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Disaster recovery solutions for HP StorageWorks Enterprise Virtual Array in a VMware Infrastructure 3 environment

Executive summary............................................................................................................................... 2 Virtualization with VI 3 ......................................................................................................................... 2 Configuring a VM ............................................................................................................................ 4 Addressing IT challenges ...................................................................................................................... 5 Disaster recovery ............................................................................................................................. 5 Planned downtime ........................................................................................................................ 5 Unplanned downtime.................................................................................................................... 5 Combining BC and CA for disaster recovery........................................................................................... 5 Local replication .............................................................................................................................. 6 Remote replication ........................................................................................................................... 6 Overall business continuity solution .................................................................................................... 6 More information ............................................................................................................................. 6 Implementing BC ................................................................................................................................. 7 Creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN ................................................................................................. 7 Adding a RDM LUN to a VM........................................................................................................... 16 Creating a snapclone of a VMFS-3 LUN ........................................................................................... 19 Adding a VMFS-3 LUN to a VM....................................................................................................... 23 Creating snapshots......................................................................................................................... 25 Remapping mirrorclones ................................................................................................................. 25 Implementing CA ............................................................................................................................... 26 Creating a CA LUN........................................................................................................................ 26 Failing over to the secondary site ..................................................................................................... 32 Failing back to the primary site ........................................................................................................ 36 Hardware proof-of-concept ................................................................................................................. 40 For more information.......................................................................................................................... 42

Executive summary
Disaster recovery solutions are key components of today’s data centers – even for small businesses. If you are deploying VMware Virtual Infrastructure 3 (VI 3), solution tools such as VMotion (instantaneously moving an entire running virtual machine from one server to another), Distributed Resource Scheduling (DRS) (resource utilization monitoring and intelligent allocation across resource pools), High Availability (HA) (cost-effective failover protection), and Consolidated Backup (LAN-free, centralized virtual machine backups) offer a broad range of disaster recovery options. When you are planning and deploying an overall solution, however, you can supplement these VMware solution tools with the disaster recovery functionality offered by HP storage arrays to provide the business continuity needed to support your desired service levels. This white paper outlines HP StorageWorks Business Copy (BC) and Continuous Access (CA) business continuity solutions for HP StorageWorks Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA) storage arrays, and provides detailed instructions for implementing BC and CA in a VI 3 environment. The proof-of-concept performed by HP and VMware to validate these implementations is described. Target audience: This white paper is intended for solutions architects or engineers engaged in the development, deployment, and operation of solutions for consolidation and storage virtualization. You should be familiar with the utilization of networking and Storage Area Network (SAN) technologies in a heterogeneous environment, and have a working knowledge of HP StorageWorks Command View, BC and CA, and VI 3 SAN implementations.

Virtualization with VI 3
VI 3 allows enterprises and small businesses alike to transform, manage, and optimize their IT environments through virtualization. Virtualization creates an abstraction layer that decouples the physical hardware from the operating system to deliver greater IT resource utilization and flexibility. Multiple virtual machines (VMs), running a range of operating systems (such as Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 or Linux) and applications, run in isolation but side-by-side on the same physical server. VI 3 delivers comprehensive virtualization, management, resource optimization, application availability and operational automation capabilities in an integrated offering.

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Figure 1 provides a logical view of the components of a VI 3 implementation.

Figure 1: VI 3 components

The components shown in Figure 1 include: • VMware ESX Server – a production-proven virtualization layer running on physical servers; abstracts processor, memory, storage and networking resources to be provisioned to multiple VMs • Virtual Machine – a representation of a physical machine implemented in software; includes an operating system and applications running on a virtual hardware configuration (CPU, system memory, disk storage, NIC, and more). The operating system sees a consistent, conventional, hardware configuration, regardless of the actual physical components. VMs support advanced capabilities such as 64-bit computing and virtual symmetric multiprocessing. A VM is implemented as an isolated file that can reside in any storage, making it easy to migrate the VM to any location (as, for example, part of a disaster recovery strategy involving BC and CA). • Virtual Machine File System (VMFS) – a high-performance cluster file system for VMs • Raw Disk Mapping (RDM) – a RDM LUN supports direct access 1 between the VM and physical storage subsystem, and is useful with SAN snapshots and other layered applications running in a VM. Because RDM volumes allow SCSI commands to pass through directly from the guest operating system, they better enable scalable backups using native SAN features. By comparison, VMFS volumes filter all SCSI commands.

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Fibre Channel or iSCSI only

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• Virtual Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP) – allows a single VM to simultaneously use multiple physical processors • VirtualCenter Management Server – provides a central point for configuring, provisioning and managing a virtualized IT infrastructure • Virtual Infrastructure (VI) Client – provides an interface that allows administrators and users to connect remotely to the VirtualCenter Management Server or individual ESX Server installations from any Windows PC • VI Web Access – A web interface for virtual machine management and remote console access

Configuring a VM
A suitable VM configuration is a pre-requisite for successful disaster recovery with BC and CA. For example, boot disk images and data disks for VMs should be located within a RAID array on the SAN. Figure 2 shows a sample configuration.

Figure 2: Sample configuration that is suitable for BC and CA business continuity solutions

HP recommends using a dedicated VMFS virtual disk to separate the VM’s operating system from all other data. This VMFS virtual disk could be on a dedicated LUN or could be shared. Application and other data are maintained on one or more additional VMFS virtual disks or RDM LUNs. With this structure, the VMFS virtual disk containing the boot image can be kept to the smallest possible size so that less time is required for cloning, exporting, and backup. You can also implement separate backup policies for the operating system virtual disk and the data disks.

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Downtime or data loss can have a devastating effect on the bottom line – no matter the size of your business. snapclones or mirrorclones of your critical data for backup purposes. allowing you to create snapshots. allowing you to protect your information in the event of a disaster. As described in this white paper. unified replication management approach. Solutions have focused on providing and maintaining a high-availability environment – often delivering four 9’s (99. BC and CA share an integrated management interface – Replication Solutions Manager (RSM) – that supports a unique. highly-available infrastructure that strongly protects the security. BC provides an ideal solution for data on EVA storage arrays. allowing you to move your data to a safe offsite data center. this infrastructure must possess sufficient flexibility to respond dynamically to changing business needs and accommodate unplanned events like power outages and natural disasters. 5 . maintaining a cost-effective. To keep you protected. In addition. Combining BC and CA for disaster recovery For today’s businesses. These solutions – BC and CA – can be deployed individually to meet backup and recovery needs or easily combined to provide a disaster-tolerant solution that helps meet your regulatory data-retention requirements. integrity and confidentiality of valuable data and transactions is a top priority. You must be able to preserve these data at a centralized location. RSM can be utilized to manage all local and remote replication features across the full EVA array storage family. away from harm.999%) availability. Disaster recovery A disaster recovery solution must be able to accommodate both planned and unplanned downtime. Unplanned downtime Unplanned downtime results from a natural disaster or sudden hardware or software failure and may impact an entire site.99%) or five 9’s (99. Planned downtime Planned downtime (for equipment or software maintenance) can jeopardize data at local or centrallylocated data centers. BC and CA functionality can be utilized to help provide business continuity in a VI 3 environment. CA offers an ideal solution.Addressing IT challenges Key challenges for today’s IT managers include safeguarding critical data and ensuring users are able to access these data with minimal disruption. HP StorageWorks EVA storage arrays provide business continuity and availability options for the smallest business with direct-attached storage to large enterprises with multiple terabytes and hundreds of sites.

Remote replication CA – HP StorageWorks Continuous Access EVA software – is an array-based application that can be used to create. More information For more information on BC and CA. Data replication from the original EVA storage array ensures that required images will always be available. For specific information. 2 Vraid 6 .pdf. read cache.www2. automated methods that virtually eliminate complexity while resulting in fewer user errors • Easy to deploy for accelerated payback • Less labor–intensive.hp. BC capabilities include: • Create point-in-time copies (snapshots. snapclones. manage and configure remote replication on the EVA product family. The benefits of remote replication with CA include: • Less expensive through faster. Snapshot capabilities allow VM images and applications to be backed up and.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00746629/c00746629.Local replication BC – HP StorageWorks Business Copy EVA software – is local replication software that allows you to create copies of virtual disks for backup and restore purposes. optimizing the utilization of your valuable IT staff Overall business continuity solution BC and CA can be combined to provide a robust business continuity solution for a VI 3 environment. refer to HP StorageWorks 4000/6000/8000 Enterprise Virtual Array – Software & Drivers. migrated to a physical host on another SAN. and write protection) • Present the copies to hosts • Allow immediate host I/O to snapshots and snapclones • Instantly restore the contents of a virtual disk Note: Features vary based on the particular array controller software version. or mirrorclones) of virtual disks • Specify properties for the copies (such as redundancy level 2 . easy-to-deploy package. CA delivers the components necessary to solve your business continuity objectives in a cost–effective. refer to HP StorageWorks EVA replication software consolidated release notes http://h20000. if desired.

Implementing BC BC is local replication software that allows you to create copies of virtual disks for backup and restore purposes. • Present the newly-cloned LUN to ESX Server. Creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN The process for creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN can be summarized as follows: • Identify the existing RDM LUN you wish to clone. add the newly-cloned LUN to a VM as an RDM. Note: You do not need to power down the VM before starting the cloning process. • Rescan the host. and re-mapping mirrorclones: • Creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN • Adding a RDM LUN to a VM • Creating a snapclone of a VMFS-3 LUN • Adding a VMFS-3 LUN to a VM • Creating snapshots • Remapping mirrorclones These instructions have been validated by HP and VMware. select the cloning option from Command View. 7 . This section provides instructions for creating snapclones and snapshots. • If desired.

navigate to the LUN under Virtual Disks that you wish to clone. Using HP StorageWorks Command View EVA (Command View).1. Figure 3: Selecting Vdiskdata2. as shown in Figure 3. the LUN you wish to clone 8 . Select Create snapclone to begin the cloning process.

as shown in Figure 4. Figure 4: Naming the snapclone Copy of Vdiskdata 2 9 . so that you will be able to keep track of the LUNs you have cloned.2. Ensure you select exactly the same performance characteristics (such as Vraid level and read cache policy) as configured on the LUN being cloned. Create a unique name for the snapclone.

This is normal. Figure 5: Starting to create a snapclone of Vdiskdata2 10 . you are shown a dialog box indicating it may take a significant amount of time to create the clone. select OK to continue. As shown in Figure 5.3.

as shown in Figure 6.4. While the LUN is being cloned. Figure 6: The creation of snapclone Copy of Vdiskdata2 is in progress 11 . note the message indicating Snapclone in progress. Avoid any change in the fabric that could disrupt SAN connectivity.

note that a new entry. Figure 7: The new LUN entry appears under Virtual Disks 12 . as shown in Figure 7. is present under Virtual Disks.5. Copy of Vdiskdata2. When cloning is complete.

is being presented to host DL580 (an HP ProLiant DL580 G2 server).6. As shown in Figure 8. Copy of Vdiskdata2. Figure 8: The newly-cloned LUN is presented to a host 13 . LUN 8. The last step from Command View is to present the newly-cloned LUN to ESX Server.

Note: LUNs with IDs 0 – 7 are currently shown under SCSI Target 0 in this example.7. Figure 9: Updating the configuration of the host so that it will be able to recognize the newly-cloned LUN 14 . ESX Server must perform a rescan to detect the newly-cloned LUN.

initiate a rescan. As shown in Figure 10. On completion.8. Figure 10: Verifying that the newly-cloned LUN (LUN 8) is present on the host 15 . LUN 8 – vmhba2:0:8 – has been added to the list of LUNs for host DL580 (see Step 7). From the host. verify that the newly-cloned LUN is present.

you should not present the newly-cloned LUNs to VM original unless you first remove original E:\ and original :F\). Caution: Do not present a cloned LUN to the VM that was the source of the cloned data unless you first remove the original LUN from that VM. If you clone these LUNs (original E:\ and original :F\). follow the procedures from the Basic System Configuration guide from VMware.html Figure 11: Selecting the Raw Device Mappings option while adding your newly-cloned RDM LUN to a VM 16 . creating new clones clone E:\ and clone F:\.Adding a RDM LUN to a VM The newly-cloned RDM LUN can now be deployed with any VM.vmware. Consider the example of a VM named original with LUNs at drive E:\ and F:\. as shown in Figure 11. Note: For the rest of the steps for Figure 11 on RDM. http://www. You can use the Add Hardware Wizard to add your newly-cloned LUN to a VM.com/support/pubs/vi_pubs. Ensure you select the Raw Device Mappings option.

You can hot-add a new LUN to a running VM without needing to power it down. You must then perform a Rescan Disks from Windows Computer Management. as shown in Figure 12. Figure 12: Selecting the Rescan Disks command after hot-adding a new LUN 17 .

Disk 1 and Disk 2 in Figure 13) are detected but are offline and must be reactivated.After the Rescan Disks. Figure 13: Reactivating a hot-added LUN 18 . Select Reactivate Disk. newly-cloned LUNs (for example. Right-click on the LUN you wish to activate.

• If desired. select the cloning option from Command View. • Change the value of the LVM.EnableResignature to 0. add any virtual disk on the newly-cloned LUN to any VM. • Rescan the host. 19 . • Restore the value of LVM.EnableResignature setting to 1.Creating a snapclone of a VMFS-3 LUN The procedure for creating a snapclone of a VMFS-3 LUN can be summarized as follows: • Identify the existing VMFS-3 LUN you wish to clone. Note: You do not need to power down the VM before starting the cloning process. • Present the newly-cloned LUN to ESX Server. Step-by-step instructions are provided below.

EnableResignature. As shown in Figure 14. as shown in Figure 9.20.3. 10.0. From VI Client. Select Advanced Settings from the host’s Configuration page 3. First. select host DL580 by its IP address. Figure 14: Changing the LVM. you must change the logical volume management setting LVM. its default value.EnableResignature setting from 0 to 1 so the host can detect the newly-cloned LUN 20 . ESX Server must perform a rescan to detect the newly-cloned LUN. to 1 (ON) forces ESX Server to recognize data-replicated LUNs. Follow Steps 1 – 6 of the Creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN procedure.EnableResignature to 1. 2. Changing LVM. change LVM.1. which is designed to prevent unknown data-replicated LUNs from adding to the ESX Server data store and causing unexpected behavior.EnableResignature from 0 (OFF).

As shown in Figure 15. Initiate a rescan operation on the host. respectively.4. verify that your newly-cloned LUNs are now present. On completion. the snapclones you presented to ESX Server in Step 6 are now listed as LUNs 14 and 15 – vmhba2:0:14 and vmhba2:0:15. Figure 15: Verifying that the newly-cloned LUNs (LUN 14 and LUN 15) are present on the host 21 .

prefixes 6. These LUNs are correctly listed with VMFS format. restore the value of LVM.5. After verifying that the desired server can successfully detect the newly-cloned LUNs. the file system’s size and attributes are preserved. are snap-00000002-VDiskdata1 and snap-00000002-VDisklgdata2.EnableResignature to 0. Figure 16: After rescanning. the VMFS-3 LUNs have been renamed with snap. Note: During cloning.prefixes. The names of the newly-created LUNs. as shown in Figure 16. 22 . Note that the VMFS-3 LUNs have been renamed with snap.

Useful tip – You may find the naming convention for cloned LUNs to be confusing when adding a new clone to a VM. Cloned LUN ID 51 has been presented to ESX Server. listing available storage.Adding a VMFS-3 LUN to a VM Newly-cloned VMFS-3 LUNs can now be hot-added to any VM without powering it down. you should not present the newly-cloned LUNs to VM original unless you first remove original E:\ and original :F\). make a note of which LUN ID is associated with which volume name. creating new clones clone E:\ and clone F:\. Caution: Do not present a cloned LUN to the VM that was the source of the cloned data unless you first remove the original LUN from that VM. Note the name associated with this LUN is snap-00000003-VDiskdata1. If you choose to add this LUN to a VM. Figure 17 shows the Storage view of host DL580’s Configuration page. Consider the example of a VM named original with LUNs at drive E:\ and F:\. To ensure you select the correct LUN. For example. If you clone these LUNs (original E:\ and original :F\). Figure 17: Noting which LUN ID is associated with which volume name 23 . look for the name snap-00000003-VDiskdata1.

as shown in Figure 18. Figure 18: Selecting the Use an existing virtual disk option while you are adding a newly-cloned VMFS-3 LUN to a VM 24 . Ensure you select the Use an existing virtual disk option.You can use the Add Hardware Wizard to add a newly-cloned LUN to a VM.

After the mirrorclone is detached. 25 . a mirrorclone continues to mirror its original LUN. Figure 19: Selecting the clone you wish to add to the VM Creating snapshots The procedures for creating snapshots of RDM or VMFS-3 LUNs are effectively the same as those for creating snapclones of RDM or VMFS-3 LUNs (Creating a snapclone of a RDM LUN or Creating a snapclone of a VMFS-3 LUN). Remapping mirrorclones Until it is broken or detached.As shown in Figure 19. snap-00000002-VDiskdata1 and snap-00000002VDisklgdata2. the newly-created clones. you can remap it to another ESX Server host in much the same way you would map a new snapclone or snapshot to the host (as described above). are now visible when you browse data stores for LUNs you can add to a VM.

• Restore the original value of LVM. • Rescan the host.EnableResignature setting to 1.EnableResignature. Step-by-step instructions are provided below. change the value of the LVM. 26 . This section provides step-by-step instructions for creating and utilizing a CA LUN: • Creating a CA LUN • Failing over to the secondary site • Failing back to the primary site These instructions have been validated by HP and VMware.Implementing CA CA is an array-based application that can be used to create. Creating a CA LUN The process for creating and utilizing a CA LUN can be summarized as follows: • Create a CA LUN by copying a data replication (DR) Group from a source array (on the primary site) to a destination array (on a secondary site). • Present the newly-created CA LUN to the ESX Server host on secondary site. manage and configure remote replication on the EVA product family. • For a VMFS-3 LUN.

select Create data replication group from the Data Replication Folder Properties page (as shown in Figure 20). Figure 20: Using Command View to create a new DR group 27 . Utilizing Command View.1.

as shown in Figure 21.2. Specify the source disk and other options. Figure 21: Creating DR Group 001 28 .

3. Figure 22: The copy process is 42% complete 29 . Monitor the progress of the copying process. as shown in Figure 22.

Figure 23 shows the DR Group Properties page for the source. verify that the source LUN has write access and the CA LUN has Inquiry only (read) access. is shown with Inquiry only access. The destination. After the copying is complete. DR Group 001 on VMWARE 2. on VMWARE1. Figure 23: The destination only has read access 30 .4.

Figure 24: Confirming that the destination only has read access 31 . The source is shown as VMWARE 2.From the same example. DR Group 001 on VMWARE 1. Figure 24 shows the DR Group Properties page for the destination. host access is Inquiry only.

32 . simply select the DR Group on the destination array and invoke the Fail over option. select DR Group 001 on destination array VMWARE 1. In this example.Failing over to the secondary site To initiate a failover from the primary to secondary site. the VM will crash 3 . This is normal given that failover to the secondary site makes the boot image and data inaccessible to the VM. 1. Caution: If you fail over a DR Group with LUNs belonging to a running VM. Figure 25: Selecting the new DR Group as the destination for the failover 3 You would receive the so-called blue screen of death (BSOD). the primary site has readonly access. Select Fail over. as shown in Figure 25.

shown in Figure 26. The Members view of the DR Group Properties page. After the failover DR Group 001 on VMWARE 1 is complete.2. Figure 26: Locating the CA LUN so that you can present it to a physical host at the secondary site 33 . indicates that the CA LUN is located in the \\Virtual Disks\Source from DL380\Vdisk001_dl580vm1 folder. locate the CA LUN and present it to the ESX Server host at the secondary site.

as shown in Figure 27. Select Vdisk001_dl580vm1. Present the CA LUN to host DL380 as LUN ID 20. a CA LUN from DR Group 001. Figure 27: Presenting the CA LUN to the host at the secondary site 34 .3.

restore the LVM setting to its original value. On completion.prefix.prefix 35 . – VMFS-3 LUN: change LVM.EnableResignature from 1 to 0 You can now initiate a rescan operation on the remote host. as shown in Figure 28 where Vdisk001_dl580vm1 now appears as snap-00000002-dl580-vm1. mapping the CA LUN to the ESX Server host requires you to temporarily change one of the host’s LVM settings. you can add it any VM. Verify that the CA LUN is now shown with a snap. Utilize VI Client to change the following setting: – RDM LUN: just a rescan is needed. As with the previous procedures.4. 5. Figure 28: The CA LUN has been detected by the physical host and is now shown with a snap. After the CA LUN has been mapped to the remote host.

Select the Remove from inventory command. VI Client reports a general system error In the example shown above. 2.Failing back to the primary site If you choose to fail the CA LUN back to its original location. When you first power on the original VM with its failed-back CA LUN. VM dl580-vm1-drgroup is inaccessible. Perform the following steps to make this VM accessible: 1. In VI Client.20. right-click on the inaccessible VM. 36 .0. Remember to change the value of LVM. CA LUN snap-00000004-dl580-vm1 has just failed back to an ESX Server host with IP address 10. you will need to rescan the appropriate ESX Server host. the VM will be inaccessible.6. Figure 29: After you power on the original VM.EnableResignature to the appropriate value. as shown in Figure 29.

locate the CA LUN that has just failed back. Select the Browse Datastore command.3. as shown in Figure 30.vmx file for the inaccessible VM 37 . From the Storage section of the ESX Server host’s Configuration page. Figure 30: Using VI Client to browse the datastore so that you can locate the .

as shown in Figure 31. To re-enable the VM. Figure 31: Re-enabling the VM by returning it to inventory 38 .vmx file and select the Add to Inventory command. locate its .4.

select the Keep option to retain its original Universally Unique Identifier (UUID). Figure 32: Retaining the original UUID for the VM 39 . as shown in Figure 32.5. Before you power on the VM you have just re-enabled.

in conjunction with a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3a database. it was possible to retrieve the report and the associated data. The proof-of-concept utilized Cognos 8 Business Intelligence (BI).Hardware proof-of-concept HP and VMware carried out a hardware proof-of-concept to validate the data copied in the procedures outlined in this white paper. Figure 33: Hardware configuration Source VMs were configured as follows: • Dl580-vm1 – One processor – 256 MB RAM – 10 GB RDM LUN for the operating system (Windows 2000 Advanced Server) – 20 GB RDM LUN for Cognos 8 BI application server – 25 GB RDM LUN for SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3a 40 . to generate a sales report. Figure 33 shows the hardware configuration for the proof-of-concept. Following planned and unplanned failover events. a business intelligence application.

• Dl580-vm2 – One processor – 256 MB RAM – 10 GB RDM LUN for the operating system (Windows 2000 Advanced Server) – 20 GB RDM LUN for Cognos 8 BI application server – 25 GB RDM LUN for SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3a 41 .

please provide feedback at www.hp.hp.hp. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.vmware.com/solutions/feedback.hp.com/storage http://www.com/pdf/vi3_san_guide.www2.hp.P.pdf http://h18006.hp.x” VMware “SAN Configuration Guide” HP StorageWorks Continuous Access EVA HP StorageWorks Business Copy EVA http://www. April 2007 . © 2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company.html http://h18006. L.com/bc/docs/support/Support Manual/c00746629/c00746629. 4AA1-0820ENW.pdf http://www.com/ActiveAnswers/cache/272 102-0-0-0-121. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services.com/products/storage/software /conaccesseva/index. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.www1. Revision 2.com/products/storage/software /bizcopyeva/index. Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.com/pdf/vi3_esx_san_cfg.hp.vmware.html http://h20000.pdf HP StorageWorks EVA replication software release notes Data storage from HP VMware Virtual Infrastructure 3 VMware “Storage/SAN Compatibility Guide for ESX Server 3.html To help us improve our documents.vmware. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty.www1.com/go/vmware http://h71019.www7. planning http://www.com/products/vi/ http://www.For more information HP virtualization with VMware VMware Infrastructure.