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City of Loganville Disaster Recovery Plan

Working Plan

8/23/2009 PM 600 Section C Tina Finch Team A: Jennifer Brower Tom Menning Fred Parlin Thomas Rampley

Table of Contents
1.0 Executive Summary ............................................................................................... 6 1.1 Project Baseline .......................................................................................... 6 1.2 Project Variance ......................................................................................... 7 1.3 Project Expansion ....................................................................................... 8 2.0 Technical Information .......................................................................................... 10 2.1 Project Purpose ........................................................................................ 10 2.2 Project Benefits ........................................................................................ 10 2.3 Statement of Work (SOW) .......................................................................... 11 2.3.1 Scope ........................................................................................ 11 2.3.2 Applicable Documents ................................................................ 12 2.3.3 Tasks (Level 2 WBS) .................................................................... 13 2.3.4 Deliverables & Acceptance Criteria .............................................. 16 2.4 Project Plan .............................................................................................. 17 2.4.1 Technical Description ................................................................. 17 2.4.2 Project Schedule ......................................................................... 19 2.4.3 Project Resource Loading ........................................................... 20 2.4.4 Specific Challenges .................................................................... 21 2.5 Project Completion Plans .......................................................................... 24 2.5.1 Deliverables ............................................................................... 24 2.5.2 Acceptance and Sign-Off ............................................................ 24 3.0 Initial Management Plan ....................................................................................... 26 3.1 Corporate Organizational Structure ........................................................... 26 3.2 Project Organizational Plan ....................................................................... 26 3.2.1 Work Breakdown Structure (Level 3 WBS) ..................................... 26 3.2.2 Project Team .............................................................................. 28

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4.0 Management Systems .......................................................................................... 29 4.1 Monitoring Cost and Schedule ................................................................. 29 4.1.1 Overview ................................................................................... 29 4.1.2 Earned Value Report .................................................................. 29 4.1.3 Major Cost and Schedule ........................................................... 30 4.2 Risk Management .................................................................................... 30 4.2.1 Overview ................................................................................... 30 4.2.2 Risk Inventory and Contingencies ............................................... 32 4.2.3 Risk Ranking and Re-Evaluation Procedures ................................ 34 4.2.5 Risk Escalation Procedures ......................................................... 34 4.3 Project Communications Management ...................................................... 35 4.4 Environmental, Worker Safety, and Health ................................................ 36 4.4.1 Environmental ............................................................................ 36 4.4.2 Worker Safety ............................................................................. 37 4.4.3 Occupational Health ................................................................... 38 5.0 Cost Working Plan ............................................................................................... 40 5.1 Project Cost ............................................................................................ 40 5.1.1 Total Project Cost ...................................................................... 40 5.1.2 Breakdown of Project Costs ....................................................... 40 5.1.3 Progress Payments ..................................................................... 45 5.2 Customer-Provided Resources .................................................................. 45 5.3 Terms and Conditions .............................................................................. 46 6.0 Unexpected Event ............................................................................................... 49 6.1 Problem Description and Current Status .................................................... 49 6.2 Alternative Solutions & Evaluation ............................................................ 49 6.3 Proposed Action ....................................................................................... 50 7.0 Added Work ........................................................................................................ 52

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7.1 Project Description ................................................................................... 52 7.2 Initial Planning ......................................................................................... 53 7.3 Scope....................................................................................................... 53 7.4 Schedule .................................................................................................. 54 7.5 Budget ..................................................................................................... 56 Appendix A: List of Figures ........................................................................................ 58 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Gantt Chart (Level 3) ...................................................................... 59 Organization Chart for Customer.................................................... 60 Work Breakdown Structure (Level 3) ................................................ 61 Organization Chart for Project ........................................................ 63

Appendix B: List of Tables ......................................................................................... 64 Table 1 Table 2 Acceptance Criteria ........................................................................ 65 Breakdown of Total Project Cost ..................................................... 67

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1.0 Executive Summary
1.1 Project Baseline
The City of Loganville Emergency Response Plan project began officially after the proposal was accepted on August 9, 2009. Overall, the project has stayed on time and budget through today, November 9, 2009. The project has gone very well and the City of Loganville has gone out of its way to work with the project team.

Here is an overview of the project status so far:

Deliverable Risk Identification, Level, and Response Warning System and Signals Emergency Plan Documentation Disaster/Hazard Supply Shelters Communications Plan Community Plan Practicing and Maintaining Plan Food Safety

Complete X X X

In-progress

Not Yet Started

X X X X X X

All project deliverables have been started and are to be completed according to the Gantt Chart. The deliverables are all on time and at budget. The following list shows the status of existing Work Breakdown Structure items:

1. Hire Director of Emergency Response: $50,000/Year. Complete 2. Subject Matter Expert Conference: $7,500. Complete 3. Emergency Response Center of Operations: $245,000 Approx 40% Complete 4. Setup of Shelter Network. Complete 5. Communication Plans. Approx 40% Complete

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6. Volunteer Selection/Training. Complete 7. Emergency Notification System. Complete 8. Emergency Response Test. Incomplete

The following progress payments were made:

1. Upon Project Initiation – 20% - Paid 2. Upon Completion of SME Conference – 20% - Paid 3. Upon Completion of Shelter Network Setup – 20% - Paid 4. Upon Completion of Emergency Notification System – 20% - Paid

1.2 Project Variance
There were two unexpected items that required extra work:

1. Asbestos Abatement (Unexpected Event) - $125,000 2. Food Safety Program (Added Work) - $10,000

The cost of both items were not disputed and were able to run parallel to the project schedule. These items also fit into the project scope.

The total project proposal was originally offered at a price of $735,000. Due to additional costs incurred by unexpected events/work, the total project costs are now $870,000. This is shown in Appendix B - Table 2 Breakdown of Project Cost.

Here is the status of the two additional items were added to the Work Breakdown Structure. The complete WBS is shown in Appendix A -Figure 3:

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1. Asbestos Abatement (Unexpected Event). Complete Next Week 2. Food Safety Program (Added Work). Complete

1.3 Project Expansion
Overall, the project has gone very well up to this point in time. The project has remained on time, on budget, and in scope. However, there were two items that required additional work. It is fortunate that these items were brought to the forefront early in the project.

First, the team learned that the largest of the buildings slotted to be used as a shelter turns out to contain asbestos and must be decontaminated before the plan can be implemented. There are no alternative buildings, so the costs and time required to carry out the decontamination, has been added to the overall cost. The City of Loganville understands that it will bear these additional costs and we have revised the project to reflect the impact of this event.

Second, the team learned of a food safety program offered by the Department of Homeland Security. This program This program permits municipalities to apply for a grant to introduce a proactive food product safety program for all foods sold locally. The project received the grant on November 9, 2009.

Any negative impact the items had on the overall project is limited to extra costs. The asbestos removal project required extra labor resources while the food safety program required the use of existing city resources.

However, these items also had a positive impact on the project. The asbestos removal program helped improve environmental factors while the food safety

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program brought peace of mind that food supplies will be safe if an emergency occurs. Also, the food safety program will bring an extra $350,000 each year to the community for safe food.

The positives, however, outweighed the negatives. Both items resulted in adding value to the project with very little interruption to the project.

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2.0 Technical Information
2.1 Project Purpose
Preparedness refers to the state of being prepared for specific or unpredictable events or situations; and that is ultimately the primary goal of this project preparedness.

The need to prepare for disasters, as well as, food safety is real. Being prepared can reduce anxiety, fear, and the losses that typically accompany disasters.

The purpose of this project is to create a comprehensive disaster recovery and food safety plan that will leave Loganville, South Carolina much better positioned and prepared to respond to the needs of its citizens in the event of catastrophe than it was prior to the creation of a disaster recovery response plan.

2.2 Project Benefits
Disaster preparedness is literally a matter of life and death. A litany of benefits large and small, tangible and intangible will be the resulting payback from the successful completion of this project, not the least of which will be a significant reduction in the potential for loss of life in the event of a disaster.

Additionally, the food safety portion of this project will provide for the development of local food safety policies, laws and activities that parallel pending federal reforms with the intent of empowering the local agencies to cooperate with state and federal agencies in a far more coordinated manner.

This project will provide many benefits to the city's visitors and inhabitants.

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1. The emergency response plan will improve the quality of life by providing a safe, healthy, beautiful and harmonious place to live and work.

2. The plan will help provide peace of mind to the community as it grows. The city must be safe and provide a haven to its citizens in order to promote growth.

3. This project will facilitate communication during a desperate situation. Help will be delivered to those who need it. And those who provide help in cases of emergency will be able to act with precision and confidence while proving information to the federal response team that will take over afterward.

4. In the unfortunate event of emergency, the community will have peace of mind and have the ability to obtain food, shelter, and safety from the elements and individuals who wish to harm others. In these times of great danger in the world, it is the responsibility of the City of Loganville to offer peace of mind and the ability to provide intelligence to federal responders. The community will be able to immediately step into action via first responders.

2.3 Statement of Work (SOW) 2.3.1 Scope
We intend to develop and administer an emergency response

preparedness plan for the City of Loganville, South Carolina. The Team's intention is to ensure that local officials are adequately prepared to provide immediate assistance to the community in the event of a disaster until outside agencies are able to respond. Additionally, the project

scope includes the utilization of a government grant for the development of a proactive food product safety program for food items sold locally.

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This plan will ensure that local officials and volunteers are adequately prepared and able to provide immediate assistance to their community in the event of a disaster until outside agencies are able to respond. This disaster response plan calls for the decontamination of one of the buildings slotted to be used as a shelter as the building contains asbestos.

2.3.2 Tasks (Level 2 WBS)

Think of a Work Breakdown Structure as a decomposition of the work that needs to be completed in order to accomplish the project’s objectives. There are a number of milestones which are significant events in a project. Milestones help to organize and define the scope of the project. Each of these milestones is subsequently subdivided into an increasingly detailed definition of the project work. The WBS is shown below in the following chart:

WBS Code

Initiative Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Emergency Response Center of Operations Shelter Setup Communication Plans Volunteers/Training Emergency Notification System Emergency Response Test Asbestos Abatement Food Safety Program

1.0
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.10

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2.3.3 Deliverables
Hazard Identification, Risk Level, and Risk Response Plan This deliverable involves identifying all potential hazards along with an assessment that rates the likelihood and the impact of each one.

For hazards identified as being high risk, the scope of work calls for the creation of a full documented risk mitigation plan detailing methods meant to lower the impact or reduce the risk of each hazard.

For hazards identified as being medium risk, a risk mitigation plan will be created for each hazard, but to a lesser degree of detail than that of the high risk hazards.

For hazards identified as being low risk, the scope of work calls for a simple statement explaining the best way to mitigate the risk of each hazard.

Warning System and Signals This deliverable involves detailing how the plan intends to provide for the initial warning of both the community, as well as, local public officials of the existence of a hazard.

The scope of work calls for a tiered system causing the higher risk hazards have higher priority in the communication plan.

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Emergency Plan Documentation This deliverable requires that the plan provide local officials with easily understood documentation to aid them in implementing the emergency response plans. These documents (checklists) are to be accessible to local officials online for review. The scope calls specifically for the following:

1. Updated area maps 2. Escape routes (a plan to manage highway traffic) 3. Communications plans, shutting off utilities, handling those with special needs (such as the elderly). 4. Handling animals (pets) 5. Basic safety skills

Disaster/Hazard Supply This deliverable calls for the creation of a method for educating the general public and local officials concerning how to prepare themselves for hazards and providing for their own basic needs for a period of several days. Basic needs are defined as water, food, first aid, clothing and blankets. The scope calls for the development of lists of emergency supplies people should have in their workplaces, homes, schools, and cars.

Shelters To meet the scope of this deliverable, the plan must identify several community buildings to be used as mass care shelters. In addition to identifying these locations, the project is expected to provide for the

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abatement of the asbestos contamination at the largest of the identified buildings and deliver a method for the stockpiling and dispensing of basic supplies at each shelter: water, food, first-aid and sanitary facilities, as well as, addressing security concerns.

Communications Plan The communications plan is two-fold.

First, this deliverable requires the development and testing of a method for local officials to use to communicate with one another during a disaster.

The second piece of this deliverable calls for the development of a means of informing the community of actions to take during a disaster rather than merely informing them that a disaster is occurring. In addition, the scope declares that the plan instruct the community to go to a website that will have further instructions for them, as well as links to other pertinent government websites.

Community Plan This deliverable requires that the plan detail a method for the creation and operation of a group of community volunteers that will report to a designated city official. This group and their city official will create a community emergency response plan.

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Practicing and Maintaining Plan This deliverable calls for the development of methods for practicing the emergency response plan for each of the various disaster scenarios. These methods should be created such that emergency communications methods and equipment are tested to assess their functionality.

In addition, this deliverable requires that the plan include a process for maintaining and updating the emergency response plan going forward as the needs of the city change and to communicate those changes to the appropriate parties.

Food Safety This deliverable calls for the development of a proactive food product safety program for all food items sold locally. Utilizing a federal grant we will develop a proactive food product safety program that links local food safety activities with state and federal efforts and parallels federal reforms.

2.3.4 Acceptance Criteria
The criteria and requirements that the project must meet before the Customer will accept delivery are as follows:

All deliverables and work performed are subject to Customer’s written approval.

All deliverables and work performed will be provided in a manner consistent with and on the dates detailed in the proposal.

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During acceptance testing, the project team will make themselves reasonably available to the customer.

During acceptance testing, if the customer determines that any deliverable does not meet the requirements agreed upon in writing, the customer will notify the project team in writing with specifics. The project team has ten (10) business days to correct the deficiencies. Then, acceptance testing will once again resume. This will continue until the deliverable is accepted. However, the customer may terminate the agreement after two (2) successive acceptance failures. If the agreement is terminated, the project team must refund within thirty (30) days all monies paid by the customer at that point and the customer must return all deliverables in their possession.

2.4 Project Plan 2.4.1 Technical Description
Project Management is the art and the science of applying certain skills, tools, techniques and knowledge to project activities in order to meet project requirements. This is accomplished through the integration of the project management processes of initiating, planning, executing,

monitoring and controlling and closing. The Team's approach to this project includes identifying requirements, establishing clear achievable objectives, balancing the demands for scope, cost, time and quality and adapting the plans and approach to best meet the city's needs and concerns.

The technical approach the team intends to take is to utilize generally accepted project management best practices and principles as defined by

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the Project Management Institute (PMI). The project will follow the processes and philosophies of PMI as described in Project Management

Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), 4th Edition.

The team will incorporate a traditional phased approach to the project; i.e. the project will begin with the initiation phase. At that time, the new project’s existence will be formally recognized. Also, a Project Charter will be created and the Project Manager will be named.

Next, the development phase will be done. This phase will include project planning. A Project Plan will be created with the help of the City of Loganville via team interviews, etc.

The implementation phase will follow the development phase. During this phase, the project plan will be executed, monitored and controlled. Monitoring will require that pertinent data be routinely acquired and analyzed so that action can be taken when progress fails to match plans and meet objectives. Additionally, a Change Management board will be formed to handle requests for changes related to scope, schedule, and cost.

The final phase of the approach to the project will be the closing phase. At that time, all outstanding contractual issues will be completed and documented in preparation for turning over the end result to the clients for acceptance and sign-off. The team will also request customer input for the lessons learned document.

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2.4.2 Project Schedule

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2.4.3 Project Resource Loading

Lead Doc. Initiative Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Emergency Response Center of Operations Shelter Setup Communication Plans Volunteers/Training Emergency Notification System Emergency Response Test Asbestos Abatement Food Safety Program Resources Scheduled Resources Available 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Team Initiative Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Emergency Response Center of Operations Shelter Setup Communication Plans Volunteers/Training Emergency Notification System Emergency Response Test Asbestos Abatement Food Safety Program Resources Scheduled Resources Available 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 4 6 1 1 1 1 2 Tech. Expert Q.A. Analyst Member Dev. Manager 1 1 1 App. Manager 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Team Lead Coordinator Tech. Expert Comm. Facilitator

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2.4.4 Specific Challenges
In order to maximize the probability of success there are a number of specific project challenges that must be overcome; they are detailed as follows:

Standup of a local emergency coordinator position : This position is
designed to manage and coordinate responses and functions as the local Director or Commander. All information flows to and from this position. This is the top priority to ensuring effective communication.

Response effectiveness: Bi-annual exercises will improve cooperation
and allow all agencies to work together to strengthen response actions.

Complete identification of all resources available: There are local
resources which when made available will render the project successful. Notification and education of all emergency responders will ensure all resources are available.

Buy in of local community: Education is the only way to improve the
likelihood the community will stand by the plan. We will provide information to the community via Television, Radio and the local news. Additionally, town hall meetings will take place to ensure the community has the ability to share their concerns and field questions.

Create a Command (Emergency) Response Center: which will act as
the hub for an emergency or natural disaster in a time of need. This is

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the major part of the plan and drives a successful response. The project's main focus will be to ensure all appropriate and most accurate data is represented in checklists and plans developed. Representatives from the following agencies would be present and consist of:

1. Director of Emergency Response (typically the Emergency Coordinator) 2. Security 3. Environmental 4. Fire 5. Civil Engineering 6. Medical 7. Manpower 8. Safety 9. Chaplain/Pastor/Preacher 10. Red Cross 11. Salvation Army 12. Communications 13. Vehicle Dispatch Perhaps Department of Transportation (DOT)

Coordination: Coordination is extremely important. When multiple
agencies are responding to a scenario, it must be ensured that everyone is speaking to each other effectively. Proper training will reduce confusion and increase awareness.

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Communication: Communication (internally/externally) is a must! To
ensure communication takes place routine meetings must take place. Outside agencies are encouraged to attend. Once again, proper training will reduce confusion and increase awareness.

Low annual cost requirements: In this small community, cost is a
major concern and utilizing resources already available will reduce costs. Additionally, regular maintenance and repairs will increase the longevity of resource.

Preparedness: The community has to be able to respond to
emergencies and disasters efficiently and effectively. Training will ensure they are prepared for the situation and understand how to act and respond accordingly and are in a position of readiness.

Continuity: The customer must ensure proper guidance is maintained
for those responding. This must try to always be done similarly to reduce confusion and increase effectiveness. Those managers who would run response teams and hold positions of authority must all be trained to the same level of understanding to reduce confusion.

Volunteers: With any emergency those who volunteer are the ones
who ensure the response is a success. There are almost no paid positions in this scenario. Therefore encouraging the community to stick together and form a bond is a must. Education will improve community awareness and proved information in case of a disaster.

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2.5 Project Completion Plans 2.5.1 Deliverable Status
The follow chart details deliverable status twelve (12) weeks into the project:
Deliverable Risk Identification, Level, and Response Warning System and Signals Emergency Plan Documentation Disaster/Hazard Supply Shelters Communications Plan Community Plan Practicing and Maintaining Plan Food Safety X X X X X X X X X Complete In-progress Not Yet Started

2.5.2 Acceptance and Sign-Off
The criteria and requirements that the project must meet before the Customer will accept delivery are as follows:

All deliverables and work performed are subject to Customer’s written approval.

All deliverables and work performed will be provided in a manner consistent with and on the dates detailed in the proposal.

During acceptance testing, the project team will make themselves reasonably available to the customer.

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During acceptance testing, if the customer determines that any deliverable does not meet the requirements agreed upon in writing, the customer will notify the project team in writing with specifics. The project team has ten (10) business days to correct the deficiencies. Then, acceptance testing will once again resume. This will continue until the deliverable is accepted. However, the customer may terminate the agreement after two (2) successive acceptance failures. If the agreement is terminated, the project team must refund within thirty (30) days all monies paid by the customer at that point and the customer must return all deliverables in their possession.

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3.0 Initial Management Plan
3.1 Corporate and Project Organizational Structure
The Project Management Team consists of 15 members, each with a unique set of skills capable of delivering high quality project outcomes to customers. Each member is responsible for specific work which spans across the entire project related to a specific end product or deliverable.

The Project Team members have the ability and are capable of executing focused implementation business concepts using a high level of operational, technical and strategic engagements. Additionally, the successful combination of innovative spirits and business concepts offers the financial power of venture capitalists and strategic investors.

3.2 Project Organizational Plan 3.2.1 Work Breakdown Structure (Level 3 WBS)
WBS Code 1.0 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 Loganville Project Director of Emergency Response Create Job Opening - Director Of Emergency Response Collect Resumes Conduct Interviews of Qualified Candidates Hire Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Identify SME to invite to Conference Plan for Conference. Food/Hotels Conduct Conference with SMEs Collect SME Feedback. Create Emergency Response Plans Emergency Response Center of Operations Hire Architect Hire Real Estate Agent Initiative

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1.3.3 1.3.4 1.3.5 1.3.6 1.3.7 1.4 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.4.4 1.4.5 1.5 1.5.1 1.5.2 1.5.3 1.5.4 1.5.5 1.5.6 1.6 1.6.1 1.6.2 1.6.3 1.6.4 1.7 1.7.1 1.7.2 1.7.3 1.8 1.8.1 1.8.2 1.8.3 1.9 1.9.1 1.9.2 1.9.3 1.10

Locate Land for Operations Center Purchase Land for Operations Center Design Operations Center Build Operations Center Emergency Leadership moved into Operations Center Shelter Setup Select Community Buildings to double as Emergency Shelters Stock Shelters with Emergency Supplies (Medical/Food/Communication) Create signage for shelters (i.e. Emergency Shelter) Post Signage in front of Shelters Install Emergency communication (radio system) to Operations Center Communication Plans Hire Web Site Designer Create Emergency Response Website Setup Automated Emergency Response information line (Where to go, What to do) Conduct Town hall Meetings at New Operations Center. Radio notifications of Town hall Meetings and Emergency Response Website/Phone Line TV notifications of new Emergency Response Plan and Website/Phone Line Volunteers/Training Draft of Volunteer Incentive Program Collect List of Volunteers Train Volunteers Assign Volunteers to Shelter Locations Emergency Notification System Work with TV Stations to Issue Alert Notification Work with Radio Stations to Issue Alert Notification Set up Alert Sirens throughout Community Emergency Response Test Select 100 Community Members (From Volunteers) Trial Alert issued Measurement of Emergency Response Plan Effectiveness Asbestos abatement Hire asbestos abatement firm Asbestos materials removed Replacement removed materials with substitute materials Food Safety Program

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1.10.1 1.10.2

Develop local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system

3.2.2 Project Team
The Project Team is shown in the Organization Chart below:

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4.0 Management Systems
4.1 Monitoring Cost and Schedule 4.1.1 Overview
Cost and schedule for the project is being calculated based upon project completion up to November 9, 2009. The Earned Value Report up to this date is given below. Due to the extended period required for

construction of the operations center, the unexpected event (asbestos) and additional work fit into the project schedule without causing any delays as can be seen in Section 4.1.2. (Schedule Variance = 0)

4.1.2 Earned Value Report

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4.1.3/4 Major Cost and Schedule
Up to this point, much of the total project costs have already been incurred. Of the original $735,000 proposed amount; $530,297 has

been spent. Some of the major expenditures up this point include:

1. 2.

Purchase of Land for the new Operations Center: $50,000 Construction costs to date on Operations Center: $32,083 (Total $175,000).

3.

Install emergency communication systems in shelters: $75,000

4. Siren System: $100,000 5. (New) Asbestos Abatement to make largest shelter usable: $100,000 6. (New) Food Safety Program: $10,000

4.2 Risk Management 4.2.1 Risk Management
Risk management risk considers risk assumptions, techniques, the roles and risk

responsibilities,

rating/scoring

establishes

thresholds, risk communication, and the development of a risk tracking process or system.

The risk management process is adjustable to ensure the correct level, type, and visibilities of risk management are commensurate with both the risk and the importance of the project.

There are eight risk management levels which collectively comprise the Risk Management Plan:

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1. Risk Identification – Risks will be identified by using a risk assessment questionnaire and include project risks and operational risks as appropriate.

2. Categorize Risks – Once identified risks will be categorized based on their severity and specific task or section of the project.

3. Risk Impact Assessment – For each of the risks identified, the risk will be assess in terms of the likelihood of the risk occurring. The results will be prioritized using established criteria.

4. Prioritize Risks – Risks will be recorded in a Risk Response Plan.

5. Risk Response Planning – For each risk identified in the Risk Response Plan, determine the actions to reduce the likelihood or consequences of impact to the overall project objective, considering cost,

mitigation, and contingency planning. Assign responsibilities, due dates, and incorporate this information into the Risk Response Plan.

6. Risk Response Tracking – Document dates and the action taken when the risk occurred and any subsequent additional actions. Incorporate this information into the Risk Response Plan.

7. Risk Monitoring – Establishment of reviews scheduled into the project schedule including risk response tracking and communication to ensure:

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      

All the requirements of the plan are being implemented Assess defined risks Evaluate effectiveness of actions taken Status of actions to be taken Validate likelihood and impact Validate previous assumptions Identify new assumptions

8. Controlling Risks       Validate mitigation strategies and alternative actions Take corrective actions when events occur Assess the impact on the project (Cost, Time, Resources) Identify new risks Ensure the project plan is maintained Ensure change control addresses risks associated with the proposed change   Revise the Risk Response Plan Communication

4.2.2 Risk Inventory and Contingencies
The following chart outlines the risks associated with this specific project and the plan of action to reduce or eliminate those risks:

Risks Financial Obligation

Likelihood Low

Impact High

Contingency Plan $735,000 has been set aside for this project. Budgeting for shortfalls / maintenance may

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be necessary Communication Breakdown Community Acceptance Moderate Moderate Low High Regularly scheduled meetings will reduce breakdowns Promote and educate the community on the importance of this project via town hall meetings and advertising Logistics Moderate High Continual coordination and maintenance of resources. Additionally, planning and training are key Technical Support Low Moderate Seek assistance from Emergency Managers from nearby cities Coordination Low Moderate Notifications and communication requirements through training will reduce this Resource Availability (Personnel) Checklist Accuracy Low Moderate Moderate Moderate Create a large list of city employees assigned to positions Checklists continually evolve. Conduct annual reviews to ensure most current information Contingency Planning Low Moderate Train using exercise scenarios. This allows the identification of shortfalls and operational problems Liabilities (Risk Management) Moderate Low Ensuring all parties are insured and documents are in place to protect the citizens and the community Long Term Risks Lack of Equipment Low High Allocate monies over time within the budget to acquire necessary equipment Lack of Training Low Moderate Initial and continual contingency training will ensure responder and community readiness Mobilization (timeliness) Moderate High A checklist will be developed to outline specific mobilization needs

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Activation Deficiencies Lack of Roles and Responsibilities

Low

Moderate

Within the checklists, activation notifications will be step one

Low

Moderate

Training and checklist will provide responders with knowledge of the Command Response Center (CRC) and will be trained to manage all aspects of a response

Confusion in Long Term Planning (post response)

Low

Low

Following emergencies create an after action reports and utilize available technical resources. For instance the EPA is a free phone call

Operations Control

Low

Moderate

Teach to maintain open channel of communication

4.2.3 Risk Ranking and Re-Evaluation Procedures
The Project Risk Management Plan will help alleviate any confusion on ranking risks. It outlines specific procedures on the process or ranking them. Each risk is unique and presents specific hazards or concerns with the overall project and in some cases must be evaluated independently.

Re-evaluation procedures are also covered in the Risk Management Plan under controlling risks. Using the Risk Management Plan will reduce any likelihood of future risks or the reassurance of previously identified risks.

4.2.4 Risk Escalation Procedures
As stated above, Risks will be identified using a risk assessment questionnaire and include project risks and operational risks as appropriate. These risks cannot always be identified via this process. Identification of additional unnoticed or unforeseen risks throughout the project is done through personal identification. These risks will be added

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to the Risk Management Plan and will also be channeled up the chain of command for review. A Quality Assurance Representative will evaluate each risk personally and outline procedures to eliminate or reduce the given risk. These specific risks will be tracked as all other risks are tracked, which is through the Risk Management Plan. Escalation is important to the success of mitigating risks. The sooner they are escalated, the greater chance of eliminating the risk.

4.3 Project Communications Management
As indicated in the Terms and Conditions of the Proposal, all communications related to the project are to be directed to the Project Leader, Tom Menning. In the event that communication with the project leader is not possible, only the new Director of Emergency Response will have the authority to make decisions that directly change the original scope of the project plan. In the event this occurs, the city of Loganville will pay any costs incurred over and above any costs already outlined in this audit. Regular communications from the project team will (and

currently) are available to the City of Loganville for the purpose of project status clarity. These communications include:

1. Project Gantt chart updated as progress is made. An updated Gantt chart is attached to this audit. 2. Earned Value Table: A table that tracks project performance related to the original budget. An updated table is included in section 4.1.2. 3. Monthly Meetings: A monthly status update meeting is held every month with the project leader as well as any interested parties. currently being held in City Hall. These meetings are

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4.4 Environmental, Worker Safety and Health
The Project's ultimate goal is to reduce occupational safety and health mishaps through education and avoidance.

4.4.1 Environmental
Maintaining or preserving the environment is extremely important and must be considered at all times with one exception - if harming the environment means saving a life! Once environmental accidents occur, it is difficult, or even impossible in some cases, to reverse the long term effects. When the work is performed for the project, even during responses it is important to be coherent of the environment and ensure we maintain or preserving land, air, and water.

During emergencies there is a high likelihood that environmental catastrophes will occur and cause emergency responders to respond differently according to the scenario. Most natural disasters are going to increase the chances of an environmental disaster occurring.

Understanding those risks and knowing how to reduce them while removing oneself from the given hazard is an important part of the responder's role.

Post emergencies create a unique concern in relation to environmental hazards. While responding, it is important to ensure that the project's footprint on the environment is reduced. However, post emergencies are equally important as we have a responsibility as a society and as a community to return the area as close to its original state as possible.

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Most

environmental

problems

associated

with

disasters

are

unpreventable. However, we have the ability to reduce or minimize additional stress on the environmental.

Environmental Engineers offer a great wealth of knowledge during responses. Their expertise and background provides them the ability to make decisions reducing the environmental effects created by disasters. Utilizing this knowledge in their efforts can be an enormous asset to the future of the community.

4.4.2 Worker Safety
During contingency operations worker safety is most important! As part of any emergency response a local safety manager will be part of the response both on the ground and in the command and control center. This will allow for maximum safety of the personnel responding.

If at any time responders are put in harm’s way and would risk injuring themselves and causing additional casualties the safety manager has the right to stop the response and ensure all precautions are being taken or eliminate that part of the response all together. They have the authority to halt all personnel from entering a certain area and ensuring responders enter only areas deemed safe.

Prior to any response proper training would be conducted utilizing the safety manager to properly training all responders on local procedures and notification instructions. This will help reduce the likelihood of additional casualties and increase mission successfulness.

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At the end of the day if the responders become casualties themselves, the project has failed its emergency responders.

4.4.3 Occupational Health
The occupational health of emergency responders will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Each officially designated responder will be asked to provide baseline blood work and perform occupational health studies. This information will be maintained at the local hospital and will be updated on a biannual basis. The rationale behind the baseline studies is so in the event of an emergency post blood work and evaluations can be conducted to verify personal exposures to hazardous chemicals and agents during a response. This information along with potential sampling results at the scene will allow medical personnel to properly treat responders and will give the city and its responders a legal stance in an unfortunate event.

Continual education and training along with the proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will allow responders to reduce the likelihood of exposure and improve responder confidence in procedure and actions taken. The training must be an annual occurrence to improve responder knowledge and awareness. This training will allow responders to see what hazards are potentially present and providing recommendations for reducing their exposures. The PPE training is important and must be maintained properly to ensure personnel understand the use of specific PPE for specific situations. For instance Nitrile gloves can be used to offer superior resistance too many types of chemicals, whereas Butyl Rubber

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gloves provide superior resistance to highly corrosive acids and are excellent for handling keytone and esters. Butyl rubber gloves also provide the highest permeation resistance to gases and vapors. Understanding this information and responding correctly reduces the risk of occupational health injuries.

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5.0 Cost Working Plan
5.1 Project Cost
This section will discuss the various costs involved in the project for project cost clarity. The purpose of this section is to itemize all costs so the customer may have the ability to customize their cost where possible.

5.1.1 Total Project Cost
The total project proposal was originally offered at a price of $735,000. Due to additional costs incurred by unexpected events/work, the total project costs are now $870,000. Terms and Conditions for payment are described in later sections of this document.

5.1.2 Breakdown of Project Costs
A breakdown of project costs is provided for cost clarity in the event the customer wishes to alter the cost structure if possible by

adding/subtracting pieces of the proposal.

The project consists of 8

major milestones as well as a 9th unexpected event all with varying costs. These milestones are outlined in order below along with their

corresponding costs.

1.

Hire Director of Emergency Response: $50,000/Year. Complete This is a re-occurring salaried position which is deemed a necessary. The most successful processes have process champions therefore successful implementation and continuity is dependent upon

maintaining a process champion.

The salary is estimated using

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freely available salary databases of persons with similar title and responsibilities.

2. Subject Matter Expert Conference: $7,500. Complete This is a onetime project expense deemed necessary to formulate the best possible Emergency Action Plans to be utilized by the Shelter Network. At times of crisis; its highly possible communication plans will be cut between a Shelter and the Operations Center necessitating Emergency Action Plans to guide Shelter leaders of appropriate actions during times of lost communication. The $7,500 cost

essentially pays lodging and travel expenses incurred by Subject Matter Experts. It also pays for a modest conference style forum with food and beverage provided.

3. Emergency Response Center of Operations: $245,000 (Approx 40% Complete) a. This is a onetime project expense which is deemed optional however highly recommended by the project team. Times of crisis call for clear leadership and the construction of a new Operations Center accomplishes this. It would also increase communication efficiencies across the already established emergency response teams in Loganville by centrally locating the heads of those functional areas all in one place. costs are estimates based on previously These

constructed

Operations Centers in other communities nearby Loganville. The breakdown of these costs are as follows:

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i. Hire Architect: $10,000 ii. Hire Real Estate Agent: $5,000 iii. Purchase of Land for Operations Center: $50,000 iv. Construction of Operations Center: $175,000 v. Moving Expense: $5,000

b. All but $5,000 of the above expense could be avoided by designating an existing town building to service this need. The moving expense would still remain since functional heads should still move into this existing building. Also, by utilizing an existing town building, as much as 60 days may be cut out of the total project duration. $240,000. Savings not adopted. Possible Optional Savings:

4. Setup of Shelter Network. Complete This is mostly a one time necessary expense with the exception of emergency supplies. The Shelter Network will consists of several preexisting buildings spread throughout the community which will act as “safe zones” for community members. Since not all community

members can fit within the Operations Center, the Shelter Network is of extreme importance. The breakdown of costs are as follows:

i.

Stock shelters with emergency supplied: $50,000 Yearly replenishment costs of $10,000 will apply

ii. iii.

Signage to indicate shelter location: $1,500 Emergency Communication Radio Systems: $75,000

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5. Communication Plans. ( Approx 40% Complete) a. These costs relate mostly to the communication process of the new Emergency Response System. Most of the cost will be

upfront “marketing” type cost which are deemed necessary by the project team. If community members are not aware of the new Emergency Response System, it ceases to have any value. Communications will be made in all media types.

i. Create Website: $7,500 ii. Automated Emergency Response Telephone Hotline: $5,000 iii. Townhall Meetings: $10,000 iv. Radio Notifications: $2,000 v. TV Notifications: $4,000

b. The website, automated telephone hotline, radio, and TV notifications are considered necessary. The town hall meetings are optional but suggested since many people will appreciate the person approach which more easily facilitates 2 sides question and answers. Possible Optional Savings: $10,000 – Savings not adopted.

6. Volunteer Selection/Training. Complete These costs are re-occurring yearly since the project team believes volunteers will require certain incentives in order to volunteer. The project team suggest yearly tax breaks given to volunteers for service.

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i. ii.

Volunteer incentive program: $10,000/Year. Volunteer Training: $0 to be facilitated by Director of Emergency Response and existing Loganville emergency response teams (Police, Fire Dept, Etc).

7. Emergency Notification System. Complete These costs are a necessary onetime expense. All the advertising in the world will not inform a bystander on the street of an impending emergency.

Setup Emergency Sirens throughout the community: $100,000

8. Emergency Response Test. Incomplete This will accomplished at no cost since all preceding costs are necessary to accomplish this step.

9.

Asbestos Abatement (Unexpected Event). Complete Next Week. The removal of asbestos from the primary shelter in the shelter network will occur concurrently with the construction of the new operations center. The complete removal of asbestos cost $125,000; this was not part of the original proposal.

10. Food Safety Program. Complete. The Department of Homeland Security offered a grant of $350,000 annually to create a food safety program. The complete cost was $10,000; this was not part of the original proposal.

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The final cost of the project proposal consists of the Project Premium to deliver the project. This cost essentially covers the projects teams’ cost to deliver the proposal over 8 months as well as a reasonable return. Total Project Premium: $167,500.

Total Project Cost: $870,000

5.1.3 Progress Payments
Proposed payments are to follow progress of the rollout of the new Emergency Response Plan. Proposed payments are as follows:

1. Upon Project Initiation – 20% - Paid 2. Upon Completion of SME Conference – 20% - Paid 3. Upon Completion of Shelter Network Setup – 20% - Paid 4. Upon Completion of Emergency Notification System – 20% - Paid 5. Upon Completion of successful Emergency Response Test – 20% Not Paid 6. Upon Completion of Asbestos Abatement - $125,000. – Not Paid

5.2 Customer-Provided Resources
The customer will make available existing emergency response personnel as well as town leadership to provide support for volunteer training as well as communication plans necessary to socialize the existence of the new Emergency Response Plan. Primary examples include (but are not limited to):

1. Police Department 2. Fire Department

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3. Loganville Mayor

The newly hired Director of Emergency Response will work and utilize necessary town resources which includes essentially any person whom is directly compensated by the city of Loganville. In order to ensure cooperation, the

project team recommends dotted line reporting to the Director of Emergency Response in all things related to the new Emergency Response system.

5.3 Terms and Conditions
Limits The delivery date of proposal is given as 8/9/09 with proposal expiration 60 days thereafter, or 10/9/09. After 10/9/09, the proposal will no longer be valid. Upon acceptance of the proposal, Project Initiation will commence 7 days later which is also the same time the customer must pay the first progress payment of 20%. The project initiation date will mark the beginning of the project schedule and will be communicated to the customer by the project team upon acceptance of the proposal.

Contact All inquiries both before and during (should the proposal be accepted) concerning the proposal should be directed to Tom Menning; Project Team Lead.

Completion Metric A successful implementation of the Emergency Response plan will be determined by the following criteria:

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1. Milestones 1-7 outlined above in section 4.1.2 Breakdown of Project Costs are completed. 2. 50% Success Rate of test subjects in milestone 8; Emergency Response Test. A success rate is defined simply as whether or not a test subject responds to the emergency test by going to the correct shelter in the shelter network.

Customer Default of Payments In the event the city of Loganville does not make payment within two weeks of a scheduled progress payment, the project team reserves the right to cancel the remainder of the proposal and require an additional 20% surcharge of whatever monies are yet unpaid. If such problems are foreseen by the customer, excess communication is requested by the project team in order to avoid such measures by adding additional flexibility by both the customer and the project team. If customer remains in default, the project team will pursue other necessary modes of collection to be paid by the customer with the primary mode of collection including civil court with all fees (including attorney and court) to be covered by the customer.

Project Extension In the event the project extends beyond its original timeline, an additional payment equal to one tenth of the total project costs will be due on the first of each additional month. As an example, If total projects costs equal $735,000, a payment of $73,500 will become due on the first day of each month beyond the original timeline. This is done only to provide cost coverage for the project team during unplanned work time. The one tenth payment does not provide the project team with any premium payment whatsoever so incentive to complete at

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or ahead of schedule is still high. Note: Unexpected Event did not increase the project duration therefore there will not be any necessary extended cost coverage.

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6.0 Unexpected Event
6.1 Problem Description and Current Status
The largest of the buildings slotted to be used as a shelter turns out to contain asbestos and must be decontaminated before the plan can be implemented. There are no alternative buildings, so the costs and time required to carry out the decontamination, has been added to the overall cost. The City of Loganville understands that it will bear these additional costs and we have revised the project to reflect the impact of this event.

6.2 Alternative Solutions & Evaluation
With no other buildings available, the removal of the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) is the only solution. After an extensive asbestos survey of the building, it was deemed to contain 300 linier feet of amphibole Thermal System Insulation (TSI). TSI is asbestos found as insulation on boilers, water and steam pipes elbows, fittings, and pipe runs. Additionally, miscellaneous material was found throughout the main level of the building. Miscellaneous material is all material containing asbestos, which is not classified as sprayed/troweled-on material or in the TSI classes. In this case the miscellaneous material was found to be chrysotile floor tile. Roughly half of the asbestos was found in a friable state, which means the material can be crushed or crumbled by hand. This required the removal of the asbestos as opposed to covering or working with it in place.

As an important notice, the city of Loganville is responsible for the removal of the contaminated waste generated from the removal process. This removal would be contracted out to ensure it is being handled properly, but we want to stress the importance of this process. ACM can only be taken to approved landfills and is heavily scrutinized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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6.3 Proposed Action
The actions we propose are to hire an asbestos team certified to conduct the removal of ACM in the State of South Carolina. We propose creating a bid for the work to be completed and putting it on the market short notice and for only a period of 30 days. We would notify all known certified contractors to review the bid and provide feedback in the form of a formal bid to this office for the final selection process for this work. In the statement of work the removal of ACM would need to start within 30 days of the formal notification of the contractor selected. This will allow the project to continue on schedule and result in no loss of time to the overall project timeline. The anticipated time frame for this work to be completed is roughly 4 weeks. This would allow time for the preparation, the removal process and the air sampling to be completed. The turnaround time of the air sampling results is expected to be roughly 1 week.

Throughout the removal process we would hire an independent contractor, preferably a Certified Industrial Hygienist, to conduct quality control of this section of the project. The Industrial Hygienist would also conduct the final clearance air sampling, send the samples to a certified laboratory and publish a letter outlining the results of the air sampling. This would provide the City of Loganville a certified document validating the removal was completed according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration, published standards and the air sampling results are below the permissible or occupational exposure limit (PEL/OEL).

Once clearance sampling is completed and results indicate the removal of the ACM was successful the renovation of the building could begin. The renovation would include all predetermined design mortifications to improve the working space of the building to fit the needs desired during an emergency response. The focal point

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of the building would include the shelter and its need to hold the maximum number of people safely. Additionally, as determined in the preliminary plan, we would like to see this building be used as the Emergency Response Center. Modification to improve the building for that use could also be determined at that time.

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7.0 Added Work
7.1 Project Description
An additional task was added to the project shortly after the proposal was accepted in August, 2009. It was started as soon as possible.

It was brought to the team's attention that the Department of Homeland Security will provide funding for a special program to promote food safety. This program permits municipalities to apply for a grant to introduce a proactive food product safety program for all foods sold locally. This program will cover all food products sold within the city limits; i.e. groceries for personal use, restaurants, schools, and hospitals. The Department of Homeland Security will give the City of Loganville upon approval - up to $350,000 each year that this program is in place.

The project team needs to do the following as needed so that the work fits sensibly into the master project schedule:

1. Create a preliminary plan for the added work. 2. Create a preliminary budget for the added work. 3. Adjust the overall project schedule. 4. Adjust the project resource allocations.

The additional task was approved via the established project change control process on Friday, August 21, 2009. The Personal Assistant of the Mayor of the City of Loganville applied for the funds from the Department of Homeland Security on August 21. Filing for the funds is considered part of her regular duties, thus incurring no additional cost to the project for her time. Also, there was no filing fee. The application process took approximately 10 weeks. On November 9, 2009, the

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City of Loganville received a grant of $350,000 from DHS to cover costs for a food safety program.

7.2 Initial Planning
The first topic to consider when planning this task is to list what exactly needs to be done by this project team and how it fits into the scope of the project. Also, an implementation plan for the City of Loganville is needed that will describe the processes the city will need to manage that are out of scope for the Emergency Recovery Plan project.

Then, it needs to be determined how this addition to the project will fit into the master project schedule. At first glance, it appears that this task can easily run parallel to the existing schedule.

Last, analysis needs to be done to determine if there are any additional costs and resource needs. However, resource allocations need to be made and if there are any extra resources that need to be added to the project.

7.3 Scope
The scope of this task as it relates to the project is rather limited. This program will permit municipalities to apply for a grant to introduce a proactive food product safety program for all foods sold locally. This program will cover all food products sold within the city limits; i.e. groceries for personal use, restaurants, and schools. It will not impact WBS item 1.4.2. Stock Shelters with Emergency Supplies (Medical/Food/Communication) for this year since the supplies have already been purchased. However, subsequent purchases will be covered by the program that occur after the DHS funding was received on November 9, 2009.

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This program does not cover vending machines and food purchased prior to receiving funds from the Department of Homeland Security. Also, it is entirely out of scope to discuss aspects of this program that do not relate to the Emergency Response Plan that the team has been hired to create. This would include every day safety concerns when an emergency does not exist and prevention of food safety emergencies from occurring.

Several items do fall into scope for the Emergency Response Plan project:

1. Apply for funds from the Department of Homeland Security. - Completed on August 21, 2009; Received approval on November 9, 2009 2. Provide a list of recommendations for local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms. This would include encouraging the city to meet with local grocers, food suppliers, and restaurant owners to find ways to avoid additional costs during times of crisis. 3. Identify a point of contact for linking local activities with state and federal system.

7.4 Schedule
The addition of the task will not cause a conflict with any of the items currently listed in the Work Breakdown Structure.

Here is the additional items added to the Work Breakdown Structure for the food safety program:

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1.10 1.10.1 1.10.2

Food Safety Program Provide a list of recommendations for local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system

1.10.1 - Provide a list of recommendations for local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms. Start Date: August 21, 2009 End Date: September 10, 2009 - On time

The team met with local officials, grocers, food suppliers, and restaurant owners to find ways to avoid additional costs during times of crisis. Then, a list of recommendations was given to the City Council. It was then up to the City Council to write and pass those laws. The local food safety laws are contingent on being approved by DHS to receive the funds. Also, the laws will not go into effect until the funds are received. Additionally, the team encourages the City Council to determine what actions will be taken to prevent food safety emergencies from occurring which is out of scope for this project.

On time completion of this task was mandatory. It ran parallel to a huge emergency response plan open house public relations event held by the city on September 11, 2009. It was open to all members of the community. The new food safety laws were also introduced within the City Council on September 11 and passed on September 18.

1.10.2 - Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system Start Date: July 1, 2009 End Date: July 31, 2009

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The team began to process of identifying the point of contact to work with state and federal officials concerning food and other supplies. On July 31, the team selected Thomas Rampley to head up that portion of the project contingent upon acceptance of the proposal.

7.5 Budget
The addition of the task cost the project an additional $10,000. This cost will be refunded to the City of Loganville by the Department of Homeland Security.

Again, here is the additional items added to the Work Breakdown Structure for the food safety program:

1.10 1.10.1 1.10.2

Food Safety Program Provide a list of recommendations for local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system

1.10.1 - Provide a list of recommendations for local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms. The team met with local officials, grocers, food suppliers, and restaurant owners to find ways to avoid additional costs during times of crisis. Then, a list of recommendations was given to the City Council. It was then up to the City Council to write and pass those laws. This process ended with a huge emergency response plan open house public relations event held by the city on September 11, 2009. It was open to all members of the community.

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The cost of lobbying city officials, holding meetings, and the final September 11 event totalled $10,000.

1.10.2 - Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system Start Date: July 1, 2009 End Date: July 31, 2009

The team began the process of identifying the point of contact to work with state and federal officials concerning food and other supplies while creating the Preliminary Plan. On July 31, the team selected Thomas Rampley to head up that portion of the project contingent upon acceptance of the proposal. Since Mr Rampley is a member of the team, no additional costs were incurred.

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Appendix A: List of Figures

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Figure 1

Gantt Chart

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Figure 2

Organization Chart for Customer

City of Loganville Emergency Response Org Chart
Appendix A: Figure 3

Mayor

Fire Chief

Police Chief

Director of Emergency Response

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Food Safety Liaison

Community Liaison

SGT SGT

SGT SGT SGT

SGT

SGT

SGT

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Figure 3
WBS Code 1.0

Work Breakdown Structure (Level 3)
Initiative Loganville Project 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.3 1.3.4 1.3.5 1.3.6 1.3.7 1.4 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.4.4 1.4.5 1.5 1.5.1 1.5.2 1.5.3 1.5.4 1.5.5 1.5.6 Director of Emergency Response Create Job Opening - Director Of Emergency Response Collect Resumes Conduct Interviews of Qualified Candidates Hire Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Identify SME to invite to Conference Plan for Conference. Food/Hotels Conduct Conference with SMEs Collect SME Feedback. Create Emergency Response Plans Emergency Response Center of Operations Hire Architect Hire Real Estate Agent Locate Land for Operations Center Purchase Land for Operations Center Design Operations Center Build Operations Center Emergency Leadership moved into Operations Center Shelter Setup Select Community Buildings to double as Emergency Shelters Stock Shelters with Emergency Supplies (Medical/Food/Communication) Create signage for shelters (i.e. Emergency Shelter) Post Signage in front of Shelters Install Emergency communication (radio system) to Operations Center Communication Plans Hire Web Site Designer Create Emergency Response Website Setup Automated Emergency Response information line (Where to go, What to do) Conduct Town hall Meetings at New Operations Center. Radio notifications of Town hall Meetings and Emergency Response Website/Phone Line TV notifications of new Emergency Response Plan and

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Website/Phone Line 1.6 1.6.1 1.6.2 1.6.3 1.6.4 1.7 1.7.1 1.7.2 1.7.3 1.8 1.8.1 1.8.2 1.8.3 1.9 1.9.1 1.9.2 1.9.3 1.10 1.10.1 1.10.2 1.10.3 Volunteers/Training Draft of Volunteer Incentive Program Collect List of Volunteers Train Volunteers Assign Volunteers to Shelter Locations Emergency Notification System Work with TV Stations to Issue Alert Notification Work with Radio Stations to Issue Alert Notification Set up Alert Sirens throughout Community Emergency Response Test Select 100 Community Members (From Volunteers) Trial Alert issued Measurement of Emergency Response Plan Effectiveness Asbestos abatement Hire asbestos abatement firm Asbestos materials removed Replacement removed materials with substitute materials Food Safety Program Apply for Department of Homeland Security Funds. Develop local food safety laws that parallel federal reforms Identify POC for linking local activities with state and federal system

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Figure 4

Organization Chart for Project

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Appendix B: List of Tables

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Table 1

Acceptance Criteria
Criteria Identify all potential hazards along with an assessment that rates the likelihood, impact and a course of action for each. Standard For hazards identified as being high risk, the scope of work calls for the creation of a full documented risk mitigation plan detailing methods meant to lower the impact or reduce the risk of each hazard. For hazards identified as being medium risk, the scope of work calls for the development of a risk mitigation plan for each hazard - but to a lesser degree of detail than that of the high risk hazards. For hazards identified as being low risk, the scope of work calls for a simple statement explaining the best way to mitigate the risk of each hazard.

Deliverable Hazard Identification, Risk Level, and Risk Response Plan

Warning System and Signals

Provide for the initial warning of the community and local public officials of the existence of a hazard.

A tiered system where the higher risk hazards have higher priority in the communication plan.

Emergency Plan Documentation

This deliverable requires that the plan provide local officials with easily understood documentation to aid them in implementing the emergency response plans.

These documents (checklists) are to be accessible to local officials online for review. The scope calls specifically for the following: updated area maps, escape routes, communications plans, shutting off utilities, handling those with special needs, handling animals, basic safety skills. Basic needs are defined as water, food, first aid, clothing and blankets.

Disaster/ Hazard Supply

Educating the general public and local officials concerning how to prepare themselves for hazards and provide for their own basic needs for a period of several days.

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Shelters

Identify several community buildings to be used as mass care shelters. Address a method for the stockpiling and dispensing of basic supplies at each shelter.

Specifically: Water, food, first-aid, sanitary facilities, security.

Communications Plan

Develop and test method local officials are to use to communicate with one another during a disaster. Develop means of informing the community at large of actions to take during a disaster.

Direct community to website with further instructions.

Community Plan

Create group of community volunteers that will report to a designated city official.

This group and their city official will create a community emergency response plan for small business owners.

Practicing and Maintaining Plan

Create a process for practicing the emergency response plan for each disaster scenario. Also, create a process for maintaining and updating the emergency response plan.

The practicing/testing process should be created such that emergency communications methods and equipment are tested for functionality. The maintaining and updating process should be created such that changes are communicated to the appropriate parties.

Asbestos Abatement

Provide for the abatement of asbestos contamination at the largest of the buildings identified to be used as a shelter.

Remove contaminates, replace with appropriate materials.

Food Safety Program

Develop a proactive food product safety program for all food items sold locally.

Utilizing a federal grant we will develop a proactive food product safety program that links local food safety activities with state and federal efforts and parallels federal reforms.

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Table 2
Milestone 1

Breakdown of Total Project Cost
Description Emergency Response Initiative Director of Emergency Response Create Job Opening - Director Of Emergency Response Collect Resumes Conduct Interviews of Qualified Candidates Hire Director of Emergency Response Subject Matter Expert Conference Indentify SME to invite to Conference Plan for Conference. Food/Hotels Conduct Conference with SMEs Collect SME Feedback. Create Emergency Response Plans Complete SME Conference Emergency Response Center of Operations Hire Architect Hire Real Estate Agent Locate Land for Operations Center Purchase Land for Operations Center Design Operations Center Build Operations Center Emergency Leadership moved into Operations Center Complete New Operations Center Shelter Setup Select Community Buildings to double as Emergency Shelters Stock Shelters with Emergency Supplies (Medical/Food/Communication) Create signage for shelters (ie. Emergency Shelter) Post Signage in front of Shelters Install Emergency communication (radio system) to Operations Center Complete Shelter Setup Communication Plans Hire Web Site Designer Create Emergency Response Website Setup Automated Emergency Response information line (Where to go, What to do) Conduct Townhall Meetings at New Operations Center. Radio notifications of Townhall Meetings and Emergency Response Website/Phone Line TV notifications of new Emergency Response Plan and Website/Phone Line Complete Communication Plans Volunteers/Training Draft of Volunteer Incentive Program Collect List of Volunteers Train Volunteers Assign Volunteers to Shelter Locations Complete Volunteer Gathering Emergency Notification System Work with TV Stations to Issue Alert Notification Work with Radio Stations to Issue Alert Notification Set up Alert Sirens throughout Community Cost $702,500.00 $50,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $50,000.00 $7,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $7,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $245,000.00 $10,000.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $50,000.00 $0.00 $175,000.00 $5,000.00 $0.00 $126,500.00 $0.00 $50,000.00 $1,500.00 $0.00 $75,000.00 $0.00 $28,500.00 $7,500.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $4,000.00 $0.00 $10,000.00 $10,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $100,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $100,000.00

2

3

4

5

6

7

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8

9

10

Complete Emergency Notification System Emergency Response Test Select 100 Community Members (From Volunteers) Trial Alert issued Measurement of Emergency Response Plan Effectiveness Asbestos Abatement Hire Asbestos abatement firm Asbestos Material Removed Replace Removed Materials Food Safety Program Develop local Food Safety Laws Identify POC

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $125,000.00 $100,000.00 $0.00 $25,000.00 $10,000.00 $10,000.00 $0.00

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