are extensions of thin shell elements that contain additional strain energy terms. 
The overlapping h/L ranges for the three continuum element types are suggested in Figure 3‐9.  The thickness 
of the lines suggests those regions where a particular element type is generally considered to be the preferred 
element of choice.  The overlapping ranges suggest where one type of element calculation can be used to 
validate a calculated result obtained with a different element type.  Validation calculations include the 
different approaches to boundary conditions and loads required by different element formulations.  They also 
can indirectly check that a user actually understands how to utilize a finite element code. 
 
FEA Concepts
Draft 
3.9 SW S
The symbols u
Figure 3‐10.  T
element solut
represents the
are often refe
displacement 
enough restra
N
Al
 
For simplicity
That is, they 
the type of re
frequently en
understand s
 
s:  SW Simula
13.0.  Copyri
Simulation 
used in SW Sim
The symbols fo
ions are based
e mechanical w
rred to as gene
DOF’s for the s
ints to prevent
Node of solid 
l three displa
F
y many finite 
enforce an Im
estraint, as w
ncounter the 
symmetry pla
Displaceme
Figu
ation Overview
ght 2009.  All
Figure 3
Fixture an
mulation to repr
r the correspo
d on work‐ener
work done at th
eralized displac
solid nodes (to
t any model fro
 
or truss elem
acements are 
Figure 3‐10  Fix
element exam
mmovable co
well as where t
common con
ane restraints
 
ent 
ure 3‐11  Single
w                 
l rights reserv
‐9  Overlappin
nd Load Sy
resent a single
nding forces a
rgy relations, th
he point.  Whe
cements.  The 
op) and shell no
om undergoing
ment:  
zero. 
xed restraint sy
mples incorre
ondition for so
the part is re
nditions of sym
 for solids an
Force 
e component s
ved. 
ng valid ranges
ymbols 
e translational a
nd moment lo
he above word
en a model can
SW Simulation
odes are seen 
g a rigid body t
ymbols for sol
ectly apply co
olids or a Fixe
strained is of
mmetry or an
d shells. 
Rot
symbols for res
 
s of element ty
and rotational 
adings are sho
d “correspondi
n involve either
n nodal symbo
in Figure 3‐11.
translation or 
Node of f
All three di
ro
ids (top) and s
omplete restr
ed condition f
ften the most
nti‐symmetry
   
tation 
straints (fixtur
    
ypes
DOF at a node
own pink in tha
ng” means tha
r translations o
ls for the unkn
.  You almost a
rigid body rota
frame or shel
splacements 
otations are ze
shell nodes 
aints at a face
for shells.  Ac
t difficult part
y restraints.  Y
Coup
res) and loads 
                     J
 3
e are shown gr
at figure.  Since
at their dot pro
or rotations as 
nown generaliz
always must su
ation.  
 
ll element: 
and all three
ero. 
e, edge or no
tually determ
t of an analys
You should un
 
le 
.E. Akin 
38 
 
reen in 
e finite 
oduct 
DOF they 
zed 
upply 
  
ode.  
mining 
is.  You 
nder 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     39 
3.10 Symmetry DOF on a Plane 
A plane of symmetry is flat and has mirror image geometry, material properties, loading, and restraints.  
Symmetry restraints\i  are very common for solids and for shells.  Figure 3‐12 shows that for both solids and 
shells, the displacement perpendicular to the symmetry plane is zero.  Shells have the additional condition that 
the in‐plane component of its rotation vector is zero.  Of course, the flat symmetry plane conditions can be 
stated in a different way.  For a solid element translational displacements parallel to the symmetry plane are 
allowed.  For a shell element rotation is allowed about an axis perpendicular to the symmetry plane and its 
translational displacements parallel to the symmetry plane are also allowed. 
 
 
Node of a solid or truss element: 
Displacement normal to the symmetry plane is zero. 
Node of a frame or shell element: 
Displacement normal to the symmetry plane and two 
rotations parallel to it are zero. 
Figure 3‐12 Symmetry requires zero normal displacement, and zero in‐plane rotation 
3.11 Available Loading (Source) Options 
Most finite element systems have a wide range of mechanical loads (or sources) that can be applied to points, 
curves, surfaces, and volumes.  The mechanical loading terminology used in SW Simulation is in Table 3‐2.  
Most of those loading options are utilized in later example applications.   
 
Table 3‐2  Mechanical loads (sources) that apply to the active structural study 
Load Type  Description 
Bearing Load  Non‐uniform bearing load on a cylindrical face 
Centrifugal Force  Radial centrifugal body forces for the angular velocity and/or tangential 
body forces from the angular acceleration about an axis 
Force  Resultant force, or moment,  at a vertex, curve, or surface 
Gravity  Gravity, or linear acceleration vector, body force loading 
Pressure  A pressure having normal and/or tangential components acting on a 
selected surface 
Remote Load / 
Mass 
Allows loads or masses remote from  the part to be applied to the part 
by treating the omitted material as rigid 
Temperature  Temperature change at selected curves, surfaces, or bodies (see 
thermal studies for more realistic temperature transfers) 
3.12 Available Material Inputs for Stress Studies 
Most applications involve the use of isotropic (direction independent) materials.  The available mechanical 
properties for them in SW Simulation are listed in Table 3‐3.  It is becoming more common to have designs 
utilizing anisotropic (direction dependent) materials.  The most common special case of anisotropic materials is 
the orthotropic material.  Any anisotropic material has its properties input relative to the principal directions of 
the material.   That means you must construct the principal material directions reference plane or coordinate 
axes before entering orthotropic data.  Mechanical orthotropic properties are subject to some theoretical 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     40 
relationships that physically possible materials must satisfy (such as positive strain energy).  Thus, 
experimental material properties data may require adjustment before being accepted by SW Simulation. 
 
Table 3‐3  Isotropic mechanical properties 
Symbol  Label  Item 
E  EX  Elastic modulus (Young’s modulus) 
ν  
NUXY  Poisson’s ratio 
G  GXY  Shear modulus 
ρ  DENS  Mass density 
σ
t
  SIGXT  Tensile strength (Ultimate stress)  
σ
c
  SIGXC  Compression stress limit 
σ
y
  SIGYLD  Yield stress (yield strength) 
α  ALPX  Coefficient of thermal expansion 
 
 
Table 3‐4  Orthotropic mechanical properties in principal material direction 
Symbol  Label  Item 
E
x
  EX  Elastic modulus in material X direction 
E
y
  EY  Elastic modulus in material Y direction 
E
z
  EZ  Elastic modulus in material Z‐direction 
ν
xy
 
NUXY  Poisson’s  ratio in material XY directions 
ν
yz
 
NUYZ  Poisson’s  ratio in material YZ directions 
ν
xz
 
NUXZ  Poisson’s  ratio in material XZ directions 
G
xy
  GXY  Shear modulus in material XY directions 
G
yz
  GYZ  Shear modulus in material YZ directions 
G
xz
  GXZ  Shear modulus in material XZ directions 
ρ  DENS  Mass density 
σ
t
  SIGXT  Tensile strength (Ultimate stress)  
σ
c
  SIGXC  Compression stress limit 
σ
y
  SIGYLD  Yield stress (Yield strength) 
α
x
  ALPX  Thermal expansion coefficient in material X 
α
y
  ALPY  Thermal expansion coefficient in material Y 
α
z
  ALPZ  Thermal expansion coefficient in material Z 
Note:  NUXY, NUYZ, and NUXZ are not independent 
Parts can also be made from orthotropic materials (as shown later).  However, their utilization is most 
common in laminated materials (laminates) where they each ply layer has a controllable principal material 
direction.  The concept for constructing laminates from orthotropic material ply’s is shown in Figure.  
Understanding the failure modes of laminates usually requires special study. 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     41 
 
Figure 3‐13 Example of a four‐ply laminate material 
3.13 Stress Study Outputs 
A successful run of a study will create a large amount of additional output results that can be displayed and/or 
listed in the post‐processing phase.  Displacements are the primary unknown in a SW Simulation stress study. 
The  available  displacement  vector  components  are  cited  in  Table  3‐5  and  Table  3‐6,  along  with  the  reactions 
they create if the displacement is used as a restraint.  The displacements can be plotted as vector displays, or 
contour values.  They can also be transformed to cylindrical or spherical components. 
Table 3‐5  Output results for solids, shells, and trusses 
Symbol  Label  Item  Symbol  Label  Item 
U
x
  UX  Displacement (X direction)  R
x
  RFX  Reaction force (X direction) 
U
y
  UY  Displacement (Y direction)  R
y
  RFY:  Reaction force (Y direction) 
U
z
  UZ  Displacement (Z direction)  R
z
  RFZ  Reaction force (Z direction) 
U
r
  URES:  Resultant displacement 
magnitude 
R
r
  RFRES  Resultant reaction force 
magnitude 
 
Table 3‐6 Additional primary results for beams, plates, and shells 
Symbol  Label  Item  Symbol  Label  Item 
θ
x
  RX  Rotation (X direction)  M
x
  RMX:  Reaction moment (X direction) 
θ
y
  RY  Rotation (Y direction)  M
y
  RMY  Reaction moment (Y direction) 
θ
z
  RZ  Rotation (Z direction)  M
z
  RMZ:  Reaction moment (Z direction) 
      M
r
  MRESR  Resultant reaction moment 
magnitude 
The  strains  and  stresses  are  computed  from  the  displacements.    The  stress  components  available  at  an 
element  centroid  or  averaged  at  a  node  are  given  in  Table  3‐7.    The  six  components  listed  on  the  left  in  that 
table give the general stress at a point (i.e., a node or an element centroid).  Those six values are illustrated on 
the left of Figure 3‐14.  They can be used to compute the scalar von Mises failure criterion.  They can also be 
used to solve an eigenvalue problem for the principal normal stresses and their directions, which are shown on 
the  right  of  Figure  3‐14.    The  maximum  shear  stress  occurs  on  a  plane  whose  normal  is  45  degrees  from  the 
direction  of  P1.    The  principal  normal  stresses  can  also  be  used  to  compute  the  scalar  von  Mises  failure 
criterion.   
The von Mises effective stress is compared to the material yield stress for ductile materials. Failure is predicted 
to occur (based on the distortional energy stored in the material) when the von Mises value reaches the yield 
stress.  The maximum shear stress is predicted to cause failure when it reaches half the yield stress.  SW 
Simulation uses the shear stress intensity which is also compared to the yield stress to determine failure 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     42 
(because it is twice the maximum shear stress).  The first four values on the right side of Table 3‐7 are often 
represented graphically in mechanics as a 3D Mohr’s circle (seen in Figure 3‐15). 
Table 3‐7: Nodal and element stress results 
Symbol  Label  Item  Symbol  Label  Item 
σ
x
  SX  Normal stress parallel to x‐axis  σ
1
  P1  1st principal normal stress 
σ
y
  SY  Normal stress parallel to y‐axis  σ
2
  P2  2nd principal normal stress 
σ
z
  SZ  Normal stress parallel to z‐axis  σ
3
  P3  3rd principal normal stress 
τ
xy
  TXY  Shear in Y direction on plane 
normal to x‐axis 
τ
I INT  Stress intensity (P1‐P3), twice 
the maximum shear stress 
τ
xz
  TXZ  Shear in Z direction on plane 
normal to x‐axis 
     
τ
yz
  TYZ  Shear in Z direction on plane 
normal to z‐axis 
σ
vm
  VON  von Mises stress (distortional 
energy failure criterion) 

Figure 3‐14  The stress tensor (left) and its principal normal values 
 
 
Figure 3‐15  The three‐dimensional Mohr's circle of stress yield the principal stresses 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     43 
 
If desired, you can plot all three principal components at once.  The three principal normal stresses at a node 
or element center can be represented by an ellipsoid. The three radii of the ellipsoid represent the magnitudes 
of the three principal normal stress components, P1, P2, and P3.  The sign of the stresses (tension or 
compression) are represented by arrows.  The color code of the surface is based on the von Mises value at the 
point, a scalar quantity.  If one of the principal stresses is zero, the ellipsoid becomes a planar ellipse.  If the 
three principal stresses have the same magnitude, the ellipsoid becomes a sphere.  In the case of simple 
uniaxial tensile stress, the ellipsoid becomes a line.  
 
 
Figure 3‐16  A principal stress ellipsoid colored by von Mises value 
 
The available nodal output results in Table 3‐7 are obtained by averaging the element values that surround the 
node.  You can also view them as constant values at the element centroids.  That can give you insight to the 
smoothness of the approximation.  For brittle materials you can also be interested in the element strain 
results.  They are listed in Table 3‐8. Table 3‐9 shows that you can also view the element error estimate, ERR 
which is used to direct adaptive solutions, and the contact pressure from an iterative contact analysis.  
Additional outputs are available if you conduct an automated adaptive analysis to reduce the (mathematical) 
error to a specific value, or to recover results from the developed pressure between contacting surfaces.  They 
are listed in Table 3‐9. 
 
Table 3‐8  Element centroidal strain component results 
Sym  Label  Item  Sym  Label  Item 
ε
x
  EPSX  Normal strain parallel to x‐
axis 
ε
1
  E1  Normal principal strain (1st 
principal direction) 
ε
y
  EPSY  Normal strain parallel to y‐
axis 
ε
2
  E2  Normal principal strain 
(2nd principal direction) 
ε
z
  EPSZ  Normal strain parallel to z‐
axis 
ε
3
  E3  Normal principal strain (3rd 
principal direction) 
γ
xy
  GMXY  Shear strain in Y direction on 
plane normal to x‐axis 
ε
r
  ESTRN  Equivalent strain 
γ
xz
  GMXZ  Shear strain in Z direction on 
plane normal to x‐axis 
SED  SEDENS  Strain energy density (per 
unit volume) 
γ
yz
  GMYZ  Shear strain in Z direction on 
plane normal to y‐axis 
SE  ENERGY  Total strain energy 
FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.E. Akin 
Draft 13.0.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.     44 
 
 
Table 3‐9  Additional element centroid stress related results 
Label  Item 
ERR  Element error measured in the strain energy norm 
CP  Contract pressure developed on a contact surface 

 and (c) 2D shear strain  Stress is a measure of the force per unit area acting on a plane passing through the point of interest in a body. the stress.  Copyright 2009.  This is known as Hooke’s Law:  σ = E ε. the engineering shear strain is γ = (∂u / ∂y + ∂v /  ∂x).   The above geometrical data (the strains) will be multiplied by material properties to define a new physical  quantity. E.  Strain has one component in 1D.                                               Figure 3‐3  Hooke's Law for linear stress‐strain. which is directly proportional to the strains.     30  . and six components in  3D.  The normal and shear stresses represent the  normal force per unit area and the tangential forces per unit area. the applications illustrated here are assume to be in the linear range of a material property.  Error estimates from stress studies are based on primarily  on the strain energy (or strain energy density).  Unless stated  otherwise.  The generalizations of the engineering strain definitions are  seen in Figure 3‐5.  They have the units of  [N/m^2]. respectively.  The 2D strains are commonly written as a column vector in finite element analysis.  The strain energy (or potential energy) stored in the differential material element is half  the scalar product of the stresses and the strains.  The 2D stresses are written as a corresponding column vector. (b) 2D.E. σ = (σx    σy    τ)T. as seen in Figure 3‐2(c).  In 2D.  All rights reserved.  The 2D and 3D stress components are shown in Figure 3‐4. ε = (εx      εy     γ)T. σ = E ε    Draft 13. contains the elastic modulus. but are usually given in [MPa]. Akin  are perpendicular to the displacement component. (see  Figure 3‐3 ) where the square material matrix.    Figure 3‐2 Geometry of normal strain (a) 1D. three components in 2D. or [Pa]. and Poisson’s ratio of the  material.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.0.

     31  .   Let the length and area of the bar be denoted  by L. Akin                                Figure 3‐4  Stress components in 2D (left) and 3D        Figure 3‐5  Graphical representations of 3D normal strains (a) and shear strains  3.0. varies linearly  Draft 13. respectively. shown in Figure 3‐6. P. at the other end and the weight is neglected.2 Axial bar example  The simplest available stress example is an axial bar. and A.  Copyright 2009.  All rights reserved.E.  Its material has an elastic modulus of E.  The axial displacement. u (x). restrained at one end and subjected  to an axial load.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                    J.

 is the Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy. at  the free (right) end.  W.  carefully check both the deflections and stresses when validating a finite element solution. done by the external forces. F.E. but a linear element mesh would not. any finite element model would give exact deflection and the  constant stress results. the mechanical work. a quadratic element mesh would give exact  stresses and displacements everywhere.  Since the assumed displacement is linear here. the axial stress is everywhere constant. if the load had been the distributed bar weight the exact displacement  would be quadratic in x and the stress would be linear in x. W.0. based on the variational calculus of Euler.3 Structural mechanics  Modern structural analysis relies extensively on the finite element method.  modulus of E.  Consider a linear spring. an area A.  Here we call that strain energy.  Copyright 2009.  The well‐known linear elastic spring will be reviewed to illustrate the concept of obtaining equilibrium  equations from an energy formulation. of stiffness k. and the displacement vector.  In introductory mechanics of materials the axial stiffness of  a bar is defined as k = E A / L. and  the strains. so the axial strain is εx = ∂u  / ∂x = δ / L.  The most popular integral  formulation.  However. which is a constant. u.  The total potential energy. the stress here does not  ⁄ .    ∆    32  . σ = E ε = E δ / L which in the  case simply reduces to σ = P / A. but the displacement always does. u (x) = x δ/ L. Akin  from zero at the support to a maximum of δ at the load point. Π.  This implies  that displacements are our primary unknowns.  The free end undergoes a  displacement of Δ. like a linear spring. and is constructed of a material elastic  ⁄ .FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J. where the bar has a length of L.  All rights reserved.  Like many other more complicated problems.  You should always  depend on the material properties. it states that the displacement field that satisfies the essential displacement boundary conditions and  minimizes the total potential energy is the one that corresponds to the state of static equilibrium.  Then.  Likewise. that has an applied force. of the structure minus the mechanical work. done by a force is the  scalar dot product of the force vector. at its point of application.  The work done by the single force is  ∆° ∆ . and is restrained from displacement at the other (left) end.   That stored energy is given by  1 2 Draft 13. U. is the strain energy.   δ = P L / E A  Figure 3‐6 A linearly elastic bar with an axial load  3. F.  From introductory mechanics.    Basically.  They will be interpolated in space as will their derivatives. Then the above bar displacement can be written as         σ = P / A.  That is.  The elastic bar is often modeled as a linear spring.  The spring stores potential energy due to its deformation (change in length).

   ∆ 0 2 2 ∆   This simplifies to the common single scalar equation   k ∆  = F.  Figure 3‐7 The classic and general linear spring element    Now the spring model has two end displacements.     33  . becomes  ∆ ∆ ∆   ∆ ∆  . ∆ .  which is the well‐known equilibrium equation for a linear spring. the total potential energy for the loaded spring is  1 2 ∆ ∆   The equation of equilibrium is obtained by minimizing this total potential energy with respect to the unknown  displacement.  This example was slightly simplified. i. Akin  Therefore.  Denote the total vector of displacement components as  ∆ and the associated vector of forces as  ∆ ∆   ∆   Then the mechanical work done on the spring is  ∆   Then the spring's strain energy is  ∆1 F1 + ∆2 F2    ∆ 1 1 1 . F1 and F2.  The total potential energy.  1 1 1 1 1 ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆ where the “spring stiffness matrix” is found to be  .E. since we  started with the condition that the left end of the spring had no displacement (an essential or Dirichlet  boundary condition).FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.  Next we will consider a spring where either end can be fixed or free to move.e. and two associated axial forces. Π.0.  That is.  The matrix equations of equilibrium come  from satisfying the displacement restraint and the minimization of the total potential energy with respect to  Draft 13.  All rights reserved.  This will  require that you both minimize the total potential energy and impose the given displacement restraint.  Copyright 2009. ∆1 and ∆2.  Note that each term has the units of energy.  The  net deformation of the bar is δ = ∆2 ‐ ∆1. force times length.

 this is clear because the square matrix has a zero determinate  and cannot be inverted. ∆1= ‐C.  Mathematically. ∆2 = C and the first row of the matrix  equations gives F1= ‐2 k C. multiply the first column of  the stiffness matrix by the known ∆given value and move it to the right side:  0 0 1 0 0 ∆ 0 ∆ ∆   and then move the unknown reaction.  Inverting the 2 by 2 matrix gives the exact  solution:  1 ∆ ∆ 0 1 ⁄ 0 ∆ ∆     ⁄ .  Therefore. “=”.  First. ∆ . and the left displacement. has a  given (restrained) value.  Draft 13.  If ∆given = 0.  Now you have the usual form of a linear system of equations where the right side is a known vector and the  left side is the product of a known square matrix times a vector of unknowns.  Copyright 2009.  That makes this linear algebraic  system look strange because there are unknowns on both sides of the equals.  If all of the displacements are known. F2. say ∆given .  .4 Equilibrium of restrained systems  Like the original spring problem. the above matrix equation represents two unique equilibrium  equations for two unknowns.   Usually. now assume the right force. you know some of the displacements and some of the forces. which is equal and opposite to F1.   so that F1 ‐F2  always. as originally stated. is known.  Algorithms for numerically solving such systems rely on symmetry to reduce both the  required storage size and the operations count. to the left side  ∆  . then the end displacement is ∆ This sort of re‐arrangement of the matrix terms is not done in practice because it destroys the symmetry of the  original equations. ∆ ∆ 1.  Then. as expected.  That represents the first stage system of algebraic equations of equilibrium for the elastic system:  1 1 1 1  . They are very important when solving thousands of equations.  For example. you can find the applied forces. as expected. The second row gives F2 = 2 k C. 3.E. or   ∆ 0 . no unique solution exists for the two displacements due to applied forces (the axial  RBM has not been eliminated).0.  You could (but usually do  not) correct that by re‐arranging the equation system (not done in practice).FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J. the displacement ∆2 and the reaction force  . The minimization requires that the partial derivative of all the  displacements vanish:  ∆ 0  .  All rights reserved.  Then you have to manipulate the matrix  equilibrium system to put it in the form of a standard linear algebraic system where a known square matrix  multiplied by a vector of unknowns is equal to a known vector:  . if  you had a rigid body translation of ∆1= ∆2 = C where C is an arbitrary constant you clearly get F1= F2= 0. 2 .  If you  stretch the spring by two equal and opposite displacements. Akin  each and every displacement component.  These two symmetric equations do not yet reflect the presence of any essential boundary condition on the  displacements.     34  .  Since both the energy  minimization and the displacement restraints have been combined you now have a unique set of equations for  the unknown displacements and the unknown restraint reactions.

 symmetric matrix equations obtained by minimizing the energy can  always be rearranged into the following partitioned matrix form:  ∆ ∆   where ∆u represents the unknown nodal displacements. and ∆g represents the given essential boundary values  (restraints. if desired. by putting it in the standard linear  equation form by moving the known product  ∆  to the right side. whereas  Kug and Kgu are rectangular.  Here. default to assuming a ductile material  Draft 13.  The first identity can be solved for the unknown displacements. or  useful in validating the solution.  Copyright 2009.  Only then does the net number  of unknowns correspond to the number of equations. natural  frequency. However. the full. deflection. strain.  The difference between brittle and ductile material behaviors is  determined by their response to a uniaxial stress‐strain test.E.  ∆ . That is  because there is not a unique equilibrium solution to the problem until you also apply the essential (Dirichlet)  boundary conditions on the displacements. ∆ . This means that after the enforcement of the  essential boundary conditions the actual remaining unknowns are ∆u and Fu. nonsingular form ( system. as in Figure 3‐8.   3.6 Structural Component Failure  Structural components can be determined to fail by various modes determined by buckling. they must be re‐arranged before all the remaining  unknowns can be computed.  SW Simulation.  The remaining reaction forces can then be recovered. from the second matrix identity:  In most applications. The stiffness sub‐matrices Kuu and Kgg are square. and most finite element systems. Akin  3. these reaction data have physical meanings that are important in their own right.  In a finite element formulation all of the coefficients in the K matrices are known. or stress.  For an elastic system of any size. or fixtures) of the other displacements. But.  Most books on numerical analysis   ) before trying to solve the  assume that you have reduced the system to this smaller.5 General equilibrium matrix partitions  The above small example gives insight to the most general form of the algebraic system resulting from only  minimizing the total potential energy: a singular matrix system with more unknowns than equations. it has been assumed that the equations have been numbered in a manner that places rows  associated with the given displacements (essential boundary conditions) at the end of the system equations.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.  You need to know what class of  material is being used.     35  .0.  All rights reserved.  Inverting the smaller non‐singular square matrix yields the unique equilibrium displacement field:  ∆   ∆ ∆ . for simplicity. this part of the calculation is optional. The algebraic system can be written in a general partitioned matrix  form that more clearly defines what must be done to reduce the system to a solvable form by utilizing  essential boundary conditions.  The resultant applied nodal loads are in sub‐vector Fg and the Fu terms represent the unknown generalized  reactions forces associated with essential boundary conditions.  The above matrix relations can be rewritten as two sets of matrix identities:  ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆   .  Strain or stress failure criteria are different depending on whether they are  considered as brittle or ductile materials.

 if from a CAD system  Draft 13.  As a guide.0.  Many authors suggest that the factor of safety should be computed as  the product of terms that are all   1. even though it is actually a scalar. ductile. A set  of typical factors is given inTable 3‐1. and an additional factor if failure is likely to result in human injury.  Some designers refer to it as the  factor of ignorance. it does not mean that a part  or assembly is safe. critical or fatal  Room‐ambient or harsh chemicals present  Is a part clearly brittle. type.    Figure 3‐8  Axial stress‐strain experimental results  3.  Various professional organizations  and standards organizations set minimum values for the factor of safety. consider the FOS as a product of factors:   … .  They should be supplemented with the additional  uncertainties that come from a FEA.  A brittle material requires the use of a higher factor of safety. a cyclic (fatigue) load  factor. the  certainty of the load region.  For example. you must always employ a Factor of Safety (FOS).  Several consistent approaches for  computing a FOS are given in mechanical design books [9]. because their failure would involve the clear risk of injuring  ∏ or killing people. or effective  stress.7 Factor of Safety  All aspects of a design have some degree of uncertainty. the standard for lifting  hoists and elevators require a minimum FOS of 4.   Remember that a FOS of unity means that failure is eminent.  For  all the reasons cited above.  In practice you should try to justify 1 < FOS < 8. Akin  and display the distortional energy failure theory which is usually called the Von Mises stress.     36  .  There is a factor for the certainty of the restraint location and type. a material factor.E.  All rights reserved.  Copyright 2009.    Table 3‐1 Factors to consider when evaluating a design (each  )  k  1  2  3  4  5  Type  Consequences  Environment  Failure theory  Fatigue  Geometry of Part  Comments  Will loss be okay. or unknown  Does the design experience more that ten cycles of use  Not uncertain. as does how the design will actually be utilized. and value. a dynamic loading factor.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.

 or shock loads  3.E. etc. frames.  The thick shells are extensions of thin shell elements that contain additional strain energy terms. Akin  Defeaturing can introduce errors.  They also  can indirectly check that a user actually understands how to utilize a finite element code.  There are also special connector elements called rigid links or multipoint constraints.  Conversely. gives some guidance as to when a particular element type is valid for an analysis. thin plates and shells. beams.  All rights reserved.  SW Simulation offers a small element  library that includes bars.  Let h denote the typical thickness of a component while its typical length is denoted by L. and solid  elements.     37  .  Solid element formulations include the stresses in all directions.  Are loads precise or do they come from wave action.  The thickness  of the lines suggests those regions where a particular element type is generally considered to be the preferred  element of choice.  The overlapping h/L ranges for the three continuum element types are suggested in Figure 3‐9.  The thickness to  length ratio. thick plates and shells.  Looking like the part is not enough.  The overlapping ranges suggest where one type of element calculation can be used to  validate a calculated result obtained with a different element type.  when h/L is very small transverse shear deformation is not important and thin shell elements are probably the  most cost effective element choice. or validated by tests  Must the reliability of the design be high  Designs are greatly influenced by assumed supports  Was stress concentration considered. in the direction normal to the middle surface.  Thick shells (like deep beams) do consider the  stresses through the thickness on the shell.  The plate elements are a special case  of flat shells with no initial curvature.    Draft 13.0.  When h/L is  large shear deformation is at its maximum importance and you should be using solid elements.  Thin shells (like thin beams) do not consider the  stress in the direction perpendicular to the shell surface. and account for  transverse shear deformations.8 Element Type Selection  Even with today’s advances in computing power you seem never to have enough computational resources to  solve all the problems that present themselves.  Frequently solid elements are not the best choice for  computational efficiency. trusses. h/L.  Element sizes and location  are important.  Validation calculations include the  different approaches to boundary conditions and loads required by different element formulations.  In the intermediate range of h/L the thick shell elements will be most cost  effective.  The analysts should learn when other element types can be valid or when they can  be utilized to validate a study carried out with a different element type.  Shells  are a mathematical simplification of solids of special shape.  Copyright 2009.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                   6  7  8  9  10  11  Geometry of Mesh  Loading  Material data  Reliability  Restraints  Stresses                                 J.  The shells and solid elements are considered to be continuum elements.  Is the material well known.

FEA Concepts s:  SW Simula ation Overview w                                             J. Akin    Figure 3‐9  Overlappin ng valid ranges s of element ty ypes 3.  All l rights reserv ved.   3 38  .   enough restraints to prevent   Node of solid or truss elem N ment:   All three displa acements are zero.  Actually determ mining  estraint. as w well as where t the part is restrained is of ften the most t difficult part t of an analysis. they enforce an Im mmovable co ondition for so olids or a Fixe ed condition f for shells.  Y You should un nder  understand s symmetry pla ane restraints for solids and shells.  You almost a always must su upply  displacement DOF’s for the s t any model fro om undergoing g a rigid body t translation or rigid body rota ation.  Copyright 2009. .  The SW Simulation n nodal symbols for the unkn nown generaliz zed  solid nodes (to op) and shell no odes are seen in Figure 3‐11.   That is.  Figure 3‐10  Fix F xed restraint sy ymbols for solids (top) and s shell nodes    For simplicity y many finite element exam mples incorre ectly apply co omplete restraints at a face e.      Displaceme ent      Force  Rot tation  Couple    Figu ure 3‐11  Single e component s symbols for res straints (fixtur res) and loads  Draft 13.E.  You  the type of re frequently en ncounter the common con nditions of sym mmetry or an nti‐symmetry y restraints.  T The symbols for the corresponding forces and moment loadings are sho own pink in tha at figure.  Whe en a model can n involve either r translations o or rotations as DOF they  represents the are often referred to as gene eralized displac cements. th he above word d “corresponding” means tha at their dot pro oduct  e mechanical w work done at th he point.    Node of f frame or shel ll element:  All three displacements and all three   ro otations are ze ero. edge or no ode.9 SW S Simulation Fixture an nd Load Sy ymbols  The symbols u used in SW Sim mulation to repr resent a single e translational a and rotational DOF at a node e are shown gr reen in  Figure 3‐10.0.  Since e finite  element solutions are based d on work‐ener rgy relations.

E. loading.  The mechanical loading terminology used in SW Simulation is in Table 3‐2.  at a vertex.  For a shell element rotation is allowed about an axis perpendicular to the symmetry plane and its  translational displacements parallel to the symmetry plane are also allowed. Akin  3.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.  Copyright 2009.10 Symmetry DOF on a Plane  A plane of symmetry is flat and has mirror image geometry. or moment. and volumes.  Figure 3‐12 Symmetry requires zero normal displacement.  Of course.  Figure 3‐12 shows that for both solids and  shells.  All rights reserved.   Most of those loading options are utilized in later example applications.0.12 Available Material Inputs for Stress Studies  Most applications involve the use of isotropic (direction independent) materials.  Shells have the additional condition that  the in‐plane component of its rotation vector is zero.  The available mechanical  properties for them in SW Simulation are listed in Table 3‐3. and zero in‐plane rotation  3. curve. surfaces.  Any anisotropic material has its properties input relative to the principal directions of  the material.   Symmetry restraints\i  are very common for solids and for shells.11 Available Loading (Source) Options  Most finite element systems have a wide range of mechanical loads (or sources) that can be applied to points.  The most common special case of anisotropic materials is  the orthotropic material.  Mechanical orthotropic properties are subject to some theoretical  Draft 13. and restraints. the flat symmetry plane conditions can be  stated in a different way. the displacement perpendicular to the symmetry plane is zero. body force loading  A pressure having normal and/or tangential components acting on a  selected surface  Allows loads or masses remote from  the part to be applied to the part  by treating the omitted material as rigid  Temperature change at selected curves. or surface  Gravity.  curves.      Table 3‐2  Mechanical loads (sources) that apply to the active structural study  Load Type  Bearing Load  Centrifugal Force  Force  Gravity  Pressure  Remote Load /  Mass  Temperature  Description  Non‐uniform bearing load on a cylindrical face  Radial centrifugal body forces for the angular velocity and/or tangential  body forces from the angular acceleration about an axis  Resultant force.  It is becoming more common to have designs  utilizing anisotropic (direction dependent) materials.  For a solid element translational displacements parallel to the symmetry plane are  allowed.     39  .    Node of a frame or shell element:  Displacement normal to the symmetry plane and two  rotations parallel to it are zero.   That means you must construct the principal material directions reference plane or coordinate  axes before entering orthotropic data. or bodies (see  thermal studies for more realistic temperature transfers)  3. or linear acceleration vector. surfaces. material properties.    Node of a solid or truss element:  Displacement normal to the symmetry plane is zero.

 Akin  relationships that physically possible materials must satisfy (such as positive strain energy).0. NUYZ. and NUXZ are not independent  Parts can also be made from orthotropic materials (as shown later).     40  .E.   Understanding the failure modes of laminates usually requires special study. their utilization is most  common in laminated materials (laminates) where they each ply layer has a controllable principal material  direction.  However.  The concept for constructing laminates from orthotropic material ply’s is shown in Figure.  Copyright 2009.  experimental material properties data may require adjustment before being accepted by SW Simulation.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.  All rights reserved.  Draft 13.    Table 3‐3  Isotropic mechanical properties  Symbol  E  ν  G  ρ  σt  σc  σy  α    Label  EX  NUXY  GXY  DENS  SIGXT  SIGXC  SIGYLD  ALPX  Item  Elastic modulus (Young’s modulus)  Poisson’s ratio  Shear modulus  Mass density  Tensile strength (Ultimate stress)   Compression stress limit  Yield stress (yield strength)  Coefficient of thermal expansion    Table 3‐4  Orthotropic mechanical properties in principal material direction  Symbol  Ex  Ey  Ez  νxy  νyz  νxz  Gxy  Gyz  Gxz  ρ  σt  σc  σy  αx  αy  αz  Label  EX  EY  EZ  NUXY  NUYZ  NUXZ  GXY  GYZ  GXZ  DENS  SIGXT  SIGXC  SIGYLD  ALPX  ALPY  ALPZ  Item  Elastic modulus in material X direction  Elastic modulus in material Y direction  Elastic modulus in material Z‐direction  Poisson’s  ratio in material XY directions  Poisson’s  ratio in material YZ directions  Poisson’s  ratio in material XZ directions  Shear modulus in material XY directions  Shear modulus in material YZ directions  Shear modulus in material XZ directions  Mass density  Tensile strength (Ultimate stress)   Compression stress limit  Yield stress (Yield strength)  Thermal expansion coefficient in material X  Thermal expansion coefficient in material Y  Thermal expansion coefficient in material Z  Note:  NUXY.  Thus.

 a node or an element centroid).0. Failure is predicted  to occur (based on the distortional energy stored in the material) when the von Mises value reaches the yield  stress..  They can also be  used to solve an eigenvalue problem for the principal normal stresses and their directions.     41  . and shells  Symbol  θx  θy  θz    Label  RX  RY  RZ    Item  Rotation (X direction)  Rotation (Y direction)  Rotation (Z direction)    Symbol  Mx  My  Mz  Mr  Label  RMX:  RMY  RMZ:  MRESR  Item  Reaction moment (X direction)  Reaction moment (Y direction)  Reaction moment (Z direction)  Resultant reaction moment  magnitude  The  strains  and  stresses  are  computed  from  the  displacements.13 Stress Study Outputs  A successful run of a study will create a large amount of additional output results that can be displayed and/or  listed in the post‐processing phase.  All rights reserved.  The six components listed on the left in that  table give the general stress at a point (i. plates. which are shown on  the right of Figure 3‐14.e.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.    The  principal  normal  stresses  can  also  be  used  to  compute  the  scalar  von  Mises  failure  criterion.  They can also be transformed to cylindrical or spherical components.E.  Copyright 2009. Akin  Figure 3‐13 Example of a four‐ply laminate material    3. or  contour values.    The  stress  components  available  at  an  element centroid or averaged at a node are given in Table 3‐7.    The von Mises effective stress is compared to the material yield stress for ductile materials.  They can be used to compute the scalar von Mises failure criterion.  Table 3‐5  Output results for solids.  The displacements can be plotted as vector displays. and trusses  Symbol  Ux  Uy  Uz  Ur  Label  UX  UY  UZ  URES:  Item  Displacement (X direction)  Displacement (Y direction)  Displacement (Z direction)  Resultant displacement  magnitude  Symbol  Rx  Ry  Rz  Rr  Label  RFX  RFY:  RFZ  RFRES  Item  Reaction force (X direction)  Reaction force (Y direction)  Reaction force (Z direction)  Resultant reaction force  magnitude    Table 3‐6 Additional primary results for beams.  The maximum shear stress occurs on a plane whose normal is 45 degrees from the  direction  of  P1.  Those six values are illustrated on  the left of Figure 3‐14.  SW  Simulation uses the shear stress intensity which is also compared to the yield stress to determine failure  Draft 13.  Displacements are the primary unknown in a SW Simulation stress study. shells.  The available displacement vector components are cited in Table 3‐5 and Table 3‐6.  The maximum shear stress is predicted to cause failure when it reaches half the yield stress. along with the reactions  they create if the displacement is used as a restraint.

     42  .  Copyright 2009. twice  the maximum shear stress    von Mises stress (distortional  energy failure criterion)  Figure 3‐14  The stress tensor (left) and its principal normal values      Figure 3‐15  The three‐dimensional Mohr's circle of stress yield the principal stresses  Draft 13.E.  The first four values on the right side of Table 3‐7 are often  represented graphically in mechanics as a 3D Mohr’s circle (seen in Figure 3‐15).  Table 3‐7: Nodal and element stress results  Symbol  σx  σy  σz  τxy  τxz  τyz  Label  SX  SY  SZ  TXY  TXZ  TYZ  Item  Normal stress parallel to x‐axis  Normal stress parallel to y‐axis  Normal stress parallel to z‐axis  Shear in Y direction on plane  normal to x‐axis  Shear in Z direction on plane  normal to x‐axis  Shear in Z direction on plane  normal to z‐axis  Symbol  σ1  σ2  σ3  τI   σvm  Label  P1  P2  P3  INT    VON  Item  1st principal normal stress  2nd principal normal stress  3rd principal normal stress  Stress intensity (P1‐P3).0.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                  J.  All rights reserved. Akin  (because it is twice the maximum shear stress).

 P2.  If one of the principal stresses is zero. P1. Akin  If desired. the ellipsoid becomes a sphere. Table 3‐9 shows that you can also view the element error estimate. a scalar quantity.     43  .  All rights reserved. the ellipsoid becomes a line.  In the case of simple  uniaxial tensile stress.    Table 3‐8  Element centroidal strain component results  Sym  εx  εy  εz  γxy  γxz  γyz  Label  EPSX  EPSY  EPSZ  GMXY  GMXZ  GMYZ  Item  Normal strain parallel to x‐ axis  Normal strain parallel to y‐ axis  Normal strain parallel to z‐ axis  Shear strain in Y direction on  plane normal to x‐axis  Shear strain in Z direction on  plane normal to x‐axis  Shear strain in Z direction on  plane normal to y‐axis  Sym  ε1  ε2  ε3  εr  SED  SE  Label  E1  E2  E3  ESTRN  SEDENS  ENERGY  Item  Normal principal strain (1st  principal direction)  Normal principal strain  (2nd principal direction)  Normal principal strain (3rd  principal direction)  Equivalent strain  Strain energy density (per  unit volume)  Total strain energy  Draft 13. and the contact pressure from an iterative contact analysis.  You can also view them as constant values at the element centroids.       Figure 3‐16  A principal stress ellipsoid colored by von Mises value    The available nodal output results in Table 3‐7 are obtained by averaging the element values that surround the  node. or to recover results from the developed pressure between contacting surfaces.  For brittle materials you can also be interested in the element strain  results.  They  are listed in Table 3‐9.E. the ellipsoid becomes a planar ellipse. you can plot all three principal components at once.  The color code of the surface is based on the von Mises value at the  point.  The three principal normal stresses at a node  or element center can be represented by an ellipsoid. ERR  which is used to direct adaptive solutions. and P3.  Copyright 2009. The three radii of the ellipsoid represent the magnitudes  of the three principal normal stress components.   Additional outputs are available if you conduct an automated adaptive analysis to reduce the (mathematical)  error to a specific value.  If the  three principal stresses have the same magnitude.  That can give you insight to the  smoothness of the approximation.0.FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                    J.  The sign of the stresses (tension or  compression) are represented by arrows.  They are listed in Table 3‐8.

     44  .FEA Concepts:  SW Simulation Overview                                                      J.0.E.  All rights reserved.  Copyright 2009. Akin  Table 3‐9  Additional element centroid stress related results  Label  ERR  CP  Item  Element error measured in the strain energy norm  Contract pressure developed on a contact surface  Draft 13.