You are on page 1of 21

Project Editors: Zhou Ling, Lara Deasy & Liu Shui Copy Editor: Book Designer: Guo Miao

& Zhao Jing-jin Cover Designer: Guo Miao & Zhao Jing-jin Typesetter:

International Standard Library of Chinese Medicine

Deng Zhong-jia, Ph.D. TCM


Professor and Doctoral Supervisor of Chinese Medicinal Formulas, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China

Greg Zimmerman, M.S., L.Ac.


Acupuncturist, Chinese American Acupuncture Center, Orlando, Florida, USA

Ye Qiao-bo, Ph.D. TCM


Lectuer, International Education College, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China

Website: http://www.pmph.com Book Title: Chinese Medicinal Formulas (International Standard Library of Chinese Medicine) Copyright 2011 by Peoples Medical Publishing House. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a database or retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, photocopy, or other recording means, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Contact address: No. 19, Pan Jia Yuan Nan Li, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021, P.R. China, phone/fax: 8610 5978 7338, E-mail: pmph@pmph.com For text and trade sales, as well as review copy enquiries, please contact PMPH at pmphsales@gmail.com

Disclaimer This book is for educational and reference purposes only. In view of the possibility of human error or changes in medical science, the author, editor, publisher and any other party involved in the publication of this work do not guarantee that the information contained herein is in any respect accurate or complete. The medicinal therapies and treatment techniques presented in this book are provided for the purpose of reference only. If readers wish to attempt any of the techniques or utilize any of the medicinal therapies contained in this book, the publisher assumes no responsibility for any such actions. It is the responsibility of the readers to understand and adhere to local laws and regulations concerning the practice of these techniques and methods. The authors, editors and publishers disclaim all responsibility for any liability, loss, injury, or damage incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this book.

First published: 2011 ISBN: Cataloguing in Publication Data: A catalogue record for this book is available from the CIP-Database China.

Printed in The Peoples Republic of China

Contributors (Listed alphabetically by name)


Chen Jian-ping , Ph.D. TCM Assistant Professor(Honorary Associate Professor), School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong , China Li Ji , Ph.D. TCM Professor, Vice president of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Harbin China Shen Tao , Ph.D. TCM Professor, Vice President of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China Yi Zi-gang , Professor, Director of the Formula Department, Guangxi College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanning, China Zhou Yong-xue , Professor, President of Shaanxi College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xian, China Jia Bo , M.S. TCM Professor, Director of the Formula Department, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China Ruan Shi-bao , Professor, Director of the formula Department, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xiamen, China Wang Di , Professor, Director of the Formula Department, Changchun University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jilin, China Zhou Ran , Professor, President of Shanxi College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Taiyuan, China

Translators (Listed alphabetically by name)


Azure (Duan Ying-zhe) Ph.D., , L.Ac., TCM Harmony Acupuncture & TCM, Atlanta, GA, U. S. A. Jin Zhao , Ph.D. TCM Attending Physician, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China Hu Peng , Ph.D. TCM Lecturer, Clinical College, Chengdu U n i v e r s i t y o f Tr a d i t i o n a l C h i n e s e Medicine, Chengdu, China Li Yi-bei Ph.D. Candidate TCM , Attending Physician, Department of Endocrinology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China

Ma Xi-tao , M.S. TCM Interpreter/Translator, Physician, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China Wang Jing , Ph.D. TCM Physician, Lecturer, Clinical College, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, China

Song Yao-ping Ph.D. L.Ac., TCM , The Academy of Oriental Medicine at Austin, Austin, TX, U. S. A.

Wu Shi-guo , Ph.D. TCM Physician, Lecturer, Yunnan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Kunming, China

English Editors
Greg Zimmerman, M.S., L.Ac. Acupuncturist, Chinese American Acupuncture Center, Orlando, Florida, USA Lara Deasy, Bsc (Hons) TCM, B.M. (Beijing) TCM, MRCHM

About the Authors

Deng Zhong-jia Deng Zhong-jia, State Council Expert for Special Allowance, is a professor and

doctoral supervisor of Chengdu University of TCM. He is the principal academic

leader of the state-level formulas courses, teaching team and key disciplines of

the State Administration of TCM of China. Prof. Deng was the Deputy Committee

Director of the Branch Association of Formulas, China TCM Association (2002-06).

The two textbooks: Formulas of Traditional Chinese Medicine, he edited in 2001 and contribution to textbook editing in 2009.

2008, are widely used in China. He was awarded the Excellent Textbook Prize for his

Greg Zimmerman
Greg Zimmerman is a Licensed Acupuncturist and Chinese Medicine Practitioner

located in Southern California. He has been involved in the academics of Traditional prominent Chinese herbal manufacturing companies, educational organizations, and Medicine Clinic , located in Irvine, CA since 1997.

Chinese Medicine since 1996 serving as a lecturer, consultant and editor for TCM colleges. Greg Zimmerman has maintained a private practice, the Yi An Chinese For the past 12 years, he has taught a variety of classes on various subjects of

Traditional Chinese Medicine with an emphasis on Chinese herbal formulas and medicinals. More recently, he has developed and teaches a certification course, regarding ethical herbal compounding and dispensing, to professional practitioners

Ye Qiao-bo ( ) Ye Qiao-bo is a graduate of the Chengdu University of TCM (Bachelor in

Chinese Herbal Medicine, 2001; Master in Formulas, 2004; Ph.D in Formulas, 2009).

She worked as an editorial member and translator for the Encyclopedia of Medicinal Tong (Research Assistant, 2004-06). Currently, she teaches formulas in the Chengdu University of TCM and serves as a physician in the affiliated clinic of the university.

Plants at the School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon

Editorial Board for International Standard Library of Chinese Medicine Executive Directors
Li Zhen-ji Vice Chairman and Secretary-general, World Federation of Chinese Medical Societies, Beijing, China Hu Guo-chen President and Editor-in-Chief, Peoples Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China

Directors
You Zhao-ling Former President and Professor of Chinese TCM, Changsha, China Xie Jian-qun Medical Gynecology, Hunan University of President and Professor of Chinese Internal Medicine, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai, China

General Coordinator
Liu Shui Director of International TCM Publications, Peoples Medical Publishing House, Beijing

Members (Listed alphabetically by last name)


Chang Zhang-fu University of CM, Beijing, China Professor of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing Chen Jia-xu , Ph.D. TCM University of CM, Beijing, China Cui Hai , Ph.D. TCM University, Beijing, China

Chen Hong-feng , Ph.D. TCM

Professor of Chinese External Medicine, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai, China Chen Ming

P ro f e s s o r o f T C M D i a g n o s t i c s , B e i j i n g

Professor of Shng Hn Ln, Beijing University of CM, Beijing, China Deng Zhong-jia

Associate Professor of TCM, Capital Medical Ding Xiao-hong

Professor of Chinese Medicinal Formulae, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China Doug Eisenstark, L.Ac

Associate Professor of Tui Na, International Nanjing,China Affairs

Education College, Nanjing University of TCM, Stephen X. Guo , M.A. International Director of Jande International, New York, USA Hu Jun , B.A. Medical English

Professor of Chinese Medicine, Emperors College, Los Angeles, USA

Han Chou-ping

Associate Professor, International Education China

College, Shanghai University of TCM, Shanghai, Hu Ke-xin , Ph.D. TCM

Currently pursuing Master s of Science in Social History of Medicine, Peking University, Beijing, China

Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, Keelung City Municipal Hospital, Taiwan, China

10

Hu Zhen

Professor and Head of Department of Medical College, Wenzhou, China

Huang Fei-li

Traditional Chinese Medicine, Wenzhou Russell William James, M.S. TCM

Professor of Cosmetology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China

IELTS Examiner & Marker, Beijing, China Jin Hong-zhu

Jia De-xian , Ph.D. TCM University of CM, Beijing, China Lao Li-xing , Ph.D.

Professor of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing

Professor of Acupuncture & Tui Na, Nanjing University of TCM, Nanjing, China

Professor of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA Research Past Co-President of the Society for Acupuncture

Hon K. Lee , Dipl. OM, L.Ac. Herndon, Virginia, USA

Director of the Jow Ga Shaolin Institute,

Li Dao-fang , Ph.D. TCM

President of Florida Acupuncture Association; Chinese TCM Organizations, Kissimmee, USA Li Ming-dong , Ph.D. OMD, L.Ac.

Executive Board Director, National Federation of

Mei Li , M.S. TOM, L.Ac. Publishing House, Beijing, China Li Wan-ling

Translator and Editor, Peoples Medical

Professor of Chinese Internal Medicine, Yo San Angeles, USA

University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Los Liang Li-na , Ph.D. TCM

Qi Gong and TCM Translator, Beijing, China

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Eye Hospital of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China L Ming

Liu Zhan-wen

P ro f e s s o r o f C h i n e s e M e d i c i n e , B e i j i n g University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China L.Ac. Mark L. Mondot, B.A. Chinese Language, Translator and Editor, Peoples Medical Publishing House, Beijing, China Julie Mulin Qiao-Wong University, Melbourne, Australia Paul F. Ryan, M.S. TCM, L.Ac. Taihu Institute, Jiangsu, China Secondo Scarsella, MD, DDS

Professor of Tui Na, Changchun University of Chinese Medicine, Changchun, China Ac. Jane Lyttleton, Hons, M Phil, Dip TCM, Cert Lecturer, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia Andy Rosenfarb, M.S. TOM, L.Ac. USA

Professor of Chinese Medicine, Victoria

Acupuncture Health Associates, New Jersey, Martin Schweizer, Ph.D. Molecular Biology, L.Ac. Emeritus Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, USA Sun Guang-ren

Visiting Professor of Tui Na, Nanjing University of TCM, China Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Salvatore Hospital, LAquila, Italy

Professor of TCM Fundamentals, Shandong University of TCM, Jinan, China

11

Tsai Chun-hui, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, School of Wang Shou-chuan

Tu Ya

Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, USA Professor of TCM Pediatrics, Nanjing University of TCM, Nanjing, China Douglas Wile, Ph.D.

Professor of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing University of CM, Beijing, China Wei Qi-ping of CM, Beijing

Professor of Ophthalmology, Beijing University Jane Frances Wilson, M.S., L.Ac.

Former professor of History & Philosophy of Chinese Medicine and of Chinese Language at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York; Professor of Chinese language at Alverno College, Milwaukee, USA Xiao Ping Changsha, China

Senior Lecturer of School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK

Associate Professor, Hunan University of TCM,

Xu Shi-zu , M.A. Chinese Martial Arts

Chinese Traditional Sports and Health Cultivation Instructor, School of Physical Education in Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, China Ye Qiao-bo , Ph.D. TCM

Yan Dao-nan

Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, Nanjing University of TCM, Nanjing, China Zhang Ji

Lecturer of Chinese Medicinal Formulae, Chengdu University of TCM, Chengdu, China Zhang Ji , Ph.D. TCM

Professor of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing University of CM, Beijing, China

Professor of Chinese Materia Medica, Emperors Dongguk University, Los Angeles, USA Zhang Qing-rong

College of Oriental Medicine, Alhambra University,

Helen Q. Zhang , Ph.D. TCM, L.Ac. Director of Qi TCM Clinic, New York, USA Zhao Bai-xiao , Ph.D. TCM

Professor of TCM Fundamentals, Liaoning University of TCM, Shenyang, China Zhao Xia , Ph.D. TCM of TCM, Nanjing, China

Professor of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing University of TCM, China Zhou Gang , Ph.D. TCM of CM, Beijing, China

Dean, School of Acupuncture and Moxibustion,

Professor of TCM Pediatrics, Nanjing University

Lecturer of Shng Hn Ln, Beijing University

Gregory Donald Zimmerman, M.S., L.Ac.

Lecturer, Southern California University of USA

Health Sciences (formerly LACC), California,

Sponsored by

World Federation of Chinese Medical Societies

12

Preface

The science of formulas is a subject dealing with the treatment and theories of formulas, as well as the clinical application. It is an important basic course in TCM and should be studied after the Basic Theory of TCM, Diagnostics of TCM and Chinese Materia Medica courses. The textbook is divided into two parts. The first part is General Discussion, focusing on the brief history and development of the formulas science, Treatment Methods and Formulas, Classification of Formulas, Composition of Formulas, Dosage, Form and Preparation and Administration of Decoctions. The second part includes specific discussions on formulas in nineteen categories. It contains 182 principal formulas and 185 associated formulas, which are divided into fundamental formulas, representative formulas and commonly used formulas. One hundred kinds of commonly used Chinese patent drugs are introduced in the Appendix in the form of a chart. Each chapter contains four parts: Brief Introduction, Specific Formulas, Summary and Questions. The Brief Introduction includes the definition of each type of formula, treatment method, function, application, cautions, clinical features, compatibility methods and the name of commonly used formulas. Specific Formulas includes the Source Text, Formula Ingredients, Preparation and Administration, Formula Indications, Analysis of Fundamental Pattern Pathogenesis, Formula Analysis, Formula Actions, Unique Combination Features, Further Clarification, Formula Applications, Associated Formulas, Case Studies, and Comments. The Summary is a brief comparison between the formulas. The Questions try to develop the ability of independent thinking and comprehensive analysis based on the important contents of each chapter. This textbook is characterized by following features: 1. Using clear and easily understood forms to elucidate Formula Analysis, Modifications, Associated Formulas, and Comparisons & Contrasts.

13

2. The item of Further Clarification is set to elucidate the difficulties and doubts. 3. The fundamental combinations are concluded in the Formula Analysis form. Also, the Unique Combination Features helps readers to learn more compatibility skills. 4. One to four typical and practical cases by famous ancient or current TCM practitioners are listed in most formulas. It can help readers master the core pathomechanism and learn how to modify the formulas in different specific cases. Work Assignment: The General Introduction was written by Deng Zhong-jia. Chapter 1 and Chapter 3 were written by Jia Bo. Chapter 2, Chapter 13 and Chapter 19 were written by Yi Zi-gang. Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 were written by Zhou Rong-xue. Chapter 6 and Chapter 7 were written by Shen Tao. Chapter 9 and Chapter 11 were written by Wang Di. Chapter 12 and Chapter 14 were written by Ruan Shi-bao. Chapter 16 was written by Li Ji. Chapter 10 and Chapter 17 were written by Zhou Ran. Chapter 8, Chapter 16 and Chapter 18 were written by Chen Jian-ping. This book can be used as an authentic textbook for overseas students. Moreover, it can serve as reference for TCM practitioners with its practical contents. Deng Zhong-jia, Greg Zimmerman, Ye Qiao-bo 2011

14

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I General Introduction


Chapter 1 The History of Chinese Formulas......................................................

Chapter 2 Treatment Methods and Formulas ....................................................

Chapter 3 Classification of Formulas ................................................................. Chapter 4 Composition of Formulas .................................................................. Chapter 5 Dosage Form ....................................................................................... Chapter 6 Preparation and Administration of Decoctions ...............................

Part II Formula Monographs


Chapter 1 Exterior Releasing Formulas .............................................................
Section 1 Acrid-Warm Exterior Releasing Formulas ............................................................. Section 2 Acrid-Cold Exterior Releasing Formulas ............................................................... Section 3 Supporting and Exterior Releasing Formulas .........................................................

Chapter 2 Downward Draining Formulas ...........................................................


Section 1 Cold Purgatives ......................................................................................................

15

Section 2 Warm Purgatives .................................................................................................... Section 3 Moist Purgatives ..................................................................................................... Section 4 Harsh Expellants .................................................................................................... Section 5 Purgative and Tonic Formulas ...............................................................................

Chapter 3 Harmonizing Formulas .......................................................................


Section 1 Shaoyang Harmonizing Formulas .......................................................................... Section 2 Liver and Spleen Harmonizing Formulas ............................................................... Section 3 Intestines and Stomach Harmonizing Formulas .....................................................

Chapter 4 Heat-Clearing Formulas .....................................................................


Section 1 Qi Level-Clearing Formulas ................................................................................... Section 2 Ying Level-Clearing and Blood-Cooling Formulas ................................................. Section 3 Heat-Clearing and Toxin-Eliminating Formulas .................................................... Section 4 Zang-fu-Clearing Formulas.................................................................................... Section 5 Deficiency-Heat-Clearing Formulas.......................................................................

Chapter 5 Summer-Heat-Dispelling Formulas ................................................... Chapter 6 Interior-Warming Formulas ................................................................


Section 1 Center-Warming and Cold-Dispelling Formulas .................................................... Section 2 Yang-Resuscitating Formulas ................................................................................ Section 3 Channel-Warming and Cold-Dispersing Formulas.................................................

Chapter 7 Tonic Formulas ...................................................................................


Section 1 Qi-Tonifying Formulas ........................................................................................... Section 2 Blood-Tonifying Formulas ...................................................................................... Section 3 Qi and Blood Tonifying Formulas .......................................................................... Section 4 Yin-Tonifying Formulas ......................................................................................... Section 5 Yang-Tonifying Formulas....................................................................................... Section 6 Yin and Yang Tonifying Formulas .........................................................................

Chapter 8 Mind-Calming Formulas .....................................................................


Section 1 Mind-Calming Formulas Using Heavy Sedatives ................................................... Section 2 Mind-Calming Formulas Using Supplementing Sedatives......................................

16

Chapter 9 Orifices-Opening Formulas................................................................


Section 1 Cool Orifices-Opening Formulas ............................................................................ Section 2 Warm Orifices-Opening Formulas .........................................................................

Chapter 10 Astringent formulas ..........................................................................


Section 1 Exterior-Consolidating Formulas to Arrest Sweating.............................................. Section 2 Lung-Restraining Formulas to Relieve Cough ....................................................... Section 3 Intestine-Astringing Formulas to Stop Leakage ..................................................... Section 4 Essence-Securing Formulas to Arrest Enuresis and Seminal Emissions ................ Section 5 Womb-Stabilizing Formulas to Arrest Profuse Uterine Bleeding and Vaginal Discharge .........................................................................................

Chapter 11 Qi-Rectifying Formulas.....................................................................


Section 1 Qi-Moving Formulas .............................................................................................. Section 2 Qi-Descending Formulas........................................................................................

Chapter 12 Blood-Regulating Formulas .............................................................


Section 1 Blood-Invigorating and Stasis-Removing Formulas ............................................... Section 2 Bleeding-Stanching Formulas ................................................................................

Chapter13 Wind-Expelling Formulas ..................................................................


Section 1 External Wind Expelling and Dissipating Formulas .............................................. Section 2 Internal Wind Calming and Extinguishing Formulas .............................................

Chapter 14 Dryness-Relieving Formulas ...........................................................


Section 1 External Dryness Relieving Formulas by Light Diffusion ...................................... Section 2 Yin-Enriching and Dryness-Moistening Formulas .................................................

Chapter 15 Dampness-Removing Formulas ......................................................


Section 1 Damp-Drying and Stomach-Harmonizing Formulas ............................................... Section 2 Heat-Clearing and Dampness-Dispelling Formulas ............................................... Section 3 Urination-Promoting and Dampness-Percolating Formulas ................................... Section 4 Warm Formulas that Remove Cold-Damp.............................................................. Section 5 Wind-Dispelling and Dampness-Overcoming Formulas ........................................

17

Chapter 16 Phlegm-Dispelling Formulas ...........................................................


Section 1 Damp-Drying and Phlegm-Dissolving Formulas .................................................... Section 2 Heat-Clearing and Phlegm-Dissolving Formulas ................................................... Section 3 Dryness-Moistening and Phlegm-Dissolving Formulas .......................................... Section 4 Warm Formulas that Dissolve Cold Phlegm ........................................................... Section 5 Wind-Dispelling and Phlegm-Dissolving formulas ................................................

Chapter 17 Digestion-Promoting Formulas .......................................................


Section 1 Digestion-Promoting and Stagnation-Removing Formulas ..................................... Section 2 Spleen-Fortifying and Digestion-Promoting Formulas ...........................................

Chapter 18 Worm-Expelling Formulas ............................................................... Chapter 19 Emetic Formulas ...............................................................................

Appendix ................................................................................................................
Appendix I List of Medicinals................................................................................................ Appendix II List of Formulas ................................................................................................. Appendix III List of Classical Texts ......................................................................................

Index .......................................................................................................................
Index by Chinese Medicinals and Formulas - Pin Yin Names ............................................... Index by Chinese Medicinals and Formulas - Pharmaceutical Names ..................................

18

Chapter 17

Digestion-Promoting Formulas

Digestion-promoting formulas utilize digestion-promoting medicinals as key components. They have the therapeutic actions to promote digestion, fortify the spleen, remove accumulation, and remove stagnation. Digestion-promoting formulas are prescribed to treat food accumulation. The modern method promote digestion was historically referred to as the dispersion method. It is one of the Eight Treatment Methods recorded in ancient literature. The dispersion method is extensively applied for conditions of accumulation, stagnation and fullness that result from blockage of qi, blood, phlegm, dampness, food and worms. This chapter discusses the therapeutic method and formulas used for food accumulation. Related therapeutic methods and formulas are discussed in the qiregulating, blood-rectifying, dampness-dispelling, accumulation-removing and wormexpelling chapters. The etiologies of food accumulation are essentially classified in terms of deficiency and excess. Deficient patterns of food accumulation are caused by spleen deficiency and poor digestion. Excessive patterns of food accumulation are due to an improper diet, bad dietary habits, and overeating. Digestion-promoting formulas are therefore categorized into two types: a) Digestionpromoting and stagnation-removing formulas b) Spleen-fortifying and digestion-promoting formulas Formulas that promote digestion typically contain qi-regulating medicinals because internal accumulation inhibits qi movement. The opposite is also true; constraint and stagnation of the qi mechanism will induce obstruction. Therefore, removing accumulation is associated with moving the qi. Those who suffer chronic conditions with a deficiency of zheng qi, as well as spleen and stomach deficiencies, require medicinals that reinforce zheng qi. They are used simultaneously along with those medicinals that disperse food accumulation. As a result of their pathological development, food accumulations may have either a hot or cold pathological character. Therefore these formulas may necessarily be heat clearing or warming in nature. It is not advised to take dispersing formulas for long periods of time. They are aggressive and may consume zheng qi and are therefore contraindicated for patterns of deficiency without signs of excess.

Chinese Medicinal Formulas

Section 1 DigeStion-Promoting anD Stagnation-removing FormulaS


Digestion-promoting and stagnation-removing formulas are used to treat food accumulation. The signs and symptoms include fullness and oppression of the chest and stomach cavity, belching, acid swallowing, aversion to food, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, abdominal pain as well as diarrhea. Common medicinals used to promote digestion are shn zh, shn q, li f z and mi y. Food accumulation may impede qi movement, produce dampness and constrain heat. Consequently, corresponding formulas often contain medicinals that regulate qi, remove dampness, and clear heat. When food accumulation and damp-heat obstruct the large intestine and block the qi of the bowels, medicinals that drain downward may be used. Common formulas in this category are Bo H Wn and Zh Sh Do Zh Wn.

Harmony-PreServing Pill Bo H Wn
Source Text Teachings of [Zhu] Dan-xi (read more on upcoming release of this book) Unique Combination Features This formula primarily promotes digestion; however, it also moves qi, removes dampness and clears heat. Formula Applications 1. Essential Pattern Differentiation: Bo H Wn is a commonly used formula applicable for a variety of food accumulation patterns. This clinical pattern is marked by: fullness in the abdomen and stomach cavity distension and pain in the abdomen and stomach cavity belching acid swallowing thick and greasy tongue coating slippery pulse

Part II

Formula Monographs Section 1

2. Modifications:
Concurrent Condition An excessive amount of food accumulation An excessive amount of heat developed from food accumulation marked by a yellow tongue coating and rapid pulse Constipation Spleen deficiency Concurrent Treatment Promote digestion and regulate qi Promote digestion and clear heat Common Medicinal Modifications zh sh, hu p, m xing and bng lng hung qn and hung lin

Promote defecation and purge the bowels Boost qi and fortify the spleen

d hung bi zh, dng shn and gn co

3. Modern Applications: This formula may be used in the following biomedically defined disorders when the patient shows signs of food accumulation: acute and chronic gastritis and enteritis, dyspepsia, and infants with diarrhea. 4. Cautions and Contraindications: This formula is an aggressive formula that attacks and dispels; therefore, it should not be taken for long periods of time. Additionally, it should not be prescribed to treat food accumulation patterns due to spleen deficiency without proper modification. Associated Formulas
Name Ingredients shn zh 2 liang (12 g), shn q 1 liang (6 g), bn xi 1 liang (6 g), f lng 1 liang (6 g), chn p 0.5 liang (3 g ), li f z 0.5 liang (3 g ), lin qio 0.5 liang (3 g ), bi zh 2 liang (12 g) Actions Applicable Patterns Food accumulation complicated by spleen deficiency Symptoms include: indigestion distending pain of the abdomen and stomach cavity diarrhea infants with food stagnation

D n Wn Source: Teachings of [Zhu] Dan-xi

Promotes digestion and fortifies the spleen

D n Wn is Bo H Wn plus bi zh. The doses of the medicinals that compose Bo H Wn are all decreased and 2 liang of bi zh is added. D n Wn is prescribed for cases of food accumulation with spleen deficiency. It has the action to promote digestion and fortify the spleen and is suitable for pediatric food accumulation. (read more on upcoming release of this book)