The business magazine for floriculture worldwide

‘Concordia res parvae crescunt’
April 2009
Rabobank
Report
Excel
or be
different 08
Sustainability
in France
Botanic develops
corporate
strategy 40
Bulb
Production
Closer control
over Easter
lily 18
Make a Move
Tread the Path
to Retail
Joi n our popul ar CC Pool Syst em f or
cost -ef Ɓci ent i nt ernat i onal l ogi st i cs!
Cont ainer Cent ralen a/ s
Egegårdsvej 20
Post box 479
DK–5260 Odense S
The CC Pool Syst em allows free exchange of RTIs* bet ween all users,
saving you t he hassle and cost s of having t o ret urn or dispose of your
empt y t ransport it ems.
Why should you join t he CC Pool Syst em:
N We always ensure t hat you have full availabilit y – also during
peak seasons
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keeps running smoot hly
N We offer a wide range of t ransport it ems for all purposes
N CC Cont ainers have become t he acknowledged st andard wit hin
t he European hort icult ural indust ry
N All CC Cont ainers will be RFID t agged in 2010 making t hem
ready for fut ure demands
N You can subscribe t o CC LogLink and follow your RTI t ransac-
t ions online as t hey change hands and move all over t he world
N We offer an ext ended CC depot net work t hroughout Europe
providing availabilit y of RTIs, t ransfers and a range of ot her
services
CC Cont ainer – t he acknowledged Ƃower and pot plant t rolley
The CC Cont ainer is designed especially t o carry pot plant s and
Ƃowers and is excellent for in-st ore displaying. It s adjust able shelves
provide you wit h maximum carrying capacit y and t he CC Cont ainer
can be rolled all t he way from t he grower and direct ly int o t he st ore’s
point of sale.
RTIs* = Returnable Transpor t Items
Tel. +45 6591 0002
Fax +45 6591 3784
ccinfo@cont ainer-cent ralen.com
www.cont ainer-cent ralen.com
Container Centralen a/ s is the leading supplier of logistics systems within the European hor ticultural industr y. We operate in more than 40 countries,
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por tation within Europe. You can even ask Container Centralen to take care of your return Ƃow, saving you both costs and hassle.
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PPPPPaaarrrtttnnneeerrrsss ooofffff FFFFFlllllooorrraaaCCCCCuuullllltttuuurrreee IIIIInnnttteeerrrnnnaaatttiiiiiooonnnaaalllll
One stop
shopping!
for the horticultural
industry worldwide
Klappolder 150, 2665 LP Bleiswijk, Holland
Tel.: +31 (0)10 52 41 620
E-mail: export@horticoop.nl
WWW.HORTICOOP.NL
Your total horticultural supplier!
Gärtnereinkauf Münchingen GmbH
Korntal Münchingen/ Deutschland
Tel.: +49 7150 9123-0
Fax: +49 7150 9123-23
E-mail: info@gem-bedarf.de
Horticoop België bvba
Beveren (Waas)/ België
Tel.: +32 499 706 343
E-mail: info@horticoop.be
Horticoop Scandinavia A/S
Tilst/ Danmark
Tel.: +45 87 369900
Fax: +45 87 369909
E-mail: info@horticoop.dk
Sistemas Agricolas Hortisur s.l.
Roquetas de Mar/ Almeria España
Tel.: +34 950 338622
Fax: +34 950 338621
E-mail: horticoop@cajamar.es
Horticoop Andina S.A.
Quito/ Ecuador
Tel.: +593 22483141/ 22483142
E-mail: sales@horticoop.ec
Horticoop Ethiopia PLC
Debre Zeyt/ Ethiopia
Tel.: 00251-910-195284
E-mail: info@horticoop.et
AIPH -
AFIF -
Arava Flowers Export -
Company
Asbindo -
BGI -
China Intex Shanghai -
Danish Ornamentals -
EHPEA -
Expoflores -
Fleuroselect -
Flowers and Cents -
HBAG -
Kenya Flower Council -
NZ Export Growers Orchid -
Association Inc.
Orchid -
Growers of Hawaii
Plantum -
SAFEC -
SAF -
Table of Contents
Packaging
At the point of sale, packaging provides an
opportunity to create clearer market distinction
for products and stimulate impulse sales; a move
gaining momentum among growers.
by Anabel Evans
Salon du Végétal
Te 24th Salon du Végétal closed its doors on
Friday 18 February 2009. Despite the economic
downturn 16,121 visitors descended on Angers
to see the absolute latest in cut fowers, potted
plants, trees, shrubs, bulbs, bedding plants and
foral products. Te 639 exhibitors from 13
countries were able to look back on a succes-
sful show where good business was done and
both the number of visitors and exhibitors was
slightly up
by Ron van der Ploeg
Closer control over Easter lily
A study to better understand the optimum
conditions for Easter lily bulb production makes
a preference for scale bulblets and reports on
temperature and nutritional efects.
by Paul Nelson, Carl Niedzala, Seung-
Hyun Kim and August De Hertogh
Mealybug in roses
Mealybugs suck the sap from plants and cause
signifcant reductions in yields as well as being
the cause of the black sooty mould which grows
on the sugary substances that drips from their
bodies.
by Louise Labuschagne
Sea freight on the rise
With increases in fuel prices and a slowing eco-
nomy worldwide, the fower industry is showing
increasing interest in sea freight distribution
which in some instances can reduce freight costs
by up to 50%.
by Anabel Evans and Ron van der Ploeg
France turns green
Awareness of ‘green’ products has been slower
to emerge as a major society expectation and
market demand in France. Nevertheless, fol-
lowing the initiative of a handful of growers, the
French garden centre Botanic and some positive
government policy, it is now becoming a hot
issue that is generating a number of initiatives in
the ornamental industry.
by Marie-Françoise Petitjean
A network to know
Te South African Flower Growers’ Association
(SAFGA), together with the South Africa Export
Council (SAFEC) create a professional commu-
nity for growers to exchange knowledge and judge
the potential of new market opportunities.
by Cilla Lowen
Calla contact point
In New Zealand the Calla Council (NZCC)
coordinates research and promotion for the sec-
tor’s growers and exporters, using its website and
meetings to encourage the efective implemen-
tation of valuable information resulting from
individual projects.
by Dr Keith Funell
Rabobank Report

In the dynamic environment of the European
floriculture industry there are plenty of oppor-
tunities to grasp, according to the Rabobank. A
recent synopsis by the bank’s Food and Agribusi-
ness research unit pointing in particular to the
successes of the grab-and-go formula in the UK,
exclusive floristry concepts and online sales.
The simultaneous emergence of new markets
and new sources requiring roughly two major
moves for the wholesale and trade business: to
excel or to be different.
DDDDDDDDeeeeeeppppppaaaaaarrrrrrttttttmmmmmmeeeeeennnnnnttttttssssss
12
08
8
International Events 23
World News 24
Prices 33
In my opinion 7
Awareness 15
Globe 19
Dust 21
Miami 29
Lifestyle Marketing 35
Touch 45
Stuff 47
CCCCCCCCooooolllllllluuuuummmmmnnnnnsssss
April 2009 Volume 19 Number 4
by Anabel Evans
16
18
20
36
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 05
46
40
44
YOUNG PLANTS
Breeding and Production of house
and bedding plants, such as:
A wide selection of cutting raised
bedding and patio plants.
Euphorbia milii • Cupressus Wilma
Ficus varieties • Fuchsia varieties
Impatiens N.G. • Pelargoniums • Petunia
Handelskwekerij M. van Veen BV
Aalsmeerderweg 725, Rijsenhout, Holland
P.O.Box 73, 1430 AB AALSMEER, Holland
Tel.: 0031 297 326516, Fax: 0031 297 328001
info@mvanveenbv.com, www.mvanveenbv.com
In the midst
of a battle feld
Orders cancelled. Prices under pressure. Banks asking 5% extra
for seasonal credit, or based on general conditions not wanting to
ofer fnance at all. Supermarket chains sending out letters to their
suppliers saying that instead of paying in 4 weeks they will be paying
after 8 weeks. Te auctions seeing their turnover fall by 19%. We are
in the midst of a monetary battle feld.
Companies are ofering their products not just at cost price but at any
price as long as they can get the wheels of commerce rolling. Whilst
companies who cannot get their money from the banks pay their
suppliers much later, leading the suppliers into the same dif cult
fnancial position. Te Dollar, Pound Sterling, Forint, Zloty and
Rouble are all down. So, not only are the exports to these countries
under pressure, but these products are then sold on other markets
damaging the competition in these countries with their dump prices.
What is lost in January and February cannot be made good in the
rest of the year. In Holland, the rose growers in particular have had
a dif cult winter season; Valentine sales were disappointing. How to
survive is the question?

Te winter was long and cold in Europe. From Lyon and Milan in the
south, through Nuremberg, across to Russia and up over Scandinavia
the land was under snow. For the frst time in 25 years there was even
heavy snow in southern England. Te whole of nature in Europe is at
least a month behind. Te dafodils from England were much later
than normal and the supply from France and Italy was slower and
the numbers lower than in previous years. If winter is as cold as this
last one has been then the forists and street vendors struggle to sell;
we lose the impulse sales. Tis winter people did not buy fowers or
bedding plants. However, if consumption of fowers and plants is
linear to the consumer’s income we can at least console ourselves with
the knowledge that the average income level is still high enough to
have decent structural sales of fowers and plants.
More optimistically, on March 8 we had Women’s Day and prices
were not completely wide of the mark. And, even with the weak
pound, the sales for Mother’s Day in the UK were also not too bad,
the price pressure falling more on cut fowers than on potted plants.
Now that spring is in the air people are looking to their gardens and
going out to buy their bedding plants; this will also stimulate the sales
of fower and plants. Plus, we still have some good celebration days
ahead of us. So, no, 2009 may not have been a very good year so far,
but we still have a good part of it in front of us.
Our editor in chief, Anabel Evans, is
currently on holiday so this month’s preface
has been written by our website editor,
Ron van der Ploeg.
Editorial & Administration Offices
FloraCulture International B.V.
P.O.Box 82, 1850 AB Heiloo, the Netherlands
T (31) 72 53 23 522 F (31) 72 53 23 521
Circulation Administration: FBW Woerden P.O. Box 612,
3440 AP Woerden, the Netherlands
T (31) 34 84 31 393 F (31) 34 84 32 552 info@fbw-woerden.nl
Editors: Anabel Evans (anabel@foracultureinternational.com)
Ron van der Ploeg (ron@foracultureinternational.com)
Editorial team: Edward Bent, Chris Beytes, Lotte Bjarke, Arturo Croci,
Hans De Vries, David Gray, Kerry Herndon, Helen Moody,
Marie-Françoise Petitjean, Marta Pizano, Leaora Policar, Jennifer White
Founding editor: Debbie Hamrick
Cover: Penta Flowers
Publisher: FloraCulture International B.V.
(jaap@foracultureinternational.com)
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International Accounts Management:
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Office Manager: Claudia Stokreef
(claudia@foracultureinternational.com)
FloraCulture International B.V.
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LB Text & Idé, Søndervej 10, 8350 Hundslund, Denmark T(45) 21 48 75 30
South America: Marta Pizano de Marquez
(marta@foracultureinternational.com)
Horti Tecnia Ltda., Calle 85 No20-25 Of. 202B, Bogotá, Colombia
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T (81) 33 32 75 756 F (81) 33 32 27 933
East Africa: David Gray (gray@africaonline.co.ke)
Colofon
FloraCulture International (ISSN1051-9076) is published monthly.Worldwide distribution.

©
2009 FloraCulture International magazine. All rights reserved. No portion of editorial may
be reproduced in any form without written permission of the publisher. Publisher is not liable
for advertisements using illegally obtained images. Send address changes to FloraCulture
International magazine, P.O.Box 82, 1850 AB Heiloo, theNetherlands. Photo credits cover:
Growing Concepts, House of Flowers and Plants by Trend House P/P/P.
Ron van
der Ploeg

Dennis
Seriese
Claudia
Stokreef
Lotte
Bjarke
Marta Piza-
node Marquez
William
Armellini
Paul
Black
Lucas
Nicholas
Eyal
Policar
Arturo
Croci
Eiji
Yoshikawa
FloraCulture International (ISSN1051-9076) is published monthly.
Worldwide distribution. ©2009 FloraCulture International magazine.
All rights reserved. No portion of editorial may be reproduced in any
form without written permission of the publisher. Publisher is not
liable for advertisements using illegally obtained images. Send address changes to
FloraCulture International magazine, P.O.Box 82,1850 AB Heiloo, the Netherlands.
In my opinion
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 07 0
In the dynamic
environment of
the European
floriculture industry
there are plenty of
opportunities to
grasp, according
to the Rabobank.
A recent synopsis
by the bank’s Food
and Agribusiness
research unit pointing
in particular to the
successes of the
grab-and-go formula
in the UK, exclusive
floristry concepts
and online sales.
The simultaneous
emergence of new
markets and new
sources requiring
roughly two major
moves for the
wholesale and trade
business: to excel or
to be different.
Production and Trade
by Cindy van Rijswick
08 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
will have to be more careful in the
way they segment their products,
brands and customer propositions
(Figure 3).
Improving availability, quality and
marketing standards will incre-
ase expansion opportunities,
however, in a market largely seen
as predominantly mature. For
example, only a small share of
cut fowers in western Europe are
bought for personal use; the vast
majority of purchases are related to
special occasions such as birthdays,
funerals, weddings, Mother’s
Day and Valentine’s Day. Further
development in the grab-and-go
market could help drive sales for
personal use.
UK impulse model
Troughout Europe, the market
share of organised retail in fori-
culture has been increasing over
recent years, although the growth
rate has been rather slow. Te UK
has been the exception, leading the
developments in multi-channel
D
espite the current chaotic
market situation and the
dif culties in forecasting
demand in the near future, sluggish
growth is still expected in western
Europe’s foriculture markets in
the medium and long term. Te
Rabobank expects an average growth
of 2 to 4% per year until 2018, based
on the observation of economics,
demographics and other growth
drivers. In this region, there are wide
diferences between countries in cut
fower and potted plant consumption
(Figure 1). Furthermore, continental
foriculture consumers have most
recently adopted a more unpredicta-
ble and demanding approach, forcing
a clearer market distinction between
mass and exclusive products. In the
past, most of the market value was
generated by ofering the consumer a
fairly good product for a reasonable
price. Nowadays, either low price or
luxury is where value is being gene-
rated, particularly in western Europe
(Figure 2). Accordingly, players in
the European foriculture industry
Make
a Move
CUT FLOWERS
Total € 16 billion
UK 19%
Germany 18%
France 12%
Italy 9%
Netherlands 9%
Spain 5%
Switzerland 4%
Russia 3%
Belgium 3%
Poland 2%
Sweden 2%
Others 17%
POTTED PLANTS
Total € 12 billion
Germany 35%
France 10%
UK 7%
Italy 5%
Netherlands 5%
Spain 4%
Sweden 4%
Switzerland 3%
Belgium 2%
Norway 2%
Denmark 2%
Russia 2%
Others 19%
Germany 18
Germany 35
France 12
France 10
Italy 9 Italy 5
Netherlands 9
Netherlands 5
Spain 5
Spain 4
Switzerland 4
Switzerland 3
Russia 3
Russia 2
Belgium 3
Belgium 2
Norway 2
Denmark 2
Poland 2
Sweden 2
Sweden 4
Others 17
CUT FLOWERS POTTED PLANTS
Others 19
UK 19
UK 7
Source: Rabobank based on Flower Council of Holland, 2008
Note: Europe, the US and Japan are the main consumer markets, accounting for roughly three-quarters of global floriculture
consumption, estimated at 80 billion; the European global market share is estimated at between 40 and 50%.
marketing of cut fowers and the
developments with respect to
supermarket sales of cut fowers.
Two decades ago, UK supermar-
kets only had a 2% market share
in cut fower sales; one decade ago
this had climbed to 35% and to a
staggering 68% in 2008. Triggered
FFFFFiiiiiggguuurrreee 11111.
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 09
by the success in the grab-and-go
impulse purchases (accounting for
almost half of the total cut fower
market), the next step for UK
supermarkets is to introduce more
segmentation in their foriculture
category: value for money next to
premium products (for the gift
market). Tesco has started this and
it seems to be rather successful. In
addition, retailers have started to
provide more information on the
products they carry, for example,
country of origin, CO
2
emission of
the products produced, and charac-
teristics of the primary producer.
An interesting question is whether
the UK model will be succes-
sfully copied in other European
countries. Probably not in the short
term, as there are still many steps to
be taken. And if forist shops and
online shops succeed in strengthe-
ning their position, supermarkets in
other European countries will pro-
bably remain below 50% market
share. An estimated 10 to 20% of
cut fowers are sold in supermarkets
throughout Europe.
>>>
FFFFFFiiiiiiggggguuuurrrreeee 222222
High Exclusively, value added Low
L
o
w
H
i
g
h
P
r
i
c
e
High Exclusively, value added Low
More distinct floriculture market segmentation.
Source: Rabobank, 2008
Selling creativity
As supermarkets are focused on
maximizing volumes and ef ciency
of logistical systems, there is little
room for tailor-made products or
delicate fowers and plants that can-
not be handled in standard systems.
Tis implies that there is still a need
for specialised forists in Europe,
particularly for weddings, funerals,
corporate clients, and for ofering
exclusivity and creativity. Florists
following this strategy will avoid
competition by price. What they sell
is creativity and exclusivity.
Another strategy for European
FFFFFFFiiiiiigggguuuurrrrreeee 333333..
CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IMPACT ON FLOWER DEMAND
Capricious: The same consumer
easily switches from low priced
bulk to high-priced exclusive
products, buying both at Prada
and the one-euro-shop.
Proper availability of both
value products and exclusive
products at different marketing
channels can expand total
flower and plant market.
Diversity: Consumers want to
express their personalities and
individualism. New technologies
have facilitated this. Examples are
creating personal greeting cards,
manufacturing your own wallpa-
per, designing your own t-shirt.
Growing market for exclusive,
tailor-made products, and new
products. Opportunities for per-
sonalized packaging, creation
of buying special experiences,
organic products, etc.
Demanding: Consumers are
becoming more demanding. They
are very well informed, mainly by
the internet. They want their unique
needs to be met quickly and effi-
ciently. At the same time consumers
want producers to take social and
environmental issues in account.
Higher demands on service,
guarantees, corporate respon-
sibility, etc. related to flowers
sold. Growing demand for con-
venience products (‘easy to take
and treat’ flowers and plants).
Production and Trade
10 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
forists is to team up with other
forists to take advantage of joint
purchasing and joint marketing.
Examples of European forist
chains are Mester Grønn with
more than 70 locations in shop-
ping malls throughout Norway,
and Blume 2000 with 210 shops
generating sales of roughly €120
million in Germany. An example
of a forist chain that aims to
compete with retail multiples by
combining low prices with conve-
nience and a clear and appealing
format is Monceau Fleurs with
close to 400 stores and annual
sales of €150 million. It is expec-
ted that in the coming years more
forist retail formats and brands
will be developed in Europe.
Online sales
A development that will surely
change the European foricul-
ture industry is the emergence of
online sales. Traditionally, forist
shops have been delivering cut
fowers to the consumer’s door, but
in the last decade new competitors
dedicated to fower and plant
delivery have emerged, some of
them having no background in the
foriculture industry at all. Some
of the new online fower shops
originate from IT-based compa-
nies, some from online gift shops.
Currently we see a great diversity
of operators in fower delivery.
Tere are various forists that sell
online, such as individual forist,
forists under umbrella organisa-
tions (feurop/interfora, eurofo-
rist), and forist chains (like Blume
2000 and Monceau Fleurs). In ad-
dition, there are supermarkets (for
example Lidl Blumenservice in
Germany), nationally or regionally
operating online shops, world-
wide online shops (for example
1800-fowers and Flora2000), and
logistical services (TNT post) who
are active in online foriculture
sales.
A number of them ofer a broad
range of gifts (fowers, chocolates,
wine etc.). Characteristic for the
online fower delivery business
is that it is occasion driven.
People are searching for a gift, not
necessarily for fowers or plants.
More than other cut fower and
potted plant retailers, online shops
compete with businesses outside
the sector, such as wine-order
companies and widely assorted
online shops like amazon.com. It
is expected that the online business
will expand rapidly (double-digit
numbers) in the coming years,
partly at the expense of fower
and plant delivery through local
forists. Online sales will likely
come partly from new consumers,
as current online shops are fnding
that a large share of consumers
who order fowers via the internet
have never ordered fowers before.
New markets
new sources
Further east, growth in markets
like Russia and Poland has been
robust over the last decade.
Although absolute fower and
plant consumption there remains
small, a high-earning consumer
base and an expanding market will
likely steer future growth (Figure
4). Over the next few years, the
foriculture market in these regions
and other central and eastern
European countries is expected
to grow by an average of 5 to
10% annually. In many eastern
European countries, street stalls,
markets and kiosks are the main
sales channel for cut fowers.
Despite the anticipated growth,
challenges remain. For instance,
the wholesale and trade business
is very vulnerable to shocks in
exchange rates and energy costs
because of the increasingly global-
focused business environment.
Te Netherlands, Colombia,
Ecuador and Kenya are the main
foriculture export nations, and
the Netherlands is the main cut
fower and potted plant trading
hub within the European and
African trading area. However, the
fow is changing direction as new
sourcing areas have emerged, such
as China, India, Ethiopia, Tai-
land and Turkey. More and more,
companies from emerging fori-
culture nations, in particular India
and China, are also stretching
their tentacles into African and
European foriculture. In general,
cross-border, even cross-continent
investments are becoming more
FFFFFiiiiiggguuurrreee 444444.
China
Russia
Poland
Hungary
Slovakia
Portugal
Czech Rep.
Slovenia
Spain
Germany
France
0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
purchasing power per capita (EUR)
EUR/capita
Italy
Greece
Finland
Belgium
UK
Japan
Netherlands
Switzerland
Norway
Denmark
Sweden
US
Ireland
Source: Rabobank, based on the Flower Council Holland and World Bank, 2008
Note: Floriculture consumption in general is strongly related to income levels, especially for cut flowers.
Purchasing power and expenditure on cut flowers, 2007.
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 11
CCCCCoooooopppeeerrraaattttiiiiivvveee rrreeettttaaaiiiiinnnsss ttttrrruuussstttt
The Rabobank Group ranks
among the world’s fifteen
largest financial institutions.
Its dedication to the Food and
Agribusiness Chain began at the
end of the nineteenth century as
a collection of small rural banks
in the Netherlands. Rabobank’s
understanding of the industry
from the ‘micro’ of local regional
farming conditions to the ‘macro’
of international commodity trade
markets has since grown into
an extensive financial group
delivering financial solutions
to more than 9 million clients
worldwide through a network of
branches in 41 countries. The ne-
arly 85% market share in primary
horticulture and agriculture in the
Netherlands is complemented by
services to corporate and retail
businesses both in the Nether-
lands and abroad.
The 2008 annual results, presen-
ted by the Rabobank Executive
Board in March, show the
Rabobank is retaining a stable
position with net profit up 2% to
€ 2.8 billion. The negative effects
of the credit crisis on net profit
were € 0.7 billion in second
half of 2008 and € 0.5 billion in
the first half year. The Executive
Board Chairman, Bert Heemskerk,
commented:“2008 may rightly be
called a historic year. The sub
prime crisis in the United States
escalated to become a deep
and worldwide financial crisis.
Regrettably, it has meanwhile
developed into an economic cri-
sis. The banking sector suffered
unprecedented and far-reaching
consequences. Across the globe -
and in our country, too - bankrupt-
cies, government interventions
and nationalisations were order
of the day. It is difficult times
like these that the benefits of a
cooperative bank clearly come
to the fore. Our societal oriented
business culture, which is based
on the Rhineland model, our de-
mocratic consultative structure,
our prudent risk management, our
sustainable remuneration policy
– all these factors, combined with
our strong financial performance
and solvency, have contributed
to Rabobank Group’s continuing
stable performance. In addition,
we continued to serve our clients
without the help of others.” In
the annual results the Rabobank
lending to the Dutch small and
medium enterprises (SME) sector
was up 21% to € 55.7 billion.
common in foriculture. Even-
tually, for European companies
who strive for continuous growth,
involvement in non-European
distribution centres and channels
would be a logical step.
Furthermore, distribution proces-
ses will change drastically. A
growing share of supply will not
be present in wholesale markets
and auction buildings but will be
transported directly from the pro-
ducer to the wholesaler or retailer.
Te total supply chain will operate
much more ef ciently and become
more transparent in the future.
Physical product fows and virtual
information fows will be more
and more separated.
For the European foriculture
wholesale and trade business these
developments are both a threat and
a challenge. Wholesale and trade
companies need to add value other-
wise they will become redundant.
Tey could succeed in becoming the
essential link between production
and retail either by ofering services
related to logistics and marketing
or by providing unique products,
making them the pivotal link in the
value chain (Figure 5).
Currently, European foricul-
ture wholesale and trade is still very
Source: Rabobank, 2008
Note: In the higher-end market segment, companies that have either a deep understanding of markets or products or a large
extent of flexibility or innovativeness will be successful. In the lower-end market, suppliers to retail multiples, discounters,
and D-I-Y (Do it Yourself) stores can only survive by use of outstanding logistics, constant quality and low costs.
FFFFFFiiiiiiggggguuuurrrreeee 5555555.. MMMMMMaaaarrrrkkkkkkkeeeetttttiiiiiinnnnggggg sssseeeegggggmmmmeeeennnntttttssss..
Online shop
Gardener
Plant decorator
Interior design shop
Garden centre
(Online) gift shop
Petrol station
D-I-Y market
Discount supermarket
Service supermarket
Street market, kiosk
F
l
o
r
i
s
t
To be different
T
o

e
x
c
e
l
High price
Mass,
ordinary
Low price
Exclusivity,
value
added,
service
fragmented and the number of large
companies is limited. As a result of
the harsh business environment -
increasing transportation costs, the
strong Euro, retail pressure and the
ageing of company owners - consoli-
dation has taken of and is expected
to continue in the coming years.
|||
Tis information is taken from a
European Floriculture Wholesale
and Trade report written by Cindy
van Rijswick from the Rabobank
Food & Agribusiness Research and
Advisory (FAR) unit (cindy.van.
rijswick@rabobank.com).
At the point of sale,
packaging provides
an opportunity
to create clearer
market distinction
for products and
stimulate impulse
sales; a move gaining
momentum among
growers.
Packaging
by Anabel Evans
12 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
attractive. Additionally, the pot form
guarantees a good, humidifed plant
microclimate with a shop foor life
of two weeks.” Vitro Plus persuaded
their local Albert Heijn supermarket
to test some Musthaves. A French
student, Justin van der Putten from
CAH Dronten, managed the tests as
part of his traineeship at Vitro Plus.
He says, “In an initial trial sales were
sluggish due to the presentation of
one colour, one type and one size
of fern. Only a third of the required
turnover was realized. In a second
test in December, four diferent ty-
pes of popular ferns were presented
in two supermarkets. In terms of
sales, the impact of the display was
sustainable within 20 days. Te life
cycle of the display lasts up to six
weeks by renewing the assortment
on the shelves.” Van der Putten’s ex-
perience stresses the importance of a
complete shelf presentation where a
combination of products draw more
consumer attention. Kraaijenbrink
adds that the Musthaves name is
purposely not related to the fern,
and therefore if required, other green
T
he packaging and labelling
industry is a discerning
partner for the ornamentals
sector, developing technology to give
products physical protection (from
external impacts and each other),
communicate how the products can
be used, add convenience in hand-
ling and make a sales presentation
more appealing. Already for some
years packaging choices have been
used by businesses to create a stron-
ger market identity, by replacing
simple sleeves and labels with more
stylish designs, most often denoting
a trademark. Te next step is to
communicate more directly with
consumers and provide convenience
for retailers; marketing moves that
are also widely evident. Last year
at the Horti Fair, for example, the
Innovation Award winner was Flo-
raHolland’s ‘Be Aware Get Better’,
which introduced six retail concepts
based on the theme of sustainability;
a subject said to “make or break
your reputation” in a new consumer
study out in the USA (see “Sustaina-
bility and packaging choices”).
A recent project by the Dutch fern
company Vitro Plus has concentra-
ted on the aspect of convenience.
Ellen Kraaijenbrink from Vitro Plus
explained their dilemma saying, “Ac-
cording to a report from the Dutch
Product Board of Horticulture
(Productschap Tuinbouw) ferns have
a rather dull image. We are also con-
scious of the modest demand from
retailers who are not specialists in
the plant trade. We therefore set to
work on developing a sales concept
to catch the eye of consumers which
at the same time required minimum
maintenance by the retailers. Te
result is the ‘Musthaves’ display with
individual ferns presented in a pro-
tective cardboard pot with a plastic
coating; being light, waterproof and
easily printable the pot has ideal cha-
racteristics - convenient, clean and
Treading the
path to retail
Vitro Plus has developed a Musthaves dis-
play that comprises a wooden disposable
tray, a cardboard display, a loose top card
and a covering box. The covering box ena-
bles easy transport of the entire display,
including the plants in their decorative
packaging. As for the shop manager, it’s
only a case of removing the covering box,
placing the top card and that’s it!
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 13
or even fowering plants could be
presented in the display.
At the FLORALL in March, the
Speciale partnership, consisting of
nine Belgian growers located in the
Ghent region, were also exhibiting
some new retail concepts, expan-
ding on the new watering system
introduced by azalea grower Kris
Flore at Plantarium 2008 (a plastic
pot equipped with a taper at the
bottom fts in a trendy cover pot
with a guaranteed reservoir of water
to increase the shelf life). In their
garden range is the Patio Rhodo-
dendron packaged under a Colours
of the Himalayas theme with a
grab-and-go handle; a concept proof
brought to the attention of retail has
clarifed important details about the
horizontal positioning of both the
barcode and consumer information.
In the gift market, a selection of
print designs on brightly coloured
holders (suitable for various azalea
pot sizes) with ribbon handles
bring a new look depending on the
seasonal celebration, e.g. Halloween,
Christmas and Valentine’s Day. Pro-
tective, decorative plant holders with
handles are also being introduced
for the Clivia and Jewel Orchids by
Speciale.
Accentuating the professionalism
of grower eforts to inform and
inspire retail and category managers
about the absolute latest develop-
ments in indoor plants, pottery and
packaging, a 900 m
2
Green Event
Centre was opened in March in
the Netherlands. Te Green Event
Centre is the result of a partner-
>>>
ship between Bunnik Plants, Rene
van Lint and Gebr Van der Salm.
Described as Holland’s biggest
showcase for indoor plants, added
value will be one of the key phrases
of the Centre which changes its
theme every six months. Te Green
Event Centre will be featuring six
miniature houses with 12 dife-
rent themes developed by Bunnik
Creations like Christmas, China
and the Mediterranean World. Te
Bunnik company produces up to 38
million indoor plants each year, the
retail supply chain being one of their
biggest customers.
Cooler protection
for cut flowers
In the cut fower sector, a cool chain
represents a protective packaging
element with a controlled environ-
ment 24/7 from harvest to point of
consumer purchase being the best
solution for high quality fowers.
However, the worst scenario is that
cut fowers that have benefted from
a cool chain throughout the supply
chain arrive in the retail store and
Very Speciale!
In the garden range of the Speciale part-
nership is the Patio Rhododendron pac-
kaged under a Colours of the Himalayas
theme with a grab-and-go handle.
Packaging
14 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
SSSSSSuuuussssttttaaaaiiiiinnnnaaaabbbbbbiiiiilllllliiiiittttyyy aaaannnndddddd ppppaaaacccckkkkkkaaaaggggiiiiinnnngggg cccchhhhhhooooiiiiicccceeeessss
Packaging definitely counts in the
concept of sustainable develop-
ment as Jennifer Duffield White
reports in her GreenTalks sustai-
nability e-news2 from the USA on
February 27, 2009: Anecdotally, I
know a lot of you are trying out
some sort of packaging alterna-
tive, from high-end upgrades to
biodegradable pots and resins for
post-consumer material. The plant
container that ends up in landfill, is
after all, the most conspicuous waste
our industry produces in the consu-
mers’ eyes. Our industry, though, isn’t
the only one attempting to “green” up
its packaging image. Check out the
Hartman Group’s Sustainability: The
Rise of Consumer Responsibility3,
which affirms the fact that sustaina-
ble packaging might not be a primary
purchase motivator, but it sure can
make or break your reputation.
The study showed that the number
one thing consumers respond to in
regards to sustainability is how the
product is disposed of (is it recycled,
reused or reduced?).75% said it was
“very important” or “important” to be
able to return a product’s vessel to
the marketplace via curbside bins.
Biodegradability ranked second in
packaging preferences. Meanwhile,
minimal packaging ranked third
(even though it probably requires
less energy than recycling or biode-
grading). Finally, they chose recycled
content, refillable containers, contai-
ners to reuse for other purposes and
compostables.
SUSTAINABLE … WHAT?
In the same study, noted above, the
Hartman Group also highlighted
the fact that sustainability is not a
household word. When pressed,
they say, many individuals are
unsure what it means. In 2007,
54% of their respondents were
familiar with the term “sustainabi-
lity”, yet in 2008 that number was
nearly identical at 56%. That could
explain why 71% didn’t know or
were uncertain which compa-
nies support sustainable values.
However, the majority of the 1,600
people interviewed still identi-
fied positively with the term. The
take home: just slapping the word
“sustainable” on a product proba-
bly isn’t going to boost sales or win
loyalty, especially in that half of
the population who can’t define the
word. Instead, think about telling
the story on what makes your com-
pany or product a good, responsible
choice. The “why” and “how” is
just as important as the “what.”
RETAIL EXPERIENCE
Here’s another interesting obser-
vation from the study, retail stores
are more than just the prime spot
for linking suppliers and consumers
looking for responsible goods and
services. They concluded, “Con-
sumer experiences in-store have
the biggest influence on overall
perceptions about the retailer and
its relation to sustainability.” What
kind of experience do you offer?
are then left in small buckets close
to a shop entrance where they are
exposed to draft, heat and rough
handling. Tis reduces the vase life
for consumers and increases the
waste percentage for retailers.
Flower coolers are already in use
in several supermarket chains in
Europe. In March, Scandinavia’s
largest garden centre chain com-
mitted to a similar cool chain
strategy after a test run using
fower coolers was completed
with success. Te Plantagen chain
with outlets in Norway, Sweden
and Finland plans to equip all its
centres (more than 90) with the
coolers from Floratech Europe.
Te coolers ensure longer shelf
life due to the patented, boundary
layer, airfow design
1
. Each centre
will have two coolers and two
dry sections, which together will
form an island of fowers, thus
creating an autonomous section
of the garden centre. Albertjan
van den Burgt, category manager
for Plantagen, is the coordinator
for the entire project: “Plantagen
has always had a focus on quality
and has until now displayed the
cut fowers in walk-in cold stores.
With the new technology sup-
plied by the Floratech coolers we
will still be able to ofer the best
possible quality, but at the same
time we have made it easier and
more inviting to buy a bouquet of
fresh fowers. Tis will no doubt
stimulate impulse sales.”
|||
1
FCI November 2008, pg 19 Horti Fair
2
https://www.ballpublishing.com/
BPSubscriptions/newslettersignup.
aspx?newsletter=greentalks
3
http://www.hartman-group.com/
publications/view/81
Seasonal campaign
from start
Te higher-end sales concept and
promotional campaign for “Ice Cry-
stal”, the newest member of Düm-
men’s Premium series, introduced at
the IPM Essen, is being launched in
the German market frst. Trough
presentations, mailings, fyers
and POS material, the German
retail, trade and consumer press are
gradually being informed about the
new sales concept. Te red and white
Christmas colours of Ice Crystal
packaged in a decorative printed box
is being positioned to stimulate sales
later this year.
Floratech Europe’s coolers
form an island of flowers.
Does Mother
Nature agree?
On the wall, next to my desk, I have a newspaper article dated the 26th
of June 2008. Te content of the article is too much to comprehend af-
ter just one reading, that’s why I have put it next to my desk, to remind
myself to read it from time to time. Te article is about a foating island
in the Pacifc Ocean to the west of San Francisco.Te island is hovering
just underneath the surface of the Pacifc Ocean. It is unimaginably big.
It is estimated to be the size of Portugal, Spain and France put together.
Discovered about 10 years ago the island consists entirely of plastic
debris. Te UNEP – the ecological department of the UN – is sending a
ship to research this huge pile of waste. Te Ocean Conservancy states
that the waste consists of 13% plastic bottles, 9% plastic bags and the
rest is millions of drinking straws, milkshake covers, beach toys, old
fshing nets and lines and agricultural plastic foil. It is known that the
seas of our world carry about 46,000 pieces of plastic per square mile.
Tis huge pile of waste absorbs all kinds of toxic waste (such as DDT
and PCB’s). It is clear that it therefore impacts on the oceans micro-
biology and ecological systems. Te efects are as yet unknown, but it
is clear to anybody that the efects will not be positive. Apart from the
toxic efects which end up in our food, the plastic debris also ends up in
the stomachs of birds and fsh which, because they have a full stomach,
do not feel hungry anymore and eventually die. One study in the north
of Holland has shown that on average each bird carries about thirty dif-
ferent pieces of plastic in its stomach. Another article dated the 28th of
August 2008 is titled ‘Horticulturists transfer to biological degradable
plastic’. However, a survey of 300 Dutch growers shows that 65% of the
growers fnd it unimportant that production is placed in environmen-
tally friendly packaging, but the expectation is that this will change in
the coming fve years. Because of the increasing temperatures around
the world sea levels are changing. Consequently, we will have to adjust
our way of living and think deeply about how we use the resources of
our planet. Some countries will not be able to deal with increasing sea
levels and large numbers of people will need to look for new land to live
on. Te efects will be huge. Due to modifed water systems commonly
used production systems will have to be adjusted. We will have to learn
again how to survive on our planet. When I am reminded of the ‘island
of plastic’ in the middle of the Pacifc I get an awkward feeling; I realize
that I am a human being living in a world full of overblown luxury for
which I am partially responsible. I was born and raised in horticulture,
but at some point it is clear that we have to make choices, choices that
will afect the lives of our unborn children. Te world is changing as
consumers become increasingly aware of environmental topics such as
temperature increase due to escalating CO2 levels and the melting of
the polar icecaps. Other issues concerning the sustainability of water-
use and food production are also hot topics. It is a critical time for our
planet and for producers around the world to opt for sustainability;
sustainability for water, for climate, for food and for health. Te questi-
ons for you are: How will you adjust? How much longer will you be able
to sell your products if Mother Nature doesn’t agree with your methods?
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 15
Jan Hein Blom is senior real estate project
developer with Legmeer Vastgoedontwikkeling
in Aalsmeer, the Netherlands.
janheinblom@gmail.com
Awareness
by Jan Hein Blom
Green Event Centre
Accentuating the professionalism of grower eforts to inform and inspire re-
tail and category managers about the absolute latest developments in indoor
plants, pottery and packaging, 900 m2 Green Event Centre was opened in
March in the Netherlands.
ANGERS: The 24th
Salon du Végétal
closed its doors on
Friday 18 February
2009. Despite the
economic downturn
16,121 visitors
descended on Angers
to see the absolute
latest in cut flowers,
potted plants, trees,
shrubs, bulbs, bedding
plants and floral
products. The 639 (622
in 2008) exhibitors
from 13 countries
were able to look
back on a successful
show where good
business was done.
Salon du Végétal
by Ron van der Ploeg
16 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
on in stylish compositions. Te 1,200
m
2
area dedicated to cut fowers
included 31 exhibitors of fowers and
foral supplies.
Innovert
Innovation is the key phrase in the
French foral sector and maybe that’s
why the novelty competition ‘In-
novert’ is gaining a lot of interest. Ac-
cording to exhibition manager Serge
Tsvétoukhine a record number of 80
new products have been registered,
an increase of 20% compared to last
year. In the end 44 products were
selected to participate in the Innovert
competition. Most novelties were to
be found in the ‘greens’ category.
Te vegetative Lobularia maritima
‘Snow Princess’ from the German
breeder Kientzler took frst prize. Tis
Lobularia doesn’t go to seed and pro-
duces an abundance of large, white,
very fragrant fowers throughout the
summer and up until the frst frosts.
Its trailing habit makes it an ideal
hanging plant. With good tolerance
to bad weather (rain, wind and hail)
Lobularia maritima ‘Snow Princess’ is
a Proven Winners product.
W
hile the forests and
meadows from France’s
horticultural heartland,
the Pays de la Loire, were reawa-
kening from a long, cold winter,
much of the foricultural industry
of France and Europe were enjoy-
ing the frst signs of spring at
the Salon du Végétal which was
held from February 17 -19 at the
Angers Exhibition Centre.
New opening times
Tis year the show was held from
Tuesday to Tursday instead of
Wednesday to Friday as in previous
editions. Tere is no doubt that in
the long run this change will play
to the advantage of France’s most
important horticultural trade show,
but this year it appeared that most
visitors were not yet used to the new
opening times. As a matter of fact
Tuesday attracted only 24% of the
visitors, whereas on Wednesday and
Tursday attendances were 40% and
36 % respectively of the total visitors.
Landscaping sector
A frst for the Salon was the ‘Pôle Es-
paces Verts et Aménagements’, a new
pavilion where industry professionals
can catch up on the latest develop-
ments in the landscaping sector. An
accompanying program of confe-
rences presented three prestigious
landscaping projects: ‘Terra Botanica’
in Angers, the tramway in Montpel-
lier and the ‘Deule parc’ in Lille.
Cut flowers
Te ‘Bouquets d’Aujourd’hui’
exhibition island featuring foral
arrangement demonstrations by
Jean-Louis Anxoine and his team is
already very popular with forists.
Launched for the frst time in 2008,
the Bouquets d’Aujourd’hui once
again attracted an increasing number
of French forists who saw typical
French cut fowers such as Hydran-
gea, lily and anemone being worked
France celebrates spring
with Salon du Végétal
Te jury of professionals also awarded
the shrub Daphne odora Marianni
‘Rogbret’ with a frst prize. Tis
evergreen shrub has shiny, dark green
foliage with light yellow edges and
has defnitely more intense variega-
tion than Daphne odora ‘Aureomar-
ginata’. Te shrub blooms in early
spring from February to March with
small, very fragrant, purple fowers.
FitzGerald Nurseries from Ireland
entered its variegated Yucca gloriasa
‘Bright Star’ in the Innovert Com-
petiton. Althought it didn’t win a
prize but, the plant is worthwhile
mentioning.’Bright Star’ was develo-
ped by Tim Crowther of Walberton
Nurseries, West Sussex, England.
It features long, broad leaves with
bright gold bands along each side. It
makes a tight rosette that is instantly
eye-catching, brighter than other
varieties and with a greater propor-
tion of the leaf coloured gold than in
competitor varieties. Mature plants
produce branching stems with large
creamy-white bell fowers. ‘Bright
Star’ makes an excellent container
plant and is also very efective as a
border or landscape plant. ‘Bright
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 17
Star’ is protected by EU Plant
Variety Rights and US Plant Patent
under the name WALBRISTAR.
It is licensed in the EU by Plants
For Europe Limited, the leading
independent breeders’ agent, based
in East Sussex. Fitzgerald Nurseries
Limited is licensed to produce and
sell Yucca gloriosa ‘Bright Star’.Ca-
mellia japonica ‘Kerguelen’, created
by Stervinou Nurseries in Brittany
took the silver medal in the Innovert
Competition. Camellia ‘Kerguelen’ is
a mutant of the good old Camel-
lia ‘Nuccio’s Cameo’. Yves-Marie
Stervinou explains that ‘Kerguelen’is
unique because it has deep pink
fowers which match beautifully
with the variegated foliage featuring
dark green, cream, silver and light
green. “Camellia portuense has also
variegated leaves but is single fowe-
red. ’Kerguelen’ has beautiful double
fowers that show up from February
to April.” Yves-Marie ensures that the
variegation will remain stable as there
are no green shoots. ‘Kerguelen’ has
an upright and compact habit and a
good resistance to diseases.
A range composed of an assortment
of Gardenias, Hibiscus and Hy-
drangeas, specially acclimatised for
outdoor shelf sale and presented in a
window box of 50 cm diameter and
a grey-blue pot of 29.50 cm won
the frst prize in the category Best
Commercial Plant meanwhile in the
Best Non Plant category the Ilot Full
Garden took frst prize.
Te Ilot Full Garden features a multi
functional display for plants and
related products.
Espace Inspiration
With an area devoted to stylish,
environmentally responsible
products, the ‘Espace Inspiration’
served as a platform for the young
students of the Lycée Jean Monnet
des Herbiers. Tis area featured
some fantastic new presentations
and news ways of using plants.
“Sustainable plants” being this
year’s theme, the students only
worked with products which were
considered to be eco-friendly.
Te selected plants for this year
were Cordyline australis, azalea
IIIIIIImmmmmpppppuuuuulllllllssssseeeee ppppprrrrroooooddddddduuuuuccccctttttsssss
At the 2009 Salon du Végétal impulse products
took centre stage. One good example of an im-
pulse product would be the MyPlant concept
of FitzGerald Nurseries of Kilkenny, Ireland,
which was awarded with the Plantarium
Press Prize last year. MyPlant includes an
elegant range of patio and garden plants
like buxus, dahlia, libertia, cordyline and
carex, specially developed and selected
as easy-care, weather tolerant plants.
FitzGerald Nurseries ensure that plants in
the range are thoroughly researched and
non invasive, PGR free, sourced only from
ethical breeders and not uprooted from
native environments.
The Dutch Van Vliet Flower Group introduced
Aqua Décor, a sales concept for aquarium
plants and accessories (vases, gravel) on a
metal display stand which lets the consumer
either buy different items separately, or buy
ready-made arrangements. Aqua Décor fea-
tures 70 varieties. The pot colour indicates
the price band. Large assortment which can
be adapted according to the space in the
retail outlet. Finally, the Belgian company
Decock Pelargonium showcased its Basil
Bonsai El Greco. El Greco is a grafted basil
plant in the form of a small tree on a stalk,
presented in attractive packaging containing
advice on how to care for the product.
and fern. A really cool novelty was
a fern in a so-called ‘Vital’pot that
recreated the rhythm and movement
of human breathing (inhalation
and exhalation). ‘Vital’ reminds the
consumer that, besides its decorative
aspect, a plant is a living being.
It expels the oxygen that humans
need and plays a part in purifying
the air. A silent motor makes a cam
rotate which makes the sides move
in a regular motion, just like human
lungs. When the plant is run-
ning out of water, the device stops
breathing. ‘Vital’ by Johanna Robin
and Marine Lacouture took the
gold trophy. Te Nymphea concept
by Pierre Barach presented a new
way to protect plants from frost.
Nymphea consists of a base to place
at the foot of the plant and seven
identical pieces which slot together
and support each other. Curving
around the plant these pieces form
a cocoon which protects the lower
parts of the plant from frost.
|||
Next year the show will be held from
Tuesday 16 to Tursday 18 February.
MyPlant concept of FitzGerarld Nurseries. Basil bonsai by Decock from Belgium.
Lobularia ‘Snow princess’.
A study to better
understand the
optimum conditions
for Easter lily bulb
production makes a
preference for scale
bulblets and reports
on temperature and
nutritional effects.
Bulb Production
by Paul Nelson, Carl Niedziela,
Seung-Hyun Kim,
and August De Hertogh
18 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
when are they needed during the
growth and developmental cycle.
Bulb type
Our primary goal was to maximize
bulb production and it was found
that scale bulblets were superior to
stem bulblets. Te weight of basal
bulbs produced from stem bulblet
plants only increased from 7.0 to 9.8
grams; while those from scale bulblet
plants increased from 5.9 to 12.2
grams during the course of the ex-
periment. Bulb circumference, used
by the commercial bulb industry,
followed a similar pattern. In addi-
tion, a larger percentage of the stem
bulblets (35%) were “no-shows” (i.e.,
bulblets that did not produce shoots
that emerged from the bulb) in com-
parison to the scale bulblets (10%).
Terefore, scale bulblets would be
the preferred bulblet type for pro-
pagation. If stem bulblets are used,
the planting density would have to
be increased to compensate for an
increased number of “no-shows”.
Scale bulblet plants also produced
the largest number of stem bulblets.
In addition, basal and stem roots
developed earlier on scale bulblet
plants. Tis is refected by the incre-
ased weights of both types of roots
at the end of short days. However, at
the end of the experiment, weights
of both types of roots were similar
on scale and stem plants. Bulblet
type did not infuence the number
of fowers formed. Tus, it was
the second objective of this study.
Te timing of fertilizer applications,
identity of the required nutrients,
and needed quantity (rate) of the
nutrients are dictated to a large
extent by the capacity of soil to
contribute and retain nutrients and
the efect of the prevailing rainfall
on nutrient leaching. Variations in
these soil and climate factors across
production areas obscure our know-
ledge of plant nutrient needs and
also explain why recommendations
and practices difer widely from one
production area to another. Tus,
the third objective of this study was
to determine which macronutrients
[nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P),
or potassium (K)] are required and
E
aster lily (Lilium longiforum)
bulbs purchased for forcing
are produced in a limited
number of areas in the world. Tey
require very specifc soil, moisture
and climatic conditions. Since bulb
production occurs in the feld, the
annual prevailing temperatures can
vary considerably. Te efect of these
variations on bulb growth and de-
velopment are not fully understood.
Tus, it was the primary objective of
this controlled environmental study.
In the Pacifc Northwest of the US,
bulbs for forcing require three years
to be produced using the current
feld production system. Tey may
originate from either stem or scale
bulblets. Stem bulblets are removed
from the below ground portion of
the stem of the lily plant after it is
pulled. In contrast, scale bulblets
are generated on detached scales
taken from selected mother bulbs
after the commercial bulbs have
been harvested in the fall. Known as
“yearlings”, bulblets must be grown
for an additional two years to reach
forcing size. Terefore, yearling scale
and stem bulblets were compared as
Closer control
over Easter lily
TTTTTTTaaaabbbbbbbllllllleeee 111111..
Treatment No-shows
(%)
Basal bulb
wt. (g)
Basal root
wt. (g)
Stem root
wt. (g)
No. flower
buds
per plant
Abort.
(%)
10/6 °C 5 6.06 6.22 1.02 1.0 0
14/10 °C 5 7.14 8.29 7.22 1.3 10
18/14 °C 25 14.54 4.20 4.67 1.1 0
22/18 °C 30 14.41 2.52 2.82 1.3 10
26/22 °C 50 18.38 1.86 1.47 0.9 31
30/26 °C 30 10.10 1.58 0.29 0 75
Variable 0 6.94 4.39 4.38 1.4 5
Greenhouse 35 10.49 3.73 2.67 2.0 0
Table 1. The number of “no-shows”, basal bulb fresh weight, basal root fresh weight, stem root fresh weight,
number of flower buds, and percent meristem abortion of Easter lilies as influenced by eight temperature regimes.
Temperature responses after 107 days under short days.
1 The variable treatment simulated seasonal field temperatures in the coastal bulb production area of northern California.
2 The greenhouse received natural photoperiods and was set to be cooled at 22°C (day) and 18°C (night).
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 19
concluded that scale bulblets are the
preferred propagation material.
Temperature
Treatments consisting of continious
temperatures in controlled envi-
ronments indicated that maximum
basal bulb weight was achieved in
a day/night termperature regime of
26/22°C followed by both 18/14
and 22/18°C (Table 1). Greenhouse
and variable temperature regimes
resulted in less growth. Tempera-
tures of 30/26°C must be avoided
due to lower bulb yield and foliar
injury (Photograph 1). “No-shows”
increased with increasing temperatu-
res with a signifcant number being
found initially at 18/14°C. Root
fresh weight was greatest in the range
of 14/10°C to 18/14°C and declined
at higher or lower temperatures.
Flower number was maximum in
the range 10/16°C to 22/18°C and
meristem fower abortion occurred at
26/22°C and 30/26°C. Our results
suggest the possibility of producing
bulbs in a controlled environment
with an initial temperature of
14/10°C to minimize “no shows”
and maximize the basal root system
and 26/22°C after shoot emergence
to maximize basal bulb fresh weight
and circumference.
Nutrition
Application of the three nutrients
(NPK) was required during the short
day period. When one of the three
nutrients was omitted, there was a
reduction in shoot weight, stem bulb
weight, stem bulb root weight, and
the number of fowers produced.
When N or P, but not K, was omit-
ted there was a further reduction in
basal bulb root weight. Also, with
the absence of P, shoot length was
reduced. Withholding N, P, or K, or
all three nutrients had no infuence
on the number of “no-shows”. Over-
all, while there was a requirement for
N, P, and K, the absence of N and
P fertilization had a greater negative
impact on growth and development
than the absence of K.
Plants tested during a subsequent long
day period had been fertilized with a
complete fertilizer during the previous
short day period. Omission of N, P, or
K singularly or in combination during
the long day period had no efect on
production of basal bulbs. Omission
of the three nutrients resulted in a re-
duction of shoot weight. Defciencies
of either N or P, but not K, increased
the number of fower abortions, but
only in the 26/22°C and 30/26°C
temperature regimes.
When each nutrient was omitted
during long days, the concentration
of N and P in basal bulbs at the end
of the experiment did not difer from
the concentrations at the start of
the experiment. However, omission
of N, P, or K did result in a lower
concentration of K at the end of the
experiment, a factor that could afect
basal bulb yield in the third year of
production. Tis indicates that all
three nutrients may provide a beneft
during the long day period. However,
the demand for nutrients during
the long day period was much lower
than during the previous short day
period, indicating strong reliance on
translocated nutrients during these
later stages of development.
|||
Paul Nelson and August De Hertogh are
in the Department of Horticultural Sci-
ence at North Carolina State University
in Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7609 U.S.A.;
Carl Niedziela is in the Department of
Biology at Elon University, Elon, NC
27244, and Seung-Hyun Kim is in the
Department of Landscape Architecture
at Sangi Youngseo College, Won Ju,
Kangwon Do, R.O. Korea 220-713.
Te authors thank the Easter Lily
Research Foundation, 96370 Wildwood
Road, Brookings, OR 97415 for
technical information; Dahlstrom and
Watt Farms, Smith River, Calif. and
Fred C. Gloeckner Co., Harrison, N.Y.
for supplying bulblets; and the NCSU
Phytotron staf for cultural assistance.
Editor note: Complete details on the
study procedures, temperature results
and references are available on the FCI
website, April issue.
Te lesson
of the cow
Above his desk my father had a cartoon pinned on the wall. Tis
cartoon showed two farmers fghting for a cow; one pulling her
head, the other pulling her tail and in the middle were two lawyers
happily milking the cow. Tis cartoon comes to mind when I am
thinking about the crisis the world is in at the moment. Te banks
are comparable to the cow with governments pulling the head and
companies pulling the tail. Governments want to take over and
heavily support banks because they are convinced solid banks are
necessary for society and the economy; companies want banks
to supply credit so that they are able to stimulate the economy.
In the middle the bankers and shareholders, as ever, are sitting
quietly collecting their bonuses and dividends and nobody seems
to notice them. Have we heard a sorry from the bankers who made
the fnancial world explode? Do we see any plans from bankers to
give the economy a push? I haven’t, but what I do see all over the
world is governments struggling with ambitious plans and compa-
nies struggling to survive. I also see shareholders of several banks
bringing cases for compensation to court; they wouldn’t have had
anything left at all if governments hadn’t put in all the money
from the tax payers, like you and me, and all those from the next
generation. I think it’s a strange world!
Huge companies are asking for support and will probably get it
because so many jobs are likely to disappear if they go bankrupt
and unemployment is not going to help the situation. Small
companies have to do it all by themselves and are experiencing
that fnding credit for investment is becoming more and more
dif cult. Moreover, it is noticeable that countries are falling back
on national protectionism and thereby hampering international
trade. Stricter phyto-sanitary requirements based on false argu-
ments are entering the foral sector and reasons for opting out of
the governing EU and WTO regulations are created to support the
national industries with subsidies.
I was taught to think of simple solutions, even for dif cult issues.
My suggestion are: lower the interest rate for credit, this will help
to encourage investment and create jobs; lowering the tax rates
will leave more money in the pocket of consumers; stimulate free
trade because this will create global economic growth; make banks
return to their core business, collecting money from people with
surplus so others can get loans to invest. Tere is no need for
banks to earn huge sums in order to pay greedy bankers’ bigger
salaries and shareholders higher dividends. A cow is an instrument
that enables farmers to produce a product that consumers need,
it is not a money maker for third parties. Te same philosophy
should also apply to the banks. Let’s call this the lesson of the cow
and practice it as from today.
Globe
Sjaak Langeslag is director of Agriraad, strategy
and consultancy. He also is Secretary General of AIPH
and president of the Royal General Bulbgrowers’
Association (KAVB) in the Netherlands.
Langeslag@agriraad.nl
by Sjaak Langeslag
Mealybugs suck the
sap from plants and
cause significant
reductions in yields
as well as being the
cause of the black
sooty mould which
grows on the sugary
substances that drips
from their bodies.
Crop Protection
20 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
L
ow pesticide, biological
programmes for spider mite
control have been blamed
for the upsurge in mealybug in
Holland and Kenya. However, if
spider mites are controlled quickly
using very high levels (1- 2 million
per hectare) of the predatory mite
Phytoseiulus, then spider mites
can be cleared within 8 weeks.
After this time, the grower can use
less compatible pesticides to clear
the mealybugs.
It is important to identify the
species of mealybug present in
the crop because some have egg
sacs (citrus mealy bug, obscure
mealybug and Mexican mealybug)
and others (long-tailed mealybug)
do not have egg sacs but give birth
to live young.
An important predator for mealy-
bug, Cryptolaemus montrouzieri,
lays her eggs only in mealybug egg
sacs – so if the mealybug species
does not produce an egg sac, it
is not possible for the Crypto-
laemus to reproduce in the rose
crop. However, if Cryptolaemus
larvae are used instead in the IPM
programme – the lack of egg sacs
is not such a problem as the young
Cryptolaemus larvae are voracious
feeders and will clean up any type
of mealybug hotspot.
Te citrus mealy bug (Planococcus
citri) is a common pest of roses
and gerbera. Te females are oval
Mealybug in roses
with a circumference of short
waxy flaments around the edge of
the body and a central depression
along the middle of the back. Te
female secretes a waxy woolen
‘nest’ into which she lays between
100 to 600 eggs.
Male mealybugs are small winged
‘wasps’ that live only for a few
days, mate, and then die. Tey
are attracted to the females by
pheromones. Artifcial pheromo-
nes can be used to lure and trap
the males and are available from
bio-control companies. If females
are not mated, they either lay no
eggs or only produce more males
depending on the species. So it is
important to reduce the number
of male mealybugs.
Te Koppert ‘Knowing and
Recognising’ Book is a useful
reference, as is the UC Davis web-
site www.ipm.ucdavis.edu
A wide range of pheromones can
be sourced from Syngenta Bioline
www.syngenta-bioline.co.uk
Good scouting is the most essen-
tial element of an IPM programme
so that hotspots can be treated
quickly. People working in crops
help spread mealybug, so access to
hotspot areas should be restricted
or work there undertaken at the
end of the working day.

Mealybug
bio-control agents
Te predatory beetle, Cryptolae-
mus montrouzieri is the bio-control
of choice if mealybug infestations
are very high, as a female can lay up
to 400 eggs – one in each mealybug
egg sac. Other parasitoids such as
Leptomastix dactylopii, Anagryus
pseudococci and Coccidoxenoides
perminutus are more suitable if the
mealybug populations are low and
more widely dispersed. For more
details on application rates and
practical information see the full
text of this article on the website of
Floraculture International> www.
foracultureinternational.com>
services.> FCI In Detail
Entomopathogenic fungi such as
Beauveria bassiana are registered for
mealybug control (BotaniGard).
Even entomopathogenic nemato-
des (Heterorhabditis) ofer some
reduction in mealybugs which are
overwintering in the soil – in fower
production areas where temperatu-
res drop in the winter.
Pesticides for mealybug
Insect Growth Regulators (azadi-
rachtin and kinoprene); neonicoti-
noid pesticides (imidacloprid and
thiamethoxam); organophosphates
(acephate); penetrating oils (neem
oil and fne oils); botanical pesticides
(pyrethrum) and detergents (Savona)
– all have a part to play. For more
information see www.foraculturein-
ternational.com> Services> FCI In
Detail. Mealybugs will be expensive
to clean up, if they have got out of
hand. But once this investment
has been made, it is important to
pay better attention to scouting and
quarantine methods to ensure that
new hotspots are found quickly and
action taken quickly.
|||
Te author has extensive practical feld
experience in the development of IPM
protocols for fruit, vegetable and fower
crops in Europe and Africa and is Joint
Managing Director of Te Real IPM
Company (Kenya) Ltd (labuschagne@
realipm.com/www.realipm.com)

by Louise Labuschagne
Cryptolaemus larvae.
Cryptolaemus adult.
Beaten
Only one in 50,000 companies survives a hundred years. Today
the average life span of a company is less than 10 years. Our
horticultural boom has lasted 120 years and this is a true miracle.
Decades of innovation, know-how, solid craftsmanship and gene-
rations of eager growers have kept it going for this long. We have
outlived the Belgian and Danish competition where now only
a handful of competitive, specialized companies are left. Are we
better growers, better entrepreneurs? Not really, we were just lucky
enough to be close to our vegetable industry, to be concentrated
with a thousand colleagues at a time when distance was an issue,
we could obtain our know-how from just around the corner… and
our auction system was superior. Starting in 1889, the goal for the
founders was to market their quality product as a brand in order
to ensure better prices for their crops. However, this goal was ne-
ver achieved. What was achieved was a concentration of products.
Te auction became the market place where all new species and
varieties were found, sometimes for the highest price, but as no
one wants to pay the highest price usually for the lowest price.
Te hand on the auction clock moves down and our ever growing
assortments and freely-communicated, low prices attract buyers
from all over the world. Our wholesalers and exporters, well, they
are still as mean and lean as ever, they are simply the best. Over
the years they have flled every European window sill with pot-
ted plants and shipped our fowers to every corner of the world;
beating any competition, occasionally on quality, but always on
price. Whatever the fower, wherever it is grown on the globe, it
sells from Holland.
I hate to admit that the ever decreasing auction price was the
main Dutch strength. Low prices beat the competition out of the
European market. Dutch growers raised production, mechanized
their facilities and reduced fuel consumption to survive this rat
race. Our auction is fully aware of the fact that there are only
two reasons for its continued existence: buyers want low prices;
growers want their money. Buyers need to pay in advance to be
permitted to buy, in exchange the auction roams the world to
fnd them the cheapest product; fowers from Africa and potted
plants from China and Central America, all marketed straight out
of the container, no questions asked on quality and if it sells it is
accepted. Te fact that low quality reduces tomorrow’s market is
ignored. Te current fnancial crisis and recession have intensifed
the search for lower prices. Prices this low can only be achieved
with free heating and a dollar-a-day labour. Dutch growers with
their costs still rising cannot keep up. Tey are at the end of their
cycle. Teir hundred years are over. Tey are fnally closing down,
beaten by their own strength.
Dust
by Hans de Vries
Hans de Vries is a grower
in Kudelstraat, the Netherlands.
hans@jdevries.nl
www.jdevries.nl
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 21
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April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 23 2
International Events
April 2009
March 19 to May 21.
The Netherlands
Keukenhof Holland, Lisse.
T (31) 252 465 555;
F (31) 252 465 565;
info@keukenhof.nl;
www.keukenhof.nl
March 28 to April 3, United States
California Pack Trials, California.
www.ngb.org
1 to 4. China
Te 11th Hortiforexpo China,
Intex Shanghai. T (86) 21
62956677 8367/2131/2132;
F (86) 21 62780038; intexcl@
sh163.net/intexljs@sh163.net;
www.hortiforexpo.com
1 to 3. United States
Wholesale Florist and Florist Sup-
plier Association (WF&FSA) An-
nual Convention & Floral Expo,
Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress,
Orlando, Florida. www.wfsa.org
1 to 3. Ukraine
4th International Exhibition for
Flower Business, Horticulture,
Nurseries, Landscape design and
Floristry, Kiev. T (31) 55 534 11
40; F (31) 55 534 01 68;
info@bto-exhibitions.nl;
www.bto-exhibitions.nl
8 to 9. The Netherlands
FloraHolland Spring Fair,
Aalsmeer. www.foraholland.com
16 to 17. Bahrein
RVBIGS 2009, Rifa Views
Bahrein International Garden
Show, Manama,
T +973 17558800
F +973 17555513
www.bigs.com.bh
23 to May 10. Korea
International Horticulture
Goyang Korea 2009,
www.fower.or.kr
20 to 24. The Netherlands
European Pack Trials,
www.feuroselect.com
May 2009
5 to 7. Israel
Agritech Israel, Tel Aviv.
www.agritech.org.il
7 to 10. Romania
May Flowers Expo, Timisoara.
Star Expo T (40) 256 431 015
F (40) 256 487 406.
19 to 23. United Kingdom
RHS Chelsea Flower Show, Royal
Hospital, Chelsea, London SW3.
www.rhs.org.uk
27 to 28. The Netherlands
FloraHolland Summer Sales,
Aalsmeer. www.foraholland.com
June 2009
9 to 11. Germany,The Netherlands
Euro Trials, www.euro-trials.com
9 to 12. The Netherlands
Flower Trials of pot plants and bed-
ding plants, Aalsmeer and Westland
Region. www.fowertrials.nl
14 to 19. Canada
GreenSys 2009, Québec City.
International Symposium on High
Technology for Greenhouse System.
T (1) 418 658 6755; F (1) 418 658
8850; info@greensys2009.com;
www.greensys2009.com
July 2009
11 to 14. United States
OFA Short Course, Columbus,
Ohio. T (1) 614 487 1117;
ofa@ofa.org; www.ofa.org
August 2009
26 to 29. The Netherlands
Plantarium, Boskoop.
T (31) 172 235 400;
F (31) 172 235 450;
info@plantarium.nl;
www.plantarium.nl
September 2009
3 to 6. Russia
Flowers 2009, All Russia
Exhibition Centre, Moscow.
T (31) 20 662 2482;
F (31) 20 675 2326;
melvin@hpp.nl; www.hpp.nl
8 to 9. United Kingdom
Four Oaks Trade Show,
Macclesfeld. T (44) 1477 571392;
F (44) 1477 571314; four-oaks-
hort@btconnect.com;
www.fouroaks-tradeshow.com
10 to 12. Italy
Flormart-Mifor 2009
T (39) 049 840 111
www.formart.it
11 to 12. Kenya
Naivasha Horticultural Fair.
T/F (254) 50 2020655;
M (254) 726 629 666;
nhfair@kenyaweb.com
20 to 22. United Kingdom
Glee 2009, National Exhibition
Centre, Birmingham.
T (44) 20 8277 5813;
F (44) 20 8277 5894;
glee@emap.com;
www.gleebirmingham.com
23 to 24. Canada
CanWest Hort Show, Vancouver,
British Columbia.
T (1) 604 574 7772;
F (1) 604 574 7773;
bnelson@bclna.com;
www.canwesthortshow.com
23 to 26. United States
Society of American Florists
(SAF) 125th Annual Convention,
Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort
Phoenix, Arizona. www.safnow.
org; Laura Weaver, CMP
lweaver@safnow.org
24 to 27. Germany
15th European Orchid Congress,
Dresden Exhibition Centre, Dresden.
Contact DOG-Zentrale, Flößweg 11,
33758 SchloßHolte-Stuckenbrock,
Germany. T (49) 05207 920607
DOG-Zentrale@orchidee.de
October 2009
30 to October 2. Colombia
Profora 2009, Bogotá.
profora@asocolfores.org;
www.profora.org.co
30 to October 4. United States
International Plant Propagators’
Society (IPPS) 50th Anniversary
Event of the Western Regional
Meeting, San Diego Crowne Plaza
Hotel Circle. www.ippswr.org
2 to 4. India
4th International Landscape &
Gardening Expo 2009, Exhibi-
tion Grounds, Necklace Road,
Hyderabad. Organizers: Media
Today Pvt. Ltd., T-30 First
Floor, Khirki Extn., Malviya
Nagar, New Delhi 110017,
India. Mr. M B Naqvi,
M (91)
9811152139/9312407851;
F (91) 11 26682045/
26681671; mediatoday@vsnl.
com, ifora@vsnl.net,
mediatodaymails@gmail.com;
www.mediatoday.in
7 to 8. Canada
Canadian Greenhouse Confe-
rence, Toronto, Ontario.
T (1) 905 945 9057; F (1) 905
945 8643; info@canadiangreen-
houseconference.com;
www.candiangreenhouseconfe-
rence.com

13 to 16. The Netherlands
International Horti Fair, Amster-
dam RAI. T (31) 297 344033;
F (31) 297 326850;
info@hortifair.nl; www.hortifair.nl
14 to 16. The Netherlands
FloraHolland Trade Fair, Aalsmeer
(previously called Aalsmeer
Market). www.foraholland.com
14 to 16. Spain
Iberfora, Valencia. T (34) 963
861 100; F (34) 963 636 111;
feriavalencia@feriavalencia.com;
www.feriavalencia.com
November 2009
18 to 20. Japan
Ifex/Gardex, Makuhari Messe,
Tokyo. Japan Floral Marketing
Association (JFMA) and Reed
Exhibitions Japan Ltd. T (81) 3
3349 8511; F (81) 3 3345 7929;
www.ifex.jp
December 2009
1 to 3. China
IPM China, Foshan City,
Guangdong Province.
info@messe-essen.de;
www.ipm-china.com
3 to 6. Turkey
Growtech Eurasia, Antalya.
International Exhibition & Con-
gress Organizer Ekinciler Cd.
Ertürk Sk. No:5 Kat: 3 Mehmet
Özçelik İş Merkezi, 34810
Kavacık / Istanbul.
T (90) 216 425 63 00;
F (90) 216 425 63 02;
info@growtecheurasia.com;
www.growtecheurasia.com
January 2010
14 to 16. United States
Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition
(TPIE), Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,
T (1) 407 295 7994
F (1) 407 295 1619
info@tpie.org; www.tpie.org
28 to 31. Germany
IPM Essen, Essen,
T (49) 201 7244 0;
F (49) 201 7244 248;
www.ipm-messe.de
February 2010
16 to 18. France
Salon du Végétal 2010
T (33) 241 79 1417
F (33) 241 45 2905
salon@bhr-vegetal.com
www.salon-du-vegetal.com
April 2010
17 to 25. Belgium
Floralies of Ghent, Ghent,
T (32) 9 241 5090
F (32) 9 221 9817
www.foralien.be
World News
24 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
The Syngenta Spring Trials in Germany,
including presentations from six spea-
kers about the trends in cultivation and
marketing, was organised for the third year
running at the end of February. The venue
changes each year; in 2008 the event was
held in Leipzig and this year in Kleve. In the
greenhouse showcase, visitors were presen-
ted with an overview of the Syngenta range
of biennials and spring flowering perennials
(from both cuttings and seed) suitable for sales
between January and April (some products
are also suitable for autumn sales). Among
the introductions, the Delta
®
pansy series of
32 colours sees the addition of Delta F1 Gold
with Blotch and Purple Surprise. Delta signifies
a high level of programmability and uniformity
across the Colossus
®
, Endurio
®
and Deltini™
family members, all of which have their
own characteristics: Colossus has very large
flowers on short stems and is heat tolerant for
late summer/autumn cultivation; a flatter, com-
pact growth habit of the semi trailing Endurio
is adapted to hanging baskets and bedding;
Deltini is the newest Delta member in four co-
lours and is adapted to limitations concerning
energy and PGR use with the compact habit
and plant size requiring low light and space
requirements. Grower desires to complement
their Delta range with unusual, special colours
are accommodated by six varieties in the
Designer Collection with Strawberry Cream F1
being the newest introduction.
The primrose range with 12 series covers
a selling season from September to March
with the new Daniella F1 Apricot colour ad-
ded to the Specialities this year. A breeding
goal to enlarge the number of special colours
and flower forms is also evident in the
Harlequin series and the Specialities Little
Girls Mix with the plants suited to 7 to 8 cm
pots showing semi-double flowers. Visitors
were also given a glimpse of the new for
2010 Primula acaulis Suzette Mischung
with their appealing frizzle type flowers and
special colours. Variations in plant habit are
also appearing in the Gessi luxury series for
cultivation in 10.5 to 12 cm pots; the familiar
show of large flowers introduced on longer
stems in Gessi Pacific Gold.
In a fast growing, perennial segment Marc
Knof pointed out among the introductions
Saxifraga Large White, Primula denticulata
Confetti™ Deeprose and Pulsatilla vulgaris
Pinwheel™, all three characterised by their
hardiness, very early flowering and intense
colours. Spring perennials traditionally repre-
sent a relatively small percentage (<15%) of
Syngenta’s spring flowers but their ability to
be grown under cold conditions in a period
dominated by rising energy costs as well as
the reduced growing time due to the early
flowering are points concentrating an exten-
sive breeding program. The diversity within
perennials, the richness and length of the
flowering period, disease resistance and a
quick wrap and clean presentation add to the
efficiency features for growers and expand
on retail marketing opportunities. Syngenta’s
Calendar Colours® concept depicts the
suitable combinations of perennials for each
month from February to October.
|||
Germany
Spring colours
The Netherlands
FlowerTrials® tells 22 companies
Deltini™ is the newest Delta
member in four colours.
New in 2010 is the Primula
acaulis Suzette Mischung.
Gessi Pacific Gold. Saxifraga Large White. Confetti™ Deeprose.
The fifth edition of the FlowerTrials®
2009 is being organised for four days
from June 9 to 12 (opening times 08:00
to 17:00 hrs). The number of participating
companies has increased again this year
from 19 to 22; it is a great opportunity to
visit a large number of companies within
easy reach of each other and gain an
impression of the very latest trends in pot
and bedding plants and delivery programs
available from a variety of leading Dutch
and international companies.
In the Aalsmeer region the seven
companies represented are Ball Holland,
Danziger/ Imperial Plants, Florist De
Kwakel, HilverdaKooij, mKoppe, Royal
Van Zanten, Moerheim New Plant.
In the Westland region the 15 compa-
nies represented are Armada, Beek-
enkamp Plants/Florema Young Plants,
Benary, Combinations, Fides, Floranova,
Florensis, Gruenewald Young Plants,
Hem Genetics, Kieft Pro-Seeds, Kiepen-
kerl, Sahin/Takii/Global Flowers, Sakata,
Selecta and Syngenta Flowers.
The website www.flowertrials.nl
offers extensive information on the
companies taking part, the new pro-
ducts and delivery programs, address
details and downloadable route descrip-
tions. You can also register in advance
for all 22 companies or the companies
of your choice.
|||
Belgium

FLORALL showcase
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 25
Over 270 professional Belgian growers
exhibited a wide range of ornamental
and arboricultural products at this
year’s Spring FLORALL trade fair held on
March 3 to 4 in the Flanders Expo, Gent.
Dimitri Barbe, on behalf of the Floralies of
Gent, coordinates the Spring and Autumn
FLORALL events in cooperation with the
Belgian Nurserymen and Growers’ Federa-
tion (AVBS).
The Best Novelty and Best Stand FLO-
RALL award presentations on the Tuesday
evening were followed by an informal
Meet & Greet reception for exhibitors and
visitors. The Best Novelty Gold award was
presented to Rudy Raes for the Rubens
Primula acaulis 1

, a double flowering prim-
rose available in eight colours, flowering
from mid-February to April and distinguis-
hed from existing double primulas by its
compactness. The Silver and Bronze award
recognised the new star of Suntory, the
Princettia Euphorbia 2

, and the Hellobo-
rus Alexia 3

, both exhibited by the Dutch
young plants company Van der Zalm.
Exhibitors rewarded for the professionalism
in their product presentation in the Best
Stand competition were the duo-stand of
the nurseries Talpe Dirk and D&V Plant Pro-
duction; Silver for Maes-Reyns and Bronze
for Deseo. The bedding and nursery stock
of these winners, together with numerous
other stands, shared the Expo hall with
nurseries exhibiting the renowned range of
Belgian azaleas, rhododendrons, ornamen-
tal trees, palms and flowering pot plants.
Both the family run nurseries and grower
groups, such as Speciale and BE.plants,
service not only the domestic market but
also use the logistically competitive loca-
tion of Belgium to distribute ornamentals
into the European markets. The Autumn
FLORALL trade fair will take place from 25
to 26 August 2009.
|||
4

The FLORALL Best Stand of Talpe Dirk.
5

Plantas Lobos is the import department of Guy van
Hautem’s nursery; the plants are sourced for regional
retail distribution in Belgium.
6

The new Belgian grower group, BE.plants.
7

A decorative touch for pot plants, Tillandsia usnoides
from BVBA Vandersteene Favere.
8

Young and dedicated, Steven Verhelle has invested
in greenhouse lighting and an ebb and flood system
to cultivate campanula (starting week 7) for southern
Europe, Germany and the UK.
1
4
2 3
6
8
7
5
World News
26 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
For the third year running, 10 breeding and propaga-
ting companies of bedding and balcony plants will
be opening their company premises to visitors of the
Euro Trials 2009 for three days in June from the 9th to
the 11th (opening times 09:00 to 17:00 hrs).
Organized by the Central Horticultural Association (ZVG)
Young Plants section, the open days are concentrated
in two regions. In the Netherlands three companies are
represented: Carmel Agrexco, Brandkamp and Grünewald
Plants. In Germany visitors can visit seven companies:
Bongartz, Dümmen, PAC Elsner, Geranien Endisch,
Grünewald Plants, Kientzler, Nebelung and Westhoff. The
website www.euro-trials.com gives complete information
about the participating companies, their locations and
online registration.
|||
Brandkamp is a member of the Euro Trials initiative
and will be presenting among their novelties the
strawberry veined flowers of Recife Strawberry in the
Marisco Petunia series, the Marisco Hot Mix to join the
Cool Mix and the Caprivi White Spoon in the Osteo
Line. At the IPM Essen, Jürgen von den Driesch further
explained how the company’s 50 year history as a
European player is changing; during the last two years
a step has been taken in overseas markets, namely the
USA and Japan.
Von den Driesch: “The concentration in the Netherlands
and Germany of young plant companies incurs risks for
those involved, particularly if you do not have your own
genetics. Our young plant distribution, together with our
own breeding lines, focus on bedding plants and chrysan-
themums. The costs of breeding are high but in the future
we do need to have our own breeding division; in Europe
alone, however, it will be difficult to make a return on
the investments. Our first opportunity to expand over-
seas began with requests originating from the USA; the
initial interest is shown in our fuschias (Jollies series) and
lantanas (Tropic Lantanas). The fuschias are recognized for
their compact, upright habit and rich, early flowering while
the lantanas have a perfect compact habit after pinching
and an early and continual flowering pattern. The trials we
have been conducting in Japan are our own initiative after
having been very successful with our chrysanthemum
garden mums for more than 10 years; we will be running
tests on Brandkamp Breeding lines in this new market for
a minimum of two years.”
|||
Germany

Third edition of Euro Trials
Germany
Overseas ventures see
start of breeding division
The Netherlands

On show this month
Ball’s European Spring Trials from April 20-24 at the Ball Re-
search Facility in Rijsenhout, the Netherlands, will give centre
stage to Viola Sorbet, Coleus Versa and Zinnia Zahara. Sorbet
XP is described as the ultimate easy-to-grow, all-new small
flowered Viola series offering growers complete uniformity, a
well branched plant habit, large leaves and timely, early flowe-
ring. Sorbet XP includes all the top-selling colours in viola plus
unique shades and novelties. There is also no need to hide the
Coleus Versa away in the shade since the Versa is a collection
of Coleus in fascinating colours, all suitable for placement in
sunny or shady positions; the long lasting colour is an extra
plus for landscapers. The Zinnia Zahara series, introduced to
the market for 2009, is disease-tolerant, heat-loving and has
20% larger flowers in stronger colours than other Zinnia’s of
its type on the market; new to the Zinnia Zahara series for
2010 is Zahara Starlight Rose and Zinnia Zahara Fire, which has
a bright orange-red hue which intensifies outdoors.
|||
PLANT INVIGORATOR
www.sbpi.co.uk
Flowerport Logistics B.V.
Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer
P.O. Box 364
1430 AJ Aalsmeer Holland
T +31 297 349 360
F +31 297 349 560
Our services
Flowerport Logistics B.V. look after clearances and
transport of complete charters, but also “small” indi-
vidual sendings will be handled with extreme care.
• Handling all customs formalities
• Including inspection by plant protection
(phyto-sanitary) service
• Delivery and distribution aal through the country
• Transport and temperature-regulated trucks
• Temporary (cold) storage, both for loose freight and
for complete aircraft pallets
• Pre-cooling
• Competitive rates
• Located in the centre of
Flora Holland Auction Aalsmeer
www.fowerportlogistics.nl
Israel
Two contradicting court
decisions regarding
Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’
versus ‘Blancanieves’
UK
Wide Support for
Greening the UK
Abuse of Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’ or not? The story con-
tinues, as on March 5 the Honourable Judge Anat Baron
of the Tel Aviv-Jaffa District Court, determined that the
Dutch breeder of Gypsohila Astee Flowers BV had infringed
Danziger Dan Flower Farm’s breeder’s rights, stating that
Astee’s Gypsophila ‘Blancanieves’ is an Essentialy Derived
Variety (EDV) of Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’. The Israeli
court’s decision is interesting because on July 13, 2005
the Civil Court in The Hague, the Netherlands found that
‘Blancanieves’ was not essentially derived. The court in The
Hague noted that ‘Blancanieves’ differed from the initial
variety in a large number of characteristics -17 out of 21 of
the characteristics relevant to Gypsophila. In reaching its
decision, the Dutch court did not use DNA fingerprinting,
whereas the Israeli court based its rulings on DNA tests.
Danziger, who were represented by the Seligsohn Gabrieli & Co.
Law Office, specializing in matters of intellectual property, clai-
med that Astee’s Gypsophila variety which they are propagating,
growing and marketing in Israel and other countries, is a derived
variety of the well-known Gypsophila variety ‘Million Stars’ bred
by Danziger. Danziger appealed to the court to issue a permanent
injunction against Astee and another grower in Israel, prohibiting
them from continuing the usage of their variety called ‘Blanca-
nieves’, because such exploitation constituted an infringement of
Danziger’s rights for the ‘Million Stars’ variety.
The Court of Law accepted Danziger’s claims and denied Astee’s
claims; the latter’s claims being based on, amongst others, the
testimony given by the variety examiner from the Council of
Breeder’s Rights at the Ministry of Agriculture. In making its
decision the Court of Law stated that much significance had been
given to the DNA tests that were conducted on the plants. The
court concluded that Astee’s variety is indeed a derived variety,
and issued a permanent injunction against Astee and the other
Israeli grower prohibiting them or others from using their variety.
The court also ordered them to submit a financial report in order
to determine the compensation due to Danziger for a breach of
their rights On making the court’s decision the judge stated that
the testimony of the variety examiner, “Makes you wonder about
him being a government employee who testifies on behalf of an
interested party on a matter in his line of work.”.
|||
The Horticultural Trades Associ-
ation’s (HTA) Greening the UK
campaign has received endor-
sement from key environmental
and planning organisations
following the publication of its
report, ‘Local Authorities Com-
mitment to Urban Planting’.
The Environment Agency, CABE
Space, the Planning Officers So-
ciety and Design for London have
all expressed their backing for the
campaign’s aims and objectives.
The campaign was also endorsed
by the Rt Hon Hazel Blears MP in
her foreword for the recent publi-
cation. Also, since the campaign
began, 10 Local Authorities so far
have adopted a Greening the UK
model motion to encourage more
positivity from their planners and
11 more are including it in their
Local Development Framework,
and all recipients have signalled
their comfort with it. Over 60
MPs signed the Greening the UK
Early Day Motion during the last
parliament.
The campaign highlights the 50%
reduction in planting on approved
planning applications in the last
decade. A further 50% of this
planting is never actually delivered
by developers and goes un-enfor-
ced by Local Authorities. Greening
the UK believes that developers
have traditionally seen green plan-
ting as an expense that can be
trimmed rather than a commerci-
ally necessary investment. In the
coming year the campaign will
produce further concrete actions
to support councils in tackling this
problem, with an amenity guide
produced by Chris Baines and
training sessions designed to help
Local Authorities make their areas
reach the highest environmental
standards.
The Rt Hon Lord Smith of Finsbu-
ry, Chairman of the Environment
Agency, states: “The Environ-
ment Agency supports the use
of planting as part of sustainable
development because, as indica-
ted by the report, planting brings
environmental and social benefits
to communities. In support of
the Greening the UK campaign I
propose to promote your report to
our staff as a topical green issue
through our website.”
Stephen Tapper, Chair of the
Planning Officers Society’s
Sustainability Committee, said:
“The importance of horticul-
ture to sustainable communities
should not be understated and
through this campaign the HTA
are increasing local authorities’
awareness of the skills needed
in their planning departments to
meet the challenges of sustai-
nability. That is why I support
Greening the UK and am glad to
see many high-profile organisati-
ons also lending their support to
the campaign.”
Since January every council in
England has received a copy of
the Greening the UK model mo-
tion, highlighting the main tenets
of the campaign. This includes
at least 690 councillors at 330
councils.
|||

Te full report can be downloaded
from www.the-hta.org.uk/greening-
theuk
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 27
World News
28 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
Danish research groups have
joined to make a large leap for-
ward in energy saving in the gr-
eenhouse industry to meet the
challenges of the global change
as expressed in the global
change summit in Copenhagen
in November 2009.
Greenhouse horticulture sector
is under pressure from the huge
energy expenses. In the last 15
years researchers, growers and
industries in Denmark have wor-
ked together on decreasing the
energy consumption. Today the
total energy consumption is 25 %
lower than 10 years ago with the
same production. Compared to
many other countries this is a suc-
cess, but still the sector’s energy
consumption needs to be reduced
significantly. New technological
solutions and increased under-
standing of the physiological reac-
tions of plants will be necessary
to achieve energy reduction while
maintaining plant quality, to obtain
a sustainable production. This has
resulted in a number of larger
projects in Denmark involving both
research and development and
with a wide coverage of funding.
Currently, the horticultural sector,
universities, ATS companies
(Authorized Technology Service)
and other companies are working
together to find solutions that
potentially can reduce the energy
use by more than 50%, thus
meeting the demand for a more
sustainable food and ornamen-
tal greenhouse production. In
cooperation with several Danish
and foreign partners two projects
were started by AgroTech in
2007: “Greenhouse Concept
2017” is an innovation consortium
financed by the Danish Agency
for Science, Technology and
Innovation under the Ministry of
Science; “Intelligent energy hand-
ling in greenhouses” is funded by
Region South Denmark and the
European Regional Fund. Both
projects are also supported by the
Danish Producers of Pot Plants
(more information about the
projects and partners is available
at www.ghc2017.com).
• “Intelligent energy handling in
greenhouses” focuses on the
energy consumption of one
particular greenhouse. Resear-
chers and technology com-
panies demonstrate together
that it is possible to cut energy
consumption by 60%. This
can be done by storing surplus
energy from the greenhouse in
a subsoil aquifer and by fitting
intelligent climate control sy-
stems. Plants are often grown
in very static climatic conditions
but in reality they can survive
and thrive under more fluctua-
ting conditions thereby saving
energy. Plant physiologists will
carry out research involving
the two main crops grown
by the nursery in question,
Saintpaulia and Euphorbia milii,
in order to exploit their climate
limits in production. “Intelligent
energy handling in greenhou-
ses” is also based on weather
forecasts, energy prices, energy
consumption models, etc.
• Danish research institutes have
made great progress in the
area of climate technology in
recent years and the consortium
behind “Greenhouse Concept
2017” comprises leading com-
panies and researchers who
have the competencies to face
the challenges of sustainable
production. This means that the
necessary know-how can be
supported by the consortium
through targeted research and
innovation concerning: col-
lection, storage and recycling
of energy, greenhouse curtains
with improved light permeability,
light emitting diodes for use in
greenhouses and novel sensors
for control, regulation and mo-
nitoring of production systems
and horticultural production.
Partners in the two projects in
different constellations are the
three Danish Universities (Århus,
Southern Denmark and Copen-
hagen), seven nurseries and a
range of national and interna-
tional companies like Senmatic,
Phillips and Danfoss and LS
Svensson and AgroTech. Hjorteb-
jerg Greenhouse I/S will erect a
demonstration facility covering
4,000 m² for ongoing testing of
new technologies. The facility
is expected to be ready in July
2009 and will be presented on a
number of occasions including
at a workshop and during the
United Nations Climate Change
Conference in Copenhagen in
December 2009.
The first results from the projects
will be presented at a interna-
tional workshop hosted by the
University of Southern Denmark
in Odense on October 6 and
7, 2009 where researchers,
consultants and growers from all
over the world are invited to meet
and exchange knowledge on the
future of greenhouses. Aarhus
University’s Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences is responsible for the
workshop entitled “Intelligent
use of Energy in Greenhouses”
and we invite all to sign in for a
presentation or participation at
the homepage, http://energysym-
posium.agrproject.dk.
|||
Carl-Otto Ottosen, Dept. of
Horticulture, University of Århus,
Denmark and Janni Bjerregård
Lund, AgroTech, Denmark
Denmark
Towards future greenhouse concepts
Where’s the money?
Ok, I have vowed not to talk about bad news but that is getting hard
to do these days. However, I will attempt to talk about some of the
realities of the current fower business. Whether we like it or not many
of us are going to have to reduce our spending to save our companies.
Tis comes at a time when many of us were hoping to ride of into the
sunset on cruise control after having put in many tough years, paid
our dues, and built our houses strong to carry us through. I speak in
the frst person because I was an owner for so long that I still think
that way; so please bear with my impersonation of an owner.
In the early days of a company the owners are often also the grower,
driver, invoice-writer, maintenance man or woman, janitor and, on
occasion, the executive. We can be found at the farm, the shop or the
warehouse early in the mornings and then again late at night. We use
the ‘flo’ method - frst in last out! But, we move on and if we are lucky
the business grows, we hire others to do some of the tasks so that we
can do less of the grunt work and more of the executive duties.
Te years pass and we feel comfortable enough to hit the cruise
control button, put our feet up and smile at what we have created.
“La-la-la” of we go to the country club or the summer, winter, lake
or ocean house or we fre up the RV; life is good. But then we start
to see reports coming in that defy the trend we had gotten so used
to. Growth is no longer measured in plus signs but with that ugly,
unforgiving minus sign. So you turn the bus around and decide it is
time to show those good, but obviously slacking, employees how it
is done. You go back to basics but fnd that you stayed away too long
allowing decisions to be made that now look dead wrong.
You make some changes and fgure you are fne and that all will be
better soon, but then it gets worse. You make more corrections and
wish that you had not bought such a big building to accommodate
your growing needs. Maybe that boat you bought to entertain custo-
mers was a bit much and needs to go, but now you can barely give it
away and the next payment is due tomorrow. Yikes!
Ok so where am I going with this? Since I have already moved on to
become an employee I am sitting on less assets and therefore need
only be concerned that my employer has made sound business deci-
sions. But many of you reading this (thank you) have to make tough
decisions about how to manage in these times, times that are not like
any we have seen before, so the road map is unclear.
History, however, shows us that over centuries of commerce people
have lost everything and survived to prosper once again. So all we
can do is look at our business and our personal wealth (or debt) and
make the best decisions we can to insure that when we take a look
back in a few years from now there is something to see.
Be sure to wear your sunscreen, Miami is hot!
Miami
by William Armellini
William Armellini has been in the floral industry
since birth and works for Greenleaf Sourcing in
Miami. william@floracultureinternational.com
www.greenleafwholesale.com.
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 29
On February 27, 2009 Guido
Schmidt, the managing director
for marketing and sales of Poep-
pelmann Holding GmbH & Co.
KG in Lohne (Germany), retired
after more than 35 years with
the company. Schmidt joined
the company in 1973. In 1974,
he became general manager for
marketing and sales. Since 1997,
he was managing director. Under
his management, the company’s
development was characterized
by a steady growth and an incre-
asing globalisation.
Today, the Poeppelmann-group with
its approximately 1,400 employees
produces and develops high-tech
plastic products for customers in
more than 70 countries world-wide.
It operates production facilities
in Lohne (Germany) as well as in
Rixheim (France) and Claremont,
NC (USA). Poeppelmann ranks
among the leading companies of
the plastics processing industry in
Europe. Friedrich Kuehling, also a
managing director at Poeppelmann,
emphasizes Schmidt’s merits for
the company, “The development of
Poeppelmann bears a high degree
of his handwriting. He has been one
of the main pillars of our success.”
Even after his retirement, Schmidt
will be active for Poeppelmann. He
has been appointed chairman of the
advisory board.
|||
Germany
Poeppelmann MD retires
Rose breeder Terra Nigra and wholesale import facilitator Tradewinds
International have announced the introduction of a new rose called
Angel’s Love. A lightly scented white rose, Angel’s Love has soft pink
edges that give the blossoms a blushing appearance when they are
fully open. Long 60-80 cm stems and a longer-than-average vase life
add to the rose’s appeal as both a wedding and cut flower.
“Its introduction is unique in that it breaks from the traditional breeder to
grower to wholesaler model of launching a new flower,” said Richard Lutes of
wholesale florist Koehler & Dramm, a member of the Tradewinds International
group. “It represents a collaboration between the breeder, wholesaler and flo-
rists to bring a fresh new rose to the public.” Last April, Koehler & Dramm hos-
ted the first International Rose Festival and Wedding Design Show in Minnea-
polis. The approximately 500 retail and wholesale florists, growers, designers
and rose breeders who attended got a sneak preview of the then, nameless
new rose. Florists were invited to suggest names for the new flower and from
over 200 entries submitted at the show, the selected winner was Angel’s Love
from Bob Larson, owner and designer with BO-JO’s Creations in Ellsworth,
Wisconsin. Angel’s Love is being grown in Ecuador and is exclusively available
through Tradewinds member wholesalers in its first year.
|||
United States
Born in Holland,
named in America
World News
30 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
Hamurabi (1), Dust column February 2009
David Efron, Yodfat Revivim Horticulture Ltd.,
Kibbutz Revivim, Israel: I would like to protest
about the biased usage of your professional
floriculture magazine as a platform for political
propaganda based on false untruthful argu-
ments. I believe that when you meant to publish
a professional floriculture magazine you did not
mean to bringt it into political disputes.
|||
Hamurabi (2), Dust column February 2009
David Squire, Flower Grower-Israel: I read your
article in the Floraculture magazine. Don’t we all
miss the good old days when one civilized suici-
de bomber from Hammas would proportionately
blow up a bus or holiday dinner of 30-40 Jews. I
think that the past 60 years of peace in Europe
has been a blessing but also has given you a
simplistic outlook on what a country can put up
with. Three and a half years ago, Israel evacuated
completely the Gaza Strip. Instead of building
up the economy, the Palestinians started firing
mortars and rockets at Israeli towns. Israel, unwi-
sely did not retaliate strongly or at all because it
believed that by not doing anything and turning
the other cheek, the terrorist government of
Gaza would stop launching rockets. What a naïve
mistake. Can you imagine living in Boskoop or
Gouda and having to worry about your child-
ren and spouse all day at work every time a
rocket falls. The people in southern Israel had
a 15-45 second warning in order to take cover.
Can you live like that?
All the Arabs in Gaza had to do was stop firing
and Israel would not have gone out on a massive
strike. They were warned time and time again but
continued to launch rockets. When Israel went
out on a massive strike to stop the rockets, the
army even warned civilians by telephone and
flyers before bombing. The Hammas fires rockets
from civilian homes (which is a breach of the
Geneva convention). We are sorry about civilian
casualties but we also will not tolerate unneces-
sary military casualties on our side.
I am very sorry that not enough of our soldiers
were killed but the EU also works that way (see
actions in former Yugoslavia) and so does Turkey
(where is the self determination of 10 million
Kurds?) It seems funny that only Israel is not
allowed to defend itself and expected to act as
if it is playing a soccer game while defending
its citizens. When was the last time your family
friends or neighbours were shot at? I think you
should stick to writing a column about flowers.
|||
Letters to
the Editor
The Flower Council of Holland, an organization that promotes
the sales of floricultural products from the Netherlands on
behalf of growers and traders, has announced that Henk Jan
Winter has joined the organization as its new corporate
communications manager.
The 45-year-old Mr. Winter will be responsible for media rela-
tions and external communications on behalf of the Flower
Council of Holland and will be based in Leiden, the Nether-
lands. He brings in a wealth of media and communications
experience to the Flower Council of Holland. Mr. Winter
most recently served as editor of Schooljournaal, a
weekly magazine for professional teachers and as a
communications manager at the Kennisnet Foundation
in Zoetermeer, a public organization which focuses on
ICT in elementary and secondary education.
Mr. Winter is very excited about the challenge of his
new job offering him the possibility to work in a more
commercial environment.
|||
Selecta Klemm and Ball Horticultural
Company announce that effective June
1, 2009, Ball will become the exclusive
supplier of Selecta genetics in North
America. All Selecta unrooted products,
including annuals, perennials and pot
plants will be available through Ball.
Selecta’s extensive Root & Sell network
will continue to supply top quality
rooted liners through their existing
North American broker group.
“We are very pleased to be working with
Ball in this partnership”, stated Nils Klemm,
Chief Executive Officer of Selecta Klemm
GmbH & Co. KG. “Ball is well regarded for
their strength in distribution and service in
North America. Their focus on the grower
fits nicely with our overall corporate
direction and, together, we will provide
the optimal solution to our North American
customers.”
“Selecta is well known for their innovative
and quality breeding. Their products, com-
bined with our market-leading service and
supply will provide growers with the best
vegetative solution for their needs”, said
Cees Boonman, Vice President of Ball
Horticultural Company. Selecta’s
MiniFamous® is the leading calibrachoa se-
ries in the market and helped to establish
Selecta’s position in North America.
Current Selecta Root and Sell stations will
remain intact and will continue to offer
rooted Selecta genetics through the current
broker customers. Selecta will continue to
host customers at their Encinitas Pack Trial
location in 2009 and will be showcasing
over 50 new products.
This partnership is for the North American
market and does not change the relationship
between these two companies in other
regions of the world such as Europe.
|||
Te Netherlands
Flower Council of Holland
appoints new corporate
communications manager
Germany/United States
Selecta and Ball announce
distribution agreement in

North America
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 31
• KENYA: Africa’s flower industry is wilting under
pressure from the worldwide financial crisis.
African flower growers might be pushed out of
business if no immediate measures are taken to
cushion them from the global economic down-
turn, according to The Citizen Correspondent.
African flower prices have declined by bet-
ween 30% and 50% during the last five months
due to the global financial crisis. Exports have
been reduced by a half in the past few months
for some African countries. The crisis has
also seen currencies of two major importing
countries of horticultural products depreciating.
The British pound has weakened by 28% over
the last year, resulting in a 20% reduction in UK
imports. The Russian Ruble has weakened by
35% during the same period.
• THE NETHERLANDS: Trianum is a biological
plant protection product manufactured by Kop-
pert that was voted the second best product at
the 2009 Innovation Awards for Sustainable Crop
Protection. Trianum increases the resistance
of plants to stress caused by diseases, climatic
conditions or sub-optimal feeding and watering
regimes. Trianum increases nutrient uptake,
enhancing the growth and development of roots
and above-ground plant parts. Henk Jan Lutgert,
a member of the jury said, “Trianum is a fungus
which combats a fungus and is special because
it is the first biological product to be authorized
by the Dutch Board for the Authorisation of Plant
Production Products and Biocides (CTgB). The
leaf-dependent spraying system Canopy Density
Spraying, developed by Plant Research Interna-
tional’s Jan van de Zande took first prize.
• GERMANY: Klasmann-Deilmann, the global
leader in substrate production, closed the 2008
financial year with a good result. The new
factory in Lithuania, scheduled to open at the
end of 2009, will increase production capacities
significantly. In 2008, the company produced a
total of 3.4 million m
3
of substrates and potting
soil. The consolidated revenue of the group was
141 million euros. The number of employees
world-wide remained more or less stable at
964. Twenty five of these are trainees in techni-
cal, commercial and IT occupations. Managing
director Dr Norbert Siebels commented: “The
scarcity of raw materials due to bad weather
conditions in the winter of 2007/2008 led to tem-
porary delivery difficulties. Since last summer
we have built up a good stock of raw materials
so that we can start the new year optimistically.
And in addition, we will be starting up pro-
duction at a new, high-performance factory in
Lithuania at the end of the year. All this means
that we can expect a considerable rise in sales,
especially on international markets.”
• UNITED STATES: The good news echoing out
of the economic tunnel is that floral business
owners are doing what they have to do to keep
moving forward, and the industry’s going to
emerge stronger on the other side. It was a
sentiment heard repeatedly in Washington,
D.C., on the Spring Meeting of SAF’s volunteer
leadership. “We can affect positive change.
We can become better. We can survive,” said
SAF President Rod Saline, AAF, of Engwall
Florist & Greenhouses, Inc., in Duluth
Online
The Netherlands
Delifor launches
Chrysanthemum
Zembla Lime
Dutch breeder Deliflor has launched a refreshing
new Chrysanthemum: Zembla Lime. This stunning
beauty is available as either a disbudded or spray
Chrysanthemum.
The white petals have a bright green edge around
them, which makes the flower a real novelty.
Because of the fresh colors, Zembla Lime is very
suitable for use in spring bouquets. Zembla Lime has
been supplied at the Dutch flower auctions since the
beginning of March. Having the same good characte-
ristics as the well-known Zembla, this trendy variety
has a great future ahead of it. For more information:
www.deliflor.nl
|||
Iberflora and Garden& Landscaping Middle East, the international gar-
dening and landscaping event held in Dubai, have signed an agreement
by which both trade fairs will promote each other in their respective
markets. By working more closely together both trade fairs hope to gain
a bigger share in strategic markets as Europe and the Middle East.
The collaboration takes the form of a reciprocal presence of both trade
fairs at each other’s events. At the same time, the image of Iberflora will
be promoted in all Garden&Landscaping catalogues, as well as on its
webpage. Iberflora will also be promoted in Dubai by distributing a range
of promotional material. These actions will then be mirrored by Iberflora
in favour of Garden&Landscaping.
Garden&Landscaping Middle East, which is set for May 17 to19, 2009 at
the International Conventions Centre in Dubai, is a trade event organized
by Epoc Messe Frankfurt. The fair is quickly earning a name as a must-vi-
sit event for all players seriously interested in landscaping and gardening;
and especially for Spanish producers of ornamental plants and flowers
whose supply is of particular interest for buyers from the United Arab
Emirates, because it suits the climate of the Persian Gulf to perfection.
Iberflora’s representatives first visited Dubai last year. More information
on the actions programmed by the fair at which Iberflora is taking
an active part will shortly be available on the webpage
http://www.feriavalencia.com/internacional.
|||
Spain
Iberflora and Garden&
Landscaping Middle
East join forces
World News
32 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
The Fleuroselect organization,
headquartered in Noordwijk,
the Netherlands, is proud to
announce that its prestigious
Gold Medals for the 2010 sea-
son have been awarded to 3
trendy, new cultivars created
by the top breeders to suit all
segments of the ornamentals
market. Gaillardia x grandiflo-
ra ‘Mesa Yellow’, Physostegia
virginiana ‘Crystal Peak’ and
Sanvitalia speciosa ‘Million
Suns’ will immediately ap-
peal to growers with their
advanced earliness, compact-
ness and uniformity.
An abundance of fabulous
flowers makes the varieties
perfect additions to fashio-
nable retail displays and
excellent container and garden
performance will delight land-
scapers and style-conscious
consumers alike.
The Fleuroselect Gold Medal for
2010 for innovation in breeding
goes to Gaillardia x grandi-
flora ‘Mesa Yellow’. Like the
flat-topped mountains (mesas)
after which it is named, this
first commercial-quality, yellow
Gaillardia from seed is a native
of the southern United States.
In common with the flat peaks,
‘Mesa Yellow’ has a uniform,
regular, even appearance. The
variety particularly impressed
the Fleuroselect judges with
its beauty and abundance of
perfect, novel, yellow flowers.
Add an excellent garden per-
formance and a long flowering
season and ‘Mesa Yellow’ is a
truly worthy winner.
Fleuroselect has awarded
its prestigious Gold Medal
for excellence in breeding
and beauty to Physostegia
virginiana ‘Crystal Peak’. This
eye-catching new cultivar fits
into the popular, modern range
of annual flowering container
perennials, which has brought
traditional perennials to a
wider market. ‘Crystal Peak’
demonstrated outstanding
compactness and uniformity
in both pack and garden trials
and the judges were particularly
impressed with its earliness.
The sparkling white peak of per-
fect flowers was impressive all
season long and will be a treat
for the container market
The 2010 Fleuroselect Gold
Medal recognising exceptional
developments in ornamental
breeding has been won by San-
vitalia speciosa ‘Million Suns’.
This new cultivar shone out as a
real winner with its abundance
of perfectly formed, golden
yellow flowers. The Fleuroselect
judges found the variety to
show exceptional compact-
ness, excellent basal branching
and a longer flowering period,
impressing from May to the first
frosts. It was judged to be an
overall superior product for both
growers and consumers alike.
|||
A Cargolux Boeing 747-400, carrying a load of cut
flowers from Kenya, veered off the tarmac at Maastricht
Aachen Airport on Tuesday March 17, 2009 after it had
landed and was heading to the cargo terminal, authori-
ties said. None of the crew aboard was injured.
The flight landed safely at 08:45 but apparently expe-
rienced some problems with its steering which caused
it to veer off the taxi route. The aircraft’s nosewheel was
bogged in a grassed area at Maastricht Aachen Airport
which has temporarily closed its only runway.
Cargolux Airlines International S.A., trading as Cargolux,
is a cargo airline based in Luxembourg City, Luxem-
bourg. It is one of the largest scheduled all-cargo airlines
in Europe with a global network. Charter flights and
third party maintenance are also operat
|||
Te Netherlands
Cargolux flower jet veers
off tarmac at Maastricht
Aachen Airport

Turkey has exported 50 million stems of cut flowers to Europe for
March 8, International Women`s Day.
Antalya Exporters` Associations Chairman Osman Bagdatlioglu told A.A
on Sunday that Women`s Day was celebrated mostly in eastern Euro-
pean countries especially the Balkan countries like Romania and Bulgaria.
He added that upon the demand of those countries, Turkey exported ten
kinds of flowers especially carnation and gerbera.
Bagdatlioglu said that Turkey`s flower export for Women`s Day increased
20 percent in 2009 when compared to last year`s Women`s Day. He ad-
ded that they aimed to earn five million USD from the export.
|||
Turkey
International Women’s Day:
Turkey’s fower exports up 20%
The Netherlands
Fleuroselect announces its
2010 gold medal winners
FloraHolland 2009
Prices
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 33
Weeks 1 to 11 (December 29 to March 13, 2009)
Category Product Quantity % 09:08 Price ‘09 Price ‘08
Cut Flowers Alstroemeria 29,203,074 -21.4 0.19 0.19
Anthurium 12,191,631 -3.9 0.53 0.70
Chrysant. 31,275,200 11.1 0.40 0.58
Chrysant. Spray 171.389,238 -9.1 0.26 0.36
Chrysant. Santini 33,564335 -20.1 0.19 0.22
Cymbidium 4,239,310 5.1 2.28 3.68
Cymbidium Mini 2,174,612 -11.6 1.15 1.62
Carnation 15,782,279 -32.5 0.16 0.14
Carnation Spray 7,319,281 -20.9 0.11 0.12
Eustoma russellianum 15,585,256 -9.8 0.35 0.39
Freesia Double 16,198,416 -32.6 0.20 0.20
Freesia 45,064,374 -17.3 0.18 0.19
Gerbera Large 32,205,812 -6.7 0.25 0.30
Gerbera Mini 112,040,321 -3.4 0.11 0.15
Gladiolus 314,880 116,8 0.31 0.28
Helianthus 3,027,980 39.7 0.28 0.41
Hippeastrum 9,536,221 -26.8 0.67 0.59
Hypericum 32,553,560 -8.8 0.15 0.17
Iris 21,639,845 -36.2 0.13 0.10
Lilium Asiatic 6,143,553 -31.9 0.39 0.38
Lilium Longiflorum 10,523,112 -8,0 0.38 0.47
Lilium Oriental Hybr. 25,259,903 -11.9 0.70 0.79
Limonium 10,035,510 26.1 0.19 0.25
Rose Large 507,074,790 -2.4 0.29 0.35
Rose Small 159,498,418 -15.6 0.11 0.13
Rose Spray 9,430,875 -23.9 0.31 0.30
Cut green and Decorat. 91,543,241 -16.8 0.14 0.15
Solidago 13,125,676 6.4 0.12 0.18
Tulip 808,884,695 -10.2 0.14 0.15
Total 2,562,677,923 -10.2 0.21 0.24
Indoor Plants Berry/Fruit plants 456,675 5.2 2.97 3.21
Flowering Plants 74,332,277 -2.6 1.10 1.21
Bulb/Tuberous 48,993,145 -20.8 0.78 0.64
Bromelia 7,012,441 -7.8 2.05 2.12
Cactus/Succulent 7,632,903 -9.8 1.17 1.13
Green Plants 33,037,351 -15.8 1.58 1.60
Orchids 23,088,435 33.7 3.94 4.86
Palms 3,966,837 -22.0 2.88 2.59
Ferns 1,882,564 -25.9 1.24 1.14
Total 207,278,401 -8.2 1.50 1.48
Garden Plants Tree/Shrub/Climbing 8,222,016 -0.3 1.53 1.62
Conifers 1,186,132 -8.8 1.07 1.15
Annual/Biennial 13,867,533 -21.1 0.39 0.37
Perennial 8,031,612 -25.3 0.69 0.61
Total 31,287,753 -17.7 0.79 0.74
In Brussels Israeli minister of Foreign Affairs Tzipi Livni
has assured her Dutch counterpart Maxime Verhagen
that Israel will open the Gaza Strip’s blockaded borders
for Gaza grown export carnations until the end of the
growing season in May, if the security situation allows.
The Netherlands supports 1,500 Palestinian growers
in Gaza. Their fruit and flowers are exported to the Net-
herlands via Israel and auctioned at Aalsmeer. Although
the situation is often tense, three consignments totaling
185,000 carnations have been exported since hostilities
erupted between Gaza and Israel earlier this year.
Mr Verhagen was satisfied with Israel’s pledge. “It shows
that cooperation is a viable alternative to violence and
terror”, he said. The hostilities had put a stop to all exports,
costing Gaza’s horticulture sector millions of euros.
Palestinian growers, however, see the move merely as
“propaganda”. According to Abdel-Karim Ashour, director
of the Palestinian Agricultural Relief Committee in Gaza,
“What happened is only propaganda. It is nothing. The
season is almost finished now.”
The closure of the borders and the recent war have had
a negative impact on Gaza’s commercial flower industry,
with some farmers resorting to uprooting thousands of
flowers they can no longer afford to grow.
Commercial flower growing in the Gaza Strip began in
1994 and 1995 when 50 dunams (a dunam is around
1,000 m2) with cut flowers –mainly carnations- were
planted with the help of Dutch investors. According to
the Palestinian Authority, 40 to 45 million cut flowers
were exported from Gaza in 2006, representing more
than 3 per cent of all exports from the Gaza Strip. But
in 2007, according to the Beit Hanoun Agricultural Asso-
ciation, farmers in Gaza have been permitted to export
just 5.5 million cut flowers. The losses in flower sales
suffered by Gazan flower growers are believed to have
reached already $3 million.
|||
Israel
Israel opens Gaza
border crossings
for cut flowers

Bedding-
plants



Chrysanthemums



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Brandkamp GmbH
In der Flora 6
D-46419 Isselburg-Anholt
Tel.: +49 2874 91 36-0
Fax : +49 2874 91 36-22
info@brandkamp.de www.brandkamp.de


www.f oracultureinternational.com
||oroCu|ture |rterrot|oro||îes
]our future...
nnn%ÕfiXZlckli\`ek\ieXk`feXc%Zfd
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 35
Lifestyle Marketing
WWWWWWoooorrrrkkkkkkiiiiinnnngggg ttttooooggggeeeetttthhhhhheeeerrrr...
Pascal Koeleman
(pascal@2dezign.nl)
and Rudi Tuinman
(rudi@2dezign.nl)
The Group of 6 lily companies is sup-
ported by professional advice from
Flora Holland Connect, to professio-
nalise their activities on trade fairs,
advise them with branche information,
and support them with the direct sales.
2Dezign is responsible for visualising
the common strengths of the Group to
the outside world and have designed a
unique lifestyle stand and little flyer to
show the strength of the group, a real
mark of high level marketing.
Zentoo and Dutch Creations are other
successful marketing cooperations.
(www.borninholland.nl)
Working together is a must in today’s market. By coupling the
common strengths of individual businesses there are many
advantages to be realised in various areas. Of particular
importance is the unique image which can evolve from coo-
peration, making the products distinctive among the many
flowers and plants that every buyer, trader and retailer sees
when visiting the numerous locations and trade fairs.
Similarly to the other branches in the trade it is important
that our commercial profile is professional, dictating
how a company or group presents itself to their potential
clients and the rest of the world. This is explicit in
becoming distinguishable from the majority and the only
means to build a reputation for high quality.
The practical advantages of working together include: an
ability to present trade and retail with a wider assortment
and hence a “one-stop” shopping address; the assortment
can be expanded to incorporate added value concepts
giving extra inspiration, for example through a display of
lifestyle arrangements depicting the available colour com-
binations or packaging options; when stepping out into the
public arena, “one look and feel” also has a tremendous
impact since combined budgets give more room to develop
unique and distinctive stands or presentations.
It is critical, however, that a stand or presentation at a
trade show or in the auctions is not, so to say, dripping
with gold. On the contrary, widespread recognition and
demand relies on visitors experiencing a more attainable,
but still desirable lifestyle feeling. In the first instance,
buyers have to be stimulated and their senses aroused
to remember the experience. At a later date, once the
same feelings have been spread among their consumers,
trading relations can be reinforced.
The essence of being different cannot be underestimated
but it is not always easy at a trade show…unless of
course, as the Lily Group would say, you participate in
a lingerie event. Then the lilies certainly would stand
out from the rest of the exhibits! Although the latter may
not be possible, or even wanted, the emphasis has to be
placed on creating recognition through a professional
and attractive experience that is different from the rest.
With increases in fuel
prices and a slowing
economy worldwide,
the flower industry is
showing increasing
interest in sea freight
distribution which in
some instances can
reduce freight costs
by up to 50%.
Cargo
by Anabel Evans and
Ron van der Ploeg
36 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
of bananas. Israeli growers too,
export their ornamentals by boat.
Foliage accounts for 85% of the
sea freight, although solidago,
waxfower, gypsophila and phlox
can also be found on board. In the
Netherlands, cut fower exporters
such as Holex Flower
1
access North
America via main shipping routes
from Rotterdam to New York and
Montreal. Also Oudendijk Import
has been a major force behind the
development of sea freight distri-
bution of cut fowers and foliage.
According to Don van der Meer,
manager Oudendijk Import, last
year his company handled more
than 200 containers with protea,
leucadendron, foliage and hyperi-
cum from South Africa, Portugal
and Ecuador. At the same time,
some African growers have perfor-
med several pilot projects. Some
have been successful, some not. A
number of reasons can be given for
the failure of some of these projects.
Existing quality problems with ro-
ses such as botrytis, downy mildew
and poor temperature management
are the biggest logistic challenges to
be overcome.
Mystery
Horticultural fresh produce is
not new to sea freight
2
and in
theory almost all fower types can
be transported by sea container.
Jeroen van der Hulst, managing
director FlowerWatch, a leading
provider of quality assessment sy-
stems doesn’t understand the mys-
tery surrounding the sea freight
distribution of cut fowers. “Tere
is nothing revolutionary about it.
Cooled at the right temperature,
diferent types of cut fowers can
be kept in good condition for
several weeks, provided the cool
chain requirements have been
A
lthough industry profes-
sionals are hesitant to
share data on volume, in
2008 more fowers than ever have
defnitely been transported by
sea freight. Five to ten containers
of hypericum, gypsophila and
carnations are exported out of
Ecuador and Colombia to the EU
by sea container each week. Tis
is mainly due to the availability
of regularly sailing ships used by
banana exporters. As cut fowers
are relatively light in weight, they
can be added to the heavy loads
Sea freight
on the rise
OOOOOOnnnn ttttthhhhhhheeee rrrrooooaaaadddddddd
Rutges Cargo is a European truck operator with
integrated logistics solutions for the international
air-cargo industry, perishable, hi-tech and phar-
maceutical sectors. Jason Breakwell, commercial
manager, comments that Rutges has received
more enquiries in the first two months of this year
from the horticulture and fresh food sectors than
in the same period in previous years. The changes
in air cargo schedules as airlines are hit by the
economic downturn are seen as the reason for the
road feeder network becoming more important;
the lower frequency of the direct cut flower
connections forcing shipments to various other
airports and a second transfer to the final desti-
nation. Breakwell
says, “We are not
seeing a downturn
in our shipments of
cut flowers, mainly
from South America
and East Africa for
western Europe. In
fact our attention to
procedures when
handling vulnerable
shipments has
increased our busi-
ness in this sector
year on year.” Credit: A.P. Moller – Maersk
>>>
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 37
OOOOOOvvvveeeerrrr tttthhhhhheeee SSSSSSeeeeaaaa
Maersk Line to enter Ethiopian exports:
Attracted by the growing horticulture sector in
Ethiopia, Maersk, one of the top shipping lines in
the world with over 325 offices in 125 countries, is to
introduce horticulture sea freight to Ethiopia. “This
will enable the exporters to reduce transportation
costs by shortening the chain between the producers
and final destinations,” says Ian Fairlie, Area Reefer
Manager for Sub Saharan Africa.
FloraHolland participates in sea freight pilot projects:
In 2005 FloraHolland became involved for the first time
in sea transport when it participated in the Maersk
Starflower project. Since 2006 the Aalsmeer Auction
has been involved in its own sea transport project.
FloraHolland’s Martien de Ruiter sets out the current
status of the sea freight projects at FloraHolland.
Which shipping routes are you using for the trials?
“Ecuador, Colombia and Kenya.”
What is your opinion on cost reduction?
“It is strongly dependant on the transport route. First-
ly, the advantage of a flower shipment from Kenya
to the Netherlands is smaller than a shipment from
Colombia to the Netherlands. Secondly, sea transport
is not a ‘done deal’, you need a lot of guidance and
coordination to make it successful That means that
if you compare rates between the air and shipping
lines, you will find that there is potential benefit.
But you also have to calculate the consultancy and
guidance costs which you need to make this work.”
What are the advantages of sea freight?
“Firstly an unbroken cool chain from farm to customer.
This means that you can control the quality of the
flowers better. We have found that in a lot of cases
flowers coming out of containers giving at least
equal if not more days of vase-life than flowers out of
airfreight. Secondly, the cost advantage is important.
Thirdly, you see that some retailers value the ‘green’
image sea freight has.”
What are the limitations of sea freight?
“Sailing schedules. Most airlines fly a specific route
each day. In most cases a sea vessel only leaves once
a week. For the trade this means a
approach at order moments and for the expected
time of arrival. Another disadvantage is the amount of
boxes to be shipped at once. A 40ft container contains
about 180,000 rose stems. That’s a lot of stems to be
handled at one moment in time, not only for a grower,
but also for an importer. We believe in consolidated
loads, but that brings new logistic challenges in
countries like Kenya and Ethiopia. You need to control
the cool chain better in that case.”
International logistic centre in Ecuador:
Oudendijk Group opened a new logistic centre last
year at San MateoParque Commercial Park (about 2
hours north of Quito and 3 km from their own hype-
ricum farm). The cold store and business premises
(including offices and a canteen) are operational for
growers requiring logistic services.
Oudendijk’s new International Logistic Centre in Ecuador.
Cargo
38 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
IIIInn ttthhhhhee AAAAiiiirr
Ethiopian Airlines responds to
Ethiopia’s economic expansion:
In May 2006 a new facility was
made operational (handling goods
coming from the horticultural indus-
try as well as the meat and textile
sector and considered to be one
the most sophisticated facilities
in the continent). The current
growth in exports demands another
expansion. The design for the new
building is finished and commented
on by different parties like USAID,
FloraHolland and a delegation of
the Dutch Embassy. As soon as the
construction plans are approved by
the airline itself, the construction
process will commence. Mr Busera
Awel, Vice President Commercial,
estimates the building to begin in
the second quarter of this year. He
said it would not take more than
two years to finalize the project and
make the new facility operational.
New MD11 freighters: Furthermore
Ethiopian Airlines has purchased
two MD11 freighters that can load
up to 85 tons per plane. The first
plane has taken off in February
this year, told Mr Gebremichael
Biwota, Director Cargo Marketing.
The second MD 11 will be touching
the sky by July 2009. This will bring
the total of freight aircrafts to 6. The
airline is now flying 2 Boeings type
747 and 2 type 757s. The aim is to
have 4 MD11s and 3 Boeings 757
available in the coming 5 years.
KLM Cargo party to Chicago
project: The Air France Cargo –
KLM Cargo network covers over
350 destinations in 175 countries
worldwide. From the main hubs:
Paris-Charles de Gaulle and
Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, direct
access is provided to and from the
most important trading centres in
Europe; to optimize the road feeder
network several regional hubs also
exist. KLM Cargo (together with
FloraHolland) will also be part of
the group of companies providing
specific logistical know-how in
the field of floricultural products to
develop a new logistics centre for
flowers at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport.
The logistics centre for flowers
at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport, the
world’s second busiest airport with
an annual passenger turnover of
some 75 million, will be part of an
updated Cargo Section. If all goes
according to plan the new logistics
centre will open in 2010. O’Hare Air-
port wishes to reinforce its function
as a global airfreight distribution
centre. Chicago’s central location
simplifies national distribution.
In addition it is an ideal meeting
place for flights from Europe, Asia
and South America, which is very
important for the shipment of non-
durable goods.
Cargolux Airlines International
setting new standards
4
: Cargolux
Airlines International, based in
Luxembourg, is the launch custo-
mer of the next-generation Boeing
B747-8F, which will be even more
fuel-efficient and produce lower
noise disturbances to commu-
nities surrounding the airports
where Cargolux operates. The first
aircraft will join the fleet in the se-
cond half of 2010; the company has
13 of this new generation aircraft
on order, plus 10 purchase rights
and 2 options.
Packing and stacking
How the cut fowers are packaged
and stacked in the reefer contai-
ners also impacts the quality of
the fowers on delivery. Tere is a
capacity for 500 boxes in a 40-foot
container. Dry packing is the most
common. Van der Hulst adds, “But
the boxes should be designed to
withstand the humid conditions.
Most fower growers for example
tend to use the standard air freight
link causes disruption of the cool
chain and means quality loss. Te
best way to maintain the cool chain
for perishable products is having a
limited number of links. Te sea
freight of cut fowers includes only
three links: grower, refrigerated
container (reefer) and receiver. Te
reefer controls the temperature,
ventilation and humidity during
transportation, which is not pos-
sible with air transport.”
rigorously taken into account,” says
Van der Hulst showing us a text-
book for horticulture from 1986 in
which all varieties, corresponding
temperatures and shelf life are listed
in detail. Van der Hulst identi-
fes temperature monitoring and
control, starting when the product
is harvested on farm, as critical:
“Our FlowerWatch program
3
aims
to maintain the cut fowers at a
temperature of 1°C. One weak
Cargo terminal Addis Ababa
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 39
IIIIIIIsssss FFFFFFFlllllllooooorrrrriiiiiiiLLLLLLLoooooggggg fffffffooooorrrrr yyyyyooooouuuuu???????
by Frank Engelbart and Arjen van Nuland. Started in 2005, in the
Netherlands, the FloriLog project reached completion at the end of last
year. This project aimed to answer questions as to how the ornamentals
sector can strengthen its European retail marketing activities by both
integrating and anticipating domestic and imported sources and thereby
facilitate international logistics. At this moment logistic services are
still too much of an isolated activity. By bringing logistics together
into a European network of Trade Parks along with other activities
(such as commerce, marketing, import, collection, trade, distribution,
processing, packaging, quality and control) added value can be created
within the logistical processes. The Trade Parks offer the possibility of
creating economies of scale at an international level. European flows
could be integrated with local flows, where at present these are still
frequently transported apart from each other. There would be a number
of advantages gained as a result of this increased logistical efficiency:
more profit could be realised; the more streamlined volume flows would
give new techniques such as multi-channel marketing a greater chance;
there would be better opportunities for isolated areas; faster realisation
of a broader assortment becomes possible. The European growers can
provide their products by means of the Trade Park while the Trade Park
offers them the opportunity to reach a larger European consumer group.
The Trade Parks will also permit clusters of European traders to coope-
rate in the matter of assortments and sales actions. A logical role for the
auctions, in addition to the quality control, sourcing and other auction
tasks, is to facilitate the Trade Parks by acting as the landlord of the pre-
mises. By introducing these locations there would no longer be the ne-
cessity for exporters and wholesalers to independently rent spaces; they
would also be able to maximise their haulage efficiency by combining
freight. At this moment the feasibility of the first Trade Park in Germany
is being examined. To receive sufficient volume for a Trade Park it will
be necessary to build an international network of growers, trade parties
and exporters. In total, six to nine Trade Parks are envisaged in Europe.
These Trade Parks offer good chances to service multi-channel markets.
Within the framework of ‘Greenports Netherlands’ it is also being
examined if transport by train can be started up. The open character of
this proposal offers the chance for everyone to participate who wants to.
(Frank.Engelbart@Rijnconsult.nl / Arjen.vanNuland@Rijnconsult.nl)
boxes, which are unsuitable for
sea freight because they lack air
circulation and strength. Te very
best option would be to use 5 layer
cardboard boxes.” According to Van
der Hulst sea freight of cut fowers
may have huge potential in the
near future. “Tere is a strong track
record of successful shipments.
In my opinion the number of
products, destinations and routes
will increase in the next few years.
Much depends on the size of the
company, the right product, direct
routes and available vessels. More
shipping companies would be more
than welcome.”
Quality
In some cases the costs of trans-
portation by sea freight may be up
to 30% to 50% lower than by air
freight. In general, the higher the
current air freight rates, the more
opportunities a country has; for
example, air freight from Ecuador
is currently US$1/ kilo more expen-
sive than from Kenya.
Don van der Meer, manager Ouden-
dijk Import, says that his company
has reported signifcant cost savings
of up to 50% by using sea freight.
Nevertheless, his motivation for sea
freight is based on quality, quality
and quality. “We are convinced that
for specifc products sea freight is a
better alternative to air transport. It
frequently happens that products
which have travelled two days by
plane show much more damage than
those transported 14 days by boat.”
Van der Meer has noticed a dif-
ference in the transport stress tole-
rance of cultivars. “Not only growers
but breeders as well are critical to the
success factor. Breeders and growers
will have to work together more and
more in selecting the most adequate
cultivars for sea transport. In this
context, Oudendijk Import fnds
itself in the luxurious position of
having its own breeding company
for proteas.”
Disappointments
Te sea containers are a standard
size and can guarantee pre-pro-
grammed environmental condi-
tions. Still the success rate is not
100%. Firstly, standard clearance
procedures at ports for example, are
organized but do not always run
as smoothly as at the airports. Te
procedures surrounding phyto-
sanitary inspections can be a lengthy
process, delaying the release of the
containers on arrival. Secondly,
cut fowers are relatively new to
most shipping companies and the
limited volumes currently involved
do not allow any demands to be
put on the shippers with regards to
transport times or whether there is
a direct route or a trans-shipment
involved. To put this into some sort
of perspective, the leading shipping
company Maersk Line serves 20,000
ports, between which the routes are
changing constantly. Van der Meer
agrees when he says, “Te limited
volumes defnitely play a huge role.
Unlike air transport try outs with sea
freight are much more complicated.
By plane you can always try out a
small shipment sending it by post,
but with 200,000 fower stems
trial shipments are much more dif-
fcult to perform. Big volumes also
demand big buyers who are able to
handle and sell a huge quantity of
fowers in a short period of time.
In the past lots of things have gone
wrong. Now lots of parties are acting
on their own instead of coopera-
ting with each other. You cannot
simply decide one day or another to
transport your fowers by boat and
then just wait and see what happens.
Errors in the crop protection system
at the fower farm can lead to a
higher incidence of botrytis in roses,
in this case sea transport should not
even been considered.”
Facing disappointment after disap-
pointment with fowers transported
by sea, a group of Dutch buyers at
the FloraHolland auction will be
pleading for a note at the clock front
saying ‘sea freight’ when fowers
transported by sea pass in front
of the clock. Van der Meer fnds
this plea regrettable. “It’s all about
quality nothing more nothing less.
It has nothing to do with sea freight.
And yes, if I have to buy fowers for
my wife I would prefer fowers that
have travelled a long way under the
best cooling conditions to fowers
which were quick to arrive, and also,
unfortunately quick to wilt.”
|||
1
FCI January 2008, pg 12 Sea freight gathers momentum
2
FCI October 2007, pg 36 Sea freight distribution
3
FCI April 2008, pg 14 Temperature and Teamwork are keys to Quality
4
FCI April 2008, pg 44 Setting new standards
Awareness of
sustainable
development has been
slower to emerge
as a major society
expectation and
market demand in
France. Nevertheless,
following the
initiative of a handful
of growers and the
French garden centre
- Botanic, and some
positive government
policy, it is now
becoming a hot issue
that is generating a
number of initiatives
in the ornamental
industry.
France
by Marie-Françoise Petitjean
(mf.petitjean@orange.fr)
40 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
accredited certifcations. Ornamental
plant suppliers have been given three
years (until 2010) to embark on the
MPS ABC environmental monito-
ring scheme. For imported fowers,
Botanic promotes Fair Flowers Fair
Plants (FFP) certifed fowers.
Jean-Marc Riva confrms “the pact
orientates our whole purchasing
policy. We are frst and foremost
accompanying our present suppliers
in our action, while setting up new
sourcing, when necessary. Our com-
mitment has also led to us increasing
our regional supply.”
If other garden centre chains initially
expressed scepticism regarding this
initiative, several, like Trufaut, are
now following Botanic’s
tracks by publishing
their own mission
statement under
the motto “Plus
belle sera la
terre” (for a
smarter earth)
and a set of 8
commitments
of which
preferentially
sourcing MPS
or organic certi-
fed plants.
and replaced by alternative natural
products. Tis was a risky decision,
since most gardeners lack know-
how on crop protection, but the
challenge seems to have been taken
up. “Except for weeding, where few
other alternatives to mechanical
or heat weeding can be proposed,
we have worked out alternative
solutions with our suppliers,” says
Jean-Marc Riva, purchase manager.
Botanic is also working towards pha-
sing out all products using disposa-
ble batteries, PVC and conventional
light bulbs.
Under “objective 100%” of the pact,
all food products sold, including
herbs and garden plants, must be
organic. Points of sale have been
enriched with new organic
food markets, as well as
organic hygiene and
beauty products and
the “Café Philo”,
where consumers
are invited to
participate in
debates while
enjoying organic
and fair-trade food,
cofee and tea. All
product lines must
prove themselves to
have been produced in an
environmental and socially
responsible way through
B
otanic is a chain of garden
centres with 62 points of sale
in France and two in Italy.
Since its inception in 1995, a focus
has been put on environmentally-
friendly options, with points of sale
preferentially using natural material,
like wood. However, sustainability
was really established as a corporate
strategy in 2005, when Botanic cre-
ated “eco-gardener” corners at their
points of sale to advise customers on
alternative protection methods, they
also stopped sending paper publicity
in the mailbox and they phased out
the sale of chemical crop protection
agents and fertilisers.
In 2007, Botanic passed a major
milestone by publishing their
mission statement to be the frst
alternative network of shops for
natural, ecological and organic pro-
ducts for the garden, house, persons
and pets. Botanic’s vision is that
sustainable development is a long
term orientation that every citizen
and economic stakeholder has to
embrace. Trough their motto:
“towards a new way of living”,
Botanic express their intention to
push and accompany consumers in
this change. “Today, the French are
ready to change their behaviour and
adopt more responsible consump-
tion patterns, as long as we propose
practical solutions. Botanic wants to
play a role in this dramatic change
in production and consumption,”
says Luc Blanchet, chairman.
Tis commitment to sustainabi-
lity forms the subject of Botanic’s
strategic pact, a three year action
plan comprising four objectives and
25 practical and measurable com-
mitments covering all components
of the business: supply, product
policy, points-of-sale, logistics and
communication.
In 2008, under “objective zero”,
all chemical crop protection agents
were withdrawn from the shelves
France turns Green
Retailers: Botanic leads the way
“towards a new way of living”
If other garden centre chains initially
expressed scepticism regarding this
initiative, several, like Trufaut, are
now following Botanic’s
tracks by publishing
their own mission
statement under
the motto “Plus
belle sera la
terre” (for a
smarter earth)
and a set of 8
commitments
of which
preferentially
sourcing MPS
or organic certi-
fed plants.
Under objective 100% of the pact,
all food products sold, including
herbs and garden plants, must be
organic. Points of sale have been
enriched with new organic
food markets, as well as
organic hygiene and
beauty products and
the “Café Philo”,
where consumers
are invited to
participate in
debates while
enjoying organic
and fair-trade food,
cofee and tea. All
product lines must
prove themselves to
have been produced in an
environmental and socially
responsible way through
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 41
I
n 2000 MPS pioneered envi-
ronmental management in fo-
riculture in France. At that time,
there was no clear market demand,
but the growers association FNPHP
anticipated MPS would become
inescapable and in 2001 took the
initiative to have a French pilot
group established in order to get a
scorecard adapted to local conditi-
ons of production. A handful of gro-
wers joined from the beginning, most
of them from the nursery stock sector.
Today, MPS has 80 French members
representing around 12% of the Fre-
nch, farm gate value of production
and is by far the most established
eco-label; there are also four or fve
other companies committed to the
national Good Agricultural Practice
(FARRE) scheme or ISO 14001.
Several companies are moving to
organic production, especially in
the feld of garden plants and herbs
(aromatic plants). Two of them
introduced their concepts during
the Salon du Végétal; Hortitouraine,
who won the “Bronze Innovert®
Award” for their Vivenat® concept,
and Taugourdeau Plantes & Plants.
Hortitouraine is growing 6 million
bedding plants and garden plants in
central France on a 7 ha operation.
“Growing organic was in our plans
for several years. We recently had
the opportunity to buy an adjacent
farm devoted to organic production
which enabled us to grow our frst
organic crops right away without
waiting the prescribed three years
to get the of cial, French AB
organic certifcation,” says Jacques
Gauthier, owner of the company.
Production, packaging, proximity
and seasonality, every aspect of the
Vivenat concept has been reviewed
for sustainability; seeds and pot-
ting soil are also organic. Plants
are grown in plugs and packed in a
natural wooden crate coming from
local sustainable forest. Te concept
does not include any full-colour
labels or facings and consumers are
invited to visit the Vivenat website
to download growing information.
Last but not least, Jacques Gauthier
wants to stick to natural seasonality.
“We will not market the product
before April 10 to 15, depending
on the weather, to maximize chan-
ces of success in the garden. Te
response from all major retailers,
especially garden centres, has been
enthusiastic and goes beyond our
expectations, which proves that
we are on the right track. We have
scaled up our production plans
from 200 to 500,000 plants for the
frst year. Tis is pushing us to ac-
celerate the implementation of our
strategic plan by developing agree-
ments with a network of growers
able to grow Vivenat according to
our strict specifcations. A network
of growers is the condition to fulfl
the high demand while staying con-
sistent with sustainability and the
‘locally grown’ option.”
Fair trade: cut flowers
on the forefront
Two international programmes
are actively promoting fair trade
fowers, mainly roses from deve-
loping countries. Max Havelaar is
present at Trufaut, several mass
marketers as well as a large num-
ber of independent forists; FFP
fowers are now sold in 114 forists
and retail shops, amongst these
are the Botanic and Le Bouquet
Nantais networks.
>>>
Production:
MPS recognized by the
market, some growers
go for organic
Government policy
T
he government is acti-
vely working on a legal
framework for sustainable
agriculture. In 2007, the French go-
vernment organised the “Grenelle de
l’Environnement”, a wide-ranging
discussion involving all stakeholders,
the conclusions and recommenda-
tions from this initiative have led to
the Grenelle 1 law that has just been
approved by the French Parliament.
Among a wide set of measures co-
vering all economic felds, two will
directly impact on horticulture.
Firstly, by 2012 all pesticides
considered worrying will see their
France
42 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
approval withdrawn. A frst list of
30 active ingredients has already
been published; it will be followed
by a list of 20 others. Tese lists
are presently being discussed at
European level. Growers in orna-
mental horticulture fear that this
policy will lead to phytosanitary
deadlocks in the protection against
harmful organisms.
Secondly, within the same
timeframe 50% of farms should
have embarked on environmental
certifcation, with three levels
up to the governmental “High
Environmental Value” (HVE) cer-
tifcation. Te scheme will cover
biodiversity, phytosanitary usage,
fertiliser and water management
and energy consumption. Te
frst level comprises an obligation
of means (good practice) while
level three incurs an obligation of
registration and result. Te HVE
scheme should not replace existing
schemes. Discussions are being
held to see how, and to which
level, existing schemes like MPS
will be benchmarked as growers
want to avoid piling-up multiple
certifcations.
Te Grenelle law has also been
seen by the sector as an opportu-
nity to stake a claim for the value
of plants in public amenities. Te
Landscapers Association, UNEP,
made a strong and successful lobby
to ensure that trees and plants
are expressly mentioned in the
law as a means to improve the
environment, quality of air and
water, health and social cohesion.
France is a partner in the Green
City campaign destined to be an
important issue for the political
decision-makers.
All these initiatives lead to more
sustainable horticulture, even if we
cannot yet talk about a concerted
national action plan. Tis could be
a new opportunity for ornamental
products, but it will also create chal-
lenges for growers as demand and
retailers’ action develop faster than
production. Tis could have the per-
nicious efect of increasing imports,
as we have already seen take place in
the organic food sector.
|||
AAAAAA ddddddeeeepppprrrreeeesssssssseeeedddddd mmmmaaaarrrrkkkkkkeeeetttt
French production covers 22 000 ha, mostly in pot
and bedding plants (45%) and nursery stock (38%).
Although widely disseminated over the whole country,
several regions lead the way, like Pays de la Loire for
pot plants and nursery stock, or the Var region (French
Riviera) for cut flowers.
Key figures on French production:
• Number of growers: 6644
• Area under production: 21 798 hectares,
of which 1 900 ha covered
• Value of production at farm gate: 1 769 € million
Companies are mostly family owned farms, with an
average of 4000 m² of covered crops and 3 ha of nursery
stock. Because consumption markets are nearby, the
majority of growers have developed short distribution
channels: 26,6% of flowers and plants are sold directly
to the consumer and 6% to florists, while 28% go to
retailers (garden centres, supermarkets or DIY stores),
16% to wholesalers and 12% to landscapers or public
authorities. These short outlets explain t he absence of
consolidation (less than 10% of production is marketed
to growers organisations) and specialisation.
What used to be an opportunity in the past has today
become a weakness : the increasing concentration of
buyers, be they supermarkets or florist networks, makes
it difficult for a single grower to serve the distribution
market and has so far led to an increase in imports,
mostly from Dutch exporters. Beyond this structural fea-
ture, the increasing demand for Mediterranean plants is
profitable to Southern European countries, like Italy and
Spain. Thus, production is facing hard time. Some region,
like the Loire Valley have taken the measure of the threat
and are working on an action plan to build on compara-
tive advantages, like quality of quite bigger plants that
the common offer from Northern Europe, proximity and
sustainable practice.
A DECLINING CONSUMPTION
With 62 million inhabitants, France1 is the third con-
sumer market in Europe, after Germany and the United
Kingdom. Consumption is estimated at € 2,9 billion, of
which € 2,1 billion for flowers and indoor plants and
€ 827 million for outdoor plants.
The market is mature, with a slightly decreasing trend
consumption patterns for more than 5 years, both in
terms of purchases and the number of buyers. The first
figures for 2008 seem to confirm the decrease, with a
3,6% decrease in indoor plants (-5,30% in quantities)
and 2.1% decrease in outdoor plants purchases (7,4%
in quantities), mainly attributable to the last 3 month
crisis. This is not good new for a sector desperately
looking forward a good season. Nevertheless, the drop
in quantity is higher than the drop in expenses, which
could indicate a higher average price per purchase.
Purchases of flowers and plants in France is linked
to special events or public holidays, who represent
54% of the purchases against 28,5% for cemeteries (all
saints chrysanthemum or Erica) and 18 % for own use.
Development has taken place for flowering plants,
with high-value presentation, like Phalaenopsis,
while cut flower consumption is more under pressure.
According to some analysts, consumers would reduce
the frequency of purchase, but then opt for a product
with a potential longer lifetime. Garden centres and
florist networks are gaining market share at the ex-
pense of traditional florist shops and street vendors.
PURPOSE OF PURCHASE
The picture for outdoor plants is comparable,
however with a higher difference between the drop
in quantities purchased and purchase value. This is
especially due to the balcony and terrace segment,
with more expensive container items than bare root
plants for the garden. Ornamental shrubs, small fruit
(berry shrubs), are on the rise, while conifers, bedding
plants, bulbs and rose bushes are down.
Garden centres and growers have initiated discus-
sions on how to revive consumption, and a number of
initiatives to respond consumers’ demand are taking
place in the field of marketing, service and sustainability.
But uncertainty is high on market perspectives, as the
consumer is presently divided between conflicting ex-
pectations of nature and sustainable development, low
price and “life-style” high value products. This creates
an exciting challenge and a chance for growers and
garden centres in search for the perfect combination: a
trendy AND sustainable AND value for money plant.
Quantities
(M €)
Change
(%)
Value
(%)
Change
(%)
Flowers / indoor plants 182,9 -5,30 2069,7 -3,60
Outdoor plants 412,2 -7,40 826,6 -2,10
Own use Gift Cemetery
Flowers / indoor plants 17,70 % 53,70 % 28,50 %
Garden Terraces
and balcony
Cemetery
Outdoor plants 66,60 % 27,90 % 5,50 %
Source : VALHOR 2008
5%
92 ME
670 ME
424 ME
376 ME
207 ME
12%
21%
24%
38%
Nursery stock
Pot plants
Bedding plants
Cut fowers
Bulb and others
1
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The South African
Flower Growers’
Association (SAFGA)
, together with the
South Africa Export
Council (SAFEC),
create a professional
community for
growers to exchange
knowledge and judge
the potential of new
market opportunities.
South Africa
by Cilla Lowen
(cilla@floracultureinternational.com)
44 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
works closely with the Department
of Trade and Industry (DTI) and
forms part of the Trade Export
South Africa (TESA) council
which meets on a quarterly basis.
Compared to some other industries
represented at TESA, the South Af-
rican foricultural industry is small
achieving export sales of R524
million (€41 million) in 2008.
SAFEC’s outward missions are
funded by DTI, and appointments
with interested parties set up by
consulates and embassies. On their
return, SAFEC shares contact
details with their members to
follow up. SAFEC itself sponsors
its members on outward missi-
ons with trips to Poland, Russia,
Argentina and China taking place
last year. In this case, members are
expected to share their informa-
tion with other export members.
An indicator of the success of these
missions is that importers from
Spain and China have since visited
South Africa to continue negotiati-
ons. Hosting and dealing with
queries of such inward missions is
another function of SAFEC.
Communication
SAFGA employs several communi-
cation methods to achieve its objec-
tives. In mid-2008 its website (www.
safower.co.za) became operational.
Tis year, each portfolio manager
to share information and discuss
their experiences. Study groups
are planned for growers of roses,
gerberas and chrysanthemums.
SAFGA also liaises with the De-
partment of Agriculture on factors
afecting growers, such as policy
changes and labour matters, and
then informs its members.
Lobbying with the auctions for
fair practices for growers is another
function. In commenting on changes
created by the economic downturn,
Duif says, “Te trend is that growers
of good quality product are now
selling directly to wholesalers and
bypassing the auctions.”
Responding to technical queries
from members, non-members and
international parties is another of
SAFGA’s functions. Tis could in-
volve linking importers with growers,
or helping growers with information
on topics such as fertilisers, soil types
and spraying programs. Tey do this
by putting members in touch with
relevant consultants.
New markets
Of SAFEC’s functions Duif says:
“Our main criterion is looking for
new markets. We fnd with outward
missions we get better closure.” Last
year SAFEC members visited im-
porters in Spain who are interested
in proteaceae and chrysanthemums.
To facilitate export trade SAFEC
I
n 1959, ten cut fower growers
took the initiative to establish
the South African Flower
Growers’ Association (SAFGA), a
non-proft organization, with the
aim building communication and
creating learning opportunities
for themselves and others in the
industry. Seeing the need for a mar-
keting function, in 1999 SAFGA
established the South Africa Export
Council (SAFEC) a separate non-
proft organization falling under the
umbrella of SAFGA. As the name
implies, SAFEC’s prime function
is to promote South African cut
fowers to overseas markets.
To date SAFGA has 120 members.
Its core membership consists of cut
fower, bulb and pot plant growers.
Exporters, freight forwarders,
af liated product and service indu-
stries like packaging suppliers and
greenhouse construction companies
and consultants working in the
feld of foriculture, constitute the
balance. Key members in the mix are
Multifora, which is South Africa’s
main auction located in Johannes-
burg, plus two smaller auctions in
the same province, as well as Flower
Dynamics, an e-trade auction.
Another member who provides an
important perspective is Interfora
African Areas.
René Schoenmaker, managing
director of Bergfora’s Johannesburg
branch, serves as chairperson of
SAFGA. Bergfora is one of South
Africa’s top export companies. His
vice-chairperson at SAFGA is Jac
Duif, a horticultural consultant
for cut fowers and bedding plants.
Duif, with 40 years’ experience in
foriculture to his credit, also serves
as CEO of SAFEC.
Functions
“SAFGA’s main function is to
communicate with growers and to
create learning opportunities for
them,” says Duif. One example of
a learning opportunity is the two
study groups organised for growers
of lisianthus who came together
A network to know
SAFGA Grower’s Day held at Safropa
Farm in northern South Africa. (Photo by
courtesy of ‘Undercover Farming’)
SAFGA exhibition at Plantimex
Trader’s Day. (Photo by courtesy
of ‘Undercover Farming’)
Te Google Game
With the internet so readily available, in most parts of the world,
and with the many options this media brings with it, if you have a
few minutes to spare why not play the Google game?
It’s really very simple, think of something, or someone, and Google
it (that is search for it on the Google search engine). Te frst piece
of info you get is how many pages Google found that have an entry
with that same name, on the left (or right side) you get info from
companies that have paid Google in the hope that you will click on
them frst and then you get the whole list.
I started with my name Leaora. So what did I fnd? Tinkbaby-
names.com, here is what they have to say. Leaora \le(o)-ra\ is
pronounced lee-OR-ah. It is of Greek origin, and its meaning is
‘compassion, light’. Now that explains why I love Greek salad. I
found a Leaora at the Department of Corrections in Washington
State, it would also seem to be the case that there are a lot of Leaora’s
in the real estate business and in April a Leaora is registered for a
car race, but by far the best is the Leaora at Vampirefreaks.com.
When I searched my surname, Policar, the frst thing Google asked
me was maybe I meant ‘Police’ …no I didn’t. Te frst site I got
was in Italian. Policar.info is a site dedicated to slot cars - that’s toy
racing cars - that were around in the 60’s and 70’s. Tey even have
a Policar Mini. Ten I found Captain Darrin Policar, the Pirate of
Geneseo, hmm... does that mean I married into a pirate family?
When I Googled my kids names I also got some interesting results.
When I searched Gahl, my eldest son’s name, I found dancers, a
genome researcher, a cosmic navigator and a symphony director.
Under Aylah I was immediately taken to a site called Chinese-tools.
com and the name was miraculously transformed into Chinese
characters. For my youngest, Timna, there was lots of stuf about
Timna park, the place where King Solomon mined copper.
I couldn’t help myself; I just had to try Anabel. So here goes.
Did you know that according to Wikipedia it’s a Spanish version
of Annabel. You have the Anabel comics, songs on You Tube, hotels
and even a vegetarian dish at the Anabel Taylor restaurant. You have
rugs, tennis players, artists, an escort service, a phone company in
Nigeria and an organisation looking for engineers in Anabel,
Missouri. Te strangest thing I found was Anabelassociates.com
where you have the Anabel team, two funny-looking people dressed
as cooks and what do they do? Cook? No, these people translate
from English to French.
So, next time you have a bit of time to spare, why not try this game.
Touch
by Leaora Policar
Leaora Policar, together with
her husband Eyal, runs a flowerfarm
in the Arava Desert in Southern Israel.
Leaora@arava.co.il
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 45
on SAFGA’s committee will submit
a monthly report for the website.
Tese reports will also be included
in SAFGA’s monthly newsletter for
members. Another advantage for
members is access to statistical data
of national and export foriculture
sales fgures on the website.
Te bi-monthly national magazine
“Undercover Farming” provides
regular editorial opportunity for
SAFGA to get its message across
and is sent free to the organisati-
on’s members. As SAFGA is a part-
ner of FloraCulture International,
its members receive a free copy of
this magazine too. Participation
in international trade exhibitions
is another communication tool
used. Te 2006 Hortifair was the
most recent. But the highlights on
the SAFGA calendar are Growers’
Days and the Annual General
Meeting. Growers’ Days happen
twice a year. It is a social occasion
when growers get an opportunity
to network and visit the larger
farms to learn how they operate.
Looking ahead
Black Economic Empowerment
(BEE) is a key strategy of the
South African government and
SAFGA is in line with supporting
this initiative. Timbali Tech-
nology Incubator in Nelspruit,
Mpumalanga, in northern South
Africa, is a SAFGA member. Te
BEE operation consists of turnkey
franchises located on site and run
by 30 apprentice and independent
fower growers who grow gerbe-
ras, lisianthus, asters, sunfowers,
snapdragons, dianthus, celosia,
gypsophila and strelitzia.
SAFGA has submitted a proposal
to the Department of Agriculture
that involves a 3-year mentorship
scheme providing on-the-job trai-
ning that will ultimately facilitate
the establishment of similar BEE
start-up programs. With not one
South African tertiary institution
ofering a diploma or degree in fo-
riculture, SAFGA is also lobbying
for the creation of a foriculture seat
at the universities.
Other plans for 2009 include a
study group of to Brazil in May to
learn how they grow fowers there,
as well as representation at the trade
fair in Atlanta, USA, in September
and an outward mission to Hun-
gary and Poland also in September.
Two organisations understanda-
bly attracted by the benefts that
SAFGA ofers are the Protea Pro-
ducers’ of South Africa (PPSA) and
the South Africa Protea Exporters’
Association (SAPPEX), and they
will be swelling the membership
numbers signifcantly when they
join SAFGA in April 2009. “Our
main interest is the interest of the
growers,” says Duif. SAFGA shows
this philosophy to be true through
their success in building communi-
cations, creating learning oppor-
tunities and facilitating export
linkages.
|||
In New Zealand the
Calla Council (NZCC)
coordinates research
and promotion for the
sector’s growers and
exporters, using its
website and meetings
to encourage
the effective
implementation of
valuable information
resulting from
individual projects.
New Zealand
by Dr Keith Funnell,
Chairman NZ Calla Council
46 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
the NZ Calla Producers Association
(NZCPA) and the International
Calla Association (ICA).
Continuing the relationship between
research providers, the NZCC
immediately set about supporting
research and extension projects,
as it continues to today. However
the NZCC recognised all this
research would be of limited value
unless efectively disseminated
and implemented. Hence even at
the frst meeting of the Executive,
discussion was held on “the need for a
comprehensive guide for growers to the
production, harvesting, and grading of
callas” (Report of First Exec Meeting
- NZCC, 1991). Together with
fnancial assistance from TRA-
DENZ and NZ’s Agricultural and
Marketing Research and Develop-
ment Trust (AgMARDT), the Calla
Growers Manual was frst published
in 1994. Te content of the manual
is progressively being placed on the
NZCC website, with updated/revi-
T
he NZCC was formed in
1991; the postal ballot
of the 300 growers and
exporters involved in formation
of the frst Executive occurred in
September of that year. At this time
“almost fve times as many growers
support the Council than oppose it”
(NZCC Newsletter No. 4, 1991),
illustrating wide support.
A signifcant event that acted as a
catalyst for the formation of the
NZCC was in 1989 when calla
growers and exporters at the NZ Flo-
riculture Federation Conference (the
national growers representative body
at that time) voted to put in place a
voluntary levy (2%) on exports to
fund research and promotion. With
ongoing government incentives
provided by NZ Trade & Enterprise
(TRADENZ), growers and exporters
subsequently agreed to establish an
incorporated society, i.e. Te New
Zealand Calla Council Inc.
Prior to 1991 no individual statis-
tics were collected for export earnings
from callas as a separate commodity.
In 1991 export earnings from callas
as cut fowers was ranked in second
place after orchids, bringing in
NZ$3.1 million (Department of Sta-
tistics, NZ), with additional earnings
from tuber exports. In 2007 this had
grown to an industry worth NZ$9
million, with NZ$3.2 million earned
from tuber exports. Callas remain
ranked second in named fower types
for their export value from NZ. Te
sales value of calla fowers domes-
tically in NZ is estimated to be an
additional NZ$4.1 million. (NZ$1
= €0.40)
Prior to the formation of the NZCC,
other collectives of interested calla-
groups were active (1984-1990).
Tese were primarily focussed on
R&D initiatives, working with
research providers such as Massey
University, NZ Nursery Research
Centre, Ministry of Agriculture &
Forestry, and the then named De-
partment of Scientifc and Industrial
Research (DSIR). Tese collectives
that preceded the NZCC included
Calla contact point
Secretary/Treasurer
of the NZCC, Don
Thomson, and other
calla growers during
a regional discussion
group meeting to a
property growing
callas for tuber
production.
sed sections available to members.
In collaboration with TRADENZ,
in the early years of the NZCC a
signifcant amount of activity also
related to the Council’s objective of
a market development program. As
a result of participating in numerous
international trade fairs, and market
research, a number of reports were
published from 1990 onwards, so as
to provide the platform for moving
the marketing of calla products
forward into the future.
R&D initiative
A major technical R&D initiative
is planned for the 2009-2011
growing seasons. With assistance
from AgMARDT and Massey
University, the NZCC will assess
and refne, under commercial
conditions, new technology to
enhance bud number and size of
calla tubers in the frst season of
growth, and increased foral pro-
ductivity in the second season.
April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 47
Te new technology has been deve-
loped by foriculture researchers at
Massey University.
Together with the NZ Flower
Exporters Association, the NZCC
hopes to facilitate future market
development projects, aimed at
increasing export earnings. Te
success in recent years of market
development projects in the USA
market for the NZ cymbidium
orchid industry is seen as a possible
exemplar for us to follow.
For exporters within most agricul-
tural industries, phyto-sanitary in-
spections, grower certifcation, and
product traceability are increasingly
becoming part of everyday life.
NZ calla growers became acutely
aware of the serious implications
of this in September 2008 when
larvae of the light brown apple
moth were detected in shipments of
Forsythia fowers on the US border.
As a result, the US Department of
Agriculture suspended all imports
of fowers from NZ on September
11, including callas. Te NZCC,
together with MAF, exporters and
other grower groups, developed an
acceptable Compliance Program
and, for calla growers, a workable
Risk Management Plan (RMP)
that they can follow. Te Compli-
ance Program came into efect on
November 1st, 2008 cutting the
period of lost export earnings to
approximately six weeks. Individual
calla growers are not necessarily well
equipped to respond to such chan-
ges in market access, and the NZCC
expects that in the future it will be
need to respond to similar demands
from other importing countries.
|||
NNNNZZZZZCCCCCCCC oobbbbbjjjjeecctttiiiivveess
• To catalyse and guide development of the New Zealand calla industry
through activities which support establishing, funding, and implementing
an industry and market development program covering calla flowers,
tubers, seeds and tissue culture material of the genus Zantedeschia.
• To hold ownership of intellectual property on behalf of the calla industry,
including trademarks and research results.
• To communicate with members items of material progress, interest and
concern, including technical/scientific and market research reports.
WHAT WE DO
As a centralised communications hub for its members, the NZ Calla Council
(NZCC) has established a website (www.callacouncil.org.nz). This also
provides information for those new to callas, who want to learn more about
the NZ calla industry. The NZCC periodically (3-4 times per year) produces a
newsletter (CALLAnews) and this is also posted on the website.
The NZCC stages an annual conference to provide additional networking
opportunities, an opportunity to learn more about effective production and
marketing of calla products and discuss topical issues. Regional groups of
the NZCC hold regular functions for existing and potential members. The
NZCC is recognised by national horticultural organizations and Government
bodies, and makes representation to these on behalf of members.
WHAT WE DON’T DO
The NZCC does not grow and/or market calla products itself and, therefore, any
information presented is not biased by commercial motives..... instead it aims to
provide an independent forum for information of value to those involved with the
calla industry, associated with the production and marketing of calla products.
Decoupled?
I am in the huge new Pudong airport in Shanghai waiting for my
long fight home. It was a quick visit to a trade show I had never
been to before. Coming to China and seeing all of the building
going up made me wonder if they are living in a diferent economy
than I am. Tat was, until I started asking some questions. Te
large international hotel I stayed at had a 30% occupancy rate
last month so they were happy that it was now running 35%. Tis
hotel has contracts with several airlines for overnight stays of crews
so much of their occupancy is at low contract rates. Te trade show
was not crowded but the exhibitors did not complain, at least not
to me. But the fact that I could spend two hours in a stand and not
see anyone else stop to get information told me enough - it was not
busy enough. Almost no Americans were at the show.
I was told a year ago that the economies of the fast growing third
world countries were now decoupled from the US economy. Tey
could and would stand on their own. China is still projecting a sub-
stantial growth rate compared to the rest of the world. But is it true?
Are they going to stand on their own? Our biggest risk in doing busi-
ness in China today is putting down a deposit with a company that
will go quickly and quietly out of business. Tousands of factories
have closed their doors this year already. Many people coming back
from New Year holiday found they no longer had jobs.
Still, Shanghai is an industrial powerhouse. As you drive to the
airport, the great names like Sharp, ABB, Omron, and other gi-
ant manufacturing organizations have huge factory facilities one
after the other. Tese companies are not going out of business.
Tey may have a bit less business than in the past but they are not
going to close. It is the smaller, domestically-created companies,
which are more fragile, that are closing down due to lack of orders.
Orders from the US and Europe are much harder to come by, and
the factories need these orders continuously or they cannot stay in
business. China is completely dependent on export manufacturing
for job creation. A small shift in demand has terrible consequences.
While in Shanghai, I had the opportunity to talk with the owner of a
number of apparel factories. He was educated and lived in the US for
ffteen years before returning to China to make his fortune. He does
contract garment production for a number of large US retailers and
said that based on his order book, 2009 will be the worst in his his-
tory. I asked if he did work for the giant department store Macy’s, one
of my favorite stores. He said their volume was too small. But he said
that on a recent trip to New York, he shopped at the Macy’s fagship
store and purchased a lot of clothes to take back to China with him.
He said the price was lower than in China and that we will never see
such low prices in our lives again.
Decoupled economies is an idea, not a fact. We are all in this together.
Stuf
by Kerry Herndon
Kerry Herndon owns Kerry’s Bromeliads,
a tropical potted plant nursery
in Homestead, Florida, United States.
kerryherndon@msn.com
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Retained basis only. Candidate contact welcome,
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48 www.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009
PLANT INVIGORATOR
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April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com 49
Company Page website
Armada ......................................................................22 ..........www.armadayoungplants.nl
Colombian Association ..........................................50 ............................ www.florverde.org
of Flower Exporters, www.asocolflores.org
Asocolflores Florverde
Brandkamp GmbH ...................................................34 ......................... www.brandkamp.de
Container Centralen ..................................................2 ..... www.container-centralen.com
Dutch Plantin B.V. ....................................................43 ....................www.dutchplantin.com
Ernst Benary Samenzucht GmbH .......................51 ..................................www.benary.de
Floragard Vertriebs GmbH ....................................43 ............................. www.floragard.de
Flowerport Logistics B.V. .......................................26 .............www.flowerportlogistics.nl
Flowers and Cents ...................................................43 .............www.flowersandcents.org
Hawe Systems Europe B.V. ..................................21 .................www.hawesystems.com
Horticoop .....................................................................4 .............................. www.horticoop.nl
Company Page website
Konst Alstroemeria B.V. .........................................22 ................... www.alstroemeria.com
Mardenkro .................................................................22 .......................www.mardenkro.com
Market News Service-MNS ................................48 .................... www.intracen.org/mns
Moerheim Roses & Trading ..................................34 ........................ www.moerheim.com
Nyenrode Business University ............................43 .............................. www.nyenrode.nl
Pindstrup Mosebrug A/S .......................................52 ......................... www.pindstrup.com
Pöppelmann GmbH & Co. KG ...............................51 ................. www.poeppelmann.com
Proflora .........................................................................3 ........................ www.proflora.org.co
Sogo Team Co., Ltd. ...................................................6 ............ www.sogo-orchids.com.tw
Stal & Plast A/S ........................................................34 ........................... www.staal-plast.dk
Stan Brouard Group ................................................21 ..................................www.sbpi.co.uk
Takii Europe B.V. .........................................................6 .........................................www.takii.nl
M. van Veen B.V. .......................................................6 ................... www.mvanveenbv.com
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Table of Contents

April 2009 Volume 19 Number 4

Rabobank Report
In the dynamic environment of the European floriculture industry there are plenty of opportunities to grasp, according to the Rabobank. A recent synopsis by the bank’s Food and Agribusiness research unit pointing in particular to the successes of the grab-and-go formula in the UK, exclusive floristry concepts and online sales. The simultaneous emergence of new markets and new sources requiring roughly two major moves for the wholesale and trade business: to excel or to be different.
by Anabel Evans

08

8
Sea freight on the rise
With increases in fuel prices and a slowing economy worldwide, the flower industry is showing increasing interest in sea freight distribution which in some instances can reduce freight costs by up to 50%.
by Anabel Evans and Ron van der Ploeg

Packaging
At the point of sale, packaging provides an opportunity to create clearer market distinction for products and stimulate impulse sales; a move gaining momentum among growers.
by Anabel Evans

12

Salon du Végétal
The 24th Salon du Végétal closed its doors on Friday 18 February 2009. Despite the economic downturn 16,121 visitors descended on Angers to see the absolute latest in cut flowers, potted plants, trees, shrubs, bulbs, bedding plants and floral products. The 639 exhibitors from 13 countries were able to look back on a successful show where good business was done and both the number of visitors and exhibitors was slightly up
by Ron van der Ploeg

36

France turns green
Awareness of ‘green’ products has been slower to emerge as a major society expectation and market demand in France. Nevertheless, following the initiative of a handful of growers, the French garden centre Botanic and some positive government policy, it is now becoming a hot issue that is generating a number of initiatives in the ornamental industry.
by Marie-Françoise Petitjean

16

Closer control over Easter lily
A study to better understand the optimum conditions for Easter lily bulb production makes a preference for scale bulblets and reports on temperature and nutritional effects.
by Paul Nelson, Carl Niedzala, SeungHyun Kim and August De Hertogh

A network to know

40 Departments
International Events World News Prices 23 24 33

The South African Flower Growers’ Association (SAFGA), together with the South Africa Export Council (SAFEC) create a professional community for growers to exchange knowledge and judge the potential of new market opportunities.
by Cilla Lowen

18

44 Columns
In my opinion Awareness Globe Dust Miami Lifestyle Marketing Touch Stuff 7 15 19 21 29 35 45 47

Mealybug in roses
Mealybugs suck the sap from plants and cause significant reductions in yields as well as being the cause of the black sooty mould which grows on the sugary substances that drips from their bodies.
by Louise Labuschagne

Calla contact point
In New Zealand the Calla Council (NZCC) coordinates research and promotion for the sector’s growers and exporters, using its website and meetings to encourage the effective implementation of valuable information resulting from individual projects.
by Dr Keith Funell

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April 2009 | www.FloraCultureInternational.com

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Fax: 0031 297 328001 info@mvanveenbv. www.: 0031 297 326516.O. Handelskwekerij M.Box 73.com . van Veen BV Aalsmeerderweg 725. • Pelargoniums • Petunia A wide selection of cutting raised bedding and patio plants.Naamloos-1 1 18-03-2009 09:52:10 YOUNG PLANTS Breeding and Production of house and bedding plants. Holland Tel. Holland P .mvanveenbv. such as: Euphorbia milii • Cupressus Wilma Ficus varieties • Fuchsia varieties Impatiens N.com. Rijsenhout. 1430 AB AALSMEER.G.

From Lyon and Milan in the south.com) Horti Tecnia Ltda. or based on general conditions not wanting to offer finance at all. Heerhugowaard Designer: Hollandia Media Productions Cartoonist: Bas Kohler In my opinion In the midst of a battle field Orders cancelled. What is lost in January and February cannot be made good in the rest of the year. IL 60186. the rose growers in particular have had a difficult winter season.com) Angie Duffree (angie@floracultureinternational. Now that spring is in the air people are looking to their gardens and going out to buy their bedding plants.O.com) T (31) 20 61 82 666 F (31) 20 61 81 333 Printer: Hollandia Printing.O. Box 612. Ron van der Ploeg. How to survive is the question? The winter was long and cold in Europe. We are in the midst of a monetary battle field. Canada.com) USA.O. 1850 AB Heiloo.Colofon FloraCulture International (ISSN1051-9076) is published monthly.Tokyo 156-0043.Worldwide distribution. Zloty and Rouble are all down. Bogotá. if consumption of flowers and plants is linear to the consumer’s income we can at least console ourselves with the knowledge that the average income level is still high enough to have decent structural sales of flowers and plants.com) Editorial team: Edward Bent.odn.com) Ball Publishing.co.Box 82.ne. the Netherlands. the price pressure falling more on cut flowers than on potted plants. the Netherlands T (31) 34 84 31 393 F (31) 34 84 32 552 info@fbw-woerden. Worldwide distribution. Japan T (81) 33 32 75 756 F (81) 33 32 27 933 East Africa: David Gray (gray@africaonline. If winter is as cold as this last one has been then the florists and street vendors struggle to sell.V. So.com) Ron van der Ploeg (ron@floracultureinternational. Søndervej 10. Prices under pressure. the sales for Mother’s Day in the UK were also not too bad. Central America: Paul Black (pblack@ballpublishing. Asia/Pacific International Accounts Management: Dennis Seriese (dennis@floracultureinternational. The daffodils from England were much later than normal and the supply from France and Italy was slower and the numbers lower than in previous years. Calle 85 No20-25 Of.com) FloraCulture International B. The Dollar. Southern France: Arturo Croci (arturo@floracultureinternational..ke) Marta Pizanode Marquez William Armellini Paul Black Lucas Nicholas Eyal Policar Eiji Yoshikawa FloraCulture International (ISSN1051-9076) is published monthly. Africa. Send address changes to FloraCulture International magazine.com) T (972) 54 42 97 002 F (972) 86 58 19 07 Japan: Eiji Yoshikawa (callems@world. Companies are offering their products not just at cost price but at any price as long as they can get the wheels of commerce rolling. theNetherlands.V. The whole of nature in Europe is at least a month behind.O. Denmark T(45) 21 48 75 30 South America: Marta Pizano de Marquez (marta@floracultureinternational.. This winter people did not buy flowers or bedding plants. Anabel Evans. 2-22-8 Matsubara. Marta Pizano. Hans De Vries. © 2009 FloraCulture International magazine. 3440 AP Woerden.FloraCultureInternational. PO Box 1660. is currently on holiday so this month’s preface has been written by our website editor. but these products are then sold on other markets damaging the competition in these countries with their dump prices.1850 AB Heiloo. we still have some good celebration days ahead of us. P .Box 82. but we still have a good part of it in front of us. Kerry Herndon. this will also stimulate the sales of flower and plants.jp) EMS Inc. Banks asking 5% extra for seasonal credit. West Chicago. P . Plus. Valentine sales were disappointing. For the first time in 25 years there was even heavy snow in southern England.com) Lucas Nicholas (lnicholas@ballpublishing. T (31)72 53 23 522 F (31) 72 53 23 521 M (31) 63 03 99 450 Italy. The auctions seeing their turnover fall by 19%.V.nl Editors: Anabel Evans (anabel@floracultureinternational. So. Leaora Policar.com 07 0 .Box 82. Chris Beytes. Pound Sterling. across to Russia and up over Scandinavia the land was under snow. Photo credits cover: Growing Concepts. However. United States T(1)6 30 23 13 675 F(1)6 30 23 15 254 Middle East: Eyal Policar (eyal@floracultureinternational. April 2009 | www. through Nuremberg.com) T(31)20 61 82 666 F (31)20 61 81 333 M(31) 62 21 65 220 Office Manager: Claudia Stokreef (claudia@floracultureinternational. Forint. P . No portion of editorial may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the publisher. Marie-Françoise Petitjean. 622 Town Road. (jaap@floracultureinternational. even with the weak pound. on March 8 we had Women’s Day and prices were not completely wide of the mark. Lotte Bjarke. David Gray. 1850 AB Heiloo. Publisher is not liable for advertisements using illegally obtained images. P Box 82. More optimistically. the Netherlands T (31) 72 53 23 522 F (31) 72 53 23 521 Circulation Administration: FBW Woerden P. ©2009 FloraCulture International magazine. Whilst companies who cannot get their money from the banks pay their suppliers much later. Dennis Seriese Claudia Stokreef Arturo Croci Advertising Sales Offices Lotte Bjarke Europe.com) LB Text & Idé. All rights reserved.O. Setagaya-ku. Jennifer White Founding editor: Debbie Hamrick Cover: Penta Flowers Publisher: FloraCulture International B. Publisher is not liable for advertisements using illegally obtained images. 8350 Hundslund. the Netherlands . In Holland. Supermarket chains sending out letters to their suppliers saying that instead of paying in 4 weeks they will be paying after 8 weeks.com Miami: William Armellini(William@floracultureinternational. All rights reserved. Helen Moody. Editorial & Administration Offices Ron van der Ploeg FloraCulture International B. not only are the exports to these countries under pressure.com) Scandinavia: Lotte Bjarke (lotte@floracultureinternational. Send address changes to FloraCulture International magazine. 202B. leading the suppliers into the same difficult financial position. No portion of editorial may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the publisher. House of Flowers and Plants by Trend House P/P/P . 2009 may not have been a very good year so far. no. 1850 AB Heiloo. Colombia T (57) 15 30 20 36 F (57) 12 36 25 54 hortitec@unete. Our editor in chief. Arturo Croci. we lose the impulse sales. And.

brands and customer propositions (Figure 3). The UK has been the exception. forcing a clearer market distinction between mass and exclusive products. Furthermore. particularly in western Europe (Figure 2). Two decades ago. UK impulse model Throughout Europe. In the past. only a small share of cut flowers in western Europe are bought for personal use. the vast majority of purchases are related to special occasions such as birthdays. however. most of the market value was generated by offering the consumer a fairly good product for a reasonable price. based on the observation of economics. weddings. continental floriculture consumers have most recently adopted a more unpredictable and demanding approach. the European global market share is estimated at between 40 and 50%. Improving availability. one decade ago this had climbed to 35% and to a staggering 68% in 2008. UK supermarkets only had a 2% market share in cut flower sales. in a market largely seen as predominantly mature. Accordingly. either low price or luxury is where value is being generated.com | April 2009 . exclusive floristry concepts and online sales. 2008 Note: Europe. estimated at 80 billion.FloraCultureInternational. CUT FLOWERS Total € 16 billion UK Germany France Italy Netherlands Spain Switzerland Russia Belgium Poland Sweden 19% 18% 12% 9% 9% 5% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% POTTED PLANTS Total € 12 billion Germany France UK Italy Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland Belgium Norway Denmark Russia Others 35% 10% 7% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 19% Others 17 UK 19 Others 19 Germany 35 Sweden 2 Poland 2 Belgium 3 Russia 3 Switzerland 4 Spain 5 Netherlands 9 Italy 9 Germany 18 CUT FLOWERS Russia 2 Denmark 2 Norway 2 Belgium 2 Switzerland 3 Sweden 4 Spain 4 POTTED PLANTS France 12 Netherlands 5 Italy 5 UK 7 France 10 Others 17% Source: Rabobank based on Flower Council of Holland. funerals. sluggish growth is still expected in western Europe’s floriculture markets in the medium and long term. there are wide differences between countries in cut flower and potted plant consumption (Figure 1). Make a Move espite the current chaotic market situation and the difficulties in forecasting demand in the near future. Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day. although the growth rate has been rather slow. A recent synopsis by the bank’s Food and Agribusiness research unit pointing in particular to the successes of the grab-and-go formula in the UK. demographics and other growth drivers. the market share of organised retail in floriculture has been increasing over recent years. players in the European floriculture industry D will have to be more careful in the way they segment their products. The simultaneous emergence of new markets and new sources requiring roughly two major moves for the wholesale and trade business: to excel or to be different. accounting for roughly three-quarters of global floriculture consumption. the US and Japan are the main consumer markets. For example. Nowadays. Triggered Figure 1. according to the Rabobank. Further development in the grab-and-go market could help drive sales for personal use. leading the developments in multi-channel by Cindy van Rijswick marketing of cut flowers and the developments with respect to supermarket sales of cut flowers. quality and marketing standards will increase expansion opportunities. The Rabobank expects an average growth of 2 to 4% per year until 2018.Production and Trade In the dynamic environment of the European floriculture industry there are plenty of opportunities to grasp. In this region. 08 www.

value added High Source: Rabobank. Another strategy for European >>> Figure 2 More distinct floriculture market segmentation. retailers have started to provide more information on the products they carry. What they sell is creativity and exclusivity. Opportunities for personalized packaging. High Low Low Price Exclusively. there is little room for tailor-made products or delicate flowers and plants that cannot be handled in standard systems. particularly for weddings. buying both at Prada and the one-euro-shop. country of origin. mainly by the internet. Growing market for exclusive.Figure 3. designing your own t-shirt. and characteristics of the primary producer. CO2 emission of the products produced. Higher demands on service. IMPACT ON FLOWER DEMAND Proper availability of both value products and exclusive products at different marketing channels can expand total flower and plant market. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Capricious: The same consumer easily switches from low priced bulk to high-priced exclusive products. And if florist shops and online shops succeed in strengthening their position. and new products. At the same time consumers want producers to take social and environmental issues in account. New technologies have facilitated this. Demanding: Consumers are becoming more demanding. organic products. etc. for example. Selling creativity As supermarkets are focused on maximizing volumes and efficiency of logistical systems. An estimated 10 to 20% of cut flowers are sold in supermarkets throughout Europe. etc. This implies that there is still a need for specialised florists in Europe. manufacturing your own wallpaper. and for offering exclusivity and creativity. They are very well informed. as there are still many steps to be taken. Probably not in the short term.FloraCultureInternational. In addition. 2008 April 2009 | www. Tesco has started this and it seems to be rather successful. Growing demand for convenience products (‘easy to take and treat’ flowers and plants). corporate clients. Diversity: Consumers want to express their personalities and individualism. guarantees. Examples are creating personal greeting cards. corporate responsibility. supermarkets in other European countries will probably remain below 50% market share. They want their unique needs to be met quickly and efficiently. tailor-made products. value added High Low Exclusively. An interesting question is whether the UK model will be successfully copied in other European countries. creation of buying special experiences. Florists following this strategy will avoid competition by price. related to flowers sold. by the success in the grab-and-go impulse purchases (accounting for almost half of the total cut flower market). funerals. the next step for UK supermarkets is to introduce more segmentation in their floriculture category: value for money next to premium products (for the gift market).com 09 .

such as wine-order companies and widely assorted online shops like amazon. New markets new sources Further east. A number of them offer a broad range of gifts (flowers. a high-earning consumer base and an expanding market will likely steer future growth (Figure 4).com | April 2009 . Some Figure 4. 2007. euroflorist). There are various florists that sell online. Ecuador and Kenya are the main floriculture export nations. More than other cut flower and potted plant retailers.000 China Portugal Hungary Poland Russia Slovakia Czech Rep. 10 www. Purchasing power and expenditure on cut flowers.000 30. Characteristic for the online flower delivery business is that it is occasion driven. In general. of the new online flower shops originate from IT-based companies. in particular India and China. The Netherlands. 2008 Note: Floriculture consumption in general is strongly related to income levels. Over the next few years. For instance. online shops compete with businesses outside the sector. the floriculture market in these regions and other central and eastern European countries is expected to grow by an average of 5 to 10% annually. even cross-continent investments are becoming more Online sales A development that will surely change the European floriculture industry is the emergence of online sales. are also stretching their tentacles into African and European floriculture. companies from emerging floriculture nations. and florist chains (like Blume 2000 and Monceau Fleurs). and logistical services (TNT post) who are active in online floriculture sales. People are searching for a gift. florists under umbrella organisations (fleurop/interflora. nationally or regionally operating online shops. street stalls. markets and kiosks are the main sales channel for cut flowers.000 15.000 35. and Blume 2000 with 210 shops generating sales of roughly €120 million in Germany. but in the last decade new competitors dedicated to flower and plant delivery have emerged. 10.000 25.000 40.000 purchasing power per capita (EUR) Source: Rabobank. such as China. the wholesale and trade business is very vulnerable to shocks in exchange rates and energy costs because of the increasingly globalfocused business environment. India. such as individual florist. An example of a florist chain that aims to compete with retail multiples by combining low prices with convenience and a clear and appealing format is Monceau Fleurs with close to 400 stores and annual sales of €150 million. there are supermarkets (for example Lidl Blumenservice in Germany).FloraCultureInternational. based on the Flower Council Holland and World Bank.Production and Trade florists is to team up with other florists to take advantage of joint purchasing and joint marketing. the flow is changing direction as new sourcing areas have emerged. challenges remain. Traditionally.com. not necessarily for flowers or plants. Examples of European florist chains are Mester Grønn with more than 70 locations in shopping malls throughout Norway.). Thailand and Turkey. However. Although absolute flower and plant consumption there remains small. It is expected that in the coming years more florist retail formats and brands will be developed in Europe. worldwide online shops (for example 1800-flowers and Flora2000). chocolates. some from online gift shops. as current online shops are finding that a large share of consumers who order flowers via the internet have never ordered flowers before. Despite the anticipated growth. In many eastern European countries. EUR/capita 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 Slovenia Japan UK Netherlands Denmark Norway Switzerland Belgium Ireland Finland Germany Sweden Italy France Greece Spain US 20 10 0 0 5. partly at the expense of flower and plant delivery through local florists. wine etc. Colombia. It is expected that the online business will expand rapidly (double-digit numbers) in the coming years. Online sales will likely come partly from new consumers. growth in markets like Russia and Poland has been robust over the last decade. cross-border. some of them having no background in the floriculture industry at all. and the Netherlands is the main cut flower and potted plant trading hub within the European and African trading area. Ethiopia. More and more. florist shops have been delivering cut flowers to the consumer’s door. especially for cut flowers. Currently we see a great diversity of operators in flower delivery.000 20. In addition.

we continued to serve our clients without the help of others. it has meanwhile developed into an economic crisis. fragmented and the number of large companies is limited.” In the annual results the Rabobank lending to the Dutch small and medium enterprises (SME) sector was up 21% to € 55. They could succeed in becoming the essential link between production and retail either by offering services related to logistics and marketing or by providing unique products. Rabobank’s understanding of the industry from the ‘micro’ of local regional farming conditions to the ‘macro’ of international commodity trade markets has since grown into an extensive financial group delivering financial solutions to more than 9 million clients worldwide through a network of branches in 41 countries. Fl o r is t April 2009 | www. Across the globe and in our country.bankruptcies. In the lower-end market. The Executive Board Chairman. Cooperative retains trust The Rabobank Group ranks among the world’s fifteen largest financial institutions.com). combined with our strong financial performance and solvency. for European companies who strive for continuous growth. For the European floriculture wholesale and trade business these developments are both a threat and a challenge. Regrettably. our prudent risk management. making them the pivotal link in the value chain (Figure 5). the strong Euro. ||| This information is taken from a European Floriculture Wholesale and Trade report written by Cindy van Rijswick from the Rabobank Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory (FAR) unit (cindy. It is difficult times like these that the benefits of a cooperative bank clearly come to the fore. The sub prime crisis in the United States escalated to become a deep and worldwide financial crisis. The banking sector suffered unprecedented and far-reaching consequences. constant quality and low costs. discounters. Wholesale and trade companies need to add value otherwise they will become redundant. show the Rabobank is retaining a stable position with net profit up 2% to € 2. Currently. Bert Heemskerk. and D-I-Y (Do it Yourself) stores can only survive by use of outstanding logistics. value added.5 billion in the first half year.van. The nearly 85% market share in primary horticulture and agriculture in the Netherlands is complemented by services to corporate and retail businesses both in the Netherlands and abroad. our democratic consultative structure.com 11 . ordinary nt differe To be l ce ex To D-I-Y market Service supermarket Street market.7 billion. government interventions and nationalisations were order of the day. presented by the Rabobank Executive Board in March. Its dedication to the Food and Agribusiness Chain began at the end of the nineteenth century as a collection of small rural banks in the Netherlands. our sustainable remuneration policy – all these factors. Furthermore. Physical product flows and virtual information flows will be more and more separated. The total supply chain will operate much more efficiently and become more transparent in the future. involvement in non-European distribution centres and channels would be a logical step. Marketing segments. suppliers to retail multiples. have contributed to Rabobank Group’s continuing stable performance. The 2008 annual results. The negative effects of the credit crisis on net profit were € 0. which is based on the Rhineland model. As a result of the harsh business environment increasing transportation costs.Figure 5. service Petrol station Mass. commented:“2008 may rightly be called a historic year.7 billion in second half of 2008 and € 0. European floriculture wholesale and trade is still very Online shop (Online) gift shop Gardener Plant decorator Interior design shop Garden centre Exclusivity.8 billion. kiosk Discount supermarket Low price Source: Rabobank.FloraCultureInternational. too . Our societal oriented business culture. In addition. Eventually. companies that have either a deep understanding of markets or products or a large extent of flexibility or innovativeness will be successful. rijswick@rabobank. A growing share of supply will not be present in wholesale markets and auction buildings but will be transported directly from the producer to the wholesaler or retailer. distribution processes will change drastically. retail pressure and the ageing of company owners . High price common in floriculture. 2008 Note: In the higher-end market segment.consolidation has taken off and is expected to continue in the coming years.

it’s only a case of removing the covering box. “According to a report from the Dutch Product Board of Horticulture (Productschap Tuinbouw) ferns have a rather dull image. The next step is to communicate more directly with consumers and provide convenience for retailers. waterproof and easily printable the pot has ideal characteristics . including the plants in their decorative packaging. In terms of sales. Additionally. add convenience in handling and make a sales presentation more appealing. Already for some years packaging choices have been used by businesses to create a stronger market identity. a loose top card and a covering box. the Innovation Award winner was FloraHolland’s ‘Be Aware Get Better’. Only a third of the required turnover was realized. for example. We therefore set to work on developing a sales concept to catch the eye of consumers which at the same time required minimum maintenance by the retailers. As for the shop manager. The life cycle of the display lasts up to six weeks by renewing the assortment on the shelves. a cardboard display.com | April 2009 . The result is the ‘Musthaves’ display with individual ferns presented in a protective cardboard pot with a plastic coating. clean and attractive. packaging provides an opportunity to create clearer market distinction for products and stimulate impulse sales. humidified plant microclimate with a shop floor life of two weeks. He says. which introduced six retail concepts based on the theme of sustainability. In a second test in December. Kraaijenbrink adds that the Musthaves name is purposely not related to the fern. and therefore if required. Last year at the Horti Fair. being light.” Van der Putten’s experience stresses the importance of a complete shelf presentation where a combination of products draw more consumer attention. by replacing simple sleeves and labels with more stylish designs. Justin van der Putten from CAH Dronten. “In an initial trial sales were sluggish due to the presentation of one colour. one type and one size of fern.” Vitro Plus persuaded their local Albert Heijn supermarket to test some Musthaves.convenient. the pot form guarantees a good. a move gaining momentum among growers. communicate how the products can be used.FloraCultureInternational. the impact of the display was sustainable within 20 days. A recent project by the Dutch fern company Vitro Plus has concentrated on the aspect of convenience. marketing moves that are also widely evident. placing the top card and that’s it! by Anabel Evans 12 www. The covering box enables easy transport of the entire display.Packaging At the point of sale. developing technology to give products physical protection (from external impacts and each other). Ellen Kraaijenbrink from Vitro Plus explained their dilemma saying. other green Vitro Plus has developed a Musthaves display that comprises a wooden disposable tray. Treading the path to retail T he packaging and labelling industry is a discerning partner for the ornamentals sector. four different types of popular ferns were presented in two supermarkets. most often denoting a trademark. managed the tests as part of his traineeship at Vitro Plus. a subject said to “make or break your reputation” in a new consumer study out in the USA (see “Sustainability and packaging choices”). A French student. We are also conscious of the modest demand from retailers who are not specialists in the plant trade.

the Speciale partnership. The Green Event Centre will be featuring six miniature houses with 12 different themes developed by Bunnik Creations like Christmas. expanding on the new watering system introduced by azalea grower Kris Flore at Plantarium 2008 (a plastic pot equipped with a taper at the bottom fits in a trendy cover pot with a guaranteed reservoir of water to increase the shelf life). In their garden range is the Patio Rhododendron packaged under a Colours of the Himalayas theme with a grab-and-go handle.FloraCultureInternational. a cool chain represents a protective packaging element with a controlled environment 24/7 from harvest to point of consumer purchase being the best solution for high quality flowers. decorative plant holders with handles are also being introduced for the Clivia and Jewel Orchids by Speciale. Rene van Lint and Gebr Van der Salm. consisting of nine Belgian growers located in the Ghent region. At the FLORALL in March. Accentuating the professionalism of grower efforts to inform and inspire retail and category managers about the absolute latest developments in indoor plants. or even flowering plants could be presented in the display. the retail supply chain being one of their biggest customers. China and the Mediterranean World. e. a concept proof brought to the attention of retail has clarified important details about the horizontal positioning of both the barcode and consumer information. However. the worst scenario is that cut flowers that have benefited from a cool chain throughout the supply chain arrive in the retail store and >>> 13 April 2009 | www. In the gift market. Described as Holland’s biggest showcase for indoor plants. Protective. Halloween. The Bunnik company produces up to 38 million indoor plants each year. were also exhibiting some new retail concepts.g. added value will be one of the key phrases of the Centre which changes its theme every six months.com . pottery and packaging. a 900 m2 Green Event Centre was opened in March in the Netherlands. Christmas and Valentine’s Day. Cooler protection for cut flowers In the cut flower sector.Very Speciale! In the garden range of the Speciale partnership is the Patio Rhododendron packaged under a Colours of the Himalayas theme with a grab-and-go handle. The Green Event Centre is the result of a partner- ship between Bunnik Plants. a selection of print designs on brightly coloured holders (suitable for various azalea pot sizes) with ribbon handles bring a new look depending on the seasonal celebration.

is the coordinator for the entire project: “Plantagen has always had a focus on quality and has until now displayed the cut flowers in walk-in cold stores. mailings. the majority of the 1. Meanwhile.75% said it was “very important” or “important” to be able to return a product’s vessel to the marketplace via curbside bins. airflow design1. Our industry.” ||| 1 FCI November 2008. refillable containers. retail stores are more than just the prime spot for linking suppliers and consumers looking for responsible goods and services. Check out the Hartman Group’s Sustainability: The Rise of Consumer Responsibility3. thus creating an autonomous section of the garden centre. The Plantagen chain with outlets in Norway. 2 https://www.FloraCultureInternational. they say. containers to reuse for other purposes and compostables. 54% of their respondents were familiar with the term “sustainability”. isn’t the only one attempting to “green” up its packaging image. many individuals are unsure what it means. is after all. They concluded. Biodegradability ranked second in packaging preferences. I know a lot of you are trying out some sort of packaging alternative.com/ BPSubscriptions/newslettersignup. is being launched in the German market first. Finally. especially in that half of the population who can’t define the word. which affirms the fact that sustainable packaging might not be a primary purchase motivator. trade and consumer press are gradually being informed about the new sales concept. With the new technology supplied by the Floratech coolers we will still be able to offer the best possible quality. Albertjan van den Burgt. but at the same time we have made it easier and more inviting to buy a bouquet of fresh flowers. the most conspicuous waste our industry produces in the consumers’ eyes. Sustainability and packaging choices Packaging definitely counts in the concept of sustainable development as Jennifer Duffield White reports in her GreenTalks sustainability e-news2 from the USA on February 27. heat and rough handling. the Hartman Group also highlighted the fact that sustainability is not a household word.hartman-group. but it sure can make or break your reputation. Through presentations.ballpublishing. 2009: Anecdotally.com/ publications/view/81 14 www. noted above. This reduces the vase life for consumers and increases the waste percentage for retailers. responsible choice. The “why” and “how” is just as important as the “what. flyers and POS material. category manager for Plantagen. Sweden and Finland plans to equip all its centres (more than 90) with the coolers from Floratech Europe. This will no doubt stimulate impulse sales. from high-end upgrades to biodegradable pots and resins for post-consumer material. The red and white Christmas colours of Ice Crystal packaged in a decorative printed box is being positioned to stimulate sales later this year. Instead. When pressed. In 2007. they chose recycled content. though.com | April 2009 .Packaging are then left in small buckets close to a shop entrance where they are exposed to draft. which together will form an island of flowers. boundary layer. reused or reduced?). aspx?newsletter=greentalks 3 http://www. minimal packaging ranked third (even though it probably requires less energy than recycling or biodegrading). Flower coolers are already in use in several supermarket chains in Europe. The study showed that the number one thing consumers respond to in regards to sustainability is how the product is disposed of (is it recycled. Each centre will have two coolers and two dry sections. The take home: just slapping the word “sustainable” on a product probably isn’t going to boost sales or win loyalty. That could explain why 71% didn’t know or were uncertain which companies support sustainable values. the newest member of Dümmen’s Premium series. introduced at the IPM Essen. “Consumer experiences in-store have the biggest influence on overall perceptions about the retailer and its relation to sustainability. The coolers ensure longer shelf life due to the patented. SUSTAINABLE … WHAT? In the same study.” What kind of experience do you offer? Seasonal campaign from start The higher-end sales concept and promotional campaign for “Ice Crystal”.600 people interviewed still identified positively with the term. Scandinavia’s largest garden centre chain committed to a similar cool chain strategy after a test run using flower coolers was completed with success.” RETAIL EXPERIENCE Here’s another interesting observation from the study. yet in 2008 that number was nearly identical at 56%. In March. the German retail. However. pg 19 Horti Fair Floratech Europe’s coolers form an island of flowers. think about telling the story on what makes your company or product a good. The plant container that ends up in landfill.

Other issues concerning the sustainability of wateruse and food production are also hot topics.com 15 . but the expectation is that this will change in the coming five years.by Jan Hein Blom Awareness Does Mother Nature agree? On the wall. It is known that the seas of our world carry about 46. that’s why I have put it next to my desk. Due to modified water systems commonly used production systems will have to be adjusted. Another article dated the 28th of August 2008 is titled ‘Horticulturists transfer to biological degradable plastic’. janheinblom@gmail. choices that will affect the lives of our unborn children. sustainability for water. old fishing nets and lines and agricultural plastic foil. do not feel hungry anymore and eventually die. Some countries will not be able to deal with increasing sea levels and large numbers of people will need to look for new land to live on. to remind myself to read it from time to time. Spain and France put together. I was born and raised in horticulture. It is unimaginably big. The content of the article is too much to comprehend after just one reading. the plastic debris also ends up in the stomachs of birds and fish which.FloraCultureInternational. The article is about a floating island in the Pacific Ocean to the west of San Francisco. because they have a full stomach. pottery and packaging.000 pieces of plastic per square mile. Discovered about 10 years ago the island consists entirely of plastic debris. next to my desk. I realize that I am a human being living in a world full of overblown luxury for which I am partially responsible. It is clear that it therefore impacts on the oceans microbiology and ecological systems.The island is hovering just underneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean. for food and for health. It is a critical time for our planet and for producers around the world to opt for sustainability. 900 m2 Green Event Centre was opened in March in the Netherlands.com April 2009 | www. for climate. When I am reminded of the ‘island of plastic’ in the middle of the Pacific I get an awkward feeling. This huge pile of waste absorbs all kinds of toxic waste (such as DDT and PCB’s). The effects are as yet unknown. The questions for you are: How will you adjust? How much longer will you be able to sell your products if Mother Nature doesn’t agree with your methods? Green Event Centre Accentuating the professionalism of grower efforts to inform and inspire retail and category managers about the absolute latest developments in indoor plants. the Netherlands. One study in the north of Holland has shown that on average each bird carries about thirty different pieces of plastic in its stomach. Consequently. It is estimated to be the size of Portugal. 9% plastic bags and the rest is millions of drinking straws. However. We will have to learn again how to survive on our planet. Jan Hein Blom is senior real estate project developer with Legmeer Vastgoedontwikkeling in Aalsmeer. The world is changing as consumers become increasingly aware of environmental topics such as temperature increase due to escalating CO2 levels and the melting of the polar icecaps. I have a newspaper article dated the 26th of June 2008. The UNEP – the ecological department of the UN – is sending a ship to research this huge pile of waste. a survey of 300 Dutch growers shows that 65% of the growers find it unimportant that production is placed in environmentally friendly packaging. The effects will be huge. but it is clear to anybody that the effects will not be positive. we will have to adjust our way of living and think deeply about how we use the resources of our planet. beach toys. milkshake covers. The Ocean Conservancy states that the waste consists of 13% plastic bottles. Apart from the toxic effects which end up in our food. Because of the increasing temperatures around the world sea levels are changing. but at some point it is clear that we have to make choices.

much of the floricultural industry of France and Europe were enjoying the first signs of spring at the Salon du Végétal which was held from February 17 -19 at the Angers Exhibition Centre. As a matter of fact Tuesday attracted only 24% of the visitors. Althought it didn’t win a prize but. Cut flowers The ‘Bouquets d’Aujourd’hui’ exhibition island featuring floral arrangement demonstrations by Jean-Louis Anxoine and his team is already very popular with florists. An accompanying program of conferences presented three prestigious landscaping projects: ‘Terra Botanica’ in Angers. the tramway in Montpellier and the ‘Deule parc’ in Lille.200 m2 area dedicated to cut flowers included 31 exhibitors of flowers and floral supplies. In the end 44 products were selected to participate in the Innovert competition. According to exhibition manager Serge Tsvétoukhine a record number of 80 new products have been registered. England. potted plants. There is no doubt that in the long run this change will play to the advantage of France’s most important horticultural trade show. were reawakening from a long. ‘Bright Star’ makes an excellent container plant and is also very effective as a border or landscape plant. W New opening times This year the show was held from Tuesday to Thursday instead of Wednesday to Friday as in previous editions. shrubs. white. an increase of 20% compared to last year. the Pays de la Loire. Landscaping sector A first for the Salon was the ‘Pôle Espaces Verts et Aménagements’.Salon du Végétal ANGERS: The 24th Salon du Végétal closed its doors on Friday 18 February 2009. The 1. broad leaves with bright gold bands along each side. but this year it appeared that most visitors were not yet used to the new opening times. The 639 (622 in 2008) exhibitors from 13 countries were able to look back on a successful show where good business was done. wind and hail) Lobularia maritima ‘Snow Princess’ is a Proven Winners product. With good tolerance to bad weather (rain. The vegetative Lobularia maritima ‘Snow Princess’ from the German breeder Kientzler took first prize. dark green foliage with light yellow edges and has definitely more intense variegation than Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’. Mature plants produce branching stems with large creamy-white bell flowers. cold winter. Innovert Innovation is the key phrase in the French floral sector and maybe that’s why the novelty competition ‘Innovert’ is gaining a lot of interest. Most novelties were to be found in the ‘greens’ category.121 visitors descended on Angers to see the absolute latest in cut flowers. lily and anemone being worked by Ron van der Ploeg The jury of professionals also awarded the shrub Daphne odora Marianni ‘Rogbret’ with a first prize.FloraCultureInternational. whereas on Wednesday and Thursday attendances were 40% and 36 % respectively of the total visitors. the Bouquets d’Aujourd’hui once again attracted an increasing number of French florists who saw typical French cut flowers such as Hydrangea. purple flowers. Despite the economic downturn 16. a new pavilion where industry professionals can catch up on the latest developments in the landscaping sector. trees. ‘Bright 16 www. West Sussex. Its trailing habit makes it an ideal hanging plant. France celebrates spring with Salon du Végétal hile the forests and meadows from France’s horticultural heartland. on in stylish compositions. FitzGerald Nurseries from Ireland entered its variegated Yucca gloriasa ‘Bright Star’ in the Innovert Competiton. brighter than other varieties and with a greater proportion of the leaf coloured gold than in competitor varieties. very fragrant flowers throughout the summer and up until the first frosts. Launched for the first time in 2008. It makes a tight rosette that is instantly eye-catching.’Bright Star’ was developed by Tim Crowther of Walberton Nurseries. It features long. very fragrant. The shrub blooms in early spring from February to March with small. This Lobularia doesn’t go to seed and produces an abundance of large. bedding plants and floral products. the plant is worthwhile mentioning. bulbs.com | April 2009 . This evergreen shrub has shiny.

A silent motor makes a cam rotate which makes the sides move in a regular motion. silver and light green. When the plant is running out of water. a sales concept for aquarium plants and accessories (vases. besides its decorative aspect. Yves-Marie Stervinou explains that ‘Kerguelen’is unique because it has deep pink flowers which match beautifully with the variegated foliage featuring dark green. gravel) on a metal display stand which lets the consumer either buy different items separately. environmentally responsible products. Large assortment which can be adapted according to the space in the retail outlet. MyPlant includes an elegant range of patio and garden plants like buxus. sourced only from ethical breeders and not uprooted from native environments.Camellia japonica ‘Kerguelen’. created by Stervinou Nurseries in Brittany took the silver medal in the Innovert Competition. The Dutch Van Vliet Flower Group introduced Aqua Décor. ‘Vital’ by Johanna Robin and Marine Lacouture took the gold trophy.Star’ is protected by EU Plant Variety Rights and US Plant Patent under the name WALBRISTAR. A really cool novelty was a fern in a so-called ‘Vital’pot that recreated the rhythm and movement of human breathing (inhalation and exhalation). One good example of an impulse product would be the MyPlant concept of FitzGerald Nurseries of Kilkenny. Impulse products MyPlant concept of FitzGerarld Nurseries. just like human lungs. The selected plants for this year were Cordyline australis. or buy ready-made arrangements. This area featured some fantastic new presentations and news ways of using plants. A range composed of an assortment of Gardenias. the ‘Espace Inspiration’ served as a platform for the young students of the Lycée Jean Monnet des Herbiers. It expels the oxygen that humans need and plays a part in purifying the air. Basil bonsai by Decock from Belgium. and fern. Curving around the plant these pieces form a cocoon which protects the lower parts of the plant from frost. the device stops breathing. ‘Kerguelen’ has an upright and compact habit and a good resistance to diseases. PGR free. “Camellia portuense has also variegated leaves but is single flowered. The pot colour indicates the price band. the leading independent breeders’ agent. azalea At the 2009 Salon du Végétal impulse products took centre stage. “Sustainable plants” being this year’s theme. April 2009 | www. The Ilot Full Garden features a multi functional display for plants and related products. Aqua Décor features 70 varieties. the Belgian company Decock Pelargonium showcased its Basil Bonsai El Greco. a plant is a living being. Camellia ‘Kerguelen’ is a mutant of the good old Camellia ‘Nuccio’s Cameo’. It is licensed in the EU by Plants For Europe Limited. Fitzgerald Nurseries Limited is licensed to produce and sell Yucca gloriosa ‘Bright Star’. Finally. El Greco is a grafted basil plant in the form of a small tree on a stalk. the students only worked with products which were considered to be eco-friendly. Nymphea consists of a base to place at the foot of the plant and seven Lobularia ‘Snow princess’.50 cm won the first prize in the category Best Commercial Plant meanwhile in the Best Non Plant category the Ilot Full Garden took first prize. Hibiscus and Hydrangeas. FitzGerald Nurseries ensure that plants in the range are thoroughly researched and non invasive. The Nymphea concept by Pierre Barach presented a new way to protect plants from frost.com 17 . cream. presented in attractive packaging containing advice on how to care for the product. ‘Vital’ reminds the consumer that.FloraCultureInternational. Ireland. based in East Sussex. specially acclimatised for outdoor shelf sale and presented in a window box of 50 cm diameter and a grey-blue pot of 29. dahlia. Espace Inspiration With an area devoted to stylish. libertia. cordyline and carex. which was awarded with the Plantarium Press Prize last year. identical pieces which slot together and support each other.” Yves-Marie ensures that the variegation will remain stable as there are no green shoots. specially developed and selected as easy-care. ’Kerguelen’ has beautiful double flowers that show up from February to April. ||| Next year the show will be held from Tuesday 16 to Thursday 18 February. weather tolerant plants.

identity of the required nutrients. moisture and climatic conditions. and percent meristem abortion of Easter lilies as influenced by eight temperature regimes.47 0. They may originate from either stem or scale bulblets. Therefore. (g) 1. or potassium (K)] are required and when are they needed during the growth and developmental cycle. This is reflected by the increased weights of both types of roots at the end of short days. the third objective of this study was to determine which macronutrients [nitrogen (N). Bulb circumference.FloraCultureInternational. Known as “yearlings”.02 7. phosphorous (P). bulblets must be grown for an additional two years to reach forcing size. it was Table 1. (g) 6. The number of “no-shows”. Since bulb production occurs in the field.com | April 2009 .52 1.0 to 9.39 3..20 2. Closer control over Easter lily aster lily (Lilium longiflorum) bulbs purchased for forcing are produced in a limited number of areas in the world.41 18.38 10. In contrast.29 4. The weight of basal bulbs produced from stem bulblet plants only increased from 7. the annual prevailing temperatures can vary considerably. it was the primary objective of this controlled environmental study. basal root fresh weight. basal and stem roots developed earlier on scale bulblet plants. number of flower buds. Carl Niedziela. weights of both types of roots were similar on scale and stem plants. 2 The greenhouse received natural photoperiods and was set to be cooled at 22°C (day) and 18°C (night). and needed quantity (rate) of the nutrients are dictated to a large extent by the capacity of soil to contribute and retain nutrients and the effect of the prevailing rainfall on nutrient leaching. scale bulblets would be the preferred bulblet type for propagation. Thus. and August De Hertogh the second objective of this study. yearling scale and stem bulblets were compared as E Temperature responses after 107 days under short days.54 14.10 6. The effect of these variations on bulb growth and development are not fully understood.22 8. In the Pacific Northwest of the US.58 4. The timing of fertilizer applications. Treatment No-shows (%) 10/6 °C 14/10 °C 18/14 °C 22/18 °C 26/22 °C 30/26 °C Variable Greenhouse 5 5 25 30 50 30 0 35 Basal bulb wt. Thus. They require very specific soil. a larger percentage of the stem bulblets (35%) were “no-shows” (i. 18 www. Scale bulblet plants also produced the largest number of stem bulblets.3 1. Bulb type Our primary goal was to maximize bulb production and it was found that scale bulblets were superior to stem bulblets.Bulb Production A study to better understand the optimum conditions for Easter lily bulb production makes a preference for scale bulblets and reports on temperature and nutritional effects.22 4.38 2.3 0. Stem bulblets are removed from the below ground portion of the stem of the lily plant after it is pulled.0 Abort. Variations in these soil and climate factors across production areas obscure our knowledge of plant nutrient needs and also explain why recommendations and practices differ widely from one production area to another.1 1.8 grams.0 1. by Paul Nelson.4 2.82 1. In addition. while those from scale bulblet plants increased from 5.2 grams during the course of the experiment. bulbs for forcing require three years to be produced using the current field production system. scale bulblets are generated on detached scales taken from selected mother bulbs after the commercial bulbs have been harvested in the fall. Therefore.67 2. flower buds per plant 1. Bulblet type did not influence the number of flowers formed.06 7. the planting density would have to be increased to compensate for an increased number of “no-shows”.e. followed a similar pattern. used by the commercial bulb industry. Seung-Hyun Kim.9 0 1. (%) 0 10 0 10 31 75 5 0 1 The variable treatment simulated seasonal field temperatures in the coastal bulb production area of northern California. bulblets that did not produce shoots that emerged from the bulb) in comparison to the scale bulblets (10%). In addition.67 No. However.49 Basal root wt. Thus.9 to 12. Table 1.94 10.29 4.86 1. at the end of the experiment.73 Stem root wt.14 14. stem root fresh weight. (g) 6. If stem bulblets are used. basal bulb fresh weight.

as ever. Omission of the three nutrients resulted in a reduction of shoot weight. Flower number was maximum in the range 10/16°C to 22/18°C and meristem flower abortion occurred at 26/22°C and 30/26°C. Gloeckner Co. Elon.C. Also. P and K. Withholding N. April issue. Root fresh weight was greatest in the range of 14/10°C to 18/14°C and declined at higher or lower temperatures. Temperature Treatments consisting of continious temperatures in controlled environments indicated that maximum basal bulb weight was achieved in a day/night termperature regime of 26/22°C followed by both 18/14 and 22/18°C (Table 1).O.by Sjaak Langeslag Globe concluded that scale bulblets are the preferred propagation material.S. it is noticeable that countries are falling back on national protectionism and thereby hampering international trade.FloraCultureInternational. P or K. omission of N. R. When N or P but not K. Governments want to take over and heavily support banks because they are convinced solid banks are necessary for society and the economy. Calif. K singularly or in combination during the long day period had no effect on production of basal bulbs. Nutrition Application of the three nutrients (NPK) was required during the short day period.. ted there was a further reduction in basal bulb root weight. and the NCSU Phytotron staff for cultural assistance. Moreover. I think it’s a strange world! Huge companies are asking for support and will probably get it because so many jobs are likely to disappear if they go bankrupt and unemployment is not going to help the situation. a factor that could affect basal bulb yield in the third year of production. Plants tested during a subsequent long day period had been fertilized with a complete fertilizer during the previous short day period. but what I do see all over the world is governments struggling with ambitious plans and companies struggling to survive. 96370 Wildwood Road. Over- all. temperature results and references are available on the FCI website. ||| Paul Nelson and August De Hertogh are in the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. This indicates that all three nutrients may provide a benefit during the long day period. stem bulb weight. Deficiencies of either N or P but not K. Temperatures of 30/26°C must be avoided due to lower bulb yield and foliar injury (Photograph 1). strategy and consultancy. and Seung-Hyun Kim is in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Sangi Youngseo College. P fertilization had a greater negative impact on growth and development than the absence of K. The banks are comparable to the cow with governments pulling the head and companies pulling the tail. and the number of flowers produced. Brookings.Y. OR 97415 for technical information. Small companies have to do it all by themselves and are experiencing that finding credit for investment is becoming more and more difficult. My suggestion are: lower the interest rate for credit. lowering the tax rates will leave more money in the pocket of consumers. I was taught to think of simple solutions. but only in the 26/22°C and 30/26°C temperature regimes. The authors thank the Easter Lily Research Foundation. they wouldn’t have had anything left at all if governments hadn’t put in all the money from the tax payers. Kangwon Do.. one pulling her head. Langeslag@agriraad. In the middle the bankers and shareholders.A. are sitting quietly collecting their bonuses and dividends and nobody seems to notice them. increased . all three nutrients had no influence on the number of “no-shows”. The same philosophy should also apply to the banks. Greenhouse and variable temperature regimes resulted in less growth. 27695-7609 U. Omission of N. was omit. with the absence of P shoot length was . like you and me. This cartoon comes to mind when I am thinking about the crisis the world is in at the moment. while there was a requirement for N. stem bulb root weight. A cow is an instrument that enables farmers to produce a product that consumers need. it is not a money maker for third parties. for supplying bulblets. Carl Niedziela is in the Department of Biology at Elon University. collecting money from people with surplus so others can get loans to invest. the concentration of N and P in basal bulbs at the end of the experiment did not differ from the concentrations at the start of the experiment. Our results suggest the possibility of producing bulbs in a controlled environment with an initial temperature of 14/10°C to minimize “no shows” and maximize the basal root system and 26/22°C after shoot emergence to maximize basal bulb fresh weight and circumference.com 19 . companies want banks to supply credit so that they are able to stimulate the economy. there was a reduction in shoot weight. Have we heard a sorry from the bankers who made the financial world explode? Do we see any plans from bankers to give the economy a push? I haven’t. This cartoon showed two farmers fighting for a cow. even for difficult issues. Harrison. However. or . the other pulling her tail and in the middle were two lawyers happily milking the cow. Let’s call this the lesson of the cow and practice it as from today. stimulate free trade because this will create global economic growth. There is no need for banks to earn huge sums in order to pay greedy bankers’ bigger salaries and shareholders higher dividends. Sjaak Langeslag is director of Agriraad. Korea 220-713. the demand for nutrients during the long day period was much lower than during the previous short day period. N. Won Ju. P or . I also see shareholders of several banks bringing cases for compensation to court. the absence of N and . When each nutrient was omitted during long days. Stricter phyto-sanitary requirements based on false arguments are entering the floral sector and reasons for opting out of the governing EU and WTO regulations are created to support the national industries with subsidies. and all those from the next generation. The lesson of the cow Above his desk my father had a cartoon pinned on the wall.nl April 2009 | www. concentration of K at the end of the experiment. and Fred C. the number of flower abortions. N. However. NC 27244. Smith River. P or K did result in a lower . indicating strong reliance on translocated nutrients during these later stages of development. He also is Secretary General of AIPH and president of the Royal General Bulbgrowers’ Association (KAVB) in the Netherlands. make banks return to their core business. Dahlstrom and Watt Farms. reduced. this will help to encourage investment and create jobs. When one of the three nutrients was omitted. “No-shows” increased with increasing temperatures with a significant number being found initially at 18/14°C. Editor note: Complete details on the study procedures.

> FCI In Detail Cryptolaemus adult. However. Pesticides for mealybug Insect Growth Regulators (azadirachtin and kinoprene). as a female can lay up to 400 eggs – one in each mealybug egg sac. neonicotinoid pesticides (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam). For more details on application rates and practical information see the full text of this article on the website of Floraculture International> www.com> services. as is the UC Davis website www. if they have got out of hand.uk Good scouting is the most essential element of an IPM programme so that hotspots can be treated quickly. After this time.com> Services> FCI In Detail. mate. The citrus mealy bug (Planococcus citri) is a common pest of roses and gerbera. People working in crops help spread mealybug. organophosphates (acephate).ucdavis. it is not possible for the Cryptolaemus to reproduce in the rose crop. obscure mealybug and Mexican mealybug) and others (long-tailed mealybug) do not have egg sacs but give birth to live young.floracultureinternational. Cryptolaemus montrouzieri. penetrating oils (neem oil and fine oils). Anagryus pseudococci and Coccidoxenoides perminutus are more suitable if the mealybug populations are low and more widely dispersed. floracultureinternational. if Cryptolaemus larvae are used instead in the IPM programme – the lack of egg sacs is not such a problem as the young Cryptolaemus larvae are voracious feeders and will clean up any type of mealybug hotspot. Mealybug in roses L ow pesticide. it is important to pay better attention to scouting and quarantine methods to ensure that new hotspots are found quickly and action taken quickly.syngenta-bioline. ||| The author has extensive practical field experience in the development of IPM protocols for fruit. The females are oval with a circumference of short waxy filaments around the edge of the body and a central depression along the middle of the back. Male mealybugs are small winged ‘wasps’ that live only for a few days. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are registered for mealybug control (BotaniGard).co. if spider mites are controlled quickly using very high levels (1. they either lay no eggs or only produce more males depending on the species.edu A wide range of pheromones can be sourced from Syngenta Bioline www. For more information see www.com/www. An important predator for mealybug. So it is important to reduce the number of male mealybugs. vegetable and flower crops in Europe and Africa and is Joint Managing Director of The Real IPM Company (Kenya) Ltd (labuschagne@ realipm. then spider mites can be cleared within 8 weeks. They are attracted to the females by pheromones. 20 www. Even entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterorhabditis) offer some reduction in mealybugs which are overwintering in the soil – in flower production areas where temperatures drop in the winter.realipm. It is important to identify the species of mealybug present in the crop because some have egg sacs (citrus mealy bug. Other parasitoids such as Leptomastix dactylopii. so access to hotspot areas should be restricted or work there undertaken at the end of the working day. the grower can use less compatible pesticides to clear the mealybugs. Mealybugs will be expensive to clean up. However. Cryptolaemus larvae. and then die. biological programmes for spider mite control have been blamed for the upsurge in mealybug in Holland and Kenya.com | April 2009 .Crop Protection Mealybugs suck the sap from plants and cause significant reductions in yields as well as being the cause of the black sooty mould which grows on the sugary substances that drips from their bodies. lays her eggs only in mealybug egg sacs – so if the mealybug species does not produce an egg sac.com) by Louise Labuschagne Mealybug bio-control agents The predatory beetle.2 million per hectare) of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus.ipm. Artificial pheromones can be used to lure and trap the males and are available from bio-control companies. But once this investment has been made. Cryptolaemus montrouzieri is the bio-control of choice if mealybug infestations are very high. The female secretes a waxy woolen ‘nest’ into which she lays between 100 to 600 eggs. The Koppert ‘Knowing and Recognising’ Book is a useful reference. botanical pesticides (pyrethrum) and detergents (Savona) – all have a part to play.FloraCultureInternational. If females are not mated.

Low prices beat the competition out of the European market. solid craftsmanship and generations of eager growers have kept it going for this long. please look at our website: www. beating any competition. Prices this low can only be achieved with free heating and a dollar-a-day labour. to be concentrated with a thousand colleagues at a time when distance was an issue. no questions asked on quality and if it sells it is accepted. Decades of innovation. Buyers need to pay in advance to be permitted to buy.jdevries. pests will not become resistant. they are still as mean and lean as ever. this goal was never achieved. all marketed straight out of the container. Their hundred years are over.co. Non-toxic.000 companies survives a hundred years.nl www. hans@jdevries. The auction became the market place where all new species and varieties were found.sbpi. Dutch growers with their costs still rising cannot keep up. They are at the end of their cycle. the Netherlands. Due to the PHYSICAL mode of action. Aphid. What was achieved was a concentration of products. Patents granted in 37 countries worldwide.FloraCultureInternational. I hate to admit that the ever decreasing auction price was the main Dutch strength. Our wholesalers and exporters. Spider Mite. well. Mealybug and Scale PLANT INVIGORATOR Beaten Only one in 50. but always on price. Our auction is fully aware of the fact that there are only two reasons for its continued existence: buyers want low prices. the goal for the founders was to market their quality product as a brand in order to ensure better prices for their crops.com 21 . We have outlived the Belgian and Danish competition where now only a handful of competitive. wherever it is grown on the globe. we were just lucky enough to be close to our vegetable industry. know-how.by Hans de Vries Dust The UNIQUE 3 in 1 Pesticide / Mildewcide / Growth Stimulant Controls important pest species including Whitefly. Whatever the flower. mechanized their facilities and reduced fuel consumption to survive this rat race. Environmentally friendly. low prices attract buyers from all over the world. but as no one wants to pay the highest price usually for the lowest price. Dutch growers raised production. For use on ALL edible and ornamental crops Before After Biodegradable. Starting in 1889. occasionally on quality. Are we better growers. Over the years they have filled every European window sill with potted plants and shipped our flowers to every corner of the world. they are simply the best. specialized companies are left. The current financial crisis and recession have intensified the search for lower prices.uk Hans de Vries is a grower in Kudelstraat. Our horticultural boom has lasted 120 years and this is a true miracle. They are finally closing down. flowers from Africa and potted plants from China and Central America. Today the average life span of a company is less than 10 years. For further information and SBPI distributors. growers want their money. However. it sells from Holland. The hand on the auction clock moves down and our ever growing assortments and freely-communicated.nl April 2009 | www. in exchange the auction roams the world to find them the cheapest product. The fact that low quality reduces tomorrow’s market is ignored. beaten by their own strength. better entrepreneurs? Not really. we could obtain our know-how from just around the corner… and our auction system was superior. sometimes for the highest price.

com Visit us at FlowerTrials® 9 – 12 june 2009 Armada_85x124. NL T +31 (0)13 .mardenkro.armadayoungplants.com Könst Alstroemeria | Nieuwveenjaagpad 93 2441 GA Nieuwveen | T: +31 (0) 172 539925 F: +31 (0) 172 537144 | W: www.5077343 info@mardenkro.com www.indd 1 25-03-2009 12:03:52 .com Konst_85x124. For more information: www. ReduHeat is highly wear resistant and can easily be removed with ReduClean.The ® ReduHeat Effect ReduHeat. n. ReduHeat makes light diffuse which also contributes to an optimal climate and a better crop.nl .mardenkro. ReduHeat effectively re ects heat radiation ( NIR ) with a high transmission of growth light ( PAR ).www.alstroemeria.5077069 F +31 (0)13 . a liquid shading agent applied by greenhouse growers worldwide that choose the very best for their crops.indd 1 ArmadA ad Noordlierweg 18b 2678 LV De Lier . potplants and perennials Supplying high quality young plants and cuttings Offering licences for propagation and production Marketing your varieties worldwide Project breeding exclusively for you 30-01-2009 10:20:42 ng your varieties! Creati Ajania Pacific® White Chrysant Pico® Sancho Dahlia Palm Beach® • • • • • Mardenkro BV Geerstraat 8 5111 PS Baarle-Nassau.The Netherlands T: +31 (0)174-520713 -F: +31 (0)174-510017 info@armadayoungplants.nl Breeding Chrysanthemum and Aster.

ofa@ofa. United Kingdom Four Oaks Trade Show.nl.nl 8 to 9. www.candiangreenhouseconference. Tokyo. Spain Iberflora. China IPM China. www. Valencia. F (86) 21 62780038.ifex. Colombia Proflora 2009.com 23 to 24. Bogotá. www.hortifair.flower.growtecheurasia.greensys2009. Ukraine 4th International Exhibition for Flower Business. www. www. www. T (1) 407 295 7994 F (1) 407 295 1619 info@tpie.com July 2009 11 to 14. Ohio. Germany 15th European Orchid Congress.co 30 to October 4. Intex Shanghai.or.ipm-china. Toronto.com. www. info@keukenhof. info@canadiangreenhouseconference.floralien. The Netherlands International Horti Fair. T (34) 963 861 100. www. www. National Exhibition Centre. T (31) 172 235 400. United States Tropical Plant Industry Exhibition (TPIE). www.ofa.. proflora@asocolflores. London SW3. Ghent.com www. The Netherlands European Pack Trials. Canada CanWest Hort Show. The Netherlands FloraHolland Trade Fair. info@greensys2009. T-30 First Floor. www.nl September 2009 3 to 6. Makuhari Messe. Kiev. T (31) 20 662 2482. United Kingdom Glee 2009. www. F (44) 1477 571314.com 16 to 17. www.org 2 to 4. United States California Pack Trials. T (81) 3 3349 8511. www. China The 11th Hortiflorexpo China. Germany. melvin@hpp. The Netherlands Keukenhof Holland.nl.com.de February 2010 16 to 18.org. International Exhibition & Congress Organizer Ekinciler Cd. India 4th International Landscape & Gardening Expo 2009. com.com. Vancouver.com November 2009 18 to 20. The Netherlands Plantarium. Organizers: Media Today Pvt. www. Germany IPM Essen.fouroaks-tradeshow.org. info@growtecheurasia. The Netherlands FloraHolland Summer Sales. iflora@vsnl. Guangdong Province.floraholland. Mr. www. San Diego Crowne Plaza Hotel Circle. www. Hyderabad. F (34) 963 636 111.net. Necklace Road.com 2 23 14 to 16. T (44) 1477 571392. www.org. Manama. M (91) 9811152139/9312407851.it 11 to 12. International Symposium on High Technology for Greenhouse System.bigs. United Kingdom RHS Chelsea Flower Show. T (31) 55 534 11 40. intexcl@ sh163. Italy Flormart-Miflor 2009 T (39) 049 840 111 www.com 9 to 12. F (1) 418 658 8850.safnow. Ertürk Sk. Israel Agritech Israel.gleebirmingham. British Columbia. F (31) 252 465 565.ngb. Foshan City.com 20 to 22. www.com.salon-du-vegetal. Romania May Flowers Expo.in 7 to 8.nl. T (49) 05207 920607 DOG-Zentrale@orchidee.org 24 to 27. nhfair@kenyaweb.proflora. M (254) 726 629 666. www. Royal Hospital. F (1) 905 945 8643. Riffa Views Bahrein International Garden Show. Ft. Star Expo T (40) 256 431 015 F (40) 256 487 406. Macclesfield. India.com. No:5 Kat: 3 Mehmet Özçelik İş Merkezi. www. Canada GreenSys 2009.fleuroselect.com.org 28 to 31. mediatoday@vsnl. T (1) 418 658 6755. T (1) 614 487 1117. Germany.wffsa. F (81) 3 3345 7929. United States International Plant Propagators’ Society (IPPS) 50th Anniversary Event of the Western Regional Meeting. Moscow.org August 2009 26 to 29.com June 2009 9 to 11. Florida. Japan Floral Marketing Association (JFMA) and Reed Exhibitions Japan Ltd.com 13 to 16. Dresden Exhibition Centre.agritech. T (31) 252 465 555.nl 14 to 19.com.com 3 to 6.net/intexljs@sh163. Contact DOG-Zentrale.mediatoday. T (86) 21 62956677 8367/2131/2132.hortiflorexpo. T/F (254) 50 2020655.ippswr. Kenya Naivasha Horticultural Fair. Belgium Floralies of Ghent. T (49) 201 7244 0.flormart.floraholland. www.com 23 to 26. United States Wholesale Florist and Florist Supplier Association (WF&FSA) Annual Convention & Floral Expo. Turkey Growtech Eurasia. Amsterdam RAI. Birmingham. Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort Phoenix. F (1) 604 574 7773. F (44) 20 8277 5894. www.The Netherlands Euro Trials. info@messe-essen. Antalya. org.canwesthortshow.nl March 28 to April 3.nl 14 to 16. M B Naqvi. 33758 SchloßHolte-Stuckenbrock. Aalsmeer (previously called Aalsmeer Market). www. T (31) 297 344033. Ontario.de October 2009 30 to October 2. Aalsmeer and Westland Region.euro-trials. Malviya Nagar.nl. mediatodaymails@gmail. Essen. Bahrein RVBIGS 2009.be April 2009 | www. Japan Ifex/Gardex.plantarium.net. info@plantarium. Columbus. Flößweg 11.org. T (1) 905 945 9057. Ltd. Nurseries. Tel Aviv. T (44) 20 8277 5813. 34810 Kavacık / Istanbul. Lisse. glee@emap.International Events April 2009 March 19 to May 21. four-oakshort@btconnect. All Russia Exhibition Centre. info@hortifair. www.bh 23 to May 10. www.com January 2010 14 to 16. www. www.org. The Netherlands Flower Trials of pot plants and bedding plants. Khirki Extn. Timisoara.com.flowertrials.com . Florida. Exhibition Grounds. Boskoop.jp December 2009 1 to 3. F (31) 20 675 2326.il 7 to 10.com May 2009 5 to 7. Lauderdale. T (32) 9 241 5090 F (32) 9 221 9817 www. bnelson@bclna.nl 8 to 9. F (31) 55 534 01 68.hpp. F (49) 201 7244 248. www. 19 to 23. www.. Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress.feriavalencia. Canada Canadian Greenhouse Conference. Chelsea. www. CMP lweaver@safnow. United States Society of American Florists (SAF) 125th Annual Convention.com April 2010 17 to 25. Dresden.keukenhof.com 10 to 12. T (1) 604 574 7772.FloraCultureInternational. Arizona. France Salon du Végétal 2010 T (33) 241 79 1417 F (33) 241 45 2905 salon@bhr-vegetal. Horticulture. T (90) 216 425 63 00. F (31) 297 326850.org. Aalsmeer.rhs.org 1 to 3. Korea International Horticulture Goyang Korea 2009. Landscape design and Floristry.kr 20 to 24. New Delhi 110017. www.nl.de. www.org 1 to 4. Orlando.ipm-messe.floraholland.bto-exhibitions. T +973 17558800 F +973 17555513 www. Québec City. feriavalencia@feriavalencia. F (31) 172 235 450. The Netherlands FloraHolland Spring Fair.uk 27 to 28. info@bto-exhibitions. Russia Flowers 2009. F (90) 216 425 63 02. Laura Weaver. F (91) 11 26682045/ 26681671. Aalsmeer.com. United States OFA Short Course.com 1 to 3. California.tpie.

compact growth habit of the semi trailing Endurio is adapted to hanging baskets and bedding. Kiepenkerl. the Delta® pansy series of 32 colours sees the addition of Delta F1 Gold with Blotch and Purple Surprise. In the Westland region the 15 companies represented are Armada.||| 24 www. perennial segment Marc Knof pointed out among the introductions Saxifraga Large White. New in 2010 is the Primula acaulis Suzette Mischung. it is a great opportunity to visit a large number of companies within easy reach of each other and gain an impression of the very latest trends in pot and bedding plants and delivery programs available from a variety of leading Dutch FlowerTrials® tells 22 companies and international companies. the richness and length of the flowering period. The primrose range with 12 series covers a selling season from September to March with the new Daniella F1 Apricot colour added to the Specialities this year. Visitors were also given a glimpse of the new for 2010 Primula acaulis Suzette Mischung with their appealing frizzle type flowers and special colours. Spring perennials traditionally represent a relatively small percentage (<15%) of Syngenta’s spring flowers but their ability to be grown under cold conditions in a period dominated by rising energy costs as well as the reduced growing time due to the early flowering are points concentrating an extensive breeding program. Floranova. The diversity within perennials. ||| Deltini™ is the newest Delta member in four colours. Grower desires to complement their Delta range with unusual.flowertrials. Primula denticulata Confetti™ Deeprose and Pulsatilla vulgaris Pinwheel™. address details and downloadable route descriptions. Florist De Kwakel. Royal Van Zanten. Among the introductions. Selecta and Syngenta Flowers. The website www. Deltini is the newest Delta member in four colours and is adapted to limitations concerning energy and PGR use with the compact habit and plant size requiring low light and space requirements. the new products and delivery programs. visitors were presented with an overview of the Syngenta range of biennials and spring flowering perennials (from both cuttings and seed) suitable for sales between January and April (some products are also suitable for autumn sales). including presentations from six speakers about the trends in cultivation and marketing. very early flowering and intense colours. mKoppe. Hem Genetics.com | April 2009 . the familiar show of large flowers introduced on longer stems in Gessi Pacific Gold. Sahin/Takii/Global Flowers. Moerheim New Plant. all of which have their own characteristics: Colossus has very large flowers on short stems and is heat tolerant for late summer/autumn cultivation.FloraCultureInternational. disease resistance and a quick wrap and clean presentation add to the efficiency features for growers and expand on retail marketing opportunities. Danziger/ Imperial Plants.5 to 12 cm pots. In a fast growing. Beekenkamp Plants/Florema Young Plants. The number of participating companies has increased again this year from 19 to 22. In the Aalsmeer region the seven companies represented are Ball Holland. special colours are accommodated by six varieties in the Designer Collection with Strawberry Cream F1 being the newest introduction. Syngenta’s Calendar Colours® concept depicts the suitable combinations of perennials for each month from February to October. Fides. The venue changes each year. Gessi Pacific Gold. You can also register in advance for all 22 companies or the companies of your choice. The Netherlands The fifth edition of the FlowerTrials® 2009 is being organised for four days from June 9 to 12 (opening times 08:00 to 17:00 hrs). A breeding goal to enlarge the number of special colours and flower forms is also evident in the Harlequin series and the Specialities Little Girls Mix with the plants suited to 7 to 8 cm pots showing semi-double flowers. Gruenewald Young Plants. a flatter. In the greenhouse showcase. was organised for the third year running at the end of February. Sakata.nl offers extensive information on the companies taking part. all three characterised by their hardiness. Combinations. Benary.World News Germany Spring colours The Syngenta Spring Trials in Germany. Variations in plant habit are also appearing in the Gessi luxury series for cultivation in 10. Saxifraga Large White. Confetti™ Deeprose. Kieft Pro-Seeds. Delta signifies a high level of programmability and uniformity across the Colossus®. Endurio® and Deltini™ family members. in 2008 the event was held in Leipzig and this year in Kleve. HilverdaKooij. Florensis.

palms and flowering pot plants. the Princettia Euphorbia 2 . The Best Novelty Gold award was presented to Rudy Raes for the Rubens Primula acaulis 1 . Steven Verhelle has invested in greenhouse lighting and an ebb and flood system to cultivate campanula (starting week 7) for southern Europe. The Silver and Bronze award recognised the new star of Suntory. Tillandsia usnoides from BVBA Vandersteene Favere. BE. and the Helloborus Alexia 3 . The Best Novelty and Best Stand FLORALL award presentations on the Tuesday evening were followed by an informal Meet & Greet reception for exhibitors and visitors. on behalf of the Floralies of Gent. The Autumn FLORALL trade fair will take place from 25 to 26 August 2009. both exhibited by the Dutch young plants company Van der Zalm. coordinates the Spring and Autumn FLORALL events in cooperation with the Belgian Nurserymen and Growers’ Federation (AVBS). rhododendrons. Dimitri Barbe. Young and dedicated. The new Belgian grower group. together with numerous other stands. ||| 7 8 4 5 6 7 8 The FLORALL Best Stand of Talpe Dirk.FloraCultureInternational. Germany and the UK. Gent. Plantas Lobos is the import department of Guy van Hautem’s nursery. Both the family run nurseries and grower groups.plants. The bedding and nursery stock of these winners. a double flowering primrose available in eight colours.1 2 3 4 5 6 Belgium FLORALL showcase Over 270 professional Belgian growers exhibited a wide range of ornamental and arboricultural products at this year’s Spring FLORALL trade fair held on March 3 to 4 in the Flanders Expo. A decorative touch for pot plants. April 2009 | www. Exhibitors rewarded for the professionalism in their product presentation in the Best Stand competition were the duo-stand of the nurseries Talpe Dirk and D&V Plant Production. such as Speciale and BE. service not only the domestic market but also use the logistically competitive location of Belgium to distribute ornamentals into the European markets. flowering from mid-February to April and distinguished from existing double primulas by its compactness. shared the Expo hall with nurseries exhibiting the renowned range of Belgian azaleas. the plants are sourced for regional retail distribution in Belgium. ornamental trees.plants. Silver for Maes-Reyns and Bronze for Deseo.com 25 .

the long lasting colour is an extra plus for landscapers.euro-trials. namely the USA and Japan. ||| Germany Third edition of Euro Trials For the third year running. The trials we have been conducting in Japan are our own initiative after having been very successful with our chrysanthemum garden mums for more than 10 years. a well branched plant habit. look after clearances and transport of complete charters. The website www. the Marisco Hot Mix to join the Cool Mix and the Caprivi White Spoon in the Osteo Line. however. Sorbet XP is described as the ultimate easy-to-grow. heat-loving and has 20% larger flowers in stronger colours than other Zinnia’s of its type on the market.sbpi. Our first opportunity to expand overseas began with requests originating from the USA. Kientzler. in Europe alone. the open days are concentrated in two regions. the initial interest is shown in our fuschias (Jollies series) and lantanas (Tropic Lantanas). introduced to the market for 2009. focus on bedding plants and chrysanthemums. The costs of breeding are high but in the future we do need to have our own breeding division. will give centre stage to Viola Sorbet. early flowering.V. Dümmen. all suitable for placement in sunny or shady positions. but also “small” individual sendings will be handled with extreme care. Brandkamp and Grünewald Plants. all-new small flowered Viola series offering growers complete uniformity.nl Flowerport Logistics B.uk World News Germany Overseas ventures see start of breeding division Brandkamp is a member of the Euro Trials initiative and will be presenting among their novelties the strawberry veined flowers of Recife Strawberry in the Marisco Petunia series. together with our own breeding lines. There is also no need to hide the Coleus Versa away in the shade since the Versa is a collection of Coleus in fascinating colours. In Germany visitors can visit seven companies: Bongartz. The fuschias are recognized for their compact. Geranien Endisch. ||| ” Our services Flowerport Logistics B. particularly if you do not have your own genetics. Bloemenveiling Aalsmeer P.V.flowerportlogistics. we will be running tests on Brandkamp Breeding lines in this new market for a minimum of two years.O. Grünewald Plants. ||| 26 www. is disease-tolerant.indd 1 Flowerport_85x124. both for loose freight and for complete aircraft pallets • Pre-cooling • Competitive rates • Located in the centre of Flora Holland Auction Aalsmeer www. Our young plant distribution.com gives complete information about the participating companies. Nebelung and Westhoff. which has a bright orange-red hue which intensifies outdoors. Organized by the Central Horticultural Association (ZVG) Young Plants section. PAC Elsner. during the last two years a step has been taken in overseas markets.FloraCultureInternational.com | April 2009 . • Handling all customs formalities • Including inspection by plant protection (phyto-sanitary) service • Delivery and distribution aal through the country • Transport and temperature-regulated trucks • Temporary (cold) storage. new to the Zinnia Zahara series for 2010 is Zahara Starlight Rose and Zinnia Zahara Fire. In the Netherlands three companies are represented: Carmel Agrexco. Sorbet XP includes all the top-selling colours in viola plus unique shades and novelties.PLANT INVIGORATOR www. At the IPM Essen. Coleus Versa and Zinnia Zahara. The Zinnia Zahara series. early flowering while the lantanas have a perfect compact habit after pinching and an early and continual flowering pattern. Jürgen von den Driesch further explained how the company’s 50 year history as a European player is changing. Box 364 1430 AJ Aalsmeer Holland T +31 297 349 360 F +31 297 349 560 Flowerport_85x124. Von den Driesch: “The concentration in the Netherlands and Germany of young plant companies incurs risks for those involved.indd 1 13-03-2009 15:35:00 10-02-2009 13:23:53 The Netherlands On show this month Ball’s European Spring Trials from April 20-24 at the Ball Research Facility in Rijsenhout. 10 breeding and propagating companies of bedding and balcony plants will be opening their company premises to visitors of the Euro Trials 2009 for three days in June from the 9th to the 11th (opening times 09:00 to 17:00 hrs).co. their locations and online registration. large leaves and timely. the Netherlands. upright habit and rich. it will be difficult to make a return on the investments.

In making its decision the Court of Law stated that much significance had been given to the DNA tests that were conducted on the plants. Also. stating that Astee’s Gypsophila ‘Blancanieves’ is an Essentialy Derived Variety (EDV) of Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’ The Israeli . Chairman of the Environment Agency.the-hta. In reaching its decision. ||| Israel Two contradicting court decisions regarding Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’ versus ‘Blancanieves’ Abuse of Gypsophila ‘Million Stars’ or not? The story continues. Danziger. In support of the Greening the UK campaign I propose to promote your report to our staff as a topical green issue through our website. The Rt Hon Lord Smith of Finsbury. 2005 the Civil Court in The Hague. The court in The Hague noted that ‘Blancanieves’ differed from the initial variety in a large number of characteristics -17 out of 21 of the characteristics relevant to Gypsophila. the testimony given by the variety examiner from the Council of Breeder’s Rights at the Ministry of Agriculture. ” Since January every council in England has received a copy of the Greening the UK model motion. specializing in matters of intellectual property. Law Office. “Makes you wonder about him being a government employee who testifies on behalf of an interested party on a matter in his line of work. as indicated by the report. determined that the Dutch breeder of Gypsohila Astee Flowers BV had infringed Danziger Dan Flower Farm’s breeder’s rights. as on March 5 the Honourable Judge Anat Baron of the Tel Aviv-Jaffa District Court. whereas the Israeli court based its rulings on DNA tests.uk/greeningtheuk April 2009 | www.com 27 .FloraCultureInternational. court’s decision is interesting because on July 13. highlighting the main tenets of the campaign. states: “The Environment Agency supports the use of planting as part of sustainable development because. CABE Space.. Over 60 MPs signed the Greening the UK Early Day Motion during the last parliament. the Netherlands found that ‘Blancanieves’ was not essentially derived. A further 50% of this planting is never actually delivered by developers and goes un-enforced by Local Authorities. Danziger appealed to the court to issue a permanent injunction against Astee and another grower in Israel. is a derived variety of the well-known Gypsophila variety ‘Million Stars’ bred by Danziger. ” Stephen Tapper. 10 Local Authorities so far have adopted a Greening the UK model motion to encourage more positivity from their planners and 11 more are including it in their Local Development Framework. and issued a permanent injunction against Astee and the other Israeli grower prohibiting them or others from using their variety. amongst others. The court concluded that Astee’s variety is indeed a derived variety. growing and marketing in Israel and other countries. Greening the UK believes that developers have traditionally seen green planting as an expense that can be trimmed rather than a commercially necessary investment.org. The campaign was also endorsed by the Rt Hon Hazel Blears MP in her foreword for the recent publication.UK Wide Support for Greening the UK The Horticultural Trades Association’s (HTA) Greening the UK campaign has received endorsement from key environmental and planning organisations following the publication of its report. the latter’s claims being based on. ‘Local Authorities Commitment to Urban Planting’. prohibiting them from continuing the usage of their variety called ‘Blancanieves’. The Court of Law accepted Danziger’s claims and denied Astee’s claims. said: “The importance of horticulture to sustainable communities should not be understated and through this campaign the HTA are increasing local authorities’ awareness of the skills needed in their planning departments to meet the challenges of sustainability. the Dutch court did not use DNA fingerprinting. since the campaign began. and all recipients have signalled their comfort with it. planting brings environmental and social benefits to communities. Chair of the Planning Officers Society’s Sustainability Committee. with an amenity guide produced by Chris Baines and training sessions designed to help Local Authorities make their areas reach the highest environmental standards. The court also ordered them to submit a financial report in order to determine the compensation due to Danziger for a breach of their rights On making the court’s decision the judge stated that the testimony of the variety examiner. because such exploitation constituted an infringement of Danziger’s rights for the ‘Million Stars’ variety. ||| ” The full report can be downloaded from www. who were represented by the Seligsohn Gabrieli & Co. The Environment Agency. In the coming year the campaign will produce further concrete actions to support councils in tackling this problem. That is why I support Greening the UK and am glad to see many high-profile organisations also lending their support to the campaign. claimed that Astee’s Gypsophila variety which they are propagating. the Planning Officers Society and Design for London have all expressed their backing for the campaign’s aims and objectives. The campaign highlights the 50% reduction in planting on approved planning applications in the last decade. This includes at least 690 councillors at 330 councils.

universities. ||| Carl-Otto Ottosen. Saintpaulia and Euphorbia milii. Aarhus University’s Faculty of Agricultural Sciences is responsible for the workshop entitled “Intelligent use of Energy in Greenhouses” and we invite all to sign in for a presentation or participation at the homepage. consultants and growers from all over the world are invited to meet and exchange knowledge on the future of greenhouses. energy prices.World News Denmark Towards future greenhouse concepts Danish research groups have joined to make a large leap forward in energy saving in the greenhouse industry to meet the challenges of the global change as expressed in the global change summit in Copenhagen in November 2009.com). seven nurseries and a range of national and international companies like Senmatic. In cooperation with several Danish and foreign partners two projects were started by AgroTech in 2007: “Greenhouse Concept 2017” is an innovation consortium financed by the Danish Agency for Science. energy consumption models. Denmark and Janni Bjerregård Lund. Plant physiologists will carry out research involving the two main crops grown by the nursery in question. light emitting diodes for use in greenhouses and novel sensors for control. Both projects are also supported by the Danish Producers of Pot Plants (more information about the projects and partners is available at www. the horticultural sector. Today the total energy consumption is 25 % lower than 10 years ago with the same production. etc. “Intelligent energy handling in greenhouses” is funded by Region South Denmark and the European Regional Fund. thus meeting the demand for a more sustainable food and ornamental greenhouse production. to obtain a sustainable production. AgroTech. of Horticulture. Compared to many other countries this is a success. The first results from the projects will be presented at a international workshop hosted by the University of Southern Denmark in Odense on October 6 and 7 2009 where researchers. New technological solutions and increased understanding of the physiological reactions of plants will be necessary to achieve energy reduction while maintaining plant quality. Technology and Innovation under the Ministry of Science. Southern Denmark and Copenhagen).000 m² for ongoing testing of new technologies.com | April 2009 . Denmark 28 www. Currently. Phillips and Danfoss and LS Svensson and AgroTech. This means that the necessary know-how can be supported by the consortium through targeted research and innovation concerning: collection.FloraCultureInternational. ATS companies (Authorized Technology Service) and other companies are working together to find solutions that potentially can reduce the energy use by more than 50%. This has resulted in a number of larger projects in Denmark involving both research and development and with a wide coverage of funding. This can be done by storing surplus energy from the greenhouse in a subsoil aquifer and by fitting intelligent climate control systems. Dept. • “Intelligent energy handling in greenhouses” focuses on the energy consumption of one particular greenhouse. In the last 15 years researchers. . in order to exploit their climate limits in production. http://energysymposium. Plants are often grown in very static climatic conditions but in reality they can survive and thrive under more fluctuating conditions thereby saving energy. Partners in the two projects in different constellations are the three Danish Universities (Århus. storage and recycling of energy. Researchers and technology companies demonstrate together that it is possible to cut energy consumption by 60%. University of Århus. • Danish research institutes have made great progress in the area of climate technology in recent years and the consortium behind “Greenhouse Concept 2017” comprises leading companies and researchers who have the competencies to face the challenges of sustainable production.ghc2017 . greenhouse curtains with improved light permeability. The facility is expected to be ready in July 2009 and will be presented on a number of occasions including at a workshop and during the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December 2009.dk. but still the sector’s energy consumption needs to be reduced significantly. Greenhouse horticulture sector is under pressure from the huge energy expenses. growers and industries in Denmark have worked together on decreasing the energy consumption.agrproject. regulation and monitoring of production systems and horticultural production. Hjortebjerg Greenhouse I/S will erect a demonstration facility covering 4. “Intelligent energy handling in greenhouses” is also based on weather forecasts.

I have vowed not to talk about bad news but that is getting hard to do these days. the selected winner was Angel’s Love from Bob Larson. growers. You make more corrections and wish that you had not bought such a big building to accommodate your growing needs. Since 1997. Last April. He has been appointed chairman of the advisory board. ||| United States Born in Holland. “The development of Poeppelmann bears a high degree of his handwriting. Angel’s Love has soft pink edges that give the blossoms a blushing appearance when they are fully open. But many of you reading this (thank you) have to make tough decisions about how to manage in these times. employees how it is done. April 2009 | www. “Its introduction is unique in that it breaks from the traditional breeder to grower to wholesaler model of launching a new flower. the managing director for marketing and sales of Poeppelmann Holding GmbH & Co. “It represents a collaboration between the breeder. Wisconsin. Angel’s Love is being grown in Ecuador and is exclusively available through Tradewinds member wholesalers in its first year. but obviously slacking. and built our houses strong to carry us through. on occasion. You make some changes and figure you are fine and that all will be better soon. KG in Lohne (Germany). a member of the Tradewinds International group. Be sure to wear your sunscreen. put our feet up and smile at what we have created. owner and designer with BO-JO’s Creations in Ellsworth. he was managing director. In the early days of a company the owners are often also the grower. The years pass and we feel comfortable enough to hit the cruise control button.by William Armellini Miami Germany Poeppelmann MD retires On February 27. wholesaler and florists to bring a fresh new rose to the public. I speak in the first person because I was an owner for so long that I still think that way. The approximately 500 retail and wholesale florists. Long 60-80 cm stems and a longer-than-average vase life add to the rose’s appeal as both a wedding and cut flower. but now you can barely give it away and the next payment is due tomorrow. also a Where’s the money? Ok. Friedrich Kuehling. Miami is hot! managing director at Poeppelmann. Schmidt joined the company in 1973. designers and rose breeders who attended got a sneak preview of the then. however.com 29 . so please bear with my impersonation of an owner. unforgiving minus sign. Under his management. So you turn the bus around and decide it is time to show those good. emphasizes Schmidt’s merits for the company. I will attempt to talk about some of the realities of the current flower business. paid our dues. He has been one of the main pillars of our success. the Poeppelmann-group with its approximately 1. Today. Florists were invited to suggest names for the new flower and from over 200 entries submitted at the show. History. 2009 Guido Schmidt. NC (USA). Poeppelmann ranks among the leading companies of the plastics processing industry in Europe. janitor and. Whether we like it or not many of us are going to have to reduce our spending to save our companies. named in America Rose breeder Terra Nigra and wholesale import facilitator Tradewinds International have announced the introduction of a new rose called Angel’s Love. william@floracultureinternational. ||| William Armellini has been in the floral industry since birth and works for Greenleaf Sourcing in Miami. he became general manager for marketing and sales. We can be found at the farm. winter. the executive. invoice-writer. driver. However. But then we start to see reports coming in that defy the trend we had gotten so used to. we hire others to do some of the tasks so that we can do less of the grunt work and more of the executive duties. “La-la-la” off we go to the country club or the summer.com. Koehler & Dramm hos” ted the first International Rose Festival and Wedding Design Show in Minneapolis. times that are not like any we have seen before. maintenance man or woman. life is good. So all we can do is look at our business and our personal wealth (or debt) and make the best decisions we can to insure that when we take a look back in a few years from now there is something to see. so the road map is unclear. Growth is no longer measured in plus signs but with that ugly. said Richard Lutes of ” wholesale florist Koehler & Dramm.FloraCultureInternational. shows us that over centuries of commerce people have lost everything and survived to prosper once again. nameless new rose. A lightly scented white rose. This comes at a time when many of us were hoping to ride off into the sunset on cruise control after having put in many tough years. Maybe that boat you bought to entertain customers was a bit much and needs to go. lake or ocean house or we fire up the RV. the company’s development was characterized by a steady growth and an increasing globalisation. the shop or the warehouse early in the mornings and then again late at night. You go back to basics but find that you stayed away too long allowing decisions to be made that now look dead wrong. It operates production facilities in Lohne (Germany) as well as in Rixheim (France) and Claremont.first in last out! But. we move on and if we are lucky the business grows. Schmidt will be active for Poeppelmann.com www.400 employees produces and develops high-tech plastic products for customers in more than 70 countries world-wide. We use the ‘filo’ method . In 1974. Yikes! Ok so where am I going with this? Since I have already moved on to become an employee I am sitting on less assets and therefore need only be concerned that my employer has made sound business decisions. but then it gets worse. retired after more than 35 years with the company. ” Even after his retirement.greenleafwholesale.

The 45-year-old Mr. unwisely did not retaliate strongly or at all because it believed that by not doing anything and turning the other cheek. the terrorist government of Gaza would stop launching rockets. Their products. Yodfat Revivim Horticulture Ltd. Kibbutz Revivim. a public organization which focuses on ICT in elementary and secondary education. 2009. This partnership is for the North American market and does not change the relationship between these two companies in other regions of the world such as Europe. He brings in a wealth of media and communications experience to the Flower Council of Holland. Israel evacuated completely the Gaza Strip. Selecta’s MiniFamous® is the leading calibrachoa series in the market and helped to establish Selecta’s position in North America.com | April 2009 . we will provide the optimal solution to our North American customers. They were warned time and time again but continued to launch rockets. Selecta’s extensive Root & Sell network will continue to supply top quality rooted liners through their existing North American broker group. I believe that when you meant to publish a professional floriculture magazine you did not mean to bringt it into political disputes. Current Selecta Root and Sell stations will remain intact and will continue to offer rooted Selecta genetics through the current broker customers. the army even warned civilians by telephone and flyers before bombing. ” “Selecta is well known for their innovative and quality breeding. Flower Grower-Israel: I read your article in the Floraculture magazine. perennials and pot plants will be available through Ball. Selecta will continue to host customers at their Encinitas Pack Trial location in 2009 and will be showcasing over 50 new products. ||| Hamurabi (2).FloraCultureInternational. Don’t we all miss the good old days when one civilized suicide bomber from Hammas would proportionately blow up a bus or holiday dinner of 30-40 Jews. Winter will be responsible for media relations and external communications on behalf of the Flower Council of Holland and will be based in Leiden. Ball will become the exclusive supplier of Selecta genetics in North America. I think that the past 60 years of peace in Europe has been a blessing but also has given you a simplistic outlook on what a country can put up with. All Selecta unrooted products. Their focus on the grower fits nicely with our overall corporate direction and. Cees Boonman. KG. Mr. The people in southern Israel had a 15-45 second warning in order to take cover. combined with our market-leading service and supply will provide growers with the best vegetative solution for their needs” said . When Israel went out on a massive strike to stop the rockets. Mr. Israel. has announced that Henk Jan Winter has joined the organization as its new corporate communications manager. ||| The Netherlands Flower Council of Holland appoints new corporate communications manager The Flower Council of Holland. Winter is very excited about the challenge of his new job offering him the possibility to work in a more commercial environment. Dust column February 2009 David Efron. ||| Germany/United States Selecta and Ball announce distribution agreement in North America Selecta Klemm and Ball Horticultural Company announce that effective June 1. The Hammas fires rockets from civilian homes (which is a breach of the Geneva convention). When was the last time your family friends or neighbours were shot at? I think you should stick to writing a column about flowers. including annuals. together. What a naïve mistake. Vice President of Ball Horticultural Company. Winter most recently served as editor of Schooljournaal. Dust column February 2009 David Squire.. “We are very pleased to be working with Ball in this partnership” stated Nils Klemm. Chief Executive Officer of Selecta Klemm GmbH & Co. the Palestinians started firing mortars and rockets at Israeli towns. Can you live like that? All the Arabs in Gaza had to do was stop firing and Israel would not have gone out on a massive strike. I am very sorry that not enough of our soldiers were killed but the EU also works that way (see actions in former Yugoslavia) and so does Turkey (where is the self determination of 10 million Kurds?) It seems funny that only Israel is not allowed to defend itself and expected to act as if it is playing a soccer game while defending its citizens. a weekly magazine for professional teachers and as a communications manager at the Kennisnet Foundation in Zoetermeer. Can you imagine living in Boskoop or Gouda and having to worry about your children and spouse all day at work every time a rocket falls. . Instead of building up the economy. We are sorry about civilian casualties but we also will not tolerate unnecessary military casualties on our side. an organization that promotes the sales of floricultural products from the Netherlands on behalf of growers and traders. ||| 30 www. “Ball is well regarded for their strength in distribution and service in North America. the Netherlands. Three and a half years ago. Israel: I would like to protest about the biased usage of your professional floriculture magazine as a platform for political propaganda based on false untruthful arguments.World News Letters to the Editor Hamurabi (1).

Garden&Landscaping Middle East.FloraCultureInternational. More information on the actions programmed by the fair at which Iberflora is taking an active part will shortly be available on the webpage http://www.com 31 . because it suits the climate of the Persian Gulf to perfection. For more information: www. The Russian Ruble has weakened by 35% during the same period. Exports have been reduced by a half in the past few months for some African countries. We can become better. Inc. as well as on its webpage.” • UNITED STATES: The good news echoing out of the economic tunnel is that floral business owners are doing what they have to do to keep moving forward. Trianum increases nutrient uptake. “We can affect positive change. and especially for Spanish producers of ornamental plants and flowers whose supply is of particular interest for buyers from the United Arab Emirates. scheduled to open at the end of 2009. All this means that we can expect a considerable rise in sales. At the same time. commercial and IT occupations. African flower prices have declined by between 30% and 50% during the last five months due to the global financial crisis. high-performance factory in Lithuania at the end of the year. which makes the flower a real novelty. and the industry’s going to emerge stronger on the other side. ||| The Netherlands Deliflor launches Chrysanthemum Zembla Lime Dutch breeder Deliflor has launched a refreshing new Chrysanthemum: Zembla Lime.com/internacional. The new factory in Lithuania. These actions will then be mirrored by Iberflora in favour of Garden&Landscaping.feriavalencia.Spain Iberflora and Garden& Landscaping Middle East join forces Iberflora and Garden& Landscaping Middle East. enhancing the growth and development of roots and above-ground plant parts. the company produced a total of 3. And in addition. the image of Iberflora will be promoted in all Garden&Landscaping catalogues. The white petals have a bright green edge around them. AAF. closed the 2008 financial year with a good result. African flower growers might be pushed out of business if no immediate measures are taken to cushion them from the global economic downturn. Managing director Dr Norbert Siebels commented: “The scarcity of raw materials due to bad weather conditions in the winter of 2007/2008 led to temporary delivery difficulties. This stunning beauty is available as either a disbudded or spray Chrysanthemum.deliflor. The consolidated revenue of the group was 141 million euros. Zembla Lime has been supplied at the Dutch flower auctions since the beginning of March. on the Spring Meeting of SAF’s volunteer leadership. which is set for May 17 to19. Iberflora will also be promoted in Dubai by distributing a range of promotional material. in Duluth April 2009 | www. the global leader in substrate production. The British pound has weakened by 28% over the last year. D. resulting in a 20% reduction in UK imports. In 2008. we will be starting up production at a new.” said SAF President Rod Saline. Trianum increases the resistance of plants to stress caused by diseases. of Engwall Florist & Greenhouses.4 million m3 of substrates and potting soil. The crisis has also seen currencies of two major importing countries of horticultural products depreciating. Twenty five of these are trainees in technical. The leaf-dependent spraying system Canopy Density Spraying.. a member of the jury said. according to The Citizen Correspondent. will increase production capacities significantly. • THE NETHERLANDS: Trianum is a biological plant protection product manufactured by Koppert that was voted the second best product at the 2009 Innovation Awards for Sustainable Crop Protection. Having the same good characteristics as the well-known Zembla. Since last summer we have built up a good stock of raw materials so that we can start the new year optimistically. developed by Plant Research International’s Jan van de Zande took first prize. especially on international markets. It was a sentiment heard repeatedly in Washington. We can survive. The number of employees world-wide remained more or less stable at 964..C. climatic conditions or sub-optimal feeding and watering regimes. Because of the fresh colors. By working more closely together both trade fairs hope to gain a bigger share in strategic markets as Europe and the Middle East. The fair is quickly earning a name as a must-visit event for all players seriously interested in landscaping and gardening. Zembla Lime is very suitable for use in spring bouquets. • GERMANY: Klasmann-Deilmann. is a trade event organized by Epoc Messe Frankfurt. The collaboration takes the form of a reciprocal presence of both trade fairs at each other’s events. 2009 at the International Conventions Centre in Dubai. this trendy variety has a great future ahead of it. Iberflora’s representatives first visited Dubai last year. Henk Jan Lutgert.nl ||| Online • KENYA: Africa’s flower industry is wilting under pressure from the worldwide financial crisis. the international gardening and landscaping event held in Dubai. “Trianum is a fungus which combats a fungus and is special because it is the first biological product to be authorized by the Dutch Board for the Authorisation of Plant Production Products and Biocides (CTgB). have signed an agreement by which both trade fairs will promote each other in their respective markets.

The Fleuroselect Gold Medal for 2010 for innovation in breeding goes to Gaillardia x grandiflora ‘Mesa Yellow’. carrying a load of cut flowers from Kenya. golden yellow flowers. even appearance. 2009 after it had landed and was heading to the cargo terminal.FloraCultureInternational. this first commercial-quality.A on Sunday that Women`s Day was celebrated mostly in eastern European countries especially the Balkan countries like Romania and Bulgaria. Add an excellent garden performance and a long flowering season and ‘Mesa Yellow’ is a truly worthy winner. yellow flowers. yellow Gaillardia from seed is a native of the southern United States. Like the flat-topped mountains (mesas) after which it is named. virginiana ‘Crystal Peak’ and Sanvitalia speciosa ‘Million Suns’ will immediately appeal to growers with their advanced earliness. ||| The Netherlands Cargolux flower jet veers off tarmac at Maastricht Aachen Airport A Cargolux Boeing 747-400. Charter flights and third party maintenance are also operat ||| 32 www. International Women`s Day. The flight landed safely at 08:45 but apparently experienced some problems with its steering which caused it to veer off the taxi route. The variety particularly impressed the Fleuroselect judges with its beauty and abundance of perfect. Antalya Exporters` Associations Chairman Osman Bagdatlioglu told A. impressing from May to the first frosts. This eye-catching new cultivar fits into the popular. novel. excellent basal branching and a longer flowering period. Turkey exported ten kinds of flowers especially carnation and gerbera. Cargolux Airlines International S. The aircraft’s nosewheel was bogged in a grassed area at Maastricht Aachen Airport which has temporarily closed its only runway. trading as Cargolux. veered off the tarmac at Maastricht Aachen Airport on Tuesday March 17. It is one of the largest scheduled all-cargo airlines in Europe with a global network.. An abundance of fabulous flowers makes the varieties perfect additions to fashionable retail displays and excellent container and garden performance will delight landscapers and style-conscious consumers alike. compactness and uniformity. which has brought traditional perennials to a wider market. The sparkling white peak of perfect flowers was impressive all season long and will be a treat for the container market The 2010 Fleuroselect Gold Medal recognising exceptional developments in ornamental breeding has been won by Sanvitalia speciosa ‘Million Suns’. Luxembourg. is a cargo airline based in Luxembourg City. He added that upon the demand of those countries. This new cultivar shone out as a real winner with its abundance of perfectly formed. None of the crew aboard was injured. ‘Mesa Yellow’ has a uniform.A. Fleuroselect has awarded its prestigious Gold Medal for excellence in breeding and beauty to Physostegia virginiana ‘Crystal Peak’. The Fleuroselect judges found the variety to show exceptional compactness. is proud to announce that its prestigious Gold Medals for the 2010 season have been awarded to 3 trendy.World News The Netherlands Fleuroselect announces its 2010 gold medal winners The Fleuroselect organization. ||| Turkey International Women’s Day: Turkey’s flower exports up 20% Turkey has exported 50 million stems of cut flowers to Europe for March 8. the Netherlands. modern range of annual flowering container perennials. In common with the flat peaks.com | April 2009 . He added that they aimed to earn five million USD from the export. It was judged to be an overall superior product for both growers and consumers alike. headquartered in Noordwijk. authorities said. regular. Bagdatlioglu said that Turkey`s flower export for Women`s Day increased 20 percent in 2009 when compared to last year`s Women`s Day. ‘Crystal Peak’ demonstrated outstanding compactness and uniformity in both pack and garden trials and the judges were particularly impressed with its earliness. new cultivars created by the top breeders to suit all segments of the ornamentals market. Gaillardia x grandiflora ‘Mesa Yellow’ Physostegia .

The losses in flower sales suffered by Gazan flower growers are believed to have reached already $3 million.15 1.were planted with the help of Dutch investors.18 0.30 112.287.15 0. .2 -2. Commercial flower growing in the Gaza Strip began in 1994 and 1995 when 50 dunams (a dunam is around 1.523.com 33 .8 -15.1 0.22 4.12 1.2 0.560 -8.50 1. ciation.13 9.040. of the Palestinian Agricultural Relief Committee in Gaza. But in 2007 according to the Beit Hanoun Agricultural Asso.112 -8.79 10.000 m2) with cut flowers –mainly carnations. The Netherlands supports 1.903 -11.70 0.74 Total Indoor Plants Berry/Fruit plants Flowering Plants Bulb/Tuberous Bromelia Cactus/Succulent Green Plants Orchids Palms Ferns Total Garden Plants Tree/Shrub/Climbing Conifers Annual/Biennial Perennial Total April 2009 | www.790 -2.68 2. Santini Cymbidium Cymbidium Mini Carnation Carnation Spray Eustoma russellianum Freesia Double Freesia Gerbera Large Gerbera Mini Gladiolus Helianthus Hippeastrum Hypericum Iris Lilium Asiatic Lilium Longiflorum Lilium Oriental Hybr.533 8.1 -25.6 1.222.200 11.8 0. with some farmers resorting to uprooting thousands of flowers they can no longer afford to grow.35 159. According to the Palestinian Authority.11 0.351 23.4 0.374 -17.16 0.221 -26.60 4.035.8 0.401 8.782.5 0.8 -7.8 0.676 6. The season is almost finished now.24 1.016 1. Solidago Tulip Weeks 1 to 11 (December 29 to March 13. 40 to 45 million cut flowers were exported from Gaza in 2006.259.880 116. Mr Verhagen was satisfied with Israel’s pledge.15 2. three consignments totaling 185.12 0.14 1.62 15.28 3.15 0.9 0.37 0.47 25. ||| FloraHolland 2009 Category Cut Flowers Product Alstroemeria Anthurium Chrysant.26 0.07 0.205.59 1.498.10 6.9 0.36 33.845 -36.31 0.29 0. 2009) Quantity % 09:08 Price ‘09 Price ‘08 29.59 32.198.3 0.0 0.966.612 -11.7 0.28 3.1 0.500 Palestinian growers in Gaza.70 31.14 7. Chrysant.867.67 0.19 32.21 0. costing Gaza’s horticulture sector millions of euros.631 -3.5 million cut flowers. “It shows that cooperation is a viable alternative to violence and terror” he said.1 2.418 -15.24 456.278.2 0.12 15.15 13.993.012.585.9 0.7 0.677.64 2.8 0.1 0.695 -10. farmers in Gaza have been permitted to export just 5.562.7 2.321 -3.7 -22.58 3.18 808.256 -9.416 -32.31 0.FloraCultureInternational.510 26. director .241 -16.19 0.875 -23.191.15 314.9 0.61 0.4 0.8 33.79 3.38 10.553 -31.553.48 1.25 507. Spray Chrysant.923 -10.05 1.143.435 3.536.53 1.8 0.17 1.69 0.279 -32.11 0.612 31.10 0.6 0.11 0.430.9 -8.39 0.21 1.564335 -20.389.882.62 1.074.675 74.30 91.037.13 1.3 -8.4 0.639.145 7. The hostilities had put a stop to all exports.8 -9. It is nothing.632.14 0. Their fruit and flowers are exported to the Netherlands via Israel and auctioned at Aalsmeer.25 0.203.17 21.186.78 2.1 0.903 33.86 2.884.132 13.543.6 0.441 7. see the move merely as “propaganda” According to Abdel-Karim Ashour.Prices Israel Israel opens Gaza border crossings for cut flowers In Brussels Israeli minister of Foreign Affairs Tzipi Livni has assured her Dutch counterpart Maxime Verhagen that Israel will open the Gaza Strip’s blockaded borders for Gaza grown export carnations until the end of the growing season in May.275.58 171.0 -25.8 -21.753 5.38 0.980 39.088.319.14 0.9 0.000 carnations have been exported since hostilities erupted between Gaza and Israel earlier this year.19 0.074 -21.277 48. Although the situation is often tense. ” The closure of the borders and the recent war have had a negative impact on Gaza’s commercial flower industry.4 0.239.6 -20.2 0.39 16.19 0.564 207.20 0. Palestinian growers.332.125.35 0.174.238 -9.027. however.41 9.281 -20.837 1.13 0.28 0.19 12. “What happened is only propaganda.20 45.3 -17. representing more than 3 per cent of all exports from the Gaza Strip.94 2.40 0. if the security situation allows.2 -0.53 0.064.031.88 1.39 0.97 1. Limonium Rose Large Rose Small Rose Spray Cut green and Decorat.21 0.812 -6.310 5.

com Beddingplants Chrysanthemums Brandkamp GmbH In der Flora 6 D-46419 Isselburg-Anholt Tel.de www.de Moerman_114x92.www.indd 1 16-09-2008 13:49:54 13-03-2009 15:31:33 Stalplast_178x60.indd 1 16-02-2009 12:26:42 .brandkamp.: +49 2874 91 36-0 Fax : +49 2874 91 36-22 info@brandkamp.indd 1 Brandkamp_54x124.floracultureinternational.

or even wanted. advise them with branche information.nl) April 2009 | www. At a later date. “one look and feel” also has a tremendous impact since combined budgets give more room to develop unique and distinctive stands or presentations. that a stand or presentation at a trade show or in the auctions is not. for example through a display of lifestyle arrangements depicting the available colour combinations or packaging options..com 35 . however. The practical advantages of working together include: an ability to present trade and retail with a wider assortment and hence a “one-stop” shopping address. buyers have to be stimulated and their senses aroused to remember the experience. The Group of 6 lily companies is supported by professional advice from Flora Holland Connect.FloraCultureInternational.Lifestyle Marketing Pascal Koeleman (pascal@2dezign.borninholland. dripping with gold. trader and retailer sees when visiting the numerous locations and trade fairs. but still desirable lifestyle feeling. The essence of being different cannot be underestimated but it is not always easy at a trade show…unless of course. once the same feelings have been spread among their consumers. Similarly to the other branches in the trade it is important that our commercial profile is professional. making the products distinctive among the many flowers and plants that every buyer. It is critical. dictating how a company or group presents itself to their potential clients and the rest of the world. 2Dezign is responsible for visualising the common strengths of the Group to the outside world and have designed a unique lifestyle stand and little flyer to show the strength of the group. Zentoo and Dutch Creations are other successful marketing cooperations. Then the lilies certainly would stand out from the rest of the exhibits! Although the latter may not be possible..nl) and Rudi Tuinman (rudi@2dezign. and support them with the direct sales. a real mark of high level marketing. In the first instance. to professionalise their activities on trade fairs. (www. the emphasis has to be placed on creating recognition through a professional and attractive experience that is different from the rest. On the contrary. so to say.nl) Working together. as the Lily Group would say. Of particular importance is the unique image which can evolve from cooperation. when stepping out into the public arena. This is explicit in becoming distinguishable from the majority and the only means to build a reputation for high quality. Working together is a must in today’s market. By coupling the common strengths of individual businesses there are many advantages to be realised in various areas. widespread recognition and demand relies on visitors experiencing a more attainable. you participate in a lingerie event. trading relations can be reinforced. the assortment can be expanded to incorporate added value concepts giving extra inspiration.

foliage and hypericum from South Africa. provided the cool chain requirements have been >>> Credit: A. although solidago. This is mainly due to the availability of regularly sailing ships used by banana exporters. At the same time. last year his company handled more than 200 containers with protea. some not. “There is nothing revolutionary about it. gypsophila and phlox can also be found on board. Jeroen van der Hulst.Cargo With increases in fuel prices and a slowing economy worldwide.” Mystery Horticultural fresh produce is not new to sea freight2 and in theory almost all flower types can be transported by sea container. the flower industry is showing increasing interest in sea freight distribution which in some instances can reduce freight costs by up to 50%. commercial manager. “We are not seeing a downturn in our shipments of cut flowers.P. different types of cut flowers can be kept in good condition for several weeks. As cut flowers are relatively light in weight. waxflower. Foliage accounts for 85% of the sea freight.FloraCultureInternational. According to Don van der Meer. Existing quality problems with roses such as botrytis.com | April 2009 . Cooled at the right temperature. Also Oudendijk Import has been a major force behind the development of sea freight distribution of cut flowers and foliage. A number of reasons can be given for the failure of some of these projects. leucadendron. Jason Breakwell. Some have been successful. managing director FlowerWatch. manager Oudendijk Import. a leading provider of quality assessment systems doesn’t understand the mystery surrounding the sea freight distribution of cut flowers. hi-tech and pharmaceutical sectors. Sea freight on the rise A lthough industry professionals are hesitant to share data on volume. by Anabel Evans and Ron van der Ploeg On the road Rutges Cargo is a European truck operator with integrated logistics solutions for the international air-cargo industry. The changes in air cargo schedules as airlines are hit by the economic downturn are seen as the reason for the road feeder network becoming more important. Israeli growers too. Moller – Maersk 36 www. In fact our attention to procedures when handling vulnerable shipments has increased our business in this sector year on year. some African growers have performed several pilot projects. Five to ten containers of hypericum. comments that Rutges has received more enquiries in the first two months of this year from the horticulture and fresh food sectors than in the same period in previous years. gypsophila and carnations are exported out of Ecuador and Colombia to the EU by sea container each week. perishable. the lower frequency of the direct cut flower connections forcing shipments to various other airports and a second transfer to the final destination. cut flower exporters such as Holex Flower1 access North America via main shipping routes from Rotterdam to New York and Montreal. export their ornamentals by boat. they can be added to the heavy loads of bananas. In the Netherlands. downy mildew and poor temperature management are the biggest logistic challenges to be overcome. Portugal and Ecuador. Breakwell says. mainly from South America and East Africa for western Europe. in 2008 more flowers than ever have definitely been transported by sea freight.

” What is your opinion on cost reduction? “It is strongly dependant on the transport route. but also for an importer. Secondly. But you also have to calculate the consultancy and guidance costs which you need to make this work.Over the Sea Oudendijk’s new International Logistic Centre in Ecuador. A 40ft container contains about 180. you need a lot of guidance and coordination to make it successful That means that if you compare rates between the air and shipping lines. Firstly.com 37 . Area Reefer Manager for Sub Saharan Africa. Maersk Line to enter Ethiopian exports: Attracted by the growing horticulture sector in Ethiopia. Most airlines fly a specific route each day.” What are the limitations of sea freight? “Sailing schedules. We have found that in a lot of cases flowers coming out of containers giving at least equal if not more days of vase-life than flowers out of airfreight. Thirdly. “This will enable the exporters to reduce transportation costs by shortening the chain between the producers and final destinations. The cold store and business premises (including offices and a canteen) are operational for growers requiring logistic services. Another disadvantage is the amount of boxes to be shipped at once. Maersk.” What are the advantages of sea freight? “Firstly an unbroken cool chain from farm to customer. you see that some retailers value the ‘green’ image sea freight has. Colombia and Kenya.FloraCultureInternational. Which shipping routes are you using for the trials? “Ecuador.” says Ian Fairlie. FloraHolland’s Martien de Ruiter sets out the current status of the sea freight projects at FloraHolland. the advantage of a flower shipment from Kenya to the Netherlands is smaller than a shipment from Colombia to the Netherlands. You need to control the cool chain better in that case. April 2009 | www. is to introduce horticulture sea freight to Ethiopia. Secondly. That’s a lot of stems to be handled at one moment in time. In most cases a sea vessel only leaves once a week. Since 2006 the Aalsmeer Auction has been involved in its own sea transport project. For the trade this means a approach at order moments and for the expected time of arrival. not only for a grower. sea transport is not a ‘done deal’. We believe in consolidated loads.” International logistic centre in Ecuador: Oudendijk Group opened a new logistic centre last year at San MateoParque Commercial Park (about 2 hours north of Quito and 3 km from their own hypericum farm). FloraHolland participates in sea freight pilot projects: In 2005 FloraHolland became involved for the first time in sea transport when it participated in the Maersk Starflower project.000 rose stems. This means that you can control the quality of the flowers better. but that brings new logistic challenges in countries like Kenya and Ethiopia. you will find that there is potential benefit. one of the top shipping lines in the world with over 325 offices in 125 countries. the cost advantage is important.

The airline is now flying 2 Boeings type 747 and 2 type 757s. Van der Hulst adds. Cargo terminal Addis Ababa 38 www. told Mr Gebremichael Biwota. is the launch customer of the next-generation Boeing B747-8F. New MD11 freighters: Furthermore Ethiopian Airlines has purchased two MD11 freighters that can load up to 85 tons per plane. He said it would not take more than two years to finalize the project and make the new facility operational.” Packing and stacking How the cut flowers are packaged and stacked in the reefer containers also impacts the quality of the flowers on delivery. In addition it is an ideal meeting place for flights from Europe. Director Cargo Marketing. The best way to maintain the cool chain for perishable products is having a limited number of links. The first plane has taken off in February this year. Vice President Commercial. KLM Cargo party to Chicago project: The Air France Cargo – KLM Cargo network covers over 350 destinations in 175 countries worldwide. Most flower growers for example tend to use the standard air freight In the Air Ethiopian Airlines responds to Ethiopia’s economic expansion: In May 2006 a new facility was made operational (handling goods coming from the horticultural industry as well as the meat and textile sector and considered to be one the most sophisticated facilities in the continent). Van der Hulst identifies temperature monitoring and control.com | April 2009 . The sea freight of cut flowers includes only three links: grower. which is very important for the shipment of nondurable goods. The design for the new building is finished and commented on by different parties like USAID. O’Hare Airport wishes to reinforce its function as a global airfreight distribution centre. The logistics centre for flowers at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport. There is a capacity for 500 boxes in a 40-foot container. One weak link causes disruption of the cool chain and means quality loss. Mr Busera Awel. direct access is provided to and from the most important trading centres in Europe. Chicago’s central location simplifies national distribution. based in Luxembourg. the construction process will commence. The reefer controls the temperature. The first aircraft will join the fleet in the second half of 2010. KLM Cargo (together with FloraHolland) will also be part of the group of companies providing specific logistical know-how in the field of floricultural products to develop a new logistics centre for flowers at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport.” says Van der Hulst showing us a textbook for horticulture from 1986 in which all varieties. If all goes according to plan the new logistics centre will open in 2010. will be part of an updated Cargo Section. From the main hubs: Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. refrigerated container (reefer) and receiver. “But the boxes should be designed to withstand the humid conditions. As soon as the construction plans are approved by the airline itself. the company has 13 of this new generation aircraft on order. Cargolux Airlines International setting new standards4: Cargolux Airlines International.FloraCultureInternational. ventilation and humidity during transportation. FloraHolland and a delegation of the Dutch Embassy. corresponding temperatures and shelf life are listed in detail. starting when the product is harvested on farm. Dry packing is the most common. as critical: “Our FlowerWatch program3 aims to maintain the cut flowers at a temperature of 1°C. The current growth in exports demands another expansion. estimates the building to begin in the second quarter of this year. Asia and South America. which will be even more fuel-efficient and produce lower noise disturbances to communities surrounding the airports where Cargolux operates. The second MD 11 will be touching the sky by July 2009. which is not possible with air transport. This will bring the total of freight aircrafts to 6. to optimize the road feeder network several regional hubs also exist. plus 10 purchase rights and 2 options. The aim is to have 4 MD11s and 3 Boeings 757 available in the coming 5 years. the world’s second busiest airport with an annual passenger turnover of some 75 million.Cargo rigorously taken into account.

faster realisation of a broader assortment becomes possible. his motivation for sea freight is based on quality. trade. At this moment the feasibility of the first Trade Park in Germany is being examined. the higher the current air freight rates. There would be a number of advantages gained as a result of this increased logistical efficiency: more profit could be realised. there would be better opportunities for isolated areas. And yes. where at present these are still frequently transported apart from each other. The European growers can provide their products by means of the Trade Park while the Trade Park offers them the opportunity to reach a larger European consumer group. Van der Meer finds this plea regrettable. pg 12 Sea freight gathers momentum FCI October 2007. is to facilitate the Trade Parks by acting as the landlord of the premises. the FloriLog project reached completion at the end of last year. delaying the release of the containers on arrival. processing. if I have to buy flowers for my wife I would prefer flowers that have travelled a long way under the best cooling conditions to flowers which were quick to arrive. trade parties and exporters. Much depends on the size of the company. they would also be able to maximise their haulage efficiency by combining freight. says that his company has reported significant cost savings of up to 50% by using sea freight. Errors in the crop protection system at the flower farm can lead to a higher incidence of botrytis in roses. quality and control) added value can be created within the logistical processes. pg 44 Setting new standards April 2009 | www. Van der Meer agrees when he says. between which the routes are changing constantly.” Disappointments The sea containers are a standard size and can guarantee pre-programmed environmental conditions. To receive sufficient volume for a Trade Park it will be necessary to build an international network of growers. Still the success rate is not 100%. In the past lots of things have gone wrong. By plane you can always try out a small shipment sending it by post. the more opportunities a country has. in this case sea transport should not even been considered. air freight from Ecuador is currently US$1/ kilo more expensive than from Kenya. European flows could be integrated with local flows. Nevertheless.” According to Van der Hulst sea freight of cut flowers may have huge potential in the near future. Unlike air transport try outs with sea freight are much more complicated. At this moment logistic services are still too much of an isolated activity. the leading shipping company Maersk Line serves 20.Engelbart@Rijnconsult. “We are convinced that for specific products sea freight is a better alternative to air transport. This project aimed to answer questions as to how the ornamentals sector can strengthen its European retail marketing activities by both integrating and anticipating domestic and imported sources and thereby facilitate international logistics. direct routes and available vessels. in addition to the quality control. “There is a strong track record of successful shipments. These Trade Parks offer good chances to service multi-channel markets.vanNuland@Rijnconsult. It has nothing to do with sea freight. distribution. are organized but do not always run as smoothly as at the airports. The very best option would be to use 5 layer cardboard boxes. (Frank. “The limited volumes definitely play a huge role. In total. “It’s all about quality nothing more nothing less.000 ports. collection. Big volumes also demand big buyers who are able to handle and sell a huge quantity of flowers in a short period of time. six to nine Trade Parks are envisaged in Europe. To put this into some sort of perspective. Within the framework of ‘Greenports Netherlands’ it is also being examined if transport by train can be started up.nl) 1 2 3 FCI January 2008. unfortunately quick to wilt. which are unsuitable for sea freight because they lack air circulation and strength. pg 36 Sea freight distribution FCI April 2008. Started in 2005. and also.000 flower stems trial shipments are much more difficult to perform. In my opinion the number of products. manager Oudendijk Import. cut flowers are relatively new to most shipping companies and the limited volumes currently involved do not allow any demands to be put on the shippers with regards to transport times or whether there is a direct route or a trans-shipment involved.nl / Arjen. in the Netherlands. import. Don van der Meer.” Quality In some cases the costs of transportation by sea freight may be up to 30% to 50% lower than by air freight. pg 14 Temperature and Teamwork are keys to Quality 4 FCI April 2008. the more streamlined volume flows would give new techniques such as multi-channel marketing a greater chance. By introducing these locations there would no longer be the necessity for exporters and wholesalers to independently rent spaces. You cannot simply decide one day or another to transport your flowers by boat and then just wait and see what happens. By bringing logistics together into a European network of Trade Parks along with other activities (such as commerce. the right product. sourcing and other auction tasks. The procedures surrounding phytosanitary inspections can be a lengthy process. Oudendijk Import finds itself in the luxurious position of having its own breeding company for proteas. standard clearance procedures at ports for example.” Van der Meer has noticed a difference in the transport stress tolerance of cultivars.com 39 . but with 200. It frequently happens that products which have travelled two days by plane show much more damage than those transported 14 days by boat. packaging. The Trade Parks will also permit clusters of European traders to cooperate in the matter of assortments and sales actions. “Not only growers but breeders as well are critical to the success factor.boxes. Firstly. In general. More shipping companies would be more than welcome.” Facing disappointment after disappointment with flowers transported by sea.” ||| Is FloriLog for you? by Frank Engelbart and Arjen van Nuland. The Trade Parks offer the possibility of creating economies of scale at an international level. for example. quality and quality. In this context. A logical role for the auctions. a group of Dutch buyers at the FloraHolland auction will be pleading for a note at the clock front saying ‘sea freight’ when flowers transported by sea pass in front of the clock. Now lots of parties are acting on their own instead of cooperating with each other. destinations and routes will increase in the next few years.FloraCultureInternational. The open character of this proposal offers the chance for everyone to participate who wants to. Secondly. marketing. Breeders and growers will have to work together more and more in selecting the most adequate cultivars for sea transport.

However. ecological and organic products for the garden. chairman. by Marie-Françoise Petitjean (mf. as well as organic hygiene and beauty products and the “Café Philo”. where few other alternatives to mechanical or heat weeding can be proposed. PVC and conventional light bulbs. persons and pets. Botanic’s vision is that sustainable development is a long term orientation that every citizen and economic stakeholder has to embrace. Jean-Marc Riva confirms “the pact orientates our whole purchasing policy.FloraCultureInternational. all chemical crop protection agents were withdrawn from the shelves B and replaced by alternative natural products. when necessary.” says Jean-Marc Riva. like Truffaut. In 2007. Nevertheless. since most gardeners lack knowhow on crop protection. Botanic wants to play a role in this dramatic change in production and consumption.Botanic. Points of sale have been enriched with new organic food markets. but the challenge seems to have been taken up. Botanic promotes Fair Flowers Fair Plants (FFP) certified flowers. This was a risky decision. “Today. product policy. following the initiative of a handful of growers and the French garden centre . objective 100%” all food products sold. Our commitment has also led to us increasing our regional supply. are now following Botanic’s tracks by publishing their own mission statement under the motto “Plus belle sera la terre” (for a smarter earth) and a set of 8 commitments of which preferentially sourcing MPS or organic certified plants. purchase manager.” If other garden centre chains initially expressed scepticism regarding this initiative. This commitment to sustainability forms the subject of Botanic’s strategic pact. must be organic. when Botanic created “eco-gardener” corners at their points of sale to advise customers on alternative protection methods. Through their motto: “towards a new way of living”. including herbs and garden plants. Since its inception in 1995. In 2008. points-of-sale. they also stopped sending paper publicity in the mailbox and they phased out the sale of chemical crop protection agents and fertilisers. where consumers are invited to participate in debates while enjoying organic and fair-trade food. Botanic express their intention to push and accompany consumers in this change. coffee and tea.” says Luc Blanchet. Botanic is also working towards phasing out all products using disposable batteries. we have worked out alternative solutions with our suppliers. All product lines must prove themselves to have been produced in an environmental and socially responsible way through accredited certifications.fr) 40 www. a three year action plan comprising four objectives and 25 practical and measurable commitments covering all components of the business: supply. France turns Green Retailers: Botanic leads the way “towards a new way of living” otanic is a chain of garden centres with 62 points of sale in France and two in Italy. it is now becoming a hot issue that is generating a number of initiatives in the ornamental industry. like wood. with points of sale preferentially using natural material. house. while setting up new sourcing. several. logistics and communication. Under “objective 100% of the pact. and some positive government policy. as long as we propose practical solutions. Ornamental plant suppliers have been given three years (until 2010) to embark on the MPS ABC environmental monitoring scheme.France Awareness of sustainable development has been slower to emerge as a major society expectation and market demand in France. a focus has been put on environmentallyfriendly options. “Except for weeding. under “objective zero”.com | April 2009 . the French are ready to change their behaviour and adopt more responsible consumption patterns. sustainability was really established as a corporate strategy in 2005. For imported flowers.petitjean@orange. We are first and foremost accompanying our present suppliers in our action. Botanic passed a major milestone by publishing their mission statement to be the first alternative network of shops for natural.

Hortitouraine. which proves that we are on the right track. This is pushing us to accelerate the implementation of our strategic plan by developing agreements with a network of growers able to grow Vivenat according to our strict specifications. Firstly.com . Several companies are moving to organic production. French AB organic certification. Last but not least. Production. mainly roses from developing countries.000 plants for the first year. Plants are grown in plugs and packed in a natural wooden crate coming from local sustainable forest. several mass marketers as well as a large number of independent florists. proximity and seasonality. most of them from the nursery stock sector. Among a wide set of measures covering all economic fields. especially garden centres. We recently had the opportunity to buy an adjacent farm devoted to organic production which enabled us to grow our first organic crops right away without waiting the prescribed three years to get the official. owner of the company. A handful of growers joined from the beginning. seeds and potting soil are also organic. In 2007. We have scaled up our production plans from 200 to 500. depending on the weather. MPS has 80 French members representing around 12% of the French. Hortitouraine is growing 6 million bedding plants and garden plants in central France on a 7 ha operation.” says Jacques Gauthier. “We will not market the product before April 10 to 15. who won the “Bronze Innovert® Award” for their Vivenat® concept. Two of them introduced their concepts during the Salon du Végétal.” Fair trade: cut flowers on the forefront Two international programmes are actively promoting fair trade flowers. farm gate value of production and is by far the most established eco-label. there are also four or five other companies committed to the national Good Agricultural Practice (FARRE) scheme or ISO 14001. Jacques Gauthier wants to stick to natural seasonality. there was no clear market demand. The response from all major retailers. Government policy T he government is actively working on a legal framework for sustainable agriculture. Today. by 2012 all pesticides considered worrying will see their >>> 41 April 2009 | www. to maximize chances of success in the garden. some growers go for organic I n 2000 MPS pioneered environmental management in floriculture in France. especially in the field of garden plants and herbs (aromatic plants). the French government organised the “Grenelle de l’Environnement”. the conclusions and recommenda- tions from this initiative have led to the Grenelle 1 law that has just been approved by the French Parliament.FloraCultureInternational. Max Havelaar is present at Truffaut. has been enthusiastic and goes beyond our expectations. “Growing organic was in our plans for several years. A network of growers is the condition to fulfil the high demand while staying consistent with sustainability and the ‘locally grown’ option. FFP flowers are now sold in 114 florists and retail shops. and Taugourdeau Plantes & Plants. every aspect of the Vivenat concept has been reviewed for sustainability. but the growers association FNPHP anticipated MPS would become inescapable and in 2001 took the initiative to have a French pilot group established in order to get a scorecard adapted to local conditions of production. a wide-ranging discussion involving all stakeholders. two will directly impact on horticulture. packaging. The concept does not include any full-colour labels or facings and consumers are invited to visit the Vivenat website to download growing information. At that time. amongst these are the Botanic and Le Bouquet Nantais networks.Production: MPS recognized by the market.

or the Var region (French Riviera) for cut flowers. quality of air and water. The market is mature. What used to be an opportunity in the past has today become a weakness : the increasing concentration of buyers.France A depressed market French production covers 22 000 ha. consumers would reduce the frequency of purchase. The scheme will cover biodiversity. Garden centres and florist networks are gaining market share at the expense of traditional florist shops and street vendors. Because consumption markets are nearby. with a 3. makes it difficult for a single grower to serve the distribution market and has so far led to an increase in imports. France is a partner in the Green City campaign destined to be an important issue for the political decision-makers. The first Purchases of flowers and plants in France is linked to special events or public holidays. Beyond this structural feature. of which 1 900 ha covered • Value of production at farm gate: 1 769 € million 92 M 5% 207 M 12% Nursery stock Pot plants Bedding plants 670 M 38% 21% 376 M Cut flowers Bulb and others figures for 2008 seem to confirm the decrease. while cut flower consumption is more under pressure. while 28% go to retailers (garden centres. be they supermarkets or florist networks. it will be followed by a list of 20 others. 63. and to which level. the majority of growers have developed short distribution channels: 26. Discussions are being held to see how. as we have already seen take place in the organic food sector. But uncertainty is high on market perspectives. This could have the pernicious effect of increasing imports. but then opt for a product with a potential longer lifetime. ||| Continental France. fertiliser and water management and energy consumption. both in terms of purchases and the number of buyers. mostly from Dutch exporters. the increasing demand for Mediterranean plants is profitable to Southern European countries. According to some analysts.60 % Terraces and balcony 27. made a strong and successful lobby to ensure that trees and plants are expressly mentioned in the law as a means to improve the environment. These lists are presently being discussed at European level. even if we cannot yet talk about a concerted national action plan. The Landscapers Association. production is facing hard time.1% decrease in outdoor plants purchases (7.7 826. The HVE scheme should not replace existing schemes.1 billion for flowers and indoor plants and € 827 million for outdoor plants. like Italy and Spain. Nevertheless. Secondly. The Grenelle law has also been seen by the sector as an opportunity to stake a claim for the value of plants in public amenities. health and social cohesion. Key figures on French production: • Number of growers: 6644 • Area under production: 21 798 hectares. are on the rise.5% for cemeteries (all saints chrysanthemum or Erica) and 18 % for own use. All these initiatives lead to more sustainable horticulture. but it will also create challenges for growers as demand and retailers’ action develop faster than production. Some region. This is not good new for a sector desperately looking forward a good season. Garden Outdoor plants 66.com | April 2009 . existing schemes like MPS will be benchmarked as growers want to avoid piling-up multiple certifications. phytosanitary usage. bedding plants. France1 is the third consumer market in Europe. however with a higher difference between the drop in quantities purchased and purchase value. several regions lead the way.9 412.8 million with overseas territories 42 www.9 billion. UNEP. within the same timeframe 50% of farms should have embarked on environmental certification.4% in quantities).6% of flowers and plants are sold directly to the consumer and 6% to florists. mainly attributable to the last 3 month crisis. 1 approval withdrawn.10 24% 424 M Source : VALHOR 2008 Companies are mostly family owned farms.40 2069. 16% to wholesalers and 12% to landscapers or public authorities. mostly in pot and bedding plants (45%) and nursery stock (38%).FloraCultureInternational.2 -5. PURPOSE OF PURCHASE Own use Flowers / indoor plants 17.6% decrease in indoor plants (-5. who represent 54% of the purchases against 28. proximity and sustainable practice. with high-value presentation. with an average of 4000 m² of covered crops and 3 ha of nursery stock. Thus. with more expensive container items than bare root plants for the garden. These short outlets explain t he absence of consolidation (less than 10% of production is marketed to growers organisations) and specialisation. low price and “life-style” high value products. bulbs and rose bushes are down.90 % Cemetery 5. like the Loire Valley have taken the measure of the threat and are working on an action plan to build on comparative advantages. Consumption is estimated at € 2.50 % Garden centres and growers have initiated discussions on how to revive consumption. which could indicate a higher average price per purchase. A DECLINING CONSUMPTION With 62 million inhabitants.30% in quantities) and 2. after Germany and the United Kingdom. service and sustainability. supermarkets or DIY stores). while conifers. with a slightly decreasing trend consumption patterns for more than 5 years. like Phalaenopsis.6 -3. of which € 2. Ornamental shrubs.70 % Gift 53. The first level comprises an obligation of means (good practice) while level three incurs an obligation of registration and result. This is especially due to the balcony and terrace segment. like quality of quite bigger plants that the common offer from Northern Europe.50 % The picture for outdoor plants is comparable. This creates an exciting challenge and a chance for growers and garden centres in search for the perfect combination: a trendy AND sustainable AND value for money plant.60 -2. Although widely disseminated over the whole country. with three levels up to the governmental “High Environmental Value” (HVE) certification. and a number of initiatives to respond consumers’ demand are taking place in the field of marketing. A first list of 30 active ingredients has already been published. the drop in quantity is higher than the drop in expenses. Growers in ornamental horticulture fear that this policy will lead to phytosanitary deadlocks in the protection against harmful organisms. Development has taken place for flowering plants. like Pays de la Loire for pot plants and nursery stock. small fruit (berry shrubs).30 -7.70 % Cemetery 28. This could be a new opportunity for ornamental products. as the consumer is presently divided between conflicting expectations of nature and sustainable development. Quantities Change (M €) (%) Value (%) Change (%) Flowers / indoor plants Outdoor plants 182.

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with the aim building communication and creating learning opportunities for themselves and others in the industry. Its core membership consists of cut flower. create a professional community for growers to exchange knowledge and judge the potential of new market opportunities. SAFEC’s prime function is to promote South African cut flowers to overseas markets. Russia. Argentina and China taking place last year. SAFEC itself sponsors its members on outward missions with trips to Poland. SAFEC’s outward missions are funded by DTI. in 1999 SAFGA established the South Africa Export Council (SAFEC) a separate nonprofit organization falling under the umbrella of SAFGA. In this case. a horticultural consultant for cut flowers and bedding plants. a non-profit organization. SAFGA also liaises with the Department of Agriculture on factors affecting growers.” Responding to technical queries from members. This could involve linking importers with growers.com) SAFGA Grower’s Day held at Safropa Farm in northern South Africa.South Africa The South African Flower Growers’ Association (SAFGA) . Communication SAFGA employs several communication methods to achieve its objectives. serves as chairperson of SAFGA. such as policy changes and labour matters. Duif says.” Last year SAFEC members visited importers in Spain who are interested in proteaceae and chrysanthemums. Bergflora is one of South Africa’s top export companies. His vice-chairperson at SAFGA is Jac Duif.za) became operational. the South African floricultural industry is small achieving export sales of R524 million (€41 million) in 2008. René Schoenmaker. soil types and spraying programs. (Photo by courtesy of ‘Undercover Farming’) 44 www.com | April 2009 . They do this by putting members in touch with relevant consultants. On their return. “The trend is that growers of good quality product are now selling directly to wholesalers and bypassing the auctions. and appointments with interested parties set up by consulates and embassies. together with the South Africa Export Council (SAFEC). In mid-2008 its website (www. An indicator of the success of these missions is that importers from Spain and China have since visited South Africa to continue negotiations. SAFEC shares contact details with their members to follow up. Exporters. Compared to some other industries represented at TESA. Key members in the mix are Multiflora. non-members and international parties is another of SAFGA’s functions. plus two smaller auctions in the same province. ten cut flower growers took the initiative to establish the South African Flower Growers’ Association (SAFGA). also serves as CEO of SAFEC. One example of a learning opportunity is the two study groups organised for growers of lisianthus who came together by Cilla Lowen (cilla@floracultureinternational. bulb and pot plant growers. saflower. Seeing the need for a marketing function. Study groups are planned for growers of roses. and then informs its members.” says Duif. New markets Of SAFEC’s functions Duif says: “Our main criterion is looking for new markets. with 40 years’ experience in floriculture to his credit. constitute the balance. each portfolio manager Functions “SAFGA’s main function is to communicate with growers and to create learning opportunities for them. or helping growers with information on topics such as fertilisers. Duif. Lobbying with the auctions for fair practices for growers is another function. This year. as well as Flower Dynamics. We find with outward missions we get better closure. which is South Africa’s main auction located in Johannesburg. In commenting on changes created by the economic downturn. A network to know n 1959. To facilitate export trade SAFEC works closely with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and forms part of the Trade Export South Africa (TESA) council which meets on a quarterly basis.FloraCultureInternational. I to share information and discuss their experiences. an e-trade auction. gerberas and chrysanthemums. managing director of Bergflora’s Johannesburg branch. Hosting and dealing with queries of such inward missions is another function of SAFEC. To date SAFGA has 120 members. freight forwarders. Another member who provides an important perspective is Interflora African Areas. members are expected to share their information with other export members.co. affiliated product and service industries like packaging suppliers and greenhouse construction companies and consultants working in the field of floriculture. As the name implies.

When I searched my surname. SAFGA is also lobbying for the creation of a floriculture seat at the universities. (Photo by courtesy of ‘Undercover Farming’) on SAFGA’s committee will submit a monthly report for the website. is a SAFGA member.com. Timna. The first piece of info you get is how many pages Google found that have an entry with that same name. So what did I find? Thinkbabynames. celosia.. Missouri. When I searched Gahl. “Our main interest is the interest of the growers. on the left (or right side) you get info from companies that have paid Google in the hope that you will click on them first and then you get the whole list. Then I found Captain Darrin Policar. The BEE operation consists of turnkey franchises located on site and run by 30 apprentice and independent flower growers who grow gerberas. You have the Anabel comics. hotels and even a vegetarian dish at the Anabel Taylor restaurant. but by far the best is the Leaora at Vampirefreaks. The bi-monthly national magazine “Undercover Farming” provides regular editorial opportunity for SAFGA to get its message across and is sent free to the organisation’s members.com. or someone. The strangest thing I found was Anabelassociates. Timbali Technology Incubator in Nelspruit. But the highlights on the SAFGA calendar are Growers’ Days and the Annual General Meeting. SAFGA has submitted a proposal to the Department of Agriculture that involves a 3-year mentorship scheme providing on-the-job training that will ultimately facilitate the establishment of similar BEE start-up programs. it would also seem to be the case that there are a lot of Leaora’s in the real estate business and in April a Leaora is registered for a car race. light’. SAFGA exhibition at Plantimex Trader’s Day. a cosmic navigator and a symphony director.il April 2009 | www.com where you have the Anabel team. an escort service. sunflowers. Policar. as well as representation at the trade fair in Atlanta. why not try this game. asters. I started with my name Leaora. and its meaning is ‘compassion. the place where King Solomon mined copper. So here goes. As SAFGA is a partner of FloraCulture International.com 45 . Participation in international trade exhibitions is another communication tool used. Now that explains why I love Greek salad. I found a Leaora at the Department of Corrections in Washington State. a phone company in Nigeria and an organisation looking for engineers in Anabel. and Google it (that is search for it on the Google search engine).by Leaora Policar T ouch The Google Game With the internet so readily available. I just had to try Anabel. The 2006 Hortifair was the most recent. Looking ahead Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is a key strategy of the South African government and SAFGA is in line with supporting this initiative. creating learning opportunities and facilitating export linkages. You have rugs. Policar. my eldest son’s name. With not one South African tertiary institution offering a diploma or degree in floriculture. in September and an outward mission to Hungary and Poland also in September. artists. The first site I got was in Italian. does that mean I married into a pirate family? When I Googled my kids names I also got some interesting results. gypsophila and strelitzia. in northern South Africa. Other plans for 2009 include a study group off to Brazil in May to learn how they grow flowers there. and they will be swelling the membership numbers significantly when they join SAFGA in April 2009. It is a social occasion when growers get an opportunity to network and visit the larger farms to learn how they operate.” says Duif. Leaora \le(o)-ra\ is pronounced lee-OR-ah. Leaora@arava. Did you know that according to Wikipedia it’s a Spanish version of Annabel. They even have a Policar Mini. SAFGA shows this philosophy to be true through their success in building communications. These reports will also be included in SAFGA’s monthly newsletter for members. So. a genome researcher. tennis players. com and the name was miraculously transformed into Chinese characters. two funny-looking people dressed as cooks and what do they do? Cook? No. I couldn’t help myself. runs a flowerfarm in the Arava Desert in Southern Israel. For my youngest. next time you have a bit of time to spare.info is a site dedicated to slot cars . snapdragons. Growers’ Days happen twice a year.co. the Pirate of Geneseo. these people translate from English to French. and with the many options this media brings with it. the first thing Google asked me was maybe I meant ‘Police’ …no I didn’t. It is of Greek origin. hmm. Another advantage for members is access to statistical data of national and export floriculture sales figures on the website. dianthus. here is what they have to say. Under Aylah I was immediately taken to a site called Chinese-tools. Two organisations understandably attracted by the benefits that SAFGA offers are the Protea Producers’ of South Africa (PPSA) and the South Africa Protea Exporters’ Association (SAPPEX). ||| Leaora Policar. lisianthus. together with her husband Eyal. its members receive a free copy of this magazine too. songs on You Tube.. there was lots of stuff about Timna park. think of something. in most parts of the world. if you have a few minutes to spare why not play the Google game? It’s really very simple. USA.FloraCultureInternational. I found dancers.that were around in the 60’s and 70’s. Mpumalanga.that’s toy racing cars .

With assistance from AgMARDT and Massey University. At this time “almost five times as many growers support the Council than oppose it” (NZCC Newsletter No. and other calla growers during a regional discussion group meeting to a property growing callas for tuber production. 46 www. Together with financial assistance from TRADENZ and NZ’s Agricultural and Marketing Research and Development Trust (AgMARDT).com | April 2009 .New Zealand In New Zealand the Calla Council (NZCC) coordinates research and promotion for the sector’s growers and exporters.e. and market research.1 million. the NZCC will assess and refine. new technology to enhance bud number and size of calla tubers in the first season of growth. a number of reports were published from 1990 onwards. The sales value of calla flowers domestically in NZ is estimated to be an additional NZ$4. discussion was held on “the need for a comprehensive guide for growers to the production. by Dr Keith Funnell.FloraCultureInternational. Continuing the relationship between research providers. Calla contact point T he NZCC was formed in 1991. Callas remain ranked second in named flower types for their export value from NZ. i. 1991). Prior to 1991 no individual statistics were collected for export earnings from callas as a separate commodity. R&D initiative A major technical R&D initiative is planned for the 2009-2011 growing seasons. the NZCC immediately set about supporting research and extension projects.NZCC. with additional earnings from tuber exports. and grading of callas” (Report of First Exec Meeting . As a result of participating in numerous international trade fairs. In collaboration with TRADENZ. harvesting.40) Prior to the formation of the NZCC. However the NZCC recognised all this research would be of limited value unless effectively disseminated and implemented. other collectives of interested callagroups were active (1984-1990).2 million earned from tuber exports. growers and exporters subsequently agreed to establish an incorporated society. working with research providers such as Massey University. With ongoing government incentives provided by NZ Trade & Enterprise (TRADENZ). Chairman NZ Calla Council the NZ Calla Producers Association (NZCPA) and the International Calla Association (ICA). as it continues to today. illustrating wide support. (NZ$1 = €0. The New Zealand Calla Council Inc. under commercial conditions. These were primarily focussed on R&D initiatives. so as to provide the platform for moving the marketing of calla products forward into the future. using its website and meetings to encourage the effective implementation of valuable information resulting from individual projects. In 2007 this had grown to an industry worth NZ$9 million. and increased floral productivity in the second season. in the early years of the NZCC a significant amount of activity also related to the Council’s objective of a market development program. These collectives that preceded the NZCC included Secretary/Treasurer of the NZCC. In 1991 export earnings from callas as cut flowers was ranked in second place after orchids. NZ). and the then named Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR). Ministry of Agriculture & Forestry. NZ Nursery Research Centre. the Calla Growers Manual was first published in 1994. with updated/revi- sed sections available to members. A significant event that acted as a catalyst for the formation of the NZCC was in 1989 when calla growers and exporters at the NZ Floriculture Federation Conference (the national growers representative body at that time) voted to put in place a voluntary levy (2%) on exports to fund research and promotion. with NZ$3.1 million (Department of Statistics. the postal ballot of the 300 growers and exporters involved in formation of the first Executive occurred in September of that year. The content of the manual is progressively being placed on the NZCC website. bringing in NZ$3. 4. Hence even at the first meeting of the Executive. 1991). Don Thomson.

WHAT WE DO As a centralised communications hub for its members. a workable Risk Management Plan (RMP) that they can follow. The success in recent years of market development projects in the USA market for the NZ cymbidium orchid industry is seen as a possible exemplar for us to follow.org..nz). As a result.callacouncil. the NZCC hopes to facilitate future market development projects. The large international hotel I stayed at had a 30% occupancy rate last month so they were happy that it was now running 35%. ABB. at least not to me. The trade show was not crowded but the exhibitors did not complain. and other giant manufacturing organizations have huge factory facilities one after the other. They may have a bit less business than in the past but they are not going to close. including technical/scientific and market research reports. It is the smaller. China is completely dependent on export manufacturing for job creation. the great names like Sharp. Shanghai is an industrial powerhouse. He does contract garment production for a number of large US retailers and said that based on his order book. The NZCC periodically (3-4 times per year) produces a newsletter (CALLAnews) and this is also posted on the website. grower certification. NZCC objectives • To catalyse and guide development of the New Zealand calla industry through activities which support establishing. kerryherndon@msn. Still. I had the opportunity to talk with the owner of a number of apparel factories.FloraCultureInternational. The NZCC stages an annual conference to provide additional networking opportunities. But he said that on a recent trip to New York. 2008 cutting the period of lost export earnings to approximately six weeks. • To hold ownership of intellectual property on behalf of the calla industry. The NZCC. associated with the production and marketing of calla products. Coming to China and seeing all of the building going up made me wonder if they are living in a different economy than I am. seeds and tissue culture material of the genus Zantedeschia. WHAT WE DON’T DO The NZCC does not grow and/or market calla products itself and. Regional groups of the NZCC hold regular functions for existing and potential members.it was not busy enough. • To communicate with members items of material progress. It was a quick visit to a trade show I had never been to before. exporters and other grower groups. not a fact. who want to learn more about the NZ calla industry. This also provides information for those new to callas. They could and would stand on their own. He said their volume was too small.. and the factories need these orders continuously or they cannot stay in business. The Compliance Program came into effect on November 1st. funding. and product traceability are increasingly becoming part of everyday life. any information presented is not biased by commercial motives.com April 2009 | www. including callas.. He was educated and lived in the US for fifteen years before returning to China to make his fortune. phyto-sanitary inspections.by Kerry Herndon Stuff Decoupled? The new technology has been developed by floriculture researchers at Massey University. NZ calla growers became acutely aware of the serious implications of this in September 2008 when larvae of the light brown apple moth were detected in shipments of Forsythia flowers on the US border. aimed at increasing export earnings.. We are all in this together. Together with the NZ Flower Exporters Association. That was. As you drive to the airport. tubers. one of my favorite stores. He said the price was lower than in China and that we will never see such low prices in our lives again. But is it true? Are they going to stand on their own? Our biggest risk in doing business in China today is putting down a deposit with a company that will go quickly and quietly out of business. Florida. Omron. therefore. he shopped at the Macy’s flagship store and purchased a lot of clothes to take back to China with him. I asked if he did work for the giant department store Macy’s. Many people coming back from New Year holiday found they no longer had jobs. and the NZCC expects that in the future it will be need to respond to similar demands from other importing countries. the NZ Calla Council (NZCC) has established a website (www. until I started asking some questions. that are closing down due to lack of orders. This hotel has contracts with several airlines for overnight stays of crews so much of their occupancy is at low contract rates. for calla growers. I was told a year ago that the economies of the fast growing third world countries were now decoupled from the US economy. and makes representation to these on behalf of members. Thousands of factories have closed their doors this year already. Orders from the US and Europe are much harder to come by. and implementing an industry and market development program covering calla flowers. China is still projecting a substantial growth rate compared to the rest of the world. including trademarks and research results. ||| I am in the huge new Pudong airport in Shanghai waiting for my long flight home. together with MAF. an opportunity to learn more about effective production and marketing of calla products and discuss topical issues. which are more fragile. interest and concern. A small shift in demand has terrible consequences. Almost no Americans were at the show. Kerry Herndon owns Kerry’s Bromeliads. Individual calla growers are not necessarily well equipped to respond to such changes in market access. 2009 will be the worst in his history.com 47 . the US Department of Agriculture suspended all imports of flowers from NZ on September 11. Decoupled economies is an idea. a tropical potted plant nursery in Homestead. developed an acceptable Compliance Program and. The NZCC is recognised by national horticultural organizations and Government bodies. domestically-created companies. But the fact that I could spend two hours in a stand and not see anyone else stop to get information told me enough . These companies are not going out of business. United States. instead it aims to provide an independent forum for information of value to those involved with the calla industry. For exporters within most agricultural industries. While in Shanghai.

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