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Africa

African Sleeping Disease Annette Slack

Africa

African Sleeping Disease

Global warning plays a large part on why this vector born disease is on the raise today in West African. Extreme weather of events may have added to the timing of and intensity of this epidemic disease re-emergence in East Africa. The African sleeping disease is caused by a parasite Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (tri-PAN-o-SO-ma BREW-see-eye rho-DEE-seeense), which is carried by the tsetse fly Approximately 12,000 new cases of West African trypanosomiasis, (African sleeping disease) is report to the World Health Organization each year. Cases of East African trypanosomiasis imported into the United States are extremely rare.(CDC, 2009) The Africa sleeping disease that is transmitting by the tsetse fly also affects West Africa and Uganda. The disease can affect both humans and animal populations and if no treatment will cause death. History The African sleeping disease would not be important to American just as AIDS or cancer but if you live in East African this disease is in epidemic stage and scientist are looking for answers and the world gets warmer and the tsetse fly multiply. Left untreated, the final outcome of the disease for the individual is death, but equally insidious is the effect on communities and quality of life resulting from the debilitating symptoms.(Hide, 1999) People from East and West African are a risk of a disease that can cause death if untreated. Money from the African government and support from; World Health Organization and Africans health agencies are in need to help fight the spread of this is disease. The parasite has sophisticated biological defense mechanisms, the tolerance of the parasite to drug treatment, and the socioeconomic realities of the prevalence of the disease in a region where resource priorities preclude an adequate surveillance and control infrastructure.(Hide, 199) African government is give little medical finical support to the East African people and little or no finical support for animals in East Africa.

Sleeping sickness represents a significant economic and public health burden in sub-Saharan Africa, affecting around half a million people, with up to 100 000 new cases a year. The WHO has classed sleeping sickness as a category I resurgent tropical disease, but it remains unchecked because of its sophisticated defence mechanisms, its tolerance to drug treatment and, as Hide (1999, 112) suggests, its prevalence in places where public health is not a priority concern, or is constrained by political and economic conditions (WHO 2004). The disease can affect both human and animal populations and is

Africa caused by a protozoan parasite, the Trypanosoma brucei, transmitted by the tsetse fly, Glossina spp. (Hide 1999). The Glossina palpalis tsetse tends to occupy waterside areas, while Clossina morsitans prefers savannah/bush habitats (Knight 1971). Uganda represents the boundary between two forms of sleeping sickness, T. brucei gambiense, a chronic form of the disease which predominates in west central Africa, and T. brucei rhodesiense, an acute form, which is prevalent in eastern and southern Africa (Berrang-Ford et al. 2005). Both forms of the disease exist in Uganda

Africa

References History of Sleeping Sickness in East Africa Geoff Hide* http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88909/

WHO to start distributing new sleeping sickness drugs in sub- Saharan Africa http://galenet.galegroup.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com 'The gloomy forebodings of this dread disease', climate, famine and sleeping sickness in East Africa. Georgina H Endfield, David B Ryves, Keely Mills, Lea Berrang-Ford. The Geographical Journal. Sept 2009 v175 i3 p181(15).

Africa

CDC 2009, Paretic Disease West African Trypanosomiasis(tri-PAN-o-SO-ma BREW-see-eye GAMbe-ense)

http://www.cdc.gov/Ncidod/dpd/parasites/trypanosomiasis/factsht_ea_trypanosomiasis.htm