Skilled workers and professionals

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Skilled workers have education, work experience, knowledge of English or French, and other abilities that will help them to establish themselves successfully as permanent residents in Canada. Making an application to immigrate to Canada is straightforward. This section will help you to find guides, information, and the forms you need to make your application. The rules for applying as a skilled worker can change from time to time, so make sure you visit this site regularly if you are considering immigrating to Canada as a skilled worker. Before you apply, make sure you refer to updated selection criteria, and that you are familiar with the current application procedures. After you apply, make sure you return to this web page to find out about the steps that follow. Note: You must meet the following minimum requirements to apply as a skilled worker:

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you have at least one continuous year of full-time, paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment; your work experience must be Skill Type 0 (managerial jobs), A (professional jobs) or B (technical jobs and skilled trades) on the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC); and you must have had this experience within the last 10 years.

Learn about…

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Who can apply How to apply After applying Arriving Frequently asked questions

Skilled workers and professionals: How to apply

There are two application processes for skilled worker applicants to Canada:

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the simplified application process, and the regular application process.

Most applicants must use the simplified process. However, you must use the regular process if:

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You are a provincial nominee; You have been selected by Quebec; You are eligible for points for arranged employment; You have been lawfully admitted to Canada for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application at the Canadian visa office in Buffalo; or You have been lawfully admitted into the United States for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application at the Canadian visa office in Buffalo.

If none of the situations described above apply to you, you must use the simplified application process. Choose the application process that applies to you:

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Simplified Application Process Regular Application Process Provincial Nominations Quebec-Selected Skilled Worker

Simplified application process
Most skilled workers can apply to immigrate to Canada using the simplified application process. Under this process, you submit only a basic application form and the fees. There is a waiting list to come to Canada as skilled worker. This means it may be several years before your application is processed. The simplified application process guarantees your place in the processing line. Your application will be processed based on regulations that are in effect on the date that you submit your application, even if they change after you apply. When the visa office is ready to assess your application, you will be asked to send the required supporting documentation. The visa office will send you information regarding the medical examination and the criminal and security checks that you and your dependants have to undergo. More information on both of these topics is available under the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page. You cannot use the simplified application if:

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You are a provincial nominee; You have been selected by Quebec and intend to settle there; You have arranged employment in Canada; You have been lawfully admitted to Canada for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application at the Canadian visa office in Buffalo; or

You have been lawfully admitted into the United States for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application at the Canadian visa office in Buffalo.

If you do not qualify for the simplified application process, you must use the regular application process. See the Related Links section at the bottom of this page for more information. Quebec has its own immigration program. For information on immigrating to Quebec, check the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. There are seven steps to apply to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Obtain and print the application kit. Complete your application. Determine where you must submit your application. Obtain the instructions for the visa office where you will submit your application. Calculate your fees. Check your application. Submit your application.

1. Obtain and print the application kit.
Download and print the simplified application kit from the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

2. Complete your application.
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Fill out and sign the forms. Most forms can be completed on your computer. Print the forms after you complete them, because you cannot save them on your computer. If you do not want to complete the forms on your computer, you can complete them by hand. Print clearly, using black ink. You can also use a typewriter.

Answer all questions carefully, completely and truthfully. Incomplete application packages will not be processed and will be returned to you.

You must complete all of the forms:

o o

Application for Permanent Residence in Canada Use of a Representative. You must complete this form if you want to use a representative to help you apply. Using a representative is a personal choice. More information on immigration representatives is available in the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page.

3. Determine where you must submit your application.
You must submit your application to the correct visa office. You must submit your application to the visa office that serves your country of nationality or the country where you have been legally admitted for at least one year. You can find a list of countries and corresponding visa offices in the Quick Find section at the right-hand side of this page. Select your country of residence or citizenship and you will be directed to the visa office responsible for your application. You must check the website of the visa office where you will submit your application, since application procedures may vary slightly from one visa office to another.

4. Obtain the instructions for the visa office where you submit your application.
You can find the visa office instructions you need under the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. Print the instructions that are required for the visa office where you submit your application.

5. Calculate your fees.
You will have to pay:

The processing fee for you and your dependants who will accompany you to Canada. This fee must be submitted when you apply. It is not refundable, even if your application is not approved. The Right of Permanent Residence fee for you and your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, if applicable. Wait until your application is processed to pay this fee. It must be paid before CIC issues your permanent resident visa. This fee is refundable if you cancel your application, if your application is not approved, or if you do not use your visa.

You will also have to pay fees to third parties for:

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Your medical examination A police certificate, if you require one as part of your criminal and security check Language testing, as required

Information on how to pay your processing fee and your Right of Permanent Residence fee is included in the instructions for the visa office where you submit your application. More information on fees is available in the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page.

6. Check your application.
Make sure your application is completed correctly. The visa office cannot process forms that are not completed correctly. Sending incomplete forms will delay your application.

7. Submit your application.
Mail your application and your fees to the appropriate Canadian visa office. Since you are using the simplified application process, you do not have to include any supporting documents when you submit your application.

Related Links
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Simplified Application Kit for Skilled Workers Regular Application Process Application for Provincial Nominees Application to Work in Quebec as a Skilled Worker Arranged Employment Visa Office Instructions

Regular application process
Making an application to immigrate to Canada is straightforward. Follow the steps described below. Most applicants can apply to immigrate to Canada using the simplified application process. However, some applicants must use the regular application process. See the Related Links section at the bottom of this page for more details. You must use the regular application process if:

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You have arranged employment in Canada; or You have been lawfully admitted to Canada for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application to the Canadian visa office in Buffalo, or You have been lawfully admitted into the United States for a period of at least one year and you are submitting your application to the Canadian visa office in Buffalo.

If none of the three situations described above apply to you, you must use the simplified application process. See the Related Links section at the bottom of this page for more information. Quebec has its own business immigration program. For information on immigrating to Quebec, check the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. There are seven steps to apply to immigrate to Canada as a Skilled Worker:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Obtain and print the application kit. Complete your application. Determine where you must submit your application. Obtain the instructions for the visa office where you will submit your application. Calculate your fees. Check your application. Submit your application.

1. Obtain and print the correct application kit.
You can download and print the application kit from the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

2. Complete your application.
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Fill out and sign the forms. Most forms can be completed on your computer. Print the forms after you complete them, because you cannot save them on your computer. If you do not want to complete the forms on your computer, you can complete them by hand. Print clearly, using black ink. You can also use a typewriter. Answer all questions carefully, completely and truthfully. Incomplete application packages will not be processed and will be returned to you. You must complete all of the forms:

o

Application for Permanent Residence in Canada

o o o o

Schedule 1: Background/Declaration Additional Family Information Schedule 3: Economic Classes: Federal Skilled Workers Use of a Representative. You must complete this form if you want to use a representative to help you apply. Using a representative is a personal choice. More information on immigration representatives is available in the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page.

If you apply using the regular application process, you must submit the police certificates with your application.

3. Determine where you must submit your application.
You must submit your application to the correct visa office. You must submit your application to the visa office that serves your country of nationality or the country where you have been legally admitted for at least one year. You can find a list of countries and corresponding visa offices in the Quick Find section of this page. Select your country of residence or citizenship and you will be directed to the visa office responsible for your application. You must check the website of the visa office where you will submit your application, since application procedures may vary slightly from one visa office to another.

4. Obtain the instructions for the visa office where you will submit your application.
You can find the visa office instructions you need under the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. Print the forms and instructions that are required for that specific visa office. The instructions include information on medical examinations and the criminal and security checks that you and your dependants will have to undergo. More information on both of these topics is available under the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page.

5. Calculate your fees.
You will have to pay:

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The processing fee for you and your dependants. This fee must be paid when you apply. It is not refundable, even if your application is not approved. The Right of Permanent Residence fee for you and your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, if applicable. Wait until your application is processed to pay this fee. It must be paid before CIC issues your permanent resident visa. This fee is refundable if you cancel your application, if your application is not approved, or if you do not use your visa.

You will also have to pay fees to third parties for:

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Your medical examination A police certificate, if you require one as part of your criminal and security check Language testing, as required

Information on how to pay your processing fee and your Right of Permanent Residence fee is included in the instructions for the visa office where you submit your application. More information on fees is available in the Quick Find section on the right-hand side of this page.

6. Check your application.
Make sure your application is completed correctly, and that you include all of the necessary supporting documentation. Use the checklist that is included in the guide (Appendix A) to make sure your have not forgotten anything. The visa office cannot process your application if supporting documentation or processing fees are missing, or if your forms are not completed and signed. This will delay your application.

7. Submit your application.
Mail your application and your fees to the appropriate Canadian visa office.

Related Links
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Skilled Worker Regular Application Kit Simplified Application Process Application for Provincial Nominees Application to Work in Quebec as a Skilled Worker Arranged Employment Visa Office Instructions

Immigrating to Canada : Provincial nominees
Persons who immigrate to Canada under the Provincial Nominee Program have the skills, education and work experience needed to make an immediate economic contribution to the province or territory that nominates them. They are ready to establish themselves successfully as permanent residents in Canada. In order to apply under the Provincial Nominee Program, applicants must be nominated by a Canadian province or territory. Consult this section to find all the information and required forms to apply as a provincial nominee. Because the criteria for provincial nomination are determined by the individual provinces and territories, they can change without notice. For this reason, make sure to consult this site and the corresponding provincial site regularly before submitting your application. Before you apply, make sure that you are familiar with the current application procedures. After you apply, make sure you return to this web page to find out about the steps that follow.

Learn about…

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Who can apply How to apply After applying Arriving

Skilled workers and professionals: Who can apply?
Skilled workers are people who can become permanent residents because they are able to become economically established in Canada. Your application to come to Canada as a skilled worker will be assessed on six selection factors and a point system. The six selection factors are:

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Your education Your abilities in English and/or French, Canada’s two official languages Your experience Your age Whether you have arranged employment in Canada Your adaptability

You must also show that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependants after you arrive in Canada, and pass a medical examination and security and criminal checks.

Six selection factors and pass mark
Will you qualify?
If you are eligible to apply as a skilled worker, you will be assessed on six selection factors and a point system. Learn more about each factor by clicking on it. Education Ability in English and/or French Maximum 25 points Maximum 24 points

Experience Age Arranged employment in Canada Adaptability Total Pass mark

Maximum 21 points Maximum 10 points Maximum 10 points Maximum 10 points Maximum 100 points 67 points

You can assess your qualifications using CIC’s Skilled Worker Self-Assessment Test. The test is available in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. If your score is the same or higher than the pass mark, then you may qualify to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker. Review the information about immigrating to Canada as a skilled worker and decide if you want to apply. If your score is lower than the pass mark, you are not likely to qualify to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker. We recommend that you do not apply at this time. However, you can still apply if you believe there are other factors that would show that you are able to establish yourself in Canada and support your dependants. Send a detailed letter with your application explaining why you think you are able to become economically established in Canada. Include any documents that support your claim.

Principal applicant
If you are married or living with a common-law partner, either you or your spouse can apply as the principal applicant. Use the self-assessment test to help you determine which person is likely to earn the most points. The person who would earn the most points should apply as the principal applicant. The other person would be considered as a dependant in the applications. Note: A common-law partner is a person who has lived with you in a conjugal relationship for at least one year. Common-law partner refers to both opposite-sex and same-sex couples.

Related Links
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Skilled worker self-assessment test How to apply as a skilled worker

Education (Maximum 25 points)
You can earn selection points for your degrees or diplomas and the number of years you spent in full-time or full-time equivalent study. To earn points in a category, you must meet all the conditions.

Definitions Full-time studies — At least 15 hours of instruction per week during the academic year, including any period of training in the workplace that is part of your studies. Full-time equivalent studies — The length of time that it would have taken to complete a program of study on a full-time basis, but was actually completed on a part-time or accelerated basis. Education Maximum 25 points 25 points

You have a master’s degree or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have two or more university degrees at the bachelor’s level and at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a three-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship and at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a university degree of two years or more at the bachelor’s level and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a two-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a one-year university degree at the bachelor’s level and at least 13 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a one-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship and at least 13 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You have a one-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship and at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. You completed high school.

22 points

22 points

20 points

20 points

15 points

15 points

12 points

5 points

If you have studied less than the number of years listed with your highest degree or diploma, you must award yourself the points that match your years of study.

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Example 1: if you have a master’s degree but have completed only 15 years of fulltime study, award yourself 22 points. Example 2: if you have a three- or four-year bachelor’s degree, and at least 14 years of education, award yourself 20 points.

Abilities in English and/or French (Maximum 24 Points)
The ability to communicate and work in one or both of Canada’s official languages is very important to you as a skilled worker. Proficiency in English, French or both will help you in the Canadian labour market. Your ability in English and/or French is one of the six selection factors for skilled workers. You will be awarded up to 24 points for your basic, moderate or high proficiency in English and French. You will be given points based on your ability to:

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listen; speak; read; and write.

Proof of your language abilities If you have some proficiency in both English and French, decide which language you are more comfortable using. This is your first official language. The other is your second official language. If you are claiming to have language abilities on your application, you must provide conclusive proof of your level of proficiency. There are two ways to do this. You can: 1. Take a language test; or 2. Provide other written proof of your abilities. We strongly recommend that you take a language test from an approved organization. You will find a link to a list of approved English language testing organizations under the Related Links section at the bottom of the page. You will also find a link to additional information on language testing. Description of each level of proficiency Use the following chart to assess your skill levels. Follow the links for a description of each skill level. Proficiency Level Speaking HIGH: You can communicate effectively in most social and work situations. MODERATE: You can communicate comfortably in familiar social and work situations. BASIC: You can communicate in predictable contexts and on Speaking: High Ability Listening Listening: High Reading Reading: High Writing Writing: High

Speaking: Moderate

Listening: Moderate

Reading: Moderate

Writing: Moderate

Speaking:

Listening:

Reading:

Writing: Basic

familiar topics, but with some difficulty. NO: You do not meet the above criteria for basic proficiency.

Basic

Basic

Basic

Does not meet Basic Level.

Does not meet Basic Level.

Does not meet Basic Level.

Does not meet Basic Level.

Calculate your language points Use the descriptions from the table above to score your language proficiency. First Official Language Speaking High proficiency Moderate proficiency Basic proficiency 4 2 1 Listening 4 2 1 Reading 4 2 1 Writing 4 2 1

Please Note: You can score a maximum of only two points in total for basic-level proficiency.

No proficiency Second Official Language

0

0

0

0

Speaking High proficiency Moderate proficiency Basic proficiency 2 2 1

Listening 2 2 1

Reading 2 2 1

Writing 2 2 1

Please Note: You can score a maximum of only two points in total for basic-level proficiency.

No proficiency

0

0

0

0

Canadian Language Benchmark 8 Speaking: High Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can communicate effectively in most daily practical and social situations, and in familiar routine work situations. Can participate in conversations with confidence. Can speak on familiar topics at both concrete and abstract levels (10 to 15 minutes).

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Can provide descriptions, opinions and explanations; can synthesize abstract complex ideas, can hypothesize. In social interaction, learner demonstrates increased ability to respond appropriately to the formality level of the situation. Can use a variety of sentence structures, including embedded and report structures, and an expanded inventory of concrete, idiomatic and conceptual language. Grammar and pronunciation errors rarely impede communication. Discourse is reasonably fluent. Uses phone on less familiar and some non-routine matters.

Performance Conditions

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Interaction is with one or more people, face to face or on the phone. It is often at a normal rate. Speech is partly predictable and does not always support the utterance. Considerable level of stress affects performance when verbal interaction may result in personal consequences (e.g., on the job). Audience is small familiar and unfamiliar informal groups. Setting and context are familiar, clear and predictable. Topic is familiar, concrete and abstract. Pictures and other visuals are used. Length of presentation is 15 to 20 minutes.

Interaction one-on-one

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Interaction is face to face or on the phone. Interaction is formal or semi-formal. Learner can partially prepare the exchange.

Interaction in a group

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Interaction takes place in a familiar group of up to 10 people. The topic or issue is familiar, non-personal, concrete and abstract. Interaction is informal or semi-formal.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do Interpersonal competencies Introduce a person (e.g., guest, speaker) formally to a large unfamiliar audience. Express/respond to a formal welcome/toast. Express sympathy formally. Respond to a minor conflict or complaint. Comfort and reassure a person in distress. Conversation management Manage conversation. Check comprehension. Use a variety of strategies to keep conversation going. Encourage others to participate. Phone competencies Carry on a brief phone conversation in a professional manner. Examples of tasks and tests Interpersonal competencies Community, Study, Workplace: Formally welcome or introduce a person (e.g., guest, speaker) to a large unfamiliar group.

Make a toast. Express sympathy formally. Respond to a minor conflict (e.g., acknowledge or clarify a problem, apologize, suggest a solution). Conversation management Can you follow? Is it clear? And what happened next? Did you want to comment, Li? How about you, Mary? What do you think, Tran? Phone competencies Workplace: Answer a routine business call; direct the call appropriately. Performance Indicators Interpersonal competencies Introduces a person (e.g., guest, speaker) formally to a small familiar group. Expresses/responds to a formal welcome or toast. Expresses/responds to sympathy. Responds to a minor conflict; comforts and reassures. Uses appropriate non-verbal behaviour. Adjusts conversation to appropriate formality level. Conversation management Manages conversation. Checks if listener can follow. Keeps conversation going with a range of strategies, including follow-up questions. Includes others. Phone competencies Greets/identifies organization. Provides clear information to simple routine questions. Clarifies/confirms information. Refers/transfers calls. Closes conversation. Speaks intelligibly. II. Instructions What the person can do Give/pass on instructions about an established familiar process or procedure (technical and non-technical). Examples of tasks and texts Workplace: Give instructions on how to administer first aid. Give instructions/directions to tourists on points of interests, trails, museums, restaurants, etc. Give instructions on operating a cash register. Performance Indicators Gives spoken directions. (Conveys the sequence of steps; uses clear reference, correct stress and intonation: listener can follow the instructions.) III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do Indicate problems and solutions in a familiar area. Propose/recommend that certain changes be made in a familiar area. Examples of tasks and texts I think that the real question here is … In my opinion, the problem is … Provide your opinions and suggestions as a respondent in a phone survey on health-care services or bank services, etc. Performance Indicators Identifies the problem. Indicates possible solutions. Recommends best solution.

Provides required details. Speaks intelligibly; listener can follow all details. IV. Information What the person can do Presentations Give a presentation to describe and explain a complex structure, system or process based on research. Use a diagram to support the explanations. Tell a story, which includes an anecdote. Interaction one-on-one Ask for or provide detailed information related to personal needs, varied daily activities and routine work requirements. Discuss options. Interaction in a group Participate in a debate/discussion/meeting on an abstract familiar topic or issue. Express and analyse opinions and feelings. Express doubts and concerns; oppose or support a stand or a proposed solution. Examples of tasks and texts Presentations Study: Make a 15-minute oral presentation on the researched topic. Analyse opinions, synthesize information. Present a summary of the weekly newscast. Describe and explain the internal structures of organisms or objects, using cross-sectional sketches in a 20-minute formal presentation. Compare two similar processes, (e.g., two processes of water treatment/purification). Tell a story, including an anecdote. Interaction one-on-one Community, Study: Obtain multiple opinions about a medical condition, treatment options, prognosis. Interaction in a group Study: Discuss values and attitudes in different cultures (intercultural education). Workplace: Participate in a group during a training meeting/workshop. Give a three-minute summary talk as a spokesperson for the group. Performance Indicators Presentations Addresses the purpose of the task. Expresses main ideas and supports them with details. Provides an introduction, development and conclusion. Narrates, describes coherently (agents, actions, circumstance, process and sequence are clear). Provides accurate and detailed descriptions, explanations or account of events in the story sequence. Uses style of presentation and formality in addressing the listener. Demonstrates good use of complex structures, with only minor difficulties. Demonstrates adequate vocabulary for the topic, including sufficient technical language to describe a process. Speaks with adequate fluency and intelligibility. Interaction one-on-one Explains or asks about the nature of inquiry or concern and information needed. Initiates questions to gather, analyse and compare information needed for some decision making. Responds to questions with required information. Summarizes and repeats the information. Closes. Speech is intelligible; listener can follow all details. Interaction in a group Participates in a seminar-style or business meeting (e.g., debate/discussion/meeting). Expresses opinions, feelings, doubts and concerns. Qualifies opinions, adds information, elaborates.

Opposes or supports a stand, idea, proposed solution. Uses appropriate non-verbal behaviour.

Canadian Language Benchmark 8 Listening: High Level
Global Performance Descriptor

• • • • • • • • •

Learner can comprehend main points, details, speaker’s purpose, attitudes, levels of formality and styles in oral discourse in moderately demanding contexts. Can follow most formal and informal conversations, and some technical work-related discourse in own field at a normal rate of speech. Can follow discourse about abstract and complex ideas on a familiar topic. Can comprehend an expanded range of concrete, abstract and conceptual language. Can determine mood, attitudes and feelings. Can understand sufficient vocabulary, idioms and colloquial expressions to follow detailed stories of general popular interest. Can follow clear and coherent extended instructional texts and directions. Can follow clear and coherent phone messages on unfamiliar and non-routine matters. Often has difficulty following rapid, colloquial/idiomatic or regionally accented speech between native speakers.

Performance Conditions

• • • • • • • • • •

Tasks are in a standard format, with items to circle, match, fill in a blank, and complete a chart. Learner is adequately briefed for focused listening. Communication is face to face, observed live, or video- and audio-mediated (e.g., tape, TV, radio). Speech is clear at a normal rate. Instructions are clear and coherent. Listening texts are monologues/presentations and dialogues (five to 10 minutes), within familiar general topics and technical discourse in own field. Topics are familiar. Presentation/lecture is informal or semi-formal with the use of pictures, visuals (10 to 15 minutes). Learner is briefed for focused listening. Speech is clear, at a normal rate.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do Identify stated and unspecified details about mood, attitude, situation and formality in discourse containing expression of and response to formal welcomes, farewells, toasts, congratulations on achievements and awards, sympathy and condolences. Examples of tasks and tests Community, Study, Workplace: Listen to videotaped casual dialogues, audiotaped and phone conversations containing expression of and response to formal welcomes, farewells, toasts, congratulations on achievements and awards, sympathy and condolences. Identify specific factual details and inferred meanings.

Respond to questions, circle or check items, write in appropriate blanks, as required in the task. Performance Indicators Identifies specific factual details and inferred meanings in video- and audio-mediated listening texts/discourse. Identifies situation, relationships between participants and speaker’s purpose. Identifies some attitudinal nuance, emotional tone and register of the text. II. Instructions What the person can do Follow an extended set of multistep instructions on technical and non-technical tasks for familiar processes or procedures. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study, Workplace: Follow first aid or other emergency instructions by phone. Follow instructions on the phone to install Internet software or other software on computer. Performance Indicators Follows instructions and completes a task. III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do Identify stated and unspecified meanings in extended warnings, threats, suggestions and recommendations. Evaluate the validity of a suggestion or proposed solution. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study, Workplace: Listen to a teacher/supervisor evaluating someone’s performance; list specific details, suggestions and advice that are mentioned. Listen to public announcements, commercials and infomercials that contain extended warnings, suggested solutions to problems or recommendations. Respond to questions according to task format (e.g., true/false, circle the correct answer, etc.). Performance Indicators Identifies main intent, main idea, factual details, words and expressions and inferred meanings in suasion oral texts as required. Identifies functional value of utterances as warnings, threats, suggestions or recommendations. Evaluates the validity of a suggestion or a proposed solution for a specific context. IV. Information What the person can do Identify main idea (which is not explicitly stated), organization and specific details in extended oral presentations. Identify facts, opinions and attitudes in conversations about abstract and complex ideas on a familiar topic. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study: Listen to a presentation on basic personality types, learning styles or lifestyles. Identify main idea, details and transition points in the presentation. Listen to a conversation about public services (e.g., transit, library) or about ice climbing in the Rockies. Identify facts, opinions and attitudes in the discourse by answering comprehension questions. Performance Indicators Identifies the component parts of the presentation (e.g., introduction, etc.). Identifies phrases and sentences that mark topic introduction, topic development, topic shift and conclusion. Identifies main idea, which is not explicitly stated, and extracts detailed information from the text.

Identifies facts, opinions and attitudes in conversations about abstract ideas.

Canadian Language Benchmark 8 Reading: High Level
Global Performance Descriptor

• • • • • • •

Learner can follow main ideas, key words and important details in an authentic twoto three-page text on a familiar topic, but within an only partially predictable context. May read popular newspaper and magazine articles and popular easy fiction as well as academic and business materials. Can extract relevant points, but often requires clarification of idioms and of various cultural references. Can locate and integrate several specific pieces of information in visually complex texts (e.g., tables, directories) or across paragraphs or sections of text. Text can be on abstract, conceptual or technical topics, containing facts, attitudes and opinions. Inference may be required to identify the writer’s bias and the purpose/function of text. Learner reads in English for information, to learn the language, to develop reading skills. Uses a unilingual dictionary when reading for precision vocabulary building.

Performance Conditions

• • • • • • • • • • •

Text is one page, five to 10 paragraphs long and is related to personal experience or familiar context. Text is legible, easy to read; is in print or neat handwriting. Instructions are clear and explicit, but not always presented step by step. Pictures may accompany text. Context is relevant, but not always familiar and predictable. Text has clear organization. Text content is relevant (e.g., commercials/advertising features, business/form letters, brochures). Informational text is eight to 15 paragraphs long with clear organization in print or electronic form. Pictures often accompany text. Language is both concrete and abstract, conceptual and technical. Text types: news articles, stories, short articles, reports, editorials, opinion essays.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction Texts What the person can do Obtain factual details and inferred meanings in moderately complex notes, e-mail messages and letters containing general opinions and assessments of situations, response to a complaint and expressions of sympathy. Examples of tasks and tests Community, Study, Workplace: Read authentic notes, e-mail messages and letters (personal and public) containing general opinions, assessments of current affairs, response to a complaint/conflict, or expression of sympathy. Identify correctly specific factual details/inferred meanings. Performance Indicators

Identifies specific factual details and inferred meanings in text. Identifies purpose of text, context of the situation, reader-writer relationship. Identifies mood/attitude of writer and register of the text. II. Instructions What the person can do Follow an extended set of multi-step instructions for established process. Follow coherent extended instructional directions. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Workplace: Explain how to assemble a simple object, according to written instructions and diagrams. Follow instructions for CPR and what to do in case of a serious injury in a car accident. Performance Indicators Follows an extended set of multi-step instructions for an established process or procedure. Completes tasks. III. Business/service texts What the person can do Identify factual and inferred meanings in written proposed solutions, recommendations and proposals; and in statements of rules, regulations, laws and norms of behaviour. Locate and integrate three or four pieces of information contained in moderately complex formatted texts. Examples of tasks and texts Workplace: Interpret selections from texts about safety precautions at a workplace (e.g., WHMIS: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System), by locating and integrating three to four pieces of information from the text. Community, Workplace: Read and explain a written declaration of the rights and responsibilities of a client, customer, patient, student. Performance Indicators Identifies main intent, main idea, factual details and some inferred meanings in the texts. Identifies writer’s purpose/intent/attitude. Identifies communicative value of text, and its parts. Finds and integrates three or four pieces of specific information in extensive and visually complex directories. IV. Informational texts What the person can do Demonstrate comprehension of factual details and inferred meanings in an extended description, report or narration when events are reported out of sequence. Draw conclusions. Express in alternative forms verbal ideas and graphics contained in charts, graphs. Information literacy/reference and study skills competencies Access/locate several pieces of information in online electronic reference sources. Examples of tasks and texts Study: Identify main ideas of a five- to 10-paragraph text about a current event; summarize the text into 150 to 200 words. Based on the information, hypothesize how something may work or may have worked. Based on the information, complete an unfinished classification/categorization diagram. Interpret orally or in written text a process flow chart related to basic science or social science. Community, Study, Workplace: Access/locate several pieces of information in online electronic reference sources. Performance Indicators Identifies factual details and inferred meanings in text (70%-80%). Identifies main idea. Identifies organization of text, topic sentences and logical relationship links between paragraphs.

Follows the sequence of narration or process even when events are out of sequence. Distinguishes facts from opinions. Extracts detailed information. Infers meaning of words from contextual clues. Hypothesizes how something works. Evaluates ideas in text, draws conclusions and expresses personal opinion. Interprets key information in a diagram or graph as verbal text; transfers key ideas diagrammatic display. Accesses/locates several pieces of information in online electronic reference sources. Uses effective search strategy and tools.

Canadian Language Benchmark 8 Writing: High Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner demonstrates fluent ability in performing moderately complex writing tasks. Can link sentences and paragraphs (three or four) to form coherent texts to express ideas on familiar abstract topics, with some support for main ideas, and with an appropriate sense of audience. Can write routine business letters (e.g., letters of inquiry, cover letters for applications) and personal and formal social messages. Can write down a set of simple instructions, based on clear oral communication or simple written procedural text of greater length. Can fill out complex formatted documents. Can extract key information and relevant detail from a page-long text and write an outline or a one-paragraph summary. Demonstrates good control over common sentence patterns, coordination and subordination, and spelling and mechanics. Has occasional difficulty with complex structures (e.g., those reflecting cause and reason, purpose, comment), naturalness of phrases and expressions, organization and style.

Performance Conditions

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Circumstances range from informal to more formal occasions. Addressees are familiar. Topics are of immediate everyday relevance. Text is one or two short paragraphs in length. Text to reproduce is one or two pages in legible handwriting or print, or may be a short oral text (10 to 15 minutes). Texts are varied and may be of a specialized or technical nature. Learner may fill out a teacher-prepared summary grid to aid note taking or summarizing. Forms have over 40 items/pieces of information. Messages are two or three paragraphs in length. Brief texts required in pre-set formats are one to several sentences, up to one paragraph long. Learner text is three or four paragraphs long, on non-personal, abstract but familiar topics and issues. Where necessary for the task, learners must include information presented to them from other sources (e.g., photographs, drawings, reference text/research information, diagrams).

Competency Outcomes and Standards

I. Social interaction What the person can do Convey a personal message in a formal short letter or note, or through e-mail, expressing or responding to sympathy; clarifying a minor conflict; or giving reassurance. Examples of tasks and tests Community, Study, Workplace: Write a personal note of sympathy to someone who has experienced a loss. Community, Study, Workplace: Write an appropriate note or letter to address or to attempt to explain and resolve a minor conflict. Performance Indicators Addresses the purpose of the task. Expresses main ideas and gives details. Conveys a sense of audience: language, format and content are appropriate. Demonstrates good use of complex structures. Demonstrates adequate vocabulary for the topic. II. Reproducing information What the person can do Write instructions about an established process or procedures given in a live demonstration, over the phone or from pre-recorded audio or video material. Write an outline or a summary of a longer text. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study, Workplace: Listen to oral instructions for, or a demonstration of, a complex recipe. Write accurate, neatly organized notes for other cooks. Performance Indicators Addresses the purpose of the task. Conveys essential information to the reader. Reduces information to main points, with accurate supporting details, with no major omission of important points or details. Fills out all form sections with required information. Conveys a sense of audience in language format and content. Demonstrates good use and control of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation. Presents text in legible handwriting or print, with clear layout. III. Business/service messages What the person can do Convey business messages as written notes, memorandums, letters of request, or work record log entries, to indicate a problem, to request a change, or to request information. Fill out forms and other materials in pre-set formats with required brief texts. Examples of tasks and texts Workplace: Write an effective personal résumé and a formal covering letter/letter of application for employment to a personnel/human resources manager. Ask for an interview. Fill out application for employment forms of any length. Community, Workplace: Write a report/memo in paragraph form (progress, action plan, incident, inspection, e.g., what has been discovered or why something is not working the way it should). Performance Indicators Addresses the purpose of the task. Conveys essential information to the reader. Reduces information to main points, with accurate supporting details, with no major omission of important points or details. Fills out all form sections with required information. Conveys a sense of audience in language format and content. Demonstrates good use and control of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary, spelling

and punctuation. Presents text in legible handwriting or print, with clear layout. IV. Presenting information and ideas What the person can do Write three or four paragraphs to narrate a historical event; to tell a story; to express or analyse opinions on a familiar abstract topic; or to provide a detailed description and explanation of a phenomenon or a process. Write a paragraph to relate/explain information in a table, graph, flow chart or diagram. Examples of tasks and texts Study, Workplace: In a three- or four-paragraph essay/composition, describe how a business (e.g., sawmill, furniture manufacturing plant, farm, bank, store, restaurant, courier service, commercial laundry, hospital kitchen, daycare, etc.) operates. Study: Write a three- or four-paragraph essay/composition on a general, previously researched academic or work-related topic, to relate events, describe, explain, or express opinions or argue a point. Write a paragraph to relate/explain information in a pie, line or bar graph, or in a process flow chart. Use a flow chart to describe a procedure or a process, in the correct sequence. Performance Indicators Addresses the purpose of the task. Expresses main ideas and gives details. Conveys a sense of audience. Demonstrates good use of complex structures, with only minor difficulties. Demonstrates adequate vocabulary. Provides accurate and detailed descriptions/explanations in the report/story sequence. Provides an introduction, development and conclusion, and paragraph structure. Presents text as a coherent connected whole with good use of appropriate logical connectors (at the same time). Demonstrates accurate spelling and punctuation; makes minor errors only. Presents text in legible handwriting.

Canadian Language Benchmark 6 Speaking: Moderate Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can communicate with some confidence in casual social conversations in some less routine situations on familiar topics of personal relevance. Can communicate facts and ideas in some detail: can describe, report and provide simple narration. Can use a variety of structures with some omission/reduction of elements (e.g., articles, past tense, morphemes). Grammar and pronunciation errors are frequent and may sometimes impede communication. Can demonstrate a range of everyday vocabulary, some common phrases and idioms. Can demonstrate discourse that is reasonably fluent, with frequent normal hesitations. Can use the phone to communicate on familiar matters, but phone exchanges with strangers are stressful.

Performance Conditions

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Interaction is face to face, or on the phone, with familiar and unfamiliar individuals and small informal groups. Rate of speech is slow to normal. Context is familiar, or clear and predictable.

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Context is moderately demanding (e.g., real world environment, limited support from speaker). Circumstances range from informal to more formal. Setting or content is familiar, clear and predictable. Topic is concrete and familiar. Presentation is informal or formal. Use of pictures or other visuals. Presentation is five to seven minutes long.

Interactions one-on-one

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Interactions are face to face or on the phone. Interaction is formal or semi-formal. Learner can partially prepare the exchange.

Interactions in a group

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Interaction occurs in a familiar group of three to five people. Topic or issue is familiar, non-personal, concrete. Interaction is informal or semi-formal.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do Interpersonal competencies Open, maintain and close a short, routine, formal conversation. Introduce a person (e.g., guest, speaker) formally to a small familiar group. Make or cancel an appointment or arrangement. Express/respond to apology, regrets and excuses. Conversation management Indicate partial comprehension. Take turns by interrupting. Encourage conversation by adding supportive comments. Avoid answering a question. Phone competencies Take phone messages with three to five details. Examples of tasks and tests Interpersonal competencies Well, I should be going. I’ll let you get back to … See you tomorrow. Community/Study/Workplace. Make/initiate simple small talk or small talk comment. Introduce a person formally to a small familiar group. Call to make or cancel an appointment. Give apologies and give reasons. Apologize for small and larger mistakes in various situations. Conversation management Could you be more specific; explain in more detail; give an example of X. Pardon me, but … Sorry to interrupt, but … That’s good, great, nice. Good for you. I’m not really sure. I’m afraid I don’t know. Phone competencies Hello, Bob speaking … How are you? I’m afraid he’s not in. Can I take a message … Okay; I’ll give him the message … No problem … You’re welcome. Performance Indicators Interpersonal competencies Indicates partial comprehension; asks clarifying questions. Takes turns by interrupting appropriately. Encourages conversation, repeating a key word or phrase.

Avoids answering a question. Uses appropriate non-verbal behaviour. Conversation management Opens, maintains, closes a short formal conversation (four to five words). Closes a conversation in three customary steps (pre-closing, closing, leave-taking). Introduces a guest/speaker formally to a small familiar group. Makes/cancels an appointment. Expresses and responds to apology, regrets and excuses. Uses appropriate non-verbal behaviour. Phone competencies Answers the phone appropriately. Greets. Clarifies and confirms accuracy of information. Closes conversation. Gets all the details in the message. II. Instructions What the person can do Give a set of instructions dealing with simple daily actions and routines where the steps are not presented as a point-form sequence of single clauses. Examples of tasks and texts Before depositing the slip in the deposit box, check if it is signed. The machine must be disconnected before you open it. Explain how to make something or do something properly; give a short set of instructions (e.g., change a light bulb). Performance Indicators Gives spoken directions (uses correct sequence of steps, clear reference, correct stress and intonation: listener can follow the instructions). III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do Make a simple formal suggestion; provide a reason. Make a simple prediction of consequences. Make a verbal request for an item. Examples of tasks and texts It’s cold — perhaps we should close the window. You shouldn’t … If we do X, Y will happen. I ordered X a while ago; I was wondering when it will be ready/if it’s ready yet. Performance Indicators Makes a simple formal suggestion; provides a reason. Makes a simple prediction of consequences. Renews a verbal request for the item or service needed. IV. Information What the person can do Presentations Relate a detailed sequence of events from the past; tell a detailed story, including reasons and consequences. Describe and compare people, places, etc. Describe a simple process. Interaction one-on-one Ask for and provide information in an interview related to daily activities. Interaction in a group Participate in a small group discussion/meeting on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty. Examples of tasks and texts Presentations

Study: Tell a detailed story that includes reasons and consequences. Describe and compare two contemporary or historical figures or locations. Give a detailed description of a simple process (e.g., the collection, sorting and distribution of mail at Canada Post). Interaction one-on-one Community, Study: Phone a library to inquire and obtain information about appropriate research materials and their availability; reserve materials. Community: Express concerns, provide explanations, and seek advice in a parent-teacher interview. Phone an airline and arrange a flight. Interaction in a group Study: Discuss current events in Canada. Discuss researched topics on social, cross-cultural, or work-related issues. Discuss aspects of Canadian culture and advice and suggestions based on "Dear …" advice columns. Performance Indicators Presentations Presents information in a coherent, connected discourse. Uses an introduction, development and conclusion. Uses explicit markers/logical connectors (first, next, finally). Uses simple grammatical structures, with clear present, past and future tenses. Uses vocabulary adequately for topic. Provides accurate and detailed descriptions. Speaks with appropriate eye contact, body language, voice volume, rate, fluency and intelligibility. Interaction one-on-one Explains the nature of an inquiry and information needed. Provides necessary details. Asks relevant questions. Summarizes and repeats back. Thanks for the help and information. Speaks intelligibly; listener can follow. Interaction in a group Participates in a small group discussion/meeting. Expresses opinions and feelings. Expresses obligation, ability, certainty (e.g., have to, must, able/unable).

Canadian Language Benchmark 6 Listening: Moderate Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can follow the main idea and identify key words and important details in oral discourse in moderately demanding contexts of language use (e.g., face-to-face formal and informal conversations, audiotapes and radio broadcasts) on relevant topics and at a slow to normal rate of speed. Can understand a range of common vocabulary and a limited number of idioms. Can follow conceptualized discourse related to common experiences and general knowledge. Can understand conceptualized short sets of instructions and directions. May still frequently request repetition. Can follow simple, short, predictable phone calls.

Performance Conditions

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Learner is adequately briefed for focused listening. Communication is live, or video- and audio-mediated (e.g., tape). Speech is clear and at a slow to normal rate. Instructions are clear and explicit, used with some visual clues, but not always presented in a step-by-step form. Listening texts are moderately short (five to eight exchange turns, each turn three to five sentences long, or two to five minutes), on familiar topics. Some tasks require oral or physical response; some tasks are in a “guided” writing format (e.g., circle or match items, fill in the blanks, complete a chart, answer questions, etc.). Learner may need one to two repetitions. Presentation or interaction is live, informal or semi-formal. Topic is concrete and familiar. Setting and context are familiar. Pictures and visuals are used. Length of discourse is up to 10 minutes.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do Identify specific factual details and inferred meanings in dialogues containing openings and closings, making and canceling of appointments, apologies, regrets, excuses, problems in reception and communication. Identify mood/attitude of participants. Examples of tasks and tests Community, Study, Work: Listen to videotaped casual dialogues, audiotaped/phone conversations. Identify specific factual details and inferred meanings. Respond to questions as required in the task. Take phone/voice-mail messages. Listen to short routine conversations. Identify the preclosing, closing, and leave-taking expression in each dialogue. Performance Indicators Identifies specific factual details and inferred meanings in video- and audio-mediated listening texts/discourse as required. Identifies mood/attitude of participants. II. Instructions What the person can do Understand a set of instructions when not presented completely in point form: sequence/order must be inferred from the text. Examples of tasks and texts Before depositing the slip in the deposit box, check if it is signed. The appliance must be disconnected prior to opening the cover. Write down customer work order in point form (e.g., photo process, picture framing). Performance Indicators Understands clear spoken instructions as required. Follows sequence markers and other linguistic clues in the text to comprehend the order of steps. Completes task. III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do

Demonstrate comprehension of details and speaker’s purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements and requests. Examples of tasks and texts Public announcements, commercials, infomercials. Community, Study, Workplace: Listen to a two- to three-minute talk quiz house renovations suggestions. Recall seven out of 10 important tips. Performance Indicators Identifies factual details, words and expressions, and inferred meanings in suasion oral texts as required. Identifies functional value of utterances as suggestions, advice, encouragements and requests. IV. Information What the person can do Identify main ideas, supporting details, statements and examples in a descriptive or narrative presentation, or in a group interaction (e.g., meeting, discussion). Suggest an appropriate conclusion to a story based on inference. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study, Workplace: Listen to a two- to three-minute conversation, report, TV/radio news item. Recall 70% of the information: identify seven to 10 important points. Listen to a two- to three-minute explanation of why certain food supplement products are more appropriate than others in a specific situation. Identify main statements and supporting examples, according to task format. Listen to a story that includes explanations and examples. Number a set of pictures in sequence. Performance Indicators Identifies factual details and inferred meanings in a listening text as required. Gets main ideas, supporting details, statements and examples as required. Suggests an appropriate conclusion based on inference: predicts what will happen next in a narration.

Canadian Language Benchmark 6 Reading: Moderate Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can follow main ideas, key words and important details in a one-page (three to five paragraphs) plain language authentic prose and non-prose (formatted) text in moderately demanding contexts of language use. Can locate three to five pieces of specific, detailed information in prose passages, charts and schedules for analysis, comparison and contrast. Can read printed or legible handwritten notes, memos, letters, schedules and itineraries. Can get new information about familiar topics from reading mostly factual texts with clear organization, and within familiar background knowledge and experience. Language of the text is mostly concrete and factual, with some abstract, conceptual and technical vocabulary items, and may require low-level inference to comprehend it (e.g., learner may guess some new words by recognition of prefixes and suffixes). Uses a concise unilingual ESL/EFL learner dictionary regularly.

Performance Conditions

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Text is up to one page long and related to a personal or common experience, or a familiar context. Text is legible, easy to read; is in print or neat handwriting. Instructions are clear and explicit, for everyday situations, used with some visual clues, but not always presented in a step by step form. Context is relevant and familiar. Pictures occasionally accompany text. Text has clear organizational structure. Types of texts: forms, tables, schedules, directories, calendars, notices and announcements. Text is three to five paragraphs long, with clear organization; is in printed or electronic form. Passages are in plain language, with occasional idioms. Language is mostly concrete and literal, but may also be abstract and technical. Context and topic are often familiar; are sometimes related to personal experience; and are partly predictable to learner. Text types: newspaper articles, educational content materials, stories, encyclopedia entries.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction Texts What the person can do Identify factual details in moderately complex notes, e-mail messages, letters and announcements containing cancellations of arrangements, apologies. Examples of tasks and tests Community, Study, Workplace: Obtain information from authentic notes, e-mail messages and letters; identify correctly specific factual details and inferred meanings (e.g., circle or check items, fill in blanks). Community, Study: Obtain information from social announcements, reports and other social texts in the newspaper. Performance Indicators Identifies specific factual details and inferred meanings in the texts. Identifies purpose of text. Identifies reader-writer relationship, attitude of writer and context. II. Instructions What the person can do Follow a set of common everyday instructions (up to 10 steps) when not presented completely in point form: sequence/order must be inferred. Examples of tasks and texts Before depositing the slip in the deposit box, check if it is signed. The appliance must be disconnected prior to opening the cover. Community, Workplace: Explain instructions of use and warnings printed on the labels of common commercial/industrial chemical products (e.g., dishwasher detergent). Performance Indicators Follows instructions as required. Carries out task. III. Business/service texts What the person can do Identify factual details and some inferred meanings in moderately complex texts containing advice, requests, specifications. Find two or three pieces of information in moderately complex formatted texts.

Examples of tasks and texts Community: Explain the details in notices, announcements and newspaper coverage of public health issues (e.g., a disease). Study: Scan a page in a continuing education community courses calendar; locate two to three pieces of information that match the requirements in another text. Performance Indicators Identifies main intent, main idea, factual details and some inferred meanings in the texts. Identifies writer’s purpose/intent/attitude. Identifies communicative value of text, and its parts. Finds two or three specific pieces of information by scanning five to 10 paragraphs, extensive directories or forms. IV. Informational texts What the person can do Show comprehension of a one-page moderately complex descriptive/narrative text on a familiar topic. Demonstrate comprehension of a cycle diagram, flow chart and a time line/schedule. Information literacy/reference and study skills competencies Access/locate/compare two or three pieces of information in a CD-ROM electronic reference source. Examples of tasks and texts Community, Study, Workplace: Read a report, interview, news item or a story that includes explanations and examples. Identify seven out of 10 important points. Retell the text in own words. Study: Explain how something works (in nature or man-made) based on a text; relate the sequence of steps or stages in a cycle or process described in the text. Use the information from a time line/schedule chart to solve a simple scheduling problem. Access, locate and compare/contrast two or three pieces of information in a CD-ROM electronic reference source (e.g., dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases). Performance Indicators Identifies factual details and inferred meanings in text as required (70%-80%). Identifies/states main idea and key details. Retells or summarizes the story. Relates sequence of steps in a cycle. Guesses meaning of words and expressions from textual clues. Predicts what will happen next in the text. Interprets a cycle diagram and a time line/schedule chart. Accesses, locates and compares two or three pieces of information in a CD-ROM electronic reference source.

Canadian Language Benchmark 6 Writing: Moderate Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner demonstrates developing ability in performing moderately complex writing tasks. Can effectively convey familiar information in familiar standard formats. Can write one- or two-paragraph letters and compositions. Can fill out detailed job application forms with short comments on previous experience, abilities and strengths, and form reports. Can reproduce information received orally or visually, and can take simple notes from short oral presentations or from reference materials. Can convey information from a table, graph or chart in a coherent paragraph. Can write down everyday phone messages.

Demonstrates good control over simple structures, but has difficulty with some complex structures and produces some awkward-sounding phrases (word combinations).

Performance Conditions

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Circumstances range from informal to more formal occasions. Addressees are familiar. Topics are of immediate everyday relevance. Text is one or two short paragraphs. Text to reproduce is up to one or one and one-half pages in legible handwriting or print, or may be a short oral text (10 to 15 minutes). Texts are varied and may be of a specialized or technical nature. Learner may fill out a teacher-prepared summary grid to aid note taking or summarizing. Forms are moderately complex in format, 30 to 40 items long. Messages are five to six sentences or one paragraph long. Text is one to two paragraphs long on a familiar and personally relevant topic. Where necessary for the task, learners must include information presented to them from other sources (e.g., photographs, drawings, reference text/research information, diagrams).

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social interaction What the person can do Convey a personal message in a formal short letter or note, or through e-mail, expressing or responding to congratulations, thanks, apology or offer of assistance. Examples of tasks and tests Community, School, Workplace: Write an appropriate personal note to cancel an appointment because something unexpected has happened. Express inability, disappointment. Send your apologies. Community: Write a personal note to thank someone for a special gesture. Write a personal note to offer assistance to a friend or acquaintance. Performance Indicators Conveys the message: reader can follow the text. Uses language and content that are appropriate and relevant to the occasion. Conveys main ideas and supports them with detail in a basic paragraph structure. Makes few errors in simple grammatical structures, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, format/layout. II. Reproducing information What the person can do Take notes from an oral presentation or a page of written information. Examples of tasks and texts Study: Take notes from a 10- to 15-minute oral/TV presentation on a general topic. Write down key information concisely and accurately. Workplace: Take notes from an oral presentation on desirable qualifications employers look for in potential employees. Community: Take notes from a talk on newcomer orientation/settlement issues. Performance Indicators Takes notes and reduces written or oral information to important points with accurate details. Records names, addresses, numbers, dates, times, directions and other details with correct spelling, and in

legible handwriting. Copies important or new words and details off the board or screen (where relevant). III. Business/service messages What the person can do Convey business messages as written notes. Fill out moderately complex forms. Examples of tasks and texts Community: Write a short letter of request to have your money returned for a guaranteed product that did not work to your satisfaction. Fill out a short medical history form. Workplace: Fill out a one- or two-page straightforward job application. Performance Indicators Conveys a clear message to the recipient. Conveys a sense of audience in language and format. Demonstrates good use and control of simple structures, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation. Fills out forms with required information. Spells and follows punctuation conventions. IV. Presenting information and ideas What the person can do Write one or two paragraphs to relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a detailed description and comparison of people, places, objects and animals, plants, materials, or routines; or describe a simple process. Examples of tasks and texts Study, Workplace: Give a detailed description of a simple process (e.g., the collection, sorting and distribution of mail at Canada Post). Study: Write a detailed story or report an incident based on a series of pictures, a film clip or a personal experience. Describe and compare two simple science experiments. Community, Study, Workplace: Word-process, revise, edit, format and print texts using a computer, if available. Performance Indicators Addresses the purpose of the task. Expresses main ideas and supports them with details. Demonstrates good control of simple grammatical structures, and some difficulty with complex structures. Demonstrates adequate vocabulary for the topic. Provides accurate descriptions, comparisons, account of events in the report/story, sequence of stages in a process. Provides an introduction, development and conclusion, and an adequate paragraph structure in the text. Uses appropriate logical connectors. Demonstrates accurate spelling and punctuation; makes minor errors only. Presents text in legible handwriting or print.

Canadian Language Benchmark 4 Speaking: Basic Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can take part in short routine conversations about needs and familiar topics of personal relevance with supportive listeners. Can communicate basic needs and personal experience.

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Can ask and respond to simple familiar questions. Can describe a situation, tell a simple story, describe the process of obtaining essential goods (e.g., purchasing, renting) or services (e.g., medical). Uses a variety of short sentences. Demonstrates control of basic grammar (basic structures and tenses). Uses correct past tense with many common verbs. Demonstrates adequate vocabulary for routine everyday communication. Clear evidence of connected discourse (and, but, first, next, then, because). Pronunciation difficulties may impede communication. Needs only a little assistance. Can use the phone only for very short, simple, predictable exchanges, communication without visual support is very difficult for him or her.

Performance Conditions

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Interaction is face to face, with one person at a time or in a familiar supportive group. Interaction on the phone is rare and brief. Speech rate is slow to normal. Verbal communication is strongly supported by gestures and other visual clues. Instructions and directions have only three to four steps and are sometimes supported with hand gestures. Learner’s speech is guided by specific questions from the interlocutor if needed. Interaction is empathetic and supportive. Topics are about common everyday matters.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do Open, close and respond to short casual small talk. Introduce two persons. Take leave appropriately. Answer the phone. Leave a short simple message. Examples of tasks and tests Nice to see you. How are you doing? Nice day. Have a good day. See you soon. This is Ela, my sister. Sorry, you’ve got the wrong number. Vi is not home. Can you call later? Leave a simple voice mail message: This is … Please call me back. My number is … Thank you. Performance Indicators Opens, develops and closes short small-talk conversation, as appropriate to the situation (casually or more formally). Introduces a person to one or two individuals. Handles basic phone situations and standard replies. II. Instructions What the person can do Give sets of simple everyday instructions and directions. Examples of tasks and texts Tell someone where to find something or someone; give directions how to get there. Give instructions on how to set an alarm clock, use a tape recorder and play a video. Performance Indicators Gives simple directions. Listener can follow the directions.

III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do Request, accept or reject goods or services, assistance or offer in a service or sales situation. Respond to warnings. Examples of tasks and texts Obtain a service or purchase; return or exchange goods in a transaction. Respond to warnings on simple by-law violations (e.g., You can’t park here. Please remove your car. Smoking is not allowed.). Performance Indicators Responds to openings, routine questions and closings in a service or sales transaction discourse. Provides required information/description of item. Asks relevant questions about price, availability, location, appearance, function. Responds to warnings. IV. Information What the person can do Relate a story about an everyday activity. Express preference, satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Examples of tasks and texts Yes, this is right. It is okay. That’s fine. No, I’m sorry, this is not right. I don’t like this; I prefer that. Tell a story about obtaining goods or services (e.g., about registering a child in a daycare or going to the doctor). Performance Indicators Relates the story about an everyday activity in a coherent narrative (connected discourse). Listener can follow the story. Expresses need, preference, satisfaction/dissatisfaction.

Canadian Language Benchmark 4 Listening: Basic Level
Global Performance Descriptor

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Learner can follow, although with considerable effort, simple formal and informal conversations and other listening texts/discourse on topics of immediate personal relevance at a slower to normal rate of speech. Can recognize many topics by familiar words and phrases. Can follow simple, short, direct questions related to personal experience and general knowledge. Can understand many common everyday instructions and directions related to the immediate context. Can follow simple, short, predictable phone messages. Often requests repetition. Needs a little assistance (such as speech modification or explanation).

Performance Conditions

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Listening texts are short monologues, presentations and dialogues (several exchange turns) on familiar everyday topics. Speech is clear and at a slow to normal rate. Learner has been adequately briefed for focused listening.

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Communication is face to face or video- and audio-mediated (e.g., tape). Instructions are clear and explicit, used with some visual clues. They are mostly simple and compound clauses containing longer phrases of location, movement and manner. Some tasks require oral or physical response. Some tasks are in a “guided” writing format (e.g., circle or match items, fill-in blanks). Learner may require an occasional repetition.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction What the person can do

Identify specific factual details and inferred meanings in dialogues of casual small talk, introductions, leave-taking, and in short phone calls.

Examples of tasks and tests

Identify correctly specific factual details and inferred meanings in a videotaped small talk; introductions or leave-taking; or in a taped phone conversation by responding correctly to comprehension questions.

Performance Indicators

Identifies specific factual details and inferred meanings in video- and audio-mediated listening texts/discourse as required.

II. Instructions What the person can do

Follow sets of sequentially presented four- to five-clause everyday instructions and directions relating to movement and position in space, manner, frequency and duration.

Examples of tasks and texts In the middle cabinet, top shelf. On the diagonal between the upper left and lower right corner. A quarter of the way from the centre in each direction.

• •

Locate items on diagrams, maps and in real space following verbal directions. Correct the order of steps in a recipe following verbal directions.

Performance Indicators

Follows instructions and directions relating to movement and position in space, manner, frequency and duration.

III. Suasion (getting things done) What the person can do

Demonstrate comprehension of mostly factual details and some inferred meanings in persuasive oral texts.

Examples of tasks and texts

• •

Public announcements, commercials, infomercials. Identify meanings, according to task requirements (e.g., true/false, answer the question, circle the correct answer, etc.).

Performance Indicators

Identifies main intent, main idea, factual details, words and expressions, and inferred meanings in persuasive oral texts as required.

IV. Information What the person can do

Demonstrate comprehension of mostly factual details and some inferred meanings in a story about obtaining goods or services; a report or a forecast; a news item.

Examples of tasks and texts

Listen to a story about shopping, getting an appliance repaired, arranging travel, etc.; a weather report/forecast, traffic report; a radio/TV news item. Complete a related task (e.g., true/false).

Performance Indicators

• •

Identifies factual details and inferred meanings in a listening text as required. Gets the gist, detail, key words and expressions as required.

Canadian Language Benchmark 4 Reading: Basic Level
Global Performance Descriptor

• • • • •

Learner is able to read a simple two- to three-paragraph passage within a mostly familiar, predictable context of daily life and experience: simple narrative, biographical or descriptive prose, set of simple instructions, plain language news items, classified ads, sales promotion coupons and flyers. Can locate, compare and contrast one or more specific pieces of information in larger texts. Is able to use low-level inference and to tolerate some ambiguity (e.g., when guessing the meaning of the unknown words in the text). Uses a bilingual dictionary almost constantly. Reads in English for information, to learn the language and to develop reading skills. Can read silently for meaning, with little visible or audible vocalization efforts, but reads slowly.

Performance Conditions

• • •

Text length: two or three paragraphs. Language is mostly concrete, factual and literal, with some abstract vocabulary items. Most words are familiar to the learner.

• • • •

Instructions are common everyday instructions without pictures. Prose passages (narrative, biographical or descriptive) can be related to personal experience. News items are in plain language, with few idioms. Context is often familiar and partly predictable; pictures occasionally accompany text. Handwritten text is legible, in print-like handwriting.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social Interaction Texts What the person can do: Get information from personal notes, e-mail messages and letters. Examples of tasks and tests Read an authentic note, e-mail message or letter; answer seven to 10 questions about the text. Performance Indicators Gets the gist of the note or letter. Gets key information/main idea from texts. Identifies important details/specific information as required. II. Instructions What the person can do Follow one- to six-step common everyday instructions and instructional texts. Examples of tasks and texts Properly sequenced instructions on how to make a long distance call or how to use the automatic teller machine. Follow instructions on employment forms. Sequence a simple five- to eight-line recipe. Performance Indicators Follows the one- to six-step instructions. Numbers steps in sequence. III. Business/service texts What the person can do Find information in formatted texts: forms, tables, schedules, directories. Get information from short business brochures, notices, form letters and flyers. Examples of tasks and texts Use a bus route map to match several bus stops with arrival/departure times. Use the White Pages to locate the closest medical clinic/emergency service. Find an ad to match your list of apartment requirements. Performance Indicators Identifies layout of forms; finds specific information. Gets overall meaning; identifies type and purpose of text. Gets key information and specific details from verbal text and graphics or a simple graph. Finds information in complex directories, dictionaries, maps. Identifies main idea, key and supporting details. Identifies links between paragraphs. Compares facts to make choices. Predicts, guesses meaning. Distinguishes facts from opinions. IV. Informational texts What the person can do Get the gist, key information and important details of simple, explicit two- to three-paragraph

texts (e.g., news articles, educational content materials, stories). Use standard reference texts: dictionaries, maps and diagrams, graphs. Examples of tasks and texts Read a short newspaper article: answer seven to 10 questions. Label a diagram using information in a text. Give a text an appropriate and informative title. Identify the percentage of Canadians who are first-generation immigrants by looking at a simple pictorial graph (e.g., a pie graph). Performance Indicators Identifies layout of forms; finds specific information. Gets overall meaning; identifies type and purpose of text. Gets key information and specific details from verbal text and graphics or a simple graph. Finds information in complex directories, dictionaries, maps. Identifies main idea, key and supporting details. Identifies links between paragraphs. Compares facts to make choices. Predicts, guesses meaning. Distinguishes facts from opinions.

Canadian Language Benchmark 4 Writing: Basic Level
Global Performance Descriptor

• • • • • • •

Learner can effectively convey in writing simple ideas and information about personal experience within predictable contexts of everyday needs. Can write simple descriptions and narration of events, stories, future plans about self and family, or other highly familiar topics. Can write short messages; postcards, notes, directions, and letters. Can fill out simple application forms. Can copy information from dictionaries, encyclopedias, and manuals. Can take a slow, simple dictation with frequent repetitions. Shows ability to use successfully one-clause sentences or coordinated clauses with basic tenses.

Performance Conditions

• • • • • • • • •

Circumstances range from informal to more formal occasions. Addressee is familiar. Topics are of immediate everyday relevance. Letter is one paragraph long. Note is three to five sentences long. Texts to copy are one to two paragraphs, with easy layout, in legible handwriting or print. Texts may come from various sources and may be of a more specialized or technical nature. Forms are simple in format, 20 items long. Text is one paragraph long, on a familiar and personally relevant topic.

Competency Outcomes and Standards I. Social interaction

What the person can do Convey personal messages in an informal or formal personal short letter or a note to express invitations, thanks, regrets, cancellations and apologies. Examples of tasks and tests Write a short letter to your friend to tell her or him about your new apartment, car, job or trip. Write a formal invitation for a special family function (e.g., housewarming party, graduation, wedding, special birthday, etc.). Write a personal note to thank your host for a dinner or a party. Performance Indicators Conveys the message: reader can follow. Uses language and content that are appropriate to the occasion, intent and social context. Uses simple grammar structures, punctuation and spelling with few errors. Conveys main ideas and supports them with detail in a basic paragraph structure. II. Recording information What the person can do Copy short texts to record information for personal use, or to complete tasks, or to learn information. Examples of tasks and texts Copy definitions from two to three different sources (e.g., dictionaries or encyclopedias), and compare them. Copy information about a product or service from catalogues, directories, instructions and manuals for comparison purposes. Performance Indicators Competently copies information, including capitalization, lower case, punctuation, and phonetic and other notations. Has legible handwriting or printing. Makes no major omissions in copying information. There are only a few occasional copying mistakes or slight uncertainty in decoding. III. Business/service messages What the person can do Fill out simple forms. Convey simple business messages as written notes. Examples of tasks and texts Fill out an application form: car rental, direct deposit request. Write a short note to your child’s teacher notifying her or him about an absence. Write down a message from one person to pass on to another. Performance Indicators Fills out form with required information. Spells and follows punctuation conventions. Has legible handwriting or printing. Makes no major omissions in providing information. Conveys a simple message. Uses simple structures with few errors in grammar. IV. Presenting information What the person can do Write a short text about a personal or familiar situation, event, personal experience, future plans. Explain reasons. Examples of tasks and texts Describe an event or tell a story (e.g., write about coming to Canada). Write about your work experience in the past. Write about what you would like to do and why (e.g., future plans and the reasons for them). Performance Indicators

Describes a situation: reader can follow. Conveys main ideas, supporting detail. Uses basic paragraph structure. Uses simple structures; few errors. Uses adequate vocabulary for the topic. Spells correctly; follows punctuation conventions. Has legible handwriting or printing.

Related Links
• •
English language testing organizations Other evidence of language abilities

Official language testing
The best way to provide proof of language skills is to take a language proficiency test given by an organization that is approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). If you do so, you will be able to see exactly how many points you will receive for the language factor according to your test results. You must

• •

Make arrangements for testing by an approved organization. You will have to pay the costs. Include the results of your test with your immigration application.

What happens next

• • •

You can use the equivalency charts to see exactly how many points you will earn based on your test results. The test results will be used by CIC as conclusive proof of your language skills. You can use language test results for one year from the time you took the test.

Approved language tests You can arrange to take a language test from any of the following approved organizations. English Language Testing Organizations IELTS: International English Language Testing System The University of Cambridge Local Examination Syndicate, IDP Education Australia: IELTS Australia and the British Council administer this test. Note: IELTS has two options for the reading and writing tests: General Training and Academic. You must take the General Training option. French Language Testing Organizations TEF: Test d’évaluation de français

The Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry administers these tests. Note: You must submit results from the following TEF tests as proof of your French language skills:

• • • •

compréhension écrite compréhension orale expression écrite expression orale

Providing other written evidence
We strongly recommend that you take an official language test if you are claiming skills in a language that is not your native language. If you choose not to take an approved language test, you must prove your ability to speak, listen, read and write Canada’s official languages through other written evidence. You must provide written proof and an explanation that clearly shows you meet the benchmark criteria listed in the Canadian Language Benchmarks in each of the four skills. NOTE Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) officers will not conduct an interview to assess your language skills. CIC will only use test results from organizations approved by CIC in assigning language points. You must: 1. Indicate what level of language proficiency you are claiming for each skill (speaking, listening, reading and writing). 2. Submit, with your application for immigration, a written explanation and supporting documentation as proof of the levels you have indicated. This material should include: o a written submission explaining your training in English or French; o an explanation of how you commonly use English or French; o official documentation of education in English or French; and o official documentation of work experience in English or French. What happens next A CIC officer will review the evidence you include with your application.

• • •

Your submission must satisfy the officer that your language skills meet the benchmarks for the levels you are claiming. The officer will award points for your language ability based on what you send with your application. You will not know in advance how many points the CIC officer will give you for your language skills.

Work Experience (Maximum 21 points)

You will earn points for the number of years you have spent in full-time, paid work. Minimum Work Experience Requirements You must meet the following minimum work experience requirements to be eligible to apply as a skilled worker:

• •

You must have at least one continuous year of full-time, paid work experience or the equivalent in part-time continuous employment. Your work experience must be in the category of Skill Type 0, or Skill Level A or B on the Canadian National Occupational Classification (NOC). See below for instructions on determining the NOC category for your work experience. You must have had this experience within the last 10 years.

National Occupational Classification The NOC is a classification system for jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for occupations in Canada. Determining Your NOC Category To determine how many points you can earn for your work experience, go to the Descriptions of Occupations page on the NOC website. You will find a link to the NOC site in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. Follow the instructions to find the NOC category that matches your work experience. If the initial description and list of main duties match what you did at your last job(s), you can use this experience to earn points under the selection factors when you apply as a skilled worker. If the description does not match your work experience, then you might not have the experience you need to apply as a skilled worker. Look through the NOC list to see if another occupation matches your experience. Check all the jobs you had in the past 10 years to see if you have at least one continuous year of work experience in a job that will qualify you as a skilled worker. You do not meet the minimum requirements if:

• •

none of your work experience is listed in the NOC list; or your experience did not occur in the 10 years before you applied.

If you do not meet the minimum work experience requirements, your application as a skilled worker will be refused. Experience 1 year 2 years 3 years 4 years Maximum 21 points 15 17 19 21

Related Links
• •
National Occupational Classification (NOC) NOC Descriptions of Occupations

About the NOC The NOC is the authoritative resource on occupational information in Canada. It is used daily by thousands of people to understand the jobs found throughout Canada's labour market. Learn more New @ NOC HRSDC wants to hear your suggestions on how we can improve the NOC. Share your comments with us before May 30th at the NOC 2011 Consultation. The new NOC Web site now reflects all NOC 2006 information. The entire content of the NOC is now available online and free of charge. In addition, we are pleased to announce the release of Job Descriptions: An Employer's Handbook. Learn more Coming Soon We are currently developing a number of NOC services in order to better meet the needs of our users. These services include an interactive version of the NOC Matrix, an updated Career Handbook and the NOC Web Service, which will allow users to seamlessly access NOC content databases. Learn more

Age (Maximum 10 points)
You will be awarded selection points based on your age at the time when the visa office receives your application. Age 16 or under 17 Points 0 2

18 19 20 21–49 50 51 52 53 54+

4 6 8 10 8 6 4 2 0

Arranged Employment (Maximum 10 points)
In some situations, you can be awarded selection points for a job that you have arranged before applying to come to Canada as a skilled worker. Determine your points based on the chart below: If: You are currently working in Canada on a temporary work permit. And: Your work permit is valid at the time of the permanent resident visa application and at the time the visa is issued; and Your employer has made an offer to employ you on an indeterminate basis if the permanent resident visa is issued. You are currently working in Canada in a job that is exempt from confirmation by HRSDC under an international agreement or a significant benefit category (e.g., intracompany transferee). Your work permit is valid at the time of your application for a permanent resident visa and at the time the visa is issued; and your employer has made an offer to employ you on an indeterminate basis if your permanent resident visa is issued. You have a full-time job offer that 10 10 Points 10

You do not currently have a work permit and

you do not intend to work in Canada before you have been issued a permanent resident visa.

has been approved by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC); Your employer has made an offer to give you a permanent job if your permanent resident visa is issued. You meet all required Canadian licensing or regulatory standards associated with the job.

Note: You cannot arrange for an HRSDC confirmation of a job offer. Your employer must do this.

Adaptability (Maximum 10 points)
You may be awarded selection points if you can show that you or your dependants can adapt to living in Canada. Adaptability Maximum 10 points 3–5

Spouse’s or common-law partner’s level of education

• •

Secondary school (high school) diploma or less: 0 points A one-year diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship, or university degree and at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 3 points A two or three-year diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship, or university degree and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 4 points A master’s degree or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 5 points 5

Previous work in Canada You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have completed a minimum of one year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit. Previous study in Canada You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have completed a program of full-time study of at least two years’ duration at a post-secondary institution in Canada. You must have done this after you were 17 years old and with a valid study permit. There is no need to have obtained a degree or diploma for these two years of study to earn these points. Arranged Employment in Canada

5

5

You can claim five additional points if you have arranged employment as described in the Arranged Employment selection factor. Relatives in Canada You, or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner, have a relative (parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, child of a parent, sibling, child of a grandparent, aunt or uncle, or grandchild of a parent, niece or nephew) who is residing in Canada and is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. 5

You can only count points from each category once. You can claim points from a category either for you, or for your spouse or common-law partner, but not for both.

Self-assessment test
The self-assessment test will help you determine if you meet the requirements of a skilled worker immigrant. This test is only to give you an idea of whether you will qualify as a skilled worker. A Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) officer will make a decision about your application based on the information you provide. The information from the test is for your use only. CIC does not keep a record of these results. If you want to keep a record, you can print or save your results from your computer. Pass mark The current pass mark is 67. The pass mark could change. You should check for updated information on a regular basis. Who should take the test? You should take this test to help you decide if you want to apply to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker. If you are married or in a common-law relationship, you both should take the test to see who scores the most points. The person with the most selection points should apply as the principal applicant. >>> Take the test Final Decision A CIC officer will make the final decision on the application you submit to a Visa Office. Make sure you fill out the application forms completely. You will need to provide documents to support your application and, if selected, to pass medical and security checks. The results from the online self-assessment test are for your advice only. CIC does not keep a record of these results. If you want to keep a record, you can print or save this page from your computer. See Immigrating to Canada as a Skilled Worker for more information on Skilled Worker immigration. Be sure to check out the Working in Canada section for more information.

There are other programs to assist you in immigrating to Canada. See Provincial Nominations and Business Class Immigration.

Working temporarily in Canada
Every year, over 90,000 foreign workers enter Canada to work temporarily in jobs that help Canadian employers address skill shortages, or as live-in caregivers. A work permit is needed for most temporary jobs in Canada, though for some positions and business people it is not necessary. More information on work permits for temporary jobs can be found in this section of the website.

Notice: Don’t be a victim of fraud — Find out more.

Are you a temporary worker or graduate with Canadian work experience? Learn more about the upcoming Canadian Experience Class!

Related Links

Assistance for victims of human trafficking

Provincial nominees
Persons who immigrate to Canada under the Provincial Nominee Program have the skills, education and work experience needed to make an immediate economic contribution to the province or territory that nominates them. They are ready to establish themselves successfully as permanent residents in Canada. To apply under the Provincial Nominee Program, applicants must be nominated by a Canadian province or territory. Consult this section to find all the information and required forms to apply as a provincial nominee. Because the criteria for provincial nomination are determined by the individual provinces and territories, they can change without notice. For this reason, consult this site and the corresponding provincial site regularly before submitting your application. Before you apply, make sure you are familiar with the current application procedures. After you apply, make sure you return to this web page to find out about the steps that follow.

Skilled workers and professionals: After applying

Your application will be processed at the visa office where you applied. The process may vary depending on the visa office. However, some processing steps are common to all offices.

• • • • • • •

The application assessment process Processing time Medical examinations Criminal and security checks The decision on your application Change of address Confirmation of permanent residence

The application assessment process After you submit your application, a Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) officer will verify that you have submitted all the required documentation with your application. The officer will make sure you have:

• • •

completed your application form correctly and signed it paid your processing fee and included the required supporting documentation if you used the regular application process.

If you applied using the simplified application process, the visa office will contact you and ask you to provide the required documentation about four months before your application is to be processed. If your application is not complete, the visa office will return it to you without processing it. The visa office where you applied will send you a letter when it receives your completed application and verifies that it is completed properly. The letter will tell you what you need to do and what happens next. Processing time The length of time it takes to process applications varies depending on where you applied. You can check application processing times in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page. You may be able to avoid unnecessary delays by:

• • • • • •

making sure all the necessary information is included with your application notifying the visa office of any changes to personal information on your application, such as your address, phone and fax numbers or a change in the makeup of your family avoiding repeated inquiries to the visa office ensuring that the photocopies and documents you provide are clear and legible providing certified English or French translations of original documents that you submit in other languages and applying from a country where you are a citizen or permanent resident.

Your application will be delayed if the visa office has to take extra steps to assess your case. Your application will take longer if:

there are criminal or security problems related to your application

• •

your family situation is not clear because of a situation, such as a divorce or an adoption that is not yet complete or child custody issues that have not been resolved or the visa office that processes your application has to consult with other CIC offices in Canada or abroad.

You can check the status of your application online after the visa office has started to process your application. Select the Check my application status button in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page. Medical examinations You must pass a medical examination before coming to Canada. Your dependants must also pass a medical examination even if they are not coming to Canada with you. Applications for permanent residence will not be accepted if an applicant’s health:

• •

is a danger to public health or safety, or would cause excessive demand on health or social services in Canada.

Instructions on how to take the medical examination will normally be sent to you after you submit your application to the visa office. More I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page. Criminal and security checks If you have a criminal record, you may not be allowed to enter Canada. People who pose a risk to Canada’s security are not allowed to come to Canada either. If you want to immigrate to Canada, you and any family members over the age of 18 who come to Canada with you must provide police certificates to the visa office. If you apply using the regular application process, you must submit the police certificates with your application. If you apply using the simplified application process, the visa office will contact you and ask you to provide the required documentation at a later date. You can find more information about criminal and security checks in the I Need To… section on the right-hand side of this page. The decision on your application A CIC officer will make a final decision on your application based on the current requirements for immigration to Canada. The decision will be based on several factors, including the results of your medical examination, and the criminal and security checks. The officer will also assess the proof of funds you have provided, to ensure that you will be able to support yourself and your family when you arrive in Canada. The visa office will contact you if it needs more documentation or if you are required to attend an interview. If your application is approved, you will be asked to submit your passport to the Canadian visa office where you applied in order to receive your permanent resident visa. Change of address

If you move or change your address, telephone number or any other contact information after you submit your application, you must contact the visa office where you submitted your application. Confirmation of permanent residence If your application is approved, the visa office will issue a permanent resident visa to you. Your permanent resident visa includes your Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) and your entry visa. Your COPR will include identification information as well as your photograph. Please check the information on your COPR to make sure it is correct. It should be the same as the information on your passport. If there is a mistake on your COPR, contact your visa office. You must have your COPR and your visa with you when you arrive in Canada.

Skilled workers and professionals: Arriving
When you arrive in Canada, you will be greeted by an officer from the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). The CBSA is responsible for border and point of entry activities in Canada. You can find more information about the CBSA in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page. The officer will ask to see your passport and other travel documents. Make sure they are not packed in your luggage, and you have them with you. This will help speed up your entry to Canada. You must present the following documents upon your arrival:

• •

Your valid passport and/or travel documents. Your passport must be a regular, private passport. You cannot immigrate to Canada with a diplomatic, government service or public affairs passport. Your valid permanent resident visa, and your Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR). The officer will make sure you are entering Canada before or on the expiry date shown on your permanent resident visa. Please note that this document cannot be extended. Make sure you use it before it expires. Proof that you have sufficient funds to support yourself and your family after you arrive in Canada. You can find more information under Proof of funds in the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

The officer will ask you a few questions to make sure you still meet the requirements to immigrate to Canada. The questions will be similar to the ones you answered on your Application for Permanent Residence in Canada. The officer will confirm that you still meet the requirements for admission to Canada. This should only take a few minutes. You will not be allowed into Canada if you give false or incomplete information, or if you do not satisfy the officer that you meet the requirements for entry into Canada. If there are no problems at the point of entry, the officer will authorize you to enter Canada as a permanent resident. The officer will also confirm your Canadian mailing address. Your permanent resident card will be mailed to you at this address.

Disclosure of funds If you arrive in Canada with more than C$10,000, you must disclose this information to the CBSA officer. If you do not disclose this information, you could be fined or put in prison. These funds could be in the form of:

• • •

cash securities in bearer form (for example, stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills) or negotiable instruments in bearer form, such as bankers’ drafts, cheques, travellers’ cheques or money orders.

What you can bring into Canada You can find customs and border information on the website of the CBSA.

Related Links

• • • •

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) What you can bring into Canada (CBSA) Proof of funds Arriving in Canada with $10,000 or more?

Proof of funds
The Government of Canada does not provide financial support to new skilled worker immigrants. You must show that you have enough money to support yourself and your dependants after you arrive in Canada. You cannot borrow this money from another person. You must be able to use this money to support the costs of living for your family. You will need to provide proof of your funds to the Canadian visa office in your home country when you submit your application for immigration. The amount of money you need to support your family is determined by the size of your family. These amounts are updated every year. Number of Funds Required Family Members (in Canadian dollars) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 or more $10,601 $13,198 $16,225 $19,700 $22,343 $25,199 $28,055

You do not have to show that you have these funds if you have arranged employment in Canada. How much money should you bring? Find out how much it costs to live where you are planning to settle in Canada. Bring as much money as possible to make moving and finding a home in Canada easier. Disclosure of funds If you are carrying more than C$10,000, tell a Canadian official when you arrive in Canada. If you do not tell an official, you may be fined or put in prison. These funds could be in the form of:

• • •

cash securities in bearer form (for example, stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills) or negotiable instruments in bearer form (for example, bankers’ drafts, cheques, travellers’ cheques or money orders).

Working in Canada Tool
If you need help finding out what your occupation is called in Canada and what jobs are open across the country, you can use the Working in Canada Tool. It will give you a detailed labour market report that includes information on wages and job opportunities for your occupation and city where you would like to work. This tool can help you prepare to work in Canada before you travel and after you arrive. You can find it in the “Learn About” section at the bottom of this page. Learn about:

Working in Canada Tool

Frequently asked questions: Skilled workers and professionals
Simplified application process

1. Why has Citizenship and Immigration Canada introduced the simplified application 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
process for Federal Economic Class applications? When did the simplified application process come into effect? What does the simplified application process involve? What does the supporting documentation to be provided later include? Is the simplified application process being used at all visa offices? Why is the simplified application process not being used by Buffalo and other U.S. offices?

7. Can a foreigner living in the United States who has legal status submit a simplified
application?

8. If I am using the simplified application process, do I have to notify the visa office if I
change jobs?

9. I have already submitted my application. Do I have to start over? 10. Why do you return the supporting documents? 11. I have been nominated under a province’s immigration program. Do I submit a
simplified application?

12. Will my processing fees be refunded if I decide to withdraw my application? 13. Will this initiative reduce processing times? 14. I have just taken a language proficiency test at a designated organization, such as the
International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or the Test d’évaluation de français (TEF). Can I submit the results now? 1. Citizienship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is committed to client-focused service delivery. CIC recognized that changes in procedure could simplify the initial application requirements for Federal Economic Class applicants waiting to have their applications assessed. 2. The simplified application process came into effect on September 1, 2006. 3. Simplified kits and forms have been developed to guide applicants through the application process. Applicants are required to complete and submit a three-page form along with the processing fees, which secures them a place in the processing line. All supporting documents will be requested at a later date, usually about four months before the visa office is ready to assess the application. A letter of receipt provides advice to the applicant on labour-market preparation. The letter also encourages applicants to take advantage of the waiting period. For example, some applicants could use this time to start courses to improve their language skills. 4. Supporting documentation would include education documents or other certificates attesting to the educational level, employment letters confirming work experience, language test results, police certificates, birth and marriage certificates, and bank statements confirming the applicant’s funds. 5. Since September 1, 2006, the simplified application process is in use at all visa offices except Buffalo, U.S.A. For applicants who submit their applications in Buffalo for processing by Buffalo and the other U.S. offices, the regular application process continues to apply. Applicants must submit their supporting documents at the same time as the application form. 6. Buffalo and its partner missions in the U.S. use a streamlined system where all files are created and pre-processed in Buffalo. It requires you to submit all relevant documents and information with your application. This makes processing faster for most clients who already live in Canada or the U.S. The SAP does not work well with this system. 7. No. Since Buffalo continues to use the regular application process, American citizens and other residents of the United States must submit a full application to our visa office in Buffalo, which will then forward it to the visa office closest to the applicant’s residence. If you submit a simplified application to Buffalo, it will be returned to you with a letter requesting you submit a regular application. Any fees sent with the simplified application will also be returned.

8. No. You only have to notify the visa office if you have a new address (postal or email) or hire a new immigration representative. You should also contact the visa office if you decide to withdraw your application. You do not have to notify Citizienship and Immigration Canada of any other changes until the visa office contacts you (about four months before the office is ready to assess your application). 9. No. Applications that were submitted before September 1, 2006, will be processed as usual. Regular applications received after September 1, 2006, are accepted, but the supporting documents will be returned to the applicant until the visa office requests them. 10. The simplified process is intended to help applicants by eliminating the burden of continuously having to submit documents while waiting for their application to be processed. It also allows Citizienship and Immigration Canada to avoid duplication of work and save storage space. In addition, given application processing times, most documents would have to be updated if the applicant’s situation changes (for example, marital status, job, education and financial situation). 11. No. Individuals applying under a provincial nomination program do not submit a simplified application because these applications are processed on a priority basis. 12. Yes. If you contact the visa office before they contact you (that is, before the assessment of your application begins), your fees will be refunded. 13. No. However, the simplified application process will reduce the amount of information you need to submit when you apply. It also secures you a place in the processing line, and you won’t have to submit supporting documents more than once. 14. If you apply under the simplified application process, the visa office will not accept any supporting documents. If you submit documents with your application, they will be returned to you. Submit your language test results with your other supporting documents. The visa office will contact you to request these documents about four months before your application is processed. If you take the language test within one year of submitting your simplified application, the results remain valid and will be accepted as supporting documentation by the visa office.

About the NOC
The National Occupational Classification (NOC) is the nationally accepted reference on occupations in Canada. It organizes over 30,000 job titles into 520 occupational group descriptions. It is used daily by thousands of people to compile, analyze and communicate information about occupations, and to understand the jobs found throughout Canada's labour market. The NOC provides a standardized framework for organizing the world of work in a coherent system. It is used to collect and organize occupational statistics and to provide labour market

information. The structure and content of the NOC is also implemented in a number of major services and products throughout the private and public sectors. The NOC is updated in partnership with Statistics Canada according to 5-year Census cycles. It is based on extensive occupational research and consultations conducted across the country, reflecting the evolution of the Canadian labour market. We hope that your session on the NOC 2006 Web site is informative and helpful. Methodology Methods of Revision for the National Occupational Classification (NOC) The NOC is a standard that classifies and describes the occupations in the Canadian economy. It is a foundation for labour market statistics and career information. The NOC must be revised periodically to reflect developments in technology, organizations and language of work in order to remain accurate and useful. Revisions have been made in five year cycles coinciding with Census intervals. Prior to the 2006 update, consultations were held with Sector Councils, industry representatives and federal, provincial and territorial personnel to identify areas where changes could be required. In some cases these consultations suggested that changes were desired at a structural level. However, by agreement with Statistics Canada, structural changes1 are considered over a tenyear time frame to allow users of statistics to compare data from different time periods. These comparisons are important for identifying trends and would be hampered by changes to the classification structure. Therefore, updating for NOC 2006 was mainly restricted to changes such as adding new occupational titles to existing groups, validating and modifying content in unit group descriptions, and correcting and enhancing title indexes and concordances between English and French. Analysts were assigned to occupational areas according to the skill types of the classification. Within an area of specialization, analysts reviewed user inquiries from the NOC inbox, correspondence from sectors and employers, and problems reported by statistical or program coding operations. They identified possible gaps, changes or new or emerging occupations. Analysts also reviewed available literature, sector studies, occupational standards, career information, industry web sites and job advertisements. Write-in information from Job Bank job orders was analyzed to identify changing tasks and certification requirements. Other primary occupational research methods were available as needed to clarify issues of content for the occupational unit groups and titles. These methods were used in the original development of the NOC and included interviews with employers, observation-interviews with workers, subject matter expert group interviews, or surveys of employers or workers. Studies could be contracted or conducted in-house. For reasons of economy for the 2006 revision, contracted research was conducted in certain occupational areas and interviews were generally used only where needed to clarify issues identified by stakeholders, users and literature reviews. Analysts prepared draft revisions, which were then reviewed with their supporting evidence by occupational classification experts within HRSDC. Proposals were then sent to Statistics Canada for review and consideration of their impact, operational feasibility and codability. Finally the revisions were discussed and accepted, modified or rejected by a committee of classification experts from the two departments. Future revisions of the NOC are expected to revisit the issue of structural changes, as well as the ongoing need to accurately represent the evolving characteristics of the world of work.

1

Structural changes involve modifying the conceptual boundaries of occupational groups, moving occupations to different groups or changing the hierarchical classification structure.

Learn More
Preface - Introduction The NOC is revised according to census cycles. Following the significant revision with structural changes for the 2001 edition, the NOC was subjected to a minor update in 2006. For a better understanding of the extent of the changes made to the NOC 2006 edition, please view the Preface in .pdf format. The NOC organizes the world of work in a standardized and structured format. It provides descriptive information about occupations in the Canadian labour market. To learn more about the organizational structure of the NOC and its classification principles and criteria, please view the Introduction in .pdf format. NOC-S to NOC Crosswalk The NOC-S to NOC concordance is a two-part coding system Statistics Canada has implemented in its publication to link the statistical aggregation to the NOC coding structure. This expended coding system allows users to relate data produced by Statistics Canada to the minor and unit groups of the NOC. View the NOC-S to NOC concordance in .pdf format. The expanded eight-digit code reflects the NOC-S alphanumerical code followed by a decimal point and the 4-digit NOC code. Job Descriptions: An Employers' Handbook This easy-to-use reference is designed to help small and medium-sized organizations with their human resources management activities. Based on National Occupational Classification (NOC) content, this handbook can help users develop job descriptions to hire employees, evaluate employee performance and identify training needs. View the Employers' Handbook in .pdf format or in HTML printer friendly format to learn more.

http://www.cic.gc.ca

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