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EOL resistors

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EOL resistors

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racefan
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12-19-2003, 02:29 AM Can someone pls explain the purpose of an EOL resistor in an alarm system? How do they provide protection from tampering? Are they required or recommended and why? Thanks, Jay

Spike
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12-19-2003, 03:00 AM "racefan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:1guEb.89660$ea%.(E-Mail Removed) le.rogers.com... > Can someone pls explain the purpose of an EOL resistor in an alarm system? It supervises the wiring to the detection device > How do they provide protection from tampering?

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10/19/2011 8:16 PM

EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

Even if the system is not armed, tampering will be announced at the keypad. DEOL circuits provide even more info to the monitoring station. Not professional to dispatch police on a wiring problem :-) Are they required or > recommended and why? Don't be stupid. :-) > > Thanks, > Jay > >

Rocky T. Squirrel, Esq.


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12-19-2003, 03:10 AM To supply a known current flow in the loop circuit.. A loss or increase in the current causes a switching circuit to trigger either a trouble or alarm signal.. Some really fancy loops also include a diode to add a reverse current trigger as well.. (ie.. fire alarms, bell ckts etc...) hih cul

"racefan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:1guEb.89660$ea%.(E-Mail Removed) le.rogers.com... > Can someone pls explain the purpose of an EOL resistor in an alarm system? > How do they provide protection from tampering? Are they required or > recommended and why? > > Thanks, > Jay > >

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10/19/2011 8:16 PM

EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

racefan
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12-19-2003, 03:28 AM Thanks guys. Makes sense now. I wasn't sure it was worth the extra soldering but obviously it is.

racefan
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12-19-2003, 11:32 AM Thanks Robert. Good explanation. I read your FAQ but didn't pick up on these details. Thanks for mentioning about NOT installing the resistors in the panel. That's what I was planning to do. I still don't understand how the system can sense a short by using a resistor. If someone shorts a door contact for example - as long as they use a jumper wire and don't allow the existing wires to leave the contact - the system won't know that's it been shorted, right? Or is the idea that most won't know to do that or will most likely break the circuit at some point.

"Robert L. Bass" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news vqdnf3Y-sqxGH-iRVn-(E-Mail Removed)... > > Can someone pls explain the purpose of an EOL > > resistor in an alarm system? How do they provide > > protection from tampering? Are they required or > > recommended and why? > > Hi Jay, > > Good questions. I have a FAQ page on EOL resistors that you may find > helpful. > http://www.bass-home.com/gotofaq.cfm?pg=eol_resistor > > EOL resistors allow a small trickle of current to flow through an alarm > sensing circuit (zone). As long as the resistor is present the panel > registers this as a normal condition. In the case of a burglary zone if the

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10/19/2011 8:16 PM

EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

> circuit opens that's usually registered as an alarm condition. A short > circuit is a trouble condition. Fire alarm circuits are usually the > opposite. That is, an open circuit is a trouble and a short circuit is an > alarm condition. > > The EOL resistor is supposed to be installed at the sensor farthest from the > control panel, ergo the name *end* of line. If a crooked employee attempts > to short out a sensor that has a built-in EOL resistor at his employer's > store the control panel can send a silent signal to the central station > allowing them to notify the property owner. Likewise, if a zone is > accidentally shorted out while someone is working in the building the alarm > can display a trouble condition so they know there's a problem and can > repair it. > > The above are by no means the only way to use an EOL resistor but they are > fairly common. One of the most common errors that alarm installer make is > to install the EOL resistors inside the alarm control panel. There they > serve no purpose at all and may as well have been programmed out and left in > the poly bag in which they were shipped. If you plan to use EOL resistors > at all, be sure you install them at the point on the cable farthest from the > control panel terminals. > > Regards, > Robert > > =============================> > Bass Home Electronics > 2291 Pine View Circle > Sarasota Florida 34231 > 877-722-8900 Sales & Tech Support > 941-925-9747 Fax > 941-232-0791 Wireless > Nextel Private ID - 161*21755*1 > http://www.bass-home.com > http://www.bassburglaralarms.com > =============================> > >

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10/19/2011 8:16 PM

EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

Rocky T. Squirrel, Esq.


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12-19-2003, 02:48 PM fake-em out by using N.O. contacts.. wire-em in parallel instead of series..

"racefan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:KdCEb.92817$ea%.(E-Mail Removed) e.rogers.com... > Thanks Robert. Good explanation. I read your FAQ but didn't pick up on > these details. > Thanks for mentioning about NOT installing the resistors in the panel. > That's what I was > planning to do. > > I still don't understand how the system can sense a short by using a > resistor. If someone > shorts a door contact for example - as long as they use a jumper wire and > don't allow > the existing wires to leave the contact - the system won't know that's it > been shorted, right? > Or is the idea that most won't know to do that or will most likely break the > circuit at some > point. > > > "Robert L. Bass" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message > news vqdnf3Y-sqxGH-iRVn-(E-Mail Removed)... > > > Can someone pls explain the purpose of an EOL > > > resistor in an alarm system? How do they provide > > > protection from tampering? Are they required or > > > recommended and why? >> > > Hi Jay, >> > > Good questions. I have a FAQ page on EOL resistors that you may find > > helpful. > > http://www.bass-home.com/gotofaq.cfm?pg=eol_resistor >> > > EOL resistors allow a small trickle of current to flow through an alarm > > sensing circuit (zone). As long as the resistor is present the panel > > registers this as a normal condition. In the case of a burglary zone if > the > > circuit opens that's usually registered as an alarm condition. A short

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10/19/2011 8:16 PM

EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

> > circuit is a trouble condition. Fire alarm circuits are usually the > > opposite. That is, an open circuit is a trouble and a short circuit is an > > alarm condition. >> > > The EOL resistor is supposed to be installed at the sensor farthest from > the > > control panel, ergo the name *end* of line. If a crooked employee > attempts > > to short out a sensor that has a built-in EOL resistor at his employer's > > store the control panel can send a silent signal to the central station > > allowing them to notify the property owner. Likewise, if a zone is > > accidentally shorted out while someone is working in the building the > alarm > > can display a trouble condition so they know there's a problem and can > > repair it. >> > > The above are by no means the only way to use an EOL resistor but they are > > fairly common. One of the most common errors that alarm installer make is > > to install the EOL resistors inside the alarm control panel. There they > > serve no purpose at all and may as well have been programmed out and left > in > > the poly bag in which they were shipped. If you plan to use EOL resistors > > at all, be sure you install them at the point on the cable farthest from > the > > control panel terminals. >> > > Regards, > > Robert >> > > =============================> > > Bass Home Electronics > > 2291 Pine View Circle > > Sarasota Florida 34231 > > 877-722-8900 Sales & Tech Support > > 941-925-9747 Fax > > 941-232-0791 Wireless > > Nextel Private ID - 161*21755*1 > > http://www.bass-home.com > > http://www.bassburglaralarms.com > > =============================> >> >>

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EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

> >

fly in the ointment


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12-19-2003, 03:13 PM racefan wrote in > I still don't understand how the system can sense a short by using a > resistor. If someone > shorts a door contact for example - as long as they use a jumper wire and > don't allow > the existing wires to leave the contact - the system won't know that's it > been shorted, right? It's true that if you short the contact AFTER the resistor, the system won't detect it. Some contacts are made with integral resistors so someone tampering can't get ahead of the resistor. js

Rich
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12-19-2003, 09:25 PM How about running four wire, and running the zone back to the panel and placing the EOL resistor there in the locked box?

Aegis
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12-19-2003, 09:33 PM Nothing wrong with that at all that I can see... Uses more wire without being absolutely necessary though. "Rich" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:e5adnaQdFrZg536iRVn-(E-Mail Removed)...

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EOL resistors

http://www.electronicspoint.com/eol-resistors-t141995.html

> > How about running four wire, and running the zone back to the panel and > placing the EOL resistor there in the locked box? > >

Jackcsg
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12-20-2003, 12:58 AM Well since 22/4 is probably the only box of wire you purchase...good idea. Jack "Rich" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:e5adnaQdFrZg536iRVn-(E-Mail Removed)... > > How about running four wire, and running the zone back to the panel and > placing the EOL resistor there in the locked box? > >

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EOL resistors

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