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ARTICLE#:13

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TITLE: A STUDY OF LANGUAGE LEARNING BEHAVIORS OF CHINESE
STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA AND THE RELATION OF THOSE
BEHAVIORS TO ORAL PROFICIENCY AND OTHER FACTORS (GEORGIA,
FOREIGN STUDENTS).
PUBLICATION NUMBER: AAI9118144
AUTHOR: CHANG, SHIANG-JIUN.;
ADVISER: MORAIN, GENELLE,
DEGREE: ED.D.
DATE/YEAR: 1990
DEGREE INFO: Thesis (ED.D.)--UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, 1990.
SCHOOL: UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA.
SOURCE: Dissertation Abstracts International
ISSUE: 52-02A.
PAGES: 144 p. Pages(s)
SUBJECTS:
0279 Education, Language and Literature.
0745 Education, Higher.
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ABSTRACT :

This study investigated the language learning strategies which overseas Chinese students
employed to cope with their language deficiency during their sojourn in the United States
and how their language learning strategy use related to an array of personal and
background variables. Fifty Chinese UGA (University of Georgia) students from Taiwan
and Mainland China participated in this study. An oral test--the Ilyin Oral Interview--was
conducted to measure the subjects' English oral proficiency. A language learning strategy
questionnaire and a one-to-one interview were used to gather other needed information.

The results of this study are as follows: (1) Among the six categories of strategies on the
strategy questionnaire--memory, cognitive, compensation, metacognitive, affective and
social strategies, this group of Chinese students employed compensation strategies most
frequently and affective strategies least frequently. (2) Subjects with different levels of
English oral proficiency as defined in terms of their scores on the Ilyin Oral Interview did
not significantly differ from one another in the frequency of their overall language
learning strategy use but that among the six categories of strategies, the Chinese students
in the top group used social strategies more often than did those in the bottom group. (3)
Academic major and self-perception of English language proficiency had strong effects
on the subjects' use of language learning strategy. Chinese students who majored in
humanities/social science/education employed overall language learning strategies more
often than those majored in science and Chin
ese students who perceived themselves to have above average English language
proficiency also employed overall language learning strategies more often than those who
perceived themselves to have below average proficiency. (4) The subjects' TOEFL
scores, length of stay in the United States and gender don't significantly affect their use of
overall language learning strategy.