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june 17, 2007 choose to improve we approach many of our daily negotiations as mere nuisances to be mindlessly dispatched or avoided. ironically this cavalier negotiating attitude is extended to those we love; our spouses, children, friends, family, and close associates. we tend to pay more attention to our interactions with those we don't know, retail clerks, teachers, students, clergy, bankers, police, dentists, doctors and the like, rather than those most important in our lives. there is no reason not to try to ease the stress of the conflict in our personal lives as much as we do with perfect strangers. continue reading "choose to improve" posted by bill at 9:30 am | comments (0) june 9, 2007 surviving daily challenges survival is a strong word. when discussing the everyday interactions we all have with one another it really doesn't seem like survival. but it is. the decisions we make, the compromises we agree to, and the arguments we win determine our quality of life each day. they also help to forge our future. survival is defined as staying alive or living through something. we endure daily challenges. we just don't give our actions and interaction with others the importance that they deserve. continue reading "surviving daily challenges" posted by bill at 11:26 am | comments (0) june 3, 2007 why negotiate? why do we negotiate? everyone does it, but why? wouldn't life be easier without conflict? wouldn't the world be better off if nation-states didn't compete for resources and land? is religious intolerance really good for the peoples of the world? we negotiate to satisfy or protect a need or want. the currency of a negotiation may be wealth, recognition, sex, a diaper change or simply peace from a crying child or whining peer. negotiation is also the process for seeking world dominance, gaining a competitive advantage, or overpowering an aggressive predator. negotiation can take the form of civil discussions, formal debates, open and hostile fighting, marketing campaigns, political caucuses, or simply a baby crying to resolve its discomfort. it is simply the broad-spectrum of human interaction.

anything we want or need becomes the commodity or currency of a negotiation. we try to improve or avoid some aspect of our lives through forcing a change. typically such change involves other people though we often negotiate with ourselves when making the decision to do something we don't want to do. conflict enters the equation when someone else has or wants what we want or we resist the need to do something out of fear, complacency or dread! continue reading "why negotiate?" posted by bill at 9:56 am | comments (0) april 18, 2007 rules and negotiations a great white has no known predator. he is unique in that he can and does make his own rules. they are simple as they are based solely on the concept that might does make right in their world. machiavelli would have liked the great white shark. every situation has rules. whether it is playing baseball on the corner lot or submitting an appeal to the supreme court. knowing the applicable rules enables us to compete more effectively. in school, legal situations, dealing with any governmental agent and other structured settings, rules must be followed to stay in the game and make progress. as an example, failure to adhere to specifics of state contract law can invalidate contracts. depending on your goal and the importance of the negotiation, it may be wise to hire professionals to assist in the documentation to insure what you sign is what was agreed to in the first place. a note of caution: use these professionals as tools to help you. do not rely on them to solve your problem. rules are essential to order but they are not sacrosanct. if you find the rules to be too restrictive it is your right to challenge them. far too often i have heard negotiators say they didn't ask for a concession because it was simply not �done� or the "rule" could not be challenged. all to frequently these are rules established by the other person (landlord or developer as an example). other than having something you want, these individuals hold no power over you; they have no authority to which you must succumb. also once firm rules may change over time. don't assume that rules of others necessarily apply to you or are still in effect. rules are subject to time and circumstances. they are not always in effect. good negotiators challenge rules to avoid missing an opportunity. posted by bill at 3:51 pm | comments (0) about how-to-negotiate is a guide to the very human process of handling conflict. conflict is not inherently bad. how people handle conflict is often what causes problems. conflict itself is the natural by-product of human interaction. this site features an a-z dictionary of negotiating tips as well as regular blog posts using examples of negotiation situations from television, in movies, and other popular media. brought to you by: associates for success get email updates

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how to negotiate effectively * introduction top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references if you think negotiating effectively is useful only in hostage situations, think again. philip crockett andalastair hull explain how this skill can help in many areas of your life and give some practical advice on how to do it

doctors are placed in many situations that involve negotiation, although some of these will be more obvious than others. it pays to start thinking early on in your career about the role negotiation plays in the context of job interviews, contracts, professional debates and discussions with patients. kevin spacey negotiating with samuel l jackson in the film "the negotiator" credit: kobal doctors are usually left to develop transferable skills�for example, their negotiating skills�independently from their core training. the brave (or foolhardy) may take an interest in management issues or local negotiating committees (lncs) and develop their experience that way.1 others represent organisations (such as the bma) at various levels, or take some role in representing their colleagues at a local level. detailed below are some of the necessary steps to negotiation and some of the common mistakes. * what is a negotiation? top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references the central process of negotiation is to confer with others in order to reach a compromise or agreement. essentially, it involves "giving" something in exchange for "getting" something you want in return. the term negotiation may conjure up images of deeply divided groups battling with each other, scoring points, and trying to come out on top. the ideal scenario for a successful negotiation is "win-win," with both sides achieving some of their aims. individuals wanting a good argument are destructive to negotiations. it is also worth remembering that you may need to work with the individuals involved again. * is it a negotiation or something else? top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references clarify that you are involved in the process of negotiation and not something else. for example, arbitration, conciliation, and mediation all involve a third party (usually in settling a dispute), but the difference is that this third party normally makes the decisions. situations where negotiation skills may be helpful * job interviews * contract negotiations

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placements on rotations pay banding issues organisation duties multidisciplinary team working management roles everyday life

* can anyone do it? top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references anyone can learn to negotiate but many shy away for fear of losing face. for example, junior doctors often think that managers will use unfair tactics and therefore believe that their views will not be taken seriously. however, if you are not afraid to negotiate and represent your (and your colleagues') views clearly, with sufficient preparation, you will soon be respected. if you think that your view is not taken seriously because you are not senior enough it may be up to you to point this out. it is always important to "choose your battles carefully." * how to negotiate top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references the negotiating process has five key steps2 : preparation, clarification, exchange of opinions and persuasion, encouraging movement, and completing the deal. preparation the foundation of a successful negotiation is groundwork. know the facts about what is available and the strengths and any potential weaknesses of your argument. try to address these as best as you can. if you are representing a group, take time to understand their attitudes and opinions. make sure those you represent agree about your objectives, otherwise they may not appreciate the results despite your best efforts. know as much as you can about the other side so you can calculate their likely priorities, and try to anticipate their arguments. set down your aims in three groups: essential, important, and perfect outcomes. essential aims represent the "bottom line" whereas important aims reflect what you hope to achieve. the perfect or ideal outcome does not imply unrealistic goals; they are genuine and ultimately achievable goals and so are usually put forward as

the opening position. we have found it helpful to rank key points and then beside each identify likely consequences if these were agreed. fortunately, the police negotiated a happy ending to this situation credit: sukree sukplang/reuters clarification both sides will need to clarify the other's position. the position you set out should reflect your ideal outcome. in addition, potentially negotiable points should be stated early. when clarifying the other side's agenda try to link items that need to be discussed together and isolate separate issues. it is often tempting to interrupt: don't. instead, allow the other side time to make a full statement and listen carefully for clues. use reflective listening techniques.3 this involves reflecting back their words and adding a question for example, "you say that . . . but what about . . . ?" look for mixed messages, summarise what you have heard, and clarify where necessary. do expect the unexpected; offers from across the table may have seemed unachievable when you entered negotiations, but they may be acceptable to the other side. exchange of opinions and persuasion this is the core component with the focus of both parties on delineating crucial points from both your own perspective and theirs while moving the discussion along. do not feel you need to answer difficult questions; shift the discussion onto safer ground. remember that scoring cheap points or attempting to defend the indefensible is seldom helpful. similarly avoid being deceitful and naive. you have to live with any decisions taken, and if they are taken in bad faith then they may well be regretted or lead to future suspicion. be prepared to cut your losses and proceed to other points. walking out is generally an unproductive technique. if the other side interrupts you, ask to be allowed to finish your point. this works both ways, but it may be necessary to interrupt on occasions. if you need to interrupt, ask if you can return to the point the other party has raised; it may cause less irritation. do not be afraid to challenge inconsistencies or omissions, and look for divided opinions. encouraging movement only concede in small steps and if you can link them with the final outcome. clarify and acknowledge important points, but keep in mind your prepared essential, important, and perfect outcomes. if negotiations are not moving on, adjourning the meeting (after you have asked if it can be adjourned) may give you valuable breathing space to revise your position if necessary. be prepared to ask for more time if you need more information or want to consult with colleagues. it can also be a helpful ploy to allow others to discuss and change their position. adjournments can also allow time to cool off. if tempers have become frayed it is far better not to push on regardless. completing the deal if agreement is reached on any point, summarise what has been achieved and what has not yet been completed. asking for written confirmation of any agreement is advisable. * roles in a negotiating team top introduction

what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references negotiating in a team has advantages. the part played by an individual in the team will depend on the number of members. often a team will only consist of two negotiators. the possible roles are: * leader: the person designated as leader will take charge of the preparation and the negotiations (including any agreement). * summariser: the summariser has dual roles of relieving pressure from the leader and refocusing any discussion that goes off course. * recorder: takes note of the key points in the negotiation and reports back to the team during any adjournment or between meetings. * common mistakes top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references not preparing this is probably the least forgivable and the most understandable mistake, usually caused by lack of time, the late request for a meeting, or stepping in for a colleague, etc. if you feel you do not have a full grasp of the relevant details, decline to meet at that time or adjourn to allow a proper briefing on the issues. win at all costs the "win-win" ideal scenario can often be forgotten, with the wish to win resulting in behaviour unhelpful in subsequent negotiations. using intimidating behaviour, emotional outbursts, over-personalisation of the issues, and arguing rather than influencing are unhelpful in the longer term. remember that "negotiation" is defined as conferring with others in order to reach a compromise or agreement. non-negotiables some issues may not be open to negotiation, and this should be clarified as early as possible in the discussions. be prepared to say no, but be aware that this will often not signify the end of the negotiation but rather signal a new phase that may necessitate a different approach or new ideas. also recognise that you may have taken things as far as is possible at that time and with that group of people. talking too much when people are nervous they tend to talk too much and listen too little. put your points across succinctly and listen carefully: hints about possible room for negotiation will often be present in their reply.

attempting to be something you are not do not attempt to adopt a different style: good negotiators keep their own personal style. philip s crockett, specialist registrar philipcrockett@aol.com alastair m hull, locum consultant alhul@aol.com royal cornhill hospital, aberdeen ab25 2zh competing interests: amh and psc have had expenses reimbursed by the bma for attendance at meetings, and represent junior doctors as representatives of the bma locally (amh and psc) and nationally (amh). * references top introduction what is a negotiation? is it a negotiation... can anyone do it? how to negotiate roles in a negotiating... common mistakes references 1. hull am, crockett ps. representing your colleagues on a local negotiating committee. bmj 2002;325:s57. (24 august.) (accessed 7 feb 2003). www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/325/7361/s57a. 2. british medical association. lnc negotiating skills course manual. london: bma professional training courses, 2001. 3. miller wr, rollnick s. motivational interviewing: preparing people to change addictive behaviour. new york: guilford press: new york, 1991.

rapid responses: read all rapid responses mediators do not "make the decisions" margaret sloane bmj career focus online, 15 feb 2003 [full text] negotiations in daily practice kamal kumar mahawar bmj career focus online, 19 feb 2003 [full text] re: mediators do not "make the decisions" philip s crockett, et al. bmj career focus online, 2 mar 2003 [full text] thanks yamini chaturvedi bmj career focus online, 2 jan 2007 [full text] sales negotiations business challenge

customers expect business negotiations to result in positive, fair outcomes that satisfy all parties. this expectation requires salespeople who can negotiate in any sales situation, ensuring outcomes that preserve the relationship and create benefits both for the customer and the selling organization. sales negotiations sales negotiations teaches negotiation methods that enhance both the customer relationship and sales results. the course builds skills for working all phases of the negotiation, from preparation to follow-through. key content the following are content highlights of sales negotiations: * driving principles that high performing salespeople use in successful negotiations * critical skills to identify the customers position, create forward momentum, and influence the customers perception * discussion of five modes of negotiation and how they relate to results and relationship * examination of the perceived value that the customer is receiving and giving in the sales negotiation * practical application of five skills for surviving a competitive negotiation * a worksheet tool for preparing and conducting competitive negotiations target audience sales negotiations is for salespeople faced with a complex sales task in which building the client relationship is crucial. it is most effective for salespeople who must negotiate price, terms, and conditions of a sale in a competitive environment. sales managers involved in similar tasks will also find value in the course. outcomes by participating in sales negotiations, participants will be able to: * negotiate more profitable business deals for the selling organization * build customer relationships and loyalty through tough, but fair, negotiation * increase win rates for new business opportunities by negotiating deals that create clear value for customers sales negotiations is a 2-day classroom-based learning experience. for more information please call 1-800-forum-11 or visit us at www.forum.com. print this page email this page to a colleague think like a customer the first job for a training consultant is to sell herself

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poll instant survey >> my company provides sexual-harassment prevention training: periodically once, when the employee is hired never not sure view poll results >> people search search for business contacts: first name : last name : company name : premium search search by job title, geography and build a list of executive contacts search by zoominfo q: my business provides training for employees in team-building, communications skills, decision-making, and more. i'm convinced that every group -- regardless of industry or skill -- would benefit from my program. however, i'm unable to convince business owners to hire me because i can't point to a direct, measurable benefit for their bottom line. how can i reach people who need this training and convince them that my program is worth paying for? -- b.j., san diego a: finding clients for a service business, particularly in a "soft" area like human-resources development, is always a struggle, especially if you don't yet have a strong client base to generate referrals. you're absolutely right about needing to tie your service to your clients' bottom lines. this is even more crucial if you're targeting small and medium-sized businesses, which typically don't have big budgets for employee development. experts say the best way to begin finding clients is to build a profile of your ideal customer, taking into consideration revenue, number of employees, geography, and other pertinent factors. also figure out who the proper contact person is at a company: the ceo, chief financial officer, head of human relations. then you'll probably want to purchase a marketing database that will help you identify potal customers who fit your target profile. dun & bradstreet (www.dnb.com) is one of many companies that sell such software online. try to think like the customers you're targeting. what professional or trade journals do they read? what associations do they belong to? many of these places sell their subscription lists. you can also buy a mailing list from a direct mail house that will narrow down the addresses (and e-mail addresses) that they send you according to your parameters. when you identify potential clients, try to relate your service to their business objectives, says sharon berman, president of berbay corp., a marketing firm based in tarzana, calif. if a client were to tell you that he or she wanted to retain 95% of existing clients and attract five major new ones, for example, you could emphasize the correlation between skilled employees and customer satisfaction. "you want to paint an enticing picture in the prospective client's mind," berman says. "use anecdotes, which can be very memorable. and, of course, give them references." try to find a hook for your service, recommends maxine fechter, president of

people equities, a new york city-based human-resources agency. in this tight labor market, you might tie your program directly to increased employee retention, compiling some statistics about the cost of recruiting, hiring, and training new employees, and showing how much a company will save if it can hang on to veteran employees. market your training to companies that are having trouble retaining long-time employees and to those who want to reward their employees with extra education and skills training. in any kind of marketing, you must identify something unique about your service and sell to that difference. "i do a lot of work with high-technology companies, and i find that the attention span nowadays is about five minutes," fechter notes. "any kind of program that looks like you're going to sit people down in a room for a long time -- anything that looks like a traditional class -- isn't that desirable. maybe you could find a different and attractive way to offer your training -- a la computer, perhaps?" for a service business, there's nothing like a personal endorsement. if you've had success in the past with clients who are happy with your training, and particularly if they feel it has helped boost business, you might get testimonials from them and ask them to refer you. "it takes a while to get a business like this going," fechter says. "the first 6 to 12 months can be scary." it also takes time and repeated contacts to build the kind of trusting relationship that you need to gain clients. "various studies show that it takes anywhere from 6 to 12 contacts to move a new contact to the first purchase, depending on the product," berman says. "each contact does not need to be in person. for example, every third one can be in person and the others by a personal e-mail note or direct mail." in the end, of course, you simply won't be able to sell your service to everyone. "i believe that business owners who need to be convinced are not worth the struggle," fechter says. "clearly, they don't understand that by investing in their people, they are investing in their own success." have a question about running your business? ask our small-business experts. send us an e-mail at smartanswers@businessweek.com, or write to smart answers, bw online, 46th floor, 1221 avenue of the americas, new york, ny 10020. please include your real name and phone number in case we need more information; only your initials and city will be printed. because of the volume of mail, we won't be able to respond to all questions personally. by karen e. klein convincing a customer to purchase the art of persuasion by jem geek clout index published jul 29, 2006 click to contact me click to rate content * * * * * * currently 3.00/5 1 2 3 4 5

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convincing a customer to purchase<br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to_purc hase.html">http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to _purchase.html</a> <br><br> submit your original video, text, audio and images to associated content to gain exposure and even earn cash. <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/join.html">get started</a>. <br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com"><img src="http://www.associatedcontent.com/images/ac_horizontal.gif" border="0"></a> click to share * * * * * * * * * * * share on digg digg share on facebook facebook share on myspace myspace share on del.icio.us del.icio.us share on technorati technorati share on stumbleupon stumbleupon share on slashdot slashdot share on reddit reddit share on netscape netscape share on yahoo my web yahoo my web more bookmarks �

content showcase the mind of a suicide bomber how to talk to a newly diagnosed cancer patie... south korea's answer to the cow is a "food do... hitler's mountaintop retreat now a luxury tou... supposedly, we're all going to hell i'm afraid of vomiting this ain't no hippie chocolate virginia tech video tribute how to upgrade memory in a laptop if you have tried the work of salesmanship, then you can agree with me that it is one of the most challenging fields of venture. there is nothing more difficult as to convince anyone that you have the best interest for him/her, especially with the connotation that one knows himself/herself better. selling become more challenging especially when the buyer seems to know more about what you are selling better than you.

it has been said before that successful salesmanship starts by one appreciating what he/she has to offer. developing a positive attitude about your product, knowing what other people are offering and their weakness, and telling the potential buyer all he needs to know about your product within a short time, has proved to help many salespersons. but there is an emerging trend where the customer is foremost informed about the product he/she wants to buy before running into you and asks for your opinion.

what do you do with a customer who wants to buy a computer for his needs and comes to you for sales service? he explains to you his needs and you realize that you don�t offer the exact machine that he requires. then you want to convince him/her to buy the computer you have, which would remarkably help in other areas of his business though not his immediate needs?

one thing that would come into mind is to try and modify his needs, then convince him to have your machine for they would readily satisfy those needs. but this is a blatant error. the customer already has in mind the type of machine he wants and unless otherwise, will not settle for anything else. you get desperate? not yet.

in order to tactfully persuade you customer to buy the machine you are offering, first of all you should listen to his history of utilization of the machines. let him explain to you the business in which he intends to get the assistance of the computer. let him narrate the daily operations he carries out. then, you should gauge the best machine you have.

it now becomes your turn to convince him to make that purchase. let him be congratulated, though indirectly, of the vast knowledge he has gained and how well he has done his research. explain to him the types of machines that are available in the market that would perfectly fit his current needs. let him also understand the benefits of purchasing other machines as opposed to the one you have to offer. then explain the dynamics associated with computers and adaptability of the machine you have to his business expansion and future adaptability. let him realize the advantages and disadvantages he will get by making a purchase of either machine, and assure him that he would have the right choice if the one you are offering is bought, and to what reasons. convincing a customer to purchase the art of persuasion by jem geek clout index published jul 29, 2006 click to contact me click to rate content * * * * * * currently 3.00/5 1 2 3 4 5

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convincing a customer to purchase<br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to_purc hase.html">http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to _purchase.html</a> <br><br> submit your original video, text, audio and images to associated content to gain exposure and even earn cash. <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/join.html">get started</a>. <br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com"><img src="http://www.associatedcontent.com/images/ac_horizontal.gif" border="0"></a> click to share * * * * * * * * * * * share on digg digg share on facebook facebook share on myspace myspace share on del.icio.us del.icio.us share on technorati technorati share on stumbleupon stumbleupon share on slashdot slashdot share on reddit reddit share on netscape netscape share on yahoo my web yahoo my web more bookmarks �

content showcase the mind of a suicide bomber how to talk to a newly diagnosed cancer patie... south korea's answer to the cow is a "food do... hitler's mountaintop retreat now a luxury tou... supposedly, we're all going to hell i'm afraid of vomiting this ain't no hippie chocolate virginia tech video tribute how to upgrade memory in a laptop in an attempt to bring the persuasion home, let your informed customer feel that the best information has been given to him. if the customer needed to purchase a computer for business database maintenance, let him be convinced that having your machine would support some other hardware, which might be necessary in the course of doing his business. to add to your advantage, let him also acquire some of the hardware he would need to install, for example, let him purchase a cd writer that would assist him backup his documents. if you don�t win the trust of your current customer, then you have made a salesperson out of him-he will sell your business to others who would want a machine you are offering.

lastly, it is important to remember to be knowledgeable above everyone in the area of your business. know you competitors well and understand the need of the market. if you make a referral to a businessperson who is offering the kind of computer your customer is in need of, know that you have not lost. surviving daily challenges survival is a strong word. when discussing the everyday interactions we all have with one another it really doesn't seem like survival. but it is. the decisions we make, the compromises we agree to, and the arguments we win

determine our quality of life each day. they also help to forge our future. survival is defined as staying alive or living through something. we endure daily challenges. we just don't give our actions and interaction with others the importance that they deserve. to illustrate how well survival our daily commute. typically we miles per hour in a 3,000 pound 405 or the 10 you are much more you get my point. our challenge contact with each other. describes what we do day in and day out consider are on the freeway, traveling between 60 and 70 steel projectile. in los angeles if you are on the likely to be traveling between 5 and 10 mph but and that of our fellow commuters is to avoid

each commuter has similar tools with which to work. each has a steering wheel, gas and brake peddles, and rear view mirrors. we also have dissimilar tools in that each car is unique with different engines, transmissions, suspensions and maintenance issues. each driver has different driving skills, experience and habits. while we are all going in the same direction, we have different goals and objectives. but we also have a common goal. to survive the commute without incident, aka contact! we, to survive, should deploy our best defensive driving habits to stay in our lane, watch out for those who can not do the same, and maintain a prudent distance from the car ahead that is safe. how many drivers on the road do this? a slim majority is my guess. many tempt faith when behind the wheel. this reality places each of as at risk on a daily basis. our skill at avoiding other drivers is a matter of survival. for the most thoughts not settle in to attention to part we climb behind the wheel armed with a mind clutter with related to driving, turn on the radio to distract ourselves and make the commute and as many cell calls as possible. paying close driving is not high on our list of priorities.

this is one example of how we unconsciously handle the abundance of everyday social, family and business interactions. we are on cruise control. yet each of these is an example of basic human negotiations that impact how our day is going to be or how our future is going to turn out. posted by bill at june 9, 2007 11:26 am comments choose to improve we approach many of our daily negotiations as mere nuisances to be mindlessly dispatched or avoided. ironically this cavalier negotiating attitude is extended to those we love; our spouses, children, friends, family, and close associates. we tend to pay more attention to our interactions with those we don't know, retail clerks, teachers, students, clergy, bankers, police, dentists, doctors and the like, rather than those most important in our lives. there is no reason not to try to ease the stress of the conflict in our personal lives as much as we do with perfect strangers. it takes very little effort to improve how we deal with people; how we handle our every day negotiations. we do this by listening better. honing our awareness of the interests and needs of others enables us to forge resolutions that are healing by design. merging some of the needs of others into your solutions to daily

problems will definitely reduce the negativism of unhealthy conflict. it is your choice; your life. you are free to choose to be proactive and improve things. you can also simply contribute to the unhealthy conflict in your life and live with the consequences. you are not helpless. you have choices. posted by bill at june 17, 2007 9:30 am conquering buyer reluctance" author: daryl allen publication: overcoming objections issue date: 12/15/97 text: prospects and customers present objections when they don't comprehend, confirm, or concur with the claims you are making about your products and services. some salespeople quit the selling process at this point and concede the victory to the buyer. professional salespeople, on the other hand, consider objections a minor roadblock and use them to further educate the prospect, to gather more intelligence about the prospect, or to help the prospect solve a problem or dilemma. tips the pros use draw out the objection. it's easy to tell when a prospect or customer has an objection. don't ignore it. try to draw out information from the prospect. if you settle the issue in the beginning, it will be easier to resolve. you can inquire, "is everything clear at this stage of my presentation?" or, "have i explained all the features and benefits to your satisfaction?" after the prospect or customer has completely explained the objection, repeat the information back to the person to show you understand it. analyse the objection. now that the objection is out in the open, you need to dissect the reasoning behind the problem. again, use clarifying questions that prompt the prospect or customer to give you more information. you could ask, "what do you think of my solution?" or, "do you want more information?" or, "what do you think you will need to resolve the issue?"

here are three things to keep in mind as you analyse the objection: 1. know the person's concerns. try to understand the foundation of the prospect's or customer's concerns. is there a fear of buying something new? is pricing an issue? is there a lack of technical knowledge? 2. attempt to understand hidden needs and requirements. behind many buyer

objections are unspoken or unclear requirements. by probing, you can reveal concealed or secret needs, learn more about the prospect or customer, and win the chance to show how you can satisfy those wants and desires. 3. allow the customer to express negative feelings. many salespeople avoid talking about anything negative during a sales presentation. professional salespeople probe and try to allow the prospect or customer to discuss all the unfavourable aspects of the offer. when these issues are out in the open, they are much easier to address and resolve. answer the objection. when you believe you completely understand the customer's uncertainty, provide the pertinent information to resolve it.

once you present your options, continue to probe. you could ask, "does my answer satisfy all your concerns?" be ready to repeat and continue to explain your solution if the person hesitates or appears unconvinced. dissolve the objection. learn all the accepted techniques for handling objections, and you will find that most objections will disappear.

"fortune favours the prepared mind" david martinez mr. chiang-schultheiss english 1 mw 8:00-9:30 convincing a customer to buy over the phone although the occupation of telemarketing can be very boring and frustrating at times, it can be somewhat interesting if you know how to use certain skills which lead to being an effective telephone sales representative. many people think that if you want to be effective on the phones you must have a god-given phone voice. this is not true! even the person with the most annoying, squeaky voice can sell if the following procedures are followed. first off and probably most important is to study what you are selling. how do you expect to show the potential customer how it could be of use to them if you are not familiar with the benefits of whatever it is you're promoting? when you feel like you're ready, guess what: you're not. go back and study twice as hard. there is no such thing as being overconfident. the next step to take is to write a script to follow when you are with a potential customer. in this script you should include only the most important benefits. you do not want the customer to get bored listening to a long dull essay. the only way to catch the customer's attention is to make the script be a lively, minimized conversation with a friend. you do not want to be overly friendly though. sound professional. do not use slang, profanity or statements that will put the customer down. also, do not use words that are out of your vocabulary range. you need to sound educated, but to the limit that your mind will allow. make sure you know what all words mean and how to pronounce them. if you use extended vocabulary not only will you confuse yourself but also you will blanken your clients mind. when you confuse the

customer he/she will not be able to follow what you are saying and will think of you as a fool. so be sure you know what you are saying. at this time you are ready to go out on the phones. from the second you put on your headset, think positive and always keep a smile on your face. make sure you are ready and respond promptly when the customer answers the phone. once you confirm that you are speaking with the customer, it's time to let everything flow out. give each customer everything you have. do not be anxious, nervous, tired or bored. these symptoms all flow through the phone lines and the customer can sense it. this will eventually lead to the customer hanging up on you. now it is your job to take control of the conversation. speak fluently with no dead air time for the potential customer to interrupt. always remember: "be persistent, confident and very enthusiastic." this will always equal results. be prepared to answer any and all questions the potential customer will eventually throw at you. answers must be clear and to the point. if you do not know the answer to a question ask the customer to hold briefly, and ask your supervisor at once. you must never mislead a customer. if you do it will come back to haunt you. as stated before the most important key to success is knowing what you're selling. once you have confidently gone through the entire script, it is time to ask for the sale. this is what you have been aiming for, so this is the time to give it one-hundred and fifty percent of your effort. do not merely ask the customer if he/she is interested. this sounds very unconfident and may even seem unprofessional. in order to convince the customer that this is something that could be of serious benefit to them, you must sound confident. you also cannot be scared. be very assertive. use a statement such as " so let's go ahead and send this out to you, o.k.?" although you may have given a great presentation you will rarely get a customer who agrees to buy at this point. when a customer replies with "i'm not interested," "i have to think about it," or anything of that sort, be prepared to overcome his/her response with a snappy reply to remind them why they should buy immediately. if they still say no, try once more. then only after the second objection (at least) let them go. remember: rebuttals are part of your script and are not an option! overcome at least two objections always. although there are many other steps that will add to your effectiveness on the phone, those highlighted above are probably the most important. these used along with vocal inflections throughout your presentation will pay off. if you put some of your time and effort into this process you will see your results as an effective telemarketer skyrocket regardless of your most bothersome, monotone or squeaky voice. return to table of contents convincing a customer to purchase the art of persuasion by jem geek clout index published jul 29, 2006 click to contact me click to rate content * * * * * * currently 3.00/5 1 2 3 4 5

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convincing a customer to purchase<br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to_purc hase.html">http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/46615/convincing_a_customer_to _purchase.html</a> <br><br> submit your original video, text, audio and images to associated content to gain exposure and even earn cash. <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com/join.html">get started</a>. <br><br> <a href="http://www.associatedcontent.com"><img src="http://www.associatedcontent.com/images/ac_horizontal.gif" border="0"></a> click to share * * * * * * * * * * * share on digg digg share on facebook facebook share on myspace myspace share on del.icio.us del.icio.us share on technorati technorati share on stumbleupon stumbleupon share on slashdot slashdot share on reddit reddit share on netscape netscape share on yahoo my web yahoo my web more bookmarks �

content showcase the mind of a suicide bomber how to talk to a newly diagnosed cancer patie... south korea's answer to the cow is a "food do... hitler's mountaintop retreat now a luxury tou... supposedly, we're all going to hell i'm afraid of vomiting this ain't no hippie chocolate virginia tech video tribute how to upgrade memory in a laptop if you have tried the work of salesmanship, then you can agree with me that it is one of the most challenging fields of venture. there is nothing more difficult as to convince anyone that you have the best interest for him/her, especially with the connotation that one knows himself/herself better. selling become more challenging especially when the buyer seems to know more about what you are selling better than you.

it has been said before that successful salesmanship starts by one appreciating what he/she has to offer. developing a positive attitude about your product, knowing what other people are offering and their weakness, and telling the potential buyer all he needs to know about your product within a short time, has proved to help many salespersons. but there is an emerging trend where the customer is foremost informed about the product he/she wants to buy before running into you and asks for your opinion.

what do you do with a customer who wants to buy a computer for his needs and comes to you for sales service? he explains to you his needs and you realize that you don�t offer the exact machine that he requires. then you want to convince him/her to buy the computer you have, which would remarkably help in other areas of his business though not his immediate needs?

one thing that would come into mind is to try and modify his needs, then convince him to have your machine for they would readily satisfy those needs. but this is a blatant error. the customer already has in mind the type of machine he wants and unless otherwise, will not settle for anything else. you get desperate? not yet.

in order to tactfully persuade you customer to buy the machine you are offering, first of all you should listen to his history of utilization of the machines. let him explain to you the business in which he intends to get the assistance of the computer. let him narrate the daily operations he carries out. then, you should gauge the best machine you have.

it now becomes your turn to convince him to make that purchase. let him be congratulated, though indirectly, of the vast knowledge he has gained and how well he has done his research. explain to him the types of machines that are available in the market that would perfectly fit his current needs. let him also understand the benefits of purchasing other machines as opposed to the one you have to offer. then explain the dynamics associated with computers and adaptability of the machine you have to his business expansion and future adaptability. let him realize the advantages and disadvantages he will get by making a purchase of either machine, and assure him that he would have the right choice if the one you are offering is bought, and to what reasons.

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