INDEPENDENT RADIO  PRODUCTIONS  COMMISSIONED BY THE  BBC 
                                Grant Goddard      July 2010

CONTENTS 
      1.    2.    3.    4.    5.    6.    7.    8.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK  THE RADIO BROADCASTING MARKET  THE INDEPENDENT RADIO PRODUCTION SECTOR  THE PRESENT BBC SYSTEMS FOR THE COMMISSIONING OF INDEPENDENT RADIO  PRODUCTIONS  THE RANGE OF COSTS WITHIN BBC INDEPENDENT RADIO COMMISSIONS  THE RANGE OF PROGRAMMES WITHIN BBC INDEPENDENT RADIO COMMISSIONS  THE DIVERSITY OF PROGRAMMES WITHIN BBC INDEPENDENT RADIO  COMMISSIONS 

  9.  OPINIONS FROM THE INDEPENDENT RADIO PRODUCTION SECTOR    10.  THE BBC EXECUTIVE PROPOSALS    11.  CONCLUSION            APPENDIX A  CONTRIBUTORS    APPENDIX B  ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

1.  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
    The BBC is required by its current Charter and Agreement to include within its radio  broadcasts a proportion of programmes made by external suppliers. The BBC Trust is  responsible for determining what it considers to be a suitable proportion of radio output to  be commissioned from external suppliers and for ensuring that this ‘quota’ is fulfilled by the  BBC Executive Board. The BBC Trust is also responsible for ensuring that the radio content  commissioned by the BBC from external suppliers comprises a suitable range and diversity of  programmes.    These regulatory requirements were incorporated into the BBC Charter and Agreement for  the first time in 2006, following a period from 1992 during which the BBC had voluntarily  implemented an internal quota for the commissioning of external productions within its  radio output. The inclusion of independent productions within radio broadcasters’ output is  not a statutory requirement of UK or European broadcast legislation, as it is in the television  medium, and the commercial radio sector has not offered a commitment to independent  productions similar to that of the BBC.    This report was commissioned by the BBC Trust as part of its review of independent radio  supply, announced in February 2010. It examines the existing arrangements for the supply of  externally produced radio programmes to the BBC, it analyses available data concerning  radio programmes commissioned externally by the BBC, and it considers the opinions of the  BBC and the external suppliers regarding future arrangements for the supply of content. This  report is intended to provide the BBC Trust with relevant information and an independent  viewpoint to help inform their decisions on these matters.    Radio broadcasting remains a popular medium that has weathered relatively well the recent  competition from newer technologies. Consumer usage remains high, with 91% of the adult  population listening to radio for an average 22 hours per week. Whereas the majority of  listening to BBC radio is to its five national FM/AM networks, the majority of listening to  commercial radio is to the sector’s 300+ local stations. Funding for BBC radio from the  Licence Fee is greater than funding for commercial radio from advertising revenues, though  the BBC operates significantly fewer radio stations. The outcome is that programme budgets  of BBC radio are generally larger than those of commercial radio.    Furthermore, the commercial radio sector has experienced lower levels of listening and  reduced revenues during the last decade which, combined with its substantial investments  in digital platforms, have reportedly reduced the sector’s profitability to near zero.     In aggregate, the independent radio production sector is a small part of the United Kingdom  radio industry, with a turnover of around £20m per annum (2% of total funds for radio  broadcasting). It is much smaller in value relatively than the independent television  production sector and comprises between 150 and 200 businesses that range in size from  sole traders to companies with multi‐million pound turnovers. The sector’s outputs have  won many awards, both at home and overseas, and many of its programmes are household  names. The BBC purchases more than 90% of the sector’s outputs.    Commercial radio’s current economic challenges make it very unlikely that its present, very  limited use of programmes from external suppliers will change in the future. Whilst a 

significant proportion of BBC radio output comprises individually produced, pre‐recorded  programmes, most commercial radio output is broadcast ‘live’ and consists of commercially  available music recordings. Consequently, external suppliers of radio programmes to the  BBC are largely reliant on a single buyer for their productions, especially in several radio  programme genres – comedy, drama and documentaries – where the BBC is the only  broadcaster. Neither do significant secondary markets (overseas, online, sell‐through) exist  for radio productions, as they do in television.    The BBC commissions radio programmes from external suppliers through separate  structures within each network and additionally, within Radio 4, through individual  structures for different genres. The commissioners of external productions also have  responsibilities for commissioning in‐house BBC productions. Only a limited range of  programmes broadcast by each network are made available to external suppliers. The  administrative systems by which commissions are offered externally vary by network, but  usually involve competitive bids between external suppliers and, sometimes, additionally  with in‐house producers.    At present, the BBC is required to contract a minimum 10% of BBC radio’s ‘eligible output’ to  external suppliers. This level of quota was established in 1992 and is calculated with  reference to broadcast hours. The BBC’s definition of ‘eligible hours’ was extended in 2006  to include the Nations radio stations and the ‘sports’ programme genre, and was extended  further in 2007 to include BBC digital radio stations.    Additionally, in 2007, Radio 4 adopted a ‘Window of Creative Competition’, a commissioning  system for both independent and in‐house productions that had also been implemented in  BBC television. As an adjunct to the 10% quota, the Window offers a further 10% of Radio 4  ‘eligible output’ which is subject to competitive bids between the independent radio  production sector and in‐house BBC producers. As a result, independent productions  contribute between 10% and 20% of Radio 4’s ‘eligible output.’    According to data supplied by the BBC for this report, it is evident that externally  commissioned programmes exceed the current 10% quota and exhibit a range of costs and  diversity of programme genres, as required by the BBC Charter and Agreement. However, a  significant proportion of programmes are commissioned from a relatively small number of  external producers. This concentration in supply is likely to increase further as a result of  amendments to commissioning policies being implemented by the BBC. The data supplied by  the BBC regarding its external commissions has lacked the granularity necessary to  illuminate further this issue and other aspects of diversity.    The BBC seems eager to recognise the creative strengths of the independent radio  production sector and the value its outputs bring to the Licence Fee payer. At the same time,  the BBC appears to find it an administrative burden to process the thousands of creative  proposals received annually from external suppliers, particularly as these are submitted  individually to commissioners within each of the radio networks.    For its part, the independent radio sector has expressed concern about the work necessary  to submit so many programme proposals that are not commissioned by the BBC, a result of  the relatively small proportion of BBC radio output available to external suppliers. The sector  trade association, the Radio Independents Group,  wishes to see the 10% quota increased to  25%, the Window of Creative Competition increased from 10% to 25% and expanded to  other networks, and commissions offered to a wider range of suppliers. 

  Underlying these concerns is the apparent economic weakness of the independent radio  production sector which, after 18 years of  BBC commissions, still seems unable to transform  itself from a ‘cottage industry’ into a profitable commercial media sector. The sector’s  dependency upon the BBC has offered it little leverage in negotiations. Individual producers’  economic security is low because the average value of individual radio commissions is small,  compared to television, and a significant proportion of commissions appear to be ‘one‐off’  or short series rather than permanent programmes.    As part of a package of wider changes submitted to the BBC Trust, the BBC Executive has  proposed that the quota for independent productions be increased from 10% to 12.5%  though, in fact, the BBC has already exceeded the existing quota by more than 2% in all but  one of the last ten years. The BBC Executive proposals seem unlikely to precipitate the  increase in scale demanded by the independent radio production sector. Neither would they  address the issue of the slim gross profit margin assigned by the BBC to each commission,  which the sector feels is restraining the ability of suppliers to cover their business overheads.    The BBC’s present insistence upon negotiating the budgets of individual radio commissions  on a line‐by‐line basis might seem to be indicative of the micro‐management that appears to  be souring the relationship between the two parties. In 40% of cases, external radio  production contracts are valued at less than £8,000, and the time consumed by such  detailed budget negotiations could appear inappropriate. For many producers in the sector,  their BBC commissions generate insufficient net profit for them to operate as full‐time  production businesses. Even for the largest production companies, it appears that income  from other activities has been imperative for their continuing existence.    Evidence suggests that there is still a serious question about the long‐term potential for  profitability in the independent radio production sector, though this issue does not appear  to have been considered within the BBC Executive’s recommendations. Unless the BBC can  improve and develop its systems for the external commissioning of radio programmes, the  independent radio production sector is unlikely to ever transform into a prosperous media  industry sub‐sector.    At present, it appears that the two parties – the BBC and the independent radio production  sector – exhibit a lack of understanding of other’s positions, the result of not having been in  constructive dialogue about the most fundamental issues. This is disappointing and,  ultimately, is unproductive for the Licence Fee payer, who should be offered the most  creative and inspiring radio content available, from whatever source those programmes  might derive. A conversation between the two parties would seem to be required that can  re‐focus minds on the reasons why the BBC commissions externally made radio productions,  and on ways to implement productive and efficient systems capable of turning the best  ideas in the marketplace for programmes into reality within BBC radio output. 

2.  THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK 
    Under the terms of the 2006 BBC Charter and Agreement, it is the responsibility of the BBC  Trust to ensure that the BBC commissions a suitable proportion, range and diversity of radio  programmes from external producers.    This responsibility derives from Clause 58 of the BBC Agreement, which states:    Production of radio programmes and material for online services 1    (1)  The Trust must impose on the Executive Board the requirements it considers  appropriate for securing—    (a)  that what appears to the Trust to be a suitable proportion of—    (i)  the programmes included in those radio services (taken together)  which are UK Public Services, and    (ii)   the material available to members of the public as part of those  online services (taken together) which are UK Public Services,    consists of programmes or, as the case may be, material made by producers  external to the BBC; and    (b)  that what appears to the Trust to be a suitable range and diversity of such  programmes and material is made by such persons.    (2)  In determining for the purposes of paragraph (1) what is a suitable proportion of   programmes or material, and what is a suitable range and diversity of  programmes or material, the Trust must have regard (in particular) to the desirability  (in the interests of listeners and users of the BBC’s online services) of both—    (a)  encouraging an appropriate degree of competition in the provision of radio  programmes and of material to be included in online services; and    (b)  maintaining within the BBC in‐house capacity for making such programmes  and material on a substantial scale.    (3)  In this clause, “range”, in relation to programmes or material, means a range of  programmes or (as the case may be) material in terms of cost of acquisition as well  as in terms of the types of programmes or material involved.      In its initial submission to the government’s most recent Charter Review, the BBC had noted:    “In radio, the BBC is the only broadcaster in Europe to commission a significant amount of  output from independents. Within the UK, the BBC has had a voluntary agreement in place 
 Department For Culture, Media & Sport, Broadcasting: An Agreement Between Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for Culture,  Media and Sport and the British Broadcasting Corporation, Cm 6872, July 2006, p.30 
1

since 1996 to commission at least 10% of its network programming from independent  producers. It has consistently exceeded that target and currently commissions around 13%  externally. There are ongoing discussions between BBC radio and the independent production  sector with a view to developing the relationship with the sector further. The commercial  sector commissions virtually no programming from the independent sector.” 2    Subsequently, the government’s ‘Green Paper’ on Charter Renewal indicated that the BBC  would be likely to remain the only significant buyer of independent radio productions:    “The BBC’s stated goal was to stimulate the development of a healthy radio production  economy outside the BBC across a range of genres in which a number of broadcasters would  invest. However, the commercial [radio] sector mainly produces ‘continuous’ programming  rather than individual programmes, and the former does not lend itself so readily to the  segmenting needed to enable independent production. … The result nevertheless is that, in  many areas of radio programming, unlike TV, the BBC remains a monopoly purchaser.” 3    The Green Paper noted a BBC proposal to extend the quota for independent radio  productions to additional segments of its output:    “The BBC’s recent content supply review concluded that the existing 10% voluntary quota  should be extended to cover sport, radio in the Nations and the new digital radio stations.  We welcome these proposals, which the BBC estimates will result in it commissioning about  an additional 3,000 hours of independent production. The BBC has also recently consulted on  new terms of trade, and is proposing a Programme Development Fund to support the  development of creative ideas from independent producers.” 4    The Green Paper also set out the government’s policy objectives:    “We think the same principle should apply to radio production as in TV – where possible, we  want to encourage competition, because it is likely to bring the best programmes to listeners.  Given the BBC’s current position as the only significant purchaser of independently produced  material, it may not be possible to create a thriving and competitive production market  through Government intervention in this area. Nevertheless, as in television, there remains a  question as to whether the BBC’s recent moves are sufficient, or whether the quota might  instead be increased or made binding.” 5    In its review of the Green Paper, the BBC agreed that greater competition in the supply of  radio programmes could benefit listeners and stated:    “However, while many of the principles underpinning in‐house television production apply  equally to radio, there are considerable differences between the two media which lie behind  the different approach taken by BBC Radio and BBC Television. Because of the nature of the  radio market and the unique character of much of the BBC’s radio output, many genres are  almost entirely supported by the BBC, radio drama being one obvious example. Television  relies heavily on recorded ‘built’ programmes, while the vast majority of radio output is live.  This in itself does not preclude independent production companies from making live  ‘streamed’ programmes for radio (and there are many examples where they do), but these 
2 3

 BBC, Building Public Value, June 2004, p.101   Department for Culture, Media & Sport, Review of the BBC’s Royal Charter: A Strong BBC, independent of government, March  2005, p.88, para.7.18  4  ibid., p.88, para.7.19  5  ibid., p.88, para.7.20 

two factors taken together mean that it is not practical to aim for as high a proportion of  independent productions for radio as for television.” 6    The BBC argued that a ‘voluntary target’ remained preferable to a mandatory quota:    “The independent radio production industry is still in its infancy. While there are several  larger companies which do not rely entirely on the BBC, there are many others which are very  small and for which the BBC, and Radio 4 in particular, represents their entire market. During  the course of the negotiations for the new terms of trade it has become clear that, as  technology and regulation change, the BBC is going to have to work very closely with the  industry to ensure that it is able to take advantage of this developing market.    In 1991, the BBC announced its intention to reach a voluntary target of 10% by 1996, a target  it has always met and generally exceeded. Commissioning currently runs at 13.3% of eligible  hours. Because of this, the BBC does not believe that a mandatory quota is an appropriate  way of stimulating the independent sector at this time. The voluntary approach that the BBC  has taken thus far has helped create the conditions for a stronger sector.” 7    The BBC proposals for independent radio production were, in full:    • “New terms of trade will soon be announced, which will be much more beneficial to the  independent sector than has historically been the case;  • A research and development fund for independents has been launched;  • The commissioning process for Radio 4 is under review, with the intention of making it  simpler. At the same time Radio 4 has formalised its ‘open slots’ structure which will  apply to programmes to be broadcast from 2006/07 onwards;  • Radio management will create a central contact point for independents to work with on  compliance issues, and join forces with television to extend the online information  available to independent companies wishing to work with the BBC.” 8    The House of Lords Select Committee on the BBC’s Charter Review concluded that the BBC’s  proposal to maintain a voluntary target was inadequate:    “A mandatory quota for television production has strengthened the independent sector and  provided stability and security for established and emerging companies. We believe that the  BBC should continue to invest in independent radio production, but to secure growth in the  sector further reforms are needed. We therefore recommend that the 10 per cent voluntary  quota for independent radio production should be made mandatory. The BBC should  consider the 10 per cent quota as a floor and not a ceiling and should operate a  competitive commissioning process to secure the best programming available.” 9    Consequently, the government ‘White Paper’ proposed:    “We will therefore place on the [BBC] Trust an overall duty of ensuring that independent  radio producers have the opportunity to contribute fully to the BBC’s provision of the best  possible programmes for listeners.   
6 7

 BBC, Review of the BBC’s Royal Charter: BBC response to ‘A Strong BBC, independent of government’, May 2005, p.86   ibid., p.86  8  ibid., p.87  9  House of Lords Select Committee on the BBC’s Charter Review, The Review of the BBC’s Royal Charter: Volume 1: Report, HL  Paper 50‐1, 1 November 2005, p.68, para.273 

We expect that, in order to meet this general obligation, the Trust will want to continue  setting a voluntary quota of at least the existing level. It will also wish to consider other  means of increasing opportunities. In this context, we welcome the BBC’s commitment to  operate a ‘window of creative competition’ for Radio 4, and expect it to identify further  opportunities in the future. The Trust will be required to keep the position under review.” 10   

10

 Department for Culture, Media & Sport, A public service for all: the BBC in the digital age, March 2006, p.42, paras.8.3.3‐8.3.4 

3.  THE RADIO BROADCASTING MARKET 
    The BBC has the greatest share of the United Kingdom radio marketplace, in terms of both  listening and expenditure. Commercial radio has existed since 1973, most significantly in  local markets where it has proven popular. Compared to some traditional media, radio’s  performance in maintaining its audience in recent years has remained relatively robust,  though the economic model for commercial radio is presently under stress from both  structural and cyclical economic factors.    Figure 1: shares of radio listening (% of total adult hours listened) 
1993 Q4 1995 Q4 1997 Q4 1999 Q4 2001 Q4 2003 Q4 2005 Q4 2007 Q4 2009 Q4

BBC Radio BBC Network Radio
analogue stations digital stations

54.9 44.0
44.0

47.2 37.1
37.1

47.9 38.3
38.3

51.3 40.5
40.5

53.4 42.0
42.0

52.9 42.0
41.0 1.0

55.1 44.0
42.4 1.6

55.4 45.4
43.6 1.8

55.2 46.7
44.4 2.3

BBC Local/Regional Commercial Radio National Commercial
analogue stations digital stations

10.9 42.6 8.0
8.0

10.1 49.7 10.7
10.7

9.6 49.5 10.0
10.0

10.8 46.7 8.3
8.3

11.3 44.6 7.8
7.8

10.9 45.3 9.6
7.2 2.4

11.1 42.8 10.1
7.7 2.4

10.0 42.4 11.3
7.7 3.6

8.5 42.6 10.4
6.7 3.7

Local Commercial Other 11 source: RAJAR  

34.7 2.5

39.1 3.1

39.5 2.6

38.4 2.0

36.8 2.1

35.7 1.9

32.7 2.1

31.1 2.2

32.2 2.2  

  In terms of audiences, the BBC presently accounts for 55% of all radio listening, of which the  greater part is attributed to the BBC’s five analogue national Networks (44% of all radio  listening). Commercial radio accounts for 43% of all radio listening, of which local radio is the  most significant part (32% of all radio listening). 12  Consequently, the BBC has the greatest  share of listening to national radio stations, whilst commercial radio has the greatest share  of listening to local radio stations.    Figure 2: radio industry funding (£m per annum) 
year BBC radio expenditure (£m) Commercial radio revenues (£m) TOTAL (£m) 13 source: Ofcom   2003 585 543 1,128 2004 607 551 1,158 2005 626 530 1,156 2006 614 512 1,126 2007 653 522 1,175 2008 643 505 1,148

 

  In 2008, the BBC accounted for 56% of UK radio industry funding, a proportion that has  increased steadily as a result of the decline in commercial radio sector revenues from a peak  in 2004. 14  In 2009, commercial radio revenues fell by 10% year‐on‐year, which is likely to  have further widened the difference in funding between the two sectors. 15    Although the revenues of the BBC and commercial radio sectors are relatively balanced,  their operational structures are very different, resulting in very different flows of funds. The  BBC dominates the market in national radio with its five analogue Networks, whereas  commercial radio dominates the local radio market with more than 300 locally licensed  stations. The cost structures of radio broadcasting stations comprise mostly ‘fixed costs’ 
11 12

 RAJAR   RAJAR, Q4 2009  13  Ofcom, The Communications Market 2009, August 2009, p.149, para. 3.1.1  14  ibid.  15  Radio Advertising Bureau 

10 

(which vary little by audience size or market size), resulting in very different expenditure  allocations as a result of commercial radio’s considerably larger number of station  operations compared to the BBC.    Figure 3: key flows of radio sector value (£m in 2007/8) 
BBC radio production (£m) transmission (£m) general & administrative (£m) rights (£m) sales & marketing (£m) EBITDA (£m) 16 source: Value Partners   405 47 91 ? ? 0 commercial radio 98 61 190 46 114 42

 

  In 2007/8, the greatest proportion (68%) of the BBC’s funding for radio was allocated to  programme production, whereas the greatest proportion of the commercial sector’s  revenues (55%) was allocated to administrative, marketing and sales costs. 17  As a result, the  BBC’s total expenditure on radio production was four times greater than that of the  commercial sector, despite commercial radio being required by the terms of its licenses to  produce approximately seven times more hours of output than BBC radio. 18    Figure 4: average costs of radio programme production (2007/8) 
BBC radio commercial radio programme costs (£m per annum) 405 75 number of radio stations 54 315 total hours output per annum 369,189 2,759,400 production costs per hour (£) 1,097 27   19 source: Grant Goddard [commercial radio hours output are estimated]  

  Of commercial radio’s £97.5m per annum expenditure on production, £22.9m was allocated  to the production of radio advertisements, leaving the remaining £74.6m per annum  estimated as commercial radio’s expenditure on programmes. 20  BBC expenditure on  programmes was estimated to be £405m, demonstrating the significant difference that  exists between the BBC and commercial radio sectors in terms of programme production  budgets. On an average hourly basis, it was estimated that the BBC spent 40 times more  (£1,097 per hour) than commercial radio (£27 per hour) on programme production in  2007/8.    This substantial gap between the average radio production costs per hour of the BBC and  commercial radio helps explain their markedly differing approaches to programme  production. Much of commercial radio output comprises music recordings interspersed with  live talk from a presenter, whereas much of the BBC’s output (particularly on its national  Networks) consists of pre‐recorded, crafted programmes produced by a production team  over a period of days or weeks.   
16

 Value Partners, UK Radio – Flow of Funds, 4 March 2009, pp.8‐9 [although BBC radio ‘cost of content’ was cited as £351m for  2007/8 in: National Audit Office, The Efficiency Of Radio Production At The BBC, 13 January 2009, p.12, Figure 3]  17  ibid.  18  Ofcom issues licenses for the commercial radio sector that mandate each station’s broadcast hours (most require 24 hours a  day)  19  Data sources: Value Partners, BBC Annual Report, Ofcom [The £405m BBC production cost figure used here was cited by  Value Partners, although the BBC Annual Report 2007/8 cited £459.9m]  20  Value Partners, UK Radio – Flow of Funds, 4 March 2009, p.73 

11 

Figure 5: number of analogue commercial radio stations and total commercial radio sector  revenues (£m at 2009 prices) 
310 315 317 350 268 272 300 242 248 255 226 250 205 172 200 143 122 150 106 100 50 231 206 218 0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 271 126 177 288 1,000 300 750 712 734 683 628 619 557 506 500 250 0

746 677 682 600

548 388 432 480

107

326

num ber of analogue local com m ercial radio stations [left axis] com m ercial radio revenues (£m @ 2009 prices) [right axis]

261

source: Ofcom, Radio Advertising Bureau  

21

 

  During the last decade, the gap in the funds available for expenditure on programme  content between the BBC and the commercial radio sector has been widened. This was the  result of continuing expansion in the number of operational commercial radio stations,  combined with a decline in aggregate sector revenues since 2004 in real terms. Although  some local commercial stations have closed as a result of financial difficulties, the sector as a  whole remains relatively large and is dependent upon diminishing revenues.    Figure 6: number of analogue local commercial radio stations and commercial radio  volume of radio listening (million adult hours per annum) by year 
300 250 200 150 100 50 0 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 num ber of analogue local com m ercial radio stations [left axis] volum e of listening to com m ercial radio (m illion hrs/annum ) [right axis] 172 177 205 226 242 248 255 261 268 272 288 310 315 317 300 106 107 122 126 143 9 16 19 19 19 19 26 33 38 42 48 49 49 50 60 76 350 50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0

source: JICRAR/RAJAR, Ofcom  

22

 

  In commercial radio, there exists an almost direct relationship between the volume of  listening a station attracts and the amount of revenues generated. Even before the current  advertising downturn impacted the sector, commercial radio’s listening had already  demonstrated slow decline for almost a decade. Consequently, it was inevitable that  revenues would also decline.   
 John Myers, An Independent Review of the Rules Governing Local Content on Commercial Radio, April 2009, p.23, Figure 4  [updated, 2009 number of stations estimated]  22  Ofcom & JICRAR/RAJAR [2009 number of stations estimated] 
21

12 

Many local commercial radio stations face the challenge of having to cover their largely fixed  costs with smaller ‘slices’ from the sector’s diminishing revenue ‘cake’. The overall  profitability of the commercial radio sector has been reduced so significantly that “current  estimates suggest the industry as a whole is now loss‐making,” according to a report in  January 2009 commissioned by the sector trade body, RadioCentre. 23    The current financial pressures on commercial radio make it very unlikely that the sector will  consider increasing its expenditure on externally produced content. A report commissioned  by Ofcom identified several reasons for the commercial radio sector’s limited use of  externally produced content:  • Commissioned programming is more expensive  • Most commercial radio output is live, DJ‐led music programming  • Few peak‐time opportunities exist for radio stations to share output  • Station format requirements or the need to identify with the audience on a local level. 24    The report estimated that the commercial radio sector had spent £6.9m per annum on the  production of syndicated programming in 2007/8, some of which was made in‐house for  networking across a radio group’s stations, and some of which was independently sourced. 25   This content included the ‘Hit40UK’ and ‘Fresh40’ chart shows, news bulletins provided by  IRN and Sky News, and entertainment news provided by UBC.    Figure 7: volume of listening to all radio (15+ adults, ‘000 hours per week) 
1,200,000

1,092,034

1,072,417

1,075,871

1,060,070

1,039,901

1,100,000 1,006,329

1,051,075

1,057,127

1,017,842

1,013,107

1,000,000

900,000 Q4 1999 Q4 2000 Q4 2001 Q4 2002 Q4 2003 Q4 2004 Q4 2005 Q4 2006 Q4 2007 Q4 2008 Q4 2009

987,585

source: RAJAR  

26

 

  Turning from the economics of the radio sector to its audiences, the medium’s listenership  has weathered the arrival of the internet, electronic games and ‘smart phones’ relatively  well. 91% of the adult population listens to radio every week, for an average 3 hours per  day. 27  However, although the total UK adult population has been growing by around 1% per  annum, total hours listened to all radio have been declining year‐on‐year since 2001. This is  because, although the same high proportion of the adult population continues to use radio  at least once a week, they are spending considerably less time listening. As a result, in Q4  2009, total hours listened to radio fell below 1bn per week, a phenomenon last recorded in  1999 when the adult population was 4m less than it is now. 
23 24

 Ingenious, Commercial Radio: The Drive To Digital, January 2009, p.2   Value Partners, UK Radio – Flow of Funds, 4 March 2009, p.75  25  ibid., p.77  26  RAJAR  27  RAJAR, Q1 2010 

13 

  Figure 8: weekly reach of all radio by age group (% of age group) 
93.4 92.6 91.2 91.9 91.4 93.1 92.5 92.6 91.2 92.6 95 92.0 92.0 91.7 90.7 90.7 91.6 90.6 89.5 89.8 90.3 91.3 91.3 90.9 92.4 87.0 55-64 Q4 2007 84.1 15-24 Q4 1999 25-34 Q4 2001
28

86.5

88.8 87.9

90

90.3

91.3

85

80 35-44 Q4 2003 45-54 Q4 2005 65+ Q4 2009

86.0 85.8 86.2 85.2 86.2

source: RAJAR  

 

  Audience data demonstrate that the weekly reach of the radio medium is declining  significantly amongst the 15‐24 year old age group, and that two age groups – 15‐24 and 25‐ 34 year olds – have fallen below 90% during the last decade.    Figure 9: average hours listened to all radio per listener by age group (hours per week  within age group) 
30 27.5 27.2 26.6 25.8 25.0 55-64 Q4 2007 25.7 26.9 26.9 26.1 25.2 24.9 65+ Q4 2009

25.3 26.0 25.7 25.5

22.0 22.5 21.7 21.7

20.6 21.8 21.5 19.6 18.3

22.3

15 15-24 Q4 1999 25-34 Q4 2001 35-44 Q4 2003 45-54 Q4 2005

16.1

18.2

20

20.0

20.9

23.8 23.1

25

23.7 23.9 23.2 22.5

25.6

source: RAJAR  

29

 

  Audience data also show that, within all adult age groups, the time spent listening to radio  has been in decline, most noticeably in the 15‐24 and 25‐34 year old age groups.    From this evidence, one might conclude that the radio medium is beginning to lose traction  amongst the younger adult age groups. However, it should be noted that the RAJAR data  cited here exclude:  • ‘Listen again’ on‐demand usage delivered via IP  • Time‐shifted listening accessed by ‘podcast’ download  • Listening to non‐broadcast ‘radio’ services such as Last.fm and Spotify.   
28 29

 RAJAR   RAJAR 

14 

Figure 10: total audio consumption by platform and age group (% of total audio consumed) 
100 6 5 4 20 75 38 34 2 16 4 14 3 12 7 11

50 76 25 55 60 81 82 85 82

0 15-18 live radio 15-24 non-radio
30

25-34

35-44

45-54 podcasts

55-64

65+

catch-up radio

unclassified radio

source: BBC Audio & Music  

 

  The 15‐24 and 25‐34 year old demographics are the most likely sections of the adult  population to be consuming traditional radio in non‐linear ways, and to be consuming non‐ broadcast ‘radio’ services via the internet. This was confirmed by BBC research which took a  wider definition than RAJAR of ‘radio listening’. It found that, amongst 15‐18 year olds,  traditional live radio now accounts for only 55% of their total audio consumption, whilst 38%  of listening is sourced from ‘non‐radio.’ 31  However, podcasts and ‘listen again’ (or ‘catch‐up’)  consumption remain only a very small proportion of total audio usage across all age groups.    Figure 11: total audio consumption by age group and gender (average hours consumed per  day per head) 
5 4 3.8 4.0 3.6 3.6 3.7 4.0 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.7 4.1 4.2 4.4 3.9 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.4 3.3 3.8 3.6

3

2

1

0 15-18 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 Total 65+ Male 65+ Female 15-18 Female 15-24 Female 25-34 Female 35-44 Female 45-54 Female 55-64 Female 65+ Male 15-18 Male 15-24 Male 25-34 Male 35-44 Male 45-54 Male 55-64 Women Men

source: BBC Audio & Music  

32

 

  Once all sources of audio consumption are measured, as opposed to only traditional live  broadcast radio (as in the RAJAR survey), it is evident that the time spent listening to all  ‘audio’ remains robust and the volumes are remarkably similar between adult age groups  and genders.   

30 31 32

 Margo Swadley, BBC Audio & Music, Is radio dead? Share of Ear Research, April 2009, p.18   ibid., p.18   ibid., p.11 

15 

These BBC data should be very encouraging for the radio sector because they demonstrate  that ‘audio’, in the widest sense, remains a very significant part of the population’s leisure  time, across all demographics. The challenge for the traditional radio sector is to maintain  the audience’s interest in ‘radio’ audio, particularly for young people, and to offer  sufficiently compelling content to convince them not to migrate to non‐traditional audio  sources such as personal audio players or online music applications.     Although these data offer evidence that demand for the radio medium as a whole is likely to  be strong, the commercial radio sector continues to face a combination of structural and  cyclical challenges that has damaged its short‐term viability. Additionally, a significant  proportion of commercial radio sector’s profits have been diverted into expenditure on DAB  digital radio infrastructure during the last decade. At present, there is no indication that the  growing gap between the BBC and the commercial sector’s levels of expenditure on  programme content will be halted or reversed.    An analyst report on the commercial radio sector, commissioned by Ofcom in 2009,  concluded that:  • “Programming costs, spent mainly on bringing on board high quality talent, are  extremely important to maintain the listener base of the station  • Most [commercial radio] stations are already running extremely lean and there are few  opportunities to reduce costs  • The impact of lower revenues could be severe on stations which are either loss‐making or  currently operating with low margins.”33    As a result, it is likely that the independent radio production sector will continue to be  largely reliant on the BBC for commissions, outside of the few networked chart shows  already broadcast on commercial radio.    However, the long‐term audience prospects for the audio medium as a whole would appear  to remain robust.   

33

 Value Partners, UK Radio – Flow of Funds, 4 March 2009, p.90 

16 

4.  THE INDEPENDENT RADIO  PRODUCTION SECTOR 
    In the television medium, the concept of ‘independent production’ is widely understood.  Most television programmes are recorded in advance of transmission, rather than broadcast  in real time. It would prove impossible for one person to single‐handedly produce a  broadcast‐quality television programme. The production process usually consists of a team  of people with different skills who collectively work together over a period of time (days or  weeks) with the end product often being a pre‐recorded 30‐minute or one‐hour programme.  Thus, an independently produced television programme can quite easily be defined as one  produced by a team of people who are not employed directly by the broadcaster.    By comparison, the concept of ‘independent production’ in the radio medium is considerably  more ambiguous. The majority of radio output is broadcast live, rather than pre‐recorded,  because immediacy is one of the medium’s advantages over television. To the average  listener, a radio show is entirely the on‐air presenter(s) because they hear nothing more.  There is little understanding of the resources required to bring that on‐air voice to the radio  receiver. This is the result of another of the radio medium’s characteristics, its intimacy,  which offers the listener the closest thing to a one‐to‐one experience within mass  communication broadcast technology.    In the television medium, an ‘independent production’ is defined in law:    “In this article “independent producer” means a producer –  (a) Who is not an employee (whether or not on temporary leave of absence) of a  broadcaster;  (b) Who, subject to paragraph (7), does not have a shareholding greater than 25 per  cent in a broadcaster; and  (c) Which is not a body corporate in which any one UK broadcaster has a  shareholding greater than 25 per cent or in which any two or more UK broadcasters  together have an aggregate shareholding greater than 50 per cent.”34    The legislation proceeds to set out, in some detail, a framework that determines the criteria  not only to qualify as an ‘independent producer’ but also for a programme to qualify as  independently produced. This detail has been developed over the period of two decades  that has followed the European Parliament’s adoption of the ‘Television Without Frontiers’  Directive in 1989, of which Article 5 stated:    “Member States shall ensure, where practicable and by appropriate means, that  broadcasters reserve at least 10% of their transmission time, excluding the time appointed to  news, sports events, games, advertising and teletext services, or alternatively, at the  discretion of the Member State, at least 10% of their programming budget, for European  works created by producers who are independent of broadcasters.” 35   

34

35

 Broadcasting: The Broadcasting (Qualifying Programmes and Independent Productions) Order 2009, Statutory Instrument  2009 No. XX, p.5   Commission of the European Communities, Council Directive 89/552/EEC, 3 October 1989, Article 5 

17 

Although this Directive referred generically to ‘broadcasters’, it was never subsequently  applied to the radio medium. In 2005, when an extension of the Directive was being  considered by the European Union, an impact assessment commissioned by Ofcom had  noted:    “The European Commission has stated that radio will not be covered by the extension, but it  is possible that the European Parliament will argue that radio services, and especially those  provided over TV sets, DAB receivers and mobile handsets where radio is linked to visual  images, should be included within the scope of the new Directive.” 36    However, to date, radio has continued to remain outside of the scope of the Directive. As a  result, the commitment by the BBC to independent radio productions in its current  Agreement is unilateral and does not apply to the commercial radio sector. There appears to  be no more robust a definition of an ‘independent production’ than that contained within  the BBC Agreement:    “material made by producers external to the BBC.” 37    Similarly, the trade group for independent radio producers, the Radio Independents Group  [RIG], stated on its web site:    “If you produce radio programming for a UK‐based broadcaster or platform on an  independent basis, then RIG is for you!” 38    However, the definition of an independent producer in the radio sector is muddied  considerably by several factors:  • Unlike the television medium, in radio it is common practice (in commercial radio more  so than in the BBC) for programmes to be produced and presented by a single person  • The services of radio presenters are sometimes contracted to a radio station by a  production company that is established as a conduit for the presenter’s revenues, even  though the presenter may work alone on their radio show  • A significant proportion of the workforce in commercial radio is employed on a freelance  or casual basis.    In this respect, data from the Skillset Workforce Census have demonstrated the differences  in working practices between BBC radio and commercial radio. Only 19% of the BBC radio  workforce was recorded as freelance, compared to 38% in commercial radio. In the  occupational groups of ‘radio broadcasting’ and ‘radio production’, across the entire radio  sector, 37% and 32% respectively of workers were recorded as freelance. Skillset noted that  its results probably underestimated the true picture, as a result of the data collection  methodology, so that, in fact, “freelancers will make up an even higher proportion of the  overall labour pool.” 39    In its early days, commercial radio in the United Kingdom had been organised internally  much along the lines of existing BBC radio structures, with each programme produced by a  team of dedicated staff, most of whom were likely to be station employees. However, as a 
 Indepen, Extension of the Television Without Frontiers Directive: An Impact Assessment: Final Report For Ofcom, September  2005, p.34  37  Department For Culture, Media & Sport, Broadcasting: An Agreement Between Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for Culture,  Media and Sport and the British Broadcasting Corporation, Cm 6872, July 2006, p.30  38  http://www.radioindependentsgroup.org/about%20rig.htm  39  Skillset, Radio Sector Profile, [undated], [not paginated] 
36

18 

result of sector consolidation and budget cuts, programme ‘teams’ are now a rarity in  commercial radio outside of the key daily shows (‘breakfast’ and ‘drivetime’). Much of the  workforce in production and presentation roles is now employed on a freelance basis. This  structural change has offered commercial radio station owners increased flexibility in staff  deployment and has minimised their exposure to potentially expensive employment  contract issues.    As a result, significant proportions of commercial radio output could be considered to be  ‘independent productions’, whereby the station owner pays the presenter (or their  production company) a fixed amount per show under the terms of a supply contract. At  larger local commercial radio stations, the content of a presenter’s show may have to follow  a programme ‘format’ whereas, at smaller stations, the content is very much the entire  product of the presenter’s creativity and ingenuity, sometimes including the particular songs  that are played. By this definition, a considerable volume of commercial radio output is in  the hands of independent radio producers.    At the same time, the ‘freelance’ situation in BBC local radio has moved in the opposite  direction. For a long time, many specialist evening and weekend shows within BBC local  radio were presented and produced by casual staff who might have had little direct  association with the station’s employees who produced the mainstream daytime output.  However, in recent years, there has been a concerted effort to integrate these programme  makers into the station fabric by offering them part‐time staff contracts, providing them  with relevant training and creating paths for their career development within the BBC.    The existence of this ‘grey area’ in the radio sector between the definitions of ‘freelancers’  and ‘independent producers’ is not confined to the United Kingdom. In the United States, a  benchmark study in 2004 of the “public radio independent sector” found that “independent  producers fill 2% of public radio’s content stream” and generate US$1.3 million revenues per  annum. However, the report noted that the terms “‘producer’, ‘independent’ and  ‘freelancer’ are synonymous” and explained:    “The focus of the study was primarily individual freelancers who work on commission – that  is, sole proprietors, commentators and station‐based producers who generate freelance  income apart from their regular radio jobs.”40    Thus, in the United States, the term ‘independent radio producer’ is applied to a freelance  presenter/producer who may also be employed by the radio station in a separate capacity.  Confusingly, the American report went on to define “independent production houses” as  “another important sector of the independent landscape” whose content stream is  “different from those of freelance independents.” 41  It appears that the role of the American  survey’s ‘independent producers’ might be closer in our parlance to on‐air ‘experts’,  ‘analysts’ and ‘commentators’ used by broadcasters to comment on news developments. In  turn, what we call ‘independent producers’ seem to be labelled in the US as ‘independent  production houses’.    In the United States, the Association of Independents in Radio trade association is focused  exclusively on the public radio sector and describes itself as:   
 Sue Schardt, Mapping Public Radio’s Independent Landscape: Opportunities For Innovation: Final Report, Schardt Media, 13  February 2006, p.1  41  ibid. 
40

19 

“a global social and professional network of 750 producers – both independent and those  employed by media organizations – representing an extensive range of disciplines, from  National Public Radio news journalists and reporters, to sound artists, station station‐based  producers, podcasters, gearheads, media activists, and more.” 42    In the Republic of Ireland, the situation is the opposite, with the commercial radio sector  being the main buyer of independent radio productions. According to the Association of  Independent Radio Producers of Ireland [AIRPI] trade association:    “The commercial radio sector makes up the bulk of the potential individual outlets for  [independent radio] productions. Local commercial stations targeting a broad‐based  listenership in their local franchise area are probably most open to taking work from  independent producers….. “ 43    In Ireland, the overwhelming majority of independent radio producers are sole traders for  whom radio work is a part‐time occupation, according to an AIRPI analysis of its  membership. 44  It found that the independent radio production sector in Ireland only  supported seven full‐time equivalent posts. As in the United States, the independent radio  production sector in Ireland was populated mostly by self‐employed individuals, rather than  by companies.    In the United Kingdom, our rather vague definition of ‘independent radio production’ does  not seem to bother the sector itself. Because the BBC is such a significant part of the market  for the commissioning of independent radio productions, the sector defines itself largely as  those who supply the BBC.    Skillset, the industry skills and training body for the creative media industries, only recently  started to consider ‘independent radio production’ as a distinct sector in its workforce  census. Its latest survey estimated that 1,000 persons were employed in independent radio  production in 2009, up from 400 in 2006. It found that, in 2009, 62% of the sector’s  workforce was freelance, 30% was female, 3.5% was from ethnic minorities and 0% was  disabled. However, interpretation of these data must be tempered by the fact that the  estimates were extrapolated from only five completed questionnaires returned from sector  participants in 2009.45  As a result, Skillset noted:    “This is one area of intelligence gathering that needs to be addressed to build a clearer  picture of the size of this community in future.” 46    The Radio Independents Group has conducted two surveys of its membership to date, one  mostly quantitative and the other mostly qualitative. Its 2008 survey (with returns from 54%  of its members) found that:    • 73% were located in London  • 67% were constituted as limited companies  • The average trading period was 10 years  • 54% of staff were employed full‐time 
 http://www.airmedia.org/PageInfo.php?PageID=1&LayOut=1   Maria Gibbons, An Analysis of the Independent Radio Production Sector In Ireland, The Association of Independent Radio  Producers of Ireland, 10 August 2009, p.36  44  ibid., p.17  45  Skillset, 2009 Employment Census, December 2009, pp.7, 10, 14, 16, 19 & 22  46  Skillset, Radio Sector Profile, [undated], [not paginated] 
43 42

20 

• The majority of businesses generated revenues of less than £500,000 per annum  • 83% of radio programme sales derived from the BBC  • BBC Radio 4 alone generated 45% of commissioning revenues. 47    The second survey by the Radio Independents Group focused more on qualitative responses  to questions about the commissioning processes and it found, amongst other things, that:  • 9 out of 10 members had pitched programme ideas to BBC Radio 4, the majority in every  commissioning round  • Around a quarter of members had pitched ideas regularly to commercial radio. 48    In 2008, a report commissioned by the BBC from PriceWaterhouse Coopers concluded that:  • In the absence of BBC commissioning, the size of the independent radio production  sector would be negligible  • There is little commissioning by commercial radio stations from the independent radio  production sector  • Expenditure by the BBC on independent radio productions accrues an economic benefit  to these producers. 49    The dependence of independent radio producers upon the BBC for commissions is starkly  different from the situation in the television medium, where the BBC generates only about  20% of the independent television production sector’s revenues. 50    In 2007, an expansion in the demand for independent radio productions had been  anticipated, following the award by Ofcom of the licence for a second national digital radio  multiplex to 4 Digital Group, whose majority shareholder was Channel 4 television. The  group’s plans included the launch of eight new national radio stations, and its prospectus  stated:    “Channel 4's biggest ambition is to do for radio what it has done for TV. If the commissioning  structure of radio can be changed in line with these ambitions, then the radio audience will  grow as new talent and creativity is encouraged in the medium.” 51    The 4 Digital Group licence application promised:    "Currently, commercial radio offers few opportunities for independents; producers must rely  on the BBC as the sole commissioner for many genres. Channel 4 Radio Limited intends to  change that by commissioning independents to produce many of the distinctive elements  within key day‐parts and built‐programmes across its three new services. Over 25 years,  Channel 4 Television has built a remarkable relationship with the independent television  production sector – nurturing and developing companies in every region and nation of the UK  and providing a platform for a genuine diversity of voices. That approach and experience will  inform Channel 4 Radio Limited’s relationship with independent radio producers. Channel 4  Radio Limited’s presence in the independent commissioning market will be at least as great  as the BBC’s, creating a more open, competitive and creative environment for producers." 52     
47 48

 Radio Independents Group, RIG Membership Survey: Analysis & Report, January 2009   Radio Independents Group, Survey of Radio Commissioning Procedures, 2008  49  PriceWaterhouse Coopers, The Economic Impact Of The BBC On The UK Creative Economy, Main Report, July 2008, p.116,  para 11.3.2  50  Deloitte, The Economic Impact Of The BBC: 2008/09, 2010, p.58, para. 6.3  51  http://www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/W/wtc4/scheduling/4radio.html  52  ibid. 

21 

However, in 2008, Channel 4 informed Ofcom of its withdrawal from the 4 Digital Group and,  as a result, neither the digital radio multiplex, the eight new radio channels nor the proposed  content materialised. Ofcom decided not to re‐advertise the licence.    Another potential boost to independent radio production occurred in 2007 when the  Guardian Media Group announced a fund of £1m for new programme commissions for  broadcast on its commercial radio stations. It said the fund would be “the biggest single  investment in content in commercial radio” and would “encourage new programme makers  to the sector.” 53   However, having announced its initial wave of programme commissions in  2008, no further announcements were made about subsequent acquisitions of independent  radio productions.    These two initiatives created expectations within the independent radio production sector  that additional sources of commissioning would finally come on‐stream alongside the BBC.  The loss of the opportunities promised by Channel 4 remains a continuing topic of  conversation amongst independent production companies and within the BBC, where the  entry of a new public service radio broadcaster might have alleviated the pressure on the  BBC as the only significant commissioner of independent radio programmes.    The BBC’s own analysis of the structure of independent radio production sector concluded  that:  • “The industry is comprised of a small number of relatively large players (turnover of £1m  or more) and a long tail of very small businesses  • Two‐thirds of indies received an income of less than £50,000 from the BBC in 2008/9  • The three largest players accounted for 25% of the BBC’s spend on the sector  • This [25%] figure will be significantly higher in 2009/10, as one indie fared particularly  well in the Spring commissioning rounds  • 40% of contracts issued [are] worth less than £8,000.”54    Figure 12: BBC Network Radio expenditure on independently produced programmes by  year (£ ‘000 per annum) 
20,000 17,204 2008/9

13,814

13,608

12,762

10,000

5,000

0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 1999/2000 2007/8

actual (£ '000)

11,603

12,363

RPI indexed (£ '000 at 2008/9 prices)
55

14,211

15,412

16,202

15,000

16,517

source: BBC Audio & Music & Grant Goddard  

 

 

 http://www.gmgradiosales.co.uk/?section=news&page=archive&id=59   BBC Audio & Music, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, pp.5‐6  55  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in spend in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary liquidation of  Wise Buddah] & Office for National Statistics, Retail Price Index RP02 
54

53

22 

BBC Network Radio spent £17.2m on commissioning programmes from the independent  production sector in 2008/9. 56  Additionally, smaller sums were spent on independent radio  productions by BBC English Regions and BBC Nations radio stations.    The value of Network Radio independent radio commissions has increased over the last five  years. However, after adjustment for price inflation, Network Radio expenditure on  independently commissioned radio content in 2008/9 was £0.7m less in real terms than it  had been in 1999/2000. 57    Figure 13: volume of independently produced radio programmes commissioned by BBC  Network Radio by year (hours per annum) 
8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 1999/2000 2008/9 3,744 3,640 3,550 2,551 3,308 3,520 3,732 3,744 6,634 6,974

source: BBC Audio & Music  

58

 

  The volume of programmes commissioned by Network Radio has increased significantly  during the last two years, largely as a result of the extension of independently produced  programmes to the BBC’s digital‐only Network stations. The number of hours commissioned  externally increased by 86% between 1999/2000 and 2008/9 to 6,974 hours. 59    Figure 14: average cost per hour of independently produced radio output commissioned  by BBC Network Radio by year (£ per hour) 
5,000 4,548 3,690 3,738 3,737 4,037 4,130 4,411

4,000

3,595

3,000

2,442

2,467

2,000

1,000

0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9 1999/ 2000

source: BBC Audio & Music  

60

 

 BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author   Office for National Statistics, Retail Price Index RP02  58  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in volume in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary liquidation of  Wise Buddah]  59  ibid.  60  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in spend in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary liquidation of  Wise Buddah] 
57

56

23 

  The substantial increase in the volume of the BBC’s independent radio commissions during  the last two years, combined with the almost static total value of commissions over the  same period, has resulted in a dramatic fall in the average ‘cost per hour’ of externally  commissioned radio content from £4,411 in 2006/7 to £2,467 per hour in 2008/9. 61    Figure 15: percentage of ‘eligible hours’ attributed to independent radio productions  broadcast on BBC Network Radio by year (%) 
16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 1999/2000 2008/9 9.6 13.9 13.8 13.3 12.4 13.4 14.2 13.5 13.7 12.8

source: BBC Audio & Music  

62

 

  In 2008/9, independent productions accounted for 13.7% of BBC Network Radio ‘eligible  output’, a proportion that has remained relatively constant since 1999/2000, the earliest  year for which data was made available. 63    Figure 16: percentage of total broadcast hours attributed to independent radio  productions broadcast on BBC Network Radio by year (%) 
10 8.4 8 8.9

6 4.0 4 4.3 4.5 4.8 4.8

2

0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 1999/2000 2008/9

source: BBC Audio & Music  

64

 

  As a proportion of BBC Network Radio total broadcast hours, independent productions  accounted for 8.9% in 2008/9, a significant increase from 4.0% in 2002/3. 65 
 ibid.   BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in volume in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary liquidation of  Wise Buddah]  63  ibid.  64  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author 
62 61

24 

  Figure 17: percentage of programme expenditure attributed to independent radio  productions broadcast on BBC Network Radio by year (%) 
12.5 12 10 8 6.2 6 4 2 0 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 1999/2000 2008/9 5.8 5.9 6.0 11.8 12.0 14 12.8

% of eligible ouput
66

% of total broadcast output

source: BBC Audio & Music  

 

  Although the proportion by volume of independent radio productions on BBC Network Radio  has increased, the proportion by expenditure has remained static, measured both in terms  of eligible output and total broadcast output.    These data provide an outline of the structure of the independent radio production sector.  In order to build up a more detailed picture, a quantitative survey of the businesses  operating in independent radio production was conducted for this report. 

65 66

 Ibid.   ibid. 

25 

5.  THE PRESENT BBC SYSTEMS FOR  COMMISSIONING INDEPENDENT RADIO  PRODUCTIONS 
    The present systems within BBC Network Radio for commissioning independent radio  content would appear to be largely a product of the separate development of each Network  over time. As a result, the independent radio production sector is required to respond to the  demands of individual commissioners in each Network. The BBC has acknowledged that “the  [independent radio production] sector’s structure is, in part, the result of the fractured  nature of BBC commissions.” 67    Having been created as the first of the National Networks, Radio 4’s internal structures  remain the cornerstone of BBC Network Radio. Whole departments continue to service what  might seem to some outside of the BBC to be remarkably esoteric programme purposes in  the multi‐tasking 21st century. Radio 4 remains organised as a group of in‐house production  departments, such as ‘General Factual’ and ‘Specialist Factual’, the former supplying  programmes only to the World Service , whilst the latter supplies programmes to several  stations, including Radios 3 and 4. The BBC’s popular music stations are organised into what  the BBC calls ‘integrated networks.’    As a result of the BBC National Networks having been organised into competing silos that  have been mostly housed in separate buildings since the post‐War period, duplication of  functions has continued to exist across much of the structures. 68  For example, the  commissioning of comedy programmes for Radio 2 remains discreet from the commissioning  of comedy programmes for Radio 4. This is not to suggest that attempts have not been made  within the BBC to modernise and rationalise such duplications.    A proposal was made internally in 2005 to create a ‘BBC Network Radio Comedy Strategy’.  Its aim was to ensure that:  • “There is complimentary scheduling  • Similar formats are not being commissioned across the networks  • Major talent does not appear on more than one network at a time  • Talent is developed and looked after by Radio so they have a long term relationship with  us  • Talent costs do not spiral by one network inflating costs for another  • Relationships with TV are developed and co‐orientated  • Issues to do with talent, producers, production, independents, rights etc can be shared  • Good ideas not suitable for one network are not lost  • With potentially four networks all commissioning more comedy, we are approaching  major and ‘new’ talent and their relationships in a planned fashion.” 69    This strategy to adopt a holistic approach to comedy commissioning on BBC Network Radio  was apparently rejected at the time. However, in recent months, a similar proposal to adopt 
67 68

 BBC Audio & Music, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.6   Sean Street, Crossing The Ether: British Public Service Radio And Commercial Competition 1922‐1945, John Libbey Publishing,  2006, p.192  69  Caroline Raphael, BBC Network Radio Comedy Strategy, BBC, January 2005, p.5 

26 

a broader strategy for the comedy genre has re‐surfaced, this time in the form of a cross‐ media BBC ‘Comedy Network’ that would provide a co‐ordinated approach to  commissioning across all television and radio channels. 70      [ ]      In the present commissioning systems for independent productions, each Network has  produced its own set of explanatory documents, available publicly from the BBC  Commissioning website, that describe the individual systems and programme needs, from  which the following narrative is summarised. 71    Additionally, a ‘Statement of Operations for Radio’ has set out an overview of the BBC  commissioning system for radio programmes. It includes the following explanations:    Eligible hours:  • “Not all types of output constitute ‘eligible hours’. News programmes, repeats and  continuity announcements, for example, are currently excluded …  • From April 2006, the 10% Quota Requirement was extended to eligible hours on the five  Nations networks and also to live sports programming  • From 1st April 2007, eligible hours on the five national digital networks will also be  subject to and included in the calculation of the 10% Quota Requirement  • The Quota Requirement may be met from anywhere within the eligible hours of the radio  portfolio. In practice, each network is generally asked to meet or exceed the target  percentage.” 72    Principles Underpinning Commissioning:  • “Commissions seek to bring audiences and the Licence Fee payer great programmes  which represent the best possible value for money  • The BBC believes this is best achieved by a combination of in‐house productions and  Independent Productions, with an element of competition between the two sectors  • In some cases, the BBC will commission directly from its in‐house production base  • The BBC is committed to a fair and equal treatment of all potential bidders and a  transparent commissioning process  • All eligible suppliers will be treated equally and provided with equivalent information, so  none gains an unfair advantage  • Commissioning decisions will be based solely on creative merit of the proposal and the  value for money offered to the audience and the Licence Fee payer.” 73    Statement of Operation:  • “Networks may operate a list of registered suppliers from whom all Independent  Productions are commissioned  • Some programmes may be commissioned through an invitation to tender to a number of  suppliers selected by objective criteria  • The aim is always to find the most efficient, effective and fair way to identify and  commission the best ideas 
70 71

 BBC Trust, Service Review: BBC Radio 2 and BBC 6 Music, February 2010, p.31, para.85   http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/  72  BBC Audio & Music, Commissioning: Statement of Operation for Radio, [undated], pp.1‐2  73  ibid., p.3 

27 

• •

Encouraging producers to devise and submit more proposals than can be reasonably  considered is a waste of time and money, both for them and the BBC  It is also pointless to invite proposals from individuals or organisations unable to  demonstrate the ability to deliver what the BBC requires.” 74 

  Categories of Commissions:  • “Universal or ‘Open’ slots: … open to all and enable the commissioner to seek proposals  from the widest range of potential producers  • Open to External Suppliers Only: … in‐house departments are excluded. In addition, some  stations may limit these slots to suppliers on a registered supplier list or to selected  suppliers (where appropriate due to the specific needs/experience of a production)  • Limited to Selected Suppliers: … it may be desirable to limit bids to suppliers who have  experience of a particular genre, access to key talent and/or other specialist skills.  Proposals will then be invited from a suitable range of producers who meet the  requirements  • Topical Commissions: Networks involved in current affairs programming routinely leave  some slots unfilled until close to transmission, against the need to transmit topical  programmes at short notice. … Networks may approach suppliers with a known capacity  or expertise in order to meet programme requirements which arise at short notice.” 75    The commissioning procedures for each Network are summarised in turn:    Radio 4    According to the BBC, “Radio 4 is the network with the most pre‐recorded ‘built’  programmes and provides a significant opportunity for the development of creativity and  best value through competition.” 76    Radio 4 only commissions programmes from independent producers that are included on its  ‘Registered Supplier List’. The four‐page application form to be considered for inclusion on  this List explains:    “Please note that only companies with significant experience in production at network level  can be considered for registration.” 77    In fact, the List is not a single list, but a set of seven Lists delineated by programme genre:  ‘general features’, ‘documentaries’, ‘science and natural history’, ‘drama’, ‘comedy’, ‘single  voice readings’ and ‘political talks.’ The application form advises:    “Within the supplier list, we also operate an eligibility list, restricting specialist genres to  suppliers with relevant expertise.” 78    As a result, an independent radio producer can be eligible for inclusion on one Radio 4  Supplier List, but not on another, dependent upon whether Radio 4 considers that, within a  specific genre, an independent producer has demonstrated:  • “Relevant expertise 

74 75

 ibid., pp.3‐4   ibid., pp.4‐5  76  ibid., p.5  77  BBC Radio 4, Application Form For The Radio 4 Supplier List, 22 February 2010, p.1  78  ibid. 

28 

• Significant experience in production at network level.” 79    Furthermore, acceptance of a supplier onto a specific List is time limited:    “If a supplier fails to win a commission in 3 successive rounds, Radio 4 reserves the right to  drop them from the list.” 80    According to Radio 4, existing suppliers and new applicants are assessed against the  following set of criteria that have been agreed with the Office of Fair Trading:  • “Our editorial and schedule requirements  • Our editorial judgement on quality  • Proven ability to deliver the desired genre  • A degree of innovation  • A company’s ability to meet the BBC’s regulations, such as on Rights and Health and  Safety  • Risk appraisal  • Track record in budget management and meeting delivery deadlines  • The appeal of talent.” 81    It is understood that the involvement of the Office of Fair Trading derived from a supplier  complaint during the 1990s. However, it is self‐evident that the criteria and the ability to be  accepted onto and to remain on a Supplier List continue to be based upon considerably  subjective criteria, exemplified by the use of phrases such as ‘relevant expertise’, ‘significant  experience’, ‘proven ability’, a ‘track record’ and, most notably, ‘our editorial judgement on  quality’.    Furthermore, the requirement that an applicant must have “significant experience of  production at network [radio] level” could appear akin to a ‘Catch 22’ condition. As long as  Radio 4 continues to be the only BBC Network broadcasting some programme genres, how  would it be possible for a new independent supplier to offer previous production experience  in that genre at Network Radio level … unless they have experience as a former Radio 4  producer?    Some stakeholders in the independent radio production sector suggested, during the course  of consultations, that Radio 4’s use of Supplier Lists demonstrates that considerable effort is  exercised in this ‘gatekeeper’ role, which they believed could be more productively  redirected towards attracting the UK’s best and creative ideas for on‐air execution.  Inevitably, because the BBC is the only broadcaster of some radio programme genres, it is  not competing with other broadcasters to attract potential suppliers. As a result, it is  understandable that much effort could become focused on limiting the inflow of creative  ideas, rather than on the potential ‘opportunity cost’ of not having commissioned  programme ideas that, if they were not made for BBC radio, might be unlikely to be made at  all.    Radio 4 also offers additional opportunities for external programme commissions:   

79 80 81

 ibid.   ibid.   ibid. 

29 

“Unlike other networks, Radio 4 has a formal commitment to a minimum of 10%  independent production, coupled to a 10% Window of Creative Competition (WoCC) which is  open to both independent and in‐house producers.” 82    In total, 118 suppliers are currently listed in Radio 4’s ‘Register of Independent Production  Companies’, of which 71 received commissions in 2008/9. 83  Geographically, 58% of the  companies on the Register are based in London, with a further 16% based in Southern  England, 12% in the remainder of England, 7% in Scotland, 6% in Wales and 1% in Ireland. 84    Within Radio 4, decisions to commission external producers are made by four  commissioners, each working across a group of genres, who also have responsibilities for  commissioning in‐house productions. Thus, there is no single external commissioning ‘touch  point’ for Radio 4, and independent producers whose work crosses several genres are  required to deal with separate departments.    Registered suppliers are sent copies of the guidelines for each commissioning round, held in  Spring and Autumn. 85    Batch Commissioning  From April 2009, Radio 4 introduced a ‘batch commissioning’ initiative which represented a  significant change for independent producers. According to Radio 4, ‘batch commissioning’ is  the process of “tendering volumes of business in some slots (batching), rather than  commissioning numerous individual programmes on a piecemeal basis.” In its proposal  document, Radio 4 argued that ‘batch commissioning’ is “not a new idea”, but rather “a  familiar and tested system in the commissioning of Radio 4 [book] readings.” 86      Part of the BBC rationale for ‘batch commissioning’ appeared to be an attempt to reduce the  number of suppliers who pitch ideas to Radio 4 and who are subsequently commissioned.  Radio 4 noted:  • “As the number of suppliers rises and available business is progressively subdivided, even  fewer suppliers can hope to win a significant share of commissions  • We expect batching will generate more effective editorial focus by encouraging more  creative relationships with key suppliers  • Reduce transaction effort.” 87    However, Radio 4 was sensitive to the outcome of a reduction in its number of suppliers:  • “There is a risk of losing diversity of output  • There will still be large areas of output open to normal competition through  commissioning rounds  • We do not see batching as a way of concentrating all our business in a few super  indies.” 88    Another part of the rationale was to reduce the costs of external commissions, at a time  when Radio 4 programme budgets are evidently being reduced year‐on‐year: 

82 83

 BBC Audio & Music, Commissioning: Statement of Operation for Radio, [undated], p.5   BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author  84  BBC Audio & Music, Register of Independent Production Companies, 9 February 2010, pp.1‐8  85  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/radio4.shtml  86  BBC Radio 4, Radio 4 batch commissioning plan,  presentation for BBC Fair Trading, 13 March 2009, pp.1‐2  87  ibid., p.1  88  ibid., p.2 

30 

• • •   Radio 4 was also keen to stress the advantages of ‘batch commissioning’ for suppliers:  • “More mature independent [production] sector  • More secure business planning  • Ability to commit to staff and training  • More constructive, creative editorial relationship with Radio 4  • All editor‐supplier conversations will be focused and creative  • Suppliers will save very substantial time currently spent in fruitless development.” 90    Radio 4’s argument for ‘batch commissioning’ was supported by the citation of selected  data:  • The growth of its approved supplier list from 71 companies in 2001/2 to 125 in 2008/9  • The growth in independent commissioning from 10% of eligible hours in 2001/2 to 13%  on 2008/9. 91    Figure 18: value of BBC Radio 4 commissions from independent producers (£ ‘000 per  annum) and number of companies on Radio 4 Supplier List by year 
140 120 125 2008/9 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 1999/ 2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 0 71 95 135 8,000

“Internal BBC pressure to maximise efficiency also requires us to ask whether our  commissioning process could not be getting better value for money from reduced  resources  It will save significant management time, making better use of limited resources  Less time filtering dross, more for refining gold  Better deals through bigger contracts.” 89 

6,000

4,000

2,000

num ber of Radio 4 approved suppliers [left axis] Radio 4 value of independent com m issions (£ '000) [right axis]

source: BBC Audio & Music  

92

 

  Radio 4 argued that “this expansion [in supplier numbers] is disproportionate to the growth  in indie commissioning.” 93  However, as demonstrated in Figure 18, it appears that the  annual value of Radio 4 independent commissions has increased roughly in line with the  number of suppliers on the Radio 4 Supplier Lists. There appears to be little evidence of a  disproportionate growth in supplier numbers.    Additionally, Radio 4’s proposal document noted that a small number of companies had  received a significant proportion of its commissions in 2007/8: 
89 90

 ibid., p.1   ibid., pp.1 & 6  91  ibid., p.3  92  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author  93  BBC Radio 4, Radio 4 batch commissioning plan,  presentation for BBC Fair Trading, 13 March 2009, p.3 

31 

• “68 indies got 328 commissions = c. £7m  • Top 10 by number = 48% of total value  • 48 got 5 or fewer  • 21 companies got just 1  • 10 got less than £10k.” 94    Inevitably, the introduction of ‘batch commissioning’ will concentrate an even greater  proportion of these commissions in the hands of fewer suppliers, which seemed to be one of  the policy objectives.    The initial proposal was to apply ‘batch commissioning’ only to 14% of Radio 4’s  independent programme commissions by value (11% by hours). 95  However, in future, if the  initiative were to be extended to a greater proportion of the Network’s output, it would be  likely to further reduce the number of external suppliers to Radio 4. At present, of the  National Networks, Radio 4 exhibits the greatest diversity of suppliers of independently  commissioned programmes.    Radio 3    Radio 3 operates two commissioning rounds annually, one for drama (plus the series ‘The  Wire’) and the other for its remaining genres. There is no Supplier List in operation, and  independent producers register to be sent commissioning round information and editorial  briefs. 96    Radio 2    Radio 2 stated that:    “The majority of programmes – the core output – are long‐running strands which are  produced either by Radio 2 producers or a small group of Independent companies. When the  strands produced by Independents come up for renewal, they are put out for tender using the  process described below. Commissioning rounds take place twice a year to complement the  core output. It is within these rounds that ideas are sought for a wide range of  documentaries, specialist music, comedy, event and other programming. Readings are  commissioned alongside special events or seasons.” 97    Commissioning rounds are held in Spring and early Autumn, for which information is sent to  prospective producers who ask to be added to the mailing list.    In addition to its regular commissions, Radio 2 has introduced a scheme called ‘Ideas  Welcome’ which, it explained:    “[is] designed to allow for ideas that carry an ambition that works beyond the traditional  commissioning brief format [and] continues to evolve, [so] we look forward to receiving ideas  that will work beyond the traditional commissioning parameters, whether it be a new  season, a live music event, or a pan‐BBC or BBC Audio & Music initiative.” 98   
94 95

 ibid., p.3   ibid., p.3  96  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/radio3.shtml  97  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/radio2.shtml  98  BBC Radio 2, Commissioning Details: Commissioning Year 2010/2011: Main Round, p.4 

32 

Radio 1    Radio 1 explained:    “The majority of programmes – the core output – are long‐running strands which are  produced either by Radio 1 producers or a small group of Independent companies chosen  through competitive tender when required. … The network also commissions weekly  documentaries from a range of independent producers – usually through an annual  commissioning round. Radio 1 also welcomes ad hoc proposals from established programme  makers. The network operates an annual commissioning round for the production of  documentaries.” 99    Commissioning briefs are made available to interested parties. Ad hoc proposals can be  submitted to the executive producer, accompanied by a short synopsis of the idea and  treatment.    Radio 5 Live    Radio 5 Live (and 5 Live Sports Extra) commission a combination of long‐term strands and ad  hoc ideas. Additionally, it sometimes offers a small, ‘quick fire’ commissioning round in  reaction to a specific event or a late schedule change. According to the station, “this would  follow the same structure, but would move at a faster pace, on a 'restricted supplier' basis  (limited to independents who already produce for 5 Live).” 100    Digital radio stations    The commissioning processes of the remaining BBC digital radio stations follow the systems  of their sister stations or, in the case of the Asian Network, offer limited commissions.    Business Affairs    Independent producers are provided with passwords to access the BBC online system  ‘Proteus’ in order to enter the details of their proposals and production budgets. 101  Once a  programme has been commissioned by one of the National Networks, the contract and  budgets are negotiated with the Business Affairs team within BBC Audio & Music. 102  At  present, the budget for each externally commissioned production is scrutinised on a line‐by‐ line basis.    The Terms of Trade for independent radio productions were negotiated collectively in 2005  and are implemented in the form of a standard nine‐page agreement. 103  Additionally, there  is a 41‐page document that sets out the General Terms, a 20‐page supply contract and a  five‐page compliance form. 104 

99

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/radio1.shtml   http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/5live.shtml  101  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/docs/proteus.pdf  102  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/busaffairs.shtml  103  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/docs/radio_terms_trade.pdf  104  http://www.bbc.co.uk/commissioning/radio/network/busaffairs.shtml 
100

33 

6.  THE RANGE OF COSTS WITHIN BBC  RADIO INDEPENDENT COMMISSIONS 
    Clause 58 of the BBC Agreement requires the BBC Trust to have regard for “a suitable range  and diversity of [radio] programmes” to be “made by producers external to the BBC”, where  ‘range’ refers to, amongst other characteristics, the “cost of acquisition” of the content. 105    The objective in this Section is to examine the range of costs of independent radio  programmes commissioned by the BBC. One of the challenges of such an examination is the  paucity of data and empirical evidence in the public domain that analyse the production  costs of radio programmes in the United Kingdom. A further challenge is that the BBC is the  only producer within several genres of radio programmes – notably drama, documentaries,  comedy – so that there is little potential for comparative analysis of production costs.    In 2009, the National Audit Office published a report on the efficiency of radio production  within the BBC which noted the difficulties involved in comparing production costs, even  between BBC Networks:  • “There is a range of cost variations for similar classifications of programmes  • The average cost per hour of music programmes on Radio 2 is 54% higher than the next  highest Network station, Radio 1, and more than twice the cost of Radio 3  • In‐house dramas in London and in Manchester and the North are over 50% higher than  the other English regions and Wales, and over three times those in Scotland  • Whilst Radio 3 pays almost 29% more for an hour of in‐house produced drama than for  independent productions, the cost of drama produced in‐house by the BBC for Radio 4 is  similar to the cost of drama Radio 4 commissions from independent production  companies.” 106    The report also noted that:  • “The BBC has undertaken exercises to inform the revision of guide prices for 2009‐10 for  Radio 4’s drama and factual programmes and Radio 2’s comedy programmes, although  these were based on budgeted rather than actual costs, and such analysis is not  undertaken routinely across all stations.  • There is limited documentary evidence, however, that [the BBC] has systematically  assessed the potential impact of savings on its radio output and it has done limited work  to examine significant cost variations.” 107    The National Audit Office’s analysis examined the differences in production costs between  BBC in‐house and externally commissioned drama programmes, though its results were  largely inconclusive:  • “The median cost per hour of in‐house productions of plays for Radio 3 and Radio 4 are  £23,965 and £24,000 respectively. This is higher than programmes commissioned from  independent production companies (for Radio 3, by 29%; for Radio 4, by 8%). The cost of  independently produced plays is 20% higher on Radio 4 than it is on Radio 3. 

105

 Department For Culture, Media & Sport, Broadcasting: An Agreement Between Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for Culture,  Media and Sport and the British Broadcasting Corporation, Cm 6872, July 2006, p.30  106  National Audit Office, The Efficiency of Radio Production At The BBC, 13 January 2009, p.5  107  ibid, pp.5‐6 

34 

The analysis [of Radio 4 dramas] did not fully explain the extent to which the variation in  costs between in‐house and independent drama is due to producing different outputs or  to differing levels of efficiency.” 108 

  The report by the National Audit Office included recommendations that the BBC should:  • Compare the costs of comparable programmes  • Identify the reasons for cost variations between programmes and whether these are due  to differences in editorial ambition or efficiency  • Inform guide price ranges for programme genres by analysis of actual cost data  • Explore with commercial radio stations a possible benchmarking arrangement for  programme production efficiency. 109    The BBC acted upon these recommendations by commissioning a radio programme  production cost benchmarking exercise from an external consultant. It too found that  significant cost variations existed between similar programmes and concluded:  • “Costs differ widely by genre  • Even within genres, there can be significant variation  • Programme duration and series length can reduce costs significantly  • Production location (indie versus in‐house, regional production) can also affect cost,  though not always in the same direction  • Number of contributors has a marked impact on costs  • Many programmes show unexplained costs.” 110    The consultant’s analysis characterised a sample of BBC radio programmes in terms of 14  variables, one of which was whether the programme was produced in‐house or  commissioned externally. Using regression analysis, it constructed a model to predict  production costs of programmes with varying characteristics. Amongst its findings were:  • “Production location (indie vs in‐house, regional production) can […] affect cost, though  not always in the same direction  • While it might seem like programmes produced in London or Indie programmes [in the  music genre] are cheaper, it is rather that the remaining programmes are more  expensive”  • The fourth most important cost factor in the genre of drama, plays and readings was  whether the programme was an independent production, the impact of which reduced  the predicted cost  • The sixth most important cost factor in the genre of comedy and entertainment was  whether the programme was an independent production, the impact of which reduced  the predicted cost  • Radio 2’s cost of acquiring an independently produced programme from overseas was  56% lower than predicted by the model. 111    These findings suggested that a programme’s status as an independent production could  sometimes be one factor that influences its cost in some genres. The BBC has acknowledged  that it has been able to achieve cost efficiencies in the independent productions it  commissions:   

108 109

 ibid., p.16   ibid., p.6    110  O&O Performance, Radio Programme Cost Benchmarking: BBC Audio & Music, 28 August 2009, p.3  111  ibid., pp.3, 33, 63, 70 & 73 

35 

“Profit incentives should drive independent [radio production] companies to seek cost  efficiencies, particularly in producing ongoing strands. The BBC’s strong buying position in  the radio industry has meant that substantial cost savings have been achieved. ….” 112    However, the BBC has not identified significant cost differences between in‐house  productions and externally commissioned equivalents:    “…. However, although we recognise these savings, we have not been able to demonstrate  conclusively that independent productions are more efficient than in‐house [productions],  once all costs are accounted for. Detailed benchmarking is underway, which is expected to  provide greater transparency in the near future.” 113    One of the challenges of analysing data for radio production costs is that, compared to  television, the per programme cost for the radio medium is low in absolute terms and,  therefore, any variation can appear to be considerable in percentage terms. The  benchmarking exercise commissioned by the BBC had to conclude that:    “A lot of the variation in [production] cost within the [BBC radio] networks remains  unexplained.” 114    Another outcome of the relatively low costs of radio production is that detailed cost control  procedures might sometimes not be present. A BBC analysis of its radio drama and  documentary production costs noted that:    “Only London and Scotland could provide a breakdown of their actual costs. Detailed records  of actual costs at a programme level or even production team level are not maintained.” 115    One of the underlying issues is that, compared to the television medium, considerably less  technology is required for a radio production. There are no ‘sets’ or ‘stages’ in radio  production because the listener creates visual interpretations of these in their mind. As a  result, a greater proportion of the production costs in radio are related to the hiring of talent  and the length of the production process. For example, a radio drama that uses ten actors is  likely to be almost twice as expensive as another drama that requires only five actors. The  outcome is that the majority of the cost elements of a radio production are ‘variable’ rather  than ‘fixed’, providing greater potential for significant variations in costs between  programmes that may superficially appear quite similar.    The following analysis of the costs of externally produced radio programmes commissioned  by the BBC is presented with these issues in mind.    In 2008/9, the range of average content costs within the radio sector was vast, stretching  from £27 per hour for commercial radio to £9,120 per hour for BBC Radio 4. 116         
112 113

 BBC Audio & Music, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.8   ibid, p.8  114  O&O Performance, Radio Programme Cost Benchmarking: BBC Audio & Music, 28 August 2009, p.50  115  BBC Audio & Music: Drama and Documentary Production Process Review: Report, December 2009, p.9  116  BBC Annual Report 2008/9, BBC Audio & Music data supplied to the author, Value Partners [commercial radio data for  2007/8] 

36 

Figure 19: average content costs by radio station (£ per hour output 2008/9) 
10,000 9,120

7,500 6,004 5,000 4,554 4,578 3,658 1,698

2,500 27 0 BBC local radio commercial radio 434 594 Radio 7 742 786

1,192 1,255

ALL BBC RADIO

Radio 1

Radio 3

Radio 2

BBC Nations

Radio 5 Live + Extra

6 Music

Asian Network

Radio 4

1Xtra

source: Grant Goddard

117

 

 

  Even within BBC Network Radio, the average content costs of individual radio stations varied  considerably. The five analogue Networks proved to be the most expensive, whilst the  newer digital stations had much lower cost bases. Although the outputs of both Radio 1 and  1Xtra comprise mostly pre‐recorded music, the content of the former station cost almost  five times the latter on an average per hour basis in 2008/9.    Figure 20: BBC Network Radio content average costs 2008/9 (£ per hour) 
network Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Radio 5 Live + Extra 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Network TOTAL NETWORK RADIO 118 source: BBC Audio & Music   content cost (£ per hour) in-house external all content commissions commissions 3,658 4,578 4,554 9,120 6,004 786 742 594 1,192 3,633 4,018 4,771 4,822 8,770 6,211 868 759 584 1,272 3,746 907 3,429 1,982 16,022 2,962 191 612 4,762 368 2,467 external commissions % of spend 2.9 10.8 4.1 8.5 3.1 3.0 9.4 1.9 2.7 6.0 % of hours 11.6 14.4 9.4 4.8 6.3 12.2 11.4 0.2 8.9 8.9

 

  Furthermore, significant differences were evident between the average cost per hour of  programmes made in‐house and those commissioned externally. With the exceptions of  Radio 4 and its sister station Radio 7, BBC National Networks’ average cost per hour of  externally commissioned content was less than the average cost per hour for in‐house  content in 2008/9.    For some Networks, the difference between in‐house and externally commissioned  programme costs proved to be considerable. External commissions were 77% cheaper for  Radio 1 and 1Xtra, 28% cheaper for Radio 2, 59% cheaper for Radio 3 and 71% cheaper for  the Asian Network on an average per hour basis. 119  These results suggested that externally  commissioned productions appear, on average, to be cheaper per hour than in‐house  productions, although additional factors may be influencing the outcomes. 

117

 Data sources: BBC Annual Report 2008/9, BBC Audio & Music data supplied to the author, Value Partners [commercial radio  data for 2007/8]  118  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author  119  ibid. 

37 

As a result, externally commissioned programmes constituted a greater proportion of  broadcast hours on most Networks than their costs might have suggested. For example, for  both Radio 1 and 1Xtra, external commissions contributed 12% of each Network’s output in  2008/9 but consumed only 3% of each Network’s content budget. 120    Figure 21: BBC Network Radio content average costs by year (£ per hour) 
content cost (£ per hour) all content external commissions 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9 Radio 1 3,430 3,500 3,658 925 886 907 Radio 2 4,349 4,500 4,578 3,712 3,161 3,429 Radio 3 3,870 4,300 4,554 2,070 1,838 1,982 Radio 4 9,905 9,900 9,120 16,053 14,080 16,022 Radio 5 Live + Extra 5,759 5,862 6,004 5,363 3,514 2,962 1Xtra 731 800 786 250 191 6 Music 616 600 742 554 612 Radio 7 582 600 594 4,750 4,762 Asian Network 1,211 1,300 1,192 494 368 TOTAL NETWORK RADIO 3,418 3,485 3,633 4,411 2,442 2,467   121 source: BBC Annual Reports & BBC Audio & Music  

  Analysis of average content costs per hour over the last three years found that, for the  analogue radio Networks, the cost of all content increased, whilst the comparable cost for  externally commissioned content decreased. The exception was Radio 4, where average  content costs of in‐house productions decreased, although the Network still remained by far  and away the most expensive BBC radio station overall for content.    The BBC decision in 2007 to extend externally commissioned content to its digital stations  has provided the independent radio production sector with a substantial volume of  additional commissions, though at considerably lower prices than commissions from the  analogue Networks. At the same time, the use of externally commissioned content on the  digital Networks appears to have enabled the BBC to reduce some of those Networks’  content costs. For example, external commissions for 1Xtra were 76% per hour cheaper than  its average content cost, and for the Asian Network were 69% cheaper in 2008/9.122    Figure 22: BBC Network Radio independent programme commissions by volume, by  Network and by year (hours per annum) 
1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 454 600 400 21 200 0 1,047 1,260 1,054

830

999

Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Radio 5 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Live + Netw ork Extra 1999/2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

625

684

 

120 121 122

 ibid.   BBC Annual Reports & BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author   ibid. 

38 

source: BBC Audio & Music [data labels refer to 2008/9]

123

 

  By its second year of external commissions, BBC 1Xtra was commissioning a greater volume  of independently produced programmes per annum than Radio 1, albeit at an hourly rate  that was 94% cheaper per hour than Radio 1. 124  According to comments received from the  independent radio production sector, the BBC digital stations have proven to be both a  blessing and a curse to the sector. On the one hand, they have succeeded in significantly  expanding the opportunities for commissions. On the other hand, the hourly rates are so low  that it has proven a challenge to derive a significant profit from the resultant commissions.    The proposals within the current BBC Strategy Review to close digital stations 6 Music and  the Asian Network by year‐end 2011 would have a substantial impact on the independent  radio production sector. At a stroke, 24% of BBC Network Radio’s volume of external  programme commissions would be lost. However, in terms of value, the loss would  represent only 5% of total BBC Network Radio commissions. 125    Neither is the BBC Strategy Review’s proposal to “strengthen the editorial links” between  the remaining digital stations and the existing analogue Networks particularly encouraging  for the independent production sector. 126  The danger voiced by independent producers was  that this could lead to a greater volume of programmes shared between each pair of  Networks or, using the successful Radio Five Live model, it might transform the digital  stations into part‐time adjuncts of their analogue partners. Either course of action would be  likely to lead to a reduced volume of original output and, therefore, to a reduced volume of  independent programme commissions.    Figure 23: BBC Network Radio independent programme commissions by value, by Network  and by year (£ ‘000 per annum) 
8,000 7,274 4,320 4,000 1,645 1,851 950 2,000

6,000

611

201

0 Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Radio 5 1Xtra Live + Extra 1999/2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

6 Music Radio 7

100

Asian Netw ork

2003/4

2004/5

252

source: BBC Audio & Music [data labels refer to 2008/9]

127

 

 

  Although the BBC’s digital radio Networks have significantly increased the volume of  independent commissions during the last two years, it is the analogue Network, Radio 4,  that provided the independent radio production sector with most of its revenue growth. In 
 BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in Radio 1 volume in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary  liquidation of Wise Buddah]  124  ibid.  125  ibid.  126  BBC, Putting Quality First: The BBC and Public Space: Proposals to the BBC Trust, March 2010, p.12  127  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in Radio 1 spend in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary  liquidation of Wise Buddah] 
123

39 

1999/2000, Radio 4 had spent £4.7m on independent commissions, accounting for 34% of  the total value of Network Radio commissions. By 2008/9, Radio 4 expenditure on  independent commissions had increased to £7.3m and accounted for 42% of the total value  of Network Radio commissions. 128    Figure 24: BBC Network Radio independent programme commissions by average cost per  hour, by Network and by year (£ per hour) 
16,022 20,000

15,000

10,000 3,429 2,962 4,762 612

907

1,982

5,000

0

Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Radio 5 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Netw ork Live + Extra 1999/2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

191

368

source: BBC Audio & Music [data labels refer to 2008/9]

129

 

 

  The attraction to the independent radio production sector of supplying content to Radio 4 is  that its average hourly commissioning rate is much higher than the other national Networks,  a reflection of the more complex productions (particularly drama, comedies and  documentaries) that it broadcasts. The disadvantage is that the competition to achieve  Radio 4 commissions is intense, for the very reason that they are likely to offer a better  profit margin to the independent producer than those from other BBC Networks.    The preceding analysis explored the range of costs of externally commissioned radio  programmes across the BBC National Networks. Next, the range of costs of commissioned  programmes within each BBC National Network was analysed. Data was made available by  the BBC for analysis of a single year’s commissions (2008/9) although this dataset had  already been aggregated:  • Firstly, by Network  • Secondly, within that, by programme genre  • Thirdly, within that, by supplier.    Consequently, the following analysis refers to neither the number of individual contracts,  nor to the number of individual suppliers. It refers to the number of suppliers within each  programme genre within each National Network. Hence, a supplier can (and does) supply  programmes in several genres to a particular Network, and those supplies are counted  discretely in the dataset. Commissions by the same supplier in the same genre had already  been aggregated in the dataset. Within these limitations, the following analysis explored the  range of commissioning costs within each National Network. Programme supplier names  have been omitted for confidentiality reasons.      [ ] 
128 129

 BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author   ibid. 

40 

  Although data was also supplied for the BBC digital radio Networks, the small number of  genres and the limited number of suppliers made analysis unproductive.     A further dataset supplied by the BBC produced an analysis of the contract costs of  independent productions aggregated across all BBC National Networks, analogue and digital,  during two consecutive years, 2007/8 and 2008/9, combined.     Figure 29: number of BBC Network Radio independent commissions by contract value in  2007/8 and 2008/9 (£ per contract) 
160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 £5,000 <£1,000 £9,000 £13,000 £17,000 £21,000 £25,000 £29,000 £33,000 £37,000 £41,000 £45,000 £49,000 £53,000 £57,000 £61,000 £65,000 £69,000 £73,000 £77,000 £81,000 £85,000 £89,000 £93,000 0% 40% 80% 151 100%

60%

20%

no. of contracts w ith value [left axis]

cum ulative percentage [right axis]

source: BBC Audio & Music

130

 

 

  It is evident that independent radio commissions from BBC Network Radio comprised a large  number of low‐value commissions, combined with a small number of high‐value contracts.  The median contract value was £7,827. Just over a quarter of contracts were valued under  £5,000, whilst three‐quarters were valued under £16,000. However, there were a significant  number of outliers, with 5% of contracts valued at more than £50,000 and, at the other  extreme, 8% of contracts valued at less than £1,000. 131    The ‘long tail’ of the 570 independent radio production contracts commissioned by BBC  Network Radio in 2007/8 and 2008/9 appears to be very long. However, it must be noted  that this dataset has aggregated the outcomes of several different commissioning systems  within different Networks, each of which reflects the differing needs of individual  programme strands. As a result, the aggregated data was likely to have included:  • Continuing series, some of which run 52 weeks per year on music stations  • Short series which might comprise, for example, 13 episodes for a comedy show  • ‘Batch commissioning’ whereby a number of discrete programmes (such as one‐off  dramas) are commissioned in a single contract from one supplier, though are not  intended for broadcast as an intrinsic series  • Ad hoc commissions, whereby individual documentaries, dramas or events are supplied  for scheduling as standalone programmes.    This mixture of commissioning systems has made the data particularly difficult to interpret in  a meaningful way. It is self evident that the contract cost for a 52‐week series of two‐hour  music shows on Radio 1 is likely to be considerably greater than the contract cost of one 
130 131

 ibid.   ibid. 

41 

half‐hour documentary on Radio 1Xtra, for example. Both commissions would have been  included in the data as individual contracts, though each provided a very different volume of  content within the BBC’s radio output.    A further, productive analysis would have been a ‘cost per hour’ comparison of  independently commissioned programmes across Networks, across genres and across  different suppliers. Datasets were requested but were not made available by the BBC, as a  result of the way its accounting systems for externally commissioned programmes are  maintained.

42 

7.  THE RANGE OF PROGRAMMES  WITHIN BBC RADIO INDEPENDENT  COMMISSIONS 
    Clause 58 of the BBC Agreement requires that the BBC Trust has regard for “a suitable range  and diversity of [radio] programmes” that are “made by producers external to the BBC”,  where ‘range’ refers to, amongst other characteristics, the “range of programmes”  acquired. 132    The objective in this Section is to examine the range of programme types within the  independent radio content commissioned by the BBC. These programme types are referred  to as ‘genres’ in the broadcast industry, and the two terms are used here interchangeably.    Figure 30: BBC Network Radio output by genre and by Network (hours in 2008/9) 
Radio 1 Music News & weather Sport Factual Current affairs Drama Arts Entertainment Religion Schools Children's Presentation Repeats TOTAL Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Five Live Sports Extra 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Network TOTAL

8,450 300 40 102

7,069 360 28 508 1 103 52 185

7,465 76

34 4

91 325 67

2,405 431 1,314 2,109 741 285 265 210 25 239 1,395 9,419

6,435 2,119 55

7,673 872 1,083

7,588 455 364 25

1,901 1,890 43 1,181 33 579 1,385 579

10 728 7,997 8,760

104 14 9,048
133

366 88 8,760

56 704 8,784

151 8,760 1,083

104 7 8,656

197 156 8,760

130 7,721

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

40,146 12,793 3,716 1,808 3,853 891 1,326 1,706 1,051 0 753 9,344 2,364 79,751  

  Analysis of the volume of output between programme genres broadcast by each of the BBC  National Networks demonstrated that the content of each Network is largely a function of  its Service Licence, which defines both its output and its intended audience.     Figure 31: BBC Network Radio output by genre and by Network (% of hours in 2008/9) 
Radio 1 Music News & weather Sport Factual Current affairs Drama Arts Entertainment Religion Schools Children's Presentation Repeats TOTAL Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Five Live Sports Extra 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Network TOTAL

93 3 0 1

81 4 0 6 0 1 1 2

85 1

0 0

1 4 1

26 5 14 22 8 3 3 2 0 3 15 100

73 24 1

89 10 100

87 5 4 0

25 24 1 15 0 7 18 7

0 8 91 100

1 0 100
134

4 1 100

1 8 100

2 100 100

1 0 100

2 2 100

2 100

source: BBC Audio & Music
132

 

50 16 5 2 5 1 2 2 1 0 1 12 3 100  

 Department For Culture, Media & Sport, Broadcasting: An Agreement Between Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for Culture,  Media and Sport and the British Broadcasting Corporation, Cm 6872, July 2006, p.30  133  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [these data differ marginally from those tabulated in the BBC Annual Report  2008/9] 

43 

  The same dataset is represented in Figure 31 as a percentage of each Network’s annual  output.    It would have been useful to compare the total volume of output of the BBC National  Networks by genre with the volume of independently commissioned programmes by genre  on those Networks. This data was requested and the BBC responded that:    “The BBC manages and monitors independent commissioning data based on networks and is  not required to track independent spend by genre.” 135    Figure 32: BBC Network Radio expenditure on independently commissioned programmes  by genre and by Network (£ in 2008/9) 
Radio 1 Music News & weather Sport Factual Current affairs Drama Arts Entertainment Religion Schools Children's Presentation Other TOTAL Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Five Live + Extra 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Network TOTAL

973,324 2,656,928 1,176,803 246,000 1,414,000 17,106 602,129 10,764 32,000 1,113,845 100,992 2,045,791 463,579 329,883 2,805,979 221,081 341,255 1,263,353

100,100

628,507

109,000

556

169,260 48,333

64,344

99,455

3,090 31,842 1,057,864 4,516,658 1,727,767 6,951,799 1,660,000
136

200,111

797,767

48,333

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

5,644,662 246,000 1,414,000 2,834,842 463,579 3,194,959 758,135 2,377,198 160,000 260,992 0 0 0 34,932 269,000 17,229,299  

  Although data was not made available to enable a comparison by volume, a separate dataset  supplied by the BBC was analysed that aggregated expenditure on independently  commissioned programmes by Network and by genre in 2008/9. As a result, analysis of  independent radio commissions by value and by genre was possible. (In Figure 32, the total  value of independent commissions in 2008/9 differs from the £17,204,000 cited elsewhere  in this report, as do the totals for individual Networks, which had been derived from a  separate BBC dataset.)    Figure 33: BBC Network Radio expenditure on independently commissioned programmes  by genre and by Network (% of expenditure in 2008/9) 
Radio 1 Music News & weather Sport Factual Current affairs Drama Arts Entertainment Religion Schools Children's Presentation Other TOTAL Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Five Live + Extra 1Xtra 6 Music Radio 7 Asian Network TOTAL

92

59

68 15 85

50

79

41

2

13 0 1 25 2 19 13

6

29 7 40 5 18

0

21 100

50 59

0 100
137

100

100

0 100

100

100

100

100

100

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

33 1 8 16 3 19 4 14 2 0 0 0 0 100  

 
134 135

 ibid.   BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author  136  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [these data differ marginally from those supplied by the BBC in other  datasets]  137  ibid. 

44 

The same data are represented in Figure 33 as a percentage of each Network’s  independently commissioned programmes.    The following analysis explores the range of independently produced programmes acquired  by BBC Network Radio within each genre.      [ ]      The dataset supplied by the BBC included a further four genres – ‘knowledge building’,  ‘news’, ‘religion’ and ‘sport’ – which comprised only three, one, two and two data points  respectively. Additionally, the supplier label for the majority of independent commissions for  Radio Five Live was ‘Several’. The BBC informed that this supplier name was used to  aggregate a number of independent radio producers that were not separately itemised. As a  result, these data could not usefully be analysed.

45 

8.  THE DIVERSITY OF PROGRAMMES  WITHIN BBC RADIO INDEPENDENT  COMMISSIONS 
    Clause 58 of the BBC Agreement requires that the BBC Trust has regard for “a suitable range  and diversity of [radio] programmes” that are “made by producers external to the BBC.” 138    The objective of this Section is to examine the diversity of independent radio content  commissioned by the BBC. The BBC Agreement offers no more specific definition of the term  ‘diversity’ in this context, and neither does it offer a benchmark against which the ‘diversity’  of independent radio commissions should be measured.    The issue of ‘diversity’ in the media is a vast subject that has rightly attracted considerable  attention in recent times. In order to be able to examine the diversity of independently  produced radio programmes commissioned by the BBC within a context, a critical framework  for the different aspects of ‘diversity’ was developed. It drew upon academic work in this  area, as well as upon empirical evidence produced by several agencies tasked with  monitoring these issues.    It would have been instructive to measure the attributes of externally commissioned radio  content against this ‘diversity’ framework so as to examine, for example:  • The diversity of the content itself, in terms of portrayal, demographics and contributors  • The diversity of the producers of the content, in terms of their geography, their  workforce and their scale  • The diversity of the exposure afforded to externally commissioned content (for example,  how much of it was broadcast at peak audience times).    Unfortunately, it is apparent that data are either not collected for these attributes of  externally commissioned radio content, or could not be provided for this report.  Consequently, the following analysis was necessarily limited to those attributes of ‘diversity’  for which data were available.    The important role of independently commissioned content in promoting cultural diversity  within broadcasters’ output was noted by the Council of Europe in June 2009. It stated:    “The effective existence of diversified independent production makes possible genuine  plurality in the field of audiovisual creation and content. It seems vital to support a variety of  world views in order to offer the wide range of viewpoints essential to democracy and the  shaping of public opinion.”139    The significance of diversity to the creative process was identified in a report commissioned  by the BBC in 2005:   
138

 Department For Culture, Media & Sport, Broadcasting: An Agreement Between Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for Culture,  Media and Sport and the British Broadcasting Corporation, Cm 6872, July 2006, p.30  139  Council of Europe, The role of independent productions in promoting cultural diversity, Directorate General of Human Rights  & Legal Affairs, Strasboug, June 2009, H/Inf(2009)8, p.8 

46 

“The Work Foundation research has identified ‘organised diversity’ as a crucial driver of  creativity, which in turn is a key determinant of organisational high performance.” 140    The BBC is a signatory to the ‘Diversity Pledge’ produced by the Cultural Diversity Network,  an alliance of UK public and commercial broadcasters. The Network launched in 2000 when  “all Britain’s major television broadcasters joined forces”, but its remit was subsequently  extended to “radio, multimedia and new digital media, as well as the creative industries’  supply chain such as craft, technical and post‐production businesses.” 141    Launched in April 2009, the Diversity Pledge required from its signatories that they made a  commitment to:  • “Recruit fairly and from as wide a base as possible and encourage industry entrants and  production staff from diverse backgrounds  • Encourage diversity in output  • Encourage diversity at senior decision‐making level  • Take part in or run events that promote diversity.” 142    The Diversity Pledge also stated:    “Channel 4, BBC, Sky, and ITV will expect all their suppliers and production partners to sign  up to this Pledge, and it is expected that other Cultural Diversity Network members will do  the same.” 143    Each broadcaster signatory presented their own Diversity Action Plan to the Cultural  Strategy Network in February 2009, and the BBC’s statement related specifically to ethnic  diversity, promising actions for 2009/10 that included:  • “Introduce an online system to track the diversity of who works on productions, both in‐ house and on indie teams supplying the BBC  • BBC signs up to and delivers on Cultural Diversity Network Diversity Pledge and monitors  in‐house and indie delivery against commitments  • Regular monitoring of snapshots of BBC output and content.” 144    However, it appeared that these policies have not been implemented for BBC radio output.  As a result, the BBC informed that no monitoring was in progress to measure:  • The diversity of independent radio producers supplying the BBC  • The diversity of content supplied by independent radio producers to the BBC.    The outputs of such monitoring would have assisted in assessing the diversity of  independent radio productions supplied to the BBC and could also have provided a  benchmark for total BBC radio output.    Within its current Diversity Strategy, the BBC’s priorities for the period 2009‐2012 included:  • “To continue to make programmes that reflect the reality of diverse audiences, including  currently underserved audiences and which deliver on the BBC’s responsibility to ‘inform,  educate and entertain.’” 145 
140 141

 The Work Foundation & BBC, The tipping point: How much is broadcast creativity at risk?, July 2005, p.5   Cultural Diversity Network, Diversity Pledge, p.2  142  ibid., pp.4‐5  143  ibid., p.3  144  BBC, BBC planned actions to ‘tackle ethnic diversity’ (2009‐2010),  http://www.culturaldiversitynetwork.co.uk/downloads/BBC%20_ethnic_%20Diversity%20Action%20Plan%20landscape.pdf  145  BBC, The BBC’s Diversity Strategy 2009‐12, p.3 

47 

  The action points within the BBC Diversity Strategy included:  • “Working to increase diverse portrayal across all platforms  • Engaging and encouraging Channel Controllers and Commissioners to think about  diversity in the commissioning and in‐house production process.” 146    Additionally, the BBC made a number of commitments to diversity in its Policies and  Guidelines that included:  • “Diversity for the BBC is a creative opportunity to engage the totality of the UK audience.  That includes diverse communities of interest, as well as gender, age, ethnicity, religion  and faith, social background, sexual orientation, political affiliation and so on.  • Delivering on our commitment to equal opportunities and diversity is important to the  BBC for a number of reasons. For example, the audiences that we serve are increasingly  diverse. The BBC is also a public service broadcaster funded by a licence fee paid by all  sections of UK society.  • The BBC is committed to reflecting the diversity of the UK audience in its workforce, as  well as in its output on TV, on radio and online.” 147    In its Statements of Programming Policy, the BBC adopted commitments to diversity which,  it stated, “apply across services”:  • “The BBC aims to reflect the reality of diversity within the UK in its output and through its  television, radio and other services to offer something for everyone in the UK.  • All newly submitted programme proposals have a diversity statement attached  highlighting how, where appropriate, the programme will fulfil the BBC's commitment to  reflecting the diversity of the licence fee paying public, both on and off screen.  • The BBC will continue to assess the impact of this commitment and will continue to  develop additional mechanisms for improving diversity in both output and  employment.” 148    Each division within the BBC has its own specific Diversity Action Plan and reports quarterly  on the progress made. The current BBC Audio & Music Diversity Action Plan includes an  action point for ‘output’:  • “Each service to develop its own plans to address respective representation gaps (e.g.  more targeted use of Outside Broadcasts to reach socially excluded areas; ethnic  minority presenters in mainstream strands; more effective monitoring of contributors  and sharing of information).” 149    However, recently reported progress on this action point has apparently not referred  explicitly to diversity within the radio commissioning process, either in‐house or external.  Radio 4 was reported to be conducting an “ethnic minority talent audit for succession  planning,” while Five Live planned to “base two Outside Broadcasts per annum in a diverse  community, reflecting its issues and concerns.” 150    Each individual BBC radio Network’s current Statement of Programme Policy and Service  Licence includes explicit and implicit commitments to diversity, as follows.   
146 147

 BBC, The BBC’s Diversity Strategy 2009‐12, p.4   BBC, Policies and Guidelines, http://www.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/policies/diversity.shtml  148  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, p.80  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  149  BBC Audio & Music, Diversity Action Plan Report, November 2009, p.4  150  BBC Audio & Music, Diversity Action Plan Report, November 2009 & February 2010, p.4 

48 

Radio 1:  • 60 hours of specialist music per week  • 40 new documentaries  • 200 hours of original opt‐outs from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland  • “Radio 1’s programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: high  quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should nurture UK talent.  The service should deliver its remit by producing a wide range of programmes that  expose listeners to new and sometimes challenging material they may not otherwise  experience….  • Radio 1 should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission some output from  outside the M25 area and from independent producers….  • Radio 1 should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10% of  eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 151    Radio 2:  • >1,100 hours of specialist music programmes  • >100 hours of arts programming  • 16 hours a week of news and current affairs programming, including regular news  bulletins  • 170 hours of religious output covering a broad range of faiths  • “Radio 2’s programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: high  quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should nurture UK talent.  Radio 2 should extend the range of music available to the public through both  mainstream and specialist programmes that enable audiences to enjoy familiar music  and also to explore a range of specialist music genres.  • Radio 2 should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission some output from  outside the M25 area and from independent producers.  • Radio 2 should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10% of  eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 152    Radio 3:  • 35 new drama productions broadcast (excluding repeats and acquisitions)  • 30 new documentaries broadcast on arts and cultural topics (excluding repeats and  acquisitions)  • 40% of relevant spend incurred outside the M25  • “Radio 3’s programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: high  quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should nurture UK talent.  Radio 3 should place a special emphasis on live and specially recorded music. The  schedule should also feature commercially recorded music, including historic recordings.  • Radio 3 should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission some output from  outside the M25 area and from independent producers.  • Radio 3 should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10% of  eligible programmes from independent producers.” 153 

151

 BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.35‐36  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, Radio 1 Service Licence, August 2009,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2009/radio_one_aug09.pdf  152  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.37‐39  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, Radio 2 Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/radio2_Apr08.pdf 

49 

  Radio 4:  • 2,500 hours of news and current affairs programmes  • 600 hours of original drama and readings (excluding repeats)  • 180 hours of original comedy (excluding repeats)  • 200 hours of original documentaries (excluding repeats)  • 200 hours of original religious programming (excluding repeats)  • “Radio 4 programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: high  quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should nurture UK talent.  Radio 4 should deliver its remit by providing in‐depth news and current affairs, strongly  supported by a wide range of other speech programmes including politics, religion and  ethics, history, science, documentaries, arts, literature, drama and readings, sports  (subject to rights ownership) and comedy.  • Radio 4 should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission some output from  outside the M25 area and from independent producers.  • Radio 4 should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10% of  eligible hours of output from independent producers.  • Radio 4 should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to ensure that at least one third of  relevant expenditure is incurred outside the M25 area each year. Each week the schedule  will include programmes from one or more of the English regions, Scotland, Wales and  Northern Ireland. It should also commission output from independent companies based  throughout the UK.” 154    Radio 5 Live:  • “BBC Radio Five Live programmes should exhibit some or all of the following  characteristics: high quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should  nurture UK talent. BBC Radio Five Live should provide a wide range of news and sport  programming, including rolling news whenever a big news story breaks, live commentary  on major sporting events (subject to rights), and a range of other programmes that  inform and entertain its listeners.  • BBC Radio Five Live should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission some  output from outside the M25 area and from independent producers.  • BBC Radio Five Live should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least  10% of eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 155    Radio 5 Live Sports Extra:  • “BBC Five Live Sports Extra programmes should exhibit some or all of the following  characteristics: high quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should  nurture UK talent.  • BBC Five Live Sports Extra should contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission  at least 10% of eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 156 

 BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.40‐41  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, Radio 3 Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/radio3_Apr08.pdf  154  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.42‐43  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, Radio 4 Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/radio4_Apr08.pdf  155  BBC Trust, Radio Five Live Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/five_live_Apr08.pdf 

153

50 

  1Xtra:  • c.20% of speech‐based output each week  • c.10% of weekly output dedicated to news, documentaries and social action  programming  • “1Xtra programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: high  quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and they should nurture UK  talent. 1Xtra should deliver its remit by bringing together the full range of contemporary  black music and culture, as driven by the needs of its target audience.  • 1Xtra should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10% of  eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 157    6 Music  • 10 hours of speech‐based features, documentaries and essays each week  • “BBC 6 Music programmes should exhibit some or all of the following characteristics:  high quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should nurture UK  talent. BBC 6 Music should deliver its remit by engaging people who are interested in  music and who want to learn more about it. Its music should focus on major artists and  material which do not receive much support from other radio stations.  • BBC 6 Music should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at least 10%  of eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 158    Radio 7  • 50 hours of comedy each week  • 50 hours of drama each week  • 1,400 hours of children’s programming. 159    Asian Network  • 50:50 proportion of speech to music  • 3–5 hours on average of language programming each day  • “BBC Asian Network programmes should exhibit some or all of the following  characteristics: high quality, original, challenging, innovative and engaging, and it should  nurture UK talent. BBC Asian Network should deliver its remit through an approximately  50:50 split of music and speech, with the precise balance varying over the course of the  week.  • BBC Asian Network should … contribute to BBC Radio’s commitment to commission at  least 10% of eligible hours of output from independent producers.” 160 
156

 BBC Trust, BBC Five Live Sports Extra Service Licence, 10 July 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/five_live_sports_extra_jul 08.pdf  157  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.47‐48  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, 1Xtra Service Licence, July 2009,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2009/1xtra_aug09.pdf  158  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.49‐50  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, BBC 6 Music Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/6music_Apr08.pdf  159  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.51‐52  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  160  BBC, Statements of Programme Policy 2009/10, pp.53‐54  http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/statements2009/pdf/BBC_SoPPs_200910.pdf  BBC Trust, BBC Asian Network Service Licence, 7 April 2008,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/assets/files/pdf/regulatory_framework/service_licences/radio/2008/asian_network_Apr08.pdf 

51 

  These commitments provide a framework against which the commissioning of externally  produced radio content could be measured for each Network. However, the BBC was unable  to provide data regarding individual BBC Network Radio commissions because, it explained,  of the way its accounting systems for externally commissioned programmes are maintained.  As a result, this report’s ability to establish that diversity exists in the BBC’s acquisitions of  externally produced radio content has remained limited.    The following analysis is confined to examining the diversity in the volume of suppliers of  independent radio productions to BBC Network Radio. Supplier names have been  anonymised.    Figure 40: number of contractors supplying BBC Network Radio with independent  productions in 2008/9 
120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 Five Live + Extra 6 Music Radio 7 TOTAL 1Xtra Asian Network 14 3 37 23 13 6 3 1 71 110

source: BBC Audio & Music

161

 

 

  There were 110 different suppliers of externally produced content to BBC Network Radio in  2008/9. 162  Many suppliers were commissioned by more than one Network.    The concentration of a significant proportion of commissions amongst a small number of  independent producers is illustrated in Figure 41, which ranks the twenty leading suppliers  to BBC Network Radio by contract value for 2008/9. These results differed slightly from the  BBC’s analysis because data for co‐owned producers have been aggregated. The top two  producers accounted for 28% of BBC Network Radio external commissions by value, and the  top four accounted for 35%. 163               

161

 BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the figure for 5 Live + 5 Live Extra includes a substantial aggregated  payment to “Several”; the figure for 6 Music includes an aggregated payment to “Indie”; the figure for Radio 7 includes an  aggregated payment to “Indies – London”.]  162  ibid.  163  BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [co‐owned producers have been aggregated] 

52 

Figure 41: total payments from BBC Network Radio to its 20 largest contractors for  independent productions in 2008/9 (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Radio 3 Radio 4 Extra 1Xtra 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [talent-led production supplier] [production company] [production company] [talent-led production supplier] [production company] [talent-led production supplier] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

17 11 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 66

0 53 0 0 0 1 0 0 36 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 96

43 4 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 3 0 8 0 6 4 1 0 5 1 0 84

15 23 33 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 76

8 3 0 8 8 0 7 6 0 3 5 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 2 3 61

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15

20 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 28

13 57 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 76

0 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

164

 

 

  A ‘talent‐led production supplier’ refers to an independently produced programme whose  content is based around a specific presenter (or presenters) whose company is contracted  by the BBC to produce the programme externally. Such a production company would  normally only produce programmes involving this specific ‘talent’. Therefore, their status is  slightly different from ‘production companies’ which generally work with a variety of ‘talent’  to produce several different programmes.    Figure 42: total payments from BBC Radio 1 to its 10 largest contractors for independent  productions in 2008/9 (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Extra 1Xtra Radio 3 Radio 4 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [talent-led production supplier] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

11 2 2 0 3 0 0 1 0 3 23

53 36 5 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 99

4 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 15

23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 23

3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 12

0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15

6 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 12

57 0 0 0 6 0 0 16 0 0 79

69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

165

 

 

  Radio 1 contracted 14 suppliers in 2008/9. 88% of Radio 1’s expenditure on independent  productions was accounted for by two contractors, and 96% by the largest five. A single  talent‐led production supplier accounted for 36% of Radio 1’s total expenditure on  independent productions. 166         

164 165 166

 ibid.   ibid.   ibid. 

53 

Figure 43: total payments from BBC Radio 2 to its 10 largest contractors for independent  productions in 2008/9 (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Radio 3 Radio 4 Extra 1Xtra 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [talent-led production supplier] [talent-led production supplier] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

17 3 2 1 1 11 1 2 1 1 41

0 1 0 0 0 53 0 0 0 0 54

43 10 8 6 5 4 4 3 3 2 87

15 0 0 0 0 23 0 0 0 0 37

8 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 0 0 16

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

20 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 26

13 6 0 0 0 57 0 0 0 0 76

0 0 0 0 0 69 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

167

 

 

  For Radio 2, 66% of expenditure on independent productions was accounted for by four  contractors in 2008/9, and 87% by the largest ten. Two talent‐led production suppliers  accounted for 13% of Radio 2’s total expenditure on independent productions. Radio 2 had  37 suppliers in 2008/9 (co‐ownership reduced this total to 34). 168    Figure 44: total payments from BBC Radio 3 to its 10 largest contractors for independent  productions in 2008/9 (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Extra 1Xtra Radio 3 Radio 4 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

3 11 17 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 37
169

0 53 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53

0 4 43 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 49

33 23 15 5 3 3 3 2 2 2 91

0 3 8 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 19

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 6 20 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 28

0 57 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70

0 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

 

  For Radio 3, 70% of expenditure on independent productions was accounted for by three  contractors in 2008/9, and 91% by the largest ten. Radio 3 used 23 suppliers (22 once co‐ ownership was taken into consideration). 170    Figure 45: total payments from BBC Radio 4 to its 10 largest contractors for independent  productions in 2008/9 (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Radio 3 Radio 4 Extra 1Xtra 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

3 17 3 3 2 2 2 1 11 1 47
171

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 0 54

0 43 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 50

2 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 0 39

8 8 8 7 6 5 3 3 3 3 55

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 26

0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 57 0 70

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 69 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

 

167 168

 ibid.   ibid.  169  ibid.  170  ibid. 

54 

  Radio 4 was the National Network with the most diverse supply of independent producers in  2008/9, contracting 71 suppliers (69 when co‐ownership was factored). No contractor  accounted for more than 8% of the total Radio 4 expenditure on commissioned content. 172    Figure 46: total payments from BBC Radio 1Xtra for independent productions in 2008/9 (%  of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Radio 3 Radio 4 Extra 1Xtra 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

1 17 0 11 0 1 0 2 0 0 32
173

0 0 0 53 0 0 0 5 1 2 62

0 43 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 47

0 15 0 23 0 3 0 0 0 0 41

0 8 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 13

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 15

53 20 9 6 4 2 2 2 2 0 100

0 13 0 57 0 0 0 0 0 0 70

0 0 0 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

 

  Digital station 1Xtra commissioned programmes from 13 suppliers in 2008/9 (reduced to 10  when co‐ownership was considered). One company accounted for 53% of this expenditure,  and two accounted for 73%. 174    Figure 47: total payments from BBC Radio 6 Music for independent productions in 2008/9  (% of total payments) 
TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 % of total value of commissions (2008/9) 5 Live + Sports Extra 1Xtra Radio 3 Radio 4 6Music Radio 7 Asian Network

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] TOTAL

11 1 17 1 3 0 32
175

53 0 0 0 1 0 55

4 0 43 1 10 0 58

23 0 15 0 0 0 37

3 0 8 0 0 0 11

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6 0 20 0 0 0 26

57 16 13 8 6 0 100

69 0 0 0 0 0 69

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

 

  Digital station 6 Music commissioned programmes from six suppliers in 2008/9. One  company accounted for 57% of this expenditure, and three accounted for 86%. 176    For the remaining BBC Network stations – Radio 5 Live, 5 Live Sports Extra, Radio 7 and the  Asian Network – the data supplied were insufficiently detailed to be able to produce an  informative analysis of expenditure on independently commissioned content.             

171 172

 ibid.   ibid.  173  ibid.  174  ibid.  175  ibid.  176  ibid. 

55 

Figure 48: ten largest suppliers of independent radio productions to analogue BBC  Networks in 2008/9 ranked by percentage of total payments by Network (%) 
100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 TOTAL NETWORK RADIO Radio 1 Radio 2 Radio 3 Radio 4 17 11 3 5 36 10 8 15 23 8 8 8 53 43 33

source: BBC Audio & Music

177

 

 

  To summarise, the supply of independent productions to BBC Network Radio was relatively  concentrated amongst a small number of suppliers in 2008/9 for Radio 1, Radio 2 and Radio  3. Radio 4 exhibited a more diverse source of programme suppliers (data for Radio 5 Live  was insufficiently robust for analysis). 178     

177 178

 ibid.   ibid. 

56 

9.  OPINIONS FROM THE INDEPENDENT  RADIO PRODUCTION SECTOR 
    This Section documents the opinions of the independent radio production sector concerning  the external commissioning of radio programmes by the BBC.  First, the opinions of the  sector trade body are considered; followed by the opinions of individual radio producers  who have provided input to the BBC Trust consultation.      Radio Independents Group    The Radio Independents Group was formed in 2004 and currently has a membership of  around 100 companies active in the independent radio production sector, including the  majority of suppliers to BBC Network Radio. In 2005, it negotiated new Terms of Trade with  the BBC for its members, and its executive meets regularly with senior BBC radio  management.    The formal submission by the Radio Independents Group to the BBC Trust consultation in  May 2010 represented an aggregation of its members’ viewpoints and concerns. Its main  proposals were:  • The independent radio production quota to be increased from 10% to 25% over three  years  • A reduction over three years of the proportion of BBC radio output ring‐fenced for in‐ house production from 91.6% to no more than 50%  • 25% of all BBC radio output to be opened to competition between independent and in‐ house producers using a Window of Creative Competition  • The quota to be implemented in terms of value, in addition to the current metric that  refers to the volume of ‘eligible hours’  • Network Radio commissioners of independent productions to have no managerial  responsibility for BBC in‐house production  • Greater transparency in the reporting of BBC independent radio commissioning  outcomes. 179    These proposals are considered here, preceded by an examination of the more general  comments on the sector made by the Radio Independents Group. Some assertions made by  the Radio Independents Group in its submission may appear to be unsubstantiated by  evidential data, which it has attributed to the absence of data provided by the BBC regarding  the outcomes of its radio commissioning systems. Some numbers cited in the submission  appear to be estimates, perhaps because BBC data and reports analysed as part of this  report had not been made available to the Radio Independents Group.    In its overview of the sector, the Radio Independents Group asserted:  • “Independent radio production is not currently in a position where it has sufficient access  to the market in order to grow and realise its full potential 

179

 Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, pp.5‐6, para.1‐7 

57 

• • •

•   Although it is beyond the scope of this report to examine the editorial characteristics of BBC  radio commissions, the notion of a “meritocracy of ideas” is undeniably important in a  situation where BBC Network Radio is the only broadcaster in many significant programme  genres. Independent producers have commented that the BBC Network Radio  commissioning systems, particularly for Radio 4, can seem more concerned with limiting the  inflow of creative ideas, rather than ensuring that this inflow is encouraged and successfully  evaluated so that its creative potential is realised on‐air. If this were the case, then the  current system may not be functioning to the maximum benefit of the Licence Fee payer.    With regard to the assertion by the Radio Independents Group that greater value is  potentially added to the economy by independent productions than by in‐house  productions, there would appear to be insufficient data on the flow of funds to perform such  an analysis. This is an area that could be given more attention in future as part of the follow‐ up to the National Audit Office 2009 report on BBC radio production costs.181    The Radio Independents Group outlined the current economic position of the sector:  • “There is limited scope to increase [the] relationship [with commercial radio] due to the  economic factors affecting the commercial radio sector …  • Keen to stand on its own feet and maximise revenue from its intellectual property, the  sector has also been looking to establish new ways of distributing their content via digital  networks  • Due to the lack of significant other sources of commissioning, there is a growing  understanding of the need for the BBC to provide the key stimulus to the independent  radio production sector, as part of its remit and purposes.” 182    Empirical evidence noted earlier has indicated that, for the foreseeable future, the BBC is  likely to continue to be the only customer of size for the independent radio production  sector’s outputs.    On the issue of the BBC commissioning system, the Radio Independents Group noted:  • “BBC Radio needs to move much more towards the use of a diverse range of independent  suppliers  • … suitable targets, set with realistic timetables, should be introduced [and] should be  enforced by the BBC Trust  • The current size of the BBC’s in‐house operation needs to be examined, along with  methods used to arrive at the current split between in‐house and out‐of‐house  [production] 

If the independent radio and audio sector is able to expand, it would be in a position to  achieve the critical mass needed to support a viable, nationally diverse radio network  [and] create much greater intellectual property value …  [BBC] money spent directly on independent production has the potential to create more  money in the economy than the equivalent spend on in‐house production  The sector’s prime customer, the BBC, maintains a commissioning system which does not  allow sufficient access to its schedule and therefore does not allow a meritocracy of ideas  and talent to flourish  The BBC has yet to make a major shift to working fully in partnership with the sector.” 180 

180 181 182

 ibid., pp.7‐8, paras.13‐17   National Audit Office, The Efficiency of Radio Production At The BBC, 13 January 2009   Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, pp.8‐9, para.18‐23 

58 

• • • •

The amount of independent production commissioned should be expressed as a  proportion of BBC Radio’s total programme output  The quota should be calculated as a percentage of value, in order to provide a clear  picture of the proportion of programming budget allocated to independent productions  RIG’s members report being disproportionately offered commissions for lower‐value  parts of the schedule  The common perception amongst our members is of independents being offered the  majority of commissions outside of peak hours.” 183 

  Analysis in this report has demonstrated that there was an evident diversity of independent  radio programme suppliers to Radio 4 in 2008/9, though the supply was less diverse to the  other National Networks. The BBC has recognised that the move towards ‘batch  commissioning’ for parts of the Radio 4 output will inevitably reduce the diversity of  suppliers. Additionally, the BBC acknowledged that the most recent commissioning round  has awarded a greater proportion of available commissions to a narrower range of suppliers.    Figure 49: volume and value of independent radio productions commissioned by BBC  Network Radio by year (£ ‘000 per annum) 
7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 1999/ 2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

volum e (hours) [left axis]

value (£ '000 at 2009 prices) [right axis]
184

source: BBC Audio & Music & Grant Goddard

 

 

  The Radio Independents Group proposal to measure independent productions supplied to  the BBC by both value and volume is illustrated by relevant data in Figure 49. In real terms  (after adjustment for price inflation), the total value of BBC Network Radio’s independent  radio commissions has remained relatively stable over the last decade, whereas the volume  of commissions has increased significantly during the last two years.    Analysis in this report has confirmed the assertion by the Radio Independents Group that  programmes commissioned recently by BBC Network Radio have been of lower average  value. Data demonstrated that commissions for the BBC’s digital radio stations in the last  two years have been contracted at much lower average hourly rates than commissions for  analogue stations. Additionally, the average cost of external commissions for analogue  stations has decreased in recent years.    Unfortunately, detailed data was not supplied by the BBC that could have determined the  proportion of externally commissioned radio content that was scheduled for broadcast in  off‐peak hours. This remains another area of investigation that would have provided a useful 
183 184

 ibid., pp.12‐14, para.37, 39, 43‐46    BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author & Office for National Statistics, Retail Price Index RP02 

59 

analysis, similar to that which is routinely carried out by Ofcom for the BBC’s independently  commissioned television output.    The Radio Independents Group proposals for the quota noted:  • “It is not clear to RIG why the figure of 10% was chosen for radio …  • UK governments, regulatory bodies and independent research such as the [Philip] Graf  Report have long taken the view that 25% is a necessary level to stimulate the right  amount of activity in the creative sector and allow a good starting level for an influx of  innovation, new ideas and talent.” 185    The argument made by the Radio Independents Group was that a 25% quota for  independent commissions has worked successfully in the television market, although it  provided no evidence to support the notion that the same success would necessarily accrue  to the radio market. It could be that the marketplaces within the two media, radio and  television, for independent commissions have more differences than similarities.    For example, a report commissioned by the BBC in 2005 had identified that the independent  television production sector benefits from a unique set of privileges:  • “Guaranteed rights across the range of genres from any British commissioner  • Guaranteed access to 25% of the BBC’s programming, with a further 25% available under  the Window of Creative Competition  • A public service broadcaster, Channel 4, which is constitutionally obliged to have no in‐ house production  • Exposure to limited risk with these guarantees – only needing to put up development  funding, end even that sometimes provided by the broadcasters  • The advantage of a test market: in particular, showcasing on the BBC gives independents  ‘brand edge’ for international markets.” 186    However, in the radio medium, it is evident that no equivalent privileges exist because:  • The BBC remains the only significant commissioner  • Certain programme genres are only produced by the BBC in‐house  • A Window of Creative Competition has only been applied to Radio 4  • Development costs are largely self‐funded by independents  • There are no significant secondary or overseas markets for radio productions.    Similarly, The Radio Independent Groups cited the successful operation of the Window of  Creative Competition in BBC television to support its proposal to extend the scope of the  existing Window in radio, presently limited to Radio 4, to all National Networks and to  increase it from 10% to 25%. 187  Again, the issues might be quite different in the two media,  particularly as there is a considerably more competitive marketplace for independent  productions in television. In this respect, it would prove useful to conduct a detailed analysis  of the outcomes of the operation of the current, limited Window of Creative Competition on  Radio 4 commissions. Consideration could then be given to its extension, with the benefit of  empirical evidence specifically from the radio medium.    The Radio Independents Group acknowledged that the implementation of an increased  quota and the extension of the Window of Creative Competition would have implications for  the capacity of the independent production sector and for in‐house BBC production: 
185 186 187

 Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, p.17, para.60   The Work Foundation & BBC, The tipping point: How much is broadcast creativity at risk?, July 2005, p.48, para.97   Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, p.18‐19, paras.64‐66 

60 

• • • • •

“The Independent Sector has significant capacity to supply a far greater amount of  quality cost‐effective content for BBC radio services  … there is already, in theory at least, a sizeable amount of extra capacity that could be  refocused to radio production if the demand was present  There are many skilled freelancers in the radio production market who are ready and  able to take on more work with independent production companies, either in a freelance,  contracted or permanent capacity  Increasing the independent quota is not a way of forcing the BBC to commission  programmes from any other than the best qualified  It is not unreasonable to speculate that there may be a significant additional contingent  of production talent within the BBC that would welcome the opportunity to ‘spread their  wings’ in the wider creative environment, and in more locations around the UK, if they  felt that there was a market large enough to support a further growth in the sector.” 188 

  Empirical evidence from Skillset has demonstrated that the workforce in the UK radio  industry is shrinking as a result of job losses in both the commercial radio sector and the  BBC. 189  It was also evident that a greater proportion of the remaining workforce is being  contracted on a freelance basis rather than as employees. Several independent radio  producers noted, during the preparation of this report, that their businesses are regularly  approached by a stream of skilled radio personnel seeking work opportunities, who have to  be turned away because the low volumes and low profits of BBC commissions preclude  business expansion. The available data suggest that there is a significant pool of skilled radio  production staff available if the independent radio production sector were offered sufficient  new business to expand.    The Radio Independents Group noted that the issue of commissioning budgets needs to be  tackled as much as does the volume of commissions:  • “We would caution against prolonging the regime of blanket cuts that penalise the  efficient and the under‐financed as much as the inefficient and generously provided‐for  • Both in‐house and out‐of‐house [BBC] production budgets have been squeezed in recent  times  • RIG would […] question the extent to which it is right that the burden of balancing the  BBC’s books should fall on production budgets  • Cuts in budgets are at a critical point, are counter‐productive and not necessarily  mirrored by cuts elsewhere in [the] BBC.”190    Data supplied by the BBC have demonstrated that the average per hour cost of external  radio commissions has decreased in recent years, whilst average in‐house per hour  production costs mostly increased over the same period.    The Radio Independents Group raised issues about the BBC commissioning processes:  • “RIG proposes that the Trust require BBC Audio & Music to introduce a commissioning  process that ensures that there is not a conflict of interest between making  commissioning decisions and being responsible for in‐house departments  • The BBC needs to ensure it commissions a range of external producers, both established  companies and new businesses 

188 189 190

 ibid., pp.26‐28, paras.102, 104, 110 & 116   Skillset, Radio Sector – Labour Market Intelligence Digest, 2009, p.2.   Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, pp.31‐32, paras.129‐131 

61 

• • •

The Trust should examine whether the BBC offers sufficient support to newer companies,  whilst offering equal executive freedom for both smaller and larger operators to use their  experience and knowledge to take risks and innovate  There are currently problems in terms of communication, relating for example to the way  in which commissioning opportunities are publicised to in‐house and out‐of‐house  producers respectively  Network Controllers [can] make decisions without considering the effect on independent  suppliers or consulting them in advance.” 191 

  These points highlight the possible problem that communication issues appear to be  impinging upon the relationship between the two parties. It is apparent that the  commissioning processes are as much an issue for the independent radio production sector  as the volume and value of the commissions themselves.    The remaining points made by the Radio Independents Group concerned specific issues  which are noted below.    Production credits  According to the Radio Independents Group, independent productions broadcast by the BBC  are not systematically credited beyond the agreement in the Terms of Trade for an ‘end  credit’. 192  In this respect, in 1992, the BBC Radio Programme Review Board had agreed a  policy that “every independently produced network radio programme should be credited as  such both on air and in Radio Times billings.” 193    Information  The Radio Independents Group noted that “it has proved difficult to extract various key  types of information from the BBC” and that requests under the Freedom of Information Act  have been turned down. 194    ‘Indie Champion’  The Radio Independents Group proposed that BBC Network Radio appoint a dedicated  executive for radio commissioning “to build and strengthen relationships with the sector,  and act as troubleshooter.” 195    Editorial Compliance  The Radio Independents Group noted that the cost of additional compliance work required  as a result of revised commissioning procedures has to be absorbed by independent  producers within their existing programme budgets, even though the costs can be significant  for some programmes. 196    Training  The Radio Independents Group proposed that the issue of training in radio production be  examined. 197  For this report, no data could be sourced from agencies regarding the training  of personnel within the radio industry or in the independent radio production sector.   
 ibid., pp.33‐34, paras.140‐144   Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, p.34, para.146  193  Bill Morris, Special Assistant to Managing Director, BBC Network Radio, Credits/Billings For Independent Productions, memo,  28 October 1992  194  Radio Independents Group, Submission to the BBC Trust Radio Network Supply Review, May 2010, p.34, para.148  195  ibid., p.35, para.151  196  ibid, pp.29‐30, paras.124‐128  197  ibid., p.29, paras.119‐123 
192 191

62 

To summarise the Radio Independents Group submission, in its words:    “Ultimately, the structure we would like to see would, by combining an enhanced quota and  Window of Creative Competition with the appropriate accompanying commissioning  practices, allow the best ideas and talent to make it on the air, thus giving the Licence Fee  payer the full return on their money.” 198      Independent Radio Producers    A large number of comments were made by independent radio producers in response to the  BBC Trust consultation process. During the outreach work for this report, it was evident that  similar, and equally forthright, viewpoints were shared by stakeholders across the  independent radio production sector, regardless of the size of their business, their location  or their success in achieving commissions from the BBC. No issues became apparent upon  which parts of the sector had significantly differing opinions.    BBC attitudes:  Many independent producers felt that they experienced rather negative and patronising  attitudes from the staff with whom they have to deal within BBC radio. They reported that,  in some cases, they felt that independent producers were merely tolerated, rather than  being viewed as an important part of the BBC radio production fabric. There was felt to be  particularly strong antipathy within the BBC to independent producers who had not  previously worked as BBC staff. These opinions were not limited to experiences with  London‐based Network Radio, but were similarly reflected in comments from the Nations  and Regions. There was also a feeling that independent producers based nearer to London  received preferential treatment from Network Radio. Some independent producers based in  the Nations commented that National Networks seemed disinterested in content with a  regional slant.    BBC Commissioning Editors:  In each BBC Network, the Commissioning Editors are the ‘touchpoint’ for independent radio  producers. There were a number of issues raised:  • Difficulties experienced accessing Commissioning Editors on an informal basis  • The dual responsibilities of Commissioning Editors for in‐house productions and external  productions are considered to be antagonistic  • Lack of awareness amongst Commissioning Editors of the track record of an independent  radio producer  • Perceived resistance from Commissioning Editors to new and creative ideas for  programmes  • Lack of co‐ordination between Commissioning Editors working for different BBC  Networks  • Lack of transparency in the business relationship between Commissioning Editors and  independent producers  • Lack of knowledge amongst Commissioning Editors of the working methods of  independent radio producers     

198

 ibid., p.21, para.83 

63 

BBC commissioning processes:  The existing systems for the commissioning of programmes create considerable tensions  with independent radio producers, who expressed the following concerns:  • Meetings to present ideas already short listed are desired, whereas meetings prior to  short listing were considered unproductive  • Block quotas for genres such as ‘readings’ appear to offer preferential treatment to in‐ house producers  • Excessively long commissioning timeframes  • Insufficient feedback  • Delays in issuing contracts for commissions  • The amount of time required to prepare programme proposals  • Lack of development funding  • The commissioning process lacks continuity as it re‐starts each year  • Inflexibility in commissioning programmes from new companies  • Insufficient volumes of commissions offered  • No lists published of which external programmes were commissioned from which  company  • Commissioning system not seen to be meritocratic and lacks consistency  • Programme ‘talent’ is often contracted directly by the BBC within independent  productions.    Supplier Lists:  Concerns were expressed about the operation of Supplier Lists:  • Start‐ups require a track record  • ‘National’ experience is required by BBC Networks, even if suppliers have previous  commissions from BBC Nations stations  • The difficulty of getting onto a Supplier List  • Removal from a Supplier List if no programme has been commissioned    Programme budgets:  The main issues concerning budgets were:  • The independent production sector’s lack of leverage in budget negotiations  • The time expended on line‐by‐line negotiation of budgets after commissioning  • The unrealistically low values ascribed by the BBC to individually budgeted items  • The low values of individual commissions  • The low gross profit margin allowed by the BBC for each commission  • Reductions over time in commission values and the gross profit margin  • Additional costs of new BBC compliance procedures that cannot be included in budgets  • Situations where independent production companies can end up not covering their costs  of commissions from the BBC.    Independent radio production quota:  Many comments were received from the independent radio production sector noting that  the current BBC quota is too low.    Batch commissioning:  Radio 4’s batch commissioning system was considered by some independent radio  producers to have restricted their opportunities for commissions and to have limited  potential bidders to those with sufficient production capacity.   

64 

The independent radio production business model:  Many and varied comments were received, including:  • Intense competition for a limited number of commissions  • The lack of significant customers outside of the BBC  • The impact of the recession on commercial radio  • The challenges of operating as a sole trader  • The lack of secondary markets for exploitation  • The lack of alternative broadcasters in speech radio  • Unused capacity within independent production businesses  • The predominance of ‘chat and music’ shows in Nations radio stations.    These comments, and many others, proved invaluable in shaping the discovery processes for  this report. Many of the analyses of the radio marketplace were the outcome of concerns  expressed by stakeholders in the independent radio production sector.   

65 

10.  THE BBC EXECUTIVE PROPOSALS 
    The BBC Executive submitted a set of proposals to the BBC Trust regarding its future strategy  for the commissioning of independent radio productions. This Section examines those  proposals and offers evidence concerning the points raised.    The main proposals of the BBC Executive were:  • The quota for independent radio productions broadcast by National Networks to be  increased from the present 10% of eligible output to 12.5% of eligible output from  2010/11  • The minimum guarantee for independent radio productions broadcast by Radio 4 to be  increased from the present 10% of eligible output to 12.5% of eligible output over a two‐ year period, supplemented by continued operation of the 10% Window of Creative  Competition  • Separate consideration to be given to quotas for independent radio productions  broadcast by the Nations stations  • “Significant improvements to commissioning practices and transparency to support the  growth and sustainability of business, and consolidation in the sector.” 199    The BBC Executive identified three distinct sources of value the BBC derives from the  commissioning of independent radio productions:  • “Developing talent from a variety of locations and industries  • Distinctive innovation driven by differences in the production model  • Potential efficiency savings.” 200    At the same time, the BBC Executive noted that:  • “Large scale [BBC] in‐house production is required to maintain globally unique  programme‐making skills, to protect editorial control; over each station’s sound and to  provide training within the industry, and that this constrains the overall potential growth  of independent radio production in the UK.” 201    The issues raised by the BBC Executive are considered in more detail, presented in the form  of extracts from the BBC Executive document, followed by references to relevant empirical  evidence.       Definitions & Governance    The BBC Executive report noted that:  • “The Charter Agreement requires the BBC to ensure it has secured a ‘suitable range and  diversity’ of programmes provided by external suppliers  • By virtue of individual requirements on each network, a level of diversity is guaranteed ….  • The proportion of eligible spend with the indie sector has been consistently above 10% in  recent years …  • The current requirement is based on hours of output, rather than spend, which is a  simple and transparent approach to measurement 
199 200 201

 BBC Audiences & Performance Committee, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.0   ibid., p.2   ibid., p.2 

66 

• There are no recommended changes to the definitions of the quota...” 202    Firstly, it might be questioned whether sufficient ‘diversity’ in the BBC’s independent radio  commissions can be achieved solely by the aggregation of “individual requirements on each  Network.” In other aspects of diversity within the broadcast sector, evidence has  demonstrated that it is not possible to guarantee that a market, without intervention, will  necessarily produce a sufficiently diverse outcome.    Figure 50: BBC Network Radio independent commissions 
% of eligible output by hours by spend % of total hours by hours by spend

1999/2000 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 2008/9

13.9 13.8 13.3 9.6 12.4 13.4 14.2 13.5 12.7 13.7
203

12.5 12.8 11.8 12.0

4.0 4.3 4.5 4.8 4.8 8.4 8.9

source: BBC Audio & Music

 

5.8 6.2 5.9 6.0  

  Secondly, it is noted that:  • The percentage of BBC Network Radio eligible output allocated to independently  produced programmes has consistently been above 12% during the last ten years [see  footnote regarding 2002/3]  • The proposed quota increase from 10% to 12.5% of eligible hours could result in an  increase in the volume of commissions, or the new quota could be satisfied by the  volume of programmes currently commissioned  • Although the volume of independently commissioned programmes has increased  significantly (from 4% in 2002/3 to 9% in 2008/9 of total broadcast hours), expenditure  has remained steady at about 6% of total expenditure on Network Radio content  • The BBC Executive preference is to maintain the independent production quota as a  percentage of ‘eligible hours’ rather than as a percentage of expenditure, possibly  because expenditure has not demonstrated growth in line with increased volumes.      The Effectiveness of Independent Supply    The BBC Executive document proceeded to itemise three sources of value derived from  commissioning independent radio productions.    Developing talent    The document noted that:  • “The nascent independent [radio production] sector began with a large influx of ex‐BBC  staff 

 ibid., p.5   BBC Audio & Music, data supplied to the author [the reduction in volume in 2002/3 was due to the voluntary liquidation of  Wise Buddah] 
203

202

67 

• • •

The leading companies have demonstrated success in developing staff from many other  areas within the creative industries  Fewer than 30 per cent of [independent radio production sector] employees have ever  worked [in] in‐house [BBC radio production]  The majority [of independent radio producers outside London] are clustered around BBC  production bases (particularly Manchester and Glasgow) where they can draw on the in‐ house pool of talent …” 204 

  These statements seemed to emphasise that the structure of the independent radio  production sector is inextricably linked to the structure of the BBC, its largest customer.  Indeed, the narrative of the BBC Executive document noted that “the [independent radio  production] industry’s structure is in part the result of the fractured nature of BBC  commissions.” 205    Distinctive Innovation    The BBC Executive document noted that:  • “Independent producers have given us examples of how their business model requires  producers to work flexibly across multiple genres of output, as well as across the  different [BBC] services  • This pattern of working is relatively rare for [BBC] in‐house producers who typically  specialise in working for specific networks or genres  • A number of examples were cited to illustrate how speech production might be mixed  with music, or factual or drama, as a differentiator for an independent producer – even if  they were ex‐BBC staff  • Some of the smaller [BBC] in‐house production teams based outside of London also  indicated this flexibility of work is benefiting their output creatively too.” 206    It is apparent that the systems for programme production within BBC Network Radio are  quite different from those practised elsewhere in the sector. Flexible working patterns that  are commonplace in commercial radio and in the independent radio production sector only  appear to have been implemented in some BBC production centres, particularly those  outside of London.     The BBC Executive document acknowledged the existence of barriers to entry for suppliers  to BBC Network radio:  • “In some areas, such as drama and light factual output, there are relatively low risks to  the BBC involved, provided the company has established a track record in related types of  output  • Radio 4’s registered supplier lists are specific to commissioning briefs and can pose a  barrier to the growth of business [sic] who may be on one list but not another  • Existing indies with an established track record in adjacent areas feel strongly that they  should not be prevented from building new areas of business which have the potential to  strengthen their overall portfolio of work  • In some specialist areas, particularly investigative journalism and hard‐edged news and  current affairs strands, the editorial risks are large and the breadth of skills needed is  very difficult to obtain.” 207 
204 205

 BBC Audiences & Performance Committee, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.6   ibid., p.6  206  ibid., p.7  207  ibid., p.8 

68 

  Formal entry barriers and gatekeeper systems for suppliers could be considered to be no  more than protective strategies. During the most recent Charter Renewal process, the  government’s Green Paper had identified that competition for in‐house BBC producers from  an external radio production sector was in the best interest of the Licence Fee payer:    “We think the same principle should apply to radio production as in TV – where possible, we  want to encourage competition, because it is likely to bring the best programmes to  listeners.” 208    In its written response, the BBC had “agreed that greater competition could benefit  listeners.” 209    Efficiency    The BBC Executive document noted that:  • “Profit incentives should drive independent companies to seek cost efficiencies,  particularly in producing ongoing strands  • The BBC’s strong buying position in the radio industry has meant that substantial cost  savings have been achieved  • We have not been able to demonstrate that independent productions are more efficient  than [BBC] in‐house, once all costs are accounted for.” 210    Analysis of programme cost data in Section 6 of this report demonstrated that, in general  terms, the characteristics of independently produced commissions resulted in lower cost  outcomes for most National Networks than in‐house productions. The caveat was that  insufficient data was supplied by the BBC to be able to make like‐for‐like programme  comparisons in terms of genres or ‘per hour’ metrics.    The BBC’s significant share of the market for independent radio productions has helped it to  make “substantial cost savings” in its programme budgets, but stakeholders in the  independent radio production sector have asked at what price to the economic viability of  their industry? As the party determining the prices of independent radio productions in such  a limited marketplace, the impact of the BBC extends far beyond that of a conventional  buyer in a competitive, commercial environment.      Business Efficiency    Commissioning & Development    The BBC Executive document noted the intense competition for external radio commissions:  • “In a recent Radio 4 commissioning round, 1,666 pre‐offers were received from the indie  sector …  • Much of the development time could be reduced by limiting the number of main pitches  requested, following the pre‐offers round 

208

 Department for Culture, Media & Sport, Review of the BBC’s Royal Charter: A Strong BBC, independent of government,  March 2005, p.88, para.7.20  209  BBC, Review of the BBC’s Royal Charter: BBC response to ‘A Strong BBC, independent of government’, May 2005, p.86  210  BBC Audiences & Performance Committee, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.8 

69 

• •

Pressure on commissioners has also intensified with the level of competition, since each  offer needs to be assessed, and feedback is expected for every rejection, often requiring  face to face meetings  Current arrangements are not sustainable and the approach to feedback and  programme evaluation should be reviewed to ensure an appropriate balance between  quality and volume.” 211 

  At issue here is the volume of work involved in the BBC being the only significant buyer of  independent radio productions. During the preparation of this report, stakeholders in the  independent radio production sector suggested that the BBC, as a public broadcaster, should  develop internal systems with sufficient capacity to deal with the volume of external input it  receives.    Staffing    The BBC Executive document noted the differences between the structures of the radio and  television divisions of the BBC:  • “94% of Audio & Music staff are on permanent contracts, compared to 43% within Vision  [BBC television]  • Permanent staffing [in BBC Network Radio] is more efficient  • Television has a more diverse employment market, whereas the BBC is the only scale  employer of radio producers with the specific skills required to produce BBC output  • A market of [radio] freelancers is not sustainable, as limited opportunities and job  instability leads individuals to change industry  • Permanency is a key benefit of radio work over television production  • Significant changes to the composition of staff are practically impossible to achieve, and  this inflexibility means that there is a high implementation cost associated with changes  in the level of independent production, as well as difficulty in managing open competition  efficiently.” 212    The key words in these statements would seem to be ‘permanency’, ‘inflexibility’ and  ‘impossible’. Whereas significant changes in working practices have been achieved in BBC  television over a period of two decades, stakeholders in the independent radio production  sector have suggested that little comparable modernisation has occurred within BBC  Network Radio.     Studio Utilisation    The BBC Executive report noted that:  • “The load of internal [BBC] studios and associated studio staff is affected by the use of  external suppliers …  • The fixed cost of empty studios cannot be recovered until buildings are disposed of or re‐ fitted  • It may be possible to increase the leasing of studio capacity for pre‐recorded output, for  example, in off‐peak periods.” 213    Several independent producers commented for this report on the difficulties and costs  involved in booking and utilising BBC radio studio time for their production work. Most 
211 212 213

 ibid., p.9   ibid., pp.9‐10   ibid., p.10 

70 

independent producers presently appear to use commercial studios for their pre‐recorded  productions for the BBC, whereas a more flexible approach to the hire of BBC studios could  benefit both parties and would produce a revenue stream for the BBC to help amortise its  capital investment in studios. Stakeholders in the radio production sector noted that such a  system already operates for external television productions which hire studio facilities from  BBC Vision.      Appropriateness of the Quota    Guaranteed Level    The report by the BBC Executive noted a number of reasons to maintain a limit on the extent  of independent productions:  • “[BBC] radio production teams are lean, with even the largest speech team in Audio &  Music employing fewer than 90 people for over 1,000 hours of output  • In the integrated networks, the ratios are even larger, with an average of over 100 hours  of originations on Radio 1 per production staff  • Each radio station requires a core hub of programming to provide strategic control over  the station’s sound, brand and reputation  • In‐house [BBC] experience is also critical for a small number of productions which are  highly editorially sensitive  • Some output is reliant on a large investment in specialist skills and equipment  • There may be too little work available in the [programme] area to support a competitive  market  • There are situations of natural monopoly in supply, and the skills should continue to be  provided by in‐house teams …  • Some programming also requires access to internal resources and networks …  • The scale of in‐house production supports a high quality training infrastructure …  • A mix of internal programmes is required to provide in‐house producers with a clear  internal development path  • Scope is […] limited for independent producers to offer creative and efficiency benefits,  given that programmes rely so heavily on centralised functions  • In areas where independent production may be beneficial, for example specialist music  programming, there is a strong case for retaining a proportion of this output in‐house to  sustain production capability and training.” 214    The conclusion of the BBC Executive Report was that:    “The long‐term scope for further growth of independent supply to BBC Network Radio is  limited by the continued importance of strong in‐house [BBC] capability.” 215    It is evident that the changes that the BBC has implemented in the television production  medium over the last two decades, where it has converted the majority of the workforce  from ‘permanent’ to ‘fixed contract’, ‘freelance’ and ‘casual’, have not similarly been  implemented in Network Radio. 216    

214 215 216

 ibid., pp.11‐12   ibid., p.12   ibid, pp.9‐10 

71 

The impetus for internal change in BBC radio would appear to be less than in the television  medium. In radio, the BBC attracts the largest share of listening, it enjoys relatively steady  funding (at a time when commercial radio revenues are falling) and it makes many  programmes that have no direct competitors. There is no threat from ‘pay radio’ or from  imported content, as there is in the television medium, since almost all UK radio output is  domestically produced and is considered by consumers to be ‘free’ at the point of use. As a  result, it might seem that there is substantially less external pressure on BBC radio for  internal reforms than there has been in the television medium, particularly as market  research has demonstrated consistently high levels of consumer satisfaction with the quality  of existing radio services. 217    Open Competition    The BBC Executive report noted:  • “We have assessed whether it is appropriate to extend the Window of Creative  Competition, either on Radio 4 or by application to other networks, but believe it would  have negative consequences for the sector  • The Window of Creative Competition creates unseen costs to the industry by encouraging  a larger volume of development work and creating additional pressure on commissioners  in assessing offers and providing feedback  • The development burden has a direct impact on the ability of companies to sustain  growth  • Rigidity in the labour market means that a significant change to the scale of Radio 4’s  Window of Creative Competition will have a direct impact on internal production  efficiency, requiring both a reduction in the headcount and increased use of fixed  contracts  • Extension of the Window of Creative Competition to other networks has also been  considered, but it cannot be widely implemented without incurring significant  incremental cost, and it is likely to cause undesirable effects.” 218    In the television medium, a more substantial Window of Creative Competition has been  implemented successfully by the BBC, although there are evident differences between the  television and radio media. The extension of the Window of Creative Competition to a  greater proportion of BBC Network Radio output is a key proposal of the Radio  Independents Group, the effect of which would be to promote greater competition between  in‐house and external producers. At present, much of the output offered to external  producers involves competition amongst independent producers for a commission, but not  competition between them and in‐house BBC producers. The independents have argued  that increased competition between all parties should deliver better outcomes for the  Licence Fee payer.      Strategy & Recommendations    To summarise, the main recommendations of the BBC Executive Report were:  • The quota for independent radio productions broadcast by National Networks to be  increased from the present 10% of eligible output to 12.5% of eligible output from  2010/11 

217 218

 Ofcom, Radio – Preparing For The Future, Appendix B, 15 December 2004, p.50, Table 9.   BBC Audiences & Performance Committee, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.13 

72 

• •

The minimum guarantee for independent radio productions broadcast by Radio 4 to be  increased from the present 10% of eligible output to 12.5% of eligible output over a two‐ year period, supplemented by continued operation of the 10% Window of Creative  Competition  Separate consideration to be given to quotas for independent radio productions  broadcast by the Nations stations  “Significant improvements to commissioning practices and transparency to support the  growth and sustainability of business, and consolidation in the sector.” 219 

  The last of these items incorporated a series of second‐tier recommendations to:  • “Improve access for out‐of‐London production companies to network commissioners  • Improve the stability of business and decrease dependency on small, ad‐hoc, one‐off  commissions, for example using ‘batch tendering’, and ensuring a mix of short  series/strands business is available. This will allow greater consolidation and support the  sector in developing its own staff base  • Work with the [independent radio production] sector to agree cost‐effective initiatives to  support skill‐building in the industry  • Simplify Radio 4 registered supplier lists to support business development amongst  proven suppliers. This would permit ‘horizontal’ growth, without affecting qualification  requirements for new companies  • Co‐ordinate the timings of commissioning rounds to reduce overlap in deadlines, thus  providing producers with space to pitch to multiple networks  • [Publish] success rates of previous commissioning rounds to provide transparency and  support producers’ decision‐making  • Cap the number of pre‐offers per company into particularly low volume slots (e.g. <25)  • [Restrict] the number of pitches following a pre‐offers round  • Review [the] system for evaluating and providing feedback on production performance  • Establish [a] workstream to review [the] approach to studio pricing.” 220    Undoubtedly, many of these recommendations would be likely to improve the efficiency of  the independent radio programme commissioning processes within the BBC and could  address some of the concerns regarding the transparency of the commissioning process  raised by the Radio Independents Group.    However, the specific recommendations to cap the number of pre‐offers submitted by  independent producers and to restrict the number of pitches would have the impact of  diminishing the level of competition for external commissions. The Radio Independents  Group has argued that the high volume of pitches submitted to the BBC for external  commissions is indicative of their sector’s capacity for supply which, they suggest, has not  been responded to with a sufficiently increased volume of demand from the BBC.    The BBC Executive suggestion that the independent radio production sector should undergo  consolidation appears to result from the administrative challenge it faces of dealing with a  large number of small independent production suppliers. However, the inclusion of such a  suggestion begs the question of exactly how ‘arms length’ the relationship is between the  BBC and its external programme suppliers. How ‘independent’ can an independent radio  production sector be that relies to such a significant extent on a single customer to purchase  its outputs? 
219 220

 ibid., p.0   ibid., pp.7, 8 & 10 

73 

  The BBC’s market power over the independent radio production sector has appeared to  enable it to:  • Ensure supply of precisely the programmes it has decided need to be produced for its  Networks  • Make cost efficiencies through its detailed budget negotiations in the commissioning of  independent radio productions  • Ensure there is no ‘bidding war’ against competitors for radio content   • Influence the organisational structure of the sector  • Continue to organise its in‐house radio production with little reference to externalities.      [ ]      The apparent paradox is that the cost structures of the independent radio sector are largely  a result of budget restrictions imposed upon it by the BBC commissioning process.  Undoubtedly, if independent radio producers could charge the BBC higher prices for their  commissioned programmes, they would. One of the most common complaints of  independent producers, large and small, voiced during the preparation of this report, was  that the gross margin permitted by the BBC within the budgets of independent radio  commissions was too low to generate sufficient net profits to run a business.    Although not explicitly documented in the BBC’s commissioning procedures for radio, the  budgets submitted by producers for programme pitches include a line for gross profit which,  it was said by independent producers, could not exceed 10% of the commission’s total costs.  It was said that this ‘gross margin’ had been eroded over time by the BBC to its current level  which, for many independent producers, is proving insufficient.    The BBC Executive proposals noted that two‐thirds of independent radio producers received  an income of less than £50,000 from the BBC in 2008/9.221  The inference was that, if the  gross profit margin were 10%, two‐thirds of the sector was provided with a gross profit  margin of less than £5,000 per annum from the BBC with which to maintain their businesses.  This is obviously an insufficient margin for a commercial enterprise to be a going concern,  without additional revenue support.    The current situation seems to be the result of the present BBC Network Radio system of  negotiating budgets for each independent radio commission on a line‐by‐line basis, an  effective way to keep its programme costs competitive. The paradox remains that the cost  control systems that the BBC now wishes to emulate for its in‐house productions are, in fact,  cost control systems that have been implemented by the BBC unilaterally upon the  independent production sector. If an external commission overruns its budget, the  additional costs have to be absorbed by the independent producer, not by the BBC, under  the terms of the contract.    In‐house BBC radio productions do not need to produce a ‘gross profit’ whereas, for the  independent production sector, gross profit is a necessary pre‐requisite for its commercial  existence. Having apparently squeezed the profit margins of the independent radio  production sector in recent years, according to sector stakeholders, the BBC could be in 
221

 BBC Audio & Music, Radio Supply Review – Independent Supply, 2 December 2009, p.5, para.1.3 

74 

danger of starving to death the very independent sector whose low costs it is now keen to  emulate.    It proves difficult to evaluate the aggregate profitability of the independent radio production  sector because it is comprised of a large number of very small enterprises. However, it is  possible to hypothesise that, if a 10% gross margin had been applied to the budget of every  BBC Network Radio programme commissioned from independent producers, the gross profit  of the entire sector would have been approximately £1.7m in 2008/9. Split between the 110  companies from which the BBC commissioned content, the average gross profit would have  been about £15,000 per company in 2008/9. This is an insufficient margin on which to  maintain even a one‐person business. Additionally, this hypothesis ignores the remaining  independent producers who received no commissions from BBC Network Radio in 2008/9.    Figure 51: revenues and profits/losses of the largest independent radio production  suppliers to BBC Network Radio in 2008/9 
revenues 2008/9 2007/8 2006/7 net profit/loss (post-tax) 2008/9 2007/8 2006/7

[production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company] [production company]

6,499,729 1,314,955 436,529

6,627,109 1,445,333 486,925 520,363

611,722

482,686

-501,591 -1,940,802 -174,876 -117,800 25,873 116,596 -72,483 6,380 1,895 -54,683 21,859 24,775 117,840 -46,114

124,870

source: Companies House accounts

222

 

 

  Evidence from accounts filed at Companies House confirmed that the profitability of the  independent radio production sector appears to be at risk. Independent production  companies listed in Figure 51 are ranked by the value of their BBC Network Radio  commissions in 2008/9. Excluded are companies whose main business was television  production or who had not filed accounts. Not all of these companies’ revenues derived  entirely from BBC commissions, but the data illustrated that some of the largest companies  were either marginally profitable or were not generating net profits, even having been  awarded a significant proportion of BBC radio commissions.    The most recent filed accounts of one of the largest companies in the independent radio  production sector noted:  • “The radio programmes and television programmes market is highly competitive and  operating margins need to be maintained  • The total liabilities [of the company] exceeded total assets by £2,137,220  • The company is forecast to generate cash to meet its obligations as they fall due,  however, such surplus will not be sufficient to redeem the convertible loan notes.” 223    These data illustrate that the independent radio production sector, as presently structured,  may not be able to exist commercially as anything more than a ‘cottage industry’ that  continues to require cross‐subsidisation from other revenue sources. If some of the largest 

222 223

 Companies House filed accounts [revenues and profits did not derive exclusively from BBC radio programme commissions]   ibid. 

75 

ventures in the sector seem unable to generate a net profit, then it is likely that the majority  of much smaller enterprises in the sector are suffering a similar fate.    With the expectation that the BBC will remain, by far and away, the largest customer of the  independent radio production sector for the foreseeable future, the sector’s future  commercial viability could be addressed by tackling these issues:  • The volume of independent radio commissions available from the BBC  • The gross profit margin available to external suppliers of radio programmes  • The distribution of BBC commissions amongst available independent radio producers.    Without attention to these issues, the danger could be that the independent radio  production sector might only limp along, at best. Sector acquisitions are likely to be fuelled  by insolvency rather than profitability. Consolidation will result from desperation rather than  from strategic opportunities. Some operations could simply disappear.    The proposals from the BBC Executive do not appear to have addressed these issues. Some  of its new practices, such as ‘batch commissioning’, are likely to exacerbate the lack of  commissions, and therefore profitability, for many stakeholders in the independent radio  production sector. Other proposals, such as the increased quota of 12.5%, in actuality, might  lead to no more than the maintenance of the status quo. The gross profit margin offered to  independent suppliers was not addressed by the BBC Executive proposals.    BBC Network Radio’s stated desire to emulate the cost structures of external radio  producers for its in‐house productions is undoubtedly in the interest of the Licence Fee  payer. However, those same tightly controlled cost structures, which have been imposed  upon the independent radio production sector by the BBC, are the very things that continue  to confine the sector to being a ‘cottage industry’ that might never generate sufficient net  profits to grow into a genuinely commercial creative industry.   

76 

11.  CONCLUSION 
    The independent radio production sector is a relatively small, but culturally significant, part  of the United Kingdom media industries. The sector’s outputs are valued for their creativity,  having won many awards, both at home and overseas, and several of its programmes are  ‘household names’, particularly amongst BBC radio listeners.    The turnover of the independent radio production industry is estimated to be around £20m  per annum, less than 2% of the total funding of the radio sector. The BBC purchases more  than 90% of the independent radio production sector’s outputs, while its other customers  are mainly commercial radio, publishers and corporate clients.    The 2006 BBC Charter and Agreement requires the BBC Trust to ensure that the BBC  commissions a suitable proportion, range and diversity of radio programmes from external  producers. Data provided by the BBC demonstrated that its commissions from the  independent radio production sector exceeded the agreed 10% ‘quota’ in each of the last  ten years. It was evident that these commissions comprised a range of programme genres  and were acquired at a range of acquisition costs, as is required by Clause 58 of the BBC  Agreement.    A lack of granularity in the data provided by the BBC made it difficult to explore the  ‘diversity’ of external radio commissions in detail. It is apparent that a significant proportion  of externally made programmes are commissioned from a relatively small number of  suppliers. This concentration in supply is likely to increase further as a result of the  introduction of a ‘batch commissioning’ system within BBC Radio 4.    Radio 4’s commissioning policies are significant for the independent radio production  because it offers a greater number of potential commissions to the sector than other BBC  Networks, and at a higher average value. The distribution of BBC commissions amongst  suppliers is an important issue for the 150 to 200 businesses in the independent radio  production sector which vary in size from sole traders to multi‐million pound media  enterprises. BBC commissions not only provide the majority of their revenues, but the BBC is  also the only broadcaster in several significant radio programmes genres, such as comedy,  documentary and drama. The commercial radio sector is unlikely to increase its minimal  commissioning of independent radio productions as a result of the economic challenges it  faces.    Other issues about which the independent radio production sector has expressed concern  are the BBC quota for external commissions, which its trade body has proposed be raised  from 10% to 25%, and the Window of Creative Competition which it recommends be  increased from 10% to 25% and expanded from Radio 4 to other BBC networks. It is evident  that, after 18 years of BBC external radio commissions, the independent radio production  sector still suffers from an underlying economic weakness. Its dependency upon the BBC has  given it little leverage in negotiations, the values of its individual BBC commissions are  relatively low, and there are no significant secondary markets to exploit, as exist in the  television sector.    As part of its package of recommendations, the BBC Executive proposed that the quota for  independent radio productions be increased from 10% to 12.5%. It also proposed that the 

77 

present Window of Creative Competition remain at its present level and continue to be  limited to Radio 4. Empirical data demonstrated that BBC Network Radio has exceeded its  present 10% quota by more than 2% in all but one of the last ten years. The BBC proposals  would be unlikely to precipitate the increase in scale of commissions demanded by the  independent radio production sector.    Although the BBC undoubtedly values the work of independent radio producers, its  proposals do not appear to have addressed the serious underlying economic weakness of  the sector. It is apparent that the profitability of small and large radio production businesses  has been eroded by a combination of downward pressure on the prices of BBC external  commissions (particularly the low prices of commissions by the digital National Networks)  and downward pressure on the gross profit margin offered for individual commissions.  These factors have ensured that external radio commissions offer increasing value for  money for the Licence Fee payer, though they have also ‘squeezed’ the independent radio  production sector to the extent that its economic viability as a commercial media sub‐sector  could be under threat.    The two parties – the BBC and the independent radio production sector – appear to share a  lack of understanding of each other’s positions, apparently due to an absence of  constructive dialogue over the most fundamental issues. The two parties should be working  together within a constructive partnership, ensuring that the interests of the Licence Fee  payer are placed firmly centre stage. Both parties need to ensure that the necessary systems  exist so that the best ideas for programmes, from whatever source they derive, can be  successfully transformed into radio programmes that will continue to make BBC radio the  envy of the world. At the same time, external producers need to be recompensed  sufficiently for their creative endeavours so as to ensure that they can remain in business  and thrive.    

78 

APPENDIX A:  CONTRIBUTORS 
    Thank you to the following parties who generously offered their assistance during the BBC  Trust consultation and the preparation of this report:    Abundant: Shane Wall  Acme: Euros Williams  All Out Productions: Jo Meek  Alfi Media: Alison Rusted  Angel Media Productions: Jane Whyatt  Art & Adventure: Roger Elsgood  Association of Independents In Radio (US): Erin Mishkin  Association of Independent Radio Producers of Ireland: Daryl Moorehouse, Mary Owens  Athena Media: Helen Shaw  B19 Media: Lincia Daniel  BBC Archives: Louise North, Jeff Walden  BBC Audio & Music: Chris Burns, Michael Davis, Will Jackson, Melanie Jones, Dennis Nolan,  Caroline Raphael, Margo Swadley, Sara Tan, Alison Winter, Jo Woods  BBC Diversity: Sue Caro  BBC English Regions: Judith Byrne, Elonka Soros  BBC Scotland: Sharon Mair, Jenni Minto  BBC Trust: Gareth Barr, Jon Cowdock  Beca TV: Helen William‐Ellis  BFI Library: Nina Bishop, Sean Delaney  Blue Egg Productions: Sarah Dickins  Bournemouth University (The Sir Michael Cobham Library): Steve Parton  Broadcast Training & Skills Regulator: Mags Noble  Campbell Davison Media: Patrick Campbell     Catherine Bailey Productions: Catherine Bailey, Robert Hughes  Chrome Radio: Catriona Oliphant  City Broadcasting: Philip Reevell  Classic Arts Productions: Wendy Thompson  CPL Productions: Liz Anstee  Cread: Stephen Edwards  Crosslab Productions: Melanie Harris  CSA Word: Clive Stanhope, Victoria Williams  Culture Wise: Mukti Jain Campion  Curlew Media: Mary Colwell  Damage: Gethin Thomas  Demus Productions: Nick Low  Dennis Marks  EGW: Eurwyn Williams  EFS TV Production: Peter Walton  Falling Tree Productions: Alan Hall  Feisty Productions: Lesley Riddoch  Festival Productions: Daniel Nathan  Floella Benjamin Productions: Floella Benjamin  Focus Productions: Ralph Maddern  Foldback Media: Dave Aylott 

79 

Folded Wing: Karen Pearson  Fresh Air Productions: Neil Cowling  Greenlight Radio: Kathy Flower  Greenpoint: Ann Scott  Heavy Entertainment: David Roper  Holy Mountain: Boz Temple‐Morris  Human Horizons: Chris Templeton  IGA Productions: Ivor Gaber  Jane Marshall Productions: Jane Marshall  Jarvis & Ayres Productions  Jolt Productions: Sarah Harrison  Just Radio: Susan Marling  Lyndon Jones Media: Lyndon Jones  Made In Manchester: Ashley Byrne, Phil Collinge  New Unique Broadcasting Company: Simon Cole, Kerry Luter  Odyssey Productions: Billy Kay  One Stop Digital: Mike Thornton  Pacificus Productions: Clive Brill  Paladin Pictures: Clive Sydall  Parrog: Ceri Wyn Richards  Pennine Productions: Janet Graves  Perfectly Normal Productions: David Morley  Pier Productions: Peter Hoare  Potton Hall Productions: Helen Hayes  Presentable: Megan Stuart  Promenade Productions: Nicholas Newton  PRX (US): Jake Shapiro  Radio Independents Group: Phil Critchlow, Mike Hally, Tim Wilson  Random Entertainment: Jon Naismith  Redbird Media: Karen Gilchrist  Rosemary Hartill  Ruth Evans Productions: Ruth Evans  Skillset: Amy Thomas, Dan Wilks  Smooth Operations: Viv Atkinson  Somethin’ Else: Nicky Birch, Jez Nelson  Soundscape Productions: Andy Cartwright  Square Dog Radio: Mike Hally  St Louis Productions: Connie St Louis  Sue Clark Productions: Sue Clark  Sugar Productions: John Sugar  Sweet Talk Productions: Peter Nichols  TBI Media: Phil Critchlow  Ten Alps Radio: Des Shaw  Terrier Radio: Llinos Jones  Testbed Productions: Nick Baker  The Comedy Unit: Gus Beattie  The Waters Company: Jill Waters  Tim Wilson Associates: Tim Wilson  Tinderbox Production: Sian Price  Tinpot Productions: Daryl Moorehouse  Tony Staveacre Productions: Tony Staveacre 

80 

TRC Media: Marie‐Claire Farmer  Unigryw: Catrin M.S. Davies  USP Content: Simon Crosse  Well Said Productions: Mary Owens  Wes Glei: Euros Lewis  Whistledown: David Prest  White Pebble Media: Laura Parfitt  Wise Buddah Creative: Mark Goodier 

81 

APPENDIX B:  ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
    Grant Goddard is an independent media analyst specialising in the radio broadcast sector.  He has contributed to public broadcasting policy through invitations to present written and  oral evidence to the House of Lords Communications Committee, Digital Britain and the  Competition Commission, as well as through his work for the Radio Authority/Ofcom.    Grant has worked as a senior manager and consultant in the radio and music industries since  1980, with a track record of having created and executed successful strategies for the launch  of large‐scale commercial radio stations in major markets in the UK, Europe and Asia. He has  written extensively about the radio industry in City analyst reports and for consumer and  trade publications, and regularly makes presentations at international broadcasting  conferences.             

82