AIEEE

Test Assessment, Analysis & Solutions
Some students are of the opinion that for AIEEE, practice is everything. At PAGE we recognize that
practice is one of the most important constituents of a good study plan. However, it is not enough to
blindly attempt tests. After every test, one needs to spend time reviewing it. The following charts will
give you a place to start your test review First check the question paper with answer keys to find out
marks scored. Religiously note down the number of questions that you obtained correct, wrong or left
unanswered in various section types. Also make a subjective self-judgment ascertaining the cause of
your performance in the various sections.
Summary performance table.
Physics Chemistry Maths Total
Total number of questions
Questions Attempted
Correct Answers
Wrong Answers
Total Scored
Analysis of wrong questions:
Reasons for wrong questions
(To be filled after you have attempted wrong questions on your own after the test) No. Questions
A. Know the solution / answer for the question but failed
to get it right in the exam: Calculation mistake
B. Know the solution / answer for the question but failed
to get it right in the exam: Applied wrong concept
C. Do not know the concept and couldn’t solve even after exam
Total Number of questions attempted wrong
If score of A &B is high then you need more practice and read questions more carefully. If C is very high you need
to revisit the topic in the textbook.
If the number of easy, average question not attempted by you is high then you need to focus on selection of
questions. In AIEEE you should select questions you can solve fast and leave lengthy and difficult questions.
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F E V
PHYSICS Analysis
Sl.No. UNIT NAME Q. Nos. Correct Wrong
1. UNITS AND MEASUREMENT 43, 60
2. DESCRIPTION OF MOTION IN ONE DIMENSION 18, 35, 46
3. MOTION IN TWO AND THREE DIMENSIONS 5, 44
4. LAWS OF MOTION 12, 19, 47, 51, 56
5. WORK, ENERGY & POWER 6, 15, 39, 54
6. ROTATIONAL MOTION & M.I. 11, 20, 52
7. GRAVITATION 22, 36
8. SOLIDS AND FLUIDS 37, 42, 57, 59
9. OSCILLATIONS 14, 34, 48
10. WAVES 8, 31, 41
11. HEAT AND THERMODYNAMICS 10, 21, 40
12. TRANSFERENCE OF HEAT 4, 38, 50
13. ELECTROSTATICS 3, 33
14. CURRENT ELECTRICITY 23, 30, 53
15. THERMAL & CHEMICAL EFFECTS OF CURRENTS 24
16. MAGNETIC EFFECTS OF CURRENTS 9
17. MAGNETOSTATICS 29, 32
18. ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION & ALT. CURRENTS 27, 58
19. RAY OPTICS 25, 26, 49
20. WAVE OPTICS 28
21. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 2
22. ELECTRON AND PHOTONS 13, 16
23. ATOMS, MOLECULES & NUCLEI 7, 17
24. SOLIDS & SEMI-CONDUCTORS DEVICES 1, 45
CHEMISTRY Analysis
Sl.No. UNIT NAME Q. Nos. Correct Wrong
1. SOME BASIC CONCEPTS 85,88,108,109
2. STATES OF MATTER 73,86,89,90,116
3. ATOMIC STRUCTURE 70, 107
4. SOLUTIONS 83, 92
5. CHEMICAL ENERGETICS & THERMODYNAMICS 77, 111, 112
6. CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM 78, 93, 113
7. REDOX REACTIONS & ELECTROCHEMISTRY 72, 94
8. RATES OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS & CHEMICAL KINETICS 82
9. SURFACE CHEMISTRY 76
10. CHEMICAL FAMILIES – PERIODIC PROPERTIES 106
11. CHEMICAL BONDING & MOLECULAR STRUCTURE 91, 98
12. CHEMISTRY OF NON-METALS – I 80, 99
13. CHEMISTRY OF NON-METALS – II 96
14. CHEMISTRY OF LIGHTER METALS 69,79,97,118,119
15. HEAVY METALS 74
16. CHEMISTRY OF REPRESENTATIVE ELEMENTS 71, 95
17. TRANSITION METALS INCLUDING LANTHANIDES 75
18. COORDINATION CHEMISTRY & ORGANO METALLICS 81, 101
19. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY 87
20. PURIFICATION & CHARACTERISATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS 100
21. SOME BASIC PRINCIPLES 62
22. HYDEROCARBONS 61,66,102,104
23. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS CONTAINING HALOGENS 103, 115
24. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS CONTAINING OXYGEN 64, 105
25. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS CONTAINING NITROGEN 65, 114, 117
26. SYNTHETIC & NATURAL POLYMERS 63, 67, 120
27. BIO MOLECULES & BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES 68
28. CHEMISTRY IN ACTION 84
29. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY ---
MATHEMATICS Analysis
Sl.No. UNIT NAME Q. Nos. Correct Wrong
1. SETS, RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS 122, 151, 152
2. COMPLEX NUMBERS 153, 154
3. MATRICES AND DETERMINANTS 131, 159, 161
4. QUADRATIC EQUATIONS 133
5. PERMUTATIONS AND COMBINATIONS 129, 135, 136
6. MATHEMATICAL INDUCTION & ITS APPLICATIONS ---
7. BINOMIAL THEOREM AND ITS APPLICATIONS 147, 164
8. SEQUENCES AND SERIES 145, 149
9. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 126,132,134,148,160,166,173,179
10. INTEGRAL CALCULUS 163, 167, 168, 178
11. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 137, 138
12. TWO DIMENSIONAL GEOMETRY 123,130,141,143,144,150,169,180
13. THREE DIMENSIONAL GEOMETRY 128, 170, 171
14. VECTOR ALGEBRA 121,124,140,172,174
15. MEASURES OF CENTRAL TENDENCY & DISPERSION 127, 142, 146
16. PROBABILITY 177
17. TRIGONOMETRY 125,139,156,157,158,162
18. STATICS 165, 176
19. DYNAMICS 175
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6
1.b.
2.c. The electromagnetic waves of all wavelengths trael with
the same speed in space which is equal to velocty of
light.
3.d.
4.c.
) T (T
∆t
∆Q
o
− ·
25)
2
60 50
K(
min 10
50) (60 ms

-
·

also
25)
2
Q 50
K(
min 10
Q) - (50 ms

-
·
Q = 42.85°C
5.b. For max range ° 45 is θ
° · · · ∴ 45 cos V V 0 V and
2g
θ sin u
H
H y
2 2
2 2
mv
4
1
mv
2
1
2
1
K.E. ·
¹
`

.
'
· ∴
6.a. Since
2gh u V
2 2
- ·
h V
2
∝ ∴
∴ graph between V and h is parabolic. Also for
downward motio
2
V
increases with h and for upward
2
V
decreases with h.
7.d.
8.b.
2
m amp 0.3 ANI M · ·
9.b.
10.b. Work = area ofABCD =
PV V) (2V p) (2p BC AB · − × − · × ·
11.d. θ 2 α ω ω
2
i
2
f
·

) 2π (36 2α ω
2
ωi
2
i
2
× ·
¹
`

.
'
......(i)
Also
) 2π (n 2α
2
ωi
0
2
2
× ·
¹
`

.
'

....(ii)
∴ from (i) and (ii) n = 12
12.b. 2a T 2g · − ]
¦
'
¦
`
¦
· −
· − -
·
2a 2g T
2a T T 2g
2a T - g
2 figure From
2
2 1
1
SOLUTIONS CODE : FEV
Solving these equns2g -6a or a = g/3
1
T
l
T
2kg
2g
2
T
2g
2g
2g
2g
13N
3
4g
T or 2g/3 T 2g
1
· · − ∴
13.a. For light of wavelength 0
0
A 1
eV w
λ
he
3000 λ − · ·
or
1.85 10 1.6 w
10 3
10 3 10 6.6.
19
7
8 34
× × - ·
×
× × ×



0
19 -
λ
hc
w Now J 10 3.63 w · × ·
6 . 1 10 27 . 2
10 3 10 6 . 6
w
hc
λ
19
8 34
0
× ×
× × ×
· ·


or
-7
0
19.8 10
λ ; 5451Å
2.27 1.6
×
·
×
14.c In going from A to B, object rises through
AC = OA -OC
θ) cos (1 θ cos − · − · l l l
Work done = gain in P.E = mgl θ) cos (1− .
15.d. Given : 2 2 1 1
2
2 2
2
1 1
v m v m &
1
4
v m 2 / 1
v m 2 / 1
· ·

( )
( )
1
4
m
m
v m 2 / 1
v m 2 / 1
1
2
2
2 2
2
1 1
· ×

1
4
m
m
1
2
·
(since m
1
v
1
= m
2
v
2
)
⇒ m
1
: m
2
= 1 : 4
16.b. Relativistic K.E. = E - m
0
c
2
⇒K.E.=3.555 MeV - MeV
10 10 6 . 1
10 9 10 1 . 9
6 19
16 31
− −

× ×
× × ×
⇒ K.E. = (3.555 - 0.51 ) MeV
⇒ K.E. = 3.045 MeV
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7
17.a. We have, decay constant,
1/2
T
0.693
· λ

1/2
T
l 2 n
· λ

λ
·
2 n
T
2 / 1
l
18.a. Given acceleration a = bt

bt
dt
dv
· ⇒ C
2
bt
v
2
- ·
Applying the condition v = v
0
at t = 0
C = v
0

0
2
v
2
bt
v - · ⇒
0
2
v
2
dt
dt
ds
- ·
⇒ t v
6
bt
s
0
3
- ·
Hence distance travelled
3
0
bt
6
1
t v - ·
19.b. Gravitational force is required for convection of fluid in
which it transfers from one point to another.
20.d.
mgl mv
2
1
mu
2
1
2 2
· −
or
2gl u v
2 2
− ·
i
ˆ
u v
i
·

2gl u J
ˆ
v
2
f
− ·

cange in velocity
i
ˆ
u - 2gl u J i v - v v
2
f
− · · ∆

f
V
i
V
L
L
21.b. ·
s
L Let specific latent heat of vaporization.
·
1
L Specific latent heat of freezing
Specific latent heat of freezing
Ziven
1 s
ηL L ·
Let m =initial mass of water.
f = friction of water frozen
Mass of vapour formed (1 -f)
mass of ice formed =
f
M
∴ m (1-f)
1 s
L mf L ·
or
n
1
L
L
f
f 1
s
1
· ·

or f ηf η · − or
1 η
η
f
-
·
22.b. Initial P.E. fo system,
2
2 2 4
G U or
2
1 1 2G
1
1 1 G
4. U
1 1
-
·
× ×
-
× ×
·
When one mass is removed, then
Kg 1
m 1
m
2
m 1
m 1
m 1
Kg 1
Kg 1
Kg 1
m
2
P.E. =
2
1 1 G
1
1 1 G
2. U
2
× ×
-
× ×
·
G;
2
1 2 2
U
2

-
·

-
·

− − -
·
2
1 2 2
G
2
1 2 2 2 2 4
G W.D.
23.d. Current in the circuit, r) E/(R I - · and heat produced
is
2
I R so
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
r) (R
R E
H
r) (R
R E
H
-
· ·
-
·
or 2
2
2
2
1
1
r) (R
R
r) (R
R
-
·
-
·
On solving we shall get,
2 1
R R r ·
24.c. Given that
α p
K K ·
We know that
qB
(2mK)
qB
mv
r
1/2
· ·
B q
) K (2m
r and
B q
) k (2m
r
α
1/2
α α
α
p
1/2
p p
p
· · ∴
Now
p
α
α
p
α
p
q
q
m
m
r
r
×

¹
`

.
'
·
1
e
2e
4m
m
p
p
· ×

¹
`

.
'
·
25.b. Fig shows two plane mirror, mutually inclined at angle
α If a lightray is incident at angle of incidence
θ
on
one mirror then it suffers anangular deviation of
) 2θ (180 δ
1
− · at first mirror, as shown in the figure.
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8
Angle of incidence of the reflected ray on theothermirror
is equal to θ) - α ( . Therefore, angular deviation due to
reflection from this mirror is
) θ 2 2α 180 ( θ) - (α 2 180 δ
2
- − · − ·
Total angular deviation of the ray is
) 2α 360 ( ) δ δ ( δ
2 1
− ° · - ·
1
δ
θ) - (α
θ
θ
It is independent oftheangle of incidence.
26.c. Water lens is formedbetween glass plate anda curved
surfacd of convex lens. Thelens formed is plano-concave
lens.
Here, R = - 20 cm,
∞ · ·
2
R ,
3
4
µ
∴ Formula

¹
`

.
'
− − ·
2 1
R
1
R
1
1) (µ
F
1
gives
;
1
20 -
1
1
3
4
F
1

¹
`

.
'


¹
`

.
'
− ·
20 3
1
F
1
×
− ·
⇒ F = - 60 cm = -0.60 m
That is water lens behave as concave ens of focal length
0.60m i.e., alterntive (c) is correct.
27.d. Superimposed current
I = 10+5 ωt
2 1
T
0
2
2 1
T
0
T
0
2
dt ) t sin 5 (10
T
1
dt
dt I
I
eff


ω - ·



·
2 1
T
0
2 2
eff
dt ) ωt sin 100 ωt sin 25 (100
T
1
I


- -
2 1
T
0 eff
2
1
(0)
7
25
(100T)
T
1
I



¹
`

.
'
- - ·
2 1 2 1 2 1
eff
6) (25 (150) ; 50] [100 I × · - ·
A 6 5 I
eff
·
28.d. Since A is moving upwards, therefore, after an elemental
time interval the wave will be as shown dotted in fig. It
means, the wave is travelling left ward. Therefore (a)
is wrong.
Displacement amplitude of the wave means mzximum
possible displacement of medium particles due to
propagation of the wae, which is equal to the
displacement at B at the instant shown in fig. Hence
(b) is correct.
From fig it is clear that C is moving downward at this
instant. Hence (c) is wrong.
The phase difference between two points will be equal
to
π/2
if distance between them is equal to
λ/4
.
Between A & C, the distance is less than
λ/2
. It may
be equal to
λ/4
. Hence phase difference between these
two points may be equal to
π/2
. Therefore (d) is
correct.
29.b. Work done = potential energy = cos MB cos · θ
MB ) (90 − α − °
α sin
,where α, is the angel between
the axis of the agnet and the magnetic meridian. The
angle θ is the angle between the axis of the magnetic
and the earth’s magnetic field B. Thus α − ° · θ 90 .
When ° · α 90
MB 90 sin MB W
1
· ° ·
when ; 30 60 90 ° · ° − ° · α work done is
2
MB
30 sin MB W
2
· ° ·
Thus /2 W W
1 2
· or
2 1
W 2 W · . Hence, n = 2
30.c. For resistace between A and D, the resistances at B
and C are not tn the circuit. Hence thegien
network can be redrawn as follows:
It is clear that the resistance between A and D = 10
+ 10 + 10 = Ω 30
A
A
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1 Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
Ω 0 1
D
D
31.b. When two waves of aplitudes
1
a and
2
a superpose to
produce beats, the resultant amplitude of the maxima
of intensity is
2 1
A a a - ·
Now, intensity ∝ (amplitudes). Since the two waves
have the same intensity, their amplitudes are equal, i.e.,
a a a · ·
2 1
. Thus, A = 2 a. Therefore,
2 2
4a A ·
or 4I I
max
·
32.c. Loss in PE = (mg)
2

2
1
2
1
·
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9
dx
B
or mgl
l
l
3g
ω or ω m
3
1
2 2 2
·
de = B (dx) x ω
2
2
1
2
1
0
3
B
2
1
B
2
1
B e l
l
g
l xdx
¹
`

.
'
· ω · ω · ∴

2
3
l e ∝ ∴
33.c. Since the maximum currentthrough a Ω 10 resistor is
1A, a current of 4A is to be divided into 4 equal parts,
each going through a branch of a circuit. Thus we need
4 branches in parallel and haing equal resistance. If r is
the resistance of each branch, the resistance of a parallel
combintion ofour braches will be r/4 which equals 5Ω.
Therefore, r = Ω 2O , i.e., each brach has two Ω 10
resistors conected inseries. hence the total number of
resistors is 8.
34.d. The time period of pendulum is gien by
g
l
π · 2 T
Incidentally, a second pendulum has T = 2s. When
the rocket comes down with a uniform acceleration
a, the effective value of g is
a g g
ff e
− ·
effectively
decreases, T will increase.
Hence choce (a) is incorrect. For choces (b) and (c) g =
0. When the rocket moves upward with a uniform
acceleration a, g increases to (g +a), leading to a decrease
in T.
35.a. The distance travelled by the train in
2
20 0.5
2
1
20S × × · = 100 m
H T
100m
T H
200 m
Motion of train
∴ The distance between the two events (H and T) =
100 . The observer has to move 100m in 20s, in a
direction opposite to that of the train.
36.a. We know that
2
R
GM
g ·
Partially differentiating, we have
2
R
R 2GM
g

· ∆
R
R 2 g ∆
·


g
Since R is reduced, the change
R ∆
is negatie. Thus
R
R ∆
= - 1%. Therefore change ing is given by
% 2 %) 1 ( 2
g
· − − ·

xt
g
Thus, g ∆ ,is positive.Henece g increases by 2% which
is choice (a)
37.c. ) ( ) .( ) ( , ) ( , ) (
1 1 1
g M m T ML L r LT v
t
· · η · ·
− − −
2 −
· LT
. Using these dimensions we find that choice(c)
is diensionally consistent. Alternatively, accorig to
Strokes’law, the ball acquires terminal velocity
t
v if
the upward viscous force ) 6 (
1
rv πη equals the
downward 1 (mg), i.e.
1
6 rv πη = mg or
r
mg
v or
rv
mg
v
t t
η

πη
·
1
6
38.d. The thermal resistances of the two rods are
KA
1
and
2KA
1
These are inseries in A and prasllel in B.
KA
1
2
3
2KA
1
KA
1
R
A
× · - · ∴
3KA
2KA KA
2KA KA
R
A
1
l l
l l
·
-
×
·
9
2
R
R
I
I
or R I R I
A
B
B
A
B B A A
· · ·
39.a. If a collision does occur, the volocities of the two
spheres will interchange. If colion does not occur,
they retain their originl velocities. As the spheres are
identical, an observer cannot tell form the velocities of
the two spheres whether collision occured or not.
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10

Before collision
No collision After colliston
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
V
1
V
1
V
2
V
2
V
2
V
40.b. Work done by unit mass of water during expansion
to form steam, at constant pressure
0
p , is

ρ

ρ
· − · ∆ ·
1 2
0 water steam 0 0
1 1
p ] V [V p V p W

− − · − · ∆
1 2
0
ρ
1
ρ
1
p Q W Q U
41.b. When sound is incidet on a receiver, it virbrates at the
frequency of the incident sound. This is forces vibration.
42.a.
3 1
W , W are the forces exerted by the ball and the
spring balance on each other before and after immersion,
4 2
W , W are the forces exerted by the tank and the
weighing machine on each other before and after
immersion.
Let m and M be the masses of the ball and the tank
respectively, and let N be the force of interaction
between the ball and the liquid in the tank.
mg W
mg M W
mg N W
mg W
2
4
3
1
=
+ =
= +
=
1
W
3
W
N
mg
2
W
Mg
4
W
N
Mg
43.d.
44.b. Since the stone is whirled in a horizontal circle, the
gravity, acting vertically downwards, has no effect on
the motion. If v is the greatest speed with which the
body can be whirled, the maximum centripetal force (or
tension) in the string is
, /
2
R mυ
which must balance
a force of 25 N Thus
1
1
25
2 2
v
R
mv ×
· ·
Which gives
, ms 5
-1
· υ
which is choice (b)
45.a. Max. input voltage = V V
rms
14 . 14 10 2 2 · × ·
Since tranformer used is a step up tranformer, with
the turn ratio 1 : 2
∴ Output voltage of the tranformer
28.28V 14.14 2 · × ·
and DC voltage
volts 18 28.28V 0.637 ) (V
de
≈ × ·
46.a.
t x x · - 2
2

1 2 2 · - - v xv
or
) 1 ( 2
1
-
·
x
v
Again,
0 2 2 . 2
2
· × - - × acc v acc x
or
2
2 ) 1 .( 2 v x acc − · - ×
or
3
2 2
) 1 ( 4
1
) 1 ( ) 1 ( 2
2
.
-
− ·
-
·
-
·
x x
v
x
v
acc
The negative sign indicates retardation.
47.b. 30 k g f < 32 k g f mg mg' > ⇒
So, it is a case of downward acceleration i.e. the
velocity is increasing.
Again, 36 k g f > 32 k g f mg mg' > ⇒
So, it is a case of downward retardation (i.e. upward
acceleration). In other words, the velocity is
decreasing.
48.b For the particle starting from A , acosωc x
1
· . For
the particle starting from O’and moving to the left
t ω sin a x
2
− · the particle will cross when
t cos a t ω sin a x x
2 1
ω · − · or or
1 t ω tan − ·
or
8
3T
t or
4

t
T

or
4

t ω · ·
¹
`

.
'
·
49.c.
1)K - 1.5 (
f
1
;
R
1
-
R
1
k Let
2 1
· ·
and
f f
5 . 0 2
2
0.5 -
f
1 −
·
¹
`

.
'
·
f f 2 ' − · ∴
50.a. The rate of flow of heat across unit cross - sectonl area
of the rod is gien by
t
T T
K
tA
Q
2 1

·
where k is the
thermal conductivity of the metaland l is the length of
the metal rod.
In steady state situation
tA
Q
is a constant quantity and
is thus the same at all points along the metal rod. It is
analogous to theelectric current 1 flowing through the
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11
metal rod and by Kirchoff’s law, it should be a constat
value at all points along the rod.
51.a. Since the block is placed on the trolley, the acceleration
of the block = acceleration of the trolley = a= 3 ms
-2
.
Therefore, the force acting on the block is
N 30 3 10 ma F · × · ·
The weight mg of the block is balanced by the normal
reaction R. As the trolley accelerates in the forward
direction, it exerts a reaction force F = 30 N on the
block in the backward direction, as shown in the figure.
The force of friction will oppose this force and will act
in a direction opposite to that of F. The force of limiting
friction f is given by
mg
f
R
f
· · µ
orf = N mg 20 10 10 2 . 0 · × × · · µ
Thus , the block is acted upon by two forces - force F
= 30 N towards the right and frictional force f = 20 N
towards the left . The net force on the block towards
the right , i.e towards the rear end of the trolley is
10N 3020 f F F' · · − ·
Due to this force ,the block experiences an acceleration
towards the rear \end which is given by
2
1
10
10 '
'

· · · ms
m
F
a
Let t be the time taken ofr the block to fall from the rear
end of the trolley. Clearly, the block has to travel a
distance
m S 5 ' ·
to fall off the trolley. Since the
trolley starts from rest, initial velocity u = 0. Now t
can be obtained from the relation
2
2
1
at ut s - ·
Putting s=5 m, u=0 and
, ms 1 a'
2 -
·
we get t=
10
s.
The distance covered by the trolley in time t =
10
s is
) 0 ( · u ∵
m 15 10 3
2
1
0 at
2
1
ut s'
2
· × × - · - ·
52.d. The acceleration of the bock sliding down the plane is
a = g sin θ
Where
θ
is the angle of inclination If l is the length of
the inclined plane, the velocity of the block on reaching
the bottom is given by
l g al × · · θ υ sin 2 2
2
or θ υ sin 2 gl ·
The acceleration of the disc rolling down the plane is
(as shown above)
θ sin
3
2
' g a ·
Therfore, the velocity of the disc on reaching the bottom
is given by
3
sin
2 ' or sin gl
3
4
' 2 '
2
θ
υ θ υ
gl
l a · · ·
' 2 2

3
υ
υ
∴ ·
53.a. and ·
di di
V L
dt dt
is same for both coils.
1 1
2 2
8
4
2
∴ · · ·
V L
V L
or
2
1
1
4
·
V
V
.
Hence (4) is true.
Instantaneous power =
·
di
Vt L
dt
. (i) is same for both
coils.
1 1 2 2
∴ · L i L i or
1 2
2 1
2 1
8 4
· · ·
i L
i L
.
∴ (1) is true.
Energy stored =
2
1
2
· W Li .
2
2
1 1 1
2 2 2
8 1 1
2 4 4
' `
' `
∴ · · ·


. ¹
. ¹
W L i
W L i
or
2 1
/ 4 · W W . ∴ (3) is true.
54.a. When C collides with A, C will be stopped and A will
acquire velocity v. If v
1
and v
2
are velocities of A and B
at any moment conservation of momentum gives
1 2
- · mv mv mw or
1 2
- · v v v
When compresssion of spring is maximum,
1 2
· v v .
1 2
/ 2 ∴ · · v v v .
∴ kinetic energy =
2
2
1
1
2
2 4
' `
' `
·


. ¹
. ¹
v
mv m .
∴ (2) is true.
At this position, decrease in kinetic energy=
2 2 2
1 1 1
2 4 4
− · mv mv mv .
∴Potential energy of spring =
2 2
1 1
4 2
· mv ka .
This gives
/ 2 · a m k
= maximum compression.
Hence (4) is true.
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12
55.d. If one ofthesurfaces of a lens is silvered, the rays
refracted at the first surface, reflected at the second
(silvered) surface andagain refracted atthefirst surface.
Thus there are two refractions and one reflection.
Then the focal legth F or the silvered lens is gien by
m m
f f f f f F
1 2 1 1 1 1
· - - ·
Where F = focal length of th lens and
m
f = focal
elngth of the sphereicl mirror. If the plane side is
Silvered, ∞ ·
m
f , therefore,
f F
2 1
·
or , 60 30 2 2 cm F f · × · · where
R f
1
) 1 (
1
− µ ·
It the convex surfaces is silvered, then
R f f f F
m
1 2 1 2 1
- · - ·
) 2 (
m
f R · ∵
or
R
2
60
2
10
1
- ·
which gives R = 30 cm. Using this in (i) we have
30
1
) 1 (
60
1
× − µ
Which gives 1.5, · µ which is choice (d)
56.a. If the cavities are not made, then the intensity at the
point P (or Q)
32
GM
2
64
GM
R
GM
I
3
R
· × · × ·
where
Q P R Q P R
I I I I ; I I I I − − · ∴ - - ·

Mass of big sphere
3
d (4) 4π
M
3
×
·
Mass of smallsphere P or Q,
3
d (1) 4π
m
3
×
·
;
64
M
m | · ∴
at P,

¹
`

.
'
· · ·
64
M
4
G
r
Gm
I 0, 1
2 2
Q P
1024
31GM
I · ∴
57.a. The averge velocity of efflux
2
2gH 2gH
v
2 1
-
·
Let t be the time taken to empty thetank from level
1
H
to
2
H . Then
] H A[H 1 a
2
2gH 2gH
2 1
2 1
− · × ×
-
or

-

×

¹
`

.
'
× ·
2 1
2 1
H H
H H
g
2
a
A
t
( )
( )( )

- -
− × −
×

¹
`

.
'
× ·
2 1 2 1
2 1 2 1
H H H H
H H H H
g
2
a
A

( )
2 1
H H
g
2
a
A
− ×

¹
`

.
'
× ·
58.a. Let
2 1
, be the lengths of the two parts PRQ and
PSQ of the conductor and
ρ
be the resistance per unit
length of the conductor. The resistnce of the portion
PRQ will be ρ ·
1 1
R .
The resistance of the p[ortions PSQ will be ρ ·
2 2
R
pot, diff. across P and Q =
2 2 1 1
R I R I ·
or
2 2 1 1 2 1
I I I · · ρ ....(i)
Magnetic field inducton at the centre O due to currents
through circular conductros PRQ and PSQ will be
2 1
B B − ·
S
P
Q
R
O
1
1
2
1
0
r
90 sin I
4 r
90 sin I
4
2 2 0 1 1 0
·
°
π

°
π
µ
·
2 2
µ
59.b. (i) Each time the car bounces off the spring, including
the first, it gains the potential energy of the compressed
spring.
E = 0.5 kx
2
= 0.5 (5000) (2
2
) = 10 kJ, in the form of
kinetic energy.
To get over the hill requires the kinetic energy at the
bottom of the hill to at least equal the potential energy
at the top of the hill.
P = mgh = (1000) (9.8) (10) = 98 kJ.
With 10 kJ gained at each bounce the number needed to
exceed 98 kJ is 10 bounces.
(ii) The acceleration is due to the force exerted on the
car by the spring. It is obtained from Newton’s second
law, F = ma. Using Hooke’s law F=–kx and solving for
the acceleration gives. (N.B. signs are not important).
–kx = ma ⇒ a = – kx / m,
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13
So the maximum acceleration occurs when the spring is
most compressed. That is when the car is stationary
so that all its kinetic energy has been converted to spring
potential energy. The potential energy in the spring is
converted to spring potential energy. The potential
energy in the spring is then 10
×
10kJ λ =100 kJ. The
corresponding compression is found from E= 0.5 kx
2
.
( )
2
100, 000 0.5
(2)(100, 000) / 5000 6.32
kx
x m
· ⇒
· · λ
Substituting this value into the acceleration equation
gives:
a = (5000) (6.32)/1000 = –3.16 ms
–2
60.c. (i) True. The speed of sound in air
s
v increases with
temperature. For an organ pipe the wavelength
λ
is
fixed by the length of the pipe.
Now
s
f v λ ·
Hence the frequency f increases with
s
v for a fixed
λ
. Thus the pitch increases with temperature.
(ii) False. Power is the rate of doing work, and work is
force
×
distance.
Hence
( ) W Fx x
P F Fv
t t t
∆ ∆ ∆
· · · ·
∆ ∆ ∆
i.e. for a constant force
P Fv ·
.
The force also causes the speed to increase. Thus the
power increases for a constant applied force.
(iii) False. For a mass m located at the equator.
2
mR mg N ω · −
where R is the radius of the Earth and ωis its angular
velocity, N is the normal reaction force of the Earth on
the mass and is equal to the
' mass s
effective weight
' mg where ' g is the effective acceleration due to
gravity.
Thus,
2
' mg mg mR · − ω or
2
' g g R · − ω .
Thus, ' g g < .
(iv) False. For a sound wave its speed in water is
greater than its speed in air as shown by the Table of
Constants.
Therefore when sound waves move from air into water
they are moving into a medium with a higher wave
speed, and hence the sound waves are refracted away
from the normal.
(v) False. The force on a wire carrying a current in a
magnetic field is given by
11 F BSin · θ, where
θ
is the angle between the wire
and the field.
Thus if the wire is parallel to the magnetic field then
θ =0, Sinθ =0 and hence F=0 even though
0 B ≠
.
(vi) True. The period of a simple pendulum is given by
2
8
l
T π ·
, where
l
is the length of the pendulum.
If the temperature increases, the length also increases
and the period becomes longer. Hence each tick of the
clock takes a longer time making the clock lose time.
(vii) False. The sketch shows the rays of light from the
fish at point A to the observer being refracted at the
surface of the water.
A B
To the observer the light appears to be travelling in a
straight line from its apparent position at point B. You
should therefore aim for a point in front of where you
see the fish.
61.c.
62.c. 4 Ethyl - N - methyl pent -1 -enal - 1 - imine.
63.a. Orlonis a polymer of CHCN CH
2
·
64.d
HCl +
ne Benzoquino p −
     → 
−Additoin 1,4
Cl
O
H
OH
O
     → 
es Tautomeris
enzene dihydroxyb
- 1,4 - chloro - 2
OH
OH
Cl
65.b. In fixation of
2
N , free
2
N of atmosphere is converted
into nitrogen compounds by various methods.
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14
66.a.
4
4 2
HgSO
SO H Dil
2
OH H CH C CH CH ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ − - ≡ − ·
3
||
2
es Tautomeris
2
O OH
|
2
CH C CH CH ] CH C CH [CH − − · ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ · − ·
67.d. All statement s are correct since these are characterstics
of thermoplastics.
68.d. All these hydrates of carbons are carbohydartes.
69.c.
3NaCl Al(OH) 3NaOH AlCl
ppt White
3 3
- → -
O 2H NaAlO NaOH Al(OH)
2
Soluble
2 3
- → -
70.d.
71.c. Iodine is oxidised bythechlorine to violet iodine which s
soluble in
4
CCl . On shaking with excess of
2
Cl water,
iodine is oxidised to colourless
3
HIO .
4 2 2
CCl in soluble (violet) I 2HCL Cl 2KI - → -
HCl 10 2HIO O 6H 5Cl I
s) (Colourles
3 2 2
) (inCCl
2
4
- → - -
72.c. Cell reaction is
2
2
H Fe 2H Fe - → -
- -
are1M) (solutions E E
cell(A)
° ·
1
0.001
log
2
0591 . 0
E E
cell(B)
° ·
i.e.
V 0.0886 - 10 log
2
0591 . 0
E - E
3 -
cell(B) cell(A)
· ·
73.a. X atoms per unit cell
1 8
8
1
· × ·
Y atoms per unit cell = 1 Hence formula is XY.
74.c. Roastig is mainly done inthe case of sulphide ores.
75.b. This phenomenion is called spitting of silver.
76.c. 100 ml of gold sol is preventedby 0.25 g =250 mg of
startch.
∴ 10 ml of gold sol will be prevented by
25 mg. Hence gold number ofstartch = 25
77.b.
∆T
∆H
C
p
·
; for ice water equilibrium
∞ · · ∴ ·
0
∆H
C 0, ∆T
p
78.a. 0.5M M 10 1.0M SO H
4 2
° ·
·
-
. Hence pH = 0 .
79.d. LiCl is a covalent compound which is soluble in alcohol
and pyridine but insoluble in water.
80.c. Ortho and para fors of hydrogenresembles intheir
chemical properties.
81.d. ] [CoF K
6 3
shows
2 3
d Sp
, hybridizationof Co giving
another orbital octahedral complex, having 4 unpaired
electrons and it strongly paramagnetic in nature.
82.b.
83.a. Mole of NaOH is solution =
30 60 5 . 0 · ×
wt. of NaOH
required = 1200gm 40 30 · × but wet NaOH cantains
10% water so 100 gm , wet NaOH contains10 gm water
so wt. of puredry NaOH = 90gm.
90gm ∴ pure NaOH in 100 gm wet NaOH
gm 1200 ∴ pure NaOH in
1.33kg 1200
90
100
· ×
84.a.
85.a. Reaction:
S.T.P at ml 2240
2 4
65gm
4 2
H ZnSO SO H Zn - → −
22400
H of volume Given
Now,
2
0.65gm X
6.5
X
22400
22.4
zinc At.Wt.of
zinc of Wt.
· ⇒ · ⇒ ·
Alternatively,
2
22400 ml H at S.T.P. ∴ is liberated from 65 gm o Zn
2
224ml H at S.T.P. ∴ will be liberated from 0.65gm of Zn.
86.c. The density of
22.4
32
S.T.P at O
2
·
gm/ litres and, that
of gm/litres
22.4
16
S.T.P. at CH
4
·
Here given,
gm/litres,
22.4
16
d gm/litres,
22.4
32
d
2 1
· ·
? T 273K, T
2 1
· ·
Now, as
2 1 1 1
T d T d ·
Therefore
16
22.4
1
273
22.4
32
d
T d
T
2
1 1
2
× × · ·
C 273 C 273) (546 546K k
0 0
· − · ·
87.b. As average life life. Half 1.44 − × · There
fore
yrs 10 275 . 2 1580 1.44
3
× · × ·
88.d. I mole of
4 2
SO H gives 3 moles of ions. Hence 0.1 mole
of
4 2
SO H will produce ions = 0.3 mole.
ions 10 1.8 ions 10 6.0 0.3
23 23
× · × ×
89.a. After putting in one liter flask.
125mm pN or ) p(N 1000 500 250
2 2
· × · ×
125mm pO or ) p(O 1000 250 500
2 2
· × · ×
250mm 125 125 P
mixture
· - ·
90.a. ABAB....... type packingis called hexagonal close
packing.
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15
91.d.
3
BF forms π bond due to back bonding from filed 2p
orbital of F-atom to empty p-orbital of B-atom.
92.a. As dissolution of Cl NH
4
(s) is endothermic,
randomness factro must favour i.e. entropy will increase.
93.a. On adding
2
Cl .eqm. shifts backward producing more
heat.
94.a. W = ZCt. Hence when C = lamp 1=1 sec, W = Z
95.c. Volatility order is the reverse of bp order O H
2
has the
lowet and S H
2
to Te H
2
96.d. Borax is used for glazing paper.
97.d. In hoop’s process for the purfication of Al. Silicon and
copper are added as impurities to molten alumina inorder
to make the melt heavier.
98.a. Violet colour of iodine is due to excutation of an electron
from the highe occupied.
M.O (antibonding
2pe
π
or
2py
π
) into the lowest un
occupied M.O. (anti bonding
2pz
σ
)
99.b.
2 3 2 3 2
O 5 2HlO O H O 5 I - → - -
100.c. Salicylaidehyde being immiscible in O H
2
but voltile
in steam can be purfied by steam distilation.
101.b. ] [NiF K
4 2
hs Ni in it’s + 4 oxidation state All other
complexes have
2 2 0 - -
oxi states respectively.
102.c.
CHCN CH HCN CH CH
2
Ba
- 2
· ÷ ÷ → ÷ - ≡
103.c. CH CH CaC
O H
2
2
· ÷ ÷ → ÷
CHO CH
3
SO H
SO H Dil
4 2
4 2
÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
2 3
PCl
CHCl CH
5
÷ ÷ → ÷
104.a. Since A ) H (C
6 2
govesred[[twotj a,,pmoca; CuCl there
fore A must be
1-butyne i.e. CH C CH CH
2 3
· Further since B is an
isomer of A and reacts with
2
Br to gave 1,4 dibromo 2.
butene, therefore, B mustbe 1-3 butadiene.
ppt Red
2 3
OH NH
CuCl
Butyne(A) 1
2 3
CCu CH CH CH CH C CH CH
4
· ≡ ÷ ÷ → ÷ ≡

÷ ÷→ ÷ · − ·

2
Br
B) Butadiene( 1.3.
2 2
CH CH CH CH
butene 2 p Dobrp, 1,4
2 2
Br CH CH CH BrCH
− − −
· ·
105.a. Most oxidants which oxidise OH CH
2
to COOH will
also oxidise CHO to COOH, therefore, protection of
the aldehyde group is needed. Thus, option (a) is correct.
106.a.
107.a. Potential energyof the electron in one electron species,
r
0
π 4
charge electronic nucleus the on charge
ε
× -
·
r e
r
e e
0
2
0
π 4 / 3
π 4
) ( ) 3 (
ε
ε
− ·

·
108.d. Gay- Lussac’s law : The volumes of the reacting gases
and those of the gaseous products bear the simple ratio
(also, called the law of gaseous volumes).
109.c. Weight of
2
O combining with 1.05 g metal = 3.15 - 1.05
= 2.10 g
Eq. mass of the metal
4
2.10
8 1.05
·
×
·
110.c. In a BCC lattice, an atom at the centre of the cube is in
touch with 2 atoms at the corners. Thus, diagonal of the
cube 3 a (a being the side of the cube) =
× 4
atomic
radius.
In short,
r a × · 4 3
or pm 173
4
3 400
·
×
· r
111.c Aim ? ∆H O H OH H :
2
· →
− -
)] (OH ∆H ) (H [∆∆ O (H ∆H ∆H
f f 2 f reaction
− -
- − ·
56KJ 230) (0 286 − · − − − ·
112.c. 2CH
4
+ 4O
2
→ 2CO
2
+ 4H
2
O; ∆H = x
2CH
3
OH + 3O
2
→ 2CO
2
+ 4H
2
O; ∆H = y
2CH
4
+ O
2
→ CH
3
OH; ∆H = x - y
CH
4
+ 1/2O
2
→ CH
3
OH ; ∆H = x - y= -ive
or x - y < 0 therefore , x < y
113.c. Since, the rate equation of first order reaction is Rate =
K[A]
∴ Rate = 1 x 10
- 6
x 0.4 = 4 x 10
- 7
∵ The equilibrium constant is independent of the
concentration of reactants and is a characteristic constant
for a given reaction.
114.c.
115.c. Br being ,prereactoe reacts first
Ether
Mg
 → 
   → 
CH CH
2
B
Cl Cl
MgBr

OMgCl CH
OH CH
1
2
   → 
Cl
(y) ene Chlorobenz
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16
116.b. The kinetic energy of an ideal gas is 3/2 RT.
So, kinetic energy per molecule is :
A
N
RT
2
3
·

23
10 02 . 6
298 314 . 8
2
3
×
×
× ·
23
10 01 . 12
716 . 7432
×
·
= 617.33 x 10
- 23
= 6.17 x 10
- 21
joule
117.d.
] H [ 4
NH CH CH N C CH
2 2 3
duction Re
3
-
− − ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ · −
(A) (B)
÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ − −
· − − O N O H
2 2 3
NH CH CH
O H N OH CH CH
2 2 2 3
- - − −
118.b. 2Na + 2H
2
O → 2NaOH + H
2
(A) (C) (B)
3 2 2
O H
ZnO Na H 2 Zn NaOH 2
2
- ÷ ÷ → ÷ -
(C) (D) (A) Sodium zincate
Zn + dil H
2
SO
4

÷→ ÷
ZnSO
4
+ H
2

(D) (A)
Na gives glolden yellow flame with bunsen Burner.
Hence, A, B, C, D are Na, H
2
, NaOH and Zn
respectively.
119.c. The crystal structrues of NaHCO
3
and
3
KHCO both
show H-bonding but a are different. In
3
NaHCO and
3
KHCO both show H-bonding but a are different. In
3
NaHCO ,
-
3
HCO ions are ions are linked into an
infinite chain, while in
-
3
KHCO a dimeric anion is
formed.
C O−
O H
O - C
O
O H O
120.d. Free radical polymerization introduces branches alog
the main polymer chain. Therfore it is used to prepare
low density polythene.
121.d. The given statements
0 5 4 3

· - - c b a
is possible only
when all the three vectors b a

, and c

are null vectors
122.a. k x f · ) (
3
4
4 3
-
· ⇒ · − ⇒
k
x k x
3
4
) (
1
-
· ∴

x
x f
123.c. The triangle OAB is formed with vertices O (0, 0), A (1,
0) and B (0, 1) which is a right angled triangle since lines
through O i.e., OA and OB are perpendicular then it is
clear that the orthocentreof
∆OAB is (0, 0)
124.b. If the given vectors are coplanar, then
0 1 0 1 ·
b c c
c a a
⇒ a(0 - c) - a(b - c) + c (c - a) = 0

ab c ·
2
⇒ c is the geometric mean of a and b
125.c. Since
π/4
is not satisfying the given equation, therefore
π/4 is not the solution.
126.d. For 1
1
1
1
1
) ( , 0
2
2
2
2
2
- ·
-

-
- · ≠ x
x
x
x
x x f x
Also, 0 ) 0 ( · f
) (x f ∴ is discontinuous at x = 0
127.a.
128.a. Here 1 , 5 , 4 , 3 · − · · − · d w v u
d w y − - - · ∴
2 2 2
u radius
1 25 16 9 − - - ·
7 49 · ·
129.b. The digits are 2, 5, 7
If n = 5, total numbers = 5 .......... 3 3 × × times = 243
If n = 6, total numbers = 6 .......... 3 3 × × times = 729
If n = 7, total number =
7 .......... 3 3 × ×
times = 2187
Since, 729 < 900 and 2187 > 900, the minimum value of
n is 7.
130.c. Since the lline y = x + 1 passes through the centre of the
circle, it is a diameter.
Therefore area of the circle below this line is the area of
semi-circle.
π 16 π.32 .
2
1
. . · e i
131.c. BA) (A BA) (A BA) (A
1 1 2 1 − − −
·
A B A BiBA A )BA B(AA A
2 1 1 1 1 − − − −
· · ·
BA) A)(A B (A BA) (A
1 2 1 3 1 − − −
· ·
A B A )BA (AA B A
3 1 1 2 1 − − −
· ·
and so on.
A. B A BA) (A
n 1 n 1 − −
· ∴
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17
132.d.
x
x
x
x x x
x x
Lim
x x
x x
Lim
'
`
¦
'
'
¦
− −
- -
·

¹
`

.
'
- −
- -
∞ → ∞ → ) 1 )( 3 2 (
) 3 )( 1 2 (
3 5 2
3 7 2
2
2
¦
¦
'
¦
¦
`
¦
¦
¦
'
¦
¦
'
¦

¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
'
-
¹
`

.
'
-
·
¦
¦
'
¦
¦
`
¦
¦
¦
'
¦
¦
'
¦

¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
'
-
¹
`

.
'
-
·
∞ → ∞ →
x x
x x
x
x
x
x x
x x
Lim
x x
x x
Lim
1
. 1 1
1
2
3
1
1
. 3 1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
6
1
2
3
3
2
1
.
.
e
e e
e e
· ·



] e
x
λ
1 Lim [Using
λ
x
x
·
¹
`

.
'
-
∞ →
133.b. Let the roots be α and β . Then nα β ·
Now
n) a(1
b
α
a
b
n) α(1
a
b
β α
-
− · ⇒ − · - ⇒ − · -
. ....(i)
and
an
c
α
a
c
α.nα
a
c
αβ
2
· ⇒ · ⇒ ·
....(ii)
From (i) & (ii)
2 2
2 2
2
n) ca(1 nb
na
c
n) (1 a
b
- · ⇒ ·
-
134. d. Let the speed of the train be v and distance to be covered
be s so that total time taken is s/v hours. Cost of fuel
per hour = kv
2
(k is constant) Also 48 = k. 16
2
by given
condition
16
3
k · ∴
∴Cost to fuel per hour
.
16
3
2
v
Other charges per hour
are 300.
Total running cost
v
s
300 v
16
3
C
2

¹
`

.
'
- ·
v
300s
v
16
3s
- ·
40 v 0
v
300s
16
3s
dv
dC
2
· ⇒ · − ·
40 v 0
v
600s
dv
C d
3 2
2
· ∴ > ·
results is minimum
running cost.
135. c. The m men can be seated in m! ways.
When they are seated, there are (m+1) places, shown
by × where n women can sit. Then no two women
would be together as shown
below
× × × × × × M ......... M M M
Then n women can arrange themselves in these (m+1)
places in
m+1
P
n
ways.
Hence the required no. of ways
1)! n (m
1)! (m m!
P x m!
n
1 m
- −
-
· ·
-
136. b. Total number of points = m + n + k. Therefore the
total number of traingles formed by these points is
m+n+k
C
3
. But out of these m + n + k points, m points lie
on L
1
, n points lie on L
2
and k points lie on L
3
and by
joining three points on the same line we do
not obtain a traingle. Hence the total number of
traingles is
m+n+k
C
3
-
m
C
3
-
n
C
3
-
k
C
3
.
137. b. Let the directrix be x=0 (y-axis) and fixed eccentricity is
e. If the focus S be (h, k) then the equation of such an
ellipse is
ly eccentrici
directrix from Distance
focus from Distance
·
y) P(x,
k) S(h,
O
K
x
y
2 2 2 2
2 2
) ( ) (
| |
) ( ) (
x e k y h x e
x
k y h x
· − - − ⇒ ·
− - −

Clearly it contains two arbitrary constants h and k.
Therefore the order of the equation is two.
138. b. The given differential equation can be rewritten as 2xdx
- 3ydy = 0, which on integration gives

· − ⇒ · ·

c
2
3y
x c 3ydy 2xdx
2
2
If
0 c ≠
it represents a family of hyperbola given by
1
2c/3
y
c
x
2 2
· −
if c>0, the eccentricity is
3
5
3
2
1
c
3
2c
c
· - ·
-
[Eccentricity of hyperbola
2
2 2
2
2
2
2
a
b a
is 1
b
y
a
x -
· − ]
if c<0 the eccentricity is
2
5
1
2
3
3
2c
3
2c
c
· - ·
-
[If c = 0, the equation becomes a pair of straight
lines]
139. d.
4tanx x 4tan x sec
3 4
- −
4tanx 1)tanx x 4(sec x sec 4tanx x tan x 4tan x sec
2 4 2 4
- − − · - − ·
x sec 4 - x 4tan - 2) 2tanx x sec ( tanx 8 x tan x sec 4 x sec
2 2 2 2 2 4
- − − · - − ·
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18
] 1 tan sec [ 0 ) 2 tan 2 (sec
2 2 2 2
· − ≥ − − · x x x x ∵
Equality holding for
( )
8

or
8

2 1 tan x
1
· ± ·

140. b. Here, a s c b , c t b a

· - · -
t and s are scalars. Subtracting, we get
a s c t c a

− · −
or c t) (1 a s) (1

- · -
But
a

,
c

are noncollinear.
c b a Hence, 0. t 1 0, s 1

− · - · - · - ∴
0 c b a · - - ⇒

141.a. Let the straight line be ax +by + c = 0 and the point be
). y , (x )....., y , (x ), y , (x
n n 2 2 1 1
Then according to question:
0
b a
c by ax
.....
b a
c by ax
b a
c by ax
2 2
n n
2 2
2 2
2 2
1 1
·
-
- -
- -
-
- -
-
-
- -
0 nc ) y .... y b(y ) x .... x a(x
n 2 1 n 2 1
· - - - - - - - - ⇒
0 c
n
y .... y y
b
n
x .... x x
a
n 2 1 n 2 1
· -
¹
`

.
' - - -
-
¹
`

.
' - - -

Clearly the straight line ax + by + c = 0 passes through
the
,
n
y .... y y
,
n
x ...... x x
n 2 1 n 2 1

¹
`

.
' - - - - - -
which is a fixed point as
) y , (x )......., y , (x ), y , (x
n n 2 2 1 1
are fixed points,
142.b. Given
7
18
x
i
·

∵ ( mean = 7 and n = 18)
⇒ 126 7 18 x
i
· × · ∑
Since an observation 12 was miscopied as 21,
therefore, correct
117 12 21 - 126 x
i
· - · ∑
Hence true mean =
5 . 6
18
117
18
x correct
i
· ·

Also variance is given to be
, 16 4
2
·
therefore,
2
2
i
(mean)
18
x


= 16
2 2 2
2
i
7 16 (mean) 4
18
x
- · - ·


· ∑ ⇒
2
i
x 18(16+49)=1170
But, in the summation on R. H. S., one observation
(=12) was miscopied as 21, therefore, correct
873 144 441 1160 12 21 1170 x
2 2 2
i
· - − · - − ·

Hence true variance =
2
2
i
mean) (true
18
x correct


6.25 42.25 48.5 (6.5)
18
873
2
· − · − ·
∴true S.D. = 2.5 6.25 variance true · ·
∴correct mean = 6.5 and correct S. d. = 2.5
143.d. Co-ordinates of the point C
= Co-ordinates of the centre of the smallest circle
= Co-ordinates of the centre of the square = (4, 4)
PQ = 8 - 2 - 2 = 4 = QR
∵ ( radius of each large circle = 2 cm)
2 4 4 4 PR
2 2
· - ·· ∴
2 2
2
2 4
PC · ·
Y
S
C
R
P Q
C
O 8 A
X
B
8
Radius of smallest circle =
2 2 2 −
∴required circle is
2 2 2
) 2 2 2 ( ) 4 ( ) 4 ( − · − - − y x
144.d. In the Argand’s plane, P is represented by
θ i
e
and Q is
represented by
θ) - ( i
e
α
. Now rotation about a line with
angle α is given by
. e
) - (2 θ i θ α i
e →
Therefore Q is
obtained from P by refection in the line making an angle
2 / α .
145.c. No group of four numbers from the first twelve natural
numbers can have the common diference 4.
If one group including 1 is selected with the common
difference 1 then the other two groups can have the
common difference 1 or 2.
If one group including 1 is selected with the common
difference 2 then of the other two groups can have the
common difference 2 and the remaining will have comon
difference 1.
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19
If one group including 1 is selected with the common
difference 3 then the other two groups will have the
common difference 3.
∴ the required number of ways = 2 + 1 + 1 = 4
146.b. Weighted mean =


i
W
i
X
i
W
2 2 2 2
2 2 2 2
... 3 2 1
. .... 3 . 3 2 . 2 1 . 1
n
n n
- - - -
- - - -
·
1) (2n 1) n(n
6
.
4
2
) 1 (
2
2
n
3
n
- -
-
·


·
n n
1) (2n 2
1) (n n 3
-
-
·
147.b. Here,
12
12 n 2
12
n
13
x
2
) x ( C T
¹
`

.
'
·

( )
36 n 2 12
12
n
x ) 2 ( C

·
If 13
th
term is independent of x, then
2n - 36 = 0 or n = 18
148.d. Given
f(x) = (1+b
2
) x
2
+ 2bx+1
∴ f’(x) = 2 (1 + b
2
) x + 2b
and f”(x) = 2(1+b
2
) > 0
for f(x) is minimum or maximum, we have
f’(x) = 0 ⇒
2
b 1
b
x
-
− ·
since 0 ) x ( " f > , then f(x) is minimum
∴ m(b) = f(x)
min
( )
( )
1
b 1
b
b 2
b 1
b
b 1
2 2
2
2
-
¹
`

.
'
-

-
-
- ·

2
b 1
1
-
·
⇒ 0 < m (b)

1; Hence range of m(b) is (0,1]
149.b. Let the G.P. be, ,..... , ,
3
ar ar a
4
1
·


r
a
.......(i)
also,
3
3
3 2 3 3
1
.... ) ( ) (
r
a
ar ar a

· - - -
) 1 ( 64 7
7
64
1
3 3
3
3
r a
r
a
− · ⇒ ·


....(ii)
Using (i) and (ii), we have
3 3
) 1 ( 64 ) 1 ( 4 7 r r − · − ×
1 , 2 ,
2
1
) 0 1 5 2 )( 1 (
2
· ⇒ · - − − ⇒ r r r r
∵G.P. is decreasing
2
1
· ∴r and a = 2
8
1
2
1
2
4
5
· × · a
150.b. For first circle
0 4 2
2 2
· − − - y x y x
Centre ) 2 , 1 (
1
≡ C and radius
5 0 2 1
2 2
1
· − - · r
and for the second circle
0 4 8
2 2
· − − - y y x
Centre 4) (0, C
2
≡ and radius
) 4 ( 4 0
2
2
− − - · r
5 2 ·
Now,
1 2
2 2
2 1
r r 5 4 1 2) (4 1) (0 C C − · · - · − - − ·
Thus, two circles touch each other internally
151.b. Obviously, the relation is reflexive
because for any point A, OA = OA
Also for any two points A and B in the plane
OA = OB ⇒OB = OA. Therefore the relation is a
symmetric relation
Also for nay three points A, B and C in the plane
OA = OB and OB = OC ⇒OA = OC
∴the relation is transitive relaltion
∴the relation is equivalence relation
152.b. We know that the interchange of two adjacent rows (or
columns) changes the value of a determinant only in
sign and not in magnitude. Hence, corresponding to
every element

of B there is an element
' ∆
in C
obtained by interchanging two adjacent rows (or
columns) in,
. ∆
It follows that n(C) n(B) ≤
That is, the number of elements in B is less than or
equal to the number of elements in C
Similarly ≤ n(C) n (B)
Hence n(B) = n(C), that is, B has many elements as C.
153..c. Since
3 i 2 -
is one root, then other root will be
3 i 2 −
∴ 0 q px x
2
· - - ∴ is given equation.
∴ Sum of roots = p 3 i 2 3 i 2 · − - -
∴ p = - 4
Product of roots q = 4 + 3 = 7
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20
154..b.
1(given) | w |
i z
iz 1
· ·


1
i z
iz 1
·



2
1
2
1
z
z
z
z
· ∵
| i z | | iz 1 | − · − ⇒
| i - iy) (x | | iy) i(x 1 | - · - − ⇒
| 1) - i(y x | | ix y) 1 | - · − - ⇒
] ) 1 ( [ ] ) ( ) 1 [(
2 2 2 2
− - · − - - ⇒ y x x y
2 2 2 2
) 1 ( ) 1 ( − - · - - ⇒ y x x y
1 2 2 1
2 2 2
- − - · - - - ⇒
2
y y x x y y
or, 4y = 0
0 · ∴y
From this it is known that the locus of z, is y = 0,
which is a real axis. Therefore, z is situated on real
axis.
155.d. Let z = x + iy, then
0 iy x iy) (x 0 z z
2
2
2
2
· - - - ⇒ · -
0 y x 2ixy y x
2 2 2 2
· - - - − ⇒
0 2xy and 0 2x 0 2ixy 2x
2 2
· · ⇒ · - ⇒
0 xy and 0 x · · ⇒
Clearly y can be any real number heance, we will get
infinitely many solutions.
156..a.
5
4
sin
1
2
sin tan 2
1
2
1 1 − − −
·
-
·
x
x
x
5
4
· ∴x
R.H.S. =
,
2
θ
sin
¹
`

.
'
where
θ
3
4
tan
1
·

then
3
θ tan
4
·
5
3
θ cos · ∴
5
2
θ cos 1
2
θ
sin 2
2
· − ·
y · · ∴
5
1
θ sin
Clearly x > y and 1-x =
2
5
1
5
4
1 y · · −
157.a.
B) cos(A 1
B) cos(A 1
2
B - A
tan
− -
− −
·
¹
`

.
'
63
1
32 / 31 1
32 / 31 1
·
-

·
63
1
2
C
cot
b a
b a
·
-

-

·

2
C
cot
b a
b a
2
B A
tan ∵
63
1
2
cot
9
1
· ⇒
C
.
3
7
2
tan · ⇒
C
Now,
2
C
tan 1
2
C
tan 1
cosC
2
2
-

·
8
1
9
7
1
9
7
1
cosC ·
-

· ⇒
cosC 2ab b a c
2 2 2
− - · ∴
36
8
1
40 16 25 c
2
· × − - · ⇒
6 c · ⇒
158..b. We have,
3 1
cp
2
1
bp
2
1
ap,
2
1
∆ · · ·
2∆
c
p
1
,
2∆
b
p
1
,
2∆
a
p
1
3
2 1
· · · ∴
altitude] base
2
1
[Area × × ·

2∆
1
p
cosC
p
cosB
p
cosA
3 2 1
· - -
(a cos A + b cos B + c cos C)
C) sin C sin sinB B sin cosA (sinA

R
- - ·
C) 2 sin B 2 sin (sin2A
2∆
R
- - ·

sinC 2RsinAsinB
2∆
AsinBsinC 4sin
R · ·
R R
R
c b a
R
ab ca bc
R 1
) 4 (
16 16 2 2 2 2
2
2
2 2 2
2
·


·

·

×

×


·
159..c For any square matrix X ,we have X (adj X) = | X |
n
l
Taking X = adj A , we get
( adj A ) [ adj (adj A) ] = | adj A |
n
l

n
1 n
l | A | (adjA)] (adjA)[adj

· ⇒
] | A | | adjA | [
1 n−
· ∵
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21
A | A | A)] (adj [adj A) adj (A
1 n−
· ⇒ A] l A [
n
· ∴
A | A | ) (adj(adjA) ) l | A (|
1 n
n

·
A | A | A) adj(adj
2 n−
·
160..a. ) (x ' f' a) - (b f(a) f(b)
1
· −

¹
`

.
'
− − · −
2
1
1
) (
1 1
x
a b
a b
2
1
1
) (
x
a b
ba
b a
− − ·

2
1
1 1
x ab
− · −
ab x ·
2
1
ab x ·
1
161.b.

0
bc ac 1 1
bd ad 1 1
bc ac 1 1
1 ac 1 1
1 ad 1 1
1 ac 1 1
bc 1 ac 1 1
bd 1 ad 1 1
bc 1 ac 1 1
·
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
·
- -
- -
- -
0 0 0 0
1
1
1
1 1
1 1
1 1
· - - · - -
bc ac
bd ad
bc ac
bc
bd
bc
162.c. a.
x
h
Let · Then a 2 tan a, tan 3 · θ · θ
3
1
a 3a
a 1
2a
2
· ⇒ ·


x
2h
h
θ
θ
163.a. Let us suppost that choosing the fair coin be the event
B, choosing the counterfeit coin be the event C and
throwing 5 heads be the event A then by the given
condition we have to find the probabil ity P (C/A) Using
Baye’ theorem
5
5
5
2
1
10
9
1 .
10
1
1
10
1
P(B)P(A/B) P(C)P(A/C)
P(C)P(A/C)
P(C/A)

¹
`

.
'
-
×
·
-
· ∴
41
32
2
9
1
1
5
·
-
·
Here, P(A/C)P (getting 5 heads if counterfeit coin
is selected) =
5
) 1 (
P(A/B) = P (getting 5 heads if fair coin is chosen)
=
5
2
1

¹
`

.
'
164.a. Given, coefficient of
4
x
in (1 + ax + bx²) .
· −
18
) 2 1 ( x coeff. of
3
x
in 0 ) 2 1 ( ) 1 (
18 2
· − - - x bx ax
0 2) ( C b. 2) ( C a. 2) ( C
2
2
18 3
3
18 4
4
18
· − - − - − ⇒
[∵coeff. of
4
x
in (1 + ax + bx²) coeff. 1 2x) (1
18
× · −
of
4
x
in - −
18
) 2 1 ( x
3
x coeff.of a × in
- −
18
2x) (1 ] 2x) in(1 x coeff.of b
18 2
− ×
240 3b 32a · − ⇒
....(1)
and 0 2) ( C b. 2) ( C a. 2) ( C
1
18 2
2
18 3
3
18
· − - − - −
544 3b 51a · − ⇒
....(2)
solving eqns. (1) and (2), we get
.
3
272
b 16, a · ·
Hence, (a, b) =

¹
`

.
'
3
272
, 16
165.d. Weights are proportional to the volume of the spheres.
Let
x
be the distance of C.G. of the whole body from
the centre O of the larger sphere. Now
OO'
= 9cm.
Weight at O is
d
3
4
3
π.6
and weight at
O'
at centre
of the smaller sphere is
d.
3
1
3
π.3
Hence
cm 1
d 3 π
3
4
d 6 π
3
4
d.9 3 π
3
4
d.0 6 π
3
4
x
3 3
3 3
·
. - .
. .
·
O O'
X
166.b.

¹
`

.
'
− -
4
π
x 2 sinx] [cosx
We know that [x] is discontinuous at integral
values of x.
Now.

¹
`

.
'
4
π
− x cos 2
is an integer when
2
1
0or
4
π
x cos ± ·
¹
`

.
'

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22
i.e.
2

,
4

,
4

,
2
π
,
4
π
4
π
x · − where 0 < x < 2π
,
4

,
2

π ,
4

,
2
π
· ∴x
hence 5 points of discontinuity
167.b. Let f(x) = ax²+ bx + c f(0) = 2 ⇒c = 2
Also b 2ax (x) ' f - · and 4 2a 4 (0) ' ' f · ⇒ ·
-3 b -3 (0) f' and 2 a · ⇒ · · ⇒
2 3x 2x f(x)
2
- − · ∴
( ) ( )
∫ ∫
- · - − ∴

1
1
1
0
2 2
dx 2 2x 2 dx 2 3x 2x
[Separating even & add parts]
( )
3
16
1
3
1
4 x
3
x
4 dx 1 x 4
1
0
1
0
3
2
·

- ·

- · -
168.c.

− − - − − -

· − ·
− −
k
k 1
k
k 1
1
x) k 1 x)f[k k 1 (k x)dx xf{x(1 I
x)}]dx k 1 (k {1 − − - − ; ∫
· − −

k
k 1
x)x}dx x)f{(1 (1
∫ ∫
− − −
− −
k
k 1
k
k 1
x)}dx xf{x(1 x)}dx f{x(1
2
1
I
I
I 2I I I I
2
1
2 1 1 2 1
· ⇒ · ⇒ − · ⇒
169.b. Lines 3x + 4y + 2 = 0 & 3x + 4y + 5 = 0 are on the the
same side of the origin. The distance between these
lines is
5
3
4 3
5 2
d
2 2
1
·
-

·
Lines 3x+4y + 2 = 0 and 3x + 4y - 5 = 0 are on the
opposite sides of the origin. The distance between
these lines is
5
7
4 3
5 2
d
2 2
2
·
-
-
·
Thus, 3x + 4y + 2 = 0 divides the distance between
3x + 4y + 5 = 0 and 3x + 4y - 5 = 0 i.e., the ratio
, d : d
2 1
i.e. 3 : 7.
170.b. The given equations are
0 5n m 3 · - - l
...(i)
and 6mn - 2nl + 5lm = 0
From (i), we have m = -3l - 5n. Putting m = -3l-5n
in (ii), we get
0 ) 5 3 ( 5 2n - n)n 5 3 ( 6 · − − - − − n l l l l
0 15 45 30
2 2
· - - ⇒ l ln n
0 ) 2 )( ( 0 3 2
2 2
· - - ⇒ · - - ⇒ l n l n l ln n
⇒either
n − · l
or
2n − · l
If n, − · l then putting l = -n in (i), we obtain m = -2n.
If l = -2n, then putting l=-2n (i), we obtain m = n
Thus, the direction ratios of two lines are -n, -2n, n
and - 2n, n, n i.e., 1, 2, -1 and -2, 1, 1.
Hence, the direction cosines are
6
1
,
6
2
,
6
1 −
or
.
6
1
,
6
1
,
6
2 −
. The angle θ
between the lines is given by cos θ =

¹
`

.
' −
· θ ⇒

· ×

- × -

×
6
1
6
1
cos
6
1
6
1
6
1
6
1
6
2
6
2
1 -
ALTERNATE:
The equations are 3l + m + n = 0 ....(1)
and 6nm -2nl +5lm = 0
Divide first by n and second by
, n
2
we get
0 l
n
m
n
3 · - -
¹
`

.
' l
and
0
n
m
n
5
n
1
n
m
6 ·
¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
'
-
¹
`

.
'

¹
`

.
' l l
Put , y
n
m
, x
n
· ·
l
we get 3x + y + 1 = 0 and
0 5xy 2x 6y · - −
Solving above equations for x, and y we get
x= -1, y = - 2 or x = - 2, y = 1
1 : 1 : 2 : : 1 , 2 If − · ⇒ · − · n m l
n
m
m
l
If
1 : 2 : 1 n : m : 2 , 1
n
− · ⇒ − · − · l
n
m l
Now proceed as above
171.a. Let the equation of the required plane be
1
c
z
b
y
a
x
· - -
.....(i)
It meets co-ordinate axes in points
A(a, 0, 0), B(0, b, 0), C(0, 0, c)
O
x
A
C
Z
Y
γ) β, , (α G •
The centroid of
∆ABC
is

¹
`

.
'
3
,
3
,
3
a c b
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23

3γ c , 3β b , 3α a
3
c
3
· · · ⇒ γ · β, ·
3
β
α, · ⇒
a
Hence the required plane is
3
x
i.e., 1
3 3 3
·
γ
-
β
-
α
·
γ
-
β
-
α
z y z y x
172.d. We have
2 a 5 a 5 3a
1 a 3 2a 1 2a
3a 2a a
] γ β α [
- - -
- - -

·

=a{2a+3) ( a+2) - ( a+5) ( a+1) }- 2a{2a+1) ( a+2) -
(3a+5)(a+1)}
-3a{(2a+1)(a+5)-(3a+5)(2a+3)}
= a( 15a²+31a+37), om simplification
0
900
1259
30
31
a a 15 ≠
'
`
¦
'
'
¦
-
¹
`

.
'
- ·
[ for all non-zero a]
Hence, the given vectors are non-coplanar, for all 0 ≠ a
173.a.
3 2 - · x
dx
dy

equation of tangent is Y- y = (2x + 3) (X - x)
It passes thorugh (0, 0), ) 3 2 ( - − · − ∴ x x y
4 3 3 2 ) 3 2 (
2 2
- - · - ⇒ - · ⇒ x x x x x x y
2 , 14 ; 2 , 2 · − · ⇒ y x
174.d. Let P (1, -1, 2) and A (2, -1, 3)
Then, required vector =
F AP

×
) 4 , 2 , 3 ( ) 1 , 0 , 1 ( − × − − · ;
k j i
k j i
ˆ
2
ˆ
7
ˆ
2
4 2 3
1 0 1 − − ·

− − ·
175.b. If sec t
1
and sec t
2
be the times of travelling 1m and
2m respectively, them
2
2 2
2
1 1
.8t
2
1
0t 2 and .8t
2
1
t 0 I - · - ·
2
1
t and
2
1
4
1
t
2 1
· · · ⇒
∴Required time = ) t (t
1 2
− sec
sec
2
1 2
sec
2
1
2
1 −
·

¹
`

.
'
− ·
176.b. R = P + Q and
R′
= -P + Q
∵ R and
R′
are perpendicular
∴ R .
R′
= 0 ⇒ (P + Q) . (-P + Q) = 0
⇒ Q
2
- P
2
= 0 ⇒ Q
2
= P
2
⇒ Q = P
177.b. Let Ai denote the event that India wins i
th
match.
Required probability =
) A A P(A
3 2 1
+ ) A A A P(
3 2 1
) P(A ) )P(A A P( ) P(A ) A P( ) P(A
3 2 1 3 2 1
-
=
4
1
2
1
2
1
3 3
·
¹
`

.
'
-
¹
`

.
'
178.a.
etc dx x x dx x dx
x
x I 2 cos
2
1
2
1
2
2 cos 1
∫ − ∫ ·
¹
`

.
' −
∫ ·

- − ·
4
2 cos
2
2 sin
2
1
2
.
2
1
2
x x
x
x
. 2 cos
8
1
2 sin
4
1
4
2
x x x
x
− − ·
179.c.
2 ) (
1
1
lim
2
3
·

¹
`

.
'
-
-
-
∞ →
b ax
x
x
x
2
1
) 1 ( ) 1 (
lim
2
2 3
·
-
− - − − −

∞ →
x
b ax bx a x
x
2
1
1
) 1 (
) 1 (
lim
2
2
·
-

- − − −

∞ →
x
x
b
x
a
b a x
x
2 , 1 2 , 0 1 − · · ⇒ · − · − ⇒ b a b a
180.b. Let P θ) sin r θ, cos (r be any point on the cirlce of
radius r.
If (h, k) is the centroid of PAB, ∆ then
3
θ) sin 1 (
,
3
θ) cos r(1
h
-
·
-
·
r
k
2 2 2
3 3 3

¹
`

.
'
·
¹
`

.
'
− -
¹
`

.
'
− ⇒
r r
k
r
h
Hence, locus of
2 2 2
3 3 3
) , (
¹
`

.
'
·
¹
`

.
'
− -
¹
`

.
'

r r
y
r
x is k h
which is the equation of a circle.
O
r
r) B(0,
θ) sin , θ P(rcos r s
r
0) A(r,

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