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V E R T THINK C A L L Y

Essential Elements of Language Arts Curriculum Committee Katie Chesler Jason DiPeppe Tamara Doehring Rob Kirkpatrick Mary Nelson Sommer McDonald Cynthia Mitchell Stefanie Pedicini Bill Ringer Karla Ritchie Cheryl Troutman Cheryl York Jennifer Cockrell Lisa Rehm Titusville High School Satellite High School Melbourne High School McNair Magnet School Palm Bay High School Johnson Middle School DeLaura Middle School Johnson Middle School Viera High School Suntree Elementary School Viera High School Cocoa High School Elementary Programs Secondary Programs

Table of Contents
Quality Language Arts Teachers 3 The Importance of Vertical Alignment . . . 4 How to Use These Materials6 Foundational Focus..7 Reading Process..7 Literary Analysis.....8 Information and Media Literacy.9 Communication.1 0 Writing Process.10 Writing Applications.1 1 Blank Template: Unit Planning Overview . . .1 3 Grade 7 Sample Unit Planning Overview ...14 Sample Unit Planning with Standards15 Sample Lesson Plan ...19 Grade 8 Sample Unit Planning Overview ...20 Sample Unit Planning with Standards21 Sample Lesson Plan....25 Grade 9 Sample Unit Planning Overview ...26 Sample Unit Planning with Standards28 Sample Lesson Plan ..32 Grade 10 Sample Unit Planning Overview ..33 Sample Unit Planning with Standards...34 Sample Lesson Plan ..38 Grade 11 Sample Unit Planning Overview ..39 Sample Unit Planning with Standards...40 Sample Lesson Plan ..44 Grade 12 Sample Unit Planning Overview ..46 Sample Unit Planning with Standards...47 Sample Lesson Plan ..51 Secondary Language Arts Helpful Website Links ...52 References and Resources.....53

Quality Language Arts teachers . . .

use knowledge of students to advance students achievement as readers, writers, speakers, listeners, and viewers and to design curricula instruction; use a range of formal and informal assessments to plan for instruction, monitor and evaluate student progress, and involve students in the assessment process; establish and manage inclusive learning environments in which they engage, challenge, and support students; create, select, adapt and use a wide range of instructional resources to support their students learning and strengthen their own learning; know and evaluate the research supporting reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and producing media texts; develop students reading and writing skills and their ability to comprehend, interpret, and analyze a wide variety of texts; continually observe, analyze, and seek to improve the effectiveness of their teaching and articulate reasons for instructional decisions; provide a print-rich environment; establish classroom procedures, cultures of trust, and cooperation; are good listeners who respect each students contribution and encourage them to take risks; keep students engaged to minimize discipline issues; make valid instructional grouping instructions (whole group, partners, etc.); place high value on diversity of language experience, cultural background, and ethnic heritage; and provide the opportunity to apply learning beyond the classroom

Adapted from www.nbct.org

The Importance of Vertical Alignment


Through Essential Elements of Language Arts Curriculum, teachers gathered input through workshops, meetings, and professional development days to find common threads throughout Secondary Language Arts classrooms. In the summer of 2007, a committee met to vertically align the curriculum with the new Sunshine State Standards. One purpose is to avoid overlap or gaps in the skills students acquire by graduation. Another purpose is to make sure the concept of Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships (Daggett) is apparent in these shared lessons. This document is an initial step toward the goal of vertical alignment in Brevard Public Schools. This continuing process of vertical alignment within the district will serve as an umbrella to include current best practices from a variety of trainings and district publications. During the September 2006 department chair meeting, language arts department chairs shared benefits of vertical alignment within our district. Vertical alignment will: promote consistency throughout the district; target strong academic focus; add opportunities for communication; support program integrity; provide unity when issues arise; enhance learning by limiting gaps and repetition for all students, with special note for those transferring schools; and serve as a guide for beginning teachers.

Feeder system communication is vital to ensure students receive instruction relevant to their needs. It is important to note that vertical alignment of instruction extends to all grades K-12. While this committees focus was grades 7-12, the foundation of knowledge established in elementary school, particularly 6th grade, was taken into consideration. While concepts and skills should recur from year to year based on grade-level appropriateness, a student should not study the same text for multiple years. The Essential Elements of Language Arts Curriculum committee included representatives from 6th grade to facilitate this communication between elementary and secondary levels.

This chart shows the target skills specifically tested on the FCAT which must be heavily imbedded when planning the curriculum. The skills of Content Focus for Reading and Writing are the Sunshine State Standards and appear on the Department of Educations Web site. Content Focus for Reading Content Focus for Writing Plus (Students in grades 8 and 10 will be asked to write an (This applies to both essay and multiple choice extended response using various skills.) section of test.)
Words and Phrases in Context Analyze words/text Conclusions/inferences Context Focus Planning for a purpose Topic awareness Writers purpose Central idea

Main Idea, Plot and Purpose Details/facts Main idea/essential message Patterns of organization Methods of development Authors point of view Authors purpose Character development Character point of view Conflict/conflict resolution Descriptive/figurative language

Organization
(Depends on type of essay received; expository and/or persuasive)

Organizational plan Logical order Transitional devices

*** Examples of essay structure: chronological, cause/effect, compare/contrast, argument/support ***

Comparisons and Cause and Effect Comparison Contrast Cause/effect

Support Development of support Word choice

Reference and Research Locates, organizes and interprets information Synthesizes information within text Synthesizes information (multiple sources) Strong vs. weak argument Validity and accuracy of information Validity and reliability of information Analyze and evaluate information

Conventions Spelling
(Weighs more in Writing Plus than essay)

Punctuation
(Use of all punctuation devices; i.e. quotation marks, commas, semicolon)

Capitalization
(Proper Nouns, Proper Adjectives)

Usage Sentence structure


(Grammar, Parts of Speech)

How to Use These Materials


Foundational Focus: Most skills/standards apply to grades 7-12 and should correlate with grade-level texts and instruction. Standards expand in upper grades to encompass more specific skills. Some skills are introduced at later grades and are labeled as such. While similar skills are taught at all levels, the honors/advanced classes may process information differently. When drafting lesson plans, a teacher must keep in mind strategies to differentiate and scaffold instruction based on the needs of a population of students. ***This guide is intended as a planning tool to be used in conjunction with the Sunshine State Standards. Highlighted sections indicate areas of FCAT focus.

Unit planner with standards: This document serves as a guide to correlate the state standards with overall teacher-created unit plans. standards. This resource also serves as a documentation guide for state

Blank unit plan template: When developing a unit of study, it is important to see where/how all resources fit together. This document is a web, linking various teaching strategies and resources to a centralized focus.

Standards checklist: This document serves as a self-check or reflection opportunity, ensuring inclusion of all state-mandated standards while teaching throughout the year.

Foundational Focus
This guide is intended as a planning tool to be used in conjunction with the Sunshine State Standards. Highlighted sections indicate areas of FCAT focus.

Reading Process
7-12 Fluency Adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form, and style such as Readers Theater or poetry recitation. Vocabulary Development Use context clues Categorize and relate new vocabulary to familiar words Understand use of synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms Distinguish between denotation and connotation Understand the use of and apply prefixes, suffixes, and root words Understand word meanings derived from Anglo-Saxon, Greek, and Latin Reading Comprehension Apply pre-reading, during, and post-reading strategies Analyze authors purpose Determine main idea and relevant details Identify cause/effect Analyze text structure/methods of development such as compare/contrast, cause/effect, organization/support Compare and contrast elements (setting, characters, problems) in multiple texts Make and confirm inferences from reading a text

9-12 Vocabulary Development Identify meanings of words and phrases from different languages

11-12 Vocabulary Development Identify unfamiliar political science/medical terms from Latin and Greek

Literary Analysis
7-12 Fiction Understand characteristics of various genres Understand literary elements and devices in all genres including characterization, setting, plot, rising action, conflict, resolution, theme, sound, meter, point of view, climax, narration Recognize recurring themes in multiple works Recognize universal themes and symbols across genres and history Recognize textual evidence or support Recognize allusions Recognize and use descriptive and idiomatic language Recognize and use figurative language such as simile, metaphor, alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme and rhythm, personification, and imagery Understand appropriate word choice Understand historical context Understand changes in language over time Non-Fiction Recognize organizational text features Understand main idea and relevant details Understand relationships among facts, ideas and events Compare different types of non-fiction texts 9-12 Fiction Understand relationships among genres Complete multi-genre responses to a comparison of two or more works Understand literary elements and devices in all genres including time and sequence (i.e. foreshadowing and flashback), repetition, consonance, assonance, hyperbole, symbolism, tone, irony, mood, pun, oxymoron, parallel, and hubris Understand features, graphics, sounds, structure, and theme in poetry Recognize social commentary in writing

11-12 Fiction Understand characteristics of subgenres such as satire, parody, and allegory

Information and Media Literacy


7-12 Informational Text Use charts, graphs, and illustrations Create consumer and workplace documents and presentations Create technical manuals or solve technical problems Research Process Select, develop, and evaluate resources Check validity of text or information and make distinctions between facts and ideas Draft reports, integrating information and making distinctions between facts and ideas with works cited page Maintain ethics regarding plagiarism, slander, etc. Media Literacy Understand production elements-- graphics, color, motion, sound, digital technology and their effects/purposes Select what is ethically appropriate, citing sources Compare propaganda with ethical reasoning in various media Technology Select and use various digital media to create a product

9-12 Research Process Draft reports, integrating information and making distinctions between facts and ideas with citations in text

Communication
7-12 Listening and Speaking Use active listening strategies for information Analyze persuasive techniques Research, organize, and deliver speeches Choose verbal and non-verbal elements for speech delivery Engage an audience with an oral presentation with introduction and conclusion 9-12 Listening and Speaking Engage an audience with figurative language

Writing Process
7-12 Prewriting Brainstorm writing topics Plan writing purpose, audience, main idea, logical sequence, time frame of completion Use organizational tools/graphic organizers Drafting Develop a topic sentence considering purpose and audience when establishing main idea Provide substantial, specific, and relevant details Analyze samples of authors to develop personal style Recognize and use transitional devices Revising Read and evaluate effectiveness of a draft (organization, voice, word choice, sentence variety) Create a unified main idea Add creative language, complex sentences, and possible research Use peer review/rubrics and self-evaluation

Editing for Language Conventions Spelling and correct word usage/editing Use correct capitalization in proper nouns, sentence structure, and proper adjectives Use correct punctuation including comma, apostrophe, dash, colon with list, semi-colons, participial, participial phrases, letter formatting, quotation marks Understand and use correctly the eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, adverb, verb, adjective, conjunction, preposition, interjection Understand regular and irregular verbs, verb tense, subject/verb agreement, noun/pronoun agreement Understand possessives and punctuate appropriately Publishing Determine technology format of writing piece Add graphic elements Share own writing piece 9-12 Drafting Use organizational patterns (cause/effect, foreshadowing) Revising Revise and add details (facts, anecdotes, expert opinions) Editing for Language Conventions Spelling/word choice of foreign words commonly used in English Use correct punctuation including underlining and italics Comparative/superlative adjectives and adverbs Absolutes and absolute phrases, infinitives, infinitive phrases, and intentional fragments

11-12 Revising Create a unified main idea and develop logical relationships in text Editing for Language Conventions Use correct punctuation including parentheses, ellipses, and brackets Recognize pronoun/antecedent, parallel structure, modifier placement, and unintended shift in person or tense Understand run-on sentences, dangling modifiers, and unintended fragments

Writing Applications
7-12 Creative Write narrative responses Use narrative techniques including plot, dialogue, characterization, figurative language, style, tone, physical description, background description, compare/contrast, and sensory description Write in expressive forms in various genres Informative Use informative forms of summaries, procedures, instructions, experiments, rubrics, how-to manuals, assembly instructions Record information for note-taking, lists, charts, legends, observations Write expository essays using process, description, explanation, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, and cause/effect Write informally in forms such as friendly letters, thank you notes, messages Write directions such as detailed travel directions Persuasive Write various forms of persuasion such as advertisements, essay, speech, public service announcement Use persuasive techniques such as word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking

9-12 Creative Use narrative techniques including internal monologue, points of view, literary devices (irony, conceit, imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, allusion) Informative Record information for note-taking with documentation of source, validity and reliability of sources Write formal communications such as conventional business letters, memos, invitations Write work-related documents such as applications, resumes, cover letters Use persuasive techniques such as testimonials, bandwagon, image association, transfer Persuasive Write various forms of persuasion such as editorial, letter to the editor State a position or claim using arguments, emotional appeals, refutes to opposing arguments 11-12 Informative Use informative forms of directions, scientific and technical vocabulary Persuasive Use persuasive techniques such as attributing sources of information

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BLANK TEMPLATE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Guiding Question


Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) Pre-Reading

Grade
Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions)

During Reading

Post Reading Reading Selections

Fiction

Vocabulary

Non-fiction

Communication (Listening and Speaking)

Literary Analysis

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology

Assessment

Reflection

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Discovering self through childhood experiences. Guiding Question How does our past guide our future?
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) Pre-Reading Quickwrites (activating prior knowledge) Oranges & Seventh Grade Describe someone you liked before. Burning Out at Nine What activities are you involved in? An American Childhood Describe a time you got in trouble. During Reading An American Childhood & Seventh Grade Prediction of what will happen. Burning Out at Nine Compare/contrast with Venn diagram (then/now children) Post Reading An American Childhood & Seventh Grade How did you like the story? Would you have acted the same way? Compare/contrast characters in both stories. Vocabulary Prefixes An American Childhood com (compelled), trans (translucent) Seventh Grade con (conviction) idioms in Seventh Grade

Grade 7

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions) Students ask peers to tell them a childhood memory while they take notes. They then write their peers story in great detail. Same activity with parents Work through process Punctuation including: comma, apostrophes, sentence punctuation, quotation marks, colon and semi-colons

Reading Selections Fiction Seventh Grade by Gary Soto, p.116, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature Oranges by Gary Soto, p.85, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature Non-fiction Burning Out at Nine by Nadya Labi, p.33, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard, p.562, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature

Communication (Listening and Speaking) Students ask peers to tell them a childhood memory while they take notes. They then write their peers story in great detail using 3rd person point of view. Same activity with parents Share presentations created about own childhood (see Research and Technology) Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology Have students collect images and create a digital presentation (slide show, collage, powerpoint, etc.) about 3-5 significant moments from their childhood and how those moments shaped who they are today. View and discuss clips from The Sandlot and My Dog Skip.

Literary Analysis Seventh Grade idioms, word choice An American Childhood descriptive language, detail, characteristics of memoirs (relate to writing activity)

Assessment Which details help the reader to experience the events of the stories? Indicate significant details in the stories.

Reflection Student reflection What have you learned about yourself? Your family?

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: Discovering self through childhood experiences. Guiding Question: How does our past guide our future? Grade 7 Texts Fiction
Seventh Grade by Gary Soto, p.116, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature Oranges by Gary Soto, p.85, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature Burning Out at Nine by Nadya Labi, p.33, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature from An American Childhood by Annie Dillard, p.562, Prentice Hall, 7th Grade Literature

Poetry

Non-fiction

Skills Focus

Making predictions, comparison/ contrast, prefixes

R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.7.1 Pre Reading


Quickwrites (prior knowledge) Oranges +Seventh Grade: Describe someone you liked in that way before. Burning Out at Nine: What activities are you involved in? Describe them. An American Childhood: Describe a time you got in trouble.

__X__ whole group _____ small group

_X__ individual

During Reading
An American Childhood +Seventh Grade: Making predictions Burning Out at Nine: Compare/contrast with T-chart between children then and now

Post Reading

An American Childhood +Seventh Grade: Class discussion How did you like the story? Would you have acted the same way? An American Childhood +Seventh Grade: Compare/contrast characters in both stories with a Venn diagram

Vocabulary
Prefixes An American Childhood: com(compelled), trans- (translucent) Seventh Grade: con- (conviction) Seventh Grade: Idioms

Fluency: LA.7.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: LA.7.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.7.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text LA.7.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.7.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.7.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.7.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.7.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words LA.7.1.6.8 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.7.1.6.9 determine the correct meanings of words with multiple meanings in context LA.7.1.6.10 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools LA.7.1.6.11 identify the meaning of words and phrases derived from Anglo-Saxon, Greek, and Latin Mythology Reading Comprehension: LA.7.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies, graphic representations, and knowledge of text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection LA.7.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose (to persuade, inform, entertain, explain) and perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning LA.7.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details LA.7.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text LA.7.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.7.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction choices LA.7.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) LA.7.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when selfmonitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources.

Literary Analysis LA.7.2

__X__ whole group _____ small group

___ individual

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Seventh Grade: Idioms, word choice An American Childhood: Descriptive language, details, characteristics of memoirs

Fiction: LA.7.2.1 LA.7.2.1.1 identify and analyze the characteristics of various genres (poetry, fiction, short story, dramatic literature) as forms with distinct characteristics and purposes LA.7.2.1.2 locate and analyze elements of characterization, setting and plot, including rising action, conflict, resolution, theme, and other literary elements as appropriate in a variety of fiction LA.7.2.1.3 locate and analyze various literary devices (sound, meter, figurative, and descriptive language), graphics, and structure contribute to the mood and meaning in poetry LA.7.2.1.4 identify and analyze recurring themes across a variety of works (bravery, friendship, loyalty, good vs. evil) LA.7.2.1.5 develop an interpretation of a selection around several clear ideas, premises, or images, developing and justifying the interpretation through sustained use of examples and contextual evidence LA.7.2.1.6 compare the illustration of the same theme in two different literary genres, using their structural features as the basis for the comparison (novel and play, poem and short story) LA.7.2.1.7 locate and analyze an authors use of allusions and descriptive, idiomatic, and figurative language in a variety of literary texts, identifying how word choice is used to appeal to the readers senses and emotions, providing evidence from text to support the analysis LA.7.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.7.2.1.9 describe changes in the English language over time, and support these descriptions with examples from literary texts s LA.7.2.1.10 use interest and recommendation of others to select a balance of age and ability appropriate fiction materials to read to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.7.2.2 LA.7.2.2.1 locate, use, and analyze specific information from organizational text features (table of contents, headings, captions, bold print, italics, glossaries, indices, key/guide words) LA.7.2.2.2 use information from the text to state the main idea and/or to provide relevant details LA.7.2.2.3 organize information to show understanding (representing main ideas within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting) LA.7.2.2.4 identify the characteristics of a variety of types of text and how they are alike and different (reference works, reports, technical manuals, newspapers, magazines, biographies, periodicals, procedures, instructions) LA.7.2.2.5 use interest and recommendation of others to select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, sports, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

Writing Process LA.7.3


With written stories, have students find five general ideas and replace them with specific details. Choose one of the two stories to tell to the class.

__X__ whole group ___X__ small group

_X__ individual

Pre-Writing : LA.7.3.1 LA.7.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (prior knowledge, brainstorming, writers notebook, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.7.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, main idea, logical sequence LA.7.3.1.3 use organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graph, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.7.3.2 LA.7.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience, elaborating on organized information using descriptive language, supporting details, and word choices appropriate to the selected tone and mood LA.7.3.2.2 organize information into a logical sequence and combining or deleting sentences to enhance clarity LA.7.3.2.3 analyze language techniques of professional authors (including abstract and concrete word choices) and infusing a variety of language techniques to reinforce voice Revising : LA.7.3.3 LA.7.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.7.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by rearranging words, sentences, and paragraphs and developing relationships among ideas LA.7.3.3.3 create precision and interest by using a variety of sentences structures (including the use of participles and participial phrases at the beginning and end of sentences), creative

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language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) LA.7.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.7.3.4 LA.7.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and using a dictionary, thesaurus, or other resources as necessary LA.7.3.4.2 capitalization, including regional names (East Coast), historical events and documents LA.7.3.4.3 punctuation of sentence structures, including participles and participial phrases, colon in introductory lists and to punctuate business letter salutations, semicolon in compound sentences, dash for additional emphasis or information, and apostrophes for plural possessives LA.7.3.4.4 the eight parts of speech (noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, adjective, conjunction, preposition, interjection) regular and irregular verbs, and pronoun agreement LA.7.3.4.5 consistency in verb tense in simple, compound, and complex sentences Publishing: LA.7.3.5 LA.7.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to audience and purpose (display, multimedia) LA.7.3.5.2 use elements of spacing and design for graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) when applicable to enhance the appearance of the document LA.7.3.5.3 share with the intended audience

Writing Applications LA.7.4


Students ask peers to tell them a childhood memory while they take notes. They then write their peers story in great detail. Students ask an adult at home about one of their childhood experiences and what it means to them now. They then write this story in great detail.

__X__ whole group __X___ small group

_X__ individual

Creative : LA.7.4.1 LA.7.4.1.1 write narrative accounts with an engaging plot (including rising action, conflict, suspense, climax, falling action and resolution) and that use a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative action (dialogue, movement, gestures, expressions) and include effectively developed and complex characters, a clearly described setting, figurative language, and descriptive words or phrases to enhance style and tone LA.7.4.1.2 write a variety of expressive forms (realistic fiction, one-act play, suspense story, poetry) that according to the type of writing employed, incorporate figurative language, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot, and appropriate format Informative : LA.7.4.2 LA.7.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms (summaries, procedures, instructions, experiments, rubrics, how-to-manuals, assembly instructions) LA.7.4.2.2 record information (observations, notes, lists, charts, legends) related to a topic, including visual aids to organize and record information, as appropriate, and attribute sources of information LA.7.4.2.3 write specialized informational/expository essays (process, description, explanation, comparison/contrast, problem/solution) that include a thesis statement, supporting details, and organizational structure particular to its type, and introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.7.4.2.4 write a variety of informal communications (friendly letters, thank-you notes, messages) and formal communications (conventional business letters, invitations) that follow a format and that have a clearly stated purpose and that include the date, proper salutation, body, closing and signature LA.7.4.2.5 write detailed directions to unfamiliar locations using cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets, and distances and create an accompanying map Persuasive : LA.7.4.3 LA.7.4.3.1 establish and develop a controlling idea and support arguments for the validity of the proposed idea with detailed evidence LA.7.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony)

Communication LA.7.5
(same as above Writing Process

__X__ whole group __X___ small group

___ individual

and Applications) Students listen and write notes. Class discussion

Penmanship : LA.7.5.1 LA.7.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.7.5.2 LA.7.5.2.1 use effective listening strategies for informal and formal discussions, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker and respecting the viewpoints of others when identifying bias or faulty logic LA.7.5.2.2 analyze persuasive techniques in both formal and informal speech LA.7.5.2.3 organize and effectively deliver speeches to entertain, inform and persuade, demonstrating appropriate language choices, body language, eye contact, gestures, and the use of supporting graphics and technology

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Information and Media Literacy LA.7.6 individual


An American Childhood: Use computer to research elements of stories Students will find pictures of northern, snowy scenes for Gallery Walk. Class will then discuss the power of the graphic image. Review and have student write the MLA citation for an interview.

__X__ whole group _____ small group __X_

Informational Text : LA.7.6.1 LA.7.6.1.1 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, sub-headings, captions, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.7.6.1.2 use information from a variety of consumer (warranties, instructional manuals) workplace (application, contract) and other documents to explain a situation and justify a decision LA.7.6.1.3 create a technical manual or solve a problem Research Process : LA.7.6.2 LA.7.6.2.1 select a topic, develop a search plan, and apply evaluative criteria (relevance, objectivity, scope of content in print and online sources) to select appropriate resources for research LA.7.6.2.2 assess, organize, and check the validity and reliability of information in text, using a variety of techniques by examining several sources of information, including both primary and secondary sources LA.7.6.2.3 write an informational report that includes a focused topic, appropriate facts and relevant details, a logical sequence, a concluding statement, and a list o f sources used LA.7.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.7.6.3 LA.7.6.3.1 analyze ways that production elements (graphics, color, motion, sound, digital technology) affect communication across the media LA.7.6.3.2 demonstrate the ability to select and ethically use media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience LA.7.6.3.3 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media Technology : LA.7.6.4 LA.7.6.4.1 select and use appropriate available technologies (computer, digital camera) to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, presentations) LA.7.6.4.2 evaluate and apply digital tools (word processing, multimedia authoring, web tools, graphic organizers) to publications and presentations

Modifications / strategies
Activating prior knowledge Graphic Organizers Prediction Comparison/ Contrast Cooperative learning (sharing in pairs) Verbal storytelling (as an alternative to written) Graphic images

Teacher Reflection (use back, if needed)

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SAMPLE LESSON PLAN Unit Title: How does our past guide our future? Lesson Title: from An American Childhood

Grade 7th

Focus Sunshine State Standards


LA.7.1.6.7 Reading Process, LA.7.1.7.1 Reading Process, LA.7.2.2.2 Literary Analysis, LA.7.3.1.1 Writing Process, LA.7.3.2.1 Writing Process, LA.7.5.2.1 Communication, LA.7.6.4.1 Information and Media Literacy

Objectives
Students will compose sentences using words with the prefixes trans- and com-. Students will choose a passage that enhances the mood of the story.

Overview
Centered on Annie Dillards An American Childhood, the lesson combines pre-reading, vocabulary, research, listening, and writing strategies to reinforce and lead students to comprehension of the memoir genre.

Materials
Prentice Hall Literature Book (Bronze Level), computers, color printer, rubric for performance task

Procedures
Quickwrite (activation of prior knowledge): Describe a time when you or a character from a novel or movie did something wrong and feared getting caught. Have students do a think-pair-share and discuss what they wrote. Introduce the words translucent and compelled. Break them into parts and discuss their prefixes (trans-, com-). Have students brainstorm other words and their meanings. Ask students to write two sentences using a word with the trans- prefix and the com- prefix. Have students use the computer to find and print pictures of northern, urban/suburban, snowy scenes. Gallery walk: Post pictures. Have students walk around and write a few words about each picture. Ask students to choose one word to share. Write them on the board. Read-aloud from An American Childhood, Prentice Hall Literature book p.562 Discuss the mood of the piece as a class. Ask students to choose one sentence from the story that enhances the mood (e.g., excitement or fear) and write a Short-Response Read, Think, and Explain paragraph about it. Tell students what they read today is called a memoir. Discuss the definition of memoir. Ask students how this piece fulfills those characteristics.

Assessment
Students use the new vocabulary appropriately. Students choose a detail that enhances the mood of the piece and then write a Short Response about it. (FCAT Short Response 2-point rubric used)

Teacher Reflection

17

SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Overcoming Adversity Guiding Question Are we defined by our differences?
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) PreReading: Discuss vocabulary. (naivet, opportunist) and affixes: (psyche, medic, ment, script, sens, ab, ex, extra, il, un) Introduce first person point-of-view. Introduce narrative/journal genre of writing. Discuss chronological order of writing/reading. Access prior knowledge of intelligence and disabilities using CRISS strategy Think-Pair-Share. During: Compare/Contrast, Cause/Effect, Predicting Outcomes/Inferencing with themes among the several texts. Use think-alouds and keep a running summary (CRISS strategy: two-column note form) of the texts to use as a reference at the end of the unit. Post: Compare themes among several texts. Synthesize texts in order to reach a common thread. --------------------------------------------------------Vocabulary: Communication (Listening and Speaking) Clips of the film Charly as they correspond to the story. Presentation of Research Project. Guest Speaker from Harmony Farms in Rockledge. (horseback riding for the handicapped)

Grade 8

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions)


Experience a disability: For example, have students wear glasses with Vaseline, wear ear plugs, or write with their opposite hand. Write about their experience. Rorschach Inkblot: Have students create their own inkblot and then write about what they see. Have students also compare what other students see in their inkblot. Focus on ideas and details. FCAT writing prompt ideas: What does it mean to be smart? Would you sacrifice yourself for the greater good of science or society like Charlie in Flowers for Algernon"? Convince Charlie to either participate in the experiment or not. Grammar/Conventions: (Grammar will be taught in conjunction with text/journal entries, since Charlie is writing incorrectly) Commonly Confused Words found in the Language Network on p. 658-659 Punctuation including: comma, apostrophes, sentence punctuation, quotation marks, colon and semi-colons. Revising Symbols: Language Network textbook p. 323

Reading Selections Fiction


Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keys, p.182 Forgotten Language Poem by Shel Silverstein, p. 869 If I can stop one Heart from breaking Poem by Emily Dickenson, p. 872 She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways Elegy by William Wordsworth, p. 850 All these texts can be found in the textbook Prentice Hall Literature

Nonfiction
Multiple Intelligences Quiz with descriptors (See Web site: http://www.ldrc.ca/projects/miinventory/mitest.html) Employment Contract, p. 112 in Prentice Hall Literature

Novel Connections
All texts support first person point of view. The Joey Pigza Series by Jack Gantos (theme, POV) So B. It. by Sarah Weeks (theme) Kissing Doorknobs by Hesser/Allen (theme) The Uglies Trilogy by Scott Westerfield (theme)

Reflection

Maze Race: Students complete a timed maze and discuss how it felt to complete under pressure.

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology


Discuss MLA citations in a Works Citied page in the Language Network textbook on p. 662. Students will research various disabilities and how to successfully live with and/or overcome them. Research products can be taken from Barry Lanes Wacky We-Search Reports. Some examples from Lanes book that can be used with this unit would be: A Recipe, How to be , A Day in the Life of , or Trading Cards.

Assessment Create a rubric for students so that they can create a unit exam based on the skills taught within the unit. Take questions from student-made tests and create a unit test for the students to take.

18

Literary Analysis Compare/Contrast Charlie from the beginning of the story vs. Charlie after the operation. Cause and effect with Charlie gaining intelligence and its effect on his life. Examine the technique of first person point-ofview in all unit texts (including supplementary texts). Characterization of Charlie, doctors, Algernon, Miss Kinnan, factory workers. Genre-short story, poetry (i.e. elegy).

SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: Overcoming Adversity Guiding Question: Are we defined by our differences? Grade 8 Texts: Fiction: All these texts can be found in the textbook Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes Silver Level
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keys, p. 182 Forgotten Language Poem by Shel Silverstein, p. 869 If I can stop one Heart from breaking Poem by Emily Dickenson, p. 872 She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways Elegy by William Wordsworth, p. 850

Non-Fiction:
Multiple Intelligences Quiz with descriptors (Please see: http://www.ldrc.ca/projects/miinventory/mitest.html) Employment Contract, p. 112 in Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes Silver Level

Skills Focus: Reading: Compare/Contrast; Cause/Effect R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.8.1


PreReading
Discuss vocabulary (naivet, opportunist) and Affixes: (psyche, medic, ment, script, sens, ab, ex, extra, il, un) Introduce first-person point-of-view Introduce narrative/journal genre of writing Discuss chronological order of writing/reading Access prior knowledge of intelligence and disabilities using CRISS strategy Think-PairShare

Writing: Relevant Details; Punctuation _X___ whole group __X___ small group

___ individual

During Reading
Compare/Contrast; Cause/Effect; Predicting Outcomes/Inferencing with themes among the several texts Use think-alouds and keep a running summary (CRISS strategy: two-column note form) of the texts to use as a reference at the end of the unit Compare themes among several texts Synthesize texts in order to reach a common thread

Post Reading

Vocabulary

Fluency: LA.8.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: LA.8.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.8.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text LA.8.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.8.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.8.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.8.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.8.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. LA.8.1.6.8 identify the meaning of words and phrases derived from Anglo-Saxon, Greek, and Latin Mythology LA.8.1.6.9 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.8.1.6.10 determine the correct meanings of words with multiples meanings in context LA.8.1.6.11 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools Reading Comprehension: LA.8.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies, graphic representations, and knowledge of text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection LA.8.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning LA.8.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details LA.8.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text LA.8.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.8.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections LA.8.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) LA.8.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using a graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources

19

Literary Analysis LA.8.2


__X__ whole group __X___ small group

___ individual

Compare and contrast Charlie from the beginning of the story to after the operation. Cause and effect with Charlie gaining intelligence and its effect on his life. Examine the technique of first person point of view in all unit texts. (including supplementary) Characterization of Charlie, doctors, Algernon, Miss Kinnan, factory workers. Genre-short story, poetry (i.e. elegy) Create a rubric for students so that they can create a unit exam based on the skills taught within the unit. Take questions from studentmade tests and create a unit test for the students to take.

Fiction: LA.8.2.1 LA.8.2.1.1 identify, analyze, and compare the characteristics of various genres (poetry, fiction, short story, dramatic literature) as forms chosen by an author to accomplish a purpose LA.8.2.1.2 locate and analyze elements of characterization, setting and plot, including rising action, conflict, resolution, theme, and other literary elements as appropriate in a variety of fiction LA.8.2.1.3 locate and analyze universal themes and symbols across genres and historical periods, and explain their significance LA.8.2.1.5 develop an interpretation of a selection around several clear ideas, premises, or images, developing and justifying the interpretation through sustained use of examples and contextual evidence LA.8.2.1.6 compare literary texts that express a universal theme, providing textual evidence as support for the identified theme LA.8.2.1.7 locate and analyze an authors use of allusions and descriptive, idiomatic, and figurative language in a variety of literary texts, identifying how word choice is used to appeal to the readers senses and emotions, providing evidence from text to support the analysis LA.8.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.8.2.1.9 identify, analyze, and compare the differences in English language patters and vocabulary choices of contemporary and historical texts LA.8.2.1.10 use interest and recommendation of others to select a balance of age and ability appropriate fiction materials to read to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.8.2.2 LA.8.2.2.1 locate, use, and analyze specific information from organizational text features (table of contents, headings, captions, bold print, italics, glossaries, indices, key/guide words) LA.8.2.2.2 synthesize and use information from the text to state the main idea or to provide relevant details LA.8.2.2.3 organize information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining) LA.8.2.2.4 identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of types of text (reference works, reports, technical manuals, newspapers, magazines, biographies, periodicals, procedures, instructions, practical/functional texts) LA.8.2.2.5 use interest and recommendation of others to select age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, sports, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

Writing Process LA.8.3


____ whole group __X___ small group

__X_ individual

Students identify ideas of writing with web. Students will construct quick-writes in journal. Grammar will be taught in conjunction with text/journal entries, since Charlie is writing incorrectly. --Commonly Confused Words found in the Language Network textbook on pgs. 658-659 --Punctuation including: comma, apostrophes, sentence punctuation, quotation marks, colon and semi-colons --Revising Symbols: Language Network textbook p. 323 Students take Revising Symbols and apply them to the story and use when editing their own writing.

Pre-Writing : LA.8.3.1 LA.8.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (prior knowledge, brainstorming, writers notebook, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.8.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, main idea, logical sequence, and time frame for completion LA.8.3.1.3 using organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graph, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.8.3.2 LA.8.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience LA.8.3.2.2 establish a logical organizational pattern with supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant LA.8.3.2.3 analyze language techniques of professional authors (rhythm, varied sentence structure) to develop a personal style, demonstrating a command of language with freshness of expression Revising : LA.8.3.3 LA.8.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.8.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by maintaining central theme, idea, or unifying point and developing meaningful relationships among ideas

20

LA.8.3.3.3 create precision and interest by elaborating ideas through supporting details (facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes) a variety of sentences structures, creative language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) LA.8.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.8.3.4 LA.8.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and using a dictionary, thesaurus, or other resources as necessary LA.8.3.4.2 capitalization, including names of academic courses and proper adjectives LA.8.3.4.3 punctuation, including commas, colons, semicolons, quotation marks, and apostrophes LA.8.3.4.4 the eight parts of speech (noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, adjective, conjunction, preposition, interjection) regular and irregular verbs, and pronoun agreement LA.8.3.4.5 subject/verb agreement, noun/pronoun agreement

Publishing: LA.8.3.5 LA.8.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (display, multimedia) LA.8.3.5.2 use elements of spacing and design for graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) when applicable to enhance the appearance of the document LA.8.3.5.3 share with the intended audience

Writing Applications LA.8.4


Experience a disability: For example, have students wear glasses with Vaseline, wear ear plugs, or write with their opposite hand. Then write about their experience during that activity. Rorschach Inkblot: Have students create their own inkblot and then write about what they see. Have students also compare what other students see in their inkblot. Focus on ideas and details. FCAT writing prompt ideas: What does it mean to be smart? Would you sacrifice yourself for the greater good of science or society like Charlie in Flowers for Algernon? Convince Charlie to either participate in the experiment or not.

____ whole group __X___ small group

_X__ individual

Creative : LA.8.4.1 LA.8.4.1.1 write narrative accounts with an engaging plot (including rising action, conflict, suspense, climax, falling action and resolution) and that use a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative action (dialogue, movement, gestures, expressions) and include well-chosen details using both narrative and descriptive strategies (relevant dialogue, specific action, physical description, background description, comparison/contrast of characters) LA.8.4.1.2 write a variety of expressive forms (realistic fiction, one-act play, suspense story, poetry) that according to the type of writing employed, incorporate figurative language, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot, and appropriate format Informative : LA.8.4.2 LA.8.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms (summaries, procedures, instructions, experiments, rubrics, how-to-manuals, assembly instructions) LA.8.4.2.2 record information (observations, notes, lists, charts, legends) related to a topic, including visual aids to organize and record information, as appropriate, and attribute sources of information LA.8.4.2.3 write specialized informational/expository essays (process, description, explanation, comparison/contrast, problem/solution) that include a thesis statement, supporting details, and organizational structure particular to its type, and introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.8.4.2.4 write a variety of informal communications (friendly letters, thankyou notes, messages business letter and/or memo) and formal communications (conventional business letters, invitations) that follow a format and that have a clearly stated purpose and that include the date, proper salutation, body, closing and signature LA.8.4.2.5 write detailed directions to unfamiliar locations using cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets, and distances and create an accompanying map Persuasive : LA.8.4.3 LA.8.4.3.1 establish and develop a controlling idea and support arguments for the validity of the proposed idea with detailed evidence LA.8.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking)

21

Communication LA.8.5

__X__ whole group __X___ small group

___ individual

Clips of the film Charly as they correspond to the story. Presentation of Research Project. Guest Speaker from Harmony Farms in Rockledge. (horseback riding for the handicapped)

Penmanship : LA.8.5.1 LA.8.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.8.5.2 LA.8.5.2.1 demonstrate effective listening skills and behaviors for a variety of purposes, and demonstrate understanding by paraphrasing and/or summarizing LA.8.5.2.2 use effective listening and speaking strategies for informal and formal discussions, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker and respecting the viewpoints of others when identifying bias or faulty logic LA.8.5.2.3 select and use a variety of creative oral language techniques for clarity and effect (connotation, denotation, hyperbole, understatement) LA.8.5.2.4 research, organize, and effectively deliver speeches to entertain, inform, and persuade LA.8.5.2.5 demonstrate language choices, body language, eye contact, gestures, appropriate use of graphics and available technology

Information and Media Literacy LA.8.6 individual


Discuss MLA citations in a Works Citied page in Language Network on p. 662. Students will research various disabilities and how to successfully live with and/or overcome them. Research products can be taken from Barry Lanes Wacky We-Search Reports. Some examples from Lanes book that can be used with this unit would be: A Recipe, How to be , A Day in the Life of , or Trading cards.

__X__ whole group ___X__ small group ___

Informational Text : LA.8.6.1 LA.8.6.1.1 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, sub-headings, captions, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.8.6.1.2 use information from a variety of consumer (warranties, instructional manuals) workplace (application, contract) and other documents to explain a situation and justify a decision LA.8.6.1.3 create a technical manual or solve a problem Research Process : LA.8.6.2 LA.8.6.2.1 select a topic and develop a search plan with multiple research strategies, and apply evaluative criteria (scope and depth of content, authority, reputation of author/publisher) to assess appropriateness of resources LA.8.6.2.2 assess, organize, synthesize and evaluate the validity and reliability of information in text, using a variety of techniques by examining several sources of information, including both primary and secondary sources LA.8.6.2.3 write an informational report that includes a focused topic, appropriate facts and relevant details, a logical sequence, a concluding statement, and a list o f sources used LA.8.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.8.6.3 LA.8.6.3.1 analyze the ways that production elements (graphics, color, motion, sound, digital technology) affect communication across the media LA.8.6.3.2 demonstrate the ability to select and ethically use print and nonprint media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience to develop into a formal presentation LA.8.6.3.3 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media Technology : LA.8.6.4 LA.8.6.4.1 use appropriate available technologies to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, digital technology,) LA.8.6.4.2 evaluate and apply digital tools (word processing, multimedia authoring, webtools, graphic organizers) to publications and presentations

Modifications / strategies
Graphic Organizers Partner Reading Think-Pair-Share Pre-Writing Strategies Cooperative Learning

Reflection
Maze Race: Students complete a timed maze and discuss how it felt to complete under pressure.

22

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN Unit Title: Overcoming Adversity Lesson Title: The Two Sides of Charlie Gordon Grade: 8

Focus Sunshine State Standards


LA.8.1.7.7 Reading Process, LA.8.2.1.2 Literary Analysis, LA.8.3.2.2 Writing Process

Objectives
The student will compare the character traits of Charlie Gordon and explore how he as a character changes throughout the story. The student will use textual evidence to prove character changes.

Overview
Overcoming Adversity is a unit focused on the short story Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keys. The unit targets the following skills: Compare and Contrast, Cause and Effect, Affixes, First Person Point-of-View, and Chronological Order. The Two Sides of Charlie Gordon is a lesson in this unit that would occur after reading all or at least 80% of Flowers for Algernon. It is assumed that the students are familiar with the concept of Compare and Contrast prior to implementing this lesson.

Materials
Butcher paper, Scissors, Post-it notes, Prentice Hall Literature textbook (Silver Level), Rubric

Procedures (Students have read Flowers for Algernon)


Divide students into pairs. Each pair will create a life-sized outline of Charlie Gordon on butcher paper and cut it out. (One student will lie on the paper and the other will trace the outline) Divide Charlie down the middle. One half is pre-surgery and the other is post-surgery (as Charlies intelligence increases). Review the text and compare Charlies ideas pre and post surgery. Using Post-its, pull quotes from the text that show the pre and post surgery changes and place them on the correct side of Charlie. (ex. Pre-surgery, Charlie believes his co-workers are laughing WITH him; post surgery, he realizes that they are making fun of him.)

Assessment
Each pair will present its cut-out and discuss its findings in terms of the changes in Charlie. Each student will reflect independently, answering the prompt- Is Charlie better off pre or post surgery?

Teacher Reflection

23

THE TWO SIDES OF CHARLIE GORDON RUBRIC


Names:____________________________________________________________________________
Task Identify the differences in Charlie pre/post surgery Illustrate changes through text with details Presentation (Be able to explain how the differences relate. Ex: Before surgery loves Miss Kinian like a mother; After the surgery loves Miss Kinian like a girlfriend) Quality/Creativity of Product (includes cut out of body, adding color/details, legible Post It Notes) Total Total Points Possibly Earned 40 40 Your Evaluation of Points Earned Teacher Evaluation of Points Earned

20

25 125

Your Comments ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Teacher Comments ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________

24

SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Your place in the world Guiding Question What is your place in the home, community, and world?
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) PreReading Teacher introduces reading strategy for comparison/contrast: Semantic Differential scale in Reading Skills and Strategies Binder p. 105 Background Knowledge: Eisenhower, Allied Forces, World War II Title Prediction Vocabulary Reading Poetry p. 489 During Pick out sensory detail (Sensory Detail Chart: Workshop Resource p. 29) T-chart Poetry - Dialogue with the Text p. 490 Vocabulary context clues

Grade 9

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions) Informative Quickwrite: p. 394 If I Could Live Anywhere . . . Paragraph: Compare and Contrast Cynthias home to Christys home (t-chart), (rubric) Descriptive Paragraph Write a description of your bedroom (use 5 senses, sensory sheet, Show not Tell (use rubric) Quickwrite: What has been the best gift of your life so far? p. 398 Conventions 6 Trait focus: detail using adjectives, participles, and action verbs Workshop Resources: Combining Sentences, Participial Phrases p. 71 Language Network: Chapter 22 Comparison-Contrast Essay Reading Selections Fiction Elements of Literature: Salvador, Late or Early from House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros p. 183 Daily p. 495 Fire and Ice p. 541 All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace p. 543 Nonfiction Active Readers Practice Book: A Place Called Home p. 55-57 Elements of Literature: The Best Gift of My Life by Cynthia Rylant p. 394 Novel Connections To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee

Post

Summarize Main Idea Semantic Differential Scales: A Place Called Home and The Best Gift of My Life (Active Readers Practice Book p. 55-57) --------------------------------------------------------Vocabulary Communication (Listening and Speaking)

http://www.channel4.com/science/microsites/G/ great_global_warming_swind le/trailer.html

Oral Interpretation: Read aloud Salvador speed, pauses, pitch, emphasis Present point of view on global warning Leonardo DiCaprios video on Global Warming http://www.earthsky.org/article/leonard o-dicaprios-global-warming-video or selections from an Inconvenient Truth The Great Global Warning Swindle

Reflection
How did the graphic organizers help you think about the material? What would you do to add more description to your essay the next time? What assignments helped you learn the best? What could the teacher have left out? What confused you? What would you like to know more about?

Literary Analysis Autobiography Imagery: p. 492 apply to short story and poetry Implied metaphor Tone Inference Character Setting

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology Background Knowledge: Eisenhower, Allied Forces, World War II Phase 4I Global Warning manmade or natural causes?

Assessment

Florida Practice Test p.31 Graphic Organizers Paragraphs Presentation

25

SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: Your place in the world Guiding Question: What is your place in your home, community and the world? Grade 9 Texts:
Non-fiction

Active Readers Practice Book: A Place Called Home p. 55-57 Elements of Literature: The Best Gift of My Life by Cynthia Rylant p. 394 Elements of Literature: Salvador, Late or Early from House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros p. 183

Fiction Poetry
Daily p. 495 Fire and Ice p. 541 All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace p. 543 Skills Focus: Reading: Comparison/Contrast Writing: Comparison/contrast and details

R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.910.1
Oral Interpretation

___x_ whole group __x___ small group

__x_ individual

Pre-reading

Vocabulary Background Knowledge: Eisenhower, Allied Forces, World War II Title Prediction Reading Poetry p. 489

During

Pick out sensory detail (Sensory Detail Chart: Workshop Resource p. 29) T-chart Poetry - Dialogue with the Text p. 490 Vocabulary context clues

Post

Summarize Main Idea Semantic Differential Scales: A Place Called Home and The Best Gift of My Life (Active Readers Practice Book p. 5557)

Fluency: X LA.910.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: X LA.910.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.910.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text X LA.910.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.910.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.910.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.910.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.910.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. LA.910.1.6.8 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.910.1.6.9 determine the correct meanings of words with multiples meanings in context LA.910.1.6.10 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools LA.910.1.6.11 identify the meaning of words and phrases from other languages commonly used by writers of English Reading Comprehension: X LA.910.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (previewing, discussing, generating questions) text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection X LA.910.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning X LA.910.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details LA.910.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text X LA.910.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.910.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections X LA.910.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) X LA.910.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self- monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using a graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources.

26

Literary Analysis LA.910.2


__X_ whole group _____ small group

__x_ individual

Autobiography Imagery: p. 492 apply to short story and poetry Implied metaphor Tone Inference Character Setting

Fiction: LA.910.2.1 X LA.910.2.1.1 read, analyze, and compare historically and culturally significant works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres and the literary devices unique to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the text X LA.910.2.1.2 read, analyze, and compare a variety of traditional, classical, and contemporary literary works, and identify the literary elements of each X LA.910.2.1.3 explain how meaning is enhanced through various features of poetry, including sound (rhythm, repetition, alliteration, consonance, assonance) structure (meter, rhyme scheme) and graphic elements (line length, punctuation, word position) X LA.910.2.1.4 identify and analyze universal themes and symbols across genres and historical periods and explain their significance X LA.910.2.1.5 describe, discuss, and analyze an authors use of literary elements (theme, point of view, characterization, setting, plot) and explain and analyze different elements of figurative language in multiple literary selections. LA.910.2.1.6 create a complex, multi-genre response to the reading of two or more literary works, describing and analyzing an authors use of literary elements, figurative language, and analyzing an authors development of time and sequence through the use of complex literary devices such as foreshadowing and flashback. X LA.910.2.1.7 analyze, interpret, and evaluate and authors use of descriptive language (tone, irony, mood, imagery, pun, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion), figurative language (symbolism, metaphor, personification, hyperbole), common idioms, and mythological and literary allusions, and explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts. X LA.910.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.910.2.1.9 describe changes in the English language over time, and support these descriptions with examples from literary texts X LA.910.2.1.10 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.910.2.2 LA.910.2.2.1 analyze and evaluate information from text features (transitional devices, table of contents, glossary, index, bold or italicized text, headings, charts and graphs, illustrations, subheadings) X LA.910.2.2.2 use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main idea or to provide relevant details X LA.910.2.2.3 organize the information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining) LA.910.2.2.4 identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of types of text (references, reports, technical manuals, articles, editorials, primary source historical documents, periodicals, job-related materials, practical/functional text) X LA.910.2.2.5 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

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Writing Process LA.910.3 Informative


__x__ whole group ___x__ small group

_x__ individual

Quickwrite: p. 394 If I Could Live Anywhere . . . Paragraph: Compare and Contrast Cynthias home to Christys home (t-chart), (rubric) Descriptive Paragraph Write a description of your bedroom (use 5 senses, sensory sheet, Show not Tell (use rubric)

Quickwrite: What has been the best gift of your life so far? p. 398 Conventions: 6 Trait focus: detail using adjectives, participles, and action verbs Workshop Resources: Combining Sentences, Participial Phrases p. 71 Language Network: Chapter 22 ComparisonContrast Essay p. 428

Pre-Writing : LA.910.3.1 X LA.910.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (brainstorming, journals, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.910.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, a controlling idea, logical sequence, and time frame for completion X LA.910.3.1.3 using organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graphs, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.910.3.2 X LA.910.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience X LA.910.3.2.2 establish a logical organizational pattern with supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant X LA.910.3.2.3 analyzing language techniques of professional authors (figurative language, denotation, connotation) to establish a personal style, demonstrating a command of language with confidence of expression Revising : LA.910.3.3 X LA.910.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.910.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by maintaining central theme, idea, or unifying point and developing meaningful relationships among ideas X LA.910.3.3.3 create precision and interest by elaborating ideas through supporting details (facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes) a variety of sentences structures, creative language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) to select more effective and precise language X LA.910.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.910.3.4 LA.910.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English LA.910.3.4.2 punctuation, including commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, and underlining or italics X LA.910.3.4.3 possessives, subject/verb agreement, comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and noun/pronoun agreement X LA.910.3.4.4 sentence formation, including absolutes and absolute phrases, Infinitives and infinitive phrases, and use of fragments for effect. Publishing: LA.910.3.5 LA.910.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (display, multimedia) LA.910.3.5.2 include such techniques as principle of design (margins, tabs, spacing, columns) and graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) X LA.910.3.5.3 sharing with others, or submitting for publication

Writing Applications LA.910.4


Informative
Quickwrite: p. 394 If I Could Live Anywhere . . .

____ whole group _____ small group

___ individual

Paragraph: Compare and Contrast Cynthias home to Christys home (t-chart), (rubric) Descriptive Paragraph Write a description of your bedroom (use 5 senses, sensory sheet, Show not Tell (use rubric) Quickwrite: What has been the best gift of your life so far? p. 398 Conventions: 6 Trait focus: detail using adjectives, participles, and action verbs Workshop Resources: Combining Sentences, Participial Phrases p. 71 Language Network: Chapter 22 ComparisonContrast Essay p. 428

Creative : LA.910.4.1 LA.910.4.1.1 an engaging plot that use a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative techniques (dialogue, internal monologue, point of view) employ literary devices (irony, conceit, imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, allusion) and sensory description LA.910.4.1.2 incorporate figurative language, emotions, gestures, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot and appropriate format Informative : LA.910.4.2 LA.910.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms, including a variety of technical documents (how-to-manuals, procedures) LA.910.4.2.2 record information and ideas from primary and/or secondary sources accurately and coherently; noting the validity and reliability of these sources and attributing sources of information X LA.910.4.2.3 write informational/expository essays that speculate on the causes and effects of a situation, establish the connections between the postulated causes or effects; offer evidence supporting the validity of the proposed causes or effects, and include introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.910.4.2.4 write a business letter and/or memo that presents information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience following

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a conventional format (block, modified block, memo, email) LA.910.4.2.5 write detailed travel directions and design an accompanying graphic using the cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets and highways, and distances. LA.910.4.2.6 write a work-related document (application, resume, meeting minutes, memo, cover letter, letter of application, speaker introduction, letter of recommendation) Persuasive : LA.910.4.3 LA.910.4.3.1 state a position or claim, presents detailed evidence, examples, and reasoning to support effective arguments and emotional appeals, and acknowledge and refutes opposing arguments LA.910.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking, testimonials, bandwagon, image associations, transfer)

Communication LA.910.5

____ whole group ___x__ small group

___ individual

Oral Interpretation: Read aloud Salvador speed, pauses, pitch, emphasis Present point of view on global warning, using power point presentation Leonardo DiCaprios video on Global Warming http://www.earthsky.org/article/leonardodicaprios-global-warming-video or selections from an Inconvenient Truth The Great Global Warning Swindle

Penmanship : LA.910.5.1 LA.910.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.910.5.2 LA.910.5.2.1 select and use appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose (solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation) X LA.910.5.2.2 research and organize information for oral communication appropriate for the occasion, audience, and purpose (digital presentations, charts, photos, primary sources, webcasts) X LA.910.5.2.3 use appropriate eye contact, body movements, voice register and oral language choices for audience engagement in formal and informal speaking situations. X LA.910.5.2.4 use an engaging introduction and conclusion and the use of figurative language to reinforce the intended message X LA.910.5.2.5 research and organize information that integrates appropriate media in to presentations for oral communication (class discussion, entertaining, informative, persuasive, or technical presentations)

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I n f o r m a t i o n a n d M e d i a L i t e r a c y L A . 9 1 0 . 6 ____ whole group _____ small group __ individual


Background Knowledge: Eisenhower, Allied Forces, World War II Phase 4I Global Warning manmade or natural causes?

Informational Text : LA.910.6.1 LA.910.6.1.1 use the knowledge to create workplace, consumer, or technical document LA.910.6.1.2 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.910.6.1.3 analyze the structure and format (diagrams, graphics, fonts) of functional workplace, consumer, or technical documents Research Process : LA.910.6.2 LA.910.6.2.1 select a topic and develop a comprehensive but flexible search plan, and analyze and apply evaluative criteria (objectivity, freedom from bias, topic format) to assess appropriateness of resources X LA.910.6.2.2 organize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate the validity and reliability of information from multiple sources (including primary and secondary sources) to draw conclusions using a variety of techniques, and correctly use standardized citations. X LA.910.6.2.3 write an informational report that integrates information and makes distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas LA.910.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.910.6.3 X LA.910.6.3.1 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media LA.910.6.3.2 ethically use mass media and digital technology in assignments and presentations, citing sources according to standardized citation styles LA.910.6.3.3 demonstrate the ability to select print and nonprint media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience to develop into a formal presentation Technology : LA.910.6.4 X LA.910.6.4.1 use appropriate available technologies to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, digital technology,) X LA.910.6.4.2 routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and productivity

Modifications / strategies

Reflection

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SAMPLE LESSON PLAN Unit Title: Your Place in the World Lesson Title: Your Surroundings: Home, Community, and World Grade Level: 9

LA.910. 1.7.7 Reading Process; LA. 910. 2.1.7 Literary Analysis; LA. 910 4.2.3 Writing Process and Application; LA.910.1.7.1 Reading Process; LA.910.3.1.1 Writing Process; LA.910.3.2.1 Writing Process; LA.910.3.2.2 Writing Process; LA.910.3.2.3 Writing Process; LA.910.3.3.1Writing Process; LA.910. 3.5.3 Writing Process; LA.910.4.2.3 Writing Application; LA.910.5.1.1 Communication

Focus Sunshine State Standards Objectives/Overview

Students will be reading autobiographical pieces describing different types of living places and why one is preferable over another. Students will compare/contrast the different places, focusing on the authors use of descriptive detail to note the physical differences and tone to note the authors feelings associated with each place. Students will write their own comparison/contrast essay, focusing on descriptive detail (5 senses) and tone to develop the authors attitude toward the place. Students will reflect on their learning at the end.

Materials
Reading Skills and Strategies Teacher binder (Holt), Active Readers Practice Book (Holt), Florida Practice Test booklet (Holt), Elements of Literature (3rd edition) Holt, Language Network: Chapter 22

Procedures
Anticipatory Question: Quickwrite: p. 394 If I Could Live Anywhere. . . Teacher will introduce the background knowledge on Eisenhower, Allied Forces, and World War II Teacher will model the reading strategy for comparison/contrast, the semantic differential scale in the Reading Skills and Strategies Binder p. 105. Students will read A Place Called Home in the Active Readers Practice Book p. 55-57 and apply the semantic differential scale to the passage. Also focus on 5 senses used in the passage Students will share findings in whole class discussion Teacher will introduce the term autobiography. Students will read the story The Best Gift of My Life by Cynthia Rylant p. 395 o Answer questions based on the story from Florida Practice Test (Holt) p. 31. (Review as a class students can correct each others.) o Students will complete a T-chart comparing Cynthia and Christys home o Students will apply the semantic differential scale to the passage. o Students will write a comparison/contrast paragraph of Cynthia and Christys home. Focus on 5 senses used in the passage. o Students will share paragraphs in their groups and choose the best paragraph in the group based on inclusion of best details from the passage. o Using a prewriting worksheet depicting the 5 senses, (Sensory Detail Chart: Workshop Resources p. 29) (Holt) students will write a descriptive paragraph of their room. (Read My Room on p. 397 as student sample for modeling purposes.) Also, students need to tie the description into a definition of how their room (their environment) reflects their personality or their personal situation. o Using Workshop Resources: Combining Sentences, Participial Phrases p. 71, students will practice combining sentences using participial phrases.

Assessment
Students will write a comparison/contrast essay of two places, using descriptive detail and developing a point of view associated with each place as to why one place is preferable over the other. Rubric will focus on sensory detail and point of view. Students will peer critique essay, using teachercreated rubric and rewrite for final submission to teacher. Use Language Network: Chapter 22 Comparison-Contrast Essay p. 428 for reference.

Teacher Reflection

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Understanding Global Issues Guiding Question How do you connect to world issues? Grade 10
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) PreReading: Journal activity Is War necessary? K-W-L on Iraq War and War on Terror During: Think/Pair/Share Think Alouds 2 Column Notes Questions/What is unclear?

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions)


Compare/contrast response to FCAT extended response prompt- timed (20 minutes) Extended response rubric (1-4 pts) Writing + persuasive prompt timed (45 minutes) Writing + rubric (1-6 pts) 45 minutes Pre-Write/Plan Write Revise

Post: Class discussion-teacher guided Exit Journals

--------------------------------------------------------Vocabulary: Literary Terms Novel/poetry- vocab in context Connotation in analysis

Reading Selections Fiction All Quiet on the Western Front (excerpt ch 9) by Enrich Maria Remarque The Parable of the old Man and the Young poem by Wilfred Owen Nonfiction Daddy, What Did You Do in the Great War? political cartoon by Saville Lumley Time magazine Iraq War pro/con articles Florida Today Iraq War pro/con articles

Literary Analysis Communication (Listening and Speaking)


Political cartoon by Saville Lumley Debate based upon pro/con research assignment Explore the medias role and use of persuasive techniques in covering Iraq War (Fox News vs. FL Today)

Study of hubris, irony, allusion, symbolism, propaganda Compare/contrast authors purpose Multi-genre analysis with common theme

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology


Assessment FCAT extended response paragraphs FL Writing + essay

Students bring in articles either pro/con War on Terror and Iraq war Teacher supplies 2 pro/2con articles on Iraq War for debate

Reflection At end of Unit *Exit Journal- Re-evaluate your stance on the Iraq War and whether it is necessary. What has come to light after this unit of study?
*George Santayanas quote repeating history discussion

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: Hubris in WWI and the War on Terror Guiding Question: How do you connect to World Issues? Grade 10 Texts: All Quiet on the Western Front Ch9 Enrich Maria Remarque
The Parable of the Old Man and the Young by Wilfred Owen Content Focus: Analysis of words in text, inference, authors purpose, figurative language, compare, contrast, synthesis

R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.910.1
Pre Reading

__X__ whole group __X___ small group

_X__ individual

Journal activity Is War necessary? K-W-L on Iraq War and War on Terror Think/Pair/Share Think Alouds 2 Column Notes Questions/What is unclear? Class discussion-teacher guided Exit Journals Literary Terms Novel/poetry- vocab in context Connotation in analysis

During

Post

Vocabulary

Fluency: LA.910.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: LA.910.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.910.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text LA.910.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.910.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.910.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.910.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.910.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. LA.910.1.6.8 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.910.1.6.9 determine the correct meanings of words with multiples meanings in context LA.910.1.6.10 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools LA.910.1.6.11 identify the meaning of words and phrases from other languages commonly used by writers of English Reading Comprehension: LA.910.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (previewing, discussing, generating questions) text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection LA.910.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning LA.910.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details LA.910.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text LA.910.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.910.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections LA.910.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) LA.910.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when selfmonitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using a graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources

Literary Analysis LA.910.2


__X__ whole group __X___ small group

_X__ individual

Study of hubris, irony, allusion, symbolism, propaganda Compare/contrast authors purpose Multi-genre analysis with common theme

Fiction: LA.910.2.1 LA.910.2.1.1 read, analyze, and compare historically and culturally significant works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres and the literary devices unique to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the text LA.910.2.1.2 read, analyze, and compare a variety of traditional, classical, and contemporary literary works, and identify the literary elements of each LA.910.2.1.3 explain how meaning is enhanced through various features of poetry, including sound (rhythm, repetition, alliteration, consonance, assonance) structure (meter, rhyme scheme) and graphic elements (line length, punctuation, word position) LA.910.2.1.4 identify and analyze universal themes and symbols across genres and historical periods and explain their significance LA.910.2.1.5 describe, discuss, and analyze an authors use of literary elements (theme, point of view, characterization, setting, plot) and explain and analyze different elements of figurative language in multiple literary selections. LA.910.2.1.6 create a complex, multi-genre response to the reading of two or more literary

33

works, describing and analyzing an authors use of literary elements, figurative language, and analyzing an authors development of time and sequence through the use of complex literary devices such as foreshadowing and flashback. LA.910.2.1.7 analyze, interpret, and evaluate and authors use of descriptive language (tone, irony, mood, imagery, pun, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion), figurative language (symbolism, metaphor, personification, hyperbole), common idioms, and mythological and literary allusions, and explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts. LA.910.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.910.2.1.9 describe changes in the English language over time, and support these descriptions with examples from literary texts LA.910.2.1.10 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.910.2.2 LA.910.2.2.1 analyze and evaluate information from text features (transitional devices, table of contents, glossary, index, bold or italicized text, headings, charts and graphs, illustrations, subheadings) LA.910.2.2.2 use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main idea or to provide relevant details LA.910.2.2.3 organize the information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining) LA.910.2.2.4 identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of types of text (references, reports, technical manuals, articles, editorials, primary source historical documents, periodicals, job-related materials, practical/functional text) LA.910.2.2.5 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

Writing Process LA.910.3

____ whole group _____ small group

_X__ individual

Compare/contrast response to FCAT extended response prompt- timed (20 minutes) Extended response rubric (1-4 pts) Writing + persuasive prompt timed (45 minutes) Writing + rubric (1-6 pts) 45 minutes: Pre-Write/Plan, Write, Revise

Pre-Writing : LA.910.3.1 LA.910.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (brainstorming, journals, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.910.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, a controlling idea, logical sequence, and time frame for completion LA.910.3.1.3 using organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graphs, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.910.3.2 LA.910.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience LA.910.3.2.2 establish a logical organizational pattern with supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant LA.910.3.2.3 analyzing language techniques of professional authors (figurative language, denotation, connotation) to establish a personal style, demonstrating a command of language with confidence of expression Revising : LA.910.3.3 LA.910.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.910.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by maintaining central theme, idea, or unifying point and developing meaningful relationships among ideas LA.910.3.3.3 create precision and interest by elaborating ideas through supporting details (facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes) a variety of sentences structures, creative language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) to select more effective and precise language LA.910.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.910.3.4 LA.910.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and AngloSaxon root words, and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English LA.910.3.4.2 punctuation, including commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, and underlining or italics

34

LA.910.3.4.3 possessives, subject/verb agreement, comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and noun/pronoun agreement LA.910.3.4.4 sentence formation, including absolutes and absolute phrases, infinitives and infinitive phrases, and sue of fragments for effect. Publishing: LA.910.3.5 LA.910.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (display, multimedia) LA.910.3.5.2 include such techniques as principle of design (margins, tabs, spacing, columns) and graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) LA.910.3.5.3 sharing with others, or submitting for publication

W r i t i n g A p p l i c a t i o n s L A . 9 1 0 . 4 ____ whole group _____ small group

__X_ individual

Informative / Expository -FCAT extended Response Persuasive Essay -Practice FL Writes

Creative : LA.910.4.1 LA.910.4.1.1 an engaging plot that use a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative techniques (dialogue, internal monologue, point of view) employ literary devices (irony, conceit, imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, allusion) and sensory description LA.910.4.1.2 incorporate figurative language, emotions, gestures, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot and appropriate format Informative : LA.910.4.2 LA.910.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms, including a variety of technical documents (how-to-manuals, procedures) LA.910.4.2.2 record information and ideas from primary and/or secondary sources accurately and coherently; noting the validity and reliability of these sources and attributing sources of information LA.910.4.2.3 write informational/expository essays that speculate on the causes and effects of a situation, establish the connections between the postulated causes or effects; offer evidence supporting the validity of the proposed causes or effects, and include introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.910.4.2.4 write a business letter and/or memo that presents information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience following a conventional format (block, modified block, memo, email) LA.910.4.2.5 write detailed travel directions and design an accompanying graphic using the cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets and highways, and distances. LA.910.4.2.6 write a work-related document (application, resume, meeting minutes, memo, cover letter, letter of application, speaker introduction, letter of recommendation) Persuasive : LA.910.4.3 LA.910.4.3.1 state a position or claim, presents detailed evidence, examples, and reasoning to support effective arguments and emotional appeals, and acknowledge and refutes opposing arguments LA.910.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking, testimonials, bandwagon, image associations, transfer)

Communication LA.910.5

____ whole group _____ small group

__X_ individual

Homework research assignment articles pro / con Iraq War

Penmanship : LA.910.5.1 LA.910.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.910.5.2 LA.910.5.2.1 select and use appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose (solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation) LA.910.5.2.2 research and organize information for oral communication appropriate for the occasion, audience, and purpose (digital presentations, charts, photos, primary sources, webcasts) LA.910.5.2.3 use appropriate eye contact, body movements, voice register and oral language choices for audience engagement in formal and informal speaking situations. LA.910.5.2.4 use an engaging introduction and conclusion and the use of figurative language to reinforce the intended message LA.910.5.2.5 research and organize information that integrates appropriate media in to presentations for oral communication (class discussion, entertaining, informative, persuasive, or technical presentations)

35

Information and Media Literacy LA.910.6 __X_ individual


__X__ whole group ___X__ small group

Analysis of Political Cartoon Homework research articles Debate: pro/con Iraq War - media persuasion - propaganda - party bashing Study of New Media Styles - liberal bias - conservative bias - techniques of persuasion

Informational Text : LA.910.6.1 LA.910.6.1.1 use the knowledge to create workplace, consumer, or technical document LA.910.6.1.2 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.910.6.1.3 analyze the structure and format (diagrams, graphics, fonts) of functional workplace, consumer, or technical documents Research Process : LA.910.6.2 LA.910.6.2.1 select a topic and develop a comprehensive but flexible search plan, and analyze and apply evaluative criteria (objectivity, freedom from bias, topic format) to assess appropriateness of resources LA.910.6.2.2 organize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate the validity and reliability of information from multiple sources (including primary and secondary sources) to draw conclusions using a variety of techniques, and correctly use standardized citations. LA.910.6.2.3 write an informational report that integrates information and makes distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas LA.910.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.910.6.3 LA.910.6.3.1 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media LA.910.6.3.2 ethically use mass media and digital technology in assignments and presentations, citing sources according to standardized citation styles LA.910.6.3.3 demonstrate the ability to select print and nonprint media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience to develop into a formal presentation Technology : LA.910.6.4 LA.910.6.4.1 use appropriate available technologies to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, digital technology,) LA.910.6.4.2 routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and productivity

Modifications / strategies

Reflection

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SAMPLE LESSON Unit Title: Hubris in WWI and The War on Terror Lesson Title: WWI British poetry and recruitment Day 2 of unit

Grade 10

Vocabulary: LA.910.1.6.1, LA.910.1.6.2, LA.910.1.6.3, LA.910.1.6.6, LA.910.1.6.9. Reading Comprehension: LA.910.1.7.2, LA.910.1.7.5, LA.910.1.7.7, LA.910. Literary Analysis: LA.910.2.1.1, LA.910.2.1.3, LA.910.2.1.5, LA.910.2.1.7, LA.910.2.1.8. NonFiction: LA.910.2.2.3, LA.910.2.2.5. Media Literacy: LA.910.6.3.1.

Focus on Sunshine State Standards Objectives

The student will develop an understanding of hubris, the sin of pride, and will be able to apply this understanding to both past and the present examples.

Unit Overview This unit focuses on history, war, and how hubris is a common flaw of man. WWI and the present day War on Terror will be used as the historical context for this unit. Students will read German and British authors as well as analyze a WWI political cartoon to compare/contrast the presence of hubris in WWI. Assessments will be formatted to align with the FCAT Reading and Florida Writes tests. Research will be conducted on the present day War on Terror where both pro and con articles from valid and copyrighted sources will be used to hold a class debate. Understanding how todays media impacts public opinion will also be explored through viewing various teacher-gathered resources supporting and denouncing the war. At the end of the unit, students will demonstrate their understanding by taking a stance on whether or not they feel the present war is justified by writing a timed Florida Writes-style persuasive essay. They must use both present and past details to support their arguments. As a final thought the following questions will be posed for class discussion: Do you agree with the 19th century poet and philosopher George Santayanas statement: "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." How does hubris or the sin of pride relate to his quote?
Reading Selections: All Quiet on the Western Front -E.M. Remarque Parable of the Old Man and the Young Wilfred Owen Teacher-selected nonfiction articles pro/con War on Terror Viewing Selections: Daddy, What Did You Do in the Great War? political cartoon, Savile Lumley Teacher-selected news (conservative and liberal) samples War on Terror Teacher-selected media coverage samples liberal/conservative Writing Prompts/Rubrics: FCAT Extended Response Prompt (compare/contrast) in which they explain similarities and differences in content, style, format, purpose, etc. from day 1/day 2 texts; FL Writes Persuasive Prompt convince the government why your plan for the War on Terror is the right one; FCAT Extended Response 4-point Rubric; FL Writes 6-point Rubric

Materials

(entire unit)

Procedures

Reflect on hubris in AQWF passage On www.firstworldwar.com display Savile Lumleys WWI British recruitment poster titled Daddy, What Did You Do in the Great War? Ask students to look at all the details in the cartoon and, in pairs, share what they observe Ask students to see if there are any connections to AQWF As a class, analyze cartoon and explain hubris connection Next display British poet Wilfred Owens poem Parable of the Old Man and the Young which can be found at www.poemtree.com and ask students to look for similarities to the cartoon and AQWF. As a class explicate poem for irony, symbolism, allusion, and hubris Reflect on the fact that both British and German authors of WWI used hubris to show a similar purpose.

Assessment On day 3 of unit, a compare/contrast-style FCAT Extended Response writing activity will be assigned to assess learning from the first 2 days of instruction. Students will have 30 minutes to re-read any previously read materials and write a response. The 4-point rubric for extended response writing will be the tool used for assigning a grade to responses. Writing strategies and grammatical mini-lessons will then be prescribed as needed for follow-up mini-lessons based upon student weaknesses diagnosed. Teacher Reflection

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit: The Puritan Experience Guiding Question: The American Dream Does it exist?
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) PreReading:

Grade 11

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions)


The Crucible Write a diary entry from a characters point of view. Write an essay detailing how various characters changed throughout the course of the play (see Reading Process). Focus on one or more of the following: pronoun/antecedent agreement, parallel structure, and unintended shift in person or tense, main idea and the development of logical relationships within the text. Proofread for run-on sentences, dangling modifiers, and unintended fragments. During revision, make sure students understand the need for a unified main idea and the development of logical relationships within the text. Proofread for run-on sentences, dangling modifiers, and unintended fragments. Write an essay which examines the inaccuracies present in the play. After researching Salem Village and Salem Town (see Research and Technology), write directions from Salem Town to Salem Village. Include

During:

Define crucible Post the various definitions. Quick-Write /discuss Honor vs. Survival Which would you choose? Research McCarthyism (see Research & Technology). Present information on the Colonial Period/Puritanism/Salem Witchcraft Trials.

The Crucible (pg. 825) Keep a chart of main characters on how they change Predict what will happen during the next Ch. (use textual evidence to support the students predictions) Discuss the authors purpose Refer to the Quick-Write and discuss which characters chose Honor or Survival. Sinners in the Hands Here Follow Some Verses ) Examine works for inversion, allusions, authors purpose, figures of speech, text structure, repetition, symbolism, connotation, denotation, mood, theme, Connect works to historical context and The Crucible.

Reading Selections Fiction The Crucible (p. 825) Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (p. 77) Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666 (p. 68) Nonfiction GaleNet articles for research- student generated

Post:

Vocabulary

Compare/contrast McCarthyism with Witch Trials

Have students keep a vocabulary journal Select words that may be unfamiliar to students. Have the students define and present the vocabulary words to the class (using a poster or other visual). Greek root word theo (p. T832), and the Greek ancient words psallein (p. T839) and diabolos (p. T843)

Literary Analysis Communication (Listening and Speaking)


Present vocabulary words to the class Use the textbooks Visual Connections: Videocassette Program and share The Puritan Experience (Videocassette A, segment 3) with your students. Refer to pages 19 25 in the Teachers Manual for the Visual Connections program.

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology


Research McCarthyism in the school library. GALENET Have students research, cite, and present information about one of the following Colonial/Puritan topics: Salem Witch Trials Salem Village vs. Salem Town Plymouth, Massachusetts Great Awakening Cotton Mather and Increase Mather Puritans (relationship with Church of England) Puritans (opinion/treatment of children)

Sinnersand Here Follow Some Verses Examine works for inversion, allusions, authors purpose, figures of speech, text structure, repetition, symbolism, connotation, denotation, mood, theme, Connect to historical context The Crucible. Discuss the two authors American Dreams. The Crucible Examine literary elements (symbolism, allusion, theme, tone, mood, dramatic irony, conflict, climax, characterization, figures of speech, etc.). Analyze Millers social commentary Compare and contrast the characters American Dream with Millers American Dream. Did the dreams change? Did they exist for both groups?

Assessment
Character analysis chart Essay rubric Informal assessment of group discussion recording sheet

Reflection
QuickWrite: How does persecution show itself in the world today?

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: The Puritan Experience Guiding Question: The American Dream: Does it exist? Grade 11 Texts:

HRW 5th Course textbook - The Crucible (pg. 825), Upon the Burning of our House (pg. 68), Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (pg. 77)

Content Focus: Reading Words & phrases in context; Main idea, plot, & purpose; Comparisons and Cause/effect; Reference and Research. Writing Focus, Organization, Support, and Conventions R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.1112.1 __x__ whole group ___x__ small group _x__ individual Fluency: Pre Reading
Define crucible post the various definitions Quick-Write and discuss Honor vs. Survival Which would you choose? Research McCarthyism (see Research and Technology) Present information on the Colonial Period/Puritanism/Salem Witchcraft Trials. (See the textbook, visit the library, or use the Visual Connections videocassette see Communication section below.) Read the selected texts: The Crucible (pg. 825) Keep a chart of main characters and take notes on how they change (Mary Warren, John Proctor, Elizabeth Proctor, Abigail Williams, Rev. Hale) At end of each act, predict what will happen during the next one (use textual evidence to support the students predictions use foreshadowing, mood, etc.) Discuss the authors purpose (esp. his focus on social commentary) and tone Refer to the Quick-Write and discuss which characters chose Honor or Survival. Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (pg. 77) Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666 (pg. 68) Examine works for inversion, allusions, authors purpose, figures of speech, text structure, repetition, symbolism, connotation, denotation, mood, theme, etc. Connect works to historical context and to The Crucible.

Post

Compare/contrast McCarthyism with Witch Trials

Vocabulary
Have students keep a vocabulary journal (individually or in their cooperative groups) Select words that may be unfamiliar to students. Have the students define and present the vocabulary words to the class (using a poster or other visual). Using the Teacher Edition of the English 3 textbook, teach students the Greek root word theo (pg. T832), and the Greek ancient words psallein (pg. T839) and diabolos (pg. T843). Have them keep a record of how many related words (and synonyms) they can find in the play and in their every day lives.

LA.1112.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: LA.1112.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.1112.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text LA.1112.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.1112.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.1112.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.1112.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.1112.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. LA.1112.1.6.8 identify the meaning of unfamiliar terms in political science and medicine derived from Greek and Latin words LA.1112.1.6.9 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.1112.1.6.10 determine the correct meanings of words with multiples meanings in context LA.1112.1.6.11 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tool Reading Comprehension LA.1112.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (previewing, discussing, generating questions) text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection LA.1112.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning LA.1112.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details and facts LA.1112.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text LA.1112.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.1112.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections LA.1112.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) LA.1112.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using a graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources

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Literary Analysis LA.1112.2


Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God Here Follow Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House, July 10, 1666 Examine works for inversion, allusions, authors purpose, figures of speech, text structure, repetition, symbolism, connotation, denotation, mood, theme, etc. Connect works to historical context and to The Crucible. Discuss the two authors American Dreams. The Crucible Examine literary elements (symbolism, allusion, theme, tone, mood, dramatic irony, conflict, climax, characterization, figures of speech, etc.) Analyze Millers social commentary evident in the play. Compare and contrast the characters American Dream with Millers American Dream. Did the dreams change? Did they exist for both groups?

__x__ whole group __x___ small group

_x__ individual

Fiction: LA.1112.2.1 LA.1112.2.1.1 read, analyze, and compare historically and culturally significant works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres and the literary devices unique to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the text LA.1112.2.1.2 read, analyze, and compare a variety of traditional, classical, and contemporary literary works, and identify the literary elements of each LA.1112.2.1.3 analyze, compare, evaluate, and interpret poetry for the effects of various literary devices, graphics, structure, and theme to convey mood, meaning, and aesthetic qualities LA.1112.2.1.4 analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, providing textual evidence for the identified theme LA.1112.2.1.5 analyze and discuss characteristics of subgenres that overlap or cut across the lines of genre classifications such as poetry, novel, drama, short story, essay or editorial LA.1112.2.1.6 create a complex, multi-genre response to the reading of two or more literary works, using multiple critical perspectives, describing and analyzing an authors use of literary elements, figurative language, and analyzing an authors development of time and sequence LA.1112.2.1.7 analyze, interpret, and evaluate and authors use of descriptive language (tone, irony, mood, imagery, pun, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion), figurative language (symbolism, metaphor, personification, hyperbole), common idioms, and mythological and literary allusions, and explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts with an emphasis on how they evoke readers emotions LA.1112.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.1112.2.1.9 describe changes in the English language over time, and support these descriptions with examples from literary texts LA.1112.2.1.10 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.1112.2.2 LA.1112.2.2.1 analyze and evaluate information from text features (transitional devices, table of contents, glossary, index, bold or italicized text, headings, charts and graphs, illustrations, subheadings) LA.1112.2.2.2 use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main idea or to provide relevant details LA.1112.2.2.3 organize the information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining) LA.1112.2.2.4 identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of types of text (references, reports, technical manuals, articles, editorials, primary source historical documents, periodicals, job-related materials, practical/functional text) LA.1112.2.2.5 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

Writing Process LA.1112.3

__x__ whole group _____ small group

__x_ individual

The Crucible Write an essay detailing how various characters changed throughout the course of the play (see Reading Process). Write an essay which examines the inaccuracies present in the play. Explain what these inaccuracies are and give Millers possible reasons for including them (see Research and Technology). After researching Salem Village and Salem Town (see Research and Technology), write

Pre-Writing : LA.1112.3.1 LA.1112.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (brainstorming, journals, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.1112.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, a controlling idea, logical sequence, and time frame for completion LA.1112.3.1.3 using organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graphs, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.1112.3.2 LA.1112.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary

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directions from Salem Town to Salem Village. Include a graphic and cardinal and ordinal directions. Focus on one or more of the following: Teach and require students to focus on pronoun/antecedent agreement, parallel structure, and unintended shift in person or tense. During revision, make sure students understand the need for a unified main idea and the development of logical relationships within the text. Have students proofread for run-on sentences, dangling modifiers, and unintended fragments.

sources appropriate to the purpose and audience LA.1112.3.2.2 establish a logical organizational pattern with supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant LA.1112.3.2.3 analyze language techniques of professional authors (figurative language, denotation, connotation) to establish a personal style, and demonstrate a command of language with confidence of expression Revising : LA.1112.3.3 LA.1112.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.1112.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by maintaining central theme, idea, or unifying point and developing meaningful relationships among ideas LA.1112.3.3.3 create precision and interest by elaborating ideas through supporting details (facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes) a variety of sentences structures, creative language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) to select more effective and precise language LA.1112.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.1112.3.4 LA.1112.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English LA.1112.3.4.2 punctuation, including commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, parentheses, ellipses, brackets, and underlining or italics LA.1112.3.4.3 grammar and usage, including but not limited to parts of speech, verb tense, possessives, pronoun/antecedent agreement, parallel structure, modifier placement, subject/verb agreement, comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, noun/pronoun agreement, and unintended shift in person or tense LA.1112.3.4.4 varied sentence structure, including the elimination of dangling or misplaced modifiers, run-on or fused sentences, and unintended sentence fragments Publishing: LA.1112.3.5 LA.1112.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (display, multimedia) LA.1112.3.5.2 include such techniques as principle of design (margins, tabs, columns) and graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) LA.1112.3.5.3 sharing with others, or submitting for publication

W r i t i n g A p p l i c a t i o n s L A . 1 1 1 2 . 4 __x__ whole group _____ small group


The Crucible Write a diary entry from a characters point of view Write an essay detailing how various characters changed throughout the course of the play (see Reading Process). Write an essay analyzing which characters chose survival and which chose honor. Examine their motivation as well. Write an essay which examines the inaccuracies present in the play. Explain what these inaccuracies are and give Millers possible reasons for including them (see Research and Technology). After researching Salem Village and Salem Town (see Research and Technology), write directions from Salem Town to Salem Village. Include a graphic and cardinal and ordinal directions. Sinners in the HandsHere Follow Some Analyze the similarities between one of these works and the Colonial/Puritan period. Ask students to pretend they were present during the Sinners sermon. Now have them write a letter to a family member living in another town explaining the sermon and their reaction to it.

_x__ individual

Creative : LA.1112.4.1 LA.1112.4.1.1 an engaging plot that uses a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative techniques (dialogue, internal monologue, point of view) employ literary devices (irony, conceit, imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, allusion) and sensory description LA.1112.4.1.2 incorporate figurative language, emotions, gestures, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot and appropriate format Informative : LA.1112.4.2 LA.1112.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms, including documents using precise technical and scientific vocabulary (manuals, procedures) LA.1112.4.2.2 record information and ideas from primary and/or secondary sources accurately and coherently; noting the validity and reliability of these sources and attributing sources of information LA.1112.4.2.3 write informational/expository essays that speculate on the causes and effects of a situation, establish the connections between the postulated causes or effects; offer evidence supporting the validity of the proposed causes or effects, and include introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.1112.4.2.4 write a business letter and/or memo that presents information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience following a conventional format (block, modified block, memo, email) LA.1112.4.2.5 write detailed travel directions and design an accompanying graphic using the cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets and highways, and distances.

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LA.1112.4.2.6 write a work-related document (application, resume, meeting minutes, memo, cover letter, letter of application, speaker introduction, letter of recommendation) Persuasive : LA.1112.4.3 LA.1112.4.3.1 state a position or claim, presents detailed evidence, examples, and reasoning to support effective arguments and emotional appeals, and acknowledges and refutes opposing arguments LA.1112.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking, testimonials, bandwagon, image associations, transfer) LA.1112.4.3.2 attribute sources of information when appropriate

Communication LA.1112.5 _x___ whole group _____ small group


Present vocabulary words to the class Small group sharing of research topic Use the textbooks Visual Connections: Videocassette Program and share The Puritan Experience (Videocassette A, segment 3) with your students. Refer to pages 19 25 in the Teachers Manual for the Visual Connections program. See Reading Process and Writing Applications for corresponding activities.

___ individual

Penmanship : LA.1112.5.1 LA.1112.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.1112.5.2 LA.1112.5.2.1 demonstrate effective listening skills and behaviors for a variety of purposes, and demonstrate understanding by critically evaluating and analyzing oral presentations LA.1112.5.2.2 apply oral communication skills in interviews, formal presentations, and impromptu situations according to designed rubric criteria LA.1112.5.2.3 use research and visual aids to deliver oral presentations that inform, persuade, or entertain, and evaluates ones own and others oral presentations according to designed rubric criteria LA.1112.5.2.4 use appropriate eye contact, body movements, and voice register for audience engagement in formal and informal speaking situations. LA.1112.5.2.5 research and organize information and demonstrate effective speaking skills and behaviors for a variety of formal and informal purposes

Information & Media Literacy (Research & Technology) LA.1112.6 _x_ whole group _x_ small group _x_individual
Have students research McCarthyism in the school library. See Streamlining the Curriculum. Have students research, cite, and present information about one of the following Colonial/Puritan topics: o Salem Witch Trials o Salem Village vs. Salem Town o Plymouth, Massachusetts o Great Awakening o Cotton Mather and Increase Mather o Puritans (relationship with Church of England) o Puritans (opinion/treatment of children) Informational Text : LA.1112.6.1 LA.1112.6.1.1 analyze the structure and format (diagrams, graphics, fonts) of functional workplace, consumer, or technical documents LA.1112.6.1.2 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.1112.6.1.3 use the knowledge to create workplace, consumer, or technical documents Research Process : LA.1112.6.2 LA.1112.6.2.1 select a topic and develop a comprehensive but flexible search plan, and analyze and apply evaluative criteria (objectivity, freedom from bias, topic format) to assess appropriateness of resources LA.1112.6.2.2 organize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate the validity and reliability of information from multiple sources (including primary and secondary sources) to draw conclusions using a variety of techniques, and correctly use standardized citations. LA.1112.6.2.3 write an informational report that integrates information and makes distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas LA.1112.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.1112.6.3 LA.1112.6.3.1 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media LA.1112.6.3.2 ethically use mass media and digital technology in assignments and presentations, citing sources according to standardized citation styles LA.1112.6.3.3 demonstrate the ability to select print and nonprint media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience to develop into a formal presentation Technology : LA.1112.6.4 LA.1112.6.4.1 select and use appropriate available technologies to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, digital technology,) LA.1112.6.4.2 routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and productivity

Modifications / strategies Reflection 42

SAMPLE LESSON PLAN Unit Title: The Puritan Experience Lesson Title: Honor vs. Survival Grade 11

Focus Sunshine State Standards


Reading Comprehension - LA.1112.1.7.1 , LA.1112.2.1.8, Writing Process - LA.1112.3.1.1 , LA.1112.3.2.2, LA.1112.3.3.1, LA.1112.3.3.2, LA.1112.3.4.3, Writing Applications - LA.1112.4.2.3 , LA.1112.4.3.1, LA1112.4.3.2 Communication - LA.1112.5.1.1 , LA.1112.5.2.5

Objectives
Students will discuss Honor vs. Survival prior to reading The Crucible. During and after reading the play, students will discuss which characters chose Honor and which chose Survival. Students will write an essay analyzing the characters choices and motivation.

Overview
Students will determine which characters chose Honor, which ones chose Survival, and the reasons behind their choices.

Materials HRW 5th Course textbook Procedures


Quickwrite (activation of prior knowledge): Honor vs. Survival Which would you choose? Have students record and discuss their thoughts and then instruct them keep track of the characters choices as they read The Crucible. During reading, have students refer back to this paper and record notes. Introduce parallel structure. After reading, have students discuss (in cooperative groups) their notes and create a whole class chart on the board which lists the characters, their choices, and motivations (focus on the Puritan culture, historical context, etc.). Assign essay topic on which characters chose Honor or Survival. (See sample essay topic sheet.) Peer review the essays for parallel structure and development of main idea and logical relationships within the text.

Assessment
Check Quickwrite for completion and collect notes along with the completed essay. Peer review participation for essay review. Use a 6 Traits rubric or the attached rubric for assessment of the Honor vs. Survival essay.

Teacher Reflection

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The Crucible: Honor vs. Survival


Select 2-4 characters from The Crucible who were faced with the choice of Honor vs. Survival. Think about why they made the choices they did and locate evidence to support your points. As you write your essay, make sure you use and underline examples of parallel structure. Name Title

Organization /30pts -Detailed thesis stated at end of introduction -Follow thesis in paper -Restate thesis at beginning of conclusion Development /30pts -Include topic sentences, specific quotes (with pg. numbers), and analysis in each support paragraph -Refer to thesis (point of paper) in each paragraph Language Conventions /25pts -Underline examples of parallel structure in your essay -No I, you, we, my, our -No informal language or abbreviations -Few errors Paper Format /5pts -Double space or skip lines if handwritten -Write on front of paper only Quickwrite and Notes /10pts -Include your Honor vs. Survival Quickwrite and class notes Total /100pts Comments: ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING OVERVIEW Unit Anglo-SaxonsSongs of Ancient Heroes Essential Question: Where are you going; where have you been? Grade 12
Reading Process (fluency, vocab, strategies) PreReading
Quick write choices: Pre-writing Quick Write choices: 1. What is a Hero? (draw interpretation or write description) 2. Do you think society worships celebrities today, not heroes? 3. Name your favorite real-life or fictional hero and discuss the nature of heroism by citing examples about the hero you have named. Consider these questions: a. What are your heros best-known achievements? b. What are your heros chief personality traits? c. What are your heros values? 4. What are the three most important characteristics you think a hero should possess? Introduce literary elements: epic, epic hero, kenning, alliteration, foil, personification, elegy Introduce background information on Anglo-Saxon era

Writing Opportunities (Writing Process and Applications/Conventions)


Pre-writing Quick Write choices: Responding to Art: Beowulf Battling Grendel Responding to Music: Hansons Lament for Beowulf Write Beowulfs Epitaph Write original kennings Write & share original Anglo-Saxon style riddles Create a musical score with sound effects for a scene from Beowulf Writers Workshop Analyzing Literary Work Elements of Literature p. 67

During
Think aloud Reading comprehension questions Summarizing & paraphrasing text Discuss main idea throughout Making predictions

Reading Selections Fiction Beowulf(main selection) Elements of Literature Seafarer (poem) Elements of Literature Readings from Grendel (John Gardner) Anglo-Saxon Riddles from text & teacher made PowerPoint presentation Nonfiction Life in 999 (text p. 47 article from Time Magazine Scars poem in Atlantic Monthly, May 1992

Post

Vocabulary

Drawing conclusions Projects riddles, Beowulf projects Shared inquiry discussion


Introduce literary elements and selection

vocabulary

Communication (Listening and Speaking)


Present & share original Anglo-Saxon style original riddles Present & share Beowulf musical project Listen to downloaded excerpts of Beowulf narrated in Old English Lament for Beowulf by Howard Hanson, performed by Eastman-Rochester Symphony Orchestra; and the Morman Youth Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Student musical score projects shared with the entire class Student original riddles

Literary Analysis
Writers Workshop Analyzing Literary Work - Elements of Literature p. 67 Poetry analysis using various strategies

Information and Media Literacy Research and Technology


Research background knowledge of Anglo Saxon era

Assessment
Rubrics for oral presentations Multiple choice unit test Formal essay choices give at the end of the unit

Reflection
How did the activities help you understand the characters of Beowulf and Grendel? Which activity was the most helpful and why?

Research Anglo-Saxon riddles Research how the English language has changed View various clips from *Power Media Plus (search epic hero; Beowulf View English: A Living Language, Part I from Visual Connections (textbook ancillary materials) View and discuss clips from Last Action

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SAMPLE UNIT PLANNING WITH STANDARDS Unit Title: Anglo Saxon - Songs of Ancient Heroes Guiding Question: Where are you going; where have you been? Grade 12 Texts
Fiction
Beowulf(main selection) Elements of Literature Seafarer (poem) Elements of Literature Readings from Grendel (John Gardner) Anglo-Saxon Riddles from text & teacher made PowerPoint presentation

Non-Fiction
Life in 999 Elements of Literature text p. 47 article from Time Magazine Scars poem in Atlantic Monthly, May 1992

Content Focus
Reading: Words & phrases in context; Main idea, plot, & purpose; Comparisons & Cause/effect; Reference & Research Writing: Focus, Organization, Support, & Conventions

R e a d i n g P r o c e s s LA.1112.1
Pre-Reading
Quick write choices: Pre-writing Quick Write choices: 1. What is a Hero? (draw interpretation or write description) 2. Do you think society worships celebrities today, not heroes? 3. Name your favorite real-life or fictional hero and discuss the nature of heroism by citing examples about the hero you have named. Consider these questions: a. What are your heros best-known achievements? b. What are your heros chief personality traits? c. What are your heros values? 4. What are the three most important characteristics you think a hero should possess?

_x___ whole group ___x__ small group

_x__ individual

Introduce literary elements: epic, epic hero, kenning, alliteration, foil, personification, elegy Introduce background information on Anglo-Saxon era

During Reading

Think aloud Reading comprehension questions Summarizing & paraphrasing text Discuss main idea throughout Making predictions

Post Reading

Drawing conclusions Projects riddles, Beowulf projects Shared inquiry discussion

Vocabulary
Introduce literary elements and selection vocabulary

Fluency: LA.1112.1.5.1 adjust reading rate based on purpose, text difficulty, form and style Vocabulary Development: LA.1112.1.6.1 use new vocabulary that is introduced and taught directly LA.1112.1.6.2 listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text LA.1112.1.6.3 use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words LA.1112.1.6.4 categorize key vocabulary and identify salient features LA.1112.1.6.5 relate new vocabulary to familiar words LA.1112.1.6.6 distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words LA.1112.1.6.7 identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root words. LA.1112.1.6.8 identify the meaning of unfamiliar terms in political science and medicine derived from Greek and Latin words LA.1112.1.6.9 identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings LA.1112.1.6.10 determine the correct meanings of words with multiples meanings in context LA.1112.1.6.11 determine the meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tool Reading Comprehension LA.1112.1.7.1 use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (previewing, discussing, generating questions) text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection LA.1112.1.7.2 analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they effect meaning LA.1112.1.7.3 determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details and facts LA.1112.1.7.4 identify cause-and-effect relationships in text LA.1112.1.7.5 analyze a variety of text structures (comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order, argument/support, lists) and text features (main heading with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text. LA.1112.1.7.6 analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and non-fiction selections LA.1112.1.7.7 compare and contrast elements in multiple texts (setting, characters, problems) LA.1112.1.7.8 use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using a graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources

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Literary Analysis LA.1112.2


Literary Analysis

_x__ whole group _____ small group

_x__ individual

Review of Six Traits rubric Writers Workshop Analyzing Literary Work - Elements of Literature text page 67 Poetry analysis using various strategies

Fiction: LA.1112.2.1 LA.1112.2.1.1 read, analyze, and compare historically and culturally significant works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres and the literary devices unique to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the text LA.1112.2.1.2 read, analyze, and compare a variety of traditional, classical, and contemporary literary works, and identify the literary elements of each LA.1112.2.1.3 analyze, compare, evaluate, and interpret poetry for the effects of various literary devices, graphics, structure, and theme to convey mood, meaning, and aesthetic qualities LA.1112.2.1.4 analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, providing textual evidence for the identified theme LA.1112.2.1.5 analyze and discuss characteristics of subgenres that overlap or cut across the lines of genre classifications such as poetry, novel, drama, short story, essay or editorial LA.1112.2.1.6 create a complex, multi-genre response to the reading of two or more literary works, using multiple critical perspectives, describing and analyzing an authors use of literary elements, figurative language, and analyzing an authors development of time and sequence LA.1112.2.1.7 analyze, interpret, and evaluate and authors use of descriptive language (tone, irony, mood, imagery, pun, alliteration, onomatopoeia, allusion), figurative language (symbolism, metaphor, personification, hyperbole), common idioms, and mythological and literary allusions, and explain how they impact meaning in a variety of texts with an emphasis on how they evoke readers emotions LA.1112.2.1.8 explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in which it was written LA.1112.2.1.9 describe changes in the English language over time, and support these descriptions with examples from literary texts LA.1112.2.1.10 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture Non-Fiction: LA.1112.2.2 LA.1112.2.2.1 analyze and evaluate information from text features (transitional devices, table of contents, glossary, index, bold or italicized text, headings, charts and graphs, illustrations, subheadings) LA.1112.2.2.2 use information from the text to answer questions or to state the main idea or to provide relevant details LA.1112.2.2.3 organize the information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (representing key points within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing, contrasting, or outlining) LA.1112.2.2.4 identify and analyze the characteristics of a variety of types of text (references, reports, technical manuals, articles, editorials, primary source historical documents, periodicals, job-related materials, practical/functional text) LA.1112.2.2.5 select a variety of age-and-ability appropriate non-fiction materials (biographies and topical areas, such as science, music, art, history, current events) to expand the core knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a fully literate member of a shared culture.

Writing Process LA.1112.3


Pre-writing Quick Write choices: Quick write choices: Pre-writing Quick Write choices: 1. What is a Hero? (draw interpretation or write description) 2. Do you think society worships celebrities today, not heroes? 3. Name your favorite real-life or fictional hero and discuss the nature of heroism by citing examples about the hero you have named. Consider these questions: a. What are your heros best-known achievements?

____ whole group _____ small group

__x_ individual

Pre-Writing : LA.1112.3.1 LA.1112.3.1.1 generate ideas from multiple sources (brainstorming, journals, discussion, research materials) based upon teacher-directed topics and personal interests LA.1112.3.1.2 make a plan for writing that addresses purpose, audience, a controlling idea, logical sequence, and time frame for completion LA.1112.3.1.3 using organizational strategies and tools ( technology, spreadsheet, outline, chart, table, graphs, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style Drafting : LA.1112.3.2 LA.1112.3.2.1 develop ideas from the pre-writing plan using primary and secondary sources appropriate to the purpose and audience

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b. What are your heros chief personality traits? c. What are your heros values? 4. What are the three most important characteristics you think a hero should possess?
Responding to Art: Beowulf Battling Grendel Responding to Music: Hansons Lament for

Beowulf
Write Beowulfs Epitaph share with class Write original kennings Write & share original Anglo-Saxon style

riddles share with class


Create a musical score with sound effects for a

scene from Beowulf


Writers Workshop Analyzing Literary Work -

Elements of Literature text p 67

LA.1112.3.2.2 establish a logical organizational pattern with supporting details that are substantial, specific, and relevant LA.1112.3.2.3 analyze language techniques of professional authors (figurative language, denotation, connotation) to establish a personal style, and demonstrate a command of language with confidence of expression Revising : LA.1112.3.3 LA.1112.3.3.1 evaluate the draft for development of ideas and content, logical organization, voice, point of view, word choice, and sentence variation LA.1112.3.3.2 create clarity and logic by maintaining central theme, idea, or unifying point and developing meaningful relationships among ideas LA.1112.3.3.3 create precision and interest by elaborating ideas through supporting details (facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes) a variety of sentences structures, creative language devices, and modifying word choices using resources and reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus) to select more effective and precise language LA.1112.3.3.4 apply appropriate tools or strategies to evaluate and refine the draft (peer review, checklists, rubrics) Editing : LA.1112.3.4 LA.1112.3.4.1 spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English LA.1112.3.4.2 punctuation, including commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, parentheses, ellipses, brackets, and underlining or italics LA.1112.3.4.3 grammar and usage, including but not limited to parts of speech, verb tense, possessives, pronoun/antecedent agreement, parallel structure, modifier placement, subject/verb agreement, comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, noun/pronoun agreement, and unintended shift in person or tense LA.1112.3.4.4 varied sentence structure, including the elimination of dangling or misplaced modifiers, run-on or fused sentences, and unintended sentence fragments Publishing: LA.1112.3.5 LA.1112.3.5.1 prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (display, multimedia) LA.1112.3.5.2 include such techniques as principle of design (margins, tabs, columns) and graphics (drawings, charts, graphs) LA.1112.3.5.3 sharing with others, or submitting for publication

W r i t i n g A p p l i c a t i o n s L A . 1 1 1 2 . 4 ____ whole group _____ small group


Responding to Art: Beowulf Battling Grendel Responding to Music: Hansons Lament for

_x__ individual

Beowulf
Write Beowulfs Epitaph Write original kennings Write & share original Anglo-Saxon style

riddles
Create a musical score with sound effects for a

scene from Beowulf either as an individual or with a group

Creative : LA.1112.4.1 LA.1112.4.1.1 an engaging plot that uses a range of appropriate strategies and specific narrative techniques (dialogue, internal monologue, point of view) employ literary devices (irony, conceit, imagery, flashback, foreshadowing, symbolism, allusion) and sensory description LA.1112.4.1.2 incorporate figurative language, emotions, gestures, rhythm, dialogue, characterization, plot and appropriate format Informative : LA.1112.4.2 LA.1112.4.2.1 write in a variety of informational/expository forms, including documents using precise technical and scientific vocabulary (manuals, procedures) LA.1112.4.2.2 record information and ideas from primary and/or secondary sources accurately and coherently; noting the validity and reliability of these sources and attributing sources of information LA.1112.4.2.3 write informational/expository essays that speculate on the causes and effects of a situation, establish the connections between the postulated causes or effects; offer evidence supporting the validity of the proposed causes or effects, and include introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs LA.1112.4.2.4 write a business letter and/or memo that presents information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience following a conventional format (block, modified block, memo, email) LA.1112.4.2.5 write detailed travel directions and design an accompanying graphic using the cardinal and ordinal directions, landmarks, streets and highways, and distances. LA.1112.4.2.6 write a work-related document (application, resume, meeting minutes, memo, cover letter, letter of application, speaker introduction, letter of recommendation)

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Persuasive : LA.1112.4.3 LA.1112.4.3.1 state a position or claim, presents detailed evidence, examples, and reasoning to support effective arguments and emotional appeals, and acknowledges and refutes opposing arguments LA.1112.4.3.2 include persuasive techniques (word choice, repetition, emotional appeal, hyperbole, appeal to authority, celebrity endorsement, rhetorical question, irony, symbols, glittering generalities, card stacking, testimonials, bandwagon, image associations, transfer) LA.1112.4.3.2 attribute sources of information when appropriate

Communication LA.1112.5 __x__ whole group _____ small group


Communication (Listening/ Speaking/Viewing:
Present & share original Anglo-Saxon style

___ individual

original riddles
Present & share Beowulf musical project Listen to downloaded excerpts of Beowulf

narrated in Old English


Lament for Beowulf by Howard Hanson,

performed by Eastman-Rochester Symphony Orchestra; and the Mormon Youth Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Student musical score projects shared with the entire class Student original riddles

Penmanship : LA.1112.5.1 LA.1112.5.1.1 the student will use fluent and legible handwriting skills Listening and Speaking : LA.1112.5.2 LA.1112.5.2.1 demonstrate effective listening skills and behaviors for a variety of purposes, and demonstrate understanding by critically evaluating and analyzing oral presentations LA.1112.5.2.2 apply oral communication skills in interviews, formal presentations, and impromptu situations according to designed rubric criteria LA.1112.5.2.3 use research and visual aids to deliver oral presentations that inform, persuade, or entertain, and evaluates ones own and others oral presentations according to designed rubric criteria LA.1112.5.2.4 use appropriate eye contact, body movements, and voice register for audience engagement in formal and informal speaking situations. LA.1112.5.2.5 research and organize information and demonstrate effective speaking skills and behaviors for a variety of formal and informal purposes

I n f o r m a t i o n a n d M e d i a L i t e r a c y L A . 1 1 1 2 . 6 ___ whole group ___ small group ___ individual


Research and Technology:
Research background knowledge of Anglo

Saxon era
Research Anglo-Saxon riddles Research how the English language has changed View various clips from *Power Media Plus

(search epic hero; Beowulf


View English: A Living Language, Part I

from Visual Connections (textbook ancillary materials) Previously viewed clips from Last Action Hero, Superman, Labyrinth Beowulf cartoon version if available

Informational Text : LA.1112.6.1 LA.1112.6.1.1 analyze the structure and format (diagrams, graphics, fonts) of functional workplace, consumer, or technical documents LA.1112.6.1.2 explain how text features (charts, maps, diagrams, captions, illustrations, graphs) aid the readers understanding LA.1112.6.1.3 use the knowledge to create workplace, consumer, or technical documents Research Process : LA.1112.6.2 LA.1112.6.2.1 select a topic and develop a comprehensive but flexible search plan, and analyze and apply evaluative criteria (objectivity, freedom from bias, topic format) to assess appropriateness of resources LA.1112.6.2.2 organize, synthesize, analyze, and evaluate the validity and reliability of information from multiple sources (including primary and secondary sources) to draw conclusions using a variety of techniques, and correctly use standardized citations. LA.1112.6.2.3 write an informational report that integrates information and makes distinctions between the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas LA.1112.6.2.4 understand the importance of legal and ethical practices, including laws regarding libel, slander, copyright, and plagiarism in the use of mass media and digital sources, know the associated consequences, and comply with the law. Media Literacy : LA.1112.6.3 LA.1112.6.3.1 distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint media LA.1112.6.3.2 ethically use mass media and digital technology in assignments and presentations, citing sources according to standardized citation styles LA.1112.6.3.3 demonstrate the ability to select print and nonprint media appropriate for the purpose, occasion, and audience to develop into a formal presentation Technology : LA.1112.6.4 LA.1112.6.4.1 select and use appropriate available technologies to enhance communication and achieve a purpose (video, digital technology,) LA.1112.6.4.2 routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and productivity

Modifications Reflection 49

SAMPLE LESSON Unit Title: Anglo-Saxon Songs of Ancient Heroes Lesson Title: The Epic Hero vs. Modern Day Hero Grade Level: 12

Focus Sunshine State Standards: Reading Process- LA.1112.1.5.1, LA.1112.1.6.1, LA.1112.1.6.2, LA.1112.1.6.3,
LA.1112.1.7.1, Writing Process - LA.1112.3.1.1, LA.1112.3.1.2, LA.1112.3.2.1, LA.1112.3.2.2, Writing Application LA.1112.4.1.1, LA.1112.4.1.2, LA.1112.4.2.3

Objectives
Students will discuss the epic hero vs. the modern day hero prior to the quick write activity to activate prior knowledge. Class will review characteristics of a well-developed essay and brainstorm ideas for their compositions.

Overview
Class will discuss characteristics of the epic hero and compare those qualities to the modern day hero to activate prior knowledge before beginning their quick write. Six Traits review to establish the characteristics of a well-written essay.

Materials
PowerPoint presentation of characteristics of the epic hero 6-Traits rubric for students Quickwrite handouts for student

Procedures
Class discussion of epic hero vs. modern day hero Review of a good 6-Traits essay Students will brainstorm pre-write activity for Quickwrite and choose a topic of their choice: 1. What is a Hero? (draw interpretation or write description) 2. Do you think society worships celebrities today, not heroes? 3. Name your favorite real-life or fictional hero and discuss the nature of heroism by citing examples about the hero you have named. Consider these questions: a. What are your heros best-known achievements? b. What are your heros chief personality traits? c. What are your heros values? 4. What are the three most important characteristics you think a hero should possess?

Assessment
Proof read & self-evaluate Quickwrite prior to submitting Use 6 Traits rubric for essay evaluation

Teacher Reflection

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Secondary Language Arts ~ Helpful Website Links


Resource Name
International Reading Association National Council Teachers of English Florida Council Teachers of English Brevard Council Teachers of English Read-Write-Think The Alan Review Poets Poetry 180 Poetry Alive Sonnet Central Poetry Slam Favorite Poem Project English Companion Web English Teacher DOE FCAT Publications Graphic Organizers Writing possibilities for students

Web Link http://www.ira.org http://www.ncte.org http://www.fcte.org http://www.bcte.org http://www.readwritethink.org http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/alan-review.html http://www.poets.org http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180 http://www.poetryalive.com http://www.sonnets.org http://www.poetryslam.com http://www.favoritepoem.org http://www.englishcompanion.com http://www.webenglishteacher.com http://www.firn.edu/doe/sas/fcat/fcatpub2.htm http://www.educationoasis.com/curriculum/graphic_organizers.htm http://www.teenink.com http://www.merlynspen.org http://www.scholastic.com/artandwritingawards/index.htm http://www.vsarts.org/x1548.xml http://secondarypgms.brevard.k12.fl.us/areas.html#Lisa%20Rehm
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Brevard County Language Arts Resource Page

References and Resources


Source Title
PowerMediaPlus

Features
images (photos, maps, charts online streaming video/audio files printable resources and Podcasts See your tech. specialist for assistance A Year-At-A-Glance overview for grades 7-12 Brevard Countys scope and sequence writing plan Six Traits and FCAT Writing definitions and rubrics Presents reading lists Provides quality lesson plan and resource samples Includes Sunshine State Standards, sample activities Brevard Countys program to address 9-12 curriculum gaps Includes helpful SAT/ACT strategies Includes essay forms, literature, mixed media, etc. Brevard Countys Writing Cadres suggested strategies Helpful charts for targeting key skill areas Reviews format, grammar, usage, and reference guides Brevard Countys Secondary approach for FCAT Writing + Visit www.projectcriss.com Training offered periodically throughout Brevard County Helps students better organize, understand, retain information Strategies show, tell, model, demonstrate, and explain content Visit www.thinkingmaps.com A common visual language for students K-12 Eight maps assist students to organize thoughts Teaches the parts of good writing Visit http://www.nwrel.org/assessment Each trait is assessed using a scoring rubric Leads to student success on FCAT Reading Brevard Countys approach to helping struggling readers Integrated approach for English I, II, and Intensive Reading Organized around four clusters of Sunshine State Standards Induction Program training manual Available on-line at Brevard Schools Homepage Each area presents strategies, resources, and ideas Subjects include assessment, diversity, knowledge of subject

Piece by Piece

Streamlining the Literature Curriculum

Mastering Ideas

Mastering Writing + Skills Project CRISS (Creating Independence through Student-owned Strategies) Thinking Maps

Six Traits

Bridging the Curriculum

We Inspire Student Excellence (WISE)

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