You are on page 1of 14

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

CHAPTER TEST: Electrostatics and DC currents Ch 16-19 Physics A FALL 2008: FyANVC07 Warning: There are more than one versions of the test. Instructions Test period Tools The test 90 minutes. Formula sheet, your personal summery booklet and ruler, Calculator. For most items a single answer is not enough. It is also expected that you write down what you do that you explain/motivate your reasoning that you draw any necessary illustrations. After every item is given the maximum mark your solution can receive. (2/3) means that the item can give 2 g-points (Pass level) and 3 vg-points (Pass with distinction level). Items marked with (Problems 1f, 1e, 6 and 7) give you a possibility to show MVG-quality (Pass with special distinction quality) This means that you use generalised methods, models and reasoning, that you analyse your results and account for a clear line of thought in a correct mathematical language. Try all of the problems. It can be relatively easy, even towards the end of the test, to receive some points for partial solutions. A positive evaluation can be given even for unfinished solutions. Enjoy it! Mark limits Maximum score: G: VG: MVG: TOTAL 63 out of which 31 vg-points, and 3 MVG points 19 points 38 points/ at least 9 VG points: 43 points/ at least 18 VG points; MVG-quality work

At the aspect assessment of your work with exercise 1e, 6 and 7 I will consider the depth of understanding of physics you have demonstrated how well you have carried through the task how well you have explained your work and motivated your conclusions how well you have accounted for your work.

Only the marked problems in the box below will be graded.


1a 1b 2/2 2/2 6a 6b 1c 1d 2/1 2/1 6c 7 1e 1/0 1e 0/2 1e 0/3/ 2 2/1 3 4 5a 5b 5c 5d 5e 2/0 1/2 1/2 2/0 1/2 2/0 1/1

1/3 2/4/ 3/0 2/4/

Total Total Vg 63 31

Total Grade Name: Enjoy it!

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

1. Answer the questions 1a to 1e based on the figure below which is a simple DCcircuit: Switch S is closed in questions 1a to 1e.:

V2
S

A2
R1 = 5.00

R2 = 10 .0

R5 = 10 .0

V1

R3 = 5.00

V5

V3

A1

V = 40 .0 V

I5
R4 = 5.00

A3

Suggested Solutions: The voltmeters and Ammeters show the following values illustrated in the figure below:
20 V

S
2 A

R2 = 10 .0

R1 = 5.00

R5 = 10 .0

R3 = 5.00

10 V

10 V

5V

2 A

V = 40 .0 V
1A 1A

R4 = 5.00

1.a

The equivalent resistance of the circuit is: i. ii. iii. iv.


40.0 20.0 10.0 5.0

Answer: Alternative: ii: R = 20.0 Show details of you calculations: Suggested solutions:

[1/0] [1/2]

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

To prove our claim completely we may first calculate the equivalent resistance of the whole circuit.

R3 = 5.00 and R4 = 5.00 are in series. Their equivalent resistance is R34 = 5.00 + 5.00 = 10.0 R34 = 10.0 and R5 = 10.0 are in parallel. Their equivalent resistance is

[1/0]

1 1 1 1 1 2 10.0 = + = + = R345 = = 5.00 R345 R34 R5 10.0 10.0 10.0 2

[0/1]

R1 = 5.00 , R2 = 10.0 and R345 = 5.00 are in series. Their equivalent resistance is the equivalent resistance of the circuit: Req = R1 + R2 + R3 = 5.0 + 10 + 5.0 = 20.0

Answer: Req = 20.0 1.b What does the voltmeter V3 read in the DC-circuit above? i. ii. iii. iv.
40.0 V 20.0 V 10.0 V 5.0 V

[0/1]

Answer: alternative iv: V3 = R3 I 3 = 5.00 V Show the details of you calculations: Suggested solution:

[1/0] [1/2]

To calculate the voltages across R3 = 5.00 shown by voltmeter V3 , and the current passing through the resistor R1 = 5.00 shown by ammeter A1 , we may use the information obtained above, i.e. the equivalent resistance of the circuit is Req = 20.0 . The total voltage supplied by the source is V = 40.0 V . Therefore: , the total current passing through the battery, as well as the resistor R1 = 5.00 may be calculated using Ohms law as:

I=

V 40.0 = = 2.00 A Req 20.0

[0/1]

This is the same current that passes through R1 = 5.00 and R2 = 10.0 . Therefore the current read by the Ammeters A1 and A2 are:

I1 = I 2 = I = 2.00 A .

[1/0]

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

The current I1 = I 2 = I = 2.00 A is divided to two equal amounts and I 2.00 A I5 = = = 1.00 A passes trough R5 = 10.0 and the rest, i.e. 2 2 I 3 = 1.00 A will pass through R3 = 5.00 and R4 = 5.00 . This is due to the fact that, as illustrated above, the equivalent resistance of the combination R34 = 5.00 + 5.00 = 10.0 is identical to R5 = 10.0 and therefore the incoming current due to the symmetry of the problem is divided to two equal amounts. [0/1] Therefore, the voltage across the resistor R3 = 5.00 , shown by the voltmeter V3 may be calculated using ohms law as:

V3 = R3 I 3 = 5.00 1.00 V = 5.00 V


1.c

Answer: V3 = R3 I 3 = 5.00 V

What does the ammeter A1 read in the DC-circuit above? i. ii. iii. iv.
4.00 A 2.00 A 1.00 A 0.500 A

Answer: alternative ii:

I1 = I 2 = I = 2.00 A

[1/0] [1/1]

Show details of you calculations: Suggested solution: See the solution of 1c. 1.d The power dissipated in the resistor of resistance R5 = 10.0 is: i. ii. iii. iv.
1.00 W 5.00 W 10.0 W 40.0 W

Answer: alternative iii: P5 = 10.0 W Show details of you calculations: Suggested solution:

[1/0] [1/1]

Using the information obtained above, i.e.: I 5 = 1.00 A we may calculate the power dissipated in the resistors R5 = 10.0 is:

P5 = R5 I 52 = 10.0 (1.00) = 10.0 W


2

[1/1]

Answer: P5 = 10.0 W

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

1.e

If the resistors are replaced by light bulbs of the same resistance. What happens when [1/0] the switch S is opened? i. ii. iii. iv. All remaining light bulbs will shine brighter. All remaining light bulbs will shine dimmer. Light bulb R5 will shine brighter but light bulb R1 and R2 will be dimmer. Light bulb R5 will be dimmer but light bulb R1 and R2 will shine brighter.

Answer: Alternative iii: Light bulb R5 will shine brighter but light bulb R1 and R2 will be dimmer.

Explain conceptually in the space provided below your motivation for the choice made above [0/2] Prove your claim by performing calculations necessary in sufficient details and as clear as possible. [0/3/]

Conceptual solutions: When the switch S is opened, the resistors R3 and R4 are taken out of the circuit and the system just consists of R1 , R2 and R5 . Due to the fact that the combination R34 = R3 + R4 and R5 were initially connected in parallel, their equivalent resistance R345 was smaller than R5 . Therefore, by removing R3 and R4 from the system the total resistance of the circuit is increased. Thus less current passes through R1 and R2 and consequently, they will be dimmer than that they were initially. But the story of R5 is different. It will shine brighter. This is due to the fact that R5 has lost its parallel companion R34 = R3 + R4 , and it does not need to share the current with its parallel neighbors anymore. Initially one half of the main current I1 was passing through R5 and the other half was passing through R3 as well as R4 . Now competition is gone an all current passes through the resistor R5 and it is therefore brighter than it was initially before switching off the current. [0/2] Calculation:. Notice: A major part of the calculations give below is provided above. In order to get a complete picture of the situation, they are repeated again: With the switch S open, the equivalent resistance of the system is Req = R1 + R2 + R5
Req = R1 + R2 + R5 = 5.00 + 10.0 + 10.0 = 25.0 = 25.0

[0/1]

The current through the light bulbs is:


I1new = I 2 new = I 5new I = V 40.00 = = 1.60 A Req 25.0
2 P2 new = R2 I 2 new = 10.0 (1.60) = 25.6 W 2

[0/1]

The power dissipated in each resistor (light bulb) is: P1new = R1 I12new = 5.00 (1.60) = 12.8 W ,
2

P5 new = R5 I 52new = 10.0 (1.60) = 25.6 W


2

[0/1/]

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

Therefore the light bulb R2 = 10.0 and R5 = 10.0 shine twice as bright as R1 = 5.00 . To prove our claim completely we may first calculate the equivalent resistance of the whole circuit 1

R3 = 5.00 and R4 = 5.00 are in series. Their equivalent resistance is R34 = 5.00 + 5.00 = 10.0 R34 = 10.0 and R5 = 10.0 are in parallel. Their equivalent resistance is

1 1 1 1 1 2 10.0 = + = + = R345 = = 5.00 R345 R34 R5 10.0 10.0 10.0 2

R1 = 5.00 , R2 = 10.0 and R345 = 5.00 are in series. Their equivalent resistance is the equivalent resistance of the circuit: Req = R1 + R2 + R3 = 5.0 + 10 + 5.0 = 20.0

The current through the battery is I =

V 40.0 = = 2.00 A Req 20.0

This is the same current that passes through R1 = 5.00 and R2 = 10.0 . Therefore the current read by the Ammeters A1 and A2 are: I1 = I 2 = I = 2.00 A . Power dissipated in the resistors R1 = 5.00 and R2 = 10.0 are:
2 P1 = R1 I12 = 5.00 (2.0 ) = 20.0 W and P2 = R2 I 2 = 10.0 (2.0 ) = 40.0 W 2 2

The current I1 = I 2 = I = 2.00 A is divided to two equal amounts and I 2.00 A I5 = = = 1.00 A passes trough R5 = 10.0 and the rest, i.e. 2 2 I 3 = 1.00 A will pass through R3 = 5.00 and R4 = 5.00 . This is due to the fact that, as illustrated above, the equivalent resistance of the combination R34 = 5.00 + 5.00 = 10.0 is identical to R5 = 10.0 and therefore the incoming current due to the symmetry of the problem is divided to two equal amount. Power dissipated in the resistors R5 = 10.0 is: P5 = R5 I 52 = 10.0 (1.00) = 10.0 W
2

Conclusion:
P1new = 12.8 W P1new < P1 R1 dimmer now P1 = 20.0 W P2 new = 25.6 W P2 new < P2 R2 dimmer now P2 = 40.0 W P5 new = 25.6 W P2 new > P2 R2 brighter now P5 = 10.0 W

This part of the calculation is done in 1a, and for the sake of the clarity is repeated here.

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

2. An object can not have a charge of i. ii. iii. iv.

[1/0]

1.6 10 19 C . 3.2 10 10 C . 1.6 10 29 C


6.4 nC .

Answer: Alternative iii. An object can not have charge of 1.6 10 29 C . Why? Explain: Suggested answer: It is smaller than the charge of electron. Charge of electron is the smallest known elementary charge. The other charges are integer multiplication of the elementary charge e = 1.6 10 19 C . [0/1] 3. Calculate the electric potential needed to accelerate an electron to 5.0 107 m / s . An electron has a negative charge of 1.6 10 19 C and the mass me = 9.1110 31 kg . Ignore the relativistic effect. i. ii. iii. iv.
7.1 MV . 7.1 kV . 7.1 V . 7.1 kJ .

[0/1]

Answer: Alternative ii, i.e.: V = 7.1 kV . Show the details of your calculations: Data: e = 1.6 10 19 C ; me = 9.1110 31 kg ; v = 5.0 107 m / s ; V = ?

[1/0] [1/0]

W = E PE = QV 1 1 QV = mv 2 V = mv 2 1 2 2 2Q E KE = 2 mv

V=

1 9.1110 31 5.0 107 mv 2 = 2Q 2 1.6 10 19

= 7117 V 7.1 kV
[1/0]

Answer: V = 7.1 kV

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

4. Which circuit diagram shows voltmeter V and ammeter A correctly positioned to measure the current through the resistor R1 , and the potential difference between two terminals of it? [1/0]
a
R2 = 10 .0

b
R2 = 10 .0

R1 = 5.00

V1

A1
V = 40 .0 V

R1 = 5.00

V = 40 .0 V

A1
c
R2 = 10 .0

V1
d
R2 = 10 .0

R1 = 5.00

V1

A1

V = 40 .0 V

V = 40 .0 V
R1 = 5.00

A1

V1

Why? Explain. What do the other alternatives voltmeter and ammeter shows and why? [0/2] Answer: Alternative a. Voltmeter must be connected in parallel, and ammeter must be connected in series with the resistor R1 . Alternative b: In this case the voltmeter is connected in series with the resistor. Due to the fact that internal resistor of a decent voltmeter is in general very large very small current passes through the circuit and none of the measuring devices show anything. In case of a very defective voltmeter with a smaller internal resistance, the ammeter will break down. The current will rush through the ammeter (which in general has a very small resistance) causing its fuse to melt. [0/1] Alternative c: In this case the voltmeter is connected in parallel with the resistor and reads a correct value of the potential difference between two terminals of the resistor R1 . But the ammeter is placed improperly and reads only an extremely small amount of the current that passes through the voltmeter. Alternative d: In this case the ammeter is placed properly and reads the current passing through the resistor R1 . But the voltmeter is placed incorrectly and reads instead the potential difference between two terminals of the resistor R2 . [0/1]

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

5. Three negative collinear point charges of equal charge Q are placed on a line as illustrated. The charge A repels charge B by 3.0 N . a. Find the direction and magnitude of the force that charge C applies on the charge B. [1/2] b. Find the magnitude and direction of the resultant force on the charge B . [2/0] c. Find the magnitude and direction of the electric field at the point D at rAD = 1.0 cm to the right of the charge A . [1/2] d. Find the electric potential at the point D . e. Find the total potential energy of the system.
A

[2/0] [1/1]
rBC = 1 .0 cm

rAB = 2.0 cm
D

rAD = 1 .0 cm

B F AB = 3 .0 N

Suggested solutions: Data: FAB = 3.0 N , rAB = 2.0 cm , rBC = 1.0 cm ;

QA = QB = QC = Q
a. Answer: The force that charge C applies on the charge B is FBC = 12.0 N to the left as illustrated below. [1/0] [0/2]

FAB = k

Q2 Q2 Q2 = 3.0 N FBC = k = 4 k (0.02) 2 = 4 3.0 = 12.0 N (0.02) 2 (0.01) 2

Alternative method: We may calculate the magnitude of each charge using the fact that FAB = 3.0 N , rAB = 2.0 cm , rBC = 1.0 cm :

FAB = 9 109 Q=

Q2 3.0 10 6 (0.02) 2 4 = 3.0 N = 3.0 10 6 N Q 2 = = 10 19 C 2 2 9 3 (0.02) 9 10


[0/2]

4 10 19 C Q = 3.65 10 10 C 3
2

Q 3.7 10 10 C

Therefore: FBC

4 10 19 Q 9 3 =k = 9 10 = 12.0 10 6 N 2 2 (0.01) (0.02)

FBC = 12.0 N

[1/0]

rAB = 2.0 cm
FBC = 12 .0 N

rBC = 1 .0 cm

B F AB = 3 .0 N

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

b. The resultant force on the charge B is FB = 9.0 N towards the left.

FB = FBC FBA = 12.0 3.0 = 9.0 N to the left.


A

[1/0]
rBC = 1 .0 cm

rAB = 2.0 cm
FB = 9 . 0 N

[1/0]

c. Answer: The resultant electric field at D: E D 8.2 kN / C Towards the right


A

rAB = 2.0 cm D
rAD = 1 .0 cm

rBC = 1 .0 cm

ED 8.2 kN / C

To find the magnitude and direction of the electric field at the point D , we need to find how large each charge are. This may be achieved by using the information about the force between the charge A and charge B: 2
FAB = 9 10 9 Q2 3.0 10 6 4 10 4 4 = 3.0 10 6 N Q 2 = = 10 19 2 9 3 (0.02) 9 10

[0/1]

4 Q = 10 19 C 3.65 10 10 C = 36.5 nC 3

The direction of electric field of a negative charge is a vector towards it:


4 10 19 3 = 32 863 N / C 32.86 kN / C Towards the left (A) (0.01) 2 4 10 19 3 = 32 863 N / C 32.86 kN / C Towards the right (B) (0.01) 2

E AD = 9 10 9

E BD = 9 10 9

4 10 19 3 ECD = 9 10 9 = 8 216 N / C 8.22 kN / C Towards the right (C) (0.02) 2 r r r r The resultant electric field E D = E AD + E BD + ECD is:

Answer: E D 8.2 kN / C Towards the right

[1/1]

This is done above in 1a as an alternative solution. It is repeated here for the reason of clarity.

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

10

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

d. Answer: The electric potential at the point D is VD 820 V

[1/0]

The electric potential is an scalar quantity which is just the algebraic sum of the electric potentials of each charge at the point D, i.e.:
4 10 19 3 9 10 9 0.01 4 10 19 3 9 109 0.01 4 10 19 3 V 0.02

VD = V AD + VBD + VCD = 9 109

[1/0]

VD = 45 10 9

4 10 19 3 V = 821.6 V 820 V 0.02

e. Answer: The total potential energy of the system is E PE = 2.2 10 7 J [1/0]


E PE Q2 Q2 Q2 =k +k +k 0.03 0.02 0.01

E PE = kQ 2

2+3+ 6 11 4 11 = kQ 2 = 9 10 9 10 19 = 22 10 8 J 0.06 0.06 3 0.06

[0/1]

6. A Q1 = +10.0 C point charge is located at the origin of a coordinate system. A second point charge of Q2 = +5.0 C is placed on the x-axis at x = 4.0 mm as illustrated in the figure below. a. Calculate the electric field at a point A on y-axis at position (0, 3.0 mm) . [1/3]

(0,

3 .0 mm )

Q 2 = + 5 .0 C Q1 = + 10 .0 C

x
x = 4.0 mm

b. Where on the x-axis, can a third test charge Q3 = +1.0 C be placed so that it experience no force? [2/4/] c. Calculate the electric potential at this point. Suggested solution: Data: Q1 = +10.0 C , Q2 = +5.0 C at x = 4.0 mm ; A (0, 3.0 mm ) ; Q3 = +1.0 C a) Answer: The electric field at a point A on x-axis at position (0, 3.0 mm ) is N at 97 with the positive x-axis. [1/0] E A 1.1 1010 C [3/0]

6 Q1 N N 9 10.0 10 away from the charge. E1 A = 1.0 1010 E1 A = k 2 = 9 10 = 1.0 1010 3 2 C r1 C 3.0 10

( (

x = 4.0 mm , y = 3.0 mm r2 = x 2 + y 2 = 32 + 4 2 = 5.0 mm

r2 = 5.0 10 3 m
11

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

E2 A = k

Q2 N N 5.0 10 6 ; E2 A = 1.8 10 9 away from the charge. = 9 10 9 = 1.8 10 9 2 3 2 C r2 C 5.0 10

( (

) )

E 2 Ax = E 2 A cos = E 2 A

4 4 N = 1.8 10 9 5 5 C

[0/1]

E2 Ax = 1.44 10 9 E 2 Ay = 1.08 10 9

N C N C N C

3 3 N E 2 Ay = E 2 A sin = E2 A = 1.8 10 9 5 5 C E Ay = E1 Ay + E2 Ay = 10 109 N N + 1.08 10 9 C C

[0/1]

E Ay = 11.08 109

Electric Field
E1 A = 10 10 9 E2 A = 1.8 10 9 E A = 11.08 10 9 N C N C N C

x-component
E1 Ax = 0

y-component
E1 Ay = 1010 9 N C N C E 2 Ay = 1.08 10 9 E Ay = 11.08 109 N C N C N C

E2 Ax = 1.44 10 9 E Ax = 1.44 10 9

EA =

(E Ax )2 + (E Ay )2

E A = 11 .08 10 9
9 2

EA =

(1.44 10 ) + (11.08 10 )
9 2

N C

N C
E2 A = 1.8 109 N C

E1 A = 10 10 9

N C

E A 1.1 1010

N C

= tan 1 = tan 1

E Ay E Ax

y = 3.0 mm

r2 = 5 .0 10 3 m

11.08 10 9 = 97.4 9 1.44 10

Q1 = +10 .0 C x = 4 .0 mm

x
Q 2 = + 5 .0 C

Answer: 97 b)

[0/1]

Answer: At (2.34 mm, 0 ) the electric field due to Q1 = +10.0 C , and Q2 = +5.0 C is zero and therefore no point charge at the point will experience any force due to these charges. [1/0]

If the electric field at a point is zero, the electric force on a given charge at the point must be zero. Therefore, we may look for a point on the x-axis so that electric field at the point is zero. Due to the fact that the charges involved, i.e. Q1 = 10.0 C , Q2 = +5.0 C are both positive, the electric field is zero somewhere between them, i.e. at a point where its x-coordinate is 0 < x < 3.0 mm . This point is closer to the smaller charge Q2 = +5.0 C . Lets assume the coordinates of the desired point is ( x, 0) . [1/1] behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes. 12

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

Therefore, the magnitude of the electric field due to the charge Q1 = 10.0 C must be equal to the magnitude of the electric field of the charge Q2 = +5.0 C at ( x, 0) .
Q1 Q2 x2 10.0 10 6 5.0 10 6 10.0 10 6 2 / / k 2 =k 2 = = = 2 2 6 2 r1 r2 x 5.0 10 (0.004 x ) (0.004 x ) 1 x = 2 x = 2 (0.004 x ) = 0.004 2 2 x x + 2 x = 0.004 2 (0.004 x ) x 1 + 2 = 0.004 2 x =

[0/1] [0/1] [0/1/]

0.004 2 = 0.002343 m 2.34 mm 1+ 2

10.0 10 6 5.0 10 6 Check: = 1.82 = 1.82 QED (0.002343)2 (0.004 x )2

c)
V =k

Answer: The electric potential at (2.34 mm, 0 ) is: V = 6.56 107 V = 65.6 MV
Q1 Q2 +k 0.004 x x

[0/1] [0/1] [0/1]

V = 9 109

10.0 10 6 5.0 10 6 V + 9 109 (0.002343) (0.004 0.002343)

V = 6.56 107 V

Note that even though the electric field at the point is zero, the electric potential of the point is quite large and is 65.6 MV.

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

13

Suggested solutions Test FyANVC07 Electrostatics, DC-Circuit Ch16-19

NV-College

7. An electron moving at one percent of the speed of light to the left enters a uniform electric field region where the electric field is horizontal. If the electron is to be brought to rest in the space of 2.0 cm calculate the magnitude and direction of the electric field. Ignore relativistic effect. [2/4/]
Suggested solutions: Answer: E 1.3
kN towards the left. C

[1/0]

Data: x = 2.0 cm , v = 0.1c = 3 107 m / s , e = 1.6 10 19 C , me = 9.1110 31 kg .


r E

v = 0 .1c = 3 10 7 m / s

r r r F = Q E = eE

[0/1]

e = 1 .6 10 19 C
m e = 9 .11 10 31 kg

The direction of the electric field must also be towards left, i.e. in the same direction as the direction of the motion of the electron. This is due to the fact that the charge of electron is negative and therefore to stop then we must apply the electric in the same direction as its motion in r r r order to get a force in the opposite direction: F = QE = eE [1/1] r r According to Newtons second law of motion: F = ma . On the other hand the equation of motion of the electron may be written 2 as: 2ax = v 2 v0 . Therefore, combining these three laws results in: r r r eE F = QE = eE 2 ma = eE a = m mv0 r r F = ma E= 2e x 2 2 2ax = v 2 v 2 2ax = 0 v0 2 eE x = v0 0 m
2 mv0 9.1110 31 3 10 6 N kN E= = = 1281 1.3 19 2 2e x 2 1.6 10 2 10 C C

[0/2]

[0/1/]

Alternative method:
2 0 3 10 6 v 2 v0 a= 2ax = v v a = 2x 2.2 10 2 2 2 0

= 2.25 1014 m / s 2

[1/1] [1/1]

F = ma = 9.1110 31 2.25 1014 N = 2.0498 10 16 N


E= F 2.0498 10 16 N N = = 1281 19 Q C C 1.6 10
Answer: E 1.3
kN to the left. C

[0/2/]

behzad.massoumzadeh@huddinge.se Not for sale. Free to use for educational purposes.

14