Beban Struktur Kapal Akibat Ombak Gila_Transportasi Maritim_Denchfield_Sally

Fluid Structure Interactions Research Group

Loads Induced on Ship Structures by Rogue Waves
Sally Denchfield
School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, UK Supervisors – Prof. P. Temarel and Dr. D. Hudson
Background
Of increasing importance in the marine industry are “rogue waves” and the effect they have on marine structures. Concern has grown following the loss of some ships due to apparent rogue wave encounters, and more famously the recorded impact of the “New Year Wave” on the Draupner oil platform on 1st January 1995.
N

Selected Rogue Wave Models
Isolated rogue wave: NewWave

S t
n 1 max

n 2

cos

n

t

•Based on a wave spectrum •Can scale to required ηmax •Can be extended to higher orders

•Suited to a comparative analysis
Figure 5: Comparison of linear NewWave theory and experimental results

Rogue wave in a random sea: Optimised seaway
N

An cos
n 1

n

t kn x f

opt

•Based on a wave spectrum
Figure 1: Photographed rogue wave encounters

Classification of a Rogue Wave
With respect to the surrounding sea state:

•Statistical properties maintained during optimisation process •Solution dependant on initial (random ) phases •Can extend to include nonlinear effects

AI

H max HS

2.0
2D linear hydroelasticity

Figure 6: Comparison of linear optimised seaway and experimental results

Wave-Structure Interactions

CI

ηmax HS

1.2
Figure 2: Definition sketch of a rogue wave

A

e

a  t p

B

e

 bpt

C c pt

t

With respect to the encountering ship:
Figure 7: Variation in maximum heave with maximum wave height for irregular, NewWave and optimised seas at zero speed Figure 8: Variation in maximum pitch with maximum wave height for irregular, NewWave and optimised seas at zero speed

LI

L OA H max

10.0

Figure 3: Variation of LI with LOA

Methodology

Figure 9: % Increase in maximum heave with forward speed in optimised sea

Figure 10: % Increase in maximum pitch with forward speed in optimised sea

•Good agreement at low speeds •2D linear hydroelasticity over-predicts maximum heave and pitch at high speeds

Influence of Rogue Wave on a Ship

Figure 11: Slamming and green water effects during rogue wave encounter at operational speed

Figure 12: Real-life rogue wave encounter showing equivalent situation to Figure 11

Acknowledgements
This project is supported by funds from the Lloyd’s Register Educational Trust, through the Lloyd’s Register University Technology Centre

Figure 4: Methodology for research

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