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COLONELS WIN
MAYORS CUP
The 2011 installment of the
Mayors Cup game will be
known as the
Snow Cup
game.
When Kings
hosted Wilkes
on Saturday at McCarthy Stadi-
um, the teams not only battled
each other, they took on the
elements as heavy, wet snow
smothered the field. Combined
with gusty winds, the weather
was very much a factor as the
teams combined for seven
fumbles, two missed extra
points and several slips on the
slushy field in the Colonels 13-6
victory.
With the win, Wilkes (3-4 over-
all, 3-3 MAC) received the May-
ors Cup trophy for the 12th
time in the 16-year history of
the game. 1C
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NOTRE DAME 56
NAVY14
PENN STATE10
ILLINOIS 7
NEBRASKA 24
MICHIGAN ST. 3
OKLAHOMA 58
KANSAS ST. 17
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 7A
B PEOPLE: 1B
Community News
2-5B, 7B,8B,10B, 13B
Birthdays, 12B
C SPORTS: Outdoors 14C
D BUSINESS: Stocks 5D
E VIEWS: Editorials 2E
F ETC.: Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED: 1G
WEATHER
Jillian Graham
Mostly sunny, cold.
High, 42. Low, 28.
Details, Page 16C
6 09815 10077
About the only thing Luzerne
County District Attorney candi-
dates Stefanie Salavantis and in-
cumbent Jackie
Musto Carroll have
in common is pas-
sionto be the coun-
tys top prosecutor.
They are more
than 20 years apart
in age; Musto Carroll has been a
prosecutor for more than 20
years; Salavantis has been an at-
torney for two years and has nev-
er prosecuted a criminal case.
Salavantis, 29, of Kingston
Township, garnered enough
write-in votes in May to obtain a
ballot position against Musto
Carroll on Nov. 8. No other Re-
publicans sought the nomina-
tion.
Since then, Salavantis has
waged a media offensive against
Musto Carroll, using television
and radio advertisements.
Musto Carroll, 50, of Pittston
Township, has served as district
attorney for the last four years af-
ter winning a primary battle with
current county solicitor Vito De-
Vast differences in
two DA candidates
Age and experience separate
incumbent Musto Carroll and
challenger Salavantis.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Salavantis Musto Carroll
See DA, Page 12A
Government-issued mobile
homes are sprouting up in flood-
ravaged regions around the Sus-
quehanna River, with more than
150 promised to Luzerne County
families.
But are these new homes for
flood victims humane habita-
tions or, as some have speculat-
ed, toxic tin cans?
The Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency in 2010 began
selling off more than 100,000
travel trailers that had been pro-
videdtovictims of hurricanes Ka-
trina and Rita in Louisiana and
Mississippi. Two years earlier, a
study by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention found
higher than average levels of for-
maldehyde in the trailers.
Becky Gillette, Formaldehyde
Campaign Director for national
environmental-advocacy group
Sierra Club, claims FEMA did
not test formaldehyde levels in
its new mobile housing units be-
fore purchasing them, and con-
tends they are probably just as
likely to seep formaldehyde.
She said she is willing to pay to
test interior air quality in mobile
housing units arriving in North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
Disaster victims are the last
F L O O D I N G A F T E R M AT H
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
The kitchen and living space of a FEMA-issued park unit mobile home in Plains Township. Some have
expressed concerns about pressed wood products used in manufacturing the trailers because they
may seep elevated levels of formaldehyde.
Mobile home safety is questioned
Formaldehyde levels in
government-issued trailers
for flood victims is an issue.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See TRAILERS, Page 4A
Who could have dreamt it a
white Halloween.
Heavy, wet snowblanketed Lu-
zerne County on Saturday, can-
celingholidayevents andfrustrat-
ing business owners hoping to
cash in on the last-minute candy
and costume trade.
Several Halloween-themed
businesses gearing up for their
busiest weekend reported disap-
pointing sales
as snowfall kept
shoppers off the
roads.
Daelynn Far-
rell, manager at Spirit Halloween
Superstore in the Kohls Plaza off
Route 309, Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship, said crowds of last-minute
costume shoppers were steady
Saturday but were far from the
throng workers expected.
I was told we were going to be
hammered today, that it was go-
ing to be absolute hell, Farrell
said. Weve been constant and
busy, but hammered? No.
We were very busy yesterday,
she continued. A lot of last
nights business was people antic-
ipatingwhat was goingtohappen
today.
A storm moving up the East
Coast dumped snow from Mary-
land to New England, behaving
pretty much as predicted, said
Brian Lovejoy, a meteorologist
with the National Weather Ser-
vice in Binghamton, N.Y.
It developed in the Carolinas.
It has moved northeast off the
coast and threw some snow back
in, he said.
The highest accumulations
wererecordedinthehigher eleva-
tions: Forest City inSusquehanna
County had 7.8 inches;
A trick, not a treat
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Tradition did not let a little snow stop the Sipskey family frompicking the perfect pumpkins at Dymonds market in Dallas on Sat-
urday afternoon. The family always gets their pumpkins the weekend before Halloween.
Rare October snowfall blankets the region
See SNOW, Page 16A
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
INSIDE: For
more snow
photos, see
Pages 14A, 16A
A story on Page 1A of Sat-
urdays Times Leader incor-
rectly reported the amount of
money Luzerne County judge
candidate Lesa Gelb has
spent on her campaign.
Gelbs campaign commit-
tee spent $164,812.22 on her
election campaign to date,
according to publicly filed
campaign finance reports.
Gelb spent $104,500.21
from Jan. 1 to May 2,
$1,797.03 from May 3 to June
6 and $58,514.98 from June 7
to Oct. 24.
Gelbs expenditures placed
her fourth on the list of judi-
cial candidates by expendi-
tures, behind Fred Pieranto-
ni, Mike Vough and Dick
Hughes.
Story on candidate spending corrected
KABUL, AfghanistanATali-
bansuicide bomber rammeda ve-
hicle loaded with explosives into
an armored NATO bus Saturday
on a busy thoroughfare in Kabul,
killing17 people, including a doz-
en Americans, in the deadliest
strike against the U.S.-led coali-
tion in the Afghan capital since
the war began.
The blast occurred on the
same day that a man wearing an
Afghan army uniform killed
three coalition troops, who were
reportedly Australian, in the
southattacks that showthe re-
siliency of the insurgency and are
likely to raise new doubts about
the unpopular 10-year-old war
and the Western strategy of try-
ingtotalkpeacewiththeTaliban.
A spokesman for the funda-
mentalist Islamic movement,
which was ousted in the 2001 in-
vasion for its affiliation with al-
Qaida, claimed responsibility for
the attack, saying the bomber
had used 1,540 pounds of explo-
sives.
A F G H A N I S TA N
12 U.S.
troops
killed
Five others killed in blast as
suicide bomber rams vehicle
into NATO bus.
By DEB RIECHMANN
and AMIR SHAH
Associated Press
See TROOPS, Page 2A
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


Baldrica, Anthony
Caruthers, Esther
Cragle, Mark
Hartman, Clifford Jr.
Holtzman, Theresa
Meehan, Kathleen
Mihalchik, Barbara
Miller, Cheryl
Mishkin, Andrew
Pello, Mary
Volanski, John Sr.
OBITUARIES
Page 7A
BUILDING
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Issue No. 2011-303
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 5-0-8
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Tuesday: 6-2-8
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Thursday: 5-2-0
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Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 03-15-16-18-25
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Sunday: 03-13-18-20-32
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Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 02-05-10-13-28-48
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Megaball: 41
Megaplier: 04
Powerball
Wednesday: 01-18-21-39-55
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Saturday: 11-16-40-51-56
powerball: 38
powerplay: 05
WEEKLY LOTTERY
SUMMARY
Divorces sought and filed in
the Luzerne County Prothono-
tarys Office fromOct. 24
through 28, 2011:
Charles S. Cromer, Hanover
Township, and Linda L. Cromer,
Plymouth
Thomas O. Maccollum, Jr.,
West Hazleton, and Francine C.
Maccollum, West Hazleton
Margaret Slusser, Bear
Creek Township, and Eugene
Gary Slusser, Bear Creek Town-
ship
Stephen J. Hischar Jr., Ha-
zleton, and Lorraine J. Hischar,
Hazleton
Vivek Patel, Hazleton, and
Vabdababen Patel, Hazleton
David R. Beynon, Luzerne,
and Debbie A. Beynon, Court-
dale
Michael R. Jones, Edwards-
ville, and Michelle Jones, Ed-
wardsville
Lorraine Ann Higgins, Ha-
zleton, and Donald John Hig-
gins, Hazleton
Susan Sikora, Nescopeck,
and Michael J. Sikora, Nesco-
peck
Valerie L. Allen, White
Haven, and Harold Allen, Allen-
town
Heather Hodle, Moutain
Top, and Christopher Hodle,
Mountain Top
MatthewP. Welebob, Ben-
ton, and Melba Reyta Naw, Ben-
ton
Richard Martin Grose, Still-
water, and Kimberly Grose,
Stillwater
Mary M. Suda, Wilkes-Barre,
and Bernard Suda, Wilkes-Barre
Elizabeth Gil, Drums, and
Rafael Vargas Jr., Rockchester,
N.Y.
Abuid C. Ramos Sr., Hanov-
er Township, and Amalia Ramos,
Tacoma, Wash.
Danielle Novick Tyson,
Wilkes-Barre, and Donald Tyson,
Wilkes-Barre
Louise A. Smith, Plymouth,
and Clement John Smith Jr.,
Swoyersville
Raymond Eckhart, un-
known address, and Tracey
Eckhart, Nanticoke
Megan Dasilva, Wilkes-
Barre, and David Dasilva,
Wilkes-Barre
Marriage license applications
filed in the Luzerne County
Register of Wills Office fromOct.
24 through 28, 2011:
Samuel Stanley Levy and
Annjanette Mary Emel
Juan Manuel Fabian Gon-
zalez and Raquel Angelina Mo-
rales
Harvey Rotzell Jr. and Crys-
tal Schneider
Paul P. Richards and There-
sa A. Riley
John Edward Phillips and
Jennifer Lynn Rushton
Jerry Joseph Roberts Jr. and
Laura Scatton
Geovanni Rodriguez Valen-
tin and Krystel Ann Delacruz
Jason R. Hinz and Andrea
Michelle Miller
Scott Allen Rowlands and
Jodi Anne Livingstone
Anthony Lopez and Linnette
Melendez
Thomas C. Potsko and Char-
la J. Slavish
MARRIAGES & DIVORCES
HOWABOUT A SCARY STORY?
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
S
tate Sen. Lisa Baker reads to children at the Nuangola Library with librarian Lina San-
tomauro. Children attending the Halloween-themed reading were treated to activities
and a snack, as well as stories.
The Talibanandrelatedgroups
have staged more than a dozen
major attacks in Kabul this year,
including seven since June, in an
apparent campaign to weaken
confidence in the Afghan govern-
ment as it prepares to take over
its own security ahead of a 2014
deadline for the U.S. and other
NATO countries to withdraw
their troops or move them into
support roles.
Underscoring the difficulties
ahead, the brazen assault oc-
curred just hours after top Af-
ghan and Western officials met in
the heart of Kabul to discuss the
second phase of shifting security
responsibilities to Afghan forces
in all or part of 17 of the countrys
34 provinces. Afghans already
have the lead in the Afghan cap-
ital.
Heavy black smoke poured
from the burning wreckage of an
armored personnel carrier,
known as a Rhino, in Kabul after
the bomber struck. The bus had
beensandwichedinthe middle of
a convoy of mine-resistant mili-
tary vehicles when it was hit
along a four-lane highway often
used by foreign military trainers
in the southwestern part of Ka-
bul.
The landmark Darulaman Pal-
ace, the bombed-out seat of for-
mer Afghan kings, was the back-
drop to the chaotic scene: Shrap-
nel, twisted pieces of metal and
charred human remains littered
the street.
U.S. soldiers wept as they
pulled bodies from the debris,
said Noor Ahmad, a witness at
the scene. One coalition soldier
was choking inside the burned
bus, he said.
The bottom half of his body
was burned, Ahmad said.
NATO said five of its service
members and eight civilian con-
tractors working for the coalition
died in the attack.
A U.S. defense official, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity to
release the information before a
formal announcement, said all 13
were Americans. However, Lt.
Col. ChristianLemay, a Canadian
defense spokesman, told The As-
sociated Press that one Canadian
soldier was among the troops
killed. The discrepancy couldnot
immediately be reconciled.
It was the deadliest single at-
tack against the U.S.-ledcoalition
across the country since the Tali-
ban shot down a NATO helicop-
ter onAug. 6inaneasternAfghan
province, killing 30 U.S. troops,
most elite Navy SEALs, andeight
Afghans.
The Afghan Ministry of Interi-
or said four Afghans, including
two children, also died in Satur-
days attack. Eight other Af-
ghans, including two children,
were wounded, said Kabir Amiri,
head of Kabul hospitals.
In all, there were three attacks
Saturday against NATO and Af-
ghan forces across the country.
Ateenage girl also blewherself
up as she tried to attack an Af-
ghan intelligence office in the
capital of Kunar province, a
hotbed of militancy in northeast
Afghanistan along the Pakistan
border, the coalition said. Abdul
Sabor Allayar, deputy provincial
police chief, said the guards out-
side the governments intelli-
gence office in Asad Abad be-
came suspicious and started
shooting, at whichpoint thebom-
ber detonated her explosives,
killing herself and wounding sev-
eral intelligence employees.
Afghan Defense Ministry
spokesman Mohammad Zahir
Azimi said officials were investi-
gating whether the man who
opened fire on a joint NATO-Af-
ghan base in the restive southern
Uruzgan province was an actual
soldier or a militant in disguise.
NATO did not give the national-
ity of the three service members
killed, but the Australian Broad-
casting Corp. reported that they
were Australian.
AP PHOTO
U.S. soliders, right, carry a body fromthe site of a suicide car bomber in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday. A suicide car bomber struck a
NATO convoy on the outskirts of Kabul on Saturday, causing casualties among the NATO service members and Afghan civilians, the
U.S.-led coalition said.
TROOPS
Continued fromPage 1A
Luzerne Boroughs police de-
partment has a new top cop.
The borough on Friday swore
in Patricia ODonnell as its new
chief of police.
ODonnells hiring was ap-
proved by council at its last regu-
lar meeting Oct. 12, Councilman
Mike Jancuska said.
ODonnell has served as a part-
time officer since the reincorpo-
ration of the Luzerne Police De-
partment in June 2010, and Jan-
cuska said ODonnell also
worked for the boroughs former
police department prior toits dis-
solution a decade ago.
Shes not a stranger to town,
Jancuska said.
ODonnell replaces Paul Bow-
man, who served as chief of po-
lice since the borough restarted
the department.
Jancuska said Bowman, who is
also a full-time police officer with
Laflin Borough, resigned amica-
bly and council accepted his re-
signation immediately prior to
ODonnells appointment.
Jancuska described Bowmans
service with the department as
an interim position.
He did very well by the town
by going through all the work to
makethings happen, but fromthe
beginning the intent was that it
would be a temporary position,
Jancuska said.
Jancuska said Saturday he was
not sure of ODonnells salary but
that it would equivalent to what
the borough had paid Bowman.
Bowman received $16 per hour
for his time with the borough po-
lice department, according to
The Times Leaders archives.
Luzerne Borough gets new police chief
Patricia ODonnell had served
as a part-time officer since
June 2010.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
DORRANCE TWP. Sur-
veillance photos of the man
who robbed the Dorrance Su-
noco on Blue Ridge Trail Tues-
day led to the arrest of three
suspects on Friday, state police
said.
State police at Hazleton
identified the suspects as Kae-
lin Kovalski, 27, Brian Stem-
ple, 38, and Jolene Vonglis, all
of White Haven.
Kovalski walked into the gas
station just before 11 a.m. on
Tuesday, showed a knife and
demanded money then fled in-
to a woods behind the build-
ing, police allege.
Kovalski and the others were
charged with conspiracy to
commit robbery and receiving
stolen property.
In addition, Kovalski was
charged with robbery and theft
by unlawful taking.
All three were arraigned by
District Justice Gerald Feissner
of Freeland and committed to
the Luzerne County Correc-
tional Facility for lack of
$100,000 bail each.
Photos lead to arrest of three
for robbery in Dorrance Twp.
Times Leader Staff
PACKER TWP. A17-year-
old boy was killed in a car
crash Friday afternoon on
Wetzel Run Road in Carbon
County, state police said.
Carl Bittner of Weatherly
was a passenger in a Ford Mus-
tang driven by Matthew Cul-
len, 17, also of Weatherly.
The car was traveling west
when it went off the roadway
around 2:40 p.m., struck a
large rock and rolled onto its
roof.
Cullen and another pas-
senger, Christopher Lafey, 17,
of Weatherly, were flown by
helicopter to St. Lukes hospi-
tal in Bethlehem for treatment
of injuries.
The crash investigation
continues to determine the
cause of the boys death. Any-
one who witnessed the crash is
asked to contact state police in
Hazleton at 570 459-3890.
HANOVER TWP. Town-
ship police Saturday reported
the following:
A driver hit three parked
cars on South Regent Street.
Tamila Burton, 46, of South
Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre
was traveling north on South
Regent around 5:40 a.m. in a
Chevrolet Monte Carlo. She hit
a Dodge Caravan, a Kia Sephia
and Chevrolet Blazer. The
parked vehicles had moderate
to severe damage. Burtons car
had severe damage and was
towed from the scene. She
declined medical treatment.
The crash investigation is
continuing.
A juvenile girl from Ashley
reported the Hyundai Elantra
she parked overnight on Divi-
sion Street was hit with eggs
and blue paint.
POLICE BLOTTER
Weatherly teenager
killed in car crash
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Shale author to speak
One writers experience with the
impact of Marcellus Shale gas drilling
will be the focus when author Seamus
McGraw speaks about his book, The
End of Country, on
Nov. 19 at Wilkes
University. McGraws
talk, sponsored by the
Institute for Energy
and Environmental
Research for North-
eastern Pennsylvania,
will be from10 a.m. to
noon in Room101 of
Stark Learning Center.
The End of Country, published by
Random House, is McGraws account of
the Marcellus Shale development in and
around the Susquehanna County village
of Dimock. Along with the discussion
about the book, McGraw will share his
experiences with gas drilling.
Admission to the talk is free, but pre-
registration is requested. To register or
for additional information, contact Erich
Schramm at erich.schramm@wilkes.edu
or call 408-5543.
WILKES-BARRE
Benefit concert rescheduled
The Flood Relief Concert featuring
Christian Artists Kendall Mosley,
Choose This Day and WATERSEDGE
planned for Saturday but cancelled due
to inclement weather has been resche-
duled to this Saturday at Genettis Hotel
and Convention Center, 77 E. Market St.
Doors open at 5 p.m.
Cost of the event is $10 per person in
advance or $12 at the door. To purchase
tickets in advance, contact Stephen L.
Perillo at 899-2264, or steve@unityby-
music.org. Cash and personal checks will
be accepted. Proceeds will benefit the
American Red Cross and the Salvation
Army.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
Veterans event is planned
Rep. Karen Boback, R-Harveys Lake,
will host for her annual Veterans Recog-
nition Event on Saturdayat 10:30 a.m. at
Misericordia Universitys Lemmond
Theater.
The keynote speaker for the event will
be Sgt. 1st Class Robert J. Lamanski, a
combat veteran and recruiter for 109th
Field Artillery in the Pennsylvania Army
National Guard, Wilkes-Barre.
The Department of Veterans Affairs
mobile veterans center will be on hand
to assist veterans, along with other orga-
nizations that will participate in an expo
after the appreciation event.
Veterans can register online at
www.RepBoback.com or by calling her
office in Sweet Valley at 477-3752, in
Tunkhannock at 836-4777 or toll free at
800-278-3930.
WILKES-BARRE
Cycling seminar to be held
Local cycling advocates will host a
seminar on making Luzerne Countys
communities more bicycle-friendly Nov.
15 from 7 to 9 p.m. at Genettis Hotel
and Conference Center, 77 E. Market St.
The event is free and open to the public.
Philadelphia community leader Alex
Doty will discuss bicycle commuting in
that city. and how the lessons can be
applied in Luzerne County.
For additional event information call
823-2191 extension 140.
WILKES-BARRE
Cocaine supplier sentenced
A Wapwallopen man investigators say
was the main cocaine supplier in a drug
ring was sentenced Friday to five to 10
years in state prison.
Anthony Manchio, 51, was sentenced
on 13 related charges he originally plead-
ed guilty to in April.
Investigators said Manchio and 22
other members of the Outlaws Motorcy-
cle Club were charged in the ongoing
investigation, known as Operation Ava-
lanche.
According to court records, the in-
vestigation began in July 2008 when
agents with the Bureau of Narcotics
Investigation unit received information
that the group was selling large quanti-
ties of cocaine in the Wilkes-Barre area.
Undercover agents raided the Outlaws
Motorcycle Club, based in a clubhouse
at 115 N. Main St., Ashley.
Investigators said they made about 30
controlled cocaine purchases from mem-
bers since July 2009.
Thousands of calls were intercepted
through court-authorized wiretaps that
led agents to identify Manchio as the
Outlaws main cocaine supplier.
I N B R I E F
McGraw
Local municipalities are getting a
one-time and in many cases much
needed boost in state aid to offset pen-
sion fund obligations this year, totaling
$3.7 million county-wide. Wilkes-Barre
City will get the lions share, seeing a
one-time boon of just over $1 million.
The increasedstate aidcomes courte-
syof steppedupefforts tocollect a 2per-
cent tax on out-of-state insurance com-
panies that sold casualty policies to
Pennsylvania residents.
Apress release fromthe state Auditor
Generals office explained that the state
department of revenue was more ag-
gressive in collecting estimated pre-
payments of insurance premiums owed
by the out-of-state insurance company
taxpayers. Compliance with the pre-
payment mandate has been lax, in part
because of ambiguous tax form instruc-
tions.
The crackdown essentially prompted
those taxpayers to double their pay-
ments this year in order to comply with
insurance prepayment mandates, pro-
viding a surge in money available for
pension aid, which is handled by the au-
ditor generals office.
But Auditor General Jack Wagner
warned the money should not be used
to plug gaps in general fund budgets or
to boost benefits.
I strongly caution against using this
additional one-time increase as justifi-
cation for providing increased pension
benefits to plan members, or for plan-
ningfuturebudgets, Wagner saidinthe
press release.
Many county municipalities have
been struggling to meet pension fund
obligations. ATimes Leader reviewlast
year found at least 44 pension funds
were dubbed distressed by the state,
Increase in state aid will offset pension fund obligations
Local municipalities receive boost
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See PENSION, Page 13A
When you come down to these ar-
eas andyouseehowhardtheywerehit,
you feel compelled to come down and
help, Miller said. With homes like
this and friends like Dave, theres no
way that we could just come once and
PLAINS TOWNSHIP Theyre in it
for the long haul.
Every weekend since the September
flood, and more often in the weeks im-
mediately following the deluge, Wilkes
Professor Andy Miller has led teams of
student, faculty and staff volunteers in
cleaning up the mess.
On Saturday, Miller was on the job
again, leading a team of 20 students in
scraping the muck from Dave Yudko-
witzs garage in Plainsville and pres-
sure washing Yudkowitzs belongings
in the snow and near freezing temper-
atures.
It may seemlike a sacrifice, but Mill-
er, a political science professor, said its
the least he and his fellow volunteers
can do.
leave. Were definitely driven to see it
through.
Saturday was the second time volun-
teers from Wilkes have helped clean at
Yudkowitzs house. Earlier in October
they spent two full days cleaning the
muck from his basement and ripping
out his first floor walls and floors.
Yudkowitz, whohadmajor heart sur-
gery in June and by doctors orders is
forbidden to lift anything weighing
more than 20 pounds, said he was al-
ready thankful beyond words for the
aidthevolunteers gaveinhelpingclean
his home and was bowled over again
when they returned Saturday.
I would never have been able to do
this without their help, never, Yudko-
witz said. If it wasnt for the professor
Overflowing help continues
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Bethany Gibson and Karryn Crisamore help with other Wilkes University students to clean up the flooded home of
Dave Yudkowitz under the watch of Wilkes Professor Andy Miller.
Wilkes students keep doing flood work
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
I would never have been
able to do this without their
help, never, Yudkowitz said.
If it wasnt for the profes-
sor and the students, I
wouldnt have been able to
do a thing.
Dave Yudkowitz
Plains Township
See FLOOD, Page 4A
PLAINS TWP. In spite of the snow
covering local roadways, the Luzerne
County SPCAsuccessfully held an open
house event entitled "Open Howl-Se"
marking Halloween on Saturday.
The facility was bustling with resi-
dents of the community, gathering to
celebrate the Halloween season with
complimentaryrefreshments andanop-
portunity to view the shelters adopt-
able animals.
The shelter, fully decorated for the
season, servedas a backdrop for the sea-
sonal festival. Vendors were on hand,
selling everything from collectibles to
candles. Proceeds from the sales of the
event benefited the shelter. All About
Singles, a local dating service, was also
present at the event to showsupport for
the organization and to offer informa-
tion about its own services.
Nick Deiss, an employee of the SPCA
and part of the kennel adoption staff,
said several pet adoptions took place
during the day, but the need to place
pets was an ongoing one.
"We are al-
most always
full," said
Deiss.
The SPCA
is a nonprofit
agency sup-
ported by area
residents con-
cerned for the
well being of
domestic ani-
mals.
An informa-
tional table
was available
to address
suchtopics as addingasecondpet tothe
family, introducing a pet to newborn,
and the benefits of animal adoption.
There was also information provided in
regard to upcoming benefits.
Cary Moran, director of education
and volunteering at the SPCA, was in-
SPCA open house is howling success
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Sandy Ansell of Hanover Township, right, and Raina Evancho of Laflin play
with Rose, an education dog, at the Luzerne County SPCA open house in
Plains Township on Saturday afternoon.
Animal shelter uses Halloween
theme to bring attention to need
for pets to be adopted.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
The next event spon-
sored by the SPCA will
be Tails at Twilight Gala
on Dec. 10. For more
information about this
event or on any aspect
of the SPCA, including
volunteering and fi-
nancial gifts, the public
may call 825-4111 or
access the website at
www.spcaluzernecoun-
ty.org/.
W H AT S N E X T ?
See SPCA, Page 13A
WILKES-BARRE If enthusiasm
could fix public educations woes, Beth
Anne Owens and Jennifer Thiemannn-
Welgosh would have already trans-
formed Wilkes-Barre
Area into a model dis-
trict.
During a recent par-
ent/teacher event at
Kistler Elementary,
the duo stood at the
door exuding opti-
mism and affability as
they stopped passing
adults to talk about a
newdistrict wellness
program and an up-
coming Harvest Fes-
tival.
Well have a turkey
dinner, free games,
free prizes, and free
snacks, Thiemann-
Welgosh told one man who nodded ap-
proval and said cool!
Everybody is going to get a little
pumpkin, Owens told a young girl who
beamed at the idea.
The two relatively new school psy-
chologists this is Owens second full
year on the job and the first for Thie-
mann-Welgosh are the drivingforce be-
hind a district program called
F.A.C.E.S. of Wilkes-Barre Area, short
for Family and Community Enrichment
Services. The goal is to expand and bet-
ter-integrate district efforts to deal with
mental health and wellness problems.
Meet the
two faces
behind
F.A.C.E.S.
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
adds Family and Community
Enrichment Services.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See FACES, Page 13A
Thiemann
-Welgosh
Owens
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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people who have time to be ad-
vocates or activists, Gillette
said. Most peoplewhentheyget
their trailer, theyre just so darn
grateful that the government is
helping themout, yousee a lot of
them who dont want to com-
plain.
I just hate to see another set
of disaster victims facing those
same issues. It seems to me that
theyve turned there backs on all
of the lessons of Katrina and Ri-
ta.
Formaldehyde hazards
Formaldehyde is an organic
material usedina wide variety of
products, including glues and
resins used in pressed wood, car-
petingandother home-construc-
tion materials. It is also found in
cigarette smoke and smog.
According to the CDC, inhal-
ing formaldehyde can cause irri-
tation of the eyes, nose, throat
and skin, sore throat, cough and
nosebleeds.
It is also a known carcinogen
that is particularly linked to nose
and throat cancer.FEMA spokes-
man Mike Sweet said the mobile
housing units arriving in North-
eastern Pennsylvania meet all
construction standards set by
the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development, and
that residents moving into trail-
ers should not worry about for-
maldehyde exposure.
All these housing units are
built to HUD standards and
these units are not being built
specifically for FEMA, Sweet
said. These are the same type of
mobile homes people buy na-
tionwide.
Sweet said he couldnt say
whether the trailers had been
testedfor formaldehyde, but that
they have ventilation units and
enough windows to maintain ad-
equate ventilation.
Gillette, however, claimed
that nothing in the U.S. Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban De-
velopments guidelines has
changed relative to formalde-
hydeandmobilehomes sincethe
CDCstudy, so it is likely that the
newtrailers contain just as much
formaldehyde as the old ones.
The HUDstandards were not
good enough in Katrina, and
they arent good enough now,
Gillette said. The government
has taken on the role of a land-
lord, and landlords are supposed
to provide safe housing.
She is offering to purchase for-
maldehyde test kits for FEMA
trailer residents willing to share
the results with Sierra Club, add-
ing that she is hoping to test at
least five trailers. Gillette can be
reached 479-253-6963 or
through her website, www.toxic-
trailers.com.
Gillette was one of the first to
bring the issue of formaldehyde
in the trailers to the govern-
ments attention.
Though she never lived in a
FEMA housing unit, Gillette
said her neighborhood in Ocean
Springs, Miss., was flooded in
Hurricane Katrina and people all
around her were living in the
trailers.
Issues in 2006
When some began complain-
ing about respiratory problems
andnosebleeds, she andthe Sier-
ra Club started testing the air
quality in trailers in 2006 and be-
gan finding elevated formalde-
hyde levels.
Alot of my friends, a lot of fel-
low Sierra Club members were
living in these trailers, Gillette
said. It was impossible toignore
the problem. For us anyway, it
was impossible.
The CDC responded by con-
ducting its own tests. In Decem-
ber 2007 and January 2008, the
CDC tested more than 500 trail-
ers provided by FEMA to resi-
dents of Louisiana andMississip-
pi who were displaced by hurri-
canes Katrina and Rita.
CDC found levels of formalde-
hyde that were higher than
would be expected inside most
homes in the United States, and
recommended FEMA move resi-
dents out of the trailers.
CDC found an average level of
77 parts per billion in the tested
units, andconcentrations as high
as 590parts per billion. Inall unit
types tested, which included
trailers, mobile homes and
smaller park units, formalde-
hyde concentrations above 100
parts per billion were identified.
Persons sensitive to formalde-
hyde may develop symptoms
when exposed to levels above
100 parts per billion.
CDC also predicted it likely
underestimated formaldehyde
levels because the tests were tak-
en in winter and in trailers that
were at least two years old. For-
maldehyde levels were likely
higher in newer trailers and in
warmer conditions.
Sweet said no travel trailers,
which showed the highest con-
centrations of formaldehyde in
the CDC study, are being sent to
Pennsylvania. Rather, FEMA is
bringing in mobile homes and
park units.
FEMA has approved tempora-
ry housing units for at least 488
Pennsylvania households in nine
counties, with 165 promised to
Luzerne County flood victims.
They began arriving at a staging
area in Plains Township about
two weeks ago.
Sweet said the housing units
are being provided as a tertiary
housing option for flood victims.
FEMA would like to see flood
victims remain in their homes
when it is safe to do so, or stay in
rental properties close to their
homes.
He said Luzerne County resi-
dents expressed an uncanny in-
terest in the trailers in the weeks
following the September flood;
an oddity, in his experience.
Family not concerned
One family living in a FEMA
park unit said they have had no
concerns about the potential
emissions. Beatrice and Stephen
Solovey of Plains Township
movedintoa FEMAtrailer sever-
al weeks ago after the single-sto-
ryhometheybuilt in1964was in-
undated in the flood. They said
they havent been bothered by
any smells or physical ailments
since moving in, and arent con-
cerned about formaldehyde.
Its a placetosleepanda place
to eat and a place to wash up,
Stephen Solovey said. What
more could you ask for?
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
FEMA trailers being stored at the former Sunshine Market along Route 315 in Plains Township.
TRAILERS
Continued from Page 1A
For flood victims living in or planning to move into mobile housing
units, the federal government recommends the following steps to
protect from formaldehyde exposure:
Open windows as much as possible to let in fresh air
Try to keep the temperature inside mobile homes at the lowest com-
fortable setting
Run the air conditioner or dehumidifier to control mold
Spend as much time outdoors in fresh air as possible. This is especial-
ly important for families with children, elderly people or those with
chronic diseases such as asthma.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
A D V I C E F O R M O B I L E H O M E R E S I D E N T S :
and the students, I wouldnt have
been able to do a thing.
Wilkes has beensendingvolun-
teers to help
victims each
weekend since
the September
flood, and uni-
versity Com-
munity Service
Director
Megan Boone
said more than
200 students,
faculty and
staff have
pitched in,
many more
than once.
Miller said
Wilkes has
made it easy to
get involved in
cleanup efforts.
We give them rides out here;
Wilkes has bought us supplies;
theyve created a really great at-
mosphere to make it easy for us
to come out and volunteer.
Student Randy Keiser of
Wilkes-Barre said Saturday was
theeighthor ninthdayhehas vol-
unteered at a cleanup event.
Its the greatest feeling when
people say thank you to you, he
said. A lot of people just want to
donate money, but money cant
do everything. You need to get
people out.
Bethany Gibson, a freshman
from Thompsontown, Juniata
County, said the cleanups have
provided a great hands-on learn-
ing experience.
I learn that if people actually
combine and take the time, its
amazing what you can do, she
said. Weve only been here a few
hours, and look what weve
done.
Miller said homeowners are
starting to get back on their feet
and his efforts are likely winding
down, but he and the other
Wilkes volunteers will be on the
job as long as theres a need.
Flood victims in need of help
cleaning up should contact their
municipal government offices,
whichcanput themintouchwith
Wilkes volunteers, Boone said.
FLOOD
Continued from Page 3A
A lot of
people just
want to
donate
money, but
money
cant do
everything.
You need
to get peo-
ple out.
Randy Keiser
Wilkes-Barre
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5A
PHILADELPHIA
Power out due to snow
The unusually early snowstorm
bringing heavy, wet snow to the East
Coast has knocked out power to nearly
580,000 customers.
Most are in Pennsylvania. Utilities
there say 428,000 customers have lost
power. PPL spokeswoman Lissette
Santana says 200 crews were working
to restore it and would be joined by 30
more crews from Kentucky and stand-
by contractors if needed. The utility
serves customers in northeast and
central Pennsylvania.
More than 160,000 customers lost
power in Philadelphia and its suburbs
Saturday afternoon.
In Connecticut, utilities reported
more than 125,000 without service.
In New York, sporadic power outages
are centered near Poughkeepsie and
Newburgh. Scattered outages have
been reported in New Jersey.
And spokesman Todd Meyers says
Potomac Edison, the dominant utility
in western Maryland, had more than
26,000 outages.
WASHINGTON
Obama cites income report
President Barack Obama is banking
on a new report detailing the income
disparity in the country as further
evidence of the need for his $447 bil-
lion jobs bill.
A report this past week by the Con-
gressional Budget Office found that
average after-tax income for the top 1
percent of U.S. households had in-
creased by 275 percent over the past
three decades. Middle-income house-
holds saw just a 40 percent rise. For
those at the bottom of the economic
scale, the jump was 18 percent.
Obama said in his weekly radio and
Internet address Saturday that he
would pay for his jobs plan with an
added tax on people who make at least
$1 million a year.
JERUSALEM
Attack kills 7 militants
Israeli aircraft struck at Palestinian
militants on Saturday who responded
with a volley of rockets which rained
on southern Israeli towns, Israeli and
Palestinian officials said. Palestinian
officials said that seven militants were
killed while the Israelis reported sever-
al civilians injured.
Exchanges of fire are common be-
tween southern Israel and the Gaza
strip controlled by the militant Hamas
group, but this is the worst one in
months.
Gaza Health Ministry spokesman
Adham Abu Salmia said that seven
people were killed and 15 injured in
two separate attacks on militant tar-
gets.
An Israeli military spokesman con-
firmed both strikes.
SAN FRANCISCO
Society opposes legal pot
A medical society for addiction doc-
tors has reiterated its opposition to
marijuana legalization as its California
chapter considers voicing its support
for allowing and regulating adult use of
the drug as a way to prevent its abuse
by adolescents.
Directors of the American Society for
Addiction Medicine meeting in Wash-
ington are scheduled on Sunday to
discuss a report from three of its top
California members that recommends
replacing the states besieged medical
marijuana program with a system that
treats and taxes pot like alcohol.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Massacred villagers finally laid to rest
Relatives watch as a forensic anthro-
pologist, not pictured, places the skel-
etal remains of Juan Bartolo Pedro
into a coffin Thursday in Guatemala.
Pedro is one of nine villagers mas-
sacred by guerrillas for collaborating
with the Guatemalan Army in 1982. A
forensics organization exhumed the
bodies in 2005 and stored them until
donors provided money for coffins
and a burial ceremony, held Friday.
GORNJA MAOCA, Bosnia-Herzego-
vina Special police units raided
homes Saturday in a Bosnian village
linked to the gunman who fired an au-
tomatic weapon at the U.S. Embassy in
Sarajevo in what authorities called a
terrorist attack. The raids came as 17
suspected associates of the shooter, all
said to be members of the ultracon-
servative Wahhabi Muslim sect, were
briefly detained in Serbia.
A convoy of police vehicles entered
the isolated northern village of Gornja
Maoca, known to be inhabited by
many Wahhabis, and officers wearing
black masks and camouflage uniforms
surrounded several houses, according
to an Associated Press video. The re-
porter saw the security forces enter
some homes before officers asked him
to leave.
The gunman, identified by police as
23-year-old Mevlid Jasarevic, is ac-
cused of shooting at the embassy
building in Sarajevo for at least 30 min-
utes Friday, wounding a policeman
guarding the facility, before a police
sniper immobilized him with a shot in
his leg.
An amateur video obtained by the
AP shows what appears to be Jasarevic
roaming a deserted intersection, wav-
ing his gun and occasionally turning
toward the embassy building, shooting
at the fence and facade. Another video
caught him dropping on the ground
after the sniper shot him.
Jasarevic is believed to be a follower
of the Wahhabi sect, and police said he
visited Gornja Maoca several times
this and last year. Both the gunman
and the police officer were hospitalized
and their wounds werent considered
to be life-threatening, authorities said.
Bosnian and Serbian police have co-
ordinated the response to the embassy
attack, and the raids in Bosnia on Sat-
urday were part of a joint operation.
The village appeared blocked with po-
lice setting up checkpoints, stopping
cars and searching them.
Police were searching several loca-
tions in Bosnia and questioning peo-
ple, State Prosecutor Dubravko Cam-
para said.
We are cooperating with colleagues
in Serbia, working with them and the
U.S. Embassy, he said.
In Serbia, police said in a statement
that as part of the detentions of sus-
pects, some 18 houses were searched
and computers and mobile phones con-
fiscated. The 17 people held were later
released after questioning, police said.
Bosnian homes raided after attack
Police search homes after gunman
fires automatic weapon at U.S.
Embassy in Sarajevo.
By ALMIR ALIC and AIDA CERKEZ
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Occupy
Nashville protesters said Satur-
day that they plan to continue
challenging a newcurfewusedto
disband their encampment, de-
spite two nights of arrests.
Tennessee state troopers ar-
rested 26 people on Friday night,
less than 24 hours after a pre-
dawn raid where 29 were arrest-
ed. Inbothcases, thenight magis-
trate refused to
jail the protes-
ters.
The arrests
came after Re-
publican Gov.
Bill Haslams
administration
on Thursday
announced it
had created a
10 p.m. curfew
and posted no-
ticesat theLeg-
islative Plaza, near the Capitol.
About 150 Occupy Nashville
protesters gatheredfor a meeting
Saturday, and several said they
would again challenge the cur-
few.
One posted new signs next to
those announcing the curfew.
The text was fromArticle1of the
Tennessee Constitution, includ-
ing the right to assemble.
The Tennesseannewspaper re-
ported early Saturday morning
(http://tnne.ws/vE2PXN) that
Magistrate Tom Nelson told
troopers deliveringtheprotesters
to jail that he could find no au-
thority anywhere for anyone to
authorize a curfew anywhere on
Legislative Plaza.
All 26 people arrested Friday
night werechargedwithtrespass-
ing; two were also charged with
public intoxication; and one was
alsochargedwithcriminal imper-
sonation, Department of Safety
spokeswoman Jennifer Donnals
said. The judicial commissioner
refused to issue warrants for any
of the charges.
Officials said 72 troopers were
involved in the curfew enforce-
ment.
The arrests came after a week
of police crackdowns around the
countryonOccupyWall Street ac-
tivists, who have been protesting
economic inequality and what
they call corporate greed.
Tennessee
protesters
challenge
curfew
State police arrested
challengers, but magistrate
refused to jail them.
BANGKOK Defenses shielding the
center of Thailands capital from the na-
tions worst floods innearly 60 years most-
ly held at critical peak tides Saturday, as
the waters began to recede after killing al-
most 400 people. But the threat to central
Bangkok was not over, the prime minister
said, and the citys northern districts re-
mainedsubmergedalongwithmuchof the
countryside.
Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra
urged citizens to let the crisis run its
course as the floodwaters slowly drain to
the sea, with Bangkok lying in their path.
The floods that have besieged central
Thailand for weeks submerged entire
towns across the countrys heartland and
shuttered hundreds of factories over the
last two months.
We have the good news that the situa-
tion in the central region has improved as
runoff water gradually decreased, she
said. I thank people and urge them to be
morepatient incasethis weekendis signif-
icant because of the high tide.
Bangkok residents watched the citys
dikes and sandbag barriers warily as the
high tide pushing up the Chao Phraya Riv-
er fromthe Gulf of ThailandpeakedSatur-
day morning. It had been described as the
greatest test of the capitals flood defenses
sincethenortherndelugefirst approached
Bangkok more than three weeks ago.
While some water doused streets and
shops alongthe river, the tides fell short of
forecast highs and there was no major
breach. Higher than usual tides will con-
tinue through Monday, but are predicted
to be lower than Saturdays.
City official Adisak Kantee said the
citys concrete barriers are efficiently pro-
tecting Bangkok from deluge, though he
said smaller, private dikes might yet fail.
The situation is so far under control,
he said.
AP PHOTO
People wade through flood waters in Bangkok, Thailand, Saturday. The network of flood defenses erected to shield Thai-
lands capital from the countrys worst floods in nearly 60 years was tested Saturday as coastal high tides hit their peak.
Bangkok flood defenses holding off tides
Waters recede in Thailands capital,
but threat to central Bangkok not
over yet. Some areas still submerged.
By TODD PITMAN and
THANYARAT DOKSONE
Associated Press
CANBERRA, Australia Qantas Air-
ways grounded its global fleet Saturday,
suddenly locking out striking workers
after weeks of flight disruptions an ex-
ecutive said could close down the
worlds 10th largest airline piece by
piece.
The Australian government called for
an emergency arbitration hearing,
which was adjourned early Sunday
morning after hearing evidence from
the unions and airline. It will resume
Sunday afternoon when the govern-
ment will argue that the airline be or-
dered to fly in Australias economic in-
terests.
Planes in the air continued to their
destinations, and at least one taxiing
flight stopped on the runway, a flier
said. Among the stranded passengers
are 17 world leaders attending a Com-
monwealth summit in the western city
of Perth.
When the grounding was announced,
36 international and 28 domestic Aus-
tralian flights were in the air, said a
Qantas spokeswoman, who declined to
be named citing company policy.
Qantas said 108 airplanes were being
grounded but did not say how many
flights were involved. The spokeswo-
man could not confirm an Australian
Broadcasting Corp. television report
that 13,305 passengers were booked to
fly Qantas international flights within
24 hours of the grounding.
The lockout was expected to have
little impact in the United States. Only
about 1,000 people fly daily between
the United States and Australia, said
aviation consultant Michael Boyd. Its
not a big deal, he said. Qantas is not
a huge player here.
Qantas Airways grounds global fleet due to strikes
By ROD McGUIRK
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Don, left, and
Derry Duns-
more, of Mine
Hill, N.J., wait
at the Qantas
counter as
they try to
reschedule
their canceled
flight to Syd-
ney at Los
Angeles In-
ternational
Airport in Los
Angeles, Sat-
urday.
N A T I O N & W O R L D
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The arrests
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PAGE 6A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 7A
O B I T U A R I E S
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have a 27-line limit, and paid
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Wednesday
November 2, 2011
Mass 10:00 A.M.
Happy 12th Wedding
Anniversary In Heaven
Sadly missed and loved,
Wife Joanne
Everything comes and
goes each night
I am alone,
I cant seem to think clearly.
I am left here on my own.
I walk down the crowded avenue,
people all around.
Something is not here that I miss
I look inside myself,
there is only emptiness.
Or I can walk alone on a
lonely road,
No one here by my side.
I could probably make it through.
I have everything I need to get by.
Except, the one thing
missing in my life
Is You.
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Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
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BIENKOWSKI Thomas, funeral
9:30 a.m. Monday in the Kearney
Funeral Home Inc., 173 E. Green St.,
Nanticoke. Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Church,
Nanticoke. Friends may call 6 to 8
p.m. today.
CICCONI Roger, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 South Main Street
Plains Township. Friends may call 2
to 4 p.m. today.
CRAGLE Mark, funeral 11 a.m. Sat-
urday in the Clarke Piatt Funeral
Home Inc., 5 Sunset Lake Road,
Hunlock Creek. Friends may call
Friday, 6 to 8 p.m. and 9 to 11 a.m.
on the day of the funeral.
DANIELS Alice, funeral 10 a.m.
Monday in the Curtis L. Swanson
Funeral Home Inc., corner of
routes 29 &118, Pikes Creek.
Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today.
DERR Jeanette, services 2 p.m.
Tuesday in the Heller Funeral
Home, Nescopeck. Friends may call
5 to 9 p.m. Monday.
KAMINSKI Thomas, funeral 10:30
a.m. Monday in the Charles V.
Sherbin Funeral Home, 630 Main
Road, Hanover Green, Hanover
Township. Mass of Christian Burial
at 11 a.m. in the Exaltation of the
Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood.
Military Services before interment
in St. Marys Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call 9 a.m.
to 10 a.m. Monday at the funeral
home.
LAMBERTI Madeline, funeral 9:15
a.m. Monday in the Jacob Davis
Funeral Home, 422 S. Main St.,
Taylor. Mass of Christian Burial at
10 a.m. at Prince of Peace Parish,
Old Forge. Friends may call 2 to 4
and 6 to 8 p.m. today.
NEARY Mary Ann, friends and
family are invited to share in a
time of remembrance 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. Monday at the Hunlock Creek
Fire Hall, 1114 Main Road, Hunlock
Creek.
POLAK Dolores, funeral services 9
a.m. Monday in Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Duryea. Friends may call 5
to 8 p.m. today.
REH John Sr., cremation funeral
Mass 10 a.m. Monday in Annuncia-
tion Church, 26 N. 3rd St., McSher-
rystown. Friends may call 4 to 6
p.m. today at Murphy Funeral
Home, 501 Ridge Ave., McSherrys-
town, with a prayer service at 6
p.m.
SAKSA-SCHINGLER Shawna,
memorial service to celebrate her
life, 10 a.m. November 6 at Calvary
Chapel, 2591 SR 903, Albrightsville,
Pa.
SLEBODA Eleanor, funeral 9:30
a.m. Monday in the Harman Funer-
al Homes and Crematory, Inc.
(East), 669 W. Butler Drive, Drums.
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. John Bosco R.C. Church,
Conyngham. Friends may call at
the funeral home 6 to 8 p.m.
today.
TEDESCO Josephine, funeral 9
a.m. Monday from the funeral
home at 251 William Street, Pitt-
ston. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church, Pittston. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today.
UREN Cecelia, memorial service 1
p.m. Tuesday in the Chapel at St.
Marys Cemetery, Hanover Town-
ship.
VETTER William J., friends may call
2 to 4 p.m. today at the Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc., 140 N.
Main Street, Shavertown. Private
graveside services Monday in Oak
Lawn Cemetery, Hanover Town-
ship.
FUNERALS
ANTHONY J. BALDRICA, age
78, of Shelby Township, Mich.,
passed away October 28, 2011. He
was the beloved husband of Kaye.
He was predeceased by son Mi-
chael. Hewas thedear father of De-
bra Chene, Robert (Sheila), De-
nise (Bruce) Leach, Anthony III
(Joyce), Dawn Davis and Dominic
(Carla); loving grandfather of 18
grandchildren and 15 great-grand-
children; brother of Francis (Lin-
da).
Visitation is today from1 to 8
p.m. at the WilliamSullivan &Son
Funeral Home, 8459 Hall Rd. (3
blocks east of Van Dyke) Utica,
N.Y. Funeral service is Monday at 1
p.m. at the funeral home. Share a
memory at www.sullivanfuneral-
directors.com.
ESTHER M. CARUTHERS, of
Plains Township, passed away on
Saturday October 29, 2011, in the
ManorCare Health Services, King-
ston. Her devoted husband of 24
years, Henry W. Caruthers, was be-
side her at this time.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Simon S. Russin
Funeral Home, Plains, Pa.
KATHLEENANNMEEHAN, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away Friday,
October 28, 2011, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre.
CHERYL MILLER, of Swoyers-
ville, died Wednesday, October 26,
2011, at her home. She was born in
Laredo, Texas, on August 3, 1944.
Cheryl is survived by her daughter
Gwendolyn Miller and grandchild
Deidria Miller; a son Robert Mill-
er; his wife and children of Colora-
do.
Private funeral will be held at
the convenience of the family.
There will be no calling hours. Ar-
rangements have been entrusted
to the Lehman-Gregory Funeral
Home Inc., 281 Chapel St.,
Swoyersville. Memorial contribu-
tions can be made to the American
Cancer Society.
MARY R. PELLO, 101, of West
Pittston, passedaway peacefully at
home surrounded by her family on
Saturday, October 29, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pendingfromthe Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home.
M
ark A. Cragle, 52, of Upper As-
kam, unexpectedly went home
to be with his Lord Wednesday, Oc-
tober 12, 2011, while on a missions
trip in France.
He was born November 2, 1958,
in Nanticoke, a son of the late Ar-
thur H. and Doris Ryman Cragle.
His belovedwife, the former Deb-
orah Lane Ebert, preceded him in
death by 20 years and he continued
to miss her everyday. He was also
preceded in death by a brother Al-
len.
He is survived by his only son Ke-
vin Cragle, Askam; sisters, Eileen
Lewis, Shickshinny; Diane Belin-
sky, Shickshinny; Darlene Cragle,
Sweet Valley; nieces and nephews,
Preston Lewis, Heather Carr, Shan-
nonLewis andApril Belinsky; great-
nieces and great-nephews, Preston
Lewis II, Glenn Carr Jr., Zachary
Carr and Alicia Carr; as well as
aunts, Amber Goodbred, Mayo,
Fla.; Rita Wenner, Wapwallopen,
and Evelyn Smith, Pond Hill.
He attended Reyburn Bible
Church, Shickshinny, for many
years and enjoyed involvement at
other churches as well.
Mark graduated from Northwest
Area High School, class of 1977, and
was affectionately nicknamed
Doc by his classmates. He served
as manager of the boys basketball
team throughout his high school
years andhadfundoing so. He grad-
uated fromPenn State University in
1995 with a bachelors degree in bio-
medical engineering. As a self-em-
ployed HVAC specialist, he always
had time to help anyone in need and
had a true servants heart.
Mark was passionate for the Lord
and in 2001 he took his first mis-
sions trip to France to assist Word
of Life (WOL) in the remodeling of
several buildings at their youth
camp and retreat center. What he
thought would be a once in a life-
time trip became his mission for
the next10years. He fell inlove with
this ministry and with what God
was going around the world. His in-
volvement with WOL and with
Good News Mission Teamtook him
not only toFrance but tothe Domin-
ican Republic, Costa Rica, South
Korea and other locations as well.
He became a Missionary Plumber
and used his abilities behind the
scenes tomake aneternal difference
in the lives of so many.
He was on his 25th missions trip
at the time of his passing and en-
joyed celebrating the10th year anni-
versary of his first trip with the
WOL staff on Oct. 8. He was doing
what he loved to do.
Marks life was centered on lov-
ing God and serving others. He was
on a mission to spread the gospel
and to give of himself for others. He
lived according to his favorite
quote: There is but one life to live,
only whats done for Christ will
last. He will be greatly missed by
his family and friends who have
been touched by his example.
Funeral services will be held at
11 a.m. on Saturday, November 5,
2011, from the Clarke Piatt Funeral
Home Inc., 5 Sunset Lake Road,
Hunlock Creek, with the Rev. C.
Glenn Neely officiating. Family and
friends may call at the funeral home
on Friday, November 4, 2011, from6
to8p.m. andfrom9to11a.m. onthe
day of the funeral.
Interment will be in Sorber Cem-
etery, Trailing Pine Road, Shick-
shinny.
Memorial donations in Marks
name may be made to the Word of
Life France, P.O. Box 600, Schroon
Lake, N.Y. 12870, or the Reyburn Bi-
ble Church, c/o Mary Jo Belles, 109
Reyburn Road, Shickshinny, PA
18655.
Mark A. Cragle
October 12, 2011
M
r. Andrew Mishkin, 88, a res-
ident of the East End section
of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
peacefully Thursday evening at
his residence in the presence of
his loved ones following a brief
illness.
His two month illness took
him to the Department of Veter-
ans Affairs Medical Center, Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center and the Timber Ridge
Health Care Center, all of Plains
Township, prior to his passing.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre,
on January 25, 1923 to the late
Nicholas and Anna (Handza)
Mishkin.
He was educated in the city
schools, and was a member of
Saint Matthew Evangelical Luth-
eran Church, North Wilkes-
Barre.
A veteran of the Second World
War, Mr. Mishkin proudly served
our country in the Army Air
Corps as an airborne paratroop-
er.
Until his retirement, he was
employed in the local manufac-
turing and construction indus-
tries, working with the former
Shelborne Electronics Corpora-
tion, Sordoni Construction Com-
pany, Kanaar Corporation of
Kingston and the Chamberlain
Corporation in Scranton, where
he manufactured shells for the
United States Army.
He is remembered by family
and friends as being an avid hun-
ter, reader and prolific speaker,
and was an expert marksman.
His talents accumulated him
many trophies and awards as a
Marksman First Class, and previ-
ously taught the Wilkes-Barre
City Police Department the art
of sharpshooting. He also pro-
duced and distributed bullets to
several police officers and local
departments. In addition, he
helped build and operate several
local shooting ranges. He was a
proud member of the National
Rifle Association.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by sisters
Mrs. Betty Hargraves and Ms.
Ruth Mishkin Handza.
Surviving are his niece, Pastor
Deborah Ann Hargraves of Bear
Creek Township; brother-in-law,
Mr. Franklin C. Hargraves Jr., al-
so of Bear Creek Township; his
caregiver for the past 10 years,
Mrs. Linda Carr of West Wyom-
ing, several cousins.
Funeral services for Mr.
Mishkin will be conducted
on Tuesday at 2 p.m. from the
John V. Morris Funeral Home,
625 North Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, followed by services at
2:30 p.m. in Saint Matthew Evan-
gelical Lutheran Church parlors
with the Reverend Gary John
Scharrer, his pastor, officiating.
Interment will be private and
at the convenience of his family
in Maple Hill Cemetery, Hanov-
er Township.
Relatives and friends may join
his family for visitation and re-
membrances Tuesday from noon
until the time of services.
In lieu of floral tributes, me-
morial contributions may be
made in Mr. Mishkins name to
Saint Matthew Evangelical Luth-
eran Church, 663 North Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705
or to Hospice Community Care,
601 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston,
PA 18704.
To send his family online
words of comfort, please visit
our website at www.JohnVMor-
risFuneralHomes.com.
Andrew Mishkin
October 27, 2011
CLIFFORD STERLING HART-
MANJR., 64, of East Ridge Street,
Nanticoke, and formerly of Bing-
hamton, NY, diedOctober 22, 2011
at Guardian Elder Care Center,
Sheatown. Clifford was born in
Binghamton, N.Y., on October 3,
1947. He was the son of the late
Clifford S. and Elizabeth (Wood-
row) Sr. Clifford was preceded in
death by a sister, Dorothy Hart-
man. Surviving are his children,
Stephanie Hayes, Ithaca, NY.; Brad
Hartman and his fiance, Stacey,
Nanticoke; Clifford Hartman III
and his wife, Nicole, Lakeland,
Fla.; eight grandchildren; sisters,
Melva Preston, Florida; Althea Ha-
lan, Connecticut; and numerous
nieces and nephews also survive.
Private funeral services were
held fromthe George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 North Main
Street, Ashley.
B
arbara J. Mihalchik, of Carey
Street, Ashley, passed away
earlySaturdaymorningat St. Lukes
Villa, Heritage House, Wilkes-
Barre, surroundedbyher familyand
loved ones.
Barbara was born in Paterson,
N.J., on June 16, 1949. She was the
daughter of the late Ted and Meta
(Springman) Volinski.
Barbara was a graduate of Hanov-
er Area High School, Class of 1967,
where she was also a cheerleader.
She also graduated from Wilkes-
Barre Area Vocational Technical
School with perfect attendance as a
Licensed Practical Nurse and was
employed at many nursing homes
throughout the Wyoming Valley,
most recentlyat GoldenLivingCen-
ter-Summit in Wilkes-Barre.
Barbara was a member of St.
Leos/Holy Rosary Church in Ash-
ley. She was also a member of the
Ashley American Legion Post 673
Ladies Auxiliary and the Associ-
ation of the Miraculous Medal.
Barbara was precededindeathby
an infant daughter, Carey Ann and
brother, Tommy Volinski.
Surviving are her husband of 40
years of marriage, John W. Mihal-
chik Sr., at home; daughter, Holly
Milhalchik Greene, Charlotte, N.C.;
sons, John W. Mihalchik Jr., Wilkes-
Barre; Adam Mihalchik, Hanover
Township; granddaughters, Meta
Mihalchik, Chloe Green and Olivia
Marie Mihalchik; grandsons, Max-
well Greene andJackMihalchik; sis-
ter, Laurie Volinski Stoodley; broth-
ers, Mark and Teddy Volinski, and
several nieces and nephews as well
as several grand nieces and grand
nephews also survive.
Barbara was an avid music lover.
She was responsible for introducing
her children to some of the most in-
fluential music of her time. With
vigor, she encouraged artistic ex-
pression.
Barbara never missed a family
function or special occasion. You
could always expect a card, gift and
her attendance at anyandall events.
She had a unique ability to connect
with young people from the cradle
on up. She was an excellent listener
and very easy to relate to and con-
fide in. She has probably taken
many secrets with her.
Barbara had a very dry sense of
humor and she and her husband
drove each other crazy for 40 years,
but when things were tough and the
chips were down, they always
formed an impenetrable bond. She
lived for her children and grandchil-
dren and will be missed with an ir-
replaceable void.
Funeral services for Barbara
will be held on Tuesday at 9 a.m.
from the George A. Strish Inc. Fu-
neral Home, 105 North Main Street,
Ashley, with a Liturgy of the Word
Service at 9:30 a.m. in St. Leos/Ho-
ly Rosary Church, Manhattan
Street, Ashley, with the Rev. Tho-
mas OMalley officiating. Interment
will be held in St. Marys Cemetery,
Hanover Township. Family and
friends may call on Monday from 5
to 8 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
her memory may be made to any of
the following; St. Leos Holy/Ros-
ary Church, 33 Manhattan Street,
Ashley, PA 18706; Medical Oncolo-
gy Prescription Fund, 382 Pierce
Street, Kingston, PA18704; Hospice
Care of the VNA, St. Lukes Villa, 80
East Northampton Street, Wilkes-
Barre PA 18701. Or simply take a
loved one out to dinner in her mem-
ory.
Barbara J. Mihalchik
October 29, 2011
THERESA TIMEK HOLTZ-
MAN, of Wyoming, passed away
Saturday, October 29, 2011, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Kizis-Lokuta Fu-
neral Home, 134 Church St., Pitt-
ston.
J
ohn Volanski Sr., 89, a resident
of Bonham Nursing Center,
Stillwater, passed away October
29, 2011.
Born April 29, 1922, in Fair-
mount Township, he was a son of
the late Michael and Anna Spess
Volanski. John was employed as a
custodian at Danville State Hospi-
tal for many years.
He was preceded in death by his
son, John Volanski Jr.; sisters, Ma-
ry and Ann Volanski; brothers, An-
drew, Frank, Michael, Nicholas
and Joseph.
Surviving are his daughters, An-
na M. Oman and her husband,
Robert, Huntington Mills; Doris
K. Davis and her husband, Elmer,
Shickshinny; grandchildren, Lisa
Majewski, Allen Moss Jr., Shawn
Davis, Shannon Davis, Tosha
Brower and Nicholas Volanski;
great-grandchildren, Jessica Da-
vis, Tyler Davis, Bobby Neishman,
Giana Neishman, Sasha Brower,
LoganBrower andDakota Brower;
sister Irene Gashi, Bloomingdale.
Funeral services will be held
on Tuesday, November 1, 2011, at
11a.m. fromtheClarkePiatt Funer-
al Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake Road,
Hunlock Creek, with Pastor Gail
Kitchen officiating. Friends may
call on Tuesday at 10 a.m. until the
timeof serviceat11a.m. Interment
will be in Fairmount Springs Cem-
etery.
Memorial donations may be
made to the Fairmount United
Methodist Church, 17 Old County
Road, Benton, PA 17814, or Bon-
ham Nursing Center, 477 Bonnie-
ville Road, Stillwater, PA17878.
John Volanski Sr.
October 29, 2011
JENKINS TWP. A blast
of explosives echoed through
the Wyoming Valley Saturday
morning as crews took down
a metal smokestack at the
former Techneglas plant.
A Jenkins Township Hose
Company spokesman said the
demolition, which took place
at approximately 8:30 a.m.,
was planned and that police,
fire and medical crews were
on scene at the time.
The blast could be heard as
far away as Wilkes-Barre and
prompted several calls to 911,
a 911 supervisor said.
There were no injuries or
other emergencies reported.
The former factory manu-
factured conventional televi-
sion screens prior to its clos-
ing in 2004.
HANOVER TWP. Police
Saturday reported Frederick
Lewis, 45, of Boland Avenue,
will be issued a traffic cita-
tion after he crashed his
Chevrolet Malibu on West
End Road around 2 a.m. He
was traveling over the Carey
Bridge toward Hanover
Township and began skid-
ding. His car jumped the
median, knocked down two
signs, went up on the side-
walk, struck a tree and con-
tinued into a yard where it
rolled over. The accident
scene stretched 334 feet from
the beginning of the skid
marks to where the car came
to rest at the intersection of
West End and Goeringer
Avenue. Lewis declined med-
ical treatment and his car
was towed from the scene.
WEST HAZLETON Vicki
Esbensen, 57, of West Hazle-
ton reported someone had
entered her Ford Explorer
while it was parked in a lot
on Branch Court across from
her residence around 6:45
a.m. Saturday. Esbensen said
she yelled at the person who
fled the area.
DORRANCE TWP. Jef-
frey Eric Rinehimer, of Wap-
wallopen, reported an un-
known person entered a resi-
dence on Hollow Road and
stole items on Wednesday,
state police at Hazleton said.
HAZLE TWP. State po-
lice at Hazleton said they
cited Dianne Lynn Lutz, 42,
of Lehighton, with retail theft
after she allegedly stole $494
in merchandise from Boscovs
Department Store, Laurel
Mall, on Wednesday.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
Dorothy Wilcox, 66, of
Kidder Street reported Friday
checks from her bank ac-
count were cashed without
her authorization.
Roberto Sosa, 42, of
North Washington Street
reported Friday a window at
his residence was damaged
by a BB.
POLICE BLOTTER
SARASOTA, Fla. Lego man
is going to stay in police custody
for three months.
Lego man, a 100-pound, 8-foot-
tall sculpture, didnt do anything
wrong except wash up on a Flor-
ida beach. Sarasota County Sher-
iff Tom Knight says his office
will hold the fiberglass sculpture
for 90 days just like all other lost
and found property.
During that time, authorities
will try to determine who the
owner is.
The Sarasota Herald-Tribune
reported that the local tourism
bureau had hoped to use the Le-
go man to promote the area, but
the sheriff says it needs to re-
main in police custody a little
longer.
The sculpture mysteriously
appeared on a Siesta Key beach
Tuesday.
A Legoland recently opened in
Winter Haven, which is about 70
miles northwest of Siesta Key.
Police keeping Lego man
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
We Will Pay Top Dollar For The Following:
We Will Pay Top Dollar For The Following:
We Buy Broken & Unworn Gold 10K,
14K, 18K, 22K and Platinum Jewelry
Used New/Mint
Indian heads, Coronets, Liberties, Eagles, St. Guadens -- WE BUY THEM ALL!
ALL COMMEMORATIVE
COINS, ROLLS, SETS,
CERTIFIED & PROOFS
(1964 & Earlier)
WILL PAY
UP TO
2200%
OF FACE
VALUE
Dimes
Half Dollars
Quarters
Silver Eagles
Ingots
SILVER COINS
999 & 925
Silver Bars
& Ingots
Wheat & Indian
Pennies
1749-1803 ...................................................................... up to
$
50,000
1836-1839 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
1840-1873 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
Trade dollars ................................................................ up to
$
2,500
1878-1904 ...................................................................... up to
$
12,500
1921-1935 ...................................................................... up to
$
5,000
" Half CT Diamond-Up to $1K
" 1 CT Diamond-Up to $6K
" 2 CT Diamond-Up to $20K
" 3 CT Diamond-Up to $35K
" 5 CT Diamond-Up to $150K
We have a great demand RIGHT NOW for diamonds of all sizes, and
especially for diamonds of five carats or more. We buy old mine cut
or European cut stones. Due to large contracts, our buying power is
stronger now than ever before! We will buy your diamonds with or
without a G.I.A. Certificate. Your diamonds can be mounted in gold
or platinum. We also buy old mountings that have had the stones
removed.
We buy diamonds: All sizes and shapes, loose or mounted, with or without a GIA certicate
PARTIAL CHECKLIST OF ITEMS WE BUY!
TAKE A FEW MOMENTS TO CHECK OFF THE ITEMS YOU HAVE THAT OUR BUYERS NEED...
JEWELRY COINS & PAPER MONEY
~ Silver dollars
~ Silver coins (pre 1964)
~ Silver bars
~ U.S. Gold coins
~ Foreign coins
~ Gold bullion coins
~ Proof sets
~ Mint sets
~ Coin collections small or large
~ Indian head pennies
~ Trade dollars
~ All silver & gold coin
~ Wheat pennies
~ Buffalo nickels
~ All older coins
~ Certified graded coins
~ All Paper money (1860-1957)
~ Confederate paper money
~ Wrist watches
~ Pocket watches
~ Dental gold
~ Class rings (gold)
~ Gold rings
~ Rolex & Patek Philippe
~ Vintage gold-filled jewelry
~ Gold Pins
~ Filigree rings
~ Silver jewelry
~ Flatware sets
~ Single flatware items
~ Tea sets
~ Antique items all kinds
~ Franklin Mint
~ Danbury Mint
~ Trophies
~ Pitchers
~ Scrap
~ Medallions
For Questions Call 1-888-GOLD-031
Ara Cash For Gold " 243 Route 70 East, Cherry Hill NJ 08034
10K, 14K, 18K, 22K, 24K
Scrap Gold...............................up to...
$
1,000
Pendants...................................up to...
$
1,500
Watch Cases ............................up to...
$
600
Chains & Necklaces ................up to...
$
5,500
Charm Bracelets......................up to...
$
3,000
Class Rings...............................up to...
$
1,500
Wedding Bands .......................up to...
$
600
Other Rings..............................up to...
$
400
U.S. SINGLE COINS OR COMPLETE SETS
up to...............
$
2,000
up to...............
$
3,000
up to...............
$
3,000
up to...............
$
2,000
up to..................
$
600
up to..................
$
400
up to..................
$
550
up to..................
$
550
up to...............
$
2,500
up to.............
$
21,000
up to.............
$
12,000
up to.............
$
12,000
up to...............
$
8,000
up to.............
$
10,500
up to...............
$
4,500
up to.............
$
12,000
up to...............
$
9,000
up to.............
$
50,000
up to...............
$
9,500
Silver halves - 1934 & older ...............
Silver quarters - 1932 & older ...........
Silver dimes - 1934 & older................
Half dimes - 1873 & older ..................
Nickels - 1938 & older.........................
Three cent pieces - 1889 & older .......
Two cent pieces - 1873 & older ..........
Indian head 1 cents - 1909 & older....
Large cents - 1857 and older..............
Half cents - 1857 and older.................
Standing Liberty 25 cents...................
Walking Liberty 50 cents
Flying Eagles/ Indian Cents
Barber dimes .......................................
Lincoln cents........................................
Buffalo nickels .....................................
Mercury dimes ....................................
Morgan dollars....................................
Peace dollars........................................
GOLD U.S. & FOREIGN COINS
Gold Bullion........................... Price based on market value
Krugerrands .......................... Price based on market value
U.S. Eagles ............................. Price based on market value
Canadian Maple Leafs.......... Price based on market value
Mexican 50 Pesos................... Price based on market value
Chinese Pandas...................... Price based on market value
$
1.00 1849-1889.....up to.....
$
2.50 1796-1834.....up to.....
$
3.00 1854-1899.....up to.....
$
5.00 1795-1804.....up to.....
$
10.00 1795-1804...up to.....
$
20.00 1850-1933...up to.....
$
50.00 1915 Pan-Pac up to..
$
1,200.......................
$
10,500
$
5,000.......................
$
17,000
$
2,500.......................
$
10,000
$
10,000...................... 50,000
$
10,500...................... 50,000
$
12,000.....................
$
50,000
$
11,000...................... 50,000
1958 & Older
Pay 20% & up over face
value
All kinds, all eras, all conditions: Up to:
Cameos.................................................................................................................
$
600
Brooches...............................................................................................................
$
600
Necklaces...........................................................................................................
$
7,000
Charm Bracelets...............................................................................................
$
5,500
Pendants..........................................................................................................
$
14,000
Victorian .........................................................................................................
$
12,000
Earings ..............................................................................................................
$
8,000
Bracelets..........................................................................................................
$
10,000
Cocktail Rings ................................................................................................
$
12,000
925 STERLING & SILVER
~ Cameos
~ Charm bracelets
~ Pendants
~ Omega & Cartier
~ Hat Pins
~ Marcasite Items
~ Earrings
~ Necklaces
~ Cuff Links 14kt.
WE BUY SILVER
SILVER DOLLARS
Pins & Brooches ......................up to...
$
2,000
Mountings ................................up to...
$
600
Dental Gold..............................up to...
$
300
Antique Items ..........................up to...
$
4,500
Earring..................................up to..
$
550/pair
VINTAGE & FINE JEWELRY WE BUY DIAMONDS
TOP DOLLAR FORGOLD
TOP DOLLAR FORCOINS
Receive an
Additional
20%
Excluding Coins
&Diamonds
. n o p u o c s i h t h t i W
Comes to
Wilkes-Barre
FREE ADMISSION NO WAITING NO APPTS NECESSARY
5 DAYS ONLY. Sun. Oct. 30th til Thurs. Nov. 3rd
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9A
All kinds, all eras, all conditions.
Scrap, medallions, collectibles
WE BUY THEM ALL
We buy all types of sterling silver by
all manufacturers and make with
emphasis on finer, more ornate pieces.
" Flatware Sets
" Serving Trays
" Candelabra
" Julep Cups
" Tea Sets
" Baskets
" Bowls
" Frames
" Trophies
We pay premium prices for Tiffany, Jensen, and Cartier!
Bring in your sterling silver pieces for a CASH offer!
WE BUY ONLY STERLING SILVER ITEMS... No silver plate please.
Rolex.................................................................................... up to $15,000
Cartier.................................................................................up to $10,000
Vacheron Constantin............................................................up to$3,500
Patek Phillipe......................................................................up to $25,000
Pocket Watches .................................................................... up to $6,000
Movado.................................................................................. up to $2,800
International......................................................................... up to $4,000
Le Coultre............................................................................. up to $2,600
Universal Geneve ................................................................. up to $3,800
Omega ................................................................................... up to $2,500
We buy Rolex, Cartier, Patek Phillippe, Vacheron Constantin, Le Coultre, Bulova,
Breitling, Omega, Corum, Audermars, Piguet, Gruen, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Longines,
Piaget, Tiffany, Universal Geneve, Van Cleef & Arpels, Movado.
Complicated watches bring the highest prices. Platinum, Pink or Rose Gold is very
desirable. Doctors watches or watches with extra dials on the face may mean more
money for you. Extra buttons, alarms, or chiming watches are very desirable. We also
buy old railroad and pocket watches of all kindss. We buy ladies Rolex, Cartier, Patek
Phillipe, etc. and watches made of gold, platinum and diamonds.
WE BUY WATCHES IN ANY CONDITION, WORKING OR NOT!
a g e m O r e i t r a C e p p i l i h P k e t a P g n i l t i e r B t e u g i P s r a m e d u A Rolex
US Large Size Bills
US Small Size Bills
Gold and Silver Certificates
Fractional Currency
$500 Bill
$1,000 Bill
$5,000 Bill
$10,000 Bill
Prices are based
on condition and rarity
Earrings, Bracelets and Necklaces, All Gold, Gold and Diamond,
Diamonds and Other Stones, Cameos, Animal or Bug Pins
We are interested in signed or designer pieces, AND we pay a premium for
these items! Bring in your items for evaluation and get a CASH offer!
IMPORTANT: All prices are based on rarity & condition. If an item is in poor condition, its value will be low. If an item is very rare, and in superb
condition, it might be worth more than the up to prices listed. For example, a 1919 dime could be worth $1,400 in very high-quality condition or
less than $1 in poor condition. In most cases, the up to prices listed in this advertisement are for items of exceptional rarity and quality. Chances
are, you will not have those items. We are willing to take the time to look at your items, just in case free of charge and give you our expert opininion.
Visit our Website www.aracash4gold.com
ANTIQUE & MODERN GOLD & PLATINUM JEWELRY
Full flatware sets ..............................................$8,500
Single flatware items...........................................$600
Punch bowl & sets............................................$5,500
Pitchers..............................................................$4,000
Spoons, forks, knives................................. $150 Each
TOP DOLLAR FORSILVER
TOP DOLLAR FORPAPER MONEY
TOP DOLLAR FORWATCHES
PAYING CASH ON THE SPOT
AMOUT TOO LARGE?
We will come to your home.
5 DAYS ONLY. Sun. Oct. 30th til Thurs. Nov. 3rd
Comes to
Wilkes-Barre
Woodlands Inn & Resort
1073 Pennsylvania 315
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Directions (1-800-762-2222)
SUNDAY OCT. 30
thru
THURSDAY, NOV. 3
Sunday 10 - 4 Monday - Thursday 10 - 6
5
DAYS
ONLY
Any amount too large to bring in call, and we will make an appointment at your home.
For questions call
888-GOLD-031
888-465-3031
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C L I C K
2
6
6
6
9
3
News. Events. Captured Moments.
Reader submitted photos thats as easy as drag and drop or a simple click and upload.
Now you can create your own online photo gallery.
Start sharing your collection today at photos.timesleader.com. m.
RINGLING BROS. AND
BARNUM & BAILEY CIRCUS
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Isabelle Davis, left, with Jill and Abbey Varzaly
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Michelle Stortz and Gavin Dane
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Tracy, left, Katie, Bruce and Aaron Charsky
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Michael, left, Paul, Paul Jr. and Tammy Reiprich
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Katelynn Warman, left, Jacob Bartlebaugh and Michelle Pelriso
JCC BENJAMIN AUGUST
MEMORIAL RUN/WALK
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Madison, 7, left, and Verona Roberts
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Rich Chase, left, and Michael Lisnock
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Bridget, 12, left, and Kathy Dugan
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jill Matthew Lada with Richard Hughes
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Debbie and Don Fries
SECOND ANNUAL PULASKI
SCHOLARSHIP BALL
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Joan and Bernie Solack, Luzerne
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Rose and Ed Carlin, Avoca
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
George and Dolly Kubasko, Pittston Township
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Eleanor Grabski, Nanticoke, left, and Mary Flannery, Laflin
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Leo and Genie Pavelco of Slattingtown, Pa.
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
William and Rita Kuklewicz, Wilkes-Barre Township
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 11A
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
7
1
9
2
9
6
(Near Carey Ave. Bridge) Hanover Twp.
829-4999
$
59
95
Only
INCL.
COAT PANTS SHIRT TIE SHOES
SUIT RENTALS
SEMI-FORMAL
SSUI
TUXEDO JUNCTION .C
O
M
Luca in 2007.
Media salvos
Salavantis campaign has in-
cluded a commercial and radio ad-
vertisements alleging Musto Car-
roll did nothing to protect juve-
niles fromthe kids for cash scan-
dal and that the district attorney
defended the decisions of former
Judge Mark Ciavarella.
Salavantis cites a brief written
by Musto Carroll and Assistant
District Attorney FrankBarletta in
May 2008, in which the prosecu-
tors ask the state Supreme Court
to deny the request of three specif-
ic juveniles for a hearing after they
alleged their rights were violated
by Ciavarella.
Elections are about account-
ability, and (Musto Carroll) needs
toexplaintothepeopleof Luzerne
County why she specifically ar-
gued that the Supreme Court
should uphold the convictions of
three juveniles despite the fact
that they had no legal representa-
tion, Salavantis said in a recent
press release.
Salavantis said in an interview
that Musto Carroll should have
been in the courtrooms where ju-
veniles were and protected their
rights. Salavantis even alleges in a
TV ad that Musto Carroll didnt
bother to take a three-minute
ride fromthe main courthouse to
another county building to check
on juvenile proceedings.
Its been one thing after anoth-
er, Salavantis charged.
Salavantis has also questioned
Musto Carrolls know-nothing
approach to what went on in Cia-
varellas courtrooms andsaidwhat
thedistrict attorneyhasdoneinre-
sponse to the scandal including
assigning specific attorneys to ju-
venile court and several programs
is too little, too late.
Musto Carroll told The Times
Leader endorsement board there
is a lack of understanding as to
what occurred to say that people
in the system should have known
something.
Musto Carroll said inside the
courtroom, what Ciavarella did
wasfail toput thejuvenilesright to
waive their counsel on the record.
MustoCarroll saidassistant dis-
trict attorneys and public defend-
ers did not see red flags or any
change in the courtroom.
But outside the courtroom, she
said, is where Ciavarellas crimes
occurred, citing the payments he
tookfor placingjuveniles ina local
detention center.
MustoCarroll alsorespondedto
her May 2008 filing, stating the ju-
veniles did not follow proper pro-
cedure when asking the Supreme
Court to hear their case.
MustoCarroll saidalower court
should have heard the juveniles
complaints first, andthena higher
court, and that proper procedure
wasnt followed.
Ultimately, The Pennsylvania
Supreme Court agreed with us,
Musto Carroll said. I have to en-
force the rules and the law. Under
the law, (the original request by
the juveniles) was not the right
avenue to take.
Musto Carroll said she brought
the handful of juveniles who made
the request for hearings back be-
fore a county judge and that some
still did not want an attorney to
represent them.
I agreed to vacate all of those
convictions because I believed it
was the right thing to do, Musto
Carroll said.
The incumbent said Salavantis
accusations are baseless and are a
lack of understanding.
I think the most important
question is what qualifies anyone
to sit as a district attorney and do
this job, Musto Carroll said. Not
just her hurling mud and having a
negative campaign.
Experience cited
For the past 26 years, Musto
Carroll has workedas aprosecutor
in the District Attorneys Office,
andsaidshehasservedineveryca-
pacity an attorney can there.
The mother of three said what
qualifies her to continue in the po-
sition is that she has been doing
the job for the last four years.
Theres a choice to make,
Musto Carroll said. Do you want
someone who has been an attor-
ney for 26 years, who has lived in
this community their entire life,
who has raised a family, who has
seen these issues, who has tried
cases? Or someone who has made
negative accusations. I think vot-
ers have more sense.
A2009 lawschool graduate, Sa-
lavantis works for aninsurance de-
fense firmandinher ownpractice.
She also holds a bachelors degree
in business management.
Salavantis said she became in-
terestedinlawbecause she was in-
trigued by the vast ways and abil-
ities of attorneys to solve prob-
lems.
She said she observed her fa-
thers attorney, Jerome Cohen, a
former district attorney, and ad-
mired his work.
She handles a variety of cases,
including family, real estate and
some criminal work, and said she
is inandout of the courtroomona
daily basis, filing court papers and
conducting depositions.
Salavantis completed her law
school externshipwithCohenand
worked for him after she was ad-
mitted to the bar in 2009. She has
also been an associate of attorney
Robert Panowicz and his firm for
about a year.
Panowiczs daughter, Megan, is
involved in a criminal case in Lu-
zerne County Court, and Salavan-
tis said she returned money Rob-
ert Panowicz donated to her cam-
paign to avoid any perception of
impropriety if she were elected.
She also said she would forward
the case tothe state Attorney Gen-
erals Office to further ensure fair-
ness.
Salavantis admitted in a recent
interview that she has not tried a
criminal case and does not have
much experience in criminal law,
but that she can still run the office
efficiently.
Factoring into her decision to
run was the fact that no one in-
cluding experienced prosecutors
who work for Musto Carroll was
entering the race.
Salavantis saidshedidnot think
it was right that an incumbent go
unopposed in both the primary
and general elections.
For both the primary and general
elections, Musto Carroll spent a
total of $70,310, and has an unpaid
debt of $25,000, which is a loan
she received from her parents.
For the general election, Salavan-
tis spent a total of $184,249, and
has an unpaid debt of $165,000 in
loans she received from her par-
ents.
M O N E Y S P E N T
DA
Continued from Page 1A
Age: 50
Education: Attended Penn State University; bachelor of science in
business administration in 1982 from The University of Scranton; juris
doctor in 1985 from the Temple University School of Law
Community affiliations: Kiwanis Club of Pittston; former board mem-
ber of the Catholic Youth Center, Wilkes-Barre; the Pennsylvania District
Attorneys Association and the National District Attorneys Association
Family: Husband, Timothy Carroll; three sons; daughter of Gerard and
Domenica Musto
J A C K I E M U S T O C A R R O L L
Age: 29
Education: Temple University, bachelors degree in business manage-
ment; Thomas Cooley Law School, juris doctor
Community affiliations: Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce;
Luzerne County Young Republicans; Young Lawyers Division of the
Wilkes-Barre Law and Library Association
Family: single; parents, Harry and Cletta Salavantis; four siblings
S T E FA N I E S A L AVA N T I S
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
John Alleva, 25, of New
Mallery Place reported Friday
his bank card was used to
make unauthorized purchases
in a Walmart in Texas.
Joseph Edwards, 60, of
Midland Court was charged
Friday with public drunkenness
and retail theft for allegedly
stealing a bottle of vodka from
the state Wine and Spirits
store on South Main Street.
Michael Filipski, of West
Ross Street, reported Thursday
his debit card was used to
make an unauthorized pur-
chase.
DORRANCE TWP. Eric
Rinehimer, 41, of Hollow Road,
Wapwallopen told state police
that his residence was burglar-
ized Wednesday and items
were stolen.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
Jacklyn Unger of McCar-
ragher Street reported Wednes-
day that her debit card was
used to make an unauthorized
purchase.
A laptop computer was
reported stolen Wednesday
from Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital on North River Street.
Debbie Williams reported
Wednesday her vehicle was
taken from near her residence.
It was later recovered at Brown
and Parrish streets.
Police said Natasha Good-
win, 20, of North River Street,
was cited with disorderly con-
duct after they investigated a
disturbance at Forrest and
Seneca streets at 12:45 a.m.
Wednesday. A 16-year-old male
from Wilkes-Barre will be
charged with disorderly con-
duct and misbranding a con-
trolled substance.
Chere McMillian, of North
River Street, reported Tuesday
someone stole the registration
plate HKB-4425 from his vehi-
cle on South Main Street.
HAZLETON Police said
they are investigating a bur-
glary at Computer Heads, 804
W. 15th St., on Tuesday. A
door was forced open, police
said.
HAZLE TWP. State police
at Hazleton reported the fol-
lowing:
Tiara D. Green, 19, of New
York City, N.Y., was charged
with retail theft after she alleg-
edly tried to steal $88 worth of
merchandise from Boscovs
Department Store, Laurel Mall,
on Tuesday.
Brian Joseph Buglio, of
West Hazleton, reported Tues-
day an unknown person forced
open a cap to his truck and
stole numerous tools on Har-
wood Road.
PLAINS TWP. David Da-
Silva, 23, of Railroad Street,
Nanticoke, was arraigned re-
cently in Wilkes-Barre Central
Court on charges of theft, re-
ceiving stolen property and
criminal attempt.
He was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
lack of $5,000 bail.
Police said they were con-
ducting surveillance of the
Woodlands Inn & Resort park-
ing lot on Friday in response to
complaints about thefts from
cars. DaSilva was spotted look-
ing into several vehicles and
trying to open doors, according
to the complaint.
Police allege DaSilva stole a
cell phone from a vehicle.
HAZLE TWP. State police
at Hazleton reported copper
pipe was recently stolen from a
vacant motel on Susquehanna
Boulevard.
HANOVER TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Police on Tuesday arrested
Michael Muchler, 43, of Hanov-
er Township, and charged him
with forgery, theft by deception
and receiving stolen property
after Muchler allegedly cashed
a check that had been reported
stolen from Kingston.
Police allege Muchler cashed
the check for $2,800 at M&T
Bank, 722 Sans Souci Parkway,
on Oct. 22. A preliminary hear-
ing has been scheduled for this
Wednesday before District
Judge Joseph Halesey, Hanover
Township.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 13A
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A
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BY
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O
D
?
84.83
101.21
108.81
115.25
119.93
126.95
155.61
171.41
180.18
191.30
136.31
145.08
235.76
135.14
143.33
163.80
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109.40
126.30
129.87
140.99
143.91
155.61
186.62
199.49
215.87
229.32
136.31
145.08
282.56
170.82
181.94
203.58
60.26
69.62
71.37
76.05
80.15
86.58
103.55
108.23
109.98
120.51
119.34
74.30
78.98
81.90
90.09
91.85
Oak Maple
76.05
87.75
90.09
98.28
103.55
111.74
129.29
137.48
142.16
152.69
151.52
91.26
101.21
105.89
115.83
126.36
212.94
253.31
270.27
324.09
111.15
119.34
145.08
149.18
163.80
184.86
197.15
228.15
123.44
141.57
156.78
138.06
178.43
196.56
$
1246
00 $
1570
00
meaning they had less money
than needed to meet all obliga-
tions. A fund is minimally dis-
tressed at 70 percent to 89 per-
cent of full funding, andseverely
distressed if it has less than half
money needed.
All of which means there will
be scant incentive in most mu-
nicipalities to use the one-time
bonus for anything beyond pen-
sion obligations that are already
hard to match.
Hazleton Mayor Joe Yannuzzi
conceded as much. The city will
see state aidjumpfrom$617,201
last year to a bit more than $1
millionthis year, a 63 percent in-
crease. While grateful for a
windfall that, at first blush,
sounds impressive, Yannuzzi
noted the citys minimum man-
dated payment for the police
pension alone is $2.7 million,
with another $1.8 million due
for firefighters.
When you look at the totals,
the increase is only about 10 per-
cent of what we owe, Yannuzzi
said.
As the countys twobiggest ci-
ties, Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton
will see the biggest dollar in-
creases. But the formula for div-
vying up state aid creates con-
siderable variation in percent-
age terms. Salem Township, for
example, will see its state aid
spike from $36,362 to $90,308
a 148 percent increase. Conyng-
ham borough, on the other ex-
treme, will see a modest climb
from $29,271 to $32,173, not
quite a 10 percent change.
All told, the state will dole out
$132.6 million more in pension
aid this year than last. But the
press release warns: It is ex-
pected that collections in future
years will be consistently lower
than in 2011 because of the
unique event of collecting ap-
proximately 18 months of tax.
Municipality 2010 2011 Increase
Wilkes-Barre $1,624,924 $2,663,680 $1,038,756
Hazleton $617,201 $1,007,624 $390,423
Kingston $444,141 $748,285 $304,144
Plains Twp. $298,449 $504,497 $206,048
Nanticoke $222,846 $385,224 $162,378
Hanover Twp. $255,407 $402,736 $147,330
Pittston $184,192 $308,715 $124,523
Wilkes-Barre Twp. $145,568 $245,160 $99,592
Butler Twp. $149,931 $221,847 $71,916
Wright Twp. $104,853 $171,130 $66,277
Kingston Twp. $149,705 $211,384 $61,678
Jenkins Twp. $0 $55,060 $55,060
West Hazleton $54,220 $108,595 $54,375
Salem Twp. $36,362 $90,308 $53,946
Forty Fort $80,902 $134,217 $53,315
Hazle Twp. $119,618 $169,030 $49,411
Fairview Twp. $75,473 $123,512 $48,039
Rice Twp. $61,792 $109,662 $47,871
Edwardsville $76,942 $124,325 $47,383
Plymouth $75,136 $121,635 $46,499
Dallas Twp. $136,164 $180,112 $43,948
Sugarloaf Twp. $70,590 $110,854 $40,264
West Pittston $73,973 $110,201 $36,229
Wyoming $45,819 $74,019 $28,200
Newport Twp. $41,011 $69,083 $28,072
Exeter $73,831 $99,520 $25,689
Black Creek Twp. $18,717 $42,405 $23,688
Jackson Twp. $61,775 $81,896 $20,121
Ross Twp. $26,957 $45,374 $18,418
Dallas $54,673 $71,893 $17,220
Swoyersville $83,150 $99,948 $16,798
Duryea $34,432 $51,008 $16,577
Larksville $22,265 $37,901 $15,636
Lehman Twp. $30,704 $46,233 $15,529
Hunlock Twp. $27,623 $42,148 $14,524
Lake Twp. $22,541 $37,045 $14,504
Foster Twp. $26,333 $39,578 $13,245
Union Twp. $22,645 $35,726 $13,081
Harveys Lake $21,221 $34,118 $12,896
Bear Creek Twp. $29,250 $41,747 $12,497
Laflin $33,722 $44,726 $11,004
Huntington Twp. $16,374 $25,908 $9,534
Dupont $17,130 $26,341 $9,211
Dorrance Twp. $21,722 $30,363 $8,641
Exeter Twp. $14,625 $22,677 $8,052
Hughestown $18,897 $26,901 $8,004
Franklin Twp. $12,115 $19,997 $7,882
Freeland $33,153 $40,981 $7,828
Luzerne $15,108 $22,726 $7,618
Ashley $13,415 $20,611 $7,195
Avoca $17,947 $25,027 $7,079
Pittston Twp. $53,383 $59,981 $6,598
West Wyoming $36,065 $42,359 $6,294
Fairmount Twp. $8,244 $14,153 $5,908
Plymouth Twp. $11,293 $16,404 $5,112
Dennison Twp. $6,591 $11,622 $5,032
Nescopeck $14,448 $19,183 $4,735
Nescopeck Twp. $7,384 $11,850 $4,466
Conyngham Twp. $7,403 $11,732 $4,330
Hollenback Twp. $7,610 $11,554 $3,944
Slocum Twp. $7,118 $11,032 $3,914
White Haven $6,512 $9,678 $3,166
Nuangola $5,263 $8,385 $3,123
Conyngham $29,271 $32,173 $2,902
Pringle $5,384 $8,283 $2,899
Sugar Notch $5,188 $7,725 $2,537
Buck Twp. $2,892 $5,327 $2,435
Courtdale $4,395 $6,454 $2,059
Yatesville $4,692 $6,688 $1,996
Penn Lake Park $2,291 $4,217 $1,926
Bear Creek Village $2,850 $4,680 $1,830
Warrior Run $3,671 $5,466 $1,794
Shickshinny $4,368 $6,140 $1,772
New Columbus $1,231 $2,008 $776
Laurel Run $3,800 $4,516 $716
Jeddo $631 $723 $91
Total $6,157,522 $9,886,028 $3,728,505
Municipal pension funds will get a one-time boost
in state aid this year. On average, state money
will increase about 61 percent from 2010.
Boon for local pension funds
Source: Pa. Auditor General For The Times Leader/Mark Guydish
PENSION
Continued from Page 3A
strumental in putting the event
together and was lauded by her
employees and volunteers.
"Cary really works hard on this
event," said Deiss. "This is her
baby. "
Many of the attendees of the
event took time to tour the facil-
ity and to view the animals that
were available for adoption. The
lobby was filled with people re-
flecting on the need for con-
cerned families to adopt the ani-
mals and on how attractive and
well-kept the animals were.
"Its really all about a love for
the animals," said volunteer
Sandy Ansell. "That is why we
work so hard to make these types
of events possible."
SPCA
Continued from Page 3A
When the administration sought a newou-
treachprogram, theduoresearchedideas and
set up a committee to implement them here,
with the help of a $25,000 earmark from the
School Board. Owens and Thiemann-Wel-
gosh launched a flurry of outreach programs
includinga monthly bulletinthat highlights a
specific issue.
TheOctober bulletin, for example, covered
bullying, beginning with a definition, bully-
ingsigns, andthedistrict bullyingpolicy. The
bulletin provides advice to parents in hand-
ling bullying and a list of community agen-
cies that can help.
The two have also launched a pilot pro-
gram encouraging positive behavior at one
elementary school, outreach efforts to con-
nect teachers and students to social service
agencies, and an adult mentoring program
for students at Meyers High School.
Were not trying to reinvent the wheel,
Owens said. There are a lot of things the dis-
trict is doing, but only in some schools. For
example, two elementary schools annually
invite a fire safety truck to visit the school so
students can learn how to spot and escape
fires, anideathat couldbeexpandedtoall ele-
mentary schools.
The programalso looks for ways to encour-
age parents and students to participate more
in existing programs, such as 8th period
study and tutoring programs. Offering free
snacks seems to work. Food is always a good
motivator, Owens said with a laugh.
The big event this year is the First Annual
Harvest Festival, slated for Nov. 3 at Meyers,
4 to 8 p.m. Along with the turkey dinner,
there will be pumpkin and face painting, a
D.J. providing music, and a bullying laser
light show. Representatives from many local
agencies will set up booths and offer informa-
tion to parents and students.
A big part of the diverse effort is to change
parent and student attitudes toward school
employees and administrators.
We really want to help the families to look
at the school as some place they can turn to
when they need assistance, Thiemann-Wel-
gosh.
FACES
Continued from Page 3A
MARK GUYDISH/THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre Area school psychologists Jennifer Thiemann-Welgosh, left, and Beth Anne
Owens have launched a new district-wide wellness program.
WILKES-BARRE City po-
lice reportedthe following:
Lawrence Harvey of Filbert
Lane was chargedwithretail
theft after he left the Walgreens
onWilkes-Barre Boulevardwith
items that were not paidfor
Saturday morning. Store surveil-
lance enabledpolice to identify
Harvey andpolice locatedhimin
a residence onLoganStreet
where he was takeninto custody.
ZarinahMuhaamadof
McLeanStreet was chargedwith
harassment Friday night after
she allegedly struck Hassan
Lindsay of West DivisionStreet,
the father of their children, dur-
ing anargument.
Three people face weapons
andalcohol-relatedcharges after
a traffic stop Saturday morning
near the intersectionof Rose
Lane andSouthMeade Street.
During a searchof the vehicle
police founda gununder the
front passenger seat of the car
drivenby JuanJose Hernandez
of ParkviewCircle. Hernandez
was chargedwithdriving under
the influence, furnishing alcohol
to minors anda personnot to
possess a firearm. His passen-
gers, Pool Perdomo-Roastenilly
of LoganStreet andWilliam
Shotwell of HowardStreet were
chargedwithunderage drinking
andfirearms possession.
Thomas Edsell of Wyalusing
reportedSaturday that a lock
was cut ona tool box onhis vehi-
cle parkedbehindthe Ramada
InnonPublic Square and200
feet of welding metal valuedat
$506 was stolen.
Nicholas Brisk, 57, of South
River Street reportedFriday his
bank cardwas usedto make
unauthorizedpurchases inHam-
mond, Ind.
Christina Solomon, of Glenn
Street, reportedThursday her
debit cardwas usedto make an
unauthorizedpurchase.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
WATERFRONT
PITTSTON
304 KENNEDY BLVD.
654-6883
www.coopers-seafood.com
NEW MARTINI LIST
THIS WEEK ALL MARTINIS $3.99
All September & October Birthdays
Will Be Honored Throughout October!
3/4 POUND PLUS LOBSTER TAIL DINNER
$
24.99
Served with
French Fries & Cole Slaw
SUNDAY & MONDAY
OR
FISHERMANS DINNER
$
12.99
Shrimp in Garlic Butter,
Shrimp & Crab stuffed Flounder and
Fried Ocean Clam Strips. Served with
French Fries & Cole Slaw.
E A R LY S E A S O N S N O W FA L L H I T S T H E R E G I O N
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
In photo above left, a line of apple trees are heavy with snow Saturday afternoon in Bear Creek Village. In the above right photo taken in the spring, those same trees are seen with apple blossoms.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A PennDOT truck plows the snow on Saturday afternoon on Route 115 in Bear Creek.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 15A
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 30TH TO NOVEMBER 5TH
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with Gold Card
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5
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Halloween Cakes, Cupcakes &
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Sun., Oct. 30 from 11am - 4pm.
C M Y K
PAGE 16A SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
MountainTop, 6 inches, andMos-
cow in Lackawanna County 4.5
inches.
The storm that started before
noon was expected to end by 9
p.m., said Lovejoy.
The forecast for today was
brighter, with a high in the
mid-40s, and therell be some
sunshine, he added.
Logan Darling, a cashier at Dy-
monds Farm Market & Bakery in
Kingston Township, said pump-
kin sales were much slower than
expected Saturday.
Its usually pretty busy, Dar-
ling said, I just think people just
dont want to come out with the
roads.
Slippery conditions caused nu-
merous accidents and closed
roads around the county. Vehicle
accidents were reported on Free-
land Mountain Road in Freeland,
Lower Demunds Road in Dallas,
Route 315 in Laflin and Interstate
81 southbound at the Hazleton
South Beltway exit. Interstate 80
westbound between the Moun-
tain Top/Hazleton exit 262 and
the White Haven/Freeland exit
273 was closed for several hours
Saturday night because of a trac-
tor-trailer crash.
The heavy, wet snow caused
tree limbs and branches to bring
down power lines, causing outag-
es throughout Luzerne County.
PPL Electric had1,880 customers
without power around 8 p.m. and
1,484 were in the Avoca area, ac-
cording to the utilitys website. In
Dorrance Township, 329 custom-
ers were affected.
The weather forced the resche-
duling of several Halloween
events Saturday.
The Downtown Wilkes-Barre
Ghost Tour planned for Saturday
by the Luzerne County Historical
Society was rescheduled for this
Friday and Saturday, and The
Shoppes at Montage Halloween
Trick or Treat andParade was res-
cheduledfor noonto2 p.m. today.
Thesnowalsoshut downspook
houses around the county.
The Carnival of Souls haunted
house in Mountain Top, Broken
Hearts Asylum in Lehman Town-
ship and Gravestone Manor in
Plains Township were all closed
Saturday night.
Ive never seen anything like
this, and Ive been doing this 13
years, Gravestone Manor project
coordinator Rick Markham said.
It looks morelikeChristmas than
Halloween Weve talked about
for years about doingaChristmas-
themed haunted house, so we
might get our chance.
Carnival of Souls and Grave-
stone Manor both said they plan
to open tonight; Broken Hearts
Asylum could not be reached for
comment.
But the cold wasnt enough to
keep the dead in their graves, as
roughly 30 locals dressed as zom-
bies limped from Kirby Park to
PublicSquareinWilkes-BarreSat-
urday afternoon in the second an-
nual Halloween zombie walk.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
A large group of people dressed as zombies participated in the
Second Annual Zombie Walk from Kirby Park to Public Square.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Snow didnt stop these zombies from their mission to travel to Public Square from Kirby Park for the Second Annual Zombie Walk as
part of a Halloween celebration.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Crates of apples sit as the snow begins to fall at Braces Orchard in Dallas. Apple picking ended
early in the afternoon due to the snowfall, but the farm was still open to buy apples, cider, dough-
nuts and other treats.
SNOW
Continued from Page 1A
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
T
he little grocery stores heavy
wooden front door creaks as I
push it open, momentarily
startling me. Its sure not like the
whoof sound of todays automatic
entrances.
But I cant betray myself by look-
ing ill at ease here. If Im found out,
well, who knows what these people
of 1952 will do to a time traveler.
Ah, there it is the magazine
rack. I see lots of grown-up stuff like
Look, True Confessions, Mod-
ern Screen, as well as the gutsier
Police Gazette, Argosy and Con-
fidential.
But theyre not what Im after.
Over to the right, on a separate
rack, is my quarry. Im about to
plunge into the colorful comic books
when suddenly I look down and my
heart skips a beat. Lets see, theyve
got The Vault of Horror, The
Haunt of Fear, Weird Science,
Detective Comics wow, a trea-
sure trove of the good reads of six
decades ago. Since theyre just 10
cents apiece I can afford to do what
no kid alive can plunk down a $5
bill and walk out with an armful of
the mags.
From the corner of my eye I can
see the storekeeper watching, prob-
ably wondering what a gray-haired
adult is doing in the comics section.
So I smile and mumble good after-
noon. Placated, he continues put-
ting cans of string beans up on a
high shelf with a long wooden grab-
ber tool.
Finally I lug my stack of purchases
to the counter and the guy is all
ready to open up the huge metal
cash register when suddenly theres
a ringing sound. Patting the cell
phone, I stammer Er, ah, sir, I work
for the government and, you know,
well, ahem
Oh, no! Im waking up in my liv-
ing room recliner. Im so upset I
dont even answer the phone. Its
probably someone trying to sell me
a subscription to Patio Gardeners
Quarterly, with a discount if I get it
for three years.
I think I know whats going on.
The lengthening shadows of autumn
always make me think back to the
days of coming home from school
and rushing down to the store to
pick up the latest colorful tales of
spacemen or otherworldly creatures
or heroic crime fighters.
Actually, no one who enjoyed what
cultural historians now call the
Golden Age of American comic
books can forget the experience. It
was an explosive time of creativity,
populated by some of the best story-
tellers and graphic artists ever to
put ink on paper.
Sadly, it all came to an end when
in 1954 psychiatrist Dr. Frederic
Wertham published Seduction of
the Innocent, a book that portrayed
everything edgier than The Adven-
tures of Donald Duck as so violent
and sadistic that it warped childrens
minds and risked turning them into
blood-drinking psychopaths.
The result was Congressional
hearings and the Comics Code Au-
thority, a self-policing agency that
tamed the comics industry. It
would not recover until the cultural
change of the 1960s spawned Stan
Lee and Marvel Comics.
For the more intellectually adven-
turous kids of the 1950s, though, the
party had been shut down early and
all the interesting guests sent pack-
ing.
Today some of those old comics
are available in paperback reprints,
orderable online. But that doesnt
bring back the exciting days or the
mental voyages that should have
happened.
And thats a real horror story this
Halloween.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
Comic industry
wrote book on
horror stories
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
CLARK
VAN
ORDEN/
THE TIMES
LEADER
A
bby Billek Singh is the owner and operator of Canteen 900 in Forty Fort. Singh, 30, is a graduate
of Wyoming Valley West High School and New York University, where she received a degree in
food studies and nutrition. She and her husband, Bhanu, have a son, Oliver, 3. They live in Dallas.
Your restaurant noted its first anni-
versary recently. What first led to
your interest in culinary art? It
was all in the cards. My brother
and I played kitchen all our
lives while we were growing up.
Its the only thing we ever did.
There was no other route.
Even if I thought about a
different route, food is where
it always came back to.
Youve got a young business,
but its already a very suc-
cessful business. Why do
you think that is? Good solid
people that make magic hap-
pen every single day. Were not
open seven days, but we do a lot
of private parties, so a lot of times
we all work seven days in a row for a
month straight. And I couldnt do it
without my brother, Drew, and my
chef, John. Theres so many people
that make the restaurant what it is and
make it tick every single day. Its a
small staff. Were literally just six peo-
ple, but theyre all so important to me.
Theyve become my family.
Whats your favorite item on your own
menu? I love sandwiches. You can
basically put anything between two
pieces of bread, and it can be awesome.
Theres so many breads to choose from,
theres so many different spreads, and
all of these types of vegetables and
really great meats and really great
cheeses. If you pick really nice product
and make really great sandwiches, its
always going to taste good.
What do you enjoy in your free time? I
spend every ounce of my free time with
my son. My time with Oliver is really
special. Its all about Oliver.
Music? I love Johnny Cash. Hes so full of
soul, and hes so real. He didnt have the
easiest of lives, but I really like the
emotion that his music shows.
Hobbies? I collect cookbooks. I have a
really large collection at home. Ive
been collecting them forever.
Favorite food? I like any food that has
lots of flavor. Lots of flavor, lots of herbs
and lots of spices. I like something with
a punch.
Favorite city? New York. I lived there for
14 years. I met my husband there. Oliver
was born in Manhattan. We still have an
apartment there. I worked at a culinary
school there for five years, and I still go
back to teach once a month. Its my
city.
Favorite place to vacation? Goa, India.
Always in the fridge? Seltzer water for
me, apple juice for Oliver and eggs for
Bhanu. If we dont have those three
things, were not happy people.
First car? 1997 navy blue Volkswagen
Jetta.
Favorite TV show? I love Modern Fam-
ily. I think it shows how everyone can
be different, yet still be a family.
Favorite quote? Ideas are like rabbits.
You get a couple and learn how to
handle them, and pretty soon you have
a dozen. John Steinbeck.
Proudest professional moment? Hon-
estly, its every day. Its really hum-
bling and awesome to see the restau-
rant fill up with people every single
day. Its regulars that support us all
the time, and new faces all the time.
Im amazed and in awe every day that
I am where I am. I wake up in the
morning and ask Is this really all
happening? Its pretty cool. Restau-
rants are major, major gambles, and
we rolled the dice. And Im glad we
did.
MEET ABBY BILLICK SINGH
Alan K. Stout writes about area people for
the Meet feature. Reach him at 970-7131.
L
OS ANGELES The loft-like offices at
5514 Wilshire Blvd. are largely the do-
main of the young, who work in jeans
and T-shirts at flat-panel screens.
They are Web branders, search engine opti-
mizers, e-tailers of underground clothing lines.
They do the virtual jobs that became jobs only
recently.
Ruben Pardo works in the building, too, in a
job that dates to the late 19th century.
Pardo operates one of the last manual eleva-
tors in Los Angeles.
The young people are not easily impressed
but something about Pardo awes them.
Each morning, the 69-year-old arrives at the
Art Deco tower in wool trousers, a button-down
shirt and a sweater vest.
Six days a week, for just over half his life, he
has been steering the same 6-foot-by-8-foot car
up and down the same 11 floors.
Hes been in this elevator longer than Ive
been on the planet, said Mani Nabavi of digi-
talgravel.com on the fifth floor, who turned 35
just after Pardos 35th anniversary.
Young people come. Young people go. Eleven
hours each weekday and nine hours each Satur-
day, Pardo greets them warmly and transports
them to and from airy work spaces with con-
crete floors and views of the ocean, downtown
and the Hollywood sign.
His cushioned, charcoal-gray cross trainers
put bounce inhis step. His voice dances withthe
lilt of an old-time 78.
Hello, Matt! he calls out, stretching each
syllable. Good mooor-ning, Victor!
Hows life? they ask.
By NITA LELYVELD Los Angeles Times
See ELEVATOR, Page 13B
Ruben Pardo, 69, who
runs the elevator
inside the Wishire
Tower building in the
Miracle Mile section
of Los Angeles, Calif.,
says goodbye to Yuko
Kitchen after giving
her a ride back down
to the lobby.
MCT PHOTO
K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
J
erry and Jackie Uhrin, Old
Forge, recently celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary.
They were married Oct. 28, 1961,
in St. Nicholas Greek Catholic
Church by the late Rev. Steven
Zajac.
They were attended by Mar-
lene Uhrin Disimoni, Helen Her-
ron Werner, Janet Leterri, Bonnie
Aulisio Mochan, George Aulisio,
William Stefanko, the late Joseph
Aulisio and the late Daniel Dis-
imoni.
Mrs. Uhrin is the former Jackie
Aulisio, daughter of the late Do-
minick and Shirley Aulisio.
Mr. Uhrin is the son of the late
John and Margaret Uhrin. Prior
to retirement, he worked for
Pennsylvania Gas and Water
Company.
The couple has six children,
Shirley Vender, Jackie Evans and
Jerry, Dominick, Mark and Mi-
chael Uhrin, all of Old Forge.
They also have 1 1 grandchildren.
They marked the occasion with
a family dinner.
The Uhrins
P
atti Kogan and Stephen Godri,
together with their families, an-
nounce their engagement and up-
coming marriage.
Patti is the daughter of Robert and
Elaine Kogan, Ellicott City, Md. She
is the granddaughter of the late Ben
and Ida Kogan and the late Phillip
and Frieda Fenster, all of Bronx, N.Y.
Stephen is the son of Edward and
Mary Godri, Harding, Pa. He is the
grandson of Elizabeth Godri and the
late Charles Godri, Phoenixville, Pa.,
and the late Charles and Jeroma Foy,
Meyersdale, Pa.
Patti is a graduate of Centennial
High School, Ellicott City, Md. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
from Penn State University and a
Master of Business Administration
degree from The George Washington
University, Washington D.C. Patti is a
senior manager at Deloitte Consult-
ing, Washington, D.C., and resides in
Arlington, Va.
Stephen is a graduate of Wyoming
Area High School, Exeter, Pa. He
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
from Kings College, Wilkes-Barre,
Pa. Stephen is a vice president at
BlackRock, Wilmington, Del., where
he also resides.
The couple will exchange vows
April 14, 2012, in Baltimore, Md.
Kogan, Godri
S
tephanie Ann Long and Zachary
Scott Tanona, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Mark and Donna Mattern, Danville.
The prospective groom is the son
of Mark Tanona, Forty Fort, and
Margaret Tanona, Kingston.
Stephanie is a 1996 graduate of
Bloomsburg High School and a 2006
graduate of Luzerne County Commu-
nity College, where she earned an
associates degree in nursing. Stepha-
nie is employed as a registered nurse
in both the recovery room and emer-
gency department at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Zachary is a 2001 graduate of West
Side Vo-Tech School and a 2003 grad-
uate of Thaddeus Stevens College
with an associates degree in applied
science. Zachary is co-owner of D&Z
Contracting and Flooring.
The couple will exchange vows
July 18, 2012, on the beach of Palace
Resorts, Punta Cana.
Long, Tanona
W
illiam and Mary Ellen Savage,
Hazleton, announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Melissa, to
Stephen Luebbert, son of Steven and
Andrea Luebbert, St. Louis, Mo.
The bride-to-be is a 2000 graduate
of Bishop Hafey High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in biology from Misericordia Uni-
versity and a degree in veterinary
medicine from the University of Mis-
souri School of Veterinary Medicine.
She is a veterinarian at Millis Animal
Hospital, St. Louis, Mo.
The prospective groom is a 2000
graduate of St. Louis University High
School, St. Louis, Mo. He has a bach-
elors degree with double majors in
political science and mass communi-
cation from the University of Miami
of Ohio. He is vice president of devel-
opment for Coolfire Originals, St.
Louis, Mo., having previously served
as coordinator for all of ABC comedi-
es.
The couple will exchange vows in
St. Francis Xavier College Church, St.
Louis, Mo.
Savage, Luebbert
C
arolyn Jane Hayer and Tim-
othy Christopher Banks were
united in marriage Sept. 23,
2011, at Appletree Terrace at
Newberry Estates, Dallas, by
Mayor Robert Boyer.
The bride is the daughter of
Joseph and Carol Hayer, Shaver-
town. She is the granddaughter
of the late John and Margaret
Hayer, Courtdale, and Anna and
Peter Buzink, Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Chris-
topher and Margie Banks, Dallas.
He is the grandson of Ginger
Banks and the late Joseph
Banks, Dallas, and John and
Patricia Luke, Carverton, and the
great-grandson of Dell Luke,
Dallas.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father. She chose
Jillian Bloom as her maid of
honor. Bridesmaids were Saman-
tha Atzeni, Jamie Polley and
Brynn Kovalick, friends of the
bride. Flower girls were Kayla,
daughter of the bride, and Zoe,
niece of the bride.
The groom chose Christopher
Pratz as his best man. Groom-
smen were Paul Wisnieski and
Andrew Gaia, friends of the
groom, and Robert Luke, uncle
of the groom. The ring bearer
was the brides nephew, Joseph.
The bride is a 1999 graduate
of Bishop OReilly High School,
Kingston, and a graduate of
Towson University, Maryland,
where she earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in mass commu-
nications/advertising.
The groom is a 2000 graduate
of Wyoming Seminary, Kingston,
and served in the United States
Marine Corps from March 2006-
August 2011, where he earned
the rank of Sergeant. Timothy
also recently returned home
from a six-month tour in Af-
ghanistan.
The couple honeymooned in
Charleston, S.C.
Hayer, Banks
M
arissa Lauren Mahle and Joshua
David Cragle were united in
marriage on June 4, 2011, at the Leh-
man-Idetown United Methodist
Church, Lehman, by the Rev. Beverly
Butler.
The bride is the daughter of Do-
nald and Shari Casterline, Sweet
Valley, and David and Karen Mahle,
Meeker. She is the granddaughter of
Richard and Esther Sutton, Lehman,
and the late John and Elizabeth Mah-
le.
The groom is the son of David
Cragle and Tom and Joy White, all of
Sweet Valley. He is the grandson of
James and Joyce Sabol, Dallas; the
late Lewis Thomas Jr.; and the late
Loren and Elinor Cragle.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her sister, Sara
Casterline, as maid of honor. Brides-
maids were Megan Mahle, sister of
the bride, and Cara Belles and Da-
nielle Evans, friends of the bride. The
flower girl was Harley Sabol, cousin
of the groom.
The groom chose his brother, Chad
Cragle, as his best man. Groomsmen
were Zachary Cragle, brother of the
groom, and Kyle Belles and Jeffrey
Cragle, friends of the groom. The
ring bearer was Mitchell Burgess,
friend of the groom.
Ceremony music was performed by
Christine Leandri and cousins of the
bride, Kieran, Emily and Kaitlin
Sutton.
A reception was held at the Check-
erboard Inn, Trucksville, after the
ceremony.
The couple took a honeymoon
cruise to Key West, Fla., and Coz-
umel, Mexico. They reside in Meeker.
Mahle, Cragle
K
evin G. Everett and Kristian
M. Barr were united in mar-
riage Oct. 6, 2011, at the Lu-
zerne County Courthouse in a
ceremony performed by Judge
Cosgrove.
The bride and groom were
accompanied by the grooms
three daughters and the brides
son and daughter.
They celebrated with a family
meal at the Mohegan Sun Casino
Buffet.
The groom is the son of Vivian
Everett and the late Norman
Everett.
The bride is the daughter of
the late Edna Louise Brown.
The groom is a 1973 graduate
of Northwest Area High School.
He is a dispatcher for Prestige
Delivery.
The bride is a 1991 graduate of
Upper Perkiomen High School,
Pennsburg. She is a nursing as-
sistant at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital on the oncology floor.
The couple resides in Jenkins
Township.
Barr, Everett
K
atie Melissa Albanese and Mark
Makowski were united in mar-
riage on June 4, 2011, on Smathers
Beach, Key West, Fla.
The bride is the daughter of Cheryl
Albanese, Tunkhannock, and the late
Joseph Albanese. She is the grand-
daughter of Emily Albanese, Tunk-
hannock, and Sandra and George
Holterhoff, Manahawkin, N.J.
The groom is the son of Angela
and Mark Makowski, Hanover Town-
ship. He is the grandson of Rose
Ziminsky.
Given in marriage by her mother,
the bride chose her sister, Kerry
Albanese, as her maid of honor and
her niece, Grace Albanese, as her
flower girl. Shaylene Scheib, Amy
Makowski and Karen Pagliaro were
the bridesmaids.
The groom chose his close friends,
Richard Zuba, Brandon Czock, Tom
Wallace and Joseph Albanese Jr., as
his groomsmen. The couples son,
Brayden Makowski, was the ring
bearer.
A rehearsal dinner took place on
Duval Street and the reception was
held at the Double Tree Hilton of Key
West.
The bride is a 2007 graduate of
Kings College with a certification in
elementary education and as a read-
ing specialist. She is pursuing her
masters degree at Kings College.
The groom is a 2006 graduate of
Kings College with a degree in busi-
ness administration. He is also a 2010
graduate of Syracuse College of Law,
where he earned his Juris Doctorate
degree. He works for Luzerne County
as an assistant district attorney.
The couple resides in Dallas with
their son.
Albanese, Makowski
M
olly Susan Sprechini and Wayne
Alan Hinkin exchanged wedding
vows and were united in holy matri-
mony on Sept. 10, 2011, at the Chris-
tian Apostolic Church of Hilldale,
Plains Township, Pa. Pastor David M.
Fischi officiated at the 11 a.m. double-
ring ceremony. Scriptural readings
were given by Pastor Ralph Trozzi,
Vestal, N.Y.
The bride is the daughter of Car-
mela Sprechini and the late Geno
Sprechini, Forty Fort, Pa. Molly is the
granddaughter of the late Vincenzo
Tavini, the late Maria Tavani, the late
Francis Tavani and the late Nazareth
Sprechini.
The groom is the son of the late
Robert Ronald Hinkin and the late
Joanne Mary Basta-Hinkin, Ply-
mouth, Pa. Wayne is the grandson of
the late Frank Basta Sr., the late Mi-
nerva Wolfe-Basta, the late Robert
Haydn Hinkin and late Isabelle Cath-
erine Guravage-Hinkin.
The bride was given in marriage by
her brother, Glenn Sprechini. Her
niece, Christianna Trozzi, Vestal,
N.Y., was her maid of honor.
The groom chose his brother, Rob-
ert F. Hinkin, as his best man. Ushers
were Matthew Trozzi, Vestal, N.Y.,
and Christopher Sprechini, Syracuse,
N.Y., nephews of the bride.
An afternoon reception took place
at The Woodlands Inn and Resort,
Plains Township, Pa., with classical
music by a trio from Supplee Strings.
A rehearsal dinner was given at Isa-
bella Restaurant, Plains Township,
Pa.
The bride is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School; Penn
State University, Worthington Cam-
pus, with an associate degree in com-
puter science; Kings College with a
Bachelor of Science degree in com-
puter and information systems; and
Marywood University with a masters
degree in management information
systems. She has been employed at
GUARD Insurance Group for 25 years
and is a director and senior business
analyst.
The groom is a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School; Luzerne
County Community College with an
associate degree in social sciences;
Kings College with a Bachelor of
Science degree in accounting and
business administration; Wilkes Uni-
versity with a Master of Business
Administration degree in finance; and
Wilkes-Barre Career and Technology
Centers nursing program.
The couple honeymooned in Rome
and the Amalfi Coast, Italy. They
reside in Plains Township, Pa., with
their precious cats, Oscar and Mid-
night.
Hinkin, Sprechini
R
acquel Alice Hettesheimer and
Anthony John Milunic were unit-
ed in marriage on Aug. 20, 2011, at
St. Lukes Reformation Lutheran
Church, Noxen.
The bride is the daughter of Frann
Rifenbery, Tunkhannock, and David
and Tara Hettesheimer, Noxen. She is
the granddaughter of James Het-
tesheimer and the late Evelyn Het-
tesheimer, Noxen; Patricia Rifenbery
and the late Robert Rifenbery, Mesh-
oppen; and the late Rosemary Engle-
man. She is the great-granddaughter
of Clara Rifenbery, Beaumont, and
the late William Rifenbery.
The groom is the son of Mary Jane
Rosenko and the late Richard Ro-
senko, Luzerne, and John and Barb
Milunic, Luzerne. He is the grandson
of Dorothy Milunic and the late John
Milunic, Luzerne; John and Jan John-
son, Larksville; and the late Mary
Jane Johnson.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle by her father. She chose her
sister, Tessa Hettesheimer, as her
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were
Brittany Barbacci, Sheena Kocher
and Amanda Sergi, close friends of
the bride.
The groom chose his brother, Mi-
chael Milunic, as his best man.
Groomsmen were Johnny Milunic,
brother of the groom; Ricky Rosenko,
half brother of the groom; and Benja-
min Nulton, cousin of the bride.
Racquel was honored with a tea
party brunch bridal shower hosted
by her mother and close family and
friends. A rehearsal dinner was given
by the grooms mother and family at
Leggios in Dallas. The dinner recep-
tion was hosted by the bride and
groom at the Checkerboard Inn,
Trucksville.
The bride is a 2003 graduate of
Tunkhannock Area High School. She
is employed as the medical records
supervisor at Advanced Pain Manage-
ment Specialists.
The groom is a 2001 graduate of
West Side Vocational-Technical
School. He has been employed with
Keystone Automotive for 10 years.
The couple honeymooned in Key
West, Fla. They reside in Kingston.
Hettesheimer, Milunic
L
eona Koepke,
Wilkes-Barre,
celebrated her 92nd
birthday Oct. 3.
Mrs. Koepke is the
wife of the late Da-
niel Koepke and the
mother of the late
Candice Koepke.
She has two sons, Robert, Wilkes-
Barre, and Brent, Mountain Top. She
also has four grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.
She celebrated her birthday with
her family.
Leona Koepke
celebrates 92nd
birthday
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
7
1
2
1
0
8
Evening Appointments Available
Accepting Most Insurance Plans
1524 Sans Souci Parkway
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
Telephone (570) 825-2247 TROYNACKI DENTAL GROUP
Accepting New Patients
Adults And Children
David J.Troynacki, Jr. D.M.D. David J.Troynacki, Sr. D.M.D. Mallory L. Troynacki, D.M.D.
Bishop Hoban High School Classes of 1976 and 1977 held a class reunion on Labor Day weekend. An
icebreaker took place Saturday evening at Cork Restaurant, Wilkes-Barre, and the reunion was held on
Sunday at Konefals Grove, Shavertown. A video presentation of high school memories was presented by
Ted Zwiebel and deceased members were also memorialized. Jerry Yozwiak, Class of 1977, was honored
for his military service. Music was provided by Tim McKeown and Ted Zwiebel. Mike Radzwilla also provid-
ed entertainment. Representatives from the Class of 1976 (above, left), from left, first row, are Mike Radz-
willa, Kim Evans Grundowski, Patti Muskas Shinko, Beth Gorski, Mary Ann Ulichney, Trudy Cravatta DiNar-
do, Kathy Szustak McGrady, Karen Szustak Bedrin, Christine Kohl, Sandy Seacrist Weeks, Paula Sakowski
Woolfolk and Cathy Hurley McGroarty. Second row: Carolyn Nork Boone, Debbie Wilcox Ostrowski, Mon-
ica Stilp Pageler, Lizanne Grochowski Chmielewski, Sister Donna Korba, MaryEllen Loftus Konetski, Eileen
Olshefski Mundenar, Debbie Housenick, Pat Klein Ignarri, Bernie Yatsko Hess and Diane Zabowski. Third
row: Sue Casey Rose, Tim McKeown, Karen Zorzi Pizii, Bill Corcoran, Phil Marino, Leo Skoronski, Mike
Bedrin, Ron Olshemski, Eileen Caffrey Stempien, JoAnn Herbert Wade, Dave Sapak, Bob Hapeman, Dave
Pascoe, Stan Shinko, Tom Gillen, John Monick and Tom McGrath. Fourth row: Jim Hurley, Mike Miller, Tim
Walsh, Mike Frank, Bill Armbruster, Dave Matcho, Pat Boyle, Tom Baloga, Brian Boyle, John Brody, Kenny
John, Joe Lyons, Al Phoenix and Ted Zwiebel. Jim Considine and Monica Yenchak also attended. Attend-
ees from the Class of 1977 (above, right), from left, are Joan Martin Loch, Colleen Lenahan Sperduto,
Margaret Mascelli Ward, Diane Swoboda Davis, Karen McCabe Rose, Jerry Yozwiak, Lori Ney Grablick,
Larry OMalia, Mary Ann Schuler Salaway, Michelle Gildea Rohrbeck, Ron Ott and Janet Dotter Pisa-
neschi.
Bishop Hoban High School Classes of 1976 and 1977 celebrate anniversary reunions at Konefals Grove
Students from the Greater Nanticoke Area Elementary Center
recently participated in the annual Artist in Residence Program.
This years theme was dancing and the students learned various
dances from instructor Vince Brust. The Artist in Residence Pro-
gram is sponsored by NEIU19, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts,
the GNA Elementary PTA and the GNA Elementary Activity Fund.
Some of the participants, from left, are Adriana Pezella, Jordan
Spencer, Margaret DeJesus, Brust, Amanda Margalski, Megan Jar-
rett and Andrew Kozlofski.
GNA Elementary students learn dance during Artist Program
Seventeen freshmen at Holy Redeemer High School were recently awarded Elizabeth Ann Seton
scholarships. Awards are given by the Diocese of Scranton to students entering Catholic high schools
and are bestowed in recognition of academic achievement in the eighth grade. The students were rec-
ognized by Holy Redeemer at its opening Mass. Scholarship recipients, from left, first row: Timothy
White, Forty Fort, Good Shepherd Academy; Gabriella Soroka, Wilkes-Barre, Good Shepherd Academy;
Tyler Scott, Ashley, St. Nicholas/St. Mary; Briana Scorey, Wilkes-Barre, Good Shepherd Academy; John
Rey, Wilkes-Barre, St. Nicholas/St. Mary; and Madison Mishanski, Wilkes-Barre, St. Nicholas/St. Mary.
Second row: Anita Sirak, principal, Holy Redeemer; Conlan McAndrew, Mountain Top, St. Jude; Mark
Liskowicz, Laflin, St. Marys Assumption; Alex Kotch, Plymouth, Good Shepherd Academy; Maria Khoud-
ary, Dallas, Gate of Heaven; Michael Gorski, Wilkes-Barre, Holy Rosary; and Cameron Gill, Wyoming,
Good Shepherd Academy. Third row: Michael Gatusky, Harveys Lake, Gate of Heaven; Robert Dough-
erty, Shavertown, Good Shepherd Academy; Ann Cosgrove, White Haven, St. Jude; Michael Conlon,
Inkerman, St. Marys Assumption; Mary Blaskiewicz, West Pittston, Wyoming Area Catholic; Abe Simon,
academic vice principal, Holy Redeemer.
Redeemer freshmen receive diocesan scholarships
More than 250 Penn State
students and staff recently gath-
ered at Penn State Behrend, Erie,
to attend the 201 1 Penn State
University Summer Leadership
Conference. Seven students from
Penn State Wilkes-Barre were
chosen to represent the campus
during the three-day conference.
Students attended workshops
and lectures and networked with
fellow students from the 19 cam-
puses of the University College
and University Park. Keynote
speaker Joshua Fredenburg
addressed personal and civic
leadership issues. The students
who attended the conference will
become leadership role models
for their classmates on campus.
Penn State Wilkes-Barre partici-
pants, from left, first row: Megan
Millo, business; Chris Kubicki,
business; and Marika Merritt,
business. Second row: Kathie
Flanagan Herstek, director of
student affairs; Donovin Lindsay,
administration of justice; Jackie
W. Piatt, student activities coor-
dinator; Fred Orlando, engineer-
ing; and Kate Lewis, adminis-
tration of justice. Third row: Joe
Gates, engineering.
PSU students, staff attend
leadership conference
Fourth-grade students at Wyoming Seminary Lower School are
taking part in a new One-to-One Laptop Computer pilot program for
the 2011-2012 academic year. The students received new, individual
MacBook laptop computers which they will use every day in school to
organize information, complete individual and collaborative assign-
ments, investigate problems, communicate with other students
around the world and create solutions to problems. The One-to-One
Laptop Computer program is largely supported by the Lower School
Parents Association. Learning how to use their new laptop computers,
from left, first row, are Varun Iyengar, Clarks Summit. Second row:
Maniyakim Welcome, Kingston; Kristine McCarthy, fourth-grade teach-
er; Harish Yerra, Wilkes-Barre; and Garrett Larson, West Pittston.
Third row: Rachel Swaback, West Pittston. Fourth row: Aishani Chau-
han, Shavertown, and Tyra McCormick, Dallas.
Sem students participating in laptop pilot program
Kindergarten students at St.
Jude School recently celebrated
Apple Day by enjoying home-
made apple sauce and using
apples for math activities. They
also studied apples in their
science class and made apple
decorations for their classroom.
Some of the students, from left,
first row, are Carly Glaser, Dona-
to Strish and Jack Novelli. Sec-
ond row: Ryan Grieves, Frances-
ca Basalyga and Gianna Musto.
St. Jude students
celebrate Apple Day
Students, faculty and staff from Misericordia University recently
volunteered to help move school supplies from Holy Rosary School,
Duryea, to its new home in Avoca. Regional flooding destroyed the
lower level of the school and classrooms had to be relocated piece-
by-piece to the former St. Marys School, Avoca. Some of the partic-
ipants, from left, first row: Aubre Mayorowski, Old Forge; Kristen
Egbert, Forked River, N.J.; Debbie Keys, Bethlehem; Colleen Noga,
Marlton, N.J.; and Paul Krzywicki. Second row: Tom Sweetz; Vanessa
Mayorowski; Helen Bogdon; Michelle Cameron, Mendham, N.J.; and
the Rev. Donald Williams, campus chaplain.
Misericordia students, staff help school move after flooding
The preschool class from Miss Ellies Education Center, Wilkes-
Barre, recently took a field trip to Millers Orchard. The children
enjoyed a hay wagon ride and a visit with the farm animals. They
also visited the apple orchard. Participating students, from left, are
Alivia Evans, Christopher Schlude, Robbie Miller, Christian Padden,
Aiden Nealon, Liam Frame, Keira Thompson, Abby Tredinnick and
Tristin Rushnock. Second row: Christopher Rilk, Shawn Rubin, Sean
Davis, Nicholas Nuss, Bobby Ashford, Tori Okonski, Mackenzie
Kearney and Jude Free.
Miss Ellies students visit orchard
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
Nesbitt Womens and Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital
Patterson, Ashley and Rafael
Reyes, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Oct.
17.
Kishbaugh, Sharleen and Jeremy,
Shickshinny, a daughter, Oct. 18.
Cox, Kelly and John, Kingston, a
daughter, Oct. 20.
Konsavage, Jill and Raul Ramirez,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, Oct. 20.
Morris, Ashley and Mark, Wyom-
ing, a daughter, Oct. 20.
Lesh, Deanna and David, Inkerman,
a daughter, Oct. 21.
Grimes, Sharon and Nicholas,
Plains Township, a son, Oct. 21.
Sinkaus, Krystal and James, Moos-
ic, a son, Oct. 21.
BIRTHS
Nov. 8
MOUNTAIN TOP: Crestwood
Middle School PTA 6:30 p.m. in
the middle school library. All
parents, guardians and grand-
parents are encouraged to at-
tend. For more information
contact PTA President Brenda
Anderson at 570-814-8831.
MEETINGS
Berklee College of Music,
Boston, Mass.
Bradley Chukinas, Plains
Township.
University of the Sciences,
Philadelphia
Lauren Davis, Kingston; Ash-
ley Hetro, Exeter; Gina
Ventre, Old Forge; Sarah
Verbyla, Larksville.
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WHAT: A walk through downtown Wilkes-Barre
WHEN: Sunday, Nov. 13, 1:00-3:00pm
WHERE: Start at Public Square
WHY: To educate and raise funds for the homeless
HOW: Go to ruthsplace.com; or call 822-6817
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Boots Shoes Slippers
Handbags Apparel Gloves
Scarves Hats Earmuffs
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
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PITTSTON: Pittston Area
High School is hosting a bon-
fire and public pep rally Thurs-
day evening at the high school
as part of the Spirit Week
celebrations.
EXETER: Highland Manor
Nursing and Rehabilitation
Center, 750 Schooley Ave., is
hosting its annual holiday food
drive to support the Greater
Pittston Food Pantry, located
in the free Medical Clinic, 37
William St. Donations will be
collected Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday at Highland
Manor. The food bank serves
households within 15 Greater
Pittston communities.
EXETER: Wyoming Area
School District will hold its
annual Veterans Day program
at noon on Nov. 9 at the
Wyoming Area Secondary
Center, 20 Memorial St.
Members of local service
organizations and Wyoming
Area veterans will be honored
guests at a luncheon followed
by an assembly in the gymnasi-
um. All veterans in the Wyom-
ing Area community are in-
vited. Reservations are re-
quired by Monday and can be
made by calling Nancy Alberi-
gi at 655-3733 ext. 2301.
WILKES-BARRE: The
Luzerne/Schuylkill Workforce
Investment Board and PA
CareerLink, Wilkes-Barre
office, are sponsoring a free
career fair for area residents
interested in careers in the
education and health care
fields 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday at PA Career-
Link, 32 E. Union St.
The event is open to the
public and will feature in-
formation about careers in
healthcare and education as
related to health care occupa-
tions.
Representatives from John-
son College of Technology,
Wilkes-Barre Career and Tech-
nical Centers Practical Nurs-
ing Program, Fortis Institute,
Kings College, Wilkes Uni-
versity, Keystone Job Corps
Centers Practical Nursing
Program, Luzerne County
Community College, Geisinger
Health Network and Penn
State University will be avail-
able to provide information
and answer questions. Stu-
dents from the Practical Nurs-
ing Program at the Keystone
Job Corps Center will offer
free blood pressure screenings.
For more information call
the PA CareerLink office at
570-826-2401.
WILKES-BARRE: The
annual Deb Ball, sponsored by
Polish Union USA, a fraternal
benefit society headquartered
in Wilkes-Barre, will take place
5:30 p.m. Saturday at Fiorellis
Restaurant, Peckville.
The theme of this years ball
is A Special Rose in honor of
late President Rose Wartko,
who founded the Debutante
Ball program of the Polish
Union and actively participa-
ted for 32 years. Former deb-
utantes will offer tributes to
Wartko and entertainment will
be provided by the George
Tarasek Orchestra. The affair
is open to the public and tick-
ets are available by calling
823-1611.
IN BRIEF
WILKES-BARRE: Kings
College is hosting a free public
Mass Communications Confer-
ence beginning 9:30 a.m.
Thursday inthe Sheehy-Farmer
Campus Center, betweenNorth
Main and North Franklin
streets.
The conference features four
sessions by professionals and
industry leaders lecturing on a
variety of topics, including ad-
vertising, sports media, film-
making, graphic design, public
relations, radio broadcasting,
and print journalism.
Schedule of sessions:
9:30 a.m.: Art director and
photographer Brian Blight on
Creating Images for Your Tar-
get Audience; 10 Ways Engag-
ing Copy CanHelp YouScore in
Life by Tracey Selingo, owner,
Inc Engage; and Media Adver-
tising in Todays Advanced
World by Bob Loftus, account
executive, WNEP-TV.
11 a.m.: Sports Media by
Erin Dugan, sports reporter
and producer, Fox 56 WOLF-
TV; Dr. Ray Gamache, assistant
professor of mass communica-
tions, Kings College; TV, Ra-
dio and Web for the Attention
Challenged by Dan Simrell,
owner and creative director of
Dan Simrell Advertising; and
Radio in Todays Marketplace
by Brian Carey, radio host for
1010 WINS, CBS Radio.
12:30 p.m.: an analysis of the
communications fieldbyCathe-
rine A. Bolton, principal, River
Rock Communications; Adver-
tising and Marketing for an E-
Business by Dawn Bobeck,
vice president of sales and mar-
keting, Vintage Tub and Bath;
and Smashing the Gates of
Media: Why You Need to be a
Fearless Storyteller by film-
maker Octavio Warnick-Gra-
ham.
2 p.m.: Design, Develop-
ment, and Then Some by
Matt Giordano, creative direc-
tor of nepaconnect.com; and
Investigative Reporting for
Print and Broadcast by Susan
Henry, radio host, WILK-FM.
The conference is sponsored
by Kings Department of Mass
Communications and funded
by a federal grant. Registration
is available online at www.king-
s.edu. For more information,
contact Michelle Schmude at
570-208-5947, or email michel-
leschmude@kings.edu.
Kings sponsoring Mass
Communications Conference
Plains Memorial and Sacred Heart High Schools Classes of 1956 celebrated a joint 55th anniversary reunion Oct. 2 at Apple Tree Terrace,
Newberry Estates, Dallas. Classmates in attendance, from left, first row, are Basil Kulick; Margaret Motsko Kropiewnicki; Camilla McNelis
Finnan; Bernadine Stanski, class secretary, Plains Memorial; Barbara Cevenski Gunsior; Marie Pascucci Hamilton; Dorothy Trosko Olshefski;
Dorothy Gates Condo; Dolores Zorzi Calore; and Jean Gabel Bohac. Second row: Andrew Walgo; Robert Kropiewnicki; Edward Gawelko; Jo-
seph Welgos; Clem Ritter; Don Waxmonsky; Dr. William Biniek; Joseph Kozich; Michael Kunec, class president, Plains Memorial; John Birosak;
Joseph Tolarski; William Corcoran; Armonde Angeli; William Zurawski; and Raymond Condo.
Plains Memorial/Sacred Heart Classes of 1956 reunite
Students in the toddler room and pre-school room at Small Won-
ders/Back Mountain Day Care School recently held a Western Day.
The students painted horseshoes, roped a steer, danced and ate
smores. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Adalyn
Gutierrez and Anya Atherton. Second row: Dallas Fernandes and
Carissa Davis. Third row: Jack McLaughlin.
Day Care School kids enjoy Western Day activities
The Luzerne County Community College Foundation Inc. recently
received a donation from Pennstar Bank for the dental clinic at the
colleges new Health Sciences Center. At the check presentation at
the new dental clinic, from left: Cathryn Brown, director, dental
health; Dr. Dana Charles Clark, provost and vice president of academ-
ic affairs; Thomas P. Leary, president, LCCC; David Raven, president
and chief executive officer, Pennstar Bank; and Elizabeth Balduino,
marketing manager, Pennstar Bank.
Pennstar makes donation to LCCC dental clinic
The Academic Affairs Division at Luzerne County Community
College recently hosted the National Alliance of Community and
Technology Colleges (NACTC) 2011 summer conference. The
NACTC is a consortium of community colleges from across the
country. Members of the NACTC Board of Directors with college
representatives, from left, first row: Dr. Dana Clark, provost and
vice president, academic affairs, LCCC; Dr. Rex Peebles, Midland,
Texas, Midland College; Dr. Gloria McCall, Versailles, Ky., Kentucky
Community and Technical College System; Dr. Kathryn Campbell,
Minneapolis, Minn., Capella University; and Dr. Gary Mrozinski,
dean, business and technologies, LCCC, and president-elect, exec-
utive committee, NACTC. Second row: Thomas P. Leary, president,
LCCC; Ted Lewis, Cypress, Texas, Lone Star College CyFair; Dr.
Robert McCabe, Miami, Fla., executive director NACTC; Dr. Carl
Hite, Cleveland, Tenn., president, NACTC, Cleveland State Commu-
nity College; Dr. Anthony Wise, Knoxville, Tenn., Pellissippi State
Community College; and Dr. John Roueche, Austin, Texas, Uni-
versity of Texas.
LCCC hosts NACTC summer conference
Members of the Misericordia University Active Minds
Chapter organized an information table and activities
for the Fifth Annual National Day Without Stigma on
Oct. 3. Students distributed educational resources and
materials and offered free giveaways to fellowstudents.
They also encouraged students to wear their clothes
inside out as part of the Turn Stigma Inside Out cam-
paign. Participants, fromleft, first row: Sarah Richard,
Pine Plains, N.Y.; Courtney Burgess-Michak, adviser;
Mary Lewis, Fayetteville, co-founder and national liaison;
Tori Flormann, Prospect, Conn.; Stephanie Evans,
Chadds Ford; and Monica Wall, Pittston. Second row:
Jaimie Washofer, Waldwick, N.J.; Brittany Lovette,
Beach Haven; Marisa Wagner, Lititz; Megan Lage, Mor-
ristown, N.J.; Dale Lehman, Zion Grove; Jesi Swoboda,
Price, Texas; Alanna Holmgren, Valhalla, N.Y.; Dana
Kinter, Lehman; Anthony Powell, Lansford; Ashlin Ro-
drigues, Mount Carmel; Colleen Noga, Mariton, N.J.;
Sarah Munley, Sussex, N.J.; Lindsey Cappello, Long
Valley, N.J.; and Amanda Lee, Turnersville, N.J.
Misericordia chapter Turns Stigma Inside Out
The Luzerne County Community College student food bank
recently received a donation from the Westminster Presbyterian
Church, Wilkes-Barre. With some of the donations, from left, first
row: Donna Dennis, secretary, counseling; Michelle McCabe, direc-
tor, Substance Abuse Education and Training Institute; Thomas P.
Leary, president; Greg Emery and Carol Conaway, Westminster
Presbyterian Church; Anna Mary McHugh, learning support assist-
ant; the Rev. Anne Emery, Westminster Presbyterian Church; and
Teddi Janosov, secretary, student life and athletics.
Westminster Church donates to LCCC food bank
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 7B
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
A team of eighth-grade students at St. Nicholas-
St.Mary School, Wilkes-Barre, will participate in the
National Aeronautics and Space Administrations
science and engineering program this year. The pro-
gram is made possible through the support of Luzerne
County Intermediate Unit 18. Students will meet at
Kings College and Wilkes University throughout the
school year and will work collaboratively to design
experiments and equipment which will be assessed by
NASA officials. Janice Szczechowicz, seventh- and
eighth-grade science teacher, is the moderator and
coach of the team. NASA Team members, from left,
first row, are Alexis Davison, Roisin Burke, Marissa
Rogers, Meghan McGraw and Michelle Devaney. Sec-
ond row: Cameron Brennan, Courtney Scovish, Ga-
brielle Tomasura, Marley Mullery and Liam Vender.
Alyssa Christian is also a member of the team.
St. Nicholas-St. Mary students
participate in space program
2
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Carved RoastTurkey w/Stuffing
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Chicken Francaise Glazed Ham
HaddockBella Vista
Homemade M ashed Potatoesw/Gravy
M ashed SweetPotatoesSweetCorn
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Pasta Bar:
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Grand DessertBarFeaturing:
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GusIce Cream Shoppe
Chocolate Fountain
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Annual Open House
Nov. 10
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10am-6pm
Nov. 12
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Miss Mollys serving lunch 11am-3pm
Be sure to make a reservation at 823-9217
Bring in Ad for 15% of one in stock,
single, non-sale item.
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Expires 11-12-2011.
Visit us on-line 24/7 at www.clarkesfowershop.com
62 N. Main St. Ashley, PA 570-823-9217
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C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
7:30P.M.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
F.M. KIRBYCENTER TICKETS$20
www.wilkes.edu/olf
Call theKirbyCenter boxofcefor tickets:
(570) 826-1100or Ticketmaster.com.
Event info: (570) 408-4330.
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L E XUS . COM
Luxury is disappearing from the
luxury car. At least, based on one
of the most telling factorsthe
features that come standard on
luxury modelsit would appear
to be the case.
In the past, luxury cars
pulled no stops, pouring luxury
into every detail, inside and out.
Compared to those luxury cars
of yesteryear (even yesterday),
todays standard-feature list often
seems downright draconian.
Looking at a cross-section
of top sellers, its immediately
apparent how many basic
luxury features no longer
come with the base model of
some car brands. Instead, they
turn up as costly additional
Options for which the consumer
must pay extra. Some models
charge extra for leather seat trim.
Some make you pay extra for
wood detailing or a sunroof. One
popular model even makes you
pay more (quite a bit more) to
have an automatic transmission.
Still another charges extra for
industry-standard 17-inch wheels.
All told, these extras can add up
to thousands of dollars consumers
never expected to pay. More than
that, it begs the question whether
a base model luxury car that does
Please turn to page C9
For more informati on, pl ease visit l exus. com/standardES. Lexus reminds you to wear
seatbelts, secure children in rear seats, obey all traffic laws and drive responsibly. 2010 Lexus.
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Standard Leather seat trim
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Standard Safety Connect

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Standard 6-speed automatic transmission
Standard Steering-wheel memory system
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Standard Auto-dimming side-viewmirrors
Standard Compass
Standard Rain-sensing wipers
Standard Front-bumper foglamps
Standard Heated side mirrors
StandardDual-zoneclimatecontrol
Standard Power moonroof
StandardOne-touchpower windows
Standard Leather-trimmed shift knob
Standard Bluetooth audio capability
Standard Drivers-seat memory system
Standard Water-repellent front-door glass
Standard Reverse tilt-down side mirrors
StandardIn-dash, six-discCDchanger
Standard Speed-sensing power steering
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StandardActivevibration-cancelingenginemount
StandardPower tilt/telescopingsteeringcolumn
StandardDriver &front-passenger lumbar support
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Coughlin High School Class of 1966 held its 45th anniversary reunion Sept. 3 at the Genetti Hotel and Conference Center. Music was provid-
ed by class member Rick Kowalski and his wife, Nicki, for the Friday and Saturday events. The night before the reunion an ice breaker was held
at the home of Joe Christopher and a Sunday brunch took place at the home of John Monico. Plans are being made to have an annual dinner
and updates will be on the website www.Coughlin66.com. Class members in attendance, from left, first row, are Peggy Yatsko Seltzer, Bob
Bartoletti, Marlene Totino Starrie, Marietta Burridge Schiavo, Patricia Brown, Judy Hilbert Karcheski, Roxanne Rhodes Czarniecki and Drew
Cummings. Second row: Jean Williams Bzura, Mary McGroarty Brown, Peggy Blamire Schuler, Irene Waznakowski Green, Patricia Brader Sand-
ers, Aggie Libertoski Fells, Theresa DePolo Morcavage, Tom Merolla and Woody Metzger. Third row: Joe Christopher, Bill Brown, Carol Ahouse
Wood, Bill Schultz, Ray Elick, John Monico, Barry Davenport, Maura Mahon, John Dirner. Fourth row: Steve Bellumori, June Suszko Miller,
Marie Dorrance Hartz, Bob Thomas, Joe Sterba, Rick Kowalski, Pete Lishnak, Chuck Mulligan, Bob Everett, Jack Kinney, Tom Zielinski, Karl
Harkenreader and Greg Miskiewicz.
Coughlin High School Class of 66 reunites
The Staff Council at Misericordia University celebrated
Mercy Week 2011 by hosting its annual Stuff the Bus
campaign and collecting donations for social service
agencies that support women and children. The group
worked throughout the lunch hour to fill the bus with
items donated by the campus community and the local
community. Some of the participants, fromleft, first row,
is Molly Harleman, a speech-language pathology student
fromLehighton, representing Campus Ministry. Second
row: Diane Morreale, manager, bookstore; Gail Wyberski,
cataloging specialist, Mary Kintz Bevevino Library; El-
izabeth Pedro, coordinator, information technology, Stu-
dent Help Desk; Carolyn Yencharis-Corcoran, assistant
director, Insalaco Center for Career Development; Bruce
Riley, assistant director, Student Success Center; Susan
Lazur, senior secretary, Mary Kintz Bevevino Library; and
Rachel Holmberg, assistant director, admissions.
Mercy Week celebrated at Misericordia
with Stuff the Bus campaign
Five Kings College physician assistant students have been select-
ed to receive educational assistance grants made possible by a
five-year federal grant awarded to the college in 2010. Funds from
the grant are allowing Kings to expand its physician assistant stud-
ies programby up to five students per year through 2015 to meet
the growing national need for primary care providers. The students
are the first to benefit fromthe Health Resources and Services
Administrations Expansion of Physician Assistant Training Program
under the Affordable Care Act. The $990,000 award was one of 32
grants awarded to Physician Assistant training programs in the
United States and was the largest of four given to Pennsylvania
institutions. Fromleft: Diana Easton, interimdirector of the Physi-
cian Assistant Program; scholarship recipients Danielle Dunham,
Amanda Evans, Elizabeth Lutz, Sara Ciarlo and Kayleen Cuddy; and
Jean Denion, associate clinical professor and academic coordinator
of the Physician Assistant Program.
Kings College physician assistant students receiving grants
Wyoming Area Catholic School, Exeter, recently announced
new Student Council officers for the 201 1-2012 school year. Offi-
cers were elected by class representatives from grades 1-8. From
left: Mrs. Owens, moderator; Sarah Satkowski, vice-president,
grade 7; Danielle Morris, secretary, grade 5; Alexia Mazzarella,
president, grade 8; Erika Serafin, treasurer, grade 6; and Mrs.
Walsh, moderator.
Wyoming Area Catholic School elects officers
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9B
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C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Sara Hunter, Avoca, is a recip-
ient of a 201 1 Nate Alston
Student Schol-
arship from
the Profes-
sional Society
of Physician
Assistants
(PSPA). Hun-
ter will re-
ceive the
$2,000 schol-
arship at the
annual PSPA Conference in
Erie in late October. The schol-
arship recognizes students
who have demonstrated the
highest standards of the physi-
cian assistant profession
through their experience and
knowledge by promoting good-
will, public recognition and
professional development of
the profession. Hunter is in
her fifth and final year of the
combined bachelors/masters
degree physician assistant
studies program at Kings
College. She is the president
of the 2012 PA graduating
class and is on the committee
for the annual Paulas Walk for
the Lupus Foundation. She
also volunteers at The Center
of Cancer Wellness, Candys
Place, Forty Fort, and was a
co-chair for the centers an-
nual fashion show which raised
more than $10,000.
Amanda Whitebread, a student
in the Luzerne County Com-
munity Col-
lege commer-
cial art pro-
gram, recently
received the
Alumni Asso-
ciation Art
Award. The
annual award
is given to an
art student
who shows talent and promise
in the field. One student who
participates in the colleges
annual student art exhibit
receives a cash award from
the Alumni Association each
year.
Lorie Zelna, associate professor
of medical imaging at Miser-
icordia University, was award-
ed the Elsevier Faculty Devel-
opment Schol-
arship in
Radiation
Science by the
Association of
Collegiate
Educators in
Radiologic
Technology.
The scholar-
ship is award-
ed annually to an educator
who excels in the classroom
and in clinical settings and has
made significant contributions
to education in radiation sci-
ence. Zelna was also one of 13
medical imaging professionals
who recently completed the
American Society of Radiolog-
ic Technologists Leadership
Academy, a six-week on-line
course that teaches medical
imaging and radiation therapy
professionals the leadership
principles of association man-
agement. Zelna is enrolled in
the Doctor of Health Education
program at A.T. Still University,
Kirksville, Mo. She holds a
certificate of radiography from
Polyclinic Medical Centers
School of Radiography, a Bach-
elor of Science degree in ra-
diologic technology education
from Bloomsburg University
and a masters degree in in-
structional technology from
Misericordia University. She
also completed a Diasonics
magnetic resonance imaging
technologist training course
and is certified by the Amer-
ican Registry of Radiologic
Technologists in magnetic
resonance imaging and radiog-
raphy. Zelna and her husband,
Al, reside in Falls with their
two sons, Alex and Zach.
Raymond Bierbach, Hunlock
Creek; Cortney Schoenberger,
Tresckow; and Nathan Volkel,
Sweet Valley, were recently
inducted into the Omicron
Delta Epsilon economics honor
society at Lycoming College,
Williamsport.
NAMES AND FACES
Hunter
Whitebread
Zelna
Sixteen Kings College students participated in a three-week study abroad experience from Venice,
Italy to Istanbul, Turkey. Students explored the culture and history of southeast Europe in the program
titled Geographies of Europe. The program is designed to investigate the creation, transformation
and enforcement of the boundaries of European identity through two case studies: the ghettoized
Jews of early modern Venice and marginalized Muslim Turks in contemporary Europe. History profes-
sors Daniel Clasby and Nicole Mares and Kim Fabbri, coordinator of the Scholars in Service Program,
coordinated the program. Participants, from left, first row, are Noah Klinges, Ashley Desiderio,
Adrienne Penney, Alexandra Shinert and Gareth Henderson. Second row: Robert Figlock, Chris Skevo-
filax, Sarah Beyer, Lisa LaMaire, Alisa Marino, Mara Olenick, Giancarlo DiLonardo and Mares. Also
participating were Jennie Hampton, Dawn Long, Tammi Sager, Cara Verazin and Clasby.
Kings students study abroad
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 11B
7
1
2
4
9
5
THE TIMES LEADER Welcomes
THE TIMES LEADER
timesleader.com
For home delivery, call 829-5000 or toll free 1-800-252-5603 Monday through Friday 6:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 7:00 a.m.- 12:00 noon
Family
Hearing Center
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Zeigler - Asby Audiology
...all ages and all stages...
At our NEW LOCATION
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400 Third Ave. Kingston
Expanded and evening hours are now available
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Jill McClelland Au. D., James Zeigler Au. D., Judith Johnston Au. D.,
and Robert Asby, M.S.
C M Y K
PAGE 12B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your childs
name, age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grandparents
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any siblings and their ages.
Dont forget to include a daytime
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We cannot return photos submitted
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photos and all publicity photos.
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Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
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GUIDELINES
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C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your childs photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
Happy Birthday Shopping Spree
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Christina Marie Kurlandski,
daughter of John and Mary
Kurlandski, Swoyersville, is
celebrating her ninth birthday
today, Oct. 30. Christina is a
granddaughter of the late Frank
and Mary Sorick, Pittston, and
the late John and Helen Kur-
landski, Plains Township. She has
five sisters, Mary, Susan, Joy,
Molly and Maria, and three
brothers, Mark, John Jr. and
Frank.
Christina M. Kurlandski
Noah Jeremy Rokosz, son of John
and Diane Rokosz, Plymouth, is
celebrating his sixth birthday
today, Oct. 30. Noah is a grandson
of John and Janet Rokosz, Ply-
mouth, and Leon and Mary Ann
Charneski, Wilkes-Barre. He has
two brothers, Jonathan, 12, and
Jacob, 10.
Noah J. Rokosz
Maggie A. Tecce, daughter of
Mike and Nikki Tecce, Pottstown,
is celebrating her fourth birth-
day today, Oct. 30. Maggie is a
granddaughter of Ron and Joan
Perry, Swoyersville; Anthony
Tecce, Gilbertsville; and the late
Margaret M. Tecce. She is a
great-granddaughter of Matilda
Hetro, Exeter; the late Andrew
Hetro; Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Perry,
Morgan City, La.; Ethel Hagner,
Ocean City, N.J.; and the late
Mary Lou Sajakowski.
Maggie A. Tecce
Greater Nanticoke Area School District Pre-K Counts classes are
having a Hop-A-Thon on Friday to benefit Jerrys Kids and the
Muscular Dystrophy Association. The children will learn about
disabilities through activities during the week and participate in a
hopping session for a timed, two-minute period. The public is
asked to make donations to support the Hop-A-Thon. Donations
can be made at the Nanticoke Pre-Ks MDA webpage at joinm-
da.org/nepafallhopathon2011/nanticokeprekcounts; the link at the
Family Center/Pre-K Counts webpage at gnasd.com; or by calling
the preschool at 735-0935. Members of the morning pre-kin-
dergarten class, from left, first row, are Ryan Simcox, Cecily John-
son, Brandon Egenski, Cerenity Eldridge, Derek Shemanski, Ma-
riah, and Victoria Mitchell. Second row: Austin Marusak, James
Orellana, Adam Shotwell, Eugene Gyle and Addison Mosgo. Third
row: Camaryn Barancho, Destiny Simone, Paige Pugh, John Fine
and Christopher Sedorchuk.
GNA Pre-K students holding MDA Hop-A-Thon
Homecoming activities at E. L. Meyers High School will begin at
the bonfire 6 p.m. Thursday in Miner Park. The Homecoming
Court will be announced and the king and queen will be crowned.
The Mohawks will take on the GAR Grenadiers at 7 p.m. Friday. A
pre-game ceremony will feature the queens court. Festivities will
end with a semi-formal dance 6-10 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Woodlands
Inn and Resort. Members of the 2011 Homecoming Court, from left,
first row, are Alexander Pape, Mary Pettit, Tyler Byrd, Leanne
McManus and Katherine Flannery. Second row: Tess Sauer and
Alivia Weidler. Third row: David Oram, Mia Scocozzo, Edward Wal-
ters, Terence Evans and Dominic Johnson.
Meyers homecoming set for Thursday
Brandon Povilitus, a freshman at Holy Redeemer High School, has
received this years Scott E. Snyder Memorial Scholarship. The an-
nual scholarship is given in memory of Scott Snyder, who was a ju-
nior at Bishop Hoban High School when he died on Jan. 4, 1989. The
four-year award is based on the qualities of the National Honor So-
ciety, scholarship, service, leadership and character, and a commit-
ment to the Catholic faith. Povilitus is the son of Mark and Pamela
Povilitus, Wilkes-Barre, and a graduate of Good Shepherd Academy.
At the scholarship presentation, from left: Michael Booth, vice princi-
pal for student affairs, Holy Redeemer; Elaine Snyder, mother of
Scott; Povilitus; Robert Musso, director of guidance, Holy Redeemer.
Redeemer student earns Snyder scholarship
GAR. Memorial High School Class of 1961 held its 50th anniversary reunion Aug. 13 at Wyoming Valley Country Club, Hanover Township.
The classmates also celebrated at an icebreaker Aug. 12 at the country club and a tour of the high school Aug. 13. Fifty classmates participa-
ted in the events and traveled from all over the United States. Attendees, from left, first row, are Ron Bonomo, James Kumiega, Zig Roebuck,
Carl Meier, Michael Michael, Dave Simakaski, the Rev. Bill Roberts and Joe Donnini, chairman. Second row: Alica Brennan Palischak, Ruth
Karalus Hockenbury, Sallyanne Williams Sincavage, Rachel Davis Nagle, Elaine Benish Gianuzzi, Barb Nareski Walker, Sharon Evans Riotto,
Eva Waskell, Judy Handel Seibert, Sandy Rossi Kurtinitis, Marilyn Davis Davis and Carol Demmeck Anstett. Third row: Sam Baccanari, Bob
Peters, Mary Klug Kopiciki, Frank Motovidlak, Eileen Stankowski Kelly, Tony English, Dewitt Davis, Rita McEvoy Taylor, John Sladin, Peggy
Gainard Pruitt, Fred Buss, Gloria Stook Dalessandro, Bradley Woode, Pat Temarantz Mickowski, Tony Giovino, Rudy Yarnott, Joe Pikas, Al
Dellaglio, Mike Burns, Bob Dourand, Jerry Flora, Tony Esser, Frank Tonart and Al Yateshin.
GAR Class of 61 holds 50th reunion
Students at Good Shepherd Academy, Kingston, recently participa-
ted in a Dress-Down Day to raise money to help families affected by
the Valleys recent flooding. The school community raised over
$5,000. Good Shepherd sent supplies, furniture, books and a mone-
tary donation to Holy Rosary School, Duryea, which was affected by
the recent flooding. Representatives from Good Shepherd, from left,
first row, are: Julia Vnuk, Amber Keithline and Sidney Jacobs. Second
row: Bailey Janowski, Justin Toporcer and Jacob Janosky. Third row:
Macy Klocko, Joshua Betz and Adam Sipler.
Good Shepherd students raise money for flood victims
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 13B
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Up and down, he quips.
Pardo lives in El Sereno, Calif.
three bus rides and a subway
trip away. He is in the elevator
when the young people show up
and when they leave.
Again and again, he goes
through the motions yanking
the heavy outer doors, stretching
the safety gate, steering the car
while counting the floors as
doors flash by.
And day in, day out, this small
man with thin salt-and-pepper
hair exudes a joy that leaves his
passengers marveling.
Luis Zavala, a 33-year-old Web
graphic designer, works at the
Ace Gallery on 2. Sometimes, he
said, he drags his way into the
day.
As for Pardo, Its like a glass of
fresh water every morning. I
dont know how he does it, but
everydayfor himjust seems tobe
a bright opportunity for some-
thing.
Good morning, Saaaa-mi!
Good morning, Ruben.
How are you, Sami?
Good. Yourself?
Wonderful, wonderful! Nice
to see you. Its good to live anoth-
er day!
In the world according to Ru-
ben Pardo, life is what you make
of it.
It is small only if you see it as
small. It is as big as you dreamit.
Life is wonderful if youlook at
the positive side, he says. I try
to pick up the high points.
He was born in Mexico City,
the son of a shop owner. But the
shops went bust and the family
went north, settling in Chicago
when he was 7.
His father worked in the steel
mills. Still, money was tight. So
at 9, Pardo became a newsboy
calling out Extra, extra, read all
about it! after school.
I learned the punches of life at
a very early age, he says.
In class, Catholic nuns taught
him to be a good soldier and
obey. But his formal education
ended after the ninth grade,
when he got a full-time job to se-
curehis younger siblings futures.
Before his family moved to East
Los Angeles in 1962, he found
work where he could, painting
garages, shoveling snow.
I was like a sacrifice, he says
one that paid off for others.
His brother became a public
defender. One sister is an ac-
countant. The other retired as a
pharmacist assistant.
Everybody had a good posi-
tion and guess what? They all got
houses andthreecars, four cars in
the garage. And Im the one with
the little apartment, Pardo says.
Thats the small version of Par-
dos life: But we are happy. Me
and my wife, we are really happy.
... As longas youre happy, as long
as you are full of happiness, thats
all that matters.
The young people in the build-
ing have led big lives already.
Theyve been to college.
Theyve seen the world.
Recently, two of themgot mar-
ried.
Tracy and Josh Ryan, the foun-
ders of Jett Media Group on 6,
were taking off for their honey-
moon to London, Ibiza, Barce-
lona and Paris.
In the elevator, Pardo wished
Josh well.
Pardo has seen the world, too,
he says when he was young.
Each Christmas, his father would
drive the family from Chicago to
Mexico or California.
Heading west, they took Route
66.
Some of the states we saw
end-to-end. Some of themwe just
saw in parts. ... In Arizona and
New Mexico, we saw a lot of
those rocks, in different shapes,
different colors, like in the old
cowboy and Indian movies. To us
kids, it was like looking at a
dream, he says.
All day, as he rides up and
down, he lets his happy memo-
ries roll around in his head.
Chicago, a place so cold you
have to dress like bears. The
windy, rainy day he first spoke to
Trudy at a bus stop after gather-
ing her school papers, which had
blown onto the street. The time
he was in the elevator in an earth-
quake and it swayed 20 to 30
times, can you imagine?
My mindis so full of all the ad-
ventures Ive been through, he
says.
They sustain him, as do lifes
daily surprises.
I love my small, little world.
ELEVATOR
Continued from Page 1B
MCT PHOTOS
Ruben Pardo takes a coffee break from his duties as one of the last elevator operators in front of the building where he works in Los
Angeles, Calif.
Ruben
Pardo, 69,
far right,
who works
six days a
week, by
choice,
has been
working
the eleva-
tor at the
Wilshire
Tower for
the past
35 years.
Four Wyoming Seminary seniors have been named Commended
Students in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship competition. Com-
mended students placed among the top five percent of more than
1.5 million students who entered the 2012 competition by taking the
2010 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.
Commended Students, from left, first row, are Sean Banul, Pittston,
and Logan May, Dallas. Second row: Brandon Bombe, Exeter, and
Kelsey Dolhon, Kingston.
Wyoming Seminary seniors named Commended Students
Artist Sue Hand recently donated the painting Pemaquid Point
Light House to Luzerne County Community Colleges 22nd Annual
Alumni Association Fall Craft Festival raffle. Chances are three for
$5 and are available at the Alumni Office. Proceeds will benefit
student programs and the colleges community outreach fund. The
artwork is on display on the alumni website at www.luzerne.edu/
alumni. The drawing for the painting will take place Nov. 14. With
the painting, from left: Bonnie Brennan Lauer, director, alumni
relations; Susan Gilroy King, member, Alumni Association; Ann
Marie Schreaeder, treasurer, Alumni Association; Hand; Thomas P.
Leary, president; and Sandra Nicholas, executive director, LCCC
Foundation, Inc.
Artist Sue Hand donates painting to LCCC raffle
C M Y K
PAGE 14B SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
timesleader.com
SOME MAY
SEE it as mar-
velous, magical
or mystical the
way Penn State
keeps finding
ways to win
football games.
Really though, the Nittany
Lions success has more to do
with their unshakeable self-faith
than depending on a wing and a
prayer.
While most Penn State fans
were asking the heavens for a
miracle during the teams final
drive Saturday, the Nittany
Lions were asking themselves
this:
Why not now?
"I kept telling the guys at
halftime, Its going to happen
for us," Penn State quarterback
Matt McGloin said. "It took a
little longer than I would have
wanted."
It took Penn State to its final
drive to finally put the ball in
the end zone and pull out a 10-7
victory over Illinois.
It took undying determina-
tion for the Lions to put aside a
whole day of struggles in the
snow and march 80 yards for a
game-winning touchdown.
It took a lot of luck for them
to remain unbeaten in the Big
Ten, too.
Signs of Penn State fortune
were everywhere at Beaver
Stadium, starting with an Illi-
nois field goal attempt that was
botched when the holder drop-
ped the snap at the end of the
first half.
A lot more fate played Penn
States way right from the start
of the second half.
You gotta have faith
A completed pass that would
have put Illinois in field goal
range was ruled an interception
when Penn State cornerback
DAnton Lynn ripped the ball
out of the receivers hands as he
appeared already down and
stretched out on the ground.
A pass interference call could
have gone either way on a
fourth-down pass play, but it
went Penn States way to extend
the winning touchdown drive.
And the Lions victory wasnt
sealed until Illinois kicker Derek
Dimke kicked a 42-yard field
goal attempt straight into the
right goal post as time expired
for his first miss all season.
Penn States Big Ten season
doesnt go to 5-0 without those
key contributions from fate.
But the Lions wouldnt have
rebounded with a winning rally
in the clutch without believing
they could put it together, ei-
ther.
"I guess its just something
this team has inside of us,"
McGloin said.
That trust stems from
McGloin, who convinced his
teammates they could march 80
yards over the games final three
minutes and five seconds
against a defense that hadnt let
the Lions in the end zone all
day.
"He just kind of said what he
always says, We got this, were
going to get down there, contin-
ue our season," said wide re-
ceiver Derek Moye, who made
two big catches and drew that
pass interference call in the end
zone on Penn States touchdown
march.
Sometimes, McGloin sounds
as if hes marching to his own
drummer. But you have to ad-
mire his dogged determination
that never sways, even in the
face of adversity.
The confident junior quarter-
back from Scranton threw18
passes and missed his target on
13 of them before the final
march. Then he hit four of his
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Lions know
that they
will win
See KNOW, Page 3C
WILKES-BARRE TWP. The
2011 installment of the Mayors
Cup game will be known at the
Snow Cup game.
When Kings hosted Wilkes on
Saturday at McCarthy Stadium,
the teams not only battled each
other, they took on the elements
as heavy, wet snow smothered
the field. Combined with gusty
winds, the weather was very
much a factor as the teams com-
bined for seven fumbles, two
missed extra points and several
slips on the slushy field in the
Colonels 13-6 victory.
Last years Wilkes victory --
when the temperature was push-
ing 80 degrees -- gave the teams
something warm to think about.
It was the first time both pro-
grams were part of a snow game
in more than 15 years.
Withthe win, Wilkes (3-4 over-
all, 3-3 MAC) received the May-
ors Cup trophy for the 12th time
in the 16-year history of the
game.
Ive told my players I always
wanted to play in a game like
this, Wilkes coach Frank Shep-
tock said. It was a neat atmo-
sphere for us to play in.
As the game continues to be
played and the tradition grows
withit, this is somethingthekids
will look back and say that its a
pretty neat atmosphere.
M AYO R S C U P : W I L K E S V S . K I N G S
Colonels storm to another Cup victory
Wilkes wins the city
championship for the eighth
time in the past nine years.
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
13
WILKES
6
KINGS
See CUP, Page 6C
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes running back Zach Tivald (27) works his way through the
Kings defense during Saturdays snow.
LINCOLN, Neb. That fan-
tastic finish against Wisconsin
sure seems like a long time ago to
Michigan State.
The ninth-rankedSpartans had
a chance to buildanalmost insur-
mountable lead in the Big Ten
Legends Division on Saturday
against No. 13 Nebraska, but the
Spartans road demons cropped
up again in a 24-3 loss.
What a difference a week
makes, Michigan State coach
Mark Dantonio said.
The Spartans were held to 187
total yards and quarterback Kirk
B I G T E N F O O T B A L L : M I C H I G A N S TAT E V S . N E B R A S K A
Burkhead, Huskers pound Spartans
By ERIC OLSON
AP Sports Writer
See HUSKERS, Page 5C
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nebraskas Kenny Bell, right, stiff-arms Michigan States Johnny
Adams in the second half Saturday in Lincoln, Neb.
as Derek Dimkes
game-tying field goal
attempt sailed back
toward the line of
scrimmage.
The remaining
students who had
stuck around
through a historic
October snowstorm frantically rushed
toward into the open seats behind the
upright before the try went up. They
STATE COLLEGE Theyre going
to remember the sound.
The snow, the cold, the record, the
three quarters of offensive ineptitude
all of it was there, too. But theyre
going to remember the sound that
final kick made as it collided with the
right upright.
Penn State players, coaches and
fans will remember the hollow thud
held their breath.
And then ... Clang.
Penn State 10, Illinois 7. Incredibly,
a seventh straight win for the Nittany
Lions and No. 409 in the Hall of Fame
career of Joe Paterno, pushing him
past the late Eddie Robinson for first
place all-time in Division I college
football.
The only other college coach at any
level still ahead of Paterno is John
Gagliardi, who is at 482 and counting
at Division III St. Johns (Minn.)
For me, a kid from Brooklyn,
whose grandfather was an immigrant,
to be something like this really means
a lot to me. An awful lot, Paterno
said after being presented a commem-
orative plaque by Penn State athletic
director Tim Curley and university
president Graham Spanier.
Ive gotta thank the coaching staff
PENN STATE FOOTBALL
FIGHTING ILLINI
7
NITTANY LIONS
10
Record for JoePa
AP PHOTO
PSU quarterback Matt McGloin, top center, celebrates with Gerald Hodges (6) and Malcom Willis (10) after Illinois missed a field goal on the final play.
Missed field goal places Penn State coach atop victory list
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
See LIONS, Page 3C
Paterno
MANCHESTER, N.H. Following one
strong road performance with another, the
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins polished
off a short but sweet weekend by hammer-
ing the Manchester Monarchs 4-1 on Satur-
day at Verizon Wireless Arena.
The Penguins pocketed two power-play
goals, while providing goaltender Brad
Thiessen with superb protection.
Thiessen made 17 saves just 11 through
the first two periods to record the win.
This after a long bus ride from Syracuse
through a freakish October blizzard on the
strength of Fridays 5-3 win.
A H L H O C K E Y
Penguins end road trip
by routing Manchester
4
PENGUINS
1
MOMARCHS
By DAN HICKLING
For The Times Leader
See PENGUINS, Page 6C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S C O R E B O A R D
CAMPS/CLINICS
Electric City Baseball & Softball
Academy will host a Winter Skills
Camp at Riverfront Sports on
Saturdays, Nov. 26, Dec. 3, 10 and
17 with baseball from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. and softball from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Cost for each is $145. For
more information, call 878-8483
or visit www.electriccitybaseball-
.com.
The 10th Annual Paul McGloin
Holiday Pitching Camp will be
held at Riverfront Sports on Dec.
26, 27 & 28 from 9:15 a.m. 11:45a.m.
Cost is $145 or $115 if signed up
byNov. 23. For more information,
call 878-8483 or visit www.e-
lectriccitybaseball.com.
MEETINGS
Nanticoke Little League will hold its
monthly meeting on Nov. 2nd at
West Side at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
The PA Boys Basketball Booster
Club will hold a monthly meeting
on Wednesday, Nov. 2nd at 6 p.m.
at Lizzas Mezzo/Mezzo 711 North
Main St. Pittston. Items to be
discussed are fund raisers for the
upcoming season. All parents of
boys interested in playing basket-
ball for Pittston Area are asked to
attend. Any questions, please call
Carl or Maria Stravinski at 570-
883-7220.
The Crestwood Boys Basketball
Booster Club will hold its next
meeting at Cavanaughs on Mon-
day, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. They will
discussing Meet the Player Night
and the Munley Tournament,
which will be held in December.
The Pittston Area Boys Basketball
Booster Club will be hosting a
happy hour on Friday, Nov. 11 from
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Red Mill at
340 South Main Street in Pittston.
Please join to help support the
team. If you have any questions,
contact Carl or Maria Stravinski at
883-7220.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
The Luzerne County Soccer Dome
still has openings for their U14B
and U16B dome soccer teams. Any
local players interested in playing
for any of our teams, for more info,
from U8Coed to U12, contact Head
Youth Coach Tom Armbruster at
570-762-5542. For U14 to U19,
contact Coach Rick at 570-814-
7403. LCSC plays in the Wyoming
Valley Sports Dome Winter soccer
leagues.
The Wilkes-Barre Express AAU
Basketball Program will hold
tryouts for the 2012 AAU season
on Nov. 9th and 10th. Tryouts for
grades 5th through 6th will be
held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Tryouts for grades 7th though 10th
will be held from 7:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. Tryouts will be held at the
Wyoming Seminary Upper School
and will cost $25. You can pre-
register online at www.black-
courthoops.com under the Wilkes-
Barre express tab. Walk ups are
also being accepted. If you have
any question you can contact Bill
Callahan at bill@backcour-
thoops.com.
Wilkes-Barre Heights Baseball will
be holding signups on Nov. 5, 12
and 19, and Dec. 3 and 10 at the
Stanton Lanes Bowling Alley. All
children ages 4 through 12 living in
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
and surrounding areas interested
in signing up are asked to bring a
copy of their Birth Certificate and
contact information. The cost is
$30 for one child, $60 for two
children and $15 for any sibling
after two. Questions can be direct-
ed to Gerrie at 570-235-6060 or
Mandy at 570-817-4638.
The Kingston Recreation Center is
taking registration for The Willie
Obremski Youth Basketball
League. Age groups are 5-7, 8-10,
11-13 and 14-17. Practice begins Nov.
28 and the league will start on
Dec. 12. For more information, call
287-1106 or stop by the Kingston
Recreation Center to sign up.
The Kingston Recreation Center is
accepting registrations for a youth
indoor soccer league to be played
on Saturdays starting Dec. 3. Age
groups are 4-6, 7-9 and 10-13.
Registrations will be accepted
through the Nov. 4 tryout date. For
more information, please call the
Kingston Recreation Center at
287-1106.
The Kingston Recreation Center is
now accepting teams for its Sun-
day and Wednesdays Mens Basket-
ball Leagues. Games start at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesdays and will end
at 9:45 p.m. Sunday games will
start at 3 p.m. and end at 9 p.m. All
players must be at least 17 years of
age. For more information, please
call the Kingston Recreation Cen-
ter at 287-1106.
The Kingston Recreation Center is
starting a Racquetball League on
Dec. 5. The fee is $40 for mem-
bers and $50 for non-members
and only 20 players will be taken.
All games will be played on Mon-
days and Wednesdays starting at 5
p.m., 6 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Please register and pay as soon as
possible, as registrations will end
Nov. 25. A T-shirt will be provided
with your league fee. For more
information, please call 287-1106.
UPCOMING EVENTS
The 2nd Annual Northwest Area
Alumni Games will be held on Nov.
25. Any alumni interested in partic-
ipation should call Lisa Mazonkey
at 57-0-256-3412 or email her at
mazonkey@epix.net. Girls game
will be at 6 p.m., boys game at 7
p.m., womens alumni at 8 p.m.,
and mens alumni at 9 p.m.
The Pace Setter Athletic Club of
Northeastern, Pa. will sponsor a
series of basketball tournaments
throughout Nov. 2011. On Saturday,
Nov. 5 the club will hold a 5th &
6th grade tournament for boys. On
Saturday, Nov. 12 and Sunday, Nov.
13 the club will present a 5th & 6th
grade tourney for girls.Each team
will play a minimum of two games
and a possible third game as
well.Each session and all gameswill
be held at the Greater Scranton
YMCA in Dunmore, Pa.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
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Today's Events
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
District 2 Semifinals
Class 2A
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 2 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary, 2 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 31
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
District 2 Semifinals
Class A
Wyoming Seminary vs. Mountain View, 7 p.m. at
Dunmore H.S.
Holy Cross vs. Forest City, 6 p.m. at Scranton H.S.
Class 3A
Abington Heights vs. Delaware Valley, 8 p.m. at
Scranton H.S.
Williamsport vs. Wallenpaupack, 6:30 p.m. at
Wilkes
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
District 2 Semifinals
Class A
MMI Prep at Lackawanna Trail, approx. 6:30 p.m.
Class 3A
North Pocono vs. Wyoming Valley West, 5 p.m. at
Delaware Valley
Abington Heights at Delaware Valley, 30 mins. after
first match
District 2 Quarterfinals
Class 2A
Crestwood vs. Lake-Lehman, 5 p.m. at Holy Re-
deemer
Berwick at Holy Redeemer, 30 mins. after first
match
Nanticoke vs. Tunkhannock, 5 p.m. at Dunmore
Meyers at Dunmore, 30 mins. after first match
TUESDAY, NOV. 1
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
District 2 Semifinals
Class 2A
Dallas vs. Crestwood, 6:30 p.m. at Wilkes
Lake-Lehman vs. Scranton Prep, 6 p.m. at Scranton
H.S.
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
District 2 Finals
Class 2A
Teams, site TBD
Class 3A
Coughlin vs. Wyoming Valley West, TBA
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
District 2 Semifinals
Class 2A
Teams, sites TBD
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
District 2 Finals
Class A & Class 3A
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
District 2 Finals
Class A
Teams TBD at Marywood
Class 3A
Teams TBD at Marywood
THURSDAY, NOV. 3
H.S. BOYS SOCCER
District 2 Finals
Class 2A
H.S. FIELD HOCKEY
PIAA Class 2A Qualifier
District 2 runner-up vs. District 4 runner-up
H.S. GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
District 2 Final
Class 2A
Teams TBD, 7 p.m. at Dallas H.S.
FRIDAY, NOV. 4
H.S. FOOTBALL
Berwick at Hazleton Area
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Northwest
Dallas at Lake-Lehman
GAR at Meyers
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Wyoming Valley West at Williamsport
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area
H.S. GIRLS TENNIS
PIAA Doubles Championships at Hershey
COLLEGE SWIMMING
Cabrini at Kings, 6 p.m.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLAS COWBOYS Waived RB Tashard
Choice. Activated LB Bruce Carter from the non-
football-injury list.
DETROIT LIONS Claimed S Chris Harris off
waivers from Chicago. Placed S Vincent Fuller on
injured reserve.
PITTSBURGHSTEELERSSignedLBMortty Ivy
from the practice squad. Released DE Corbin
Bryant.
ST. LOUIS RAMS Activated CB Marquis John-
son from the physically-unable-to-perform list.
Placed CB Brian Jackson on injured reserve.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL Suspended Edmonton D Andy Sutton one
game for a check to the head of Colorado F Gabriel
Landeskog during Fridays game.
MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Nate Prosser
from Houston (AHL). Placed D Greg Zanon on in-
jured reserve.
MONTREAL CANADIENS Assigned F Aaron
Palushaj to Hamilton (AHL).
OTTAWASENATORSRecalledGRobinLehner
from Binghamton (AHL) on an emergency basis.
NFL
Favorite Points Underdog
TITANS 8.5 Colts
TEXANS 9.5 Jaguars
PANTHERS 3.5 Vikings
Saints 13.5 RAMS
RAVENS 13 Cards
GIANTS 10 Dolphins
t-BILLS 5 Redskins
Lions 3 BRONCOS
Patriots 2.5 STEELERS
49ERS 8.5 Browns
Bengals 2.5 SEAHAWKS
EAGLES 3 Cowboys
Monday
Chargers 3 CHIEFS
t- Toronto, Canada.
Bye week: Falcons, Bears, Packers, Jets, Raiders,
Bucs.
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Ducks -$125/
+$105
BLUE JACKETS
SENATORS -$110/-
$110
Maple Leafs
Kings -$110/-
$110
AVALANCHE
OILERS -$110/-
$110
Blues
CFL
Favorite Points Underdog
MONTREAL 4.5 Calgary
Home Teams in Capital Letters
AME RI C A S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
INJURY REPORT: On the NFL board, Detroit QB Matthew Stafford is probable and
RB Jahvid Best is out; Seattle QB Tarvaris Jackson is probable.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBO welterweight title fight on November 12 in Las
Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao is -$800 vs. Juan Manuel Marquez +$550.
F O O T B A L L
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England .......................... 5 1 0 .833 185 135
Buffalo..................................... 4 2 0 .667 188 147
N.Y. Jets ................................. 4 3 0 .571 172 152
Miami ....................................... 0 6 0 .000 90 146
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston................................... 4 3 0 .571 182 131
Tennessee.............................. 3 3 0 .500 112 135
Jacksonville............................ 2 5 0 .286 84 139
Indianapolis............................. 0 7 0 .000 111 225
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Pittsburgh................................ 5 2 0 .714 151 122
Cincinnati ................................ 4 2 0 .667 137 111
Baltimore................................. 4 2 0 .667 155 83
Cleveland................................ 3 3 0 .500 97 120
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego ............................... 4 2 0 .667 141 136
Oakland................................... 4 3 0 .571 160 178
Kansas City............................. 3 3 0 .500 105 150
Denver..................................... 2 4 0 .333 123 155
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants.............................. 4 2 0 .667 154 147
Dallas ...................................... 3 3 0 .500 149 128
Washington ............................ 3 3 0 .500 116 116
Philadelphia............................ 2 4 0 .333 145 145
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans........................... 5 2 0 .714 239 158
Tampa Bay.............................. 4 3 0 .571 131 169
Atlanta ..................................... 4 3 0 .571 158 163
Carolina................................... 2 5 0 .286 166 183
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay............................. 7 0 0 1.000 230 141
Detroit.................................... 5 2 0 .714 194 137
Chicago................................. 4 3 0 .571 170 150
Minnesota............................. 1 6 0 .143 148 178
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco......................... 5 1 0 .833 167 97
Seattle...................................... 2 4 0 .333 97 128
Arizona.................................... 1 5 0 .167 116 153
St. Louis .................................. 0 6 0 .000 56 171
Today's Games
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, GreenBay, N.Y. Jets, Oak-
land, Tampa Bay
Monday, Oct. 31
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
NCAA
The AP Top 25 Fared
No. 1LSU(8-0) did not play. Next: at No. 2 Alabama,
Saturday.
No. 2 Alabama (8-0) did not play. Next: vs. No. 1
LSU, Saturday.
No. 3OklahomaState(8-0) beat Baylor 59-24. Next:
vs. No. 10 Kansas State, Saturday.
No. 4 Stanford (7-0) at No. 20 Southern Cal. Next: at
Oregon State, Saturday.
No. 5 Boise State (7-0) did not play. Next: at UNLV,
Saturday.
No. 6 Clemson (8-0) at Georgia Tech. Next: vs.
Wake Forest, Saturday, Nov. 12.
No. 7 Oregon (7-1) beat Washington State 43-28.
Next: at Washington, Saturday.
No. 8 Arkansas (7-1) beat Vanderbilt 31-28. Next:
vs. No. 14 South Carolina, Saturday.
No. 9 Michigan State (6-2) lost to No. 13 Nebraska
24-3. Next: vs. Minnesota, Saturday.
No. 10 Kansas State (7-1) lost to No. 11 Oklahoma
58-17. Next: at No. 3 Oklahoma State, Saturday.
No. 11 Oklahoma (7-1) beat No. 10 Kansas State
58-17. Next: vs. No. 16 Texas A&M, Saturday.
No. 12 Wisconsin (6-1) at Ohio State. Next: vs. Pur-
due, Saturday.
No. 13 Nebraska (7-1) beat No. 9 Michigan State
24-3. Next: vs. Northwestern, Saturday.
No. 14 South Carolina (6-1) at Tennessee. Next: at
No. 8 Arkansas, Saturday.
No. 15 Virginia Tech (8-1) beat Duke 14-10. Next: at
Georgia Tech, Thursday, Nov. 10.
No. 16 Texas A&M(5-3) lost to Missouri 38-31, OT.
Next: at No. 11 Oklahoma, Saturday.
No. 17 Michigan (7-1) beat Purdue 36-14. Next: at
Iowa, Saturday.
No. 18 Houston (8-0) beat Rice 73-34, Thursday.
Next at UAB, Saturday.
No. 19 Texas Tech (5-2) vs. Iowa State. Next: at
Texas, Saturday.
No. 20 Southern Cal (6-1) vs. No. 4 Stanford. Next:
at Colorado, Friday.
No. 21 Penn State (8-1) beat Illinois 10-7. Next: vs.
No. 13 Nebraska, Saturday, Nov. 12.
No. 22 Georgia (6-2) beat Florida 24-20. Next: vs.
New Mexico State, Saturday.
No. 23 Arizona State (6-2) beat Colorado 48-14.
Next: at UCLA, Saturday.
No. 24 Cincinnati (6-1) did not play. Next: at Pitts-
burgh, Saturday.
No. 25West Virginia(6-2) beat Rutgers 41-31. Next:
vs. Louisville, Saturday.
EAST
Albany (NY) 24, Wagner 0
Army 55, Fordham 0
Bentley 28, Pace 0
Brown 6, Penn 0
Bucknell 39, Lafayette 13
CW Post 24, Bloomsburg 20
California (Pa.) 28, Indiana (Pa.) 10
Cornell 24, Princeton 7
Cortland St. 23, College of NJ 20
Drake 23, Marist 13
Duquesne 16, Monmouth (NJ) 0
Edinboro 42, Lock Haven 7
Georgetown 19, Holy Cross 6
Harvard 41, Dartmouth 10
Kean 13, Rowan 6
Lehigh 45, Colgate 25
Lycoming 10, Lebanon Valley 7
Maine 41, Villanova 25
Muhlenberg 12, Dickinson 0
NY Maritime 34, Husson 13
New Hampshire 31, Rhode Island 24
Penn St. 10, Illinois 7
Sacred Heart 27, Robert Morris 15
St. Francis (Pa.) 27, CCSU13
Stevenson 36, FDU-Florham13
Stony Brook 42, Coastal Carolina 0
Susquehanna 40, Franklin & Marshall 13
Thomas More 27, Westminster (Pa.) 10
West Virginia 41, Rutgers 31
Widener 60, Albright 20
Wilkes 13, Kings (Pa.) 6
Yale 16, Columbia 13
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 20, Alabama St. 19
Appalachian St. 24, Georgia Southern 17
Arkansas 31, Vanderbilt 28
Bethune-Cookman 34, NC Central 6
Boston College 28, Maryland 17
Bridgewater (Va.) 27, Emory & Henry 14
Campbell 26, Davidson 20, 3OT
Campbellsville 24, Kentucky Christian 20
Carson-Newman 27, Brevard 24
Cumberland (Tenn.) 43, Union (Ky.) 35
Cumberlands 58, Belhaven 0
E. Illinois 19, Austin Peay 10
E. Kentucky 34, Murray St. 33
East Carolina 34, Tulane 13
Florida St. 34, NC State 0
Furman 14, Chattanooga 7
Gallaudet 59, Castleton St. 40
Gardner-Webb 14, Charleston Southern 7
Georgia 24, Florida 20
Hampden-Sydney 63, Guilford 49
Hampton 22, Savannah St. 5
Kentucky St. 17, Lane 6
Lenoir-Rhyne 52, Wingate 28
Liberty 27, Presbyterian 20, 2OT
Louisiana Tech 38, San Jose St. 28
Louisville 27, Syracuse 10
MVSU12, Texas Southern 9
Mars Hill 47, Tusculum 37
Marshall 59, UAB14
Morgan St. 12, Delaware St. 0
Norfolk St. 14, NC A&T 10
North Carolina 49, Wake Forest 24
Old Dominion 23, James Madison 20
SC State 31, Howard 0
Samford 52, W. Carolina 24
Sewanee 34, Rhodes 7
South Alabama 28, Henderson St. 3
St. Augustines 45, Livingstone 14
Tennessee Tech 21, Jacksonville St. 14
The Citadel 41, VMI 14
UCF 41, Memphis 0
UMass 28, Richmond 7
UNC-Pembroke 23, Newberry 20
UT-Martin 38, SE Missouri 30
Virginia Tech 14, Duke 10
W. Kentucky 31, Louisiana-Monroe 28, OT
Winston-Salem 21, Shaw14
Wofford 48, Elon 28
MIDWEST
Albion 28, Adrian 14
Ashland 34, Findlay 19
Augsburg 31, Macalester 23
Aurora 40, Rockford 7
Baldwin-Wallace 29, Muskingum17
Beloit 20, Lawrence 14
Benedictine (Ill.) 28, Lakeland 19
Bethel (Minn.) 27, Concordia (Moor.) 13
Case Reserve 6, Chicago 0
Cent. Michigan 23, Akron 22
Coe 30, Buena Vista 14
Concordia (Ill.) 62, Maranatha Baptist 27
Concordia (St.P.) 38, Minn.-Crookston 20
Cornell (Iowa) 19, Loras 10
Dayton 49, Valparaiso 10
Defiance 21, Rose-Hulman 18
Dubuque 45, Luther 0
Greenville 52, Minn.-Morris 14
Heidelberg 49, Wilmington (Ohio) 20
Hillsdale 14, Northwood (Mich.) 10
Illinois College 48, Grinnell 16
Illinois St. 38, S. Illinois 30
Illinois Wesleyan 28, Millikin 25
Indianapolis 24, Ferris St. 17
Kent St. 27, Bowling Green 15
Lake Forest 31, Knox 27
Mary 52, Minn. St.-Moorhead 13
Miami (Ohio) 41, Buffalo 13
Michigan 36, Purdue 14
Minnesota 22, Iowa 21
Monmouth (Ill.) 69, Carroll (Wis.) 14
N. Dakota St. 27, N. Iowa 19
N. Michigan 59, Tiffin 3
Nebraska 24, Michigan St. 3
Northern St. (SD) 14, Bemidji St. 0
Northwestern 59, Indiana 38
Northwestern (Iowa) 34, Dakota Wesleyan 0
Northwestern (Minn.) 53, Eureka 14
Notre Dame 56, Navy 14
Ohio Dominican 38, Lake Erie 30
Ohio Northern 56, Marietta 35
Oklahoma 58, Kansas St. 17
S. Dakota St. 43, Missouri St. 36, 2OT
Saginaw Valley St. 28, Wayne (Mich.) 20
St. Ambrose 59, Waldorf 0
St. Cloud St. 35, Minn. Duluth 7
St. Johns (Minn.) 47, Carleton 14
St. Norbert 37, Ripon 21
St. Olaf 40, Hamline 0
St. Thomas (Minn.) 20, Gustavus 7
St. Xavier 63, Concordia (Mich.) 3
Trine 42, Olivet 6
Valley City St. 28, Mayville St. 14
W. Michigan 45, Ball St. 35
Wartburg 20, Central 13
Wayne (Neb.) 44, Upper Iowa 41, OT
Winona St. 47, SW Minnesota St. 20
Wis. Lutheran 35, Concordia (Wis.) 28
Wis.-Platteville 31, Wis.-Eau Claire 21
Wis.-Stout 16, Wis.-River Falls 10
Wis.-Whitewater 31, Wis.-Stevens Pt. 16
Youngstown St. 56, W. Illinois 14
SOUTHWEST
East Central 31, Arkansas Tech 16
Grambling St. 27, Ark.-Pine Bluff 20
Jackson St. 44, Prairie View14
Louisiana College 37, Texas Lutheran 16
Mary Hardin-Baylor 57, Howard Payne 6
McMurry 24, Hardin-Simmons 14
Missouri 38, Texas A&M 31, OT
Northwestern St. 23, Texas St. 10
Oklahoma St. 59, Baylor 24
Sam Houston St. 66, Lamar 0
Stephen F. Austin 37, McNeese St. 17
Sul Ross St. 49, Mississippi College 42, OT
Trinity (Texas) 24, Birmingham-Southern 16
Tulsa 38, SMU 7
H O C K E Y
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh......................... 13 8 3 2 18 39 28
Philadelphia..................... 11 6 4 1 13 41 36
New Jersey...................... 8 4 3 1 9 19 21
N.Y. Rangers................... 9 3 3 3 9 20 23
N.Y. Islanders.................. 9 3 4 2 8 18 23
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto............................. 10 7 2 1 15 34 32
Buffalo .............................. 10 6 4 0 12 29 22
Ottawa .............................. 11 6 5 0 12 36 43
Montreal ........................... 11 4 5 2 10 29 30
Boston .............................. 10 3 7 0 6 22 25
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington...................... 8 7 1 0 14 31 16
Florida............................... 10 6 4 0 12 26 25
Tampa Bay ....................... 11 5 4 2 12 33 35
Carolina............................ 11 4 4 3 11 28 35
Winnipeg.......................... 10 3 6 1 7 26 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago............................ 9 5 2 2 12 27 23
Detroit ............................... 8 5 3 0 10 22 22
St. Louis ........................... 10 5 5 0 10 26 27
Nashville........................... 9 4 4 1 9 21 26
Columbus......................... 10 1 8 1 3 23 34
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Edmonton......................... 10 6 2 2 14 21 16
Colorado........................... 10 6 4 0 12 29 27
Calgary............................. 9 4 4 1 9 22 23
Minnesota ........................ 9 3 3 3 9 20 23
Vancouver........................ 10 4 5 1 9 24 29
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Dallas................................ 10 7 3 0 14 25 22
Los Angeles..................... 9 6 2 1 13 22 16
San Jose .......................... 9 6 3 0 12 28 21
Anaheim........................... 9 5 3 1 11 21 22
Phoenix ............................ 9 4 3 2 10 27 28
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday's Games
Carolina 3, Chicago 0
San Jose 4, Detroit 2
Edmonton 3, Colorado 1
Calgary 3, St. Louis 1
Saturday's Games
Ottawa 5, N.Y. Rangers 4, SO
Florida 3, Buffalo 2
Toronto 4, Pittsburgh 3
Montreal 4, Boston 2
San Jose 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT
Philadelphia 5, Carolina 1
Tampa Bay 1, Winnipeg 0
Anaheim at Nashville, late
Detroit at Minnesota, late
New Jersey at Dallas, late
Columbus at Chicago, late
Los Angeles at Phoenix, late
Washington at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
Anaheim at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Toronto at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Jose at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. Johns................... 9 5 2 2 0 12 28 24
Worcester .................. 5 4 0 0 1 9 20 10
Providence ................ 10 4 5 1 0 9 24 34
Manchester................ 11 4 7 0 0 8 32 32
Portland...................... 9 3 5 0 1 7 23 32
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Norfolk........................ 9 6 2 0 1 13 40 32
Hershey ..................... 8 5 1 2 0 12 33 23
Penguins .................. 9 5 2 1 1 12 30 22
Binghamton............... 9 5 3 1 0 11 27 29
Syracuse.................... 8 4 2 1 1 10 29 27
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Connecticut ............... 8 5 1 0 2 12 25 18
Springfield ................. 11 6 5 0 0 12 33 35
Adirondack ................ 9 5 3 0 1 11 33 28
Bridgeport .................. 9 4 4 1 0 9 27 33
Albany ........................ 10 4 6 0 0 8 25 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Milwaukee.................. 6 5 0 0 1 11 17 9
Charlotte.................... 8 5 2 1 0 11 24 20
Rockford .................... 8 4 4 0 0 8 23 27
Peoria......................... 9 3 4 1 1 8 32 33
Chicago...................... 8 2 4 0 2 6 16 22
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto....................... 8 5 2 1 0 11 29 19
Rochester .................. 10 3 4 2 1 9 26 32
Hamilton..................... 7 4 3 0 0 8 19 18
Lake Erie.................... 10 3 6 1 0 7 18 33
Grand Rapids............ 8 3 5 0 0 6 16 26
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Houston ..................... 8 5 1 0 2 12 23 16
Abbotsford................. 8 5 3 0 0 10 17 17
Oklahoma City .......... 7 4 2 0 1 9 22 16
San Antonio............... 6 3 3 0 0 6 15 20
Texas ......................... 7 3 4 0 0 6 28 31
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Friday's Games
Connecticut 4, Adirondack 2
Abbotsford 5, Grand Rapids 1
Worcester 3, Bridgeport 2, OT
Norfolk 4, Providence 2
Binghamton 4, Albany 2
Manchester 5, Portland 2
Lake Erie 2, Toronto 1
Penguins 5, Syracuse 3
Springfield 4, Hershey 3, OT
Houston 4, San Antonio 2
Rockford 6, Peoria 4
Charlotte 2, Oklahoma City 1
Milwaukee 2, Chicago 1
Saturday's Games
Albany 3, Hamilton 2
Bridgeport 3, Providence 2
Springfield 4, St. Johns 3, OT
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Manchester 1
Binghamton 3, Rochester 1
Hershey at Adirondack, late
Connecticut at Worcester, late
Norfolk at Syracuse, late
Charlotte at San Antonio, late
Grand Rapids at Milwaukee, late
Texas at Chicago, late
Peoria at Rockford, late
Oklahoma City at Houston, late
Today's Games
Toronto at Lake Erie, 2 p.m.
Abbotsford at Hamilton, 3 p.m.
Texas at Milwaukee, 4 p.m.
St. Johns at Providence, 4:05 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m.
Binghamton at Hershey, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 6:05 p.m.
G O L F
PGA Tour
CIMB Asia Pacific Classic Par Scores
Third Round
Bo Van Pelt ..................................66-64-67197-16
Jeff Overton .................................67-62-69198-15
Mark Wilson.................................67-66-67200-13
Fredrik Jacobson ........................65-64-71200-13
Jason Dufner ...............................70-67-65202-11
Danny Chia ..................................71-65-66202-11
Vijay Singh ...................................72-64-66202-11
Ryan Palmer ................................71-65-67203-10
Chris Kirk......................................71-65-67203-10
Camilo Villegas............................69-66-68203-10
Jerry Kelly ....................................69-66-69204 -9
Jimmy Walker ..............................66-67-71204 -9
Stewart Cink ................................67-66-71204 -9
Jeev Milkha Singh.......................69-69-67205 -8
John Senden ...............................67-70-68205 -8
Ben Crane....................................69-68-68205 -8
Robert Allenby.............................63-72-70205 -8
Jhonattan Vegas..........................64-69-72205 -8
Cameron Tringale .......................66-68-71205 -8
Ricky Barnes................................69-71-66206 -7
Brandt Snedeker .........................71-68-67206 -7
Jonathan Byrd..............................69-68-69206 -7
Chez Reavie................................69-71-67207 -6
Thongchai Jaidee .......................68-71-68207 -6
Tommy Gainey............................68-70-70208 -5
Chinnarat Phadungsil .................70-66-72208 -5
Siddikur Rahman.........................68-73-68209 -4
Scott Stallings..............................67-72-70209 -4
Kyle Stanley.................................68-69-72209 -4
Spencer Levin .............................70-67-72209 -4
Kiradech Aphibarnrat ..................70-67-72209 -4
Brendon de Jonge ......................68-72-70210 -3
D.A. Points ...................................71-68-71210 -3
Stuart Appleby.............................72-67-71210 -3
Rory Sabbatini .............................68-70-73211 -2
Lucas Glover ...............................71-70-71212 -1
Jbe Kruger ..................................70-70-72212 -1
Brian Davis...................................71-71-71213 E
Carl Pettersson ...........................68-67-78213 E
David Gleeson.............................73-71-70214 +1
Tetsuji Hiratsuka..........................70-72-72214 +1
Angel Cabrera .............................73-73-69215 +2
Chan Yih-shin..............................72-70-74216 +3
Brendan Steele............................74-73-70217 +4
Charley Hoffman .........................69-73-75217 +4
Ryan Moore .................................71-68-79218 +5
Shaaban Hussin..........................72-72-75219 +6
S.S.P. Chowrasia........................75-71-74220 +7
Andalucia Masters Leading Scores
Third Round
Sergio Garcia, Spain........................70-70-67207
Christian Nilsson, Sweden ..............73-71-65209
Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain .........71-70-68209
Richie Ramsay, Scotland.................65-72-73210
Steve Webster, England..................75-72-66213
Stephen Gallacher, Scotland ..........68-76-70214
Alejandro Canizares, Spain.............71-72-71214
Shane Lowry, Ireland........................72-71-71214
David Howell, England.....................72-75-68215
Martin Wiegele, Austria....................71-76-68215
Ross Fisher, England.......................67-79-69215
Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano,
Spain ..................................................73-72-70215
Francesco Molinari, Italy..................71-73-71215
Gregory Havret, France...................68-71-76215
Raphael Jacquelin, France..............73-72-71216
Oliver Wilson, England.....................73-71-72216
Peter Hanson, Sweden....................72-71-73216
Romain Wattel, France.....................73-70-73216
Danny Willett, England.....................75-74-68217
Graeme Storm, England..................73-75-69217
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark..................73-70-74217
Justin Rose, England .......................72-71-74217
Mark Foster, England.......................72-77-69218
Alexander Noren, Sweden ..............74-70-74218
Stephen Dodd, Wales......................71-73-74218
Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium.............74-75-70219
Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Spain...........78-71-70219
Matteo Manassero, Italy...................77-72-70219
Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay...............75-72-73219
Martin Kaymer, Germany.................71-75-73219
David Drysdale, Scotland ................70-76-73219
Peter Lawrie, Ireland.........................70-73-76219
Nationwide Tour
Championship Scores
Third Round
Jason Kokrak.....................................67-67-75209
Scott Brown .......................................75-68-67210
Ken Duke ...........................................72-68-70210
Garth Mulroy......................................69-71-71211
Matt Every ..........................................71-68-72211
Camilo Benedetti...............................67-70-74211
Daniel Chopra ...................................72-62-77211
Jeff Gove............................................71-72-69212
David Lingmerth................................69-73-70212
Alistair Presnell .................................72-70-71213
Roger Tambellini...............................68-71-74213
Roberto Castro..................................68-68-77213
Danny Lee..........................................72-65-76213
Steve Wheatcroft...............................68-75-71214
Jonas Blixt .........................................72-69-73214
Ted Potter, Jr.....................................67-72-75214
Mathew Goggin .................................70-69-75214
Greg Owen ........................................71-66-77214
Billy Hurley III ....................................72-71-72215
Kyle Thompson.................................68-73-74215
Will Wilcox .........................................72-67-76215
Darron Stiles......................................68-70-77215
Matt Davidson....................................70-72-74216
Marco Dawson...................................75-67-74216
Cliff Kresge........................................69-69-78216
Mark Anderson..................................66-78-73217
Gary Christian....................................71-72-74217
Aaron Watkins ...................................69-72-76217
Casey Wittenberg.............................70-70-77217
Paul Claxton.......................................71-69-77217
John Mallinger...................................71-74-73218
Martin Flores .....................................72-73-73218
Aaron Goldberg ................................72-73-73218
Erik Compton.....................................73-71-74218
Brian Smock ......................................73-70-75218
Rob Oppenheim................................70-70-78218
Brenden Pappas...............................77-71-71219
Luke List.............................................74-73-72219
Russell Knox .....................................71-73-75219
B.J. Staten..........................................73-71-75219
Justin Bolli..........................................73-71-75219
Josh Broadaway................................72-70-77219
Kyle Reifers .......................................70-70-79219
Ryan Armour......................................69-77-74220
James Nitties.....................................73-71-76220
Kirk Triplett.........................................76-72-73221
A U T O R A C I N G
NASCAR Camping World
Truck Series
Kroger 200 Results
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200 laps, 139.6 rating.
2. (2) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 127.9.
3. (10) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 113.
4. (4) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 200, 117.6.
5. (12) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 96.
6. (6) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 115.3.
7. (13) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 200, 88.7.
8. (9) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 200, 98.4.
9. (28) Brendan Gaughan, Toyota, 200, 74.
10. (5) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 200, 81.7.
11. (7) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 200, 94.
12. (1) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 200, 100.2.
13. (18) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 70.3.
14. (21) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, 200, 59.8.
15. (26) Jason White, Chevrolet, 200, 63.7.
16. (11) Miguel Paludo, Toyota, 200, 66.6.
17. (8) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 200, 77.7.
18. (15) Max Papis, Toyota, 200, 74.8.
19. (14) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 200, 84.
20. (29) Grant Enfinger, Dodge, 200, 54.6.
21. (16) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 200, 53.5.
22. (22) David Starr, Toyota, 200, 72.5.
23. (17) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 200, 61.3.
24. (20) Clay Rogers, Chevrolet, 199, 41.3.
25. (24) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 198, 50.7.
26. (36) Bryan Silas, Ford, 198, 31.
27. (19) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 197, 64.6.
28. (25) Josh Richards, Toyota, 197, 56.7.
29. (33) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 197, 31.2.
30. (31) Tyler Tanner, Ford, 195, 30.4.
31. (27) Matt Lofton, Toyota, 195, 38.3.
32. (34) Blake Feese, Chevrolet, 182, 36.1.
33. (30) Johanna Long, Toyota, 166, 35.2.
34. (32) T.J. Duke, Toyota, 159, 32.4.
35. (23) Ricky Carmichael, Chevrolet, accident, 37,
42.2.
36. (35) Mike Garvey, Chevrolet, brakes, 8, 28.6.
NASCAR Sprint Cup
TUMS Fast Relief 500 Lineup
(Car number in parentheses)
Due to rain, all positions based on owner
points
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford.
2. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford.
3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge.
4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet.
5. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
6. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota.
7. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
8. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge.
9. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
11. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
13. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
14. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota.
15. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford.
16. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.
18. (6) David Ragan, Ford.
19. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet.
20. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet.
21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
22. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota.
23. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.
24. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota.
25. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota.
26. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
27. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
28. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota.
29. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota.
30. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
31. (34) David Gilliland, Ford.
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet.
33. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota.
34. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford.
35. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford.
36. (71) Hermie Sadler, Ford.
37. (7) Reed Sorenson, Dodge.
38. (37) Mike Skinner, Ford.
39. (46) Scott Speed, Ford.
40. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota.
42. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
43. (55) J.J. Yeley, Ford.
Failed to Qualify
44. (92) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet.
45. (75) Derrike Cope, Dodge.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Tums Fast Relief
500, at Martinsville, Va.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Big OTires Nationals, at Las Ve-
gas (same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Andalucia Masters,
final round, at Sotogrande, Spain
2:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour Championship, final
round, at Charleston, S.C.
NFL
1 p.m.
CBS Miami at N.Y. Giants
4 p.m.
FOX Washington vs. Buffalo, at Toronto
4:15 p.m.
CBS New England at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
NBC Dallas at Philadelphia
SOCCER
3 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Conference Semifinals Game 1,
Los Angeles at New York
5 p.m.
ESPN MLS, Conference Semifinals Game 1,
Houston at Philadelphia
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
4 p.m.
BTN Michigan State at Penn State
MEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
Noon
BTN Michigan at Michigan State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
2 p.m.
BTN Indiana at Ohio State
6 p.m.
BTN Purdue at Penn State
UTSA17, Georgia St. 14, OT
FAR WEST
Air Force 42, New Mexico 0
Hawaii 16, Idaho 14
Montana 45, Weber St. 10
Montana St. 54, Idaho St. 13
North Dakota 27, N. Colorado 25
Oregon 43, Washington St. 28
Portland St. 43, E. Washington 26
S. Utah 34, UC Davis 3
UNLV 38, Colorado St. 35
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3C
P S U F O O T B A L L
No. 21 PENN ST. 10, ILLINOIS 7
Illinois..................................... 0 0 7 0 7
Penn St.................................. 0 0 0 10 10
Ill PSU
First downs............................. 16 14
Rushes-yards ........................ 50-192 41-111
Passing................................... 94 98
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 13-24-2 9-28-1
Return Yards.......................... 0 40
Punts-Avg............................... 9-38.0 8-35.9
Fumbles-Lost ......................... 2-2 6-2
Penalties-Yards..................... 6-50 4-30
Time of Possession .............. 32:51 27:09
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGIllinois, Ford 24-100, Scheelhaase
14-89, Young 5-4,
Pollard 5-2, OToole1-0, Jenkins1-(minus 3). Penn
St., Redd 30-137,
Zordich 2-3, Beachum 2-1, Team 1-(minus 1), Bol-
den 2-(minus 9),
McGloin 4-(minus 20).
PASSINGIllinois, Scheelhaase 9-16-0-63,
OToole 4-7-1-31,
Russell 0-1-1-0. Penn St., McGloin 9-24-1-98, Bol-
den 0-4-0-0.
RECEIVINGIllinois, Jenkins 6-43, Harris 2-24,
Ford 2-5,
Davis 1-16, Lankford 1-12, Millines 1-(minus 6).
Penn St., Brown 3-50, De.Smith 3-17, Moye 2-29,
Zordich 1-2.
six attempts in the clutch for 58
of his 98 total passing yards on
the day.
"Hes just part of what the
whole team has done all year,"
said Penn State coach Joe Pater-
no, whose team is suddenly 8-1
overall. "Were not killing peo-
ple. We dont go out and run over
them. Weve had to struggle.
"Theyve kept their poise and
they dont panic," Paterno con-
tinued about his Lions. "I think
Mac has epitomized that."
If nothing else, the Lions have
turned themselves into perfect
examples of resiliency.
McGloin never got gun-shy
while he was having a bad day,
taking his team on a last-gasp
touchdown drive the way a cer-
tain high-profile New England
Patriots quarterbackhas become
known for in the NFL.
"I thought about how Tom
Brady does those things,"
McGloin said, "move the chains.
The line was confident, the
backs were confident."
Moyes confidence may have
been shaken when he dropped a
third-down pass with time run-
ning out deep in Illinois territo-
ry. But the Lions went right back
to him on the next play, and the
pass interference call on the de-
fending trying to stop him gave
the Lions a fresh set of downs 17
yards from the end zone.
"I felt like I let my teammates
down," Moye said of his drop.
"But I got back in the huddle, re-
alized there was another chance
to make up for it."
Silas Redd made up for what
seemed like a lost cause.
His fumble in the first quarter
didnt give Illionis the games
first points, only because a fero-
cious Lions defense drove the Il-
lini backwards.
But Redd came back fromthat
witha three-yardtouchdownrun
as thegameclockhit1:08- anide-
al ending to his 137-yard rushing
day.
"At times we struggle," Pater-
no said. "But jeez, theres a lot of
character, a lot of feeling for each
other. Weve proven to ourselves
well stick together and we can
make things happen."
It may seem like a mystery,
how the Lions remain at the top
of the Legends Division in the
new Big Ten with an offense
playingsopoorly that something
looks broken.
They do it with the desire it
takes to make their own breaks.
KNOW
Continued from Page 1C
THIRD QUARTER
UIUC -- Spencer Harris 10-yard
pass from Nathan Scheelhaase
(Derek Dimke kick), 3:32. Drive:
11 plays, 64 yards, 4:26. Com-
ment: After a bad two-plus
quarters of offense, Illinois
finally breaks through. Scheel-
haase, who came into this drive
late in the third quarter sitting
at minus-4 yards passing on the
game, gets things going with his
legs. The sophomore scrambles
for a few important first downs
before Jason Ford rips off an
impressive, tackle-busting run
of 18 yards down to the Penn
State 12-yard line. On third-
and-8 from the 10, Illinois offen-
sive coordinator Paul Petrino
dials up a well-timed and well-
executed play as Scheelhaase
fakes the handoff and delivers a
pass to Harris open in the end
zone. In this game, it just might
be enough. ILLINOIS 7, PENN
STATE 0.
FOURTH QUARTER
PSU -- Anthony Fera 30-yard
field goal, 7:00. Drive: 10 plays,
18 yards, 5:24. Comment: The
defense had already forced four
turnovers only to see the of-
fense fail to score after any of
them. This time its the special
teams unit that tries to resusci-
tate the dying offense as red-
shirt freshman Brad Bars comes
through, leaps and deflects a
Justin DuVernois punt directly
skyward. Penn State takes over
at the Illinois 31 and, yes, there
is a pulse. Matt McGloin com-
pletes the teams first pass since
late in the first quarter when he
finds Devon Smith for a first-
and-goal at the Illinois 5. But
the Illini defense is up to the
task, pushing the Lions back-
ward. On third down, the pres-
sure closes in on McGloin, who
drops the ball while scrambling
in the pocket for the teams
sixth fumble of the game.
McGloin picks it up but is forced
to take a sack and bring out
Fera for a disappointing three
points. UIUC 7, PSU 3.
PSU -- Silas Redd 3-yard run
(Fera kick), 1:08. Drive: 10 plays,
80 yards, 1:57. Comment: OK, so
it wasnt exactly the 94 game
out in Champaign -- one of the
Nittany Lions most historic
comebacks, which was capped
off with a 99-yard touchdown
drive in the final minutes to
keep the teams unbeaten sea-
son alive. But after a long, cold,
gray afternoon in which almost
nothing went right for the Lions
offense, it felt impressive.
McGloin had been just 5-of-18
passing for 40 yards as the
drive opened. But he went 4-
for-6 for 58 yards on this one,
incredibly connecting with se-
nior Derek Moye, who came on
late to play on a broken left foot
to get things started. On fourth-
and-6 from the Illinois 32,
McGloin looks first underneath
to Justin Brown and Devon
Smith, but both are covered
tightly near the sticks. So the
man from Scranton goes deep
to Moye instead, and the senior
captain draws a borderline pass
interference flag in the end
zone as both players handfight
their way down the field. From
there, its three straight hand-
offs to Redd, who tops 1,000
yards on the season and does
his best Brian Milne impression,
fighting through tackles to final-
ly get the Lions across the goal
line. Wow. PSU10, UIUC 7.
PLAY OF THE GAME
Despite an utter lack of big
plays throughout the first 50-
plus minutes, there are actually
quite a few candidates here.
Forced to pick just one, how
about the job by redshirt fresh-
man Brad Bars, who blocked a
punt from the Illinois 37 with
12:24 to play and gave life to the
Lions, who were barely regis-
tering a pulse? Penn State only
got three points out of the en-
suing drive, but it seemed to
give the team the extra spark
needed to pull out the improb-
able victory.
STATECOLLEGE Call it ug-
ly, old-fashioned or even hard to
watch. Penn States showing in a
10-7 victory over Illinois on Sat-
urday will not win any beauty
pageants.
And thats just how the defen-
sive unit likes it.
With the offense sputtering in
an all-too-common fashion, the
Nittany Lions defense forced a
season-high four takeaways to
keep the Fightin Illini at bay. It
allowed quarterback Matt
McGloin to tailor a late fourth-
quarter comeback, capped off by
a 3-yard touchdown run by Silas
Redd.
As a whole defense, you al-
ways try to make turnovers,
said Nate Stupar, who forced a
fumble. Just like any other
week, we made a lot of turnovers
and big plays. The turnovers
changed the game; they changed
the momentum.
Junior linebacker Gerald
Hodges proved to be Illinois
coach Ron Zooks offenses No. 1
foe. Hodges posted a career-high
19 tackles, one sack, a forced
fumble and two pass breakups to
frustrate the Illinis similarly
stagnant offense.
Playingweakside, youre nev-
er thinking youre going to get
that many tackles, Hodges said.
But being around the ball that
often, it just happens.
None of Penn States four turn-
overs proved as crucial as a punt
block on special teams early in
the fourth quarter. Brad Bars
blocked and recovered a punt
that gave the Nittany Lions pos-
session at the Illinois 31, setting
up an Anthony Fera field goal
that ended their scoreless
drought.
Despite the four turnovers,
PennStates offense didnot man-
age any points off of them. Until
the late scoring drive, it strug-
gled to move the ball into Illinois
territory. For the game, the Nit-
tany Lions managed 209 yards of
offense.
With the scored knotted at ze-
ro apiece for much of the game,
Joe Paterno needed an outstand-
ing effort by the defense; howev-
er, its job remained unchanged,
according to players.
We dont feel the pressure,
said Devon Still, who contribut-
ed a career-best 10 tackles and
3.5 tackles for loss. I feel as a de-
fense, thats your job: to get the
ball back into the offenses hands
as quick as possible. We go into
every game with that mentality.
The Penn State defense prac-
ticed throughout the week for Il-
linois to run an option-style of-
fense. But the Nathan Scheel-
haase-led Illini utilized only one
or two option plays, according to
Stupar.
Its funny. We were expecting
a lot of options. They only ran
one or two plays. We just
manned up, changed on the fly
and played defense.
To Paterno, this years team is
a more defensive-oriented team,
compared to past seasons.
Some years you play great de-
fense and great kicking, and
some years you have to offset
that with more offense. I think
this club obviously is a very fine
defensive football team.
In the drive after Illinois went
ahead 7-0, Hodges forced a fum-
ble that ended a third-quarter Il-
linois drive that had already
moved 30 yards. Hodges hit Do-
novonn Young on a second effort
before Stupar pounced on it to
claim possession.
I saw him make a spin move,
andthenthe ball he was carrying
came to view, Hodges said. I
hit him and ripped it out of
there.
Three of Penn States turn-
overs occurred deep in Nittany
Lion territory.
Nick Sukay forced a fumble in
the second quarter the first time
Illinois advanced past midfield.
Later in the quarter, Sean Stan-
ley intercepted a botched field
goal hold that was thrown down-
field to the Penn State 11. DAn-
ton Lynn pulled an interception
out of a receivers hands in the
third quarter at the 31-yard line.
Stanley said this was the de-
fenses best game of the sea-
son. Penn State held Illinois to
94 yards passing.
For the second consecutive
week, the rushing defense strug-
gled against a running game that
boasts a mobile quarterback.
Scheelhaase, along with running
back Jason Ford, produced a100-
plus yards on the ground.
PSU defense takes center stage once again
Nittany Lions hold Illinois to
one TD as Penn State enters
bye week with an 8-1 mark.
By JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
STATE COLLEGE -- Derek
Moye would be rehabbing in
the pool. There was Matt
McGloin.
In the locker room. McGloin
again.
On the practice field and all
the way into the fourth quarter
on Saturday, McGloin followed
his top target around.
Still recovering froma broken
bone in his left foot, Moye
seemed all but certain to miss
his third straight game Saturday
when Penn State took on Illi-
nois.
But McGloin kept it up.
He was messing with me all
week in practice, Moye said
with a smirk. Id be (working
out) and hed be saying, You
practicing today? You practicing
today? It was the same thing in
the game. When you going in?
When you going in?
I think he kinda wanted me
to lobby the coaches. He was
lobbying me to lobby the coach-
es.
Stunningly, Moye suited up
for the game despite not prac-
ticing all week while donning
the red-cross jersey that keeps a
player out of most every type of
drill.
Even more surprising was
when Moye actually came out
on the field for a drive late in
the third quarter.
What many assumed was just
a decoy role turned into any-
thing but, as the senior captain
caught two key passes for 29
yards and drewa game-saving
pass interference flag on the
Nittany Lions game-winning
drive.
I was trying to get himgoing
all week, said McGloin, who
comes out for every game in
tandemwith Moye to throwthe
ball around. I just kept asking
him, You playing, man? You
feel good? You feel good?
He kept telling me he felt
good. We were going to need
himin an emergency situation,
and Id say that was an emergen-
cy.
Oh, yes.
(Receivers coach Mike
McQueary) told me at halftime,
Be ready. We may need you.
They told me that before the
game, too, Moye said. Then it
was a drive and I just heard my
name being called to get
warmed up.
Penn State receivers had
filled in ably for Moye when he
sat out the past two weeks. But
on this day, everything in the
Lions passing game seemed to
misfire and the wideouts played
their role with a fewill-timed
drops.
Down 7-0 with three minutes
to play, Moye was on the field
again.
The doctors had said Moye
can play if you really need him,
but be careful with him, coach
Joe Paterno said. Yknow, we
were dropping the ball and I
said to Jay Paterno, You tell
Mike McQueary, I want our
best receivers in the game for
that drive. We cant afford to
drop a pass.
As it turned out Moye did
end up dropping a pass himself
on the drive, a key miss on
third-and-6 fromthe Illinois
32-yard line.
But Moye made up for it by
doing just enough on the next
play to get the pass interference
call against his man and then
snagged a 9-yard gain to the 8 to
set up Silas Redds winning
touchdown.
Penn States doctors said
Moye would sit out against
Purdue and Northwestern be-
fore returning to face the Illini.
But as the last two weeks went
along with Moye unable to go
much in practice, it looked less
and less likely that he would be
able to play Saturday.
Yet there he was, helping the
Lions stay atop the Big Ten
standings with a 10-7 win.
To be honest with you, I
really didnt think they were
going to put himin today,
McGloin said. But we did need
himthere in the end. And he
came through for us.
Redd letter day
Penn State finished with just
209 yards of total offense, with
Redd picking up137 of themby
himself on the ground. It was
his fifth straight game over the
century mark, making himthe
first Penn State back since
Curtis Enis in1997 to accom-
plish that feat.
Redd finished with a career-
high 30 carries despite battling
another stinger on his left
shoulder in the first half. The
Lions needed every last one of
them, as No. 30 finally got them
across the goal line.
Moye answers call
when team needs him
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
PENN STATE
N O T E B O O K
and a really good buncha kids
that I think proved today (what)
theyve got. And to all the fans
out there, thanks for sitting
through that today. Youve gotta
be nuts!
For several reasons, yes.
Not just the surreal snow that
started early in the morning and
dumped nearly 6 inches of snow
on Happy Valley. But because for
nearly 50 minutes, the Lions of-
fenseappeareddeadonthetable.
Throughthree-and-a-half quar-
ters, Matt McGloin and Rob Bol-
den combined to go 4-of-21 pass-
ing for 33 yards and two turn-
overs. Penn State trailed 7-0 on a
Nathan Scheelhaase touchdown
pass and was floundering.
But the defense forced four
turnovers by the Fighting Illini
and Brad Bars blocked a punt to
set up an Anthony Fera 30-yard
field goal with seven minutes to
play.
The Lions (8-1, 5-0 Big Ten)
then got a stop on defense and
forcedapunt, takingover at their
own 20 yard-line with 3:05 to
play.
I dont knowwhat it was, if we
werent into it or what, but we
couldnt get things going early
on, saidMcGloin, whomade his
second straight start, though he
watched most of the second
quarter from the sideline as Bol-
den took over for four ineffective
drives.
But every quarterbackandev-
eryoffense wants tobe inthat sit-
uation to make a play and win.
Youhavetomakeaplay. Youhave
to pressure yourself to get some-
thing done. Youve gotta score.
Youre either a hero or youre
nothing.
Sounding hoarse and battling
acold, McGloinralliedthetroops
and them on their most impor-
tant drive of the season, hooking
upwitha hobbledDerekMoye to
get things going.
McGloin proceeded to go 4-
for-6 for 58 yards on the drive, in-
cluding a fourth-down bomb in
the end zone to Moye who was
came in late to play on a broken
foot that drew a pass interfe-
rence flag.
He was open, McGloin said
simply. They jumped the two
underneath routes. He was open
so I threw it to him. I took a
shot, and luckily we got the pass
interference.
Four plays later, it was Silas
Redd, having just topped 1,000
yards ontheseason, scoringfrom
3 yards out for Penn States first
lead of the game 10-7 with just
1:01 to play.
The Illini (6-3, 2-3) drove 58
yards to the Penn State 25 in that
final minute, bringing on Dimke
to send the game to overtime
with five seconds left.
I knewit was close. I was lean-
ingyouknowhowwhenyouhit
your (pitchingwedge) andyoure
leaning, leaning, defensivecoor-
dinator Tom Bradley joked, tilt-
ing all the way to his right in his
seat to demonstrate after the
game.
But I just felt that theywerent
gonna score. I just had that feel-
ing that he wasnt gonna make
it.
Dimke, whohadbeenaperfect
7-for-7 on field goals on the sea-
son, including a long of 49 yards,
hit it well. But he hit it right. Just
far enoughtoconnect inthedead
center of the upright.
Thosefewinches madethedif-
ference, keeping Penn State as
the lone team left undefeated in
Big Ten play.
Nowthe Lions will rest updur-
ing an open week before closing
with the toughest part of their
schedule home against Nebras-
ka and on the road at Ohio State
and Wisconsin as they try and
holdonfor aspot intheinaugural
Big Ten championship game.
I think weve proven to our-
selves that well stick together
and make some things happen,
Paterno said. Whether thats
gonna be good enough with oth-
er teams, well see.
Well find out how good we
are.
LIONS
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTOS
Penn State running back Silas Redd (25) rushes for 3 yards and
a touchdown against Illinois during the fourth quarter Saturday.
Illinois kicker Derek Dimke (13) watches his failed field goal at-
tempt as time runs out in the fourth quarter Saturday.
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5C
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Notre
Dame less than two minutes to
make a weeks worth of problems
heck, maybe a seasons worth
disappear.
Michael Floyd and Jonas Gray
scored in a span of 1 minute, 59
seconds Saturday, and Notre
Damerolledfromthere, rebound-
ingfromits roughweekwitha56-
14 thrashing of Navy. The Irish
(5-3) rushed for seven touch-
downs, most in 19 years, while
limiting Navy (2-6) to a season-
low 229 yards of offense in the
Midshipmens sixth straight loss.
As a family, we all have good
days and bad days. And you work
through that as a family, Notre
Dame coach Brian Kelly said.
We communicated with each
other as a team and as a family,
and you saw it today. You saw a
team that played together. I told
our team, thats the best collec-
tion of plays relative to all 11play-
ers playing together.
Alopsidedloss to USClast Sat-
urday night pretty much ended
Notre Dames chances of a BCS
bowl for yet another year, and
tensions within the team appar-
ently flared after Kelly talked
about having to retrain the
players he inherited fromCharlie
Weis. Some of the veterans, in-
cluding star linebacker Manti
Teo, expressed their displeasure
with his comments on Twitter,
and the Chicago Tribune report-
ed Saturday that Kelly apol-
ogized to players during a team
meeting Friday.
But winning cures all kinds of
ills and the Irish looked like a
happy bunch Saturday, exchang-
ing flying chest bumps after TDs
and dancing on the sidelines.
Notre Dame scored on five of
its first six possessions, and had
tworunningbacks score multiple
touchdowns (Gray had three,
CierreWoodhadtwo) for thefirst
time since 2001. Floyd also had
two TDs, scoring on a 56-yard
catch and a 10-yard lateral for
Notre Dame, whichbeat Navy for
only the second time in five years
after winning 43 straight from
1964 to 2006.
The game was so out of hand,
thestarters spent thefourthquar-
ter on the sidelines.
Im not going to get into the
specifics of it, but we just had to
go out there and play unified,
Gray said. Let the outside dis-
tractions be just that, outside dis-
tractions. Obviously, when you
look at us on the field, that was a
unified team, no doubt.
Not that everything was per-
fect.
Notre Dame has struggled
with turnovers all season, and its
sloppiness cost the Irish again in
early in the second quarter. Theo
Riddick couldnt get his hands on
a swing pass from Tommy Rees,
and Navy end Jabree Tuani
scooped the ball up. Though the
play was initially ruled a lateral
and, thus anincomplete, that was
overturned, giving the Middies
the ball at the Notre Dame 27.
Sixplays later, Gee Gee Greene
scored on a 9-yard pass from
young quarterback Trey Miller,
playing in place of Kriss Proctor,
to cut Notre Dames lead to 14-7.
Instead of falling apart,
though, the Irish roared back
with two touchdowns in a 2-min-
ute span.
George Atkinson III gave the
Irish great field position, putting
the ball at the Notre Dame 44.
Rees then found Floyd, who took
advantage of Navys defensive
breakdowns and strolled into the
end zone untouched for a 56-yard
score.
The Irish defense hounded
young quarterback Trey Miller
all afternoon. Miller finished just
5-of-13 for 33 yards, and Navy
could only manage 196 yards on
the groundwell belowits aver-
age of 325 yards.
Fullback Alex Teich, who ran
roughshodover theIrishlast year
for a career-high 210 yards on 26
carries, was held to just 62 on 15
touches.
N O T R E D A M E F O O T B A L L
Fighting Irish ground their way to 7 TDs, sink Navy
After his apology to his team,
Notre Dame responds with big
win for coach Brian Kelly.
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
AP PHOTO
Notre Dame wide receiver Michael Floyd (3) scores a touchdown
after getting past Navy cornerback Eric Grahamon Saturday.
Cousins couldnt get anything
going in the passing game
against Nebraskas swarmingde-
fense.
After throwing for 290 yards
and three TDs at home in last
weeks crazy 37-31win over Wis-
consin last week, Cousins mis-
sed on 12 of his first 16 passes
andfinished11of 27for 86yards.
He was sacked four times.
Cousins was intercepted on
the Spartans first possession,
was nearly pickedoff three other
times and often threw into dou-
ble coverage.
Were a much better team
than we showed today and we
still havealot of things infront of
us to accomplish, Cousins said.
Its important to push on and
understand that so much of
what happens tous this seasonis
not what happened to us but
how we respond. Its important
that we respond the right way.
The Cornhuskers (7-1, 3-1)
moved into a tie with Michigan
State (6-2, 3-1) and Michigan for
the Big Ten Legends Division
lead. Iowa also would have a
share of the lead with a win over
Minnesota. The Huskers own
the tiebreaker with Michigan
State and are yet to play Michi-
gan and Iowa.
Michigan State running back
LeVeon Bell said he and his
teammates wont use the emo-
tional hangover of last weeks
win as an excuse.
I dont thinkthat affectedus,
he said. We just didnt execute
the way we should have. Espe-
cially in an environment like
that, playing on the road, youve
got to execute a lot better.
The road hasnt been kind to
the Spartans. They were ham-
mered at Iowa a year ago for
their only Big Tenloss andagain
by Alabama in the Capital One
Bowl. This year they were
drilled 31-13 at Notre Dame and
scraped by in a 10-7 win at Ohio
State.
Rex Burkhead scored three
touchdowns andran35times for
130 yards as Nebraska won for
onlythesecondtimein17games
against a top-10 opponent.
Burkhead, who went over 100
yards for the fifth time in six
games, scored at the end of 80-
and 89-yard drives in the third
quarter that broke open a 10-3
game.
Nebraskas Taylor Martinez
completed only a shovel pass for
no yards in the first half, but
went 4 for 4 on the first series of
the second half and completed
third-down passes to Tim Mar-
lowe and Brandon Kinnie before
Burkheadscoredfroma yardout
to make it a two-touchdown
lead.
HUSKERS
Continued fromPage 1C
ANN ARBOR, Mich.
Fitzgerald Toussaint ran for a
career-high 170 yards and tied a
career high with two touch-
downs, leading No. 17 Michi-
gan to a 36-14 win over Purdue
on Saturday.
The Wolverines (7-1, 3-1 Big
Ten) gave up a TD on the
opening drive of the game,
then scored 36 straight points
to bounce back from their first
loss of the season, two weeks
ago at Michigan State.
The Boilermakers (4-4, 2-2)
havent won or lost consecutive
games this year.
Toussaint had 155 yards
rushing through three quar-
ters, helping Michigan find a
rusher to take some of the load
from quarterback Denard Rob-
inson. Backup Michael Shaw
ran for a 37-yard TD on his first
carry early in the fourth for a
36-7 lead.
Northwestern 59, Indiana 38
Dan Persa and Kain Colter
combined to throw five touch-
down passes Saturday, and
Drake Dunsmore hauled in a
school-record four TDs to lead
Northwestern past Indiana
59-38.
It was a record-setting day
for the Wildcats (3-5, 1-4 Big
Ten), who scored nine times
before finally punting in the
fourth quarter. Dunsmore also
became Northwesterns all-
time leader in yards receiving
by a tight end, and the five TD
passes tied the schools single-
game team record. Northwest-
ern finished with 616 total
yards, just short of another
school record (674).
The Wildcats ended their
five-game losing streak.
Indiana (1-8, 0-5) lost its
sixth straight and has now
given up 40 or more points in
four straight games for the first
time since 2005.
Minnesota 22, Iowa 21
MINNEAPOLIS Mar-
Queis Grays fourth-down
sprint for the pylon from the
2-yard line in the closing min-
utes lifted Minnesota to a 22-21
victory over Iowa on Saturday,
giving the Gophers possession
of the Floyd of Rosedale bronze
pig trophy for the second
straight year.
Gray went 11 for 17 for 193
yards and a touchdown passing
and ran 11 times for 62 yards
and the go-ahead score for the
Gophers (2-6, 1-3), who lost
their first three Big Ten games
by an average margin of 38
points. Minnesota students
stormed the field in celebration
and surrounded the players
afterward.
Marcus Coker carried the
ball 32 times through several
huge holes for 252 yards and
two touchdowns, but the Haw-
keyes (5-3, 2-2) missed a
chance to move into a four-way
tie for first place in the Leg-
ends Division with a rough
November schedule ahead.
B I G T E N R O U N D U P
Toussaint runs wild as
Michigan clubs Purdue
The Associated Press MANHATTAN, Kan. Lan-
dry Jones and Ryan Broyles
helped No. 11 Oklahoma get
back on track and spoil 10th-
ranked Kansas States dream
season.
Jones threw for a school-
record 505 yards and five touch-
downs, his All-American wide
receiver caught 14 passes for 171
yards and a score, and the Soon-
ers bounced back from a stun-
ning defeat to beat the previous-
ly unbeaten Wildcats 58-17
Saturday.
Kenny Stills added four catch-
es for 101 yards, Roy Finch fin-
ished with 73 yards rushing and
another 69 through the air, and
the Sooners potent, fast-paced
attack managed 690 yards of
total offense against the leagues
top-ranked defense.
Jones passing total shattered
the previous record of 468 yards
he shared with Sam Bradford,
while Broyles moved into first
place on the Big 12s career list
with 4,499 yards receiving.
It wasnt all good for Oklaho-
ma (7-1, 4-1).
Leading rusher Dominique
Whaley was hurt while blocking
on the first play of the game.
The Oklahoma medical staff put
an air cast around his lower left
leg and he was removed from
the field on a cart. He later
returned to the sideline on
crutches, but the extent of the
injury was unknown.
No. 3 Oklahoma St. 59,
Baylor 24
STILLWATER, Okla. Jo-
seph Randle set career-highs by
running for 152 yards and four
touchdowns, Justin Blackmon
matched his career best with 13
catches for 172 yards and two
scores and No. 3 Oklahoma
State beat Baylor 59-24 on Sat-
urday.
The Cowboys (8-0, 5-0 Big 12)
started a season with eight
straight wins for only the sec-
ond time in school history. The
other time was in 1945, when
they finished the season 9-0,
won the Sugar Bowl and were
ranked fifth in the final poll.
Brodrick Brown recovered
two fumbles, and Daytawion
Lowe and Justin Gilbert had
interceptions as Oklahoma State
forced five turnovers.
Robert Griffin III threw for
425 yards to end up 5 shy of his
career best set last week. The
Bears (4-3, 1-3) amassed 622
yards but most of them were
empty.
No. 7 Oregon 43,
Washington State 28
EUGENE, Ore. Oregon
stars LaMichael James and
Darron Thomas returned from
injury but true freshman DeAn-
thony Thomas sparked the No.
7 Ducks with two second-half
touchdowns in a 43-28 victory
over Washington State on Sat-
urday.
Darron Thomas, who missed
a game because of a knee injury,
returned to start against the
Cougars but threw two intercep-
tions in the first half and was
replaced by backup Bryan Ben-
nett in the second.
No. 8 Arkansas 31,
Vanderbilt 28
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Zach
Hocker kicked a 42-yard field
goal with 6:53 left, and eighth-
ranked Arkansas rallied yet
again to beat Vanderbilt 31-28
Saturday for the Razorbacks
fourth straight win.
This was the third time this
season the Razorbacks (7-1, 3-1
Southeastern Conference)
trailed by double digits. They
didnt trail by 18 as they did
against Texas A&M or 17 last
week before beating Mississippi.
This time, Vanderbilt led by 21-7
with 1:39 left in the first half.
No. 14 South Carolina 14,
Tennessee 3
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Con-
nor Shaw threw for one touch-
down and ran for another as No.
14 South Carolina survived
Tennessee with a 14-3 victory on
Saturday night.
The Gamecocks (7-1, 5-1)
remain in control of the South-
eastern Conferences East Divi-
sion.
No. 15 Virginia Tech 14,
Duke 10
DURHAM, N.C. David
Wilson rushed for 148 yards and
No. 15 Virginia Tech overcame a
sloppy performance to beat
Duke 14-10 on Saturday for its
Atlantic Coast Conference-
record 11th straight road victory.
Logan Thomas was 17 of 28
for 190 yards with two intercep-
tions and a 2-yard touchdown
pass to Eric Martin. Josh Ogles-
by added a 1-yard scoring run
for the Coastal Division-leading
Hokies (8-1, 4-1).
Missouri 38,
No. 16 Texas A&M31, OT
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
James Franklins 11-yard
touchdown pass to Marcus
Lucas in overtime lifted the
Missouri Tigers to a 38-31 win
over No. 16 Texas A&M on
Saturday.
Texas A&M got the ball after
the score, but Ryan Tannehills
pass on fourth down was de-
flected.
Iowa State 41, Texas Tech 7
LUBBOCK, Texas Redshirt
freshman Jared Barnett threw
for a touchdown and ran for
another, and Iowa State shocked
No. 19 Texas Tech 41-7 on Sat-
urday night, a week after the
Red Raiders won at Oklahoma.
Making his first start, Bar-
netts mobility caused the Red
Raiders defense fits. He rushed
for 92 yards on 19 carries and
completed 14 of 26 passes for
144 yards. His touchdowns were
career firsts.
No. 22 Georgia 24, Florida 20
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Aaron Murray threw two touch-
down passes on fourth down,
and No. 22 Georgia overcame
several mistakes to beat South-
eastern Conference rival Florida
24-20 Saturday.
The Bulldogs, at the very
least, kept pace with South
Carolina in the Eastern Divi-
sion.
No. 23 Arizona State 48,
Colorado 14
TEMPE, Ariz. Brock Os-
weiler threw for 307 yards and
two touchdowns, Cameron
Marshall added three scores on
the ground and No. 23 Arizona
State avoided a letdown with a
48-14 rout over Colorado on
Saturday.
In control of the Pac-12 South,
Arizona State couldnt afford a
slip-up against an injury-riddled,
31-point underdog.
No. 25 West Virginia 41,
Rutgers 31
PISCATAWAY, N.J. Geno
Smith threw two second-half
touchdowns and scored a go-
ahead TD on a fourth-down,
1-yard run with 6:18 to play as
No. 25 West Virginia rallied for a
41-31 victory on Saturday in a
game played in a wet, snowy
pre-Halloween storm.
Boston College 28,
Maryland 17
COLLEGE PARK, Md.
Rolandan Finch ran for 243
yards and two touchdowns, and
Boston College defeated Mary-
land 28-17 Saturday for its first
Atlantic Coast Conference victo-
ry of the season.
Army 55, Fordham0
WEST POINT, N.Y. Max
Jenkins ran for two touchdowns
in his last game at Michie Stadi-
um and Army rushed through
an October snowstorm to beat
Fordham a 55-0 victory over
Fordham Saturday.
Brown 6, Pennsylvania 0
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Brown
ended Pennnsylvanias 18-game
Ivy League winning streak 6-0
on Saturday on the strength of
two field goals by Alexander
Norocea.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L R O U N D U P
Jones record day lifts Sooners
The Associated Press
AP PHOTOS
Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops instructs his teamas defensive back SamProctor, left, listens in dur-
ing the second half against Kansas State on Saturday in Manhattan, Kan.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
WILKES-BARRE At least
Meyers left with a warm feeling
on a very cold, snowy night for
football.
The same couldnt be said for
Holy Redeemer in the only local
highschool game playedSaturday.
The Mohawks dominated all as-
pects of the game to post their
third win of the season with a 36-6
victory in a Wyoming Valley Con-
ference Division 2A-A game at
snow-covered Wilkes-Barre Me-
morial Stadium.
Running back Fabian Smith led
the victory, rushing for 168 yards
and two touchdowns as Meyers
improved to 3-6. Redeemer (0-9)
lost its 20thconsecutive game, but
was able to avoid a shutout when
quarterback David Gawlas scored
on a 9-yard run with eight seconds
remaining.
Special teams and fumbles
played a big part in the game turn-
ing into a rout by halftime.
A bad punt snap on Redeemers
first possession of the game result-
ed in a 22-yard loss to give Meyers
the ball at the Royals 4-yard line.
Meyers quarterback Teaguen La-
batch scored on a 1-yard run two
plays later.
Thenlate inthe first quarter, Re-
deemer fumbled twice on the
same play, losing the second one.
Smith galloped 50 yards on the
next play, givingMeyers the ball at
the Redeemer 8.
After a penalty, Labatch fired a
pass to tight end Jalen Miller over
the middle for a 13-yard touch-
downanda14-0leadat11:55of the
second quarter.
Miller followed with a big play
fromhis defensive end spot on Re-
deemers ensuing possession. He
broke through the line and tackled
Redeemer running back Vince Vil-
lani in the end zone for a safety.
Smithscoredona 48-yardpitchon
the first play after the free kick, in-
creasing the Mohawks lead to
23-0.
Matt DeMarco scored on a 32-
yard run with 4:15 left in the sec-
ond quarter as Meyers took a 30-0
lead into halftime.
The poor weather and field con-
ditions hurt Redeemer more than
Meyers. TheRoyals relyheavilyon
their passing game and it pro-
duced little throughout.
Meyers 36, Holy Redeemer 6
Holy Redeemer...................... 0 0 0 6 6
Meyers .................................... 7 23 6 0 36
First Quarter
MEY Labatch 1 run (Lisman kick), 10:14
Second Quarter
MEY Miller 13 pass from Labatch (Lisman
kick), 11:55
MEY Safety, Miller tackles V.Villani in end
zone, 10:55
MEY Smith 48 run (Lisman kick), 10:36
MEY M.DeMarco 32 run (Lisman kick), 4:15
Third Quarter
MEY Smith 8 run (kick failed), 4:45
Fourth Quarter
HR Gawlas 9 run (pass failed), 0:08
TeamStatistics Redeemer Meyers
First downs........................ 7 9
Rushes-yards ................... 30-(-3) 34-290
Passing.............................. 55 18
Total Yards........................ 52 308
Comp-Att-Int ..................... 7-18-1 2-3-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .......... 1-10 0-0
Punts-Avg.......................... 2-34 0-0
Fumbles-Lost.................... 8-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards................ 5-42 11-89
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Redeemer, Gawlas 18-38, Kasten-
dieck 3-14, V.Villani 2-2, Strickland 4-(minus-7),
team 3-(minus-50). Meyers, Smith 15-168, Labatch
2-(minus-2), Owens 2-29, M.DeMarco 5-63, Stew-
ard 3-20, Proctor 7-12.
PASSING Redeemer, Gawlas 4-11-0-47,
Strickland 3-7-1-8. Meyers, Labatch 2-3-0-18.
RECEIVING Redeemer, Gawlas 1-5, V.Villani
2-3, Tarselli 1-5, Kastendieck 2-30, Shandra 1-12.
Meyers, Miller 1-13, Reilly 1-5.
INTS Meyers, Steward.
H I G H S C H O O L F O O T B A L L : H O LY R E D E E M E R V S . M E Y E R S
Mohawks romp to victory over Redeemer
Meyers Fabian Smith rushes
for 168 yards and scores two
touchdowns Saturday night.
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Meyers quar-
terback Tea-
guen Labatch
looks toward
the linesman
for his signal
after scoring a
touchdown
against Holy
Redeemer at
Wilkes-Barre
Memorial
Stadium on
Saturday
night.
D I S T R I C T 2
G I R L S
V O L L E Y B A L L
P L A Y O F F
G L A N C E
CLASS 3A
Semifinals
(at Delaware Valley)
Monday, Oct. 31
Wyoming Valley West vs. North Pocono, 5 p.m.
Abington Heights vs. Delaware Valley, 30 minutes
after
Finals
Wednesday, Nov. 2
At Marywood University
CLASS 2A
Quarterfinals
Monday, Oct. 31
(at Holy Redeemer)
Lake-Lehman vs. Crestwood, 5 p.m.
Holy Redeemer vs. Berwick, 30 minutes after con-
clusion
Semifinals
Tuesday, Nov. 1
(at Holy Redeemer)
Finals
Thursday, Nov. 3, 7 p.m. at Dallas H.S.
CLASS A
Semifinals
Monday, Oct. 31
(at Lackawanna Trail)
Mountain View vs. Susquehanna, 5 p.m.
MMI vs. Lackawanna Trail, 30 minutes after conclu-
sion of first match
Finals
Wednesday, Nov. 2
At Marywood University
D I S T R I C T 2 B O Y S S O C C E R
P L A Y O F F G L A N C E
CLASS 3A
Quarterfinals
Wednesday's Results
Abington Heights 6, Tunkhannock 2
Delaware Valley 6, Wyoming Valley West 0
Wallenpaupack 1, Coughlin 0
Williamsport 4, Pittston Area 0
Semifinals
Monday, Oct. 31
Abington Heights (13-1-1) vs. Delaware Valley (10-5), 8 p.m. at Scranton H.S.
Wallenpaupack (6-8-1) vs. Williamsport (11-3-1), 6:30 p.m. at Wilkes
Finals
Wednesday, Nov. 2 site and time TBA
CLASS 2A
Quarterfinals
Wednesday's Results
Dallas 9, Berwick 3
Crestwood 3, Honesdale 1
Lake-Lehman 2, North Pocono 0
Scranton Prep 4, Hanover Area 2
Semifinals
Tuesday, Nov. 1
Dallas (15-0) vs. Crestwood (10-5), 6:30 p.m. at Wilkes
Lake-Lehman (14-3) vs. Scranton Prep (11-3-1), 6 p.m. at Scranton H.S.
Finals
Thursday, Nov. 3 site and time TBA
CLASS A
Quarterfinals
Wednesday's Results
Holy Cross 4, Lakeland 1
Forest City 3, Meyers 0
Mountain View 4, Montrose 0
Wyoming Seminary 2, Elk Lake 0
Semifinals
Monday, Oct. 31
Holy Cross (13-0) vs. Forest City (14-1), 6 p.m. at Scranton H.S.
Mountain View (13-2) vs. Wyoming Seminary (9-6-2), 7 p.m. at Dunmore
Finals
Wednesday, Nov. 2 site and time TBA
D I S T R I C 2
F I E L D H O C K E Y
P L A Y O F F
G L A N C E
CLASS 3A
Quarterfinals
Monday's Result
Hazleton Area 5, Lackawanna Trail 4
Semifinals
Wednesday's Results
Wyoming Valley West 8, Hazleton Area 1
Coughlin 1, Delaware Valley 0, OT
Final
Tuesday, Nov. 1
Wyoming Valley West vs. Coughlin, TBA
CLASS 2A
First round
Tuesday's Results
Nanticoke 2, Elk Lake 0
Wyoming Area 4, Pittston Area 0
Quarterfinals
Wednesday's Results
Holy Redeemer 3, Lake-Lehman 0
Friday's Results
Dallas 4, Wyoming Area 1
Crestwood 7, Nanticoke 0
Wyoming Seminary 4, Northwest 1
Semifinals
Today
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, ppd
Sunday
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary, 2 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 2 p.m.
Finals
Tuesday, Nov. 1
Site and time TBA
The conditions also affected
the Monarchs (1-6, 1-5) passing
game. With freshman quarter-
back Bryant Klein making his
first career start, Monarchs
coach Jeff Knarr wanted to uti-
lize a more potent passing at-
tack, but the weather kept the
team from achieving that until
the snow slowed down in the
fourth quarter.
We were trying to run he ball,
but we need to throw it, Knarr
said. Theyre an eight-man, 4-4
defense, so you got to throw the
football. It was really tough, not
only in the snow, but the wind
was an issue. Its really hard to
throw the ball effectively.
Wilkes didnt have much trou-
ble gettingits offense goingearly
as Zach Tivald broke off a 52-
yard touchdown run at the 11:26
mark in the first quarter. Tivald,
who ran for 128 yards on 18 car-
ries, took the ball off the right
end and scampered for the score
and a 6-0 lead.
That gave us great momen-
tumandwe wantedto get a good
start today because of the ele-
ments, Sheptock added. You
didnt know what was coming.
So having that early lead gave us
some confidence.
As the clock was winding
down in the first half, Colonels
quarterbackAlexGeorge capped
a 5-play, 69-yard drive with a 25-
yard scamper to the end zone to
put his teamahead13-0with3:56
left.
The Kings offense, which
managed only 65 total yards in
the first half, got going late inthe
third quarter. Then as the fourth
started, the Monarchs got on the
board when Klein ended an 8-
play, 51-yard possession with a 1-
yard quarterback sneak for the
score to trim the lead to 13-6.
Wilkes took more than 8 min-
utes off the clock on its next
drive, whichendedwhenGeorge
was sacked and turned the ball
over on downs.
The Monarchs had one last
chance to tie the game, getting
the ball with4:52 left ontheir 25.
They drove 49 yards on eight
plays before Klein was picked off
at the goal line by Joe Chrismer
with 37 seconds remaining to se-
cure the victory.
Klein was 5-of-11 for 51 yards
and also ran for 31 yards -- all of
those yards were gathered in the
second half.
It was a good game. We bat-
tledtothe endandwe kindof ran
out of time there, Knarr noted.
(Klein) settled down and hit
some passes at the end. Hes go-
ing to remember his first start no
matter what, but this one hell
probably never forget. He did a
lot of good things and at the end
of day he gave us a chance to
win.
Wilkes defensive end Rob
Houseknecht was named his
teams MVP for a 12-tackle per-
formance, whichincluded2.5for
a loss and a half of a sack. Kings
junior defensive lineman Jake
Lehnowsky earned the Mon-
archs MVP award, racking up
six tackles, three for a loss and a
half of a sack.
Wilkes 13, King's 6
Wilkes....................................... 6 7 0 0 13
Kings ....................................... 0 0 0 6 6
First Quarter
WILKES Tivald 52 run (kick blocked) 11:26
Second Quarter
WILKES George 25 run (Arentz kick) 3:56
Fourth Quarter
KINGS Klein 1 run (kick failed) 13:15
TeamStatistics Wilkes King's
First downs .............................. 17 9
Rushes-yards.......................... 45-258 42-128
Passing..................................... 91 51
Total Yards .............................. 349 179
Comp-Att-Int ............................ 7-17-0 5-11-1
Sacked-Yards Lost................. 2-12 1-8
Punts-Avg. ............................... 3-18.3 3-36.3
Fumbles-Lost .......................... 4-1 3-1
Penalties-Yards ...................... 9-102 3-36
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING WILKES: Tivald 18-128, George
16-85, Wogou 8-69, Regan 1-(minus-2), TEAM 2-
(minus-22). KINGS: McGrath 11-51, Klein 17-31,
Ofcharsky 8-20, Haddock 8-20, Torres 1-6.
PASSING WILKES: George 7-17-0-91.
KINGS: Klein 5-11-1-51.
RECEIVING WILKES: Eagles 3-28, Behrman
2-37, Wogou 2-26. KINGS: Haddock 2-26,
McGrath 1-17, Ofcharsky 1-5, Ford 1-3.
INTS WILKES: Chrismer
MISSED FGS none
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The Mayors Cup had a throwback feel as Wilkes and Kings battled in the snow Saturday at McCarthy Stadium.
CUP
Continued from Page 1C
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes players celebrate winning the Mayors Cup while holding
the prized trophy aloft Saturday at McCarthy Stadium.
The Misericordia mens and
womens cross country teams
finished fifth out of 14 and 13
teams respectively at the
Middle Atlantic Conference
Cross Country Champion-
ships on Saturday. A.J. Li-
mongelli and Bill Cooney
both earned second-team
All-MAC status on the day.
Limongelli (28:21) placed
11th while Cooney (28:28)
was 14th.
For the Lady Cougars, Mari-
na Orrson finished second
while Kelsey Cameron missed
All-MAC status by one spot
with her 21st place finish and
Alexa Yoder was 38th.
Meanwhile, Kings College
mens and womens teams
finished in seventh place.
Robert MacNeal was the first
Monarch to cross the finish
line in 40th place in a time of
30:03. Nick Guarino finished
in a time of 30:05, good for
42nd place and Tim Lambert
(30:33) finished in 52nd
place.
For the women, Michon
Dinwoodie was the Lady Mon-
archs first finisher in 27th
place in a time of 26:37. Kir-
stie Nicol crossed the finish
line in a time of 27:57, while
Shannon McGowan finished
in 28:02 (52nd place).
Wilkes University mens
cross country team finished
eighth while the women came
in 10th.
Tyler Layton led the mens
squad, finishing 66th at 31:19,
while Austin Loukas placed
72nd with a time of 31:46. For
the women, Becky Gordon
(28:34) finished 64th and
Christine Klingel completed
the race in 92nd with a time
of 30:45.
L O C A L C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
Misericordia XC teams
finish 5th at MAC meet
The Times Leader staff
W Y O M I N G
V A L L E Y
C O N F E R E N C E
Division 4A.................. W L PF PA CP
x-Wyoming Valley
West............................... 8 1 382 159 67
Hazleton Area .............. 4 5 190 276 34
Williamsport .................. 3 6 140 227 25
Division 3A.................. W L PF PA CP
Dallas............................. 8 1 310 135 67
Crestwood .................... 7 2 269 163 59
Berwick.......................... 6 3 277 211 49
Coughlin........................ 5 4 209 182 43
Pittston Area................. 2 7 197 248 17
Tunkhannock................ 0 9 98 360 0
Division 2A-A.............. W L PF PA CP
GAR............................... 8 1 378 156 54
Wyoming Area ............. 6 2 341 139 41
Northwest (A) ............... 5 4 210 238 35
Lake-Lehman ............... 5 4 284 203 34
Hanover Area ............... 3 6 182 304 21
Meyers........................... 3 6 130 280 21
Nanticoke...................... 2 6 171 281 14
Holy Redeemer ............ 0 9 169 409 0
x-Clinched division title.
NOTE: CP is Championship Points toward the
divisional title.
Teams get nine points for defeating a Class 4A
opponent, eight for a Class 3Aopponent, seven
for a Class 2A opponent and six for a Class A
opponent.
The teamwith the most Championship Points is
the division winner.
Friday's Results
Berwick 26, Coughlin 21
Crestwood 40, Williamsport 20
Dallas 42, Tunkhannock 14
GAR 68, Nanticoke 0
Hazleton Area 19, East Stroudsburg South 0
Lake-Lehman 42, Hanover Area 7
Wyoming Area 50, Northwest 17
Wyoming Valley West 37, Pittston Area 14
Saturday's Result
Meyers 36, Holy Redeemer 6
Friday, Nov. 4
Berwick at Hazleton Area
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Northwest
Dallas at Lake-Lehman
GAR at Meyers
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Wyoming Valley West at Williamsport
Pittston Area at Wyoming Area
Saturday, Nov. 5
Tunkhannock at Holy Redeemer, 2 p.m.
Crestwood at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
(END OF REGULAR SEASON)
It was a real simple and smart
road win, said rookie forward
Brian Gibbons, who factored into
twogoals. I thinkwestucktothe
game plan really well. We played
the kind of game we wanted to
play, anddidwhat wetriedtodo.
The Penguins displayed much
more energy thantheir hosts, los-
ers of five of their past six starts.
They grabbed a 1-0 first period
lead courtesy of Gibbons, then
fattened it to two goals in the sec-
ond.
We wanted to try to end the
weekend on a good note, Pen-
guins coach John Hynes said.
And also to progress forward. It
was nice to be able to get the lead
and get things going. The guys
are feeling good about how
theyre playing.
Gibbons tally, hissecondof the
season, came on a power play at
13:13, as the Penguins buzzed
Manchester starting goalie Mar-
tin Jones.
Gibbons was in the right spot
to park a rebound left after Colin
McDonalds stuff attempt from
close range was kicked out by
Jones.
Colinwasabletoget goodtraf-
fic in front, Gibbons said, and
the puck just squeakedout to me.
I was able to finish it.
McDonald also had a hand in
Eric Tangradis goal, which came
at 4:59 of the middle stanza.
Streaking down right wing,
McDonald fed a cross-ice pass to
Tangradi, who parked it for his
fourth goal of the season.
He (McDonald) has good
hockey sense, Hynes said. He
seems to distribute the puck, so
he knows what hes going to do
before he gets it. He can collect it
and move it quick.
Thenless thantwominutes lat-
er, the Penguins received a gift
goal, alsoonapowerplay, afterJa-
son Williams rebound was
kicked in by Manchester defense-
man Thomas Hickey.
Jones was pulled at that point
in favor of backup Jeff Zatkoff.
Gibbons made a nifty play after
a faceoff win to set up Niko Dimi-
trakos third-period tally.
Thiessens shutout bid was
spoiledwith5:21remainingwhen
Brandon Kozun scored for Man-
chester.
NOTES: Thecontest wastaken
in by members of the Pittsburgh
brain trust, including top execu-
tive Tom Fitzgerald. The Pen-
guins lost veteran right wing Ge-
off Walker late in the first period
after he came up holding his left
wrist followinga corner collision.
He did not return. The game
was a homecoming of sorts for
rookiePens forwardPaul Thomp-
son, who played his college hock-
ey at the University of New
Hampshire, located a long slap-
shot away in Durham.
PENGUINS
Continued from Page 1C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 7C
NFL SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
A F C
I N D I V I D U A L
L E A D E R S
Week 7
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Brady, NWE.............. 237 160 2163 16 8
Schaub, HOU............ 224 137 1893 12 5
Fitzpatrick, BUF ........ 202 134 1477 12 6
Roethlisberger, PIT.. 234 147 1937 12 6
Hasselbeck, TEN..... 211 131 1518 10 6
Painter, IND .............. 119 65 873 5 2
Dalton, CIN................ 189 118 1311 7 5
J. Campbell, OAK .... 165 100 1170 6 4
Sanchez, NYJ........... 231 129 1545 12 6
Rivers, SND.............. 218 141 1715 7 9
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Jones-Drew, JAC....... 148 677 4.57 41 2
D. McFadden, OAK.... 113 614 5.43 70t 4
F. Jackson, BUF......... 106 601 5.67 80t 6
Be. Tate, HOU ............ 92 466 5.07 24 1
McGahee, DEN.......... 103 460 4.47 28 1
Benson, CIN ............... 117 458 3.91 39t 2
Ry. Mathews, SND..... 98 452 4.61 36 3
S. Greene, NYJ .......... 113 426 3.77 24 2
R. Rice, BAL................ 97 426 4.39 53 2
A. Foster, HOU........... 102 420 4.12 42t 3
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Welker, NWE................ 51 785 15.4 99t 6
M. Wallace, PIT ........... 36 730 20.3 95t 5
B. Marshall, MIA.......... 34 483 14.2 46 1
St. Johnson, BUF......... 33 382 11.6 44 4
Garcon, IND................. 30 503 16.8 87t 4
Wayne, IND.................. 30 426 14.2 36 1
Bowe, KAN................... 29 496 17.1 52t 4
A.. Green, CIN ............. 29 453 15.6 58 4
R. Gronkowski, NWE.. 29 401 13.8 30 5
N. Washington, TEN... 29 399 13.8 57 1
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
Lechler, OAK....................... 34 1776 77 52.2
Moorman, BUF.................... 28 1409 65 50.3
B. Colquitt, DEN.................. 32 1601 66 50.0
B. Fields, MIA...................... 30 1476 70 49.2
McAfee, IND........................ 38 1830 64 48.2
Koch, BAL............................ 30 1420 62 47.3
Scifres, SND........................ 16 756 58 47.3
Sepulveda, PIT ................... 24 1122 66 46.8
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Arenas, KAN................. 12 186 15.5 37 0
Cosby, DEN.................. 9 129 14.3 30 0
A. Brown, PIT............... 17 217 12.8 41 0
Edelman, NWE ............ 9 105 11.7 18 0
Jac. Jones, HOU ......... 16 186 11.6 79t 1
Bess, MIA..................... 10 116 11.6 22 0
Cribbs, CLE.................. 16 172 10.8 43 0
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
McKnight, NYJ........... 13 520 40.0 107t 1
A. Brown, PIT............. 12 353 29.4 52 0
D. Manning, HOU...... 13 356 27.4 46 0
Cribbs, CLE................ 11 275 25.0 52 0
Mariani, TEN.............. 10 244 24.4 42 0
Br. Tate, CIN .............. 14 339 24.2 37 0
Karim, JAC................. 17 411 24.2 37 0
Edelman, NWE.......... 9 214 23.8 37 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
F. Jackson, BUF ...... 6 6 0 0 36
Welker, NWE............ 6 0 6 0 36
Burress, NYJ............ 5 0 5 0 30
Decker, DEN............ 5 0 4 1 30
Green-Ellis, NWE.... 5 5 0 0 30
R. Gronkowski,
NWE.......................... 5 0 5 0 30
D. McFadden, OAK. 5 4 1 0 30
Tolbert, SND............ 5 3 2 0 30
M. Wallace, PIT ....... 5 0 5 0 30
Bowe, KAN............... 4 0 4 0 24
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Rackers, HOU................ 20-20 14-15 54 62
Cundiff, BAL.................... 15-15 14-17 48 57
Janikowski, OAK............ 16-16 12-13 63 52
Gostkowski, NWE.......... 21-21 10-11 47 51
Nugent, CIN.................... 12-13 13-14 47 51
Folk, NYJ......................... 20-20 10-10 50 50
Lindell, BUF .................... 23-23 9-10 49 50
D. Carpenter, MIA.......... 6-6 14-17 51 48
Scobee, JAC .................. 6-6 14-14 55 48
Suisham, PIT.................. 17-17 10-14 48 47
N F C
I N D I V I D U A L
L E A D E R S
Week 7
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
A. Rodgers, GBY...... 239 171 2372 20 3
Brees, NOR............... 299 212 2477 18 8
E. Manning, NYG ..... 196 125 1778 11 5
Stafford, DET............ 269 162 1912 16 4
Ale. Smith, SNF........ 158 100 1090 8 2
Romo, DAL................ 217 140 1756 10 6
Vick, PHL................... 200 123 1573 9 8
Cutler, CHI ................ 232 137 1702 9 6
McNabb, MIN............ 156 94 1026 4 2
C. Newton, CAR....... 252 152 2103 8 9
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
A. Peterson, MIN........ 146 712 4.88 54 8
Forte, CHI.................... 124 672 5.42 46 2
M. Turner, ATL ........... 138 621 4.50 61 6
L. McCoy, PHL ........... 105 569 5.42 49t 6
Gore, SNF................... 109 541 4.96 55 4
B. Wells, ARI............... 91 423 4.65 39 6
Best, DET.................... 84 390 4.64 88t 2
Bradshaw, NYG.......... 98 390 3.98 37 5
J. Starks, GBY............ 83 374 4.51 40 1
Vick, PHL..................... 45 372 8.27 53 0
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
J. Graham, NOR.......... 45 674 15.0 59 5
Sproles, NOR............... 45 329 7.3 36 2
G. Jennings, GBY........ 42 677 16.1 79t 5
Ca. Johnson, DET....... 41 679 16.6 73t 10
St. Smith, CAR............. 39 818 21.0 77t 3
R. White, ATL............... 39 425 10.9 30 3
Forte, CHI ..................... 38 419 11.0 56t 1
Pettigrew, DET............. 38 352 9.3 27 2
Maclin, PHL.................. 37 489 13.2 59 3
Witten, DAL.................. 36 449 12.5 64 3
Punters
No Yds LG Avg
A. Lee, SNF......................... 32 1616 68 50.5
McBriar, DAL....................... 22 1095 68 49.8
Morstead, NOR................... 18 896 61 49.8
J. Ryan, SEA....................... 40 1899 77 47.5
Weatherford, NYG.............. 32 1484 61 46.4
Koenen, TAM....................... 35 1622 65 46.3
Zastudil, ARI........................ 24 1081 58 45.0
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
P. Peterson, ARI.......... 11 175 15.9 89t 1
D. Hester, CHI.............. 11 161 14.6 69t 1
Ginn Jr., SNF ............... 20 273 13.7 55t 1
Sherels, MIN ................ 14 179 12.8 53 0
L. Washington, SEA.... 17 202 11.9 36 0
Weems, ATL ................ 14 142 10.1 37 0
Sproles, NOR............... 12 121 10.1 72t 1
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Ginn Jr., SNF............. 13 414 31.8 102t 1
Harvin, MIN................ 9 280 31.1 103t 1
Cobb, GBY................. 13 396 30.5 108t 1
Sproles, NOR............. 14 376 26.9 57 0
D. Hester, CHI ........... 15 402 26.8 98t 1
Logan, DET................ 11 291 26.5 32 0
Booker, MIN............... 13 340 26.2 68 0
Dev. Thomas, NYG... 15 378 25.2 37 0
Scoring
Touchdowns
TD Rush Rec Ret Pts
Ca. Johnson, DET... 10 0 10 0 60
L. McCoy, PHL......... 8 6 2 0 48
A. Peterson, MIN..... 8 8 0 0 48
C. Newton, CAR...... 7 7 0 0 42
Bradshaw, NYG....... 6 5 1 0 38
M. Turner, ATL......... 6 6 0 0 36
B. Wells, ARI ............ 6 6 0 0 36
J. Graham, NOR...... 5 0 5 0 30
G. Jennings, GBY.... 5 0 5 0 30
Sproles, NOR........... 5 2 2 1 30
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Kasay, NOR.................... 25-25 16-18 53 73
Crosby, GBY................... 26-26 14-14 58 68
Ja. Hanson, DET............ 20-20 16-17 51 68
D. Bailey, DAL ................ 14-14 17-18 51 65
Gould, CHI ...................... 18-18 14-15 51 60
Akers, SNF ..................... 18-18 13-15 55 57
Mare, CAR...................... 15-16 13-15 45 54
Longwell, MIN................. 16-16 12-14 53 52
Barth, TAM....................... 12-12 13-15 49 51
M. Bryant, ATL................ 17-17 11-11 50 50
PHILADELPHIALast years
Dallas Cowboys and this group of
Philadelphia Eagles have a lot in
common.
Americas Teamknows what its
like when a Dream Team under-
achieves.
Asyouknow, theyput together
the Super Teamat the start of the
year, Cowboys owner JerryJones
saidduringhis weeklyradioshow.
We know how it goes when you
put it onpaper, but its got to go to
thefield. Wehadthat happentous
last year, for sure.
So, we know that they have
their heart. They have not in any
way let where they are with their
recordimpact their aspirations for
this year. Thats a dangerous situa-
tion.
The Cowboys (3-3) visit the Ea-
gles (2-4) on Sunday night in the
105th meeting between the NFC
East rivals, including playoffs. Its
another must-win game for Phila-
delphia.
Thingshavent gonethewaythe
Eagles, their fansandmanyothers
expected. After awildoffseasonin
which they added several high-
profile players, the Eagles had a
Super Bowl-or-bust mentality. In-
stead, they are last in the NFC
East.
Comingoff a divisiontitle anda
playoff win in 2009, the Cowboys
were hoping to become the first
team to play in a Super Bowl at
homelast year. It wasarealisticex-
pectation for a team that was
among the preseason favorites to
winit all.
But the season spun out of con-
trol early, andcoachWadePhillips
was firedafter a1-7 start.
It hasnt reached that point in
Philadelphia, though plenty of
fansincludingaguywhohunga
signoutside the teams practice fa-
cility want to see coach Andy
Reidgone.
A 20-13 win at Washington
snapped the Eagles four-game
winningstreak, tooksomeheat off
Reidandgavetheplayersreasonto
feel encouragedgoing into a bye.
Still, theyknowtheyvegotplen-
ty of work to do.
The odds favor Philadelphia
this week. Under Reid, the Eagles
are12-0 after a bye.
Trash-talkinghasbeenabigpart
of this rivalry over the years, and
the notorious Eagles fans hate the
Cowboys more than any other op-
ponent.
BuddyRyannever wonaplayoff
gameinfiveseasons coachingPhi-
ladelphia from 1986-90. But a big
reasonwhyhesstill reveredinthis
city is his dominance over the
Cowboys. Buddys boys were 8-2
against Dallas, including seven
straight wins. There were some
memorable games among those,
including the Bounty Bowl in
1989.
The Cowboys have won four of
theprevious fivemeetings, includ-
ing a meaningless regular-season
finalelast year inwhichtheEagles
restedtheir starters.
C O W B OY S V S . E A G L E S
Showdown will be nightmare for losing team
Tonights big game could
determine playoff fortunes
for the NFC East contenders.
By ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
AP FILE PHOTO
Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy carries the ball
against the Dallas Cowboys last December in Arlington, Texas.
DALLAS at PHILADELPHIA
TV: 8:20 p.m., NBC (WBRE-28)
OPENING LINE: Eagles by 3
1
2
LAST MEETING: Cowboys beat
Eagles 14-13, Jan. 2, 2011
N E X T G A M E
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
Like many players during a bye
week, the New York Giants got in
front of their televisions this past
weekend and watched the winless
Miami Dolphins blow a 15-point
lead in the final three minutes and
lose in overtime.
They watchedthe Broncos Tim
Tebow run al-
most untouched
for a game-ty-
ing, 2-point con-
version in the fi-
nal seconds and
saw a fumble by
Dolphins quar-
terback Matt
Moore set up a
game-winning
field goal. They
also heard the
sound bite of
Dolphins run-
ning back Reg-
gie Bush saying
his team
stinks.
They werent
the only ones
watching the
mess.
Tom Cough-
lin saw it, too,
and the coach spent the early part
of the week warning his NFCEast-
leading Giants (4-2) that the Dol-
phins (0-6) have the capability to
beat them Sunday at MetLife Sta-
diumdespiteall their problems, in-
cluding speculation that coach To-
ny Sparano is in his final season.
Coughlin broke down the Dol-
phins season for his team, noting
Miami wasincontentioninthesec-
ond half against New England,
Houston, Cleveland, San Diego
and Denver, but just didnt make
theplays. Eveninthegameagainst
theJetshereacoupleof weeksago,
theDolphinscouldhavebeenup14
points early.
If there was a bottomline for the
Giants, it was dont approach the
Dolphins the same way they did
Seattle. New York came out flat
and got beat.
The Giants are coming off their
bye with a healthy roster for the
first time this season. Defensive
end Justin Tuck, guard Chris Snee
andbackuprunningbackBrandon
Jacobs are all expected back in the
lineup after missing the win over
Buffalo.
D O L P H I N S V S . G I A N T S
Cant take
Dolphins
for granted
Miami has yet to win a game,
but the N.Y. Giants cant look
past todays opponent.
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI at N.Y.
GIANTS
TV: 1 p.m., CBS
(WYOU-22)
OPENING
LINE: Giants by
10
LAST MEET-
ING: Giants
beat Dolphins
13-10, Oct. 28,
2007
U P N E X T
PITTSBURGH Steelers
coachMikeTomlinmeant tosay
he planned to educate his
teams younger players about
the franchises long-simmering
and largely one-sided ri-
valry with New England.
Only, Tomlin didnt use edu-
cate. At least, not at first, in-
stead letting forth a Freudian
slip that perhaps more accurate-
ly describes how the Steelers
feel about their longtime neme-
sis.
I am going to agitate our
guys, Tomlin said before cor-
recting himself.
No need. TomBrady has been
agitating the Steelers for a dec-
ade.
The Patriots quarterback has
spent the last10years shredding
one of the NFLs proudest de-
fenses, beating Pittsburgh six
times in seven meetings head-
ing into Sundays showdown at
Heinz Field that could be a pre-
view of the AFC championship
game.
New England (5-1) is rested
after a bye week. The Steelers
(5-2) are surgingafter a sluggish
start.
Yet it doesnt seem to matter
how Pittsburgh is playing when
thePatriots cometotown. Good
teams. OK teams. Rebuilding
teams. All of themlose to Brady.
Pittsburghs only victory over
New England with Brady under
center came in 2004 when the
Steelers ended the Patriots
NFL record 21-game winning
streak.
No biggie. The Patriots re-
turned to Heinz Field three
months later and won the AFC
championship game en route to
their second straight Super
Bowl title.
Running backs change. Wide
receivers change. Linemen
change. Coordinators change.
Bradys mastery over the Steel-
ers does not.
The two-time MVPs secret is
no secret to the Steelers. He
takes care of the ball hes
thrown three interceptions in
255 career attempts against the
Steelers and he doesnt back
down.
Weve got to minimize our
miscues and be physical and
play our game, Pittsburgh nose
tackle Casey Hampton said. I
thinka lot of people get involved
with trying to do too much
against them, instead of just do-
ing what you do. So, you have to
do what you
do and do it
well.
The Steel-
ers will proba-
bly have to do
it better than
that to slow
down the
NFLs top of-
fense, a unit
led by the for-
mer sixth-
round pick
whose great-
est moments
in his Hall-of-
Fame career
have come
Pittsburghs
expense.
Brady was
still finding
his footing af-
ter replacing
injured Drew Bledsoe in 2001
when he helped the Patriots to
an upset victory over the Steel-
ers in the AFC championship
game. He threw for just 115
yards inthat first meetingbefore
leaving with an ankle injury.
Most times against the Steel-
ers, he has that number by the
half.
Hes won four straight against
Pittsburgh, averaging 332 yards
passing in the process, includ-
ing a 350-yard, three-touch-
down performance in a 39-26
victory here last year.
I tell youthat the times weve
beaten them, weve had to play
very, very, very goodgames, and
we have, Brady said. I think
thats probably what I am most
proud of. Some of our greatest
games that weve ever played
have been against them and
thats just the level of execu-
tion.
Something that rarely chang-
es regardless of who surrounds
Brady in the huddle.
Therearecertainplays inour
offense that Ive literally run
thousands of times, Brady said.
Youmake a lot of mistakes over
the course of those plays and
you learn from them and hope-
fully you dont make them
again.
He rarely makes themagainst
the Steelers, who stress they re-
spect Brady but they dont fear
him.
The Steelers have won three
straight games toclimbintofirst
in the tight AFC North. A re-
match with Baltimore who
whipped Pittsburgh 35-7 in the
season-opener looms next
week.
It might as well be next year.
If youre in this locker room
and youre thinking about Balti-
more, youhave a problem, safe-
ty Ryan Clark said.
PAT R I O T S V S . S T E E L E R S
ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots offensive lineman Dan Connolly (63) blocks Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison (92) as quarter-
back Tom Brady (12) throws a pass in Pittsburgh last season. The Patriots won 39-26.
Its a very Brady rivalry
New England has enjoyed the
better of its matchups with
Pittsburgh in recent years.
By WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
NEW
ENGLAND at
PITTSBURGH
TV: 4:15 p.m.,
CBS (WYOU-22)
OPENING
LINE: Patriots
by 2
1
2
LAST MEET-
ING: Patriots
beat Steelers
39-26, Nov. 14,
2010
U P N E X T
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9C
PENGUINS SUNDAY
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
Oct. 15
Binghamton
L, 5-4
Oct. 21
at Springfield
W, 3-0
Oct. 22
at Hershey
W, 3-1
Saturday
at Manchster
7 p.m.
Friday
at Syracuse
W. 5-3
L A S T F I V E G A M E S
Nov. 4
Hershey
7:05 p.m.
Nov. 5
at Binghamn
7:05 p.m.
Nov. 9
at Norfolk
7:15 p.m.
Nov. 12
Norfolk
7:05 p.m.
Nov. 11
at Hershey
7 p.m.
N E X T F I V E G A M E S
BRAD THIESSEN
Penguins goalie
Standing in net, Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Penguins goaltender Brad
Thiessen gets a perspective of the
game thats different from his team-
mates. He sees plays develop in
front of him and he gets a first-hand
glimpse at how a skilled forward
maneuvers into the offensive zone
or how a defenseman works the
point on the power play.
Because Thiessens position af-
fords him a unique perspective of
the game, he knows exactly how his
team would look if he were a gener-
al manager for a day.
Id have a couple of high-flying
forward, plenty of good D and a
good goalie, he said. The way they
play would resemble our style.
So just who would Thiessen pick
to fill those slots and play that style
if he were a fantasy hockey GM?
How about a set of twins, a couple
of familiar faces, a few superstars, a
legend in the making and one of the
greatest to ever lace up the skates.
Forward Daniel Sedin (Vancouv-
er) He puts up points all the time.
Defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom
(Detroit) Hes the best at every-
thing, points and defense.
Goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury
(Pittsburgh) He can get you a lot of
points in fantasy hockey.
Power Play Specialist Henrik
Sedin (Vancouver) Now I have
them both.
Penalty Kill Specialist Ryan
Kesler (Vancouver) Hes a good
penalty killer and is able to score
shorthanded. He works hard, flies
around and blocks shots.
Shootout Specialist Corey Per-
ry (Anaheim) Fifty goals. Hes a
good sniper.
Enforcer Deryk Engelland (Pitts-
burgh)
Pest/Agitator Alexandre Bur-
rows (Vancouver)
Head coach Barry Trotz (Nash-
ville) He never gets fired.
All-Time Great Wayne Gretzky
(Edmonton, Los Angeles, St. Louis,
N.Y. Rangers) Does he really need
an explanation?
-- Tom Venesky
FANTASY GM
That prowess on special
teams has earned Gibbons
plenty of time on the power
play and penalty kill with the
Penguins this season, some-
thing that Hynes said makes
him a versatile player.
Hes a dynamic player.
Brians a really good puck han-
dler and he makes others
around him better because he
has good vision and can move
the puck, Hynes said, adding
Gibbons speed is similar to
that of former Penguin Chris
Conner.
If he can get the type of
strength Chris Conner had,
hell continue to make steps,
tention on his rookie season in
the AHL.
And its been a good one.
After the first seven games,
Gibbons has two goals and
three assists. One of his goals
was a shorthandedtallyandthe
other came on the power play.
That success on the special
teams isnt a really a surprise
considering Gibbons saw ex-
tensive time in those areas at
Boston College, and he put up
points when playing in those
roles.
During his senior season,
Gibbons scored seven power
play goals and added four more
shorthanded.
When Brian Gibbons came
to the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins at the end of last
season, he had a choice: hit
the ice or hit the books.
Gibbons, 23, had just signed
a two-year contract with the
Penguins after finishing up his
senior season at Boston Col-
lege. But while his college
hockey ca-
reer had
ended, there
were still
some classes
that re-
mained.
Gibbons had
a few courses
to finish up
in order to
earn a degree
in marketing.
Hockey or
education?
Gibbons
chose the
latter.
I had been
at Boston
College for
three-and-a-
half years,
and put a lot
of time and
effort into
my school-
work, he
said. I chose
to go to Boston College for a
reason. Not only for the hock-
ey, but for the education as
well.
So while former college
teammates such as Cam At-
kinson (currently with Spring-
field), Jimmy Hayes (Rock-
ford) and Joe Whitney (Alba-
ny) put school on hold to get
into a handful of AHL games,
Gibbons headed back to the
classroom and earned his
degree.
I knew I would get my
chance the next year, he said.
Sure it wouldve been nice to
get a few games in, but while I
was here for a week (last
season) I really learned a lot
about practices, what the
coaches look for and how hard
I would have to work. It was a
good teaching tool for me.
Gibbons doesnt regret his
decision and there are a num-
ber of reasons behind it. The
Penguins were wrapping up a
franchise-record 58-win sea-
son and the roster was loaded
with talented players.
I didnt want to interrupt
that, Gibbons said. They
had a lot of good players here
and I dont think I wouldve
been a game changer.
Also factoring into Gibbons
decision was he was still on
scholarship at BC and could
finish up his classes and get
his degree without having to
pay for it. He also wanted to
wrap his academic career up
in the spring so he could
spend all summer focusing on
training for the upcoming
season.
I just wanted to stay the
extra two months, put the
work in and get it done, Gib-
bons said.
But there was yet a bigger
factor that influenced Gib-
bons decision to get his de-
gree.
I know my parents wanted
me to finish, he said. It was
also very important to me
knowing whenever the time
comes, after hockey, I have a
degree that will help with my
future.
Head coach John Hynes said
the team respected Gibbons
decision to go back to school
and said its a reflection of the
type of person he is.
Education is important to
him, Hynes said. Hes an ex-
cellent player whos going to
have a bright future inthe game
of hockey, but I think he also
has his eye on the long-term.
With his goal of earning a de-
gree accomplished, Gibbons
has been able to focus all his at-
Hynes added.
While success has come
quickly for Gibbons early in his
professional career, he clearly
isnt satisfied. Always wanting
to improve, the 5-8, 165-pound
Gibbons said he has work to do
with his play in the defensive
zone, especially when it comes
todefendingagainst bigger and
stronger players.
Ill learn from my experi-
ence and by watching guys like
Bryan Lerg and Ben Street do
it, he said.
And learning, as he proved at
the end of last season, is some-
thing Gibbons does particular-
ly well.
Penguins forward Brian Gibbons finished his degree after his college
playing days ended. Now, hes learning on the fly in the AHL.
Continuing education
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Brian Gibbons has two goals and four assists in eight games with the Penguins this season.
It was
also very
important
to me
knowing
whenever
the time
comes,
after hock-
ey, I have a
degree
that will
help with
my fu-
ture.
Brian Gibbons
Penguins
forward
Goaltender Patrick Killeencontinued
his strong play in net last weekend for
the Nailers, stopping18 of 20 shots for a
3-2 win over Elmira. On the season, Kil-
len is 3-0-0 and has stopped 54 of the 58
shots he faced. The Nailers are a perfect
3-0-0-0 heading into this weekend.
Coincidentally, Mountain Top native
Martin Moucha, who was at Wilkes-
Barre/Scrantons training camp, suited
up with Elmira for last weekends game.
Moucha had an assist and was a plus-1
on the night.
The Nailers faced Gwinnett on Friday
and hosted Trenton on Saturday night.
-- Tom Venesky
W H E E L I N G WAT C H
Killeen keeps
winning ways
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
Product Manager:
Required 5 years
experience in retail
chain/Plan-o-gram,
international mer-
chandising, product
development and
sourcing using MS
Office S/W to man-
age projects from
initial design & spe-
cific to approval.
Negotiate product
costs & lead times
with factories. Cre-
ate, source, mer-
chandise and price
new seasonal pro-
grams. Direct and
coordinate with
Oct. showroom
set-up in HK. Coor-
dinate with cross
functional team to
increase speed to
market. Build rela-
tionship with ven-
dors and manage
relationship with
project manage-
ment counter
parts. Align with art
director to create
trendy color right
designs for prod-
ucts. Work with
sales, purchasing,
marketing and cus-
tomer care and
vendors to ensure
customer goals are
met and on-going
business with
retailers. Super-
vise lead improve-
ment project with
current vendors.
Research market
to identify competi-
tors strength and
gaps. Manage
presentation
requests and
develop account-
specific proposals.
Oversee direction
of samples and
sales materials.
Work with interna-
tional vendors & HK
Office to source &
develop custom
items & programs
and sourcing new
product for line
introduction. Work
with Cost Account-
ing Department to
develop and imple-
ment the pricing
structure. Coordi-
nate with Planning
& Sales teams to
forecast on new
stock line items.
Salary: $44866 to
$63819. Full Time
(Monday-Friday, 9-
5). Berwick Offray
LLC, Berwick, PA.
Travel to HK/Asia
3-4 times/year.
Standard on-job
training & employ-
ee benefits. Submit
resumes to:
Recruitment &
Employment Office,
BERWICK OFFRAY
LLC, Attention: Job
Ref#BER76444,
P.O.Box 56625,
Atlanta, GA 30303.
522 Education/
Training
CHILDCARE DIRECTOR
Full Time position.
Benefits included.
Apply at: CYC
36 S. Washington St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
or Fax Resume
570-823-0175.
LINEUP
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
POWER GENERATION
TECHNICIANS
Shop and Field
Service
Cleveland Brothers
Equipment Co.,
Central PAs Cater-
pillar dealer, has
excellent career
opportunities avail-
able at our Wilkes-
Barre facility. Candi-
dates should have
strong mechanical
knowledge as well
as electrical appli-
cations: Power Gen-
eration, Air Com-
pressors, and
Diesel Engines.
Caterpillar experi-
ence is a plus. Basic
computer skills and
strong written and
verbal communica-
tion skills required.
We offer an excel-
lent wage and ben-
efits package. For
confidential consid-
eration, please sub-
mit resume with ref-
erences to:
Cleveland Brothers
Equipment
970 Wilkes-Barre
Township Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18703
Attn: John Borys
A Drug Free Work-
place Affirmative
Action Employer
M/F/D/V
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536 IT/Software
Development
TECHNICAL ANALYST
ASSOCIATES
Geisinger Health
System seeks highly
skilled IT candidates
for Technical Ana-
lyst Associate posi-
tions to provide tech
support for elec-
tronic health record
applications. Bache-
lor's degree and
strong knowledge
of WinXP & Win7 OS;
VMWare; MS Virtual
PC; IIS 6/7/7.5; Unix
command; 1 year
database experi-
ence. Coursework
accepted! Geisinger
offers a competitive
salary and benefits
package beginning
day one of employ-
ment. Apply online:
www.geisinger.org/
careers. Search
Job ID: 4134 & 3571.
Geisinger is a drug-
screening employ-
er; EOE/M/F/D/V
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
FACILITY CLEANER-
PITTSTON LOCATION
Immediate need for
person to work
4:30pm -10pm And/
or 5;30-10pm. Gen-
eral cleaning and
some floor care
helpful. Great part
time job. Starting
rate of $8.75 to
$9.00 hour. Stable
work history and
must have reliable
transportation.
Apply online at
www.sovereigncs.
com. EOE and Drug
Free Workplace.
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HOUSEKEEPERS
Part time nights
and weekends.
Experience pre-
ferred. Email
resume to
resume@odyssey
fitnesscenter.com
or apply in person
at 401 Coal St., WB.
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
CUSTODIAL-
FLOOR CLEANER
Full time opening for
6pm -2am. Hanover
area. General
cleaning and floor
care required.
Starting rate of
$9.50. Benefits and
paid time off after
90 days. Apply
online at
www.sovereigncs.
com. EOE and Drug
Free Workplace.
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
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tocleanout your closets!
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVER-
CDL CLASS A OR B-
SCRANTON AREA
Full time position
located in Scranton
for experienced
driver that can
make frequent
stops and unload
and load product.
Must have experi-
ence of NO less
than 5 years cur-
rent. Clean MVR
and ability to lift up
to 100lbs. Hazmat
helpful. All same day
driving. $13.00-
$14.00 hour to start
based on experi-
ence. DOT required.
Apply online at:
www.papaper.com
Benefits after 90
days. EOE and Drug
Free Workplace.
DRIVERS CDL - A:
Local Dedicated
Route! Home every
night! Great Pay,
Benefits! Estenson
Logistics. Apply
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
TEAMS WANTED
Company Drivers
& Independent
Contractors
HOME WEEKLY!
Great pay, Excellent
benefits, 401K &
Bonuses. Class A
CDL & 1 year OTR
experience required.
(888) 690-4242
WWW.
EPESTRANSPORT.COM
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
We are growing!
Core-Mark is
accepting
applications Sunday
through Friday with
Guaranteed
Interviews Monday
through Friday
between 8am &
6pm. FULL TIME 3
OR 4 DAY WORK
WEEK AVAILABLE
Monday through
Friday -
weekends off !
We are a national
convenience store
distribution compa-
ny seeking full time
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS. Generous
benefit package to
include Medical/
Dental/Vision/STD/
LTD and 401k.
$1,500 sign on
bonus as well as
Attendance/Safety
and Performance
Bonus programs
available. Annual
and merit increases.
Designed Route
Deliveries. Com-
pany provided uni-
form and work
boots Guaranteed
40 hours/week.
Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
570-823-6865
SHOW UP AND BE
INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants sub-
ject to pre-employ-
ment drug and
background check.
E.O.E
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
COUNTER SALES
Peirce-Phelps, Inc.,
Americas fastest
growing HVAC
leader has an IDEAL
Counter Sales posi-
tion in our Wilkes-
Barre, PA store.
The position is for a
self-driven, highly
motivated individual
with great customer
service skills. Duties
include cross-refer-
encing service parts
and compressors,
sale of supplies and
equipment, tele-
marketing and other
store functions. The
ideal candidate will
have good comput-
er skills, a strong
work ethic and
HVAC and or whole-
sale experience.
Excellent telephone,
organizational and
customer relation
skills are required.
We offer a competi-
tive compensation
& attractive compa-
ny benefits pack-
age, tuition reim-
bursement & 401(k)
retirement plan.
Please submit
resumes to:
Peirce-Phelps, Inc.
Fax: (570) 823-
3197
Email:
jobs@peirce.com
EOE
No phone calls
please
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700
MERCHANDISE
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVDs, VHS &
CDs & Pre 90s
toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929
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Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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the directions!
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 story, 5 bedroom
home completely
remodeled in & out.
$245k with owner
financing with
20% down or will
do a lease-
option-purchase.
tj2isok@gmail.com
To place your
ad call...829-7130
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DALLAS
Large 3 bedroom
2nd floor. No pets.
Off street parking.
Call Joe 570-881-
2517
KINGSTON
Page Avenue
2 bedroom, living
room, dining room,
off street parking.
$450 + utilities. Call
570-752-6399
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MOOSIC
4 rooms, 2nd floor,
heat, water, sewer
included. $695.
Security /refer-
ences
570-457-7854
SCRANTON
GREEN RIDGE SECTION
Large 1 bedroom.
Heat included.
Bathroom, eat in
kitchen, living room.
Off street parking.
$650/month
(631) 821-8600 x103
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Half Double- 3 bed-
room, 1 Bath $725.
with discount. All
new carpet, dish-
washer, garbage
disposal, appli-
ances
Large Kitchen,
Washer / dryer
hookup. Double
Security. Facebook
us @ BOVO
Rentals
570-328-9984
953Houses for Rent
WEST PITTSTON
SINGLE FAMILY HOME
3 bedroom. 1.5
baths. Full kitchen.
Living & dining
room. Hardwood
floors. Front & rear
porch. Off street
parking. Large
yard. $675 + utili-
ties, security. No
pets or smoking.
Call 570-696-3289
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
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timesleader.com
MARTINSVILLE, Va.
Roush Fenway Racing team-
mates Carl Edwards and Matt
Kenseth couldnt have asked for a
better scenariothanrainwashing
out qualifying for Sundays race
at Martinsville Speedway.
Edwards had never qualified
better than seventh on the 0.526-
mile oval, and Kenseth had never
qualified better than 14th before
weather handed them the front
row spots Saturday.
Qualifying, I think, is one of
the most important parts of this
race and its no secret thats been
a tough thing for me and Matt as
well, soI thinkits best-case for us
that we get to start on the front
row, and even better is the pit
stall selection, Edwards said.
With only four races left in the
season, and a lead of just 14
points over Kenseth, 18over Brad
Keselowski and 19 over Tony
Stewart, Edwards will take all the
help he can get. He has four
top-10 finishes in his last seven
starts at the oldest track inthe se-
ries, while Kenseth has seven top
10s in 23 starts. Neither has won
here, whilesomeof theother con-
tenders have.
Stewart has won twice, but not
since 2006, and five-time defend-
ing series champion Jimmie
Johnson, who is 50 points off the
lead, has been to Victory Lane six
times, last in 2009.
Of course, apart from being
able to select the pit stall at the
front of pit road, giving him un-
impeded access back onto the
track, the other contenders will
start up front, too.
Its nearly impossible to get
through 500 laps around the pa-
per clip-shaped oval without sus-
taining some damage to your car,
and with a poor track record, Ed-
wards team will try to build off
the setup Kenseth used for his
sixth-place runhere inthe spring.
Best-case
for Kenseth,
Edwards
By HANK KURZ Jr.
AP Sports Writer
MARTINSVILLE, Va.
Kevin Harvick and Greg Biffle
had a run-in on the track when
the Sprint Cup Series got in its
only practice after the rain stop-
ped Saturday, and then had
words as the confrontation
spilled over into the garage
later.
On the track, Biffle ran into
the back of Harvicks car. Har-
vick, who is fifth in the series
standings 26 points behind
leader Carl Edwards, later hit
Biffle in the back.
The drivers later stopped at
the exit of Turn 2, then headed
for the garage, where Harvick
pulled in alongside Biffle, then
ahead, momentarily blocking
Biffles access to his stall. Biffle
turned in anyway, clipping the
back of Harvicks car.
After climbing from his car,
Biffle headed to Harvicks ga-
rage stall, drawing a crowd of
team members and officials,
even though the conversation
appeared to become amicable.
Biffles teammates, Edwards
and Matt Kenseth, are 1-2 in the
point standings.
OVER FOR FIVE-TIME?
Jimmie Johnsons six victories
at Martinsville are second
among active drivers to team-
mate Jeff Gordons seven, but
Johnson doesnt necessarily
view Sundays race as his best
chance to make a dent in his
50-point deficit to leader Carl
Edwards with four races left.
He figures that came last
week at Talladega, but his strat-
egy of racing at the back of the
pack to avoid a big crash, and
then charging to the front at the
end was foiled by cautions.
Now, its anyones guess.
As long as we are still mathe-
matically in it, Im not going to
give up hope. I just never been
one to lay down on something
or to quit and not try; we have
four races left on the schedule,
stuff can happen, Johnson said.
That window of opportunity is
getting smaller and smaller,
especially with these last two
weeks, but it is not over until it
is over.
With six drivers ahead of him
in the standings, he knows his
odds are long.
Its one thing if there were
one or two guys ahead of me,
my odds would improve at that
point. But its impossible to
know whats going to happen
and Ive just got to go out and
try to lead as many laps as I can,
win as often as I can, and see
where everyone elses luck
goes, he said.
Kurt Busch, who is eighth, 52
points behind, thinks their
Chase already is over.
Were 50 points back, which
is the equivalent of being over a
race back, he said. The old
system, that would be 200
points back. Theres no way you
can gain that in four races.
SHORT TRACK TEMPERS:
Timothy Peters and Brendan
Gaughan dont like each other.
The Truck Series drivers had
issues at the end of Saturdays
race, and a confrontation after
they climbed from their cars had
Peters listening and then laugh-
ing as Gaughan stormed away.
I cant help but laugh, he
said. I guess he just wants me
to pull over for him.
Gaughan said the two have a
long-running feud that wont go
away.
Him and I have had a lot of
problems for a lot of years, and
he just added another notch to
it, he said. When it does come
back, it might hurt a little bit. I
would like to handle it like a
man, but I think he would be
too afraid.
N A S C A R
Paint gets traded during practice runs
By HANK KURZ Jr.
AP Sports Writer
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drivers Kevin Harvick, left, and Greg Biffle discuss an on-track
incident in the garage after practice Saturday.
NASCAR
N O T E B O O K
MARTINSVILLE, Va. Den-
ny Hamlin ducked inside points
leader Austin Dillon and four-
time TruckSeries championRon
Hornaday Jr. after a restart with
14 laps to go and went on to win
at Martinsville Speedway on Sat-
urday.
Hamlins first victory in the se-
ries, in a truck owned by Kyle
Busch, made himthe 23rd driver
to win a race in each of NAS-
CARs three national series.
It really means a lot to me to
be able to get my very first Truck
victory, he said. I knew if I
could win a race today, it was go-
ing to propel me hopefully into
tomorrow, and if I didnt win, I
would have been pretty disap-
pointed because I had a great
truck, he said.
It was harder than he thought
it might be after giving up the
lead hed held for 54 laps by pit-
ting for tires with other leaders
with 70 laps to go. When he got
back out, he was 18th.
I just gave it everything I had
those last 50 laps the hardest
last 50 laps Ive ever driven at
Martinsville, Hamlin said. Hes
won four Cup Series races on the
0.526-mile oval.
Hornaday, seeking his fifth se-
ries championship, finished sec-
ond and Dillon was third. He re-
mainedthe points leader by11
over James Buescher and15 over
Hornaday and Johnny Sauter
with two races remaining, but
felt that he cost himself or Horn-
aday a victory.
We gave it to him. I did, Dil-
lon said of Hamlins inside pass
out of Turn 2. If I could have
made the first turn, it wouldhave
been either me or Ron in Victory
Lane, I think.
The series races next at Texas
on Nov. 4 and finishes at Home-
stead two weeks later.
Hamlin earns first Truck Series victory after late pass
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Max Gresham (66) spins out in front of David Starr (81) and
Parker Kligerman (29) on Saturday at Martinsville Speedway.
By HANK KURZ Jr.
AP Sports Writer
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 11C
summitpointebuilders.com
675-7900
John E. Halbing III
For Over 25 Years
Jo J
ISTANBUL Wimbledon
champion Petra Kvitova will play
Victoria Azarenka in the WTA
Championships final on Sunday
with the No. 2 ranking on the line
along with a $1.5 million pay-
check.
Kvitova, a Czech lefthander
with booming serves, rallied to
defeat U.S. Open winner Saman-
tha Stosur 5-7, 6-3, 6-3 in the
semifinals Saturday, while
fourth-ranked Azarenka defeated
Vera Zvonareva 6-2, 6-3.
Kvitova beat Azarenka in the
semifinals en route to winning
her first Grand Slamtitle at Wim-
bledon this year. Shes counting
on a psychological edge after de-
feating Azarenka in both the
matches they played this season.
Hopefully, it will be better for
me, mentally, Kvitova said. We
know each other very well.
Azarenka said shed need to
blunt Kvitovas powerful serve
when they meet at the Sinan Er-
dem Dome in Istanbul, which is
hosting the championships for
the first time. Some 12,000 peo-
ple attended the semifinals.
She really goes for her shots,
said Azarenka, who has won
three titles this season. Sosome-
times she doesnt find the
rhythm. But at the same time,
she can be on and just hit win-
ners.
Against Stosur, Kvitova hit big
serves and groundstrokes and
moved to the net. In the first set,
Stosur capitalizedonapair of ser-
vice breaks and her own strong
kick serve.
Kvitova took early leads in the
second and third sets with a pow-
er game that has propelled her
from outside the top 30 at the
start of the year to No. 3.
It was very tough to break
her, Kvitova said. It was a great
match for us.
Azarenkas solid ground-
strokes forced errors fromZvona-
reva, who was never able to gain
momentum in the match. Zvona-
reva held two break points in the
last game, but could not convert
them.
One game in the second set
lasted nearly12 minutes and end-
ed when the Russian held serve
to tie at 2-all, but Azarenka broke
her next two service games.
The score doesnt say much
about the game, Azarenka said.
It was important to be consis-
tent andaggressive, findtheright
balance.
At 21, Kvitova was the young-
est of the four semifinalists and
hadnt droppeda set inthe round-
robin phase of the $4.9 million
WTA Championships. She beat
Stosur in their two previous
meetings, including a tough
third-round win at the Australian
Open this year and a comfortable
victory at the 2008 French Open.
W O M E N S T E N N I S
Kvitova, Azarenka reach final
The Wimbledon champ could
take the No. 2 ranking with
a victory today in Istanbul.
By CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA
Associated Press Writer
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Samantha Stosur returns to Petra Kvitova during the first semi-
final of the WTA championships in Istanbul, Turkey, on Saturday.
Brittney Griner and Baylor are
starting the season where they
hope to end it at No. 1.
The Lady Bears are ranked at
the top for the first time in the
preseason womens basketball
poll by The Associated Press.
Baylor started last year at No. 2
before ascending to No. 1in early
January for the first time in
school history. The Lady Bears
finished with a No. 3 ranking.
Certainly wed rather it was
the last ranking, but its great rec-
ognition for our program and
Baylor University, coach Kim
Mulkey said. Regardless of
where youre ranked at the begin-
ning of the season its a positive
for your university. Well embrace
it in such a way and understand
that it doesnt win basketball
games.
Baylor received 33 of 40 first-
place votes Saturday from a na-
tional media panel. The Lady
Bears became the first Big 12
school to be ranked No. 1 to start
the season since Texas in 1985
and 1986.
Notre Dame drew six first-
place votes and was second, with
Tennessee, Connecticut and
Stanford rounding out the first
five. The No. 2 ranking is the
Irishs best since the final poll of
2001.
The Lady Bears couldmeet the
Irishinthe PreseasonWNITfinal
in mid-November. They also play
the Lady Vols and Huskies before
the New Year.
If you have a team capable of
playing them, go play them,
Mulkey said. This schedules ex-
tremely tough the toughest
since Ive been at Baylor.
Notre Dame returns four start-
ers, including sensational guard
Skylar Diggins, fromlast seasons
squad that lost to Texas A&M in
the national championshipgame.
Tennessee retains most of the
teamthat swept the SEClast sea-
son for the conference title. The
Lady Vols fell to Notre Dame in
the NCAAregional finals last sea-
son, missing a Final Four trip for
the third year in a row.
Theyve never gone four sea-
sons without playing in the Final
Four, but coach Pat Summitt has
said her players seem even more
determined to win a title since
she revealed shed been diag-
nosed with early onset dementia.
Penn State is ranked 12th. The
last time the Nittany Lions were
ranked this high was in the final
poll of 2004, whentheywerefifth.
W O M E N S C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Baylor opens with No. 1 ranking
Penn State, the preseason
pick to win the Big Ten, is
ranked 12th in the country.
By DOUG FEINBERG
AP Basketball Writer
SOTOGRANDE, Spain
Sergio Garcia put himself in
position for a second straight
European Tour victory on Sat-
urday, shooting a 4-under 67 at
the Andalucia Masters to take a
two-stroke lead after the third
round.
Garcia had to remove his
shoes and socks for a shot dur-
ing an eventful round that
moved him to 6 under 207,
ahead of Miguel Angel Jimenez
(68) and Christian Nilsson, who
matched the lowest round this
weekend with a 65.
Overnight leader Richie Ram-
say bogeyed the last two holes
for a 73 that left him three
strokes adrift.
The 31st ranked Garcia won
the Castello Masters last week-
end to end a nearly three-year
title drought.
Garcia nearly hit a hole-in-one
at No. 6 as he collected one of
six birdies at the famed Valder-
rama course.
Defending champion Graeme
McDowell was at 14 over after a
round of 81.
Shanghai Masters
SHANGHAI U.S. Open
champion Rory McIlroy shot a
7-under 65 to increase his lead
to three strokes after the third
round of the Shanghai Masters.
The 22-year-old made seven
birdies in another bogey-free
round on Lake Malarens Jack
Nicklaus-designed Masters
course to finish at 18-under 198.
Anthony Kim was second
after a 65. Noh Seung-yul was 14
under after a 67.
Ian Poulter (67) and Hunter
Mahan (68) were 11 under, Lee
Westwood (70) and Geoff Ogil-
vy (66) were another stroke
back, and Robert Karlsson (72),
Padraig Harrington (73) and
Y.E. Yang (68) were 6 under.
P R O G O L F
Garcia on pace for 2nd consecutive title
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
ST. LOUIS Albert Pujols
tried to give away nothing during
the celebration, tried to stay in
the moment. But what a moment
it was.
Getting another taste of that
championship feeling surely will
tip the scales in favor of the St.
Louis Cardinals at least a little bit
when it comes time to talk con-
tract.
Obviously, right now a lot of
things go through my head and
thinking about the whole sea-
son, Pujols saidat the podiumaf-
ter the Cardinals won their 11th
World Series.
Probably like two or three
weeks from now, thats when Im
really going to be sitting down
andsaying, Wow, wherewewere,
and now were the 2011 World
Champions. Its unbelievable.
What remained of Friday after
the Cardinals finishedoff the Tex-
as Rangers in Game 7 was for sa-
voring one of the most unlikely
comebacks in major league histo-
ry. Hundreds of fans peacefully
roamed the downtown streets
well into the night.
Truly a dream come true,
manager Tony La Russa said. Its
hard to really imagine it actually
happened.
On Sunday, the team will bask
inadulationonce againwitha vic-
tory parade scheduled for late af-
ternoon. In 2006, the team esti-
mated between 300,000 and a
half-milllion people lined the
streets.
Five players remain from 2006,
when the Cardinals backed into
the postseason as an 83-win team
and then got hot when key play-
ers got healthy. Pujols, Yadier
Molina, Skip Schumaker and
Chris Carpenter and Adam
Wainwright remain from that
team, which also was lightly re-
garded.
Cant top 2011.
This team is unbelievable,
Carpenter said after beating the
Rangers for the second time.
Most amazing team Ive ever
been a part of.
General manager John Moze-
liak takes special satisfaction in
the championship. The moves he
made at the trade deadline for
shortstop Rafael Furcal, starter
Edwin Jackson and three reliev-
ers paid off.
All you can do is live and die
with your club, Mozeliak said.
Tosit herenowandbeontop, its
just a wonderful experience.
Mozeliak cant celebrate for
long, though.
I would say I have about a 72-
hour window to enjoy this, Mo-
zeliak said. And then right back
it Monday.
A decision looms: Can the Car-
dinals persuade Pujols to stay?
Would extra millions he might
make elsewhere compensate for
shedding the role of local icon?
He seemed proud about his
place in St. Louis after Game 7.
It doesnt matter the numbers,
it doesnt matter the records, it
doesnt matter the money that
you make, Pujols said. What
matters is to raise that trophy and
to be able to bring that smile to
the city of St. Louis.
And not just the city of St.
Louis, but all our fans around the
world.
Mozeliak has more than just
Pujols on his plate. But after the
postseason, the roster just
seemed so much deeper.
October brought out new stars
in third baseman David Freese,
the MVP of both the NLCS and
World Series, and Allen Craig,
whose big bat helped the team
overcome injuries to cleanup hit-
ter Matt Holliday.
Freese was the Cardinals most
dangerous hitter throughout the
playoffs.
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Pujols decision can wait for now
Super slugger has won two
World Series with St. Louis
By R.B. FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer
ASSOCIATED PRESS
St. Louis Cardinals Albert Pujols, left, and manager Tony La Rus-
sa celebrate after Game 7 of the World Series on Friday.
NEW YORK Anyone who
has been to a car dealership, or
bought ahome, understandshow
negotiating works.
One side offers a number, the
other counters, and they meet
somewhere in the middle and
make a deal.
Thats not the way its working
in the NBAs labor standoff
evenwithpotentially$2billionat
stake for each side.
Owners and players keep in-
sistingthey are ready andwilling
to make the necessary financial
step for an agreement. Yet talks
havebrokendowneachof thelast
two weeks with little movement
and the same type of answer:
Were here, theyre there, and
thats that.
That wont get players back on
the court or fans in the seats.
And with both sides so en-
trenched, it might be a question
of when, not if, another round of
cancellations will be necessary.
I dont know, Commissioner
David Stern said Friday when
asked about the next deadline.
We just had a difficult day. Well
go back, well go to the office
Mondayandseewhat todoabout
this big mess.
They could start with a phone
call to the players association to
schedule more talks, and the
sides likely will meet again soon.
But it will remainpointless if nei-
ther sideispreparedtooffer com-
promise.
Ownersareinsistent ona50-50
split of basketball-related in-
come. Players have proposed re-
ducing their guarantee from 57
percent downto52.5, sayingthat
will transfer more than $1.5 bil-
lion to owners over six years.
And when neither side would
go further Friday, NBA officials
saidunionexecutive director Bil-
ly Hunter ended the session.
Billy said, My phone is ring-
ing off the hook from agents and
players tellingme I cannot goun-
der 52percent andhesaidunless
youre willing to go there, we
have nothingtotalkabout, Dep-
uty Commissioner Adam Silver
said.
Thedifferencebetween50and
52.5percent isabout $100million
annually, based on last seasons
revenues, or $1 billion over the
course of the 10-year agreement
the NBAis seeking.
The cost of not making a deal?
We expect there to be a $2 bil-
lion loss for us for the loss of the
season, which we will then begin
to dig out from under and try to
get back, if there were a seasons
loss,Sternsaid. Andtheplayers
would lose $2 billion. Period.
The losses already have been
piling up. Stern said wiping out
the preseason schedule, which
would have ended Friday, cost
the league $200million. The first
month of real games adds anoth-
er couple hundred million, and
Hunter has saidmissinga month
would cost the players about
$350 million.
But thats not enough to make
players agree to a deal they say
would cost themmoney and lim-
it options in free agency.
We think we gave more than
enough, and thats what we con-
stantly said to them: Look, we
did what it was you said you
needed, we did it, Hunter said.
And now all of a sudden, every
time we did it, its like their eyes
got bigger andthey wantedmore
andmoreandmore. Sofinallywe
just had to shut it down and just
say it cant be.
Stern has made it clear that
owners future proposals could
be made with the losses in mind.
Players eventually will get their
money, just lessof it, but thedam-
age to businesses that rely onthe
game wont be recovered.
Thesidesaremuchcloserafter
threestraight days of meetings in
consecutive weeks. Besides the
BRI split, the list of remaining
items is down to just a handful,
such as the ability of teams over
the luxury tax threshold to use
themidlevel exceptionor partici-
pate in sign-and-trade deals.
Those are important to play-
ers. The top-spending teams are
mostly the ones in the biggest
markets, and players want to
know teams in the most desired
cities wont be prevented from
bidding on them.
N B A
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NBA Commissioner David Stern canceled all November games
on Friday, the 120th day of the lockout.
Little compromise
given at labor talks
Owners, players stand firm
as regular season games
continue to fall by wayside.
By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
PHILADELPHIAJaromir
Jagr scoredtwogoals andIlya
Bryzgalovreboundedstronginnet
froma stringof badgames tolead
the Philadelphia Flyers toa 5-1win
over the Carolina Hurricanes on
Saturdaynight.
Bryzgalovneededanoutinglike
this one torestore the confidence
he saidwas shot after an0-4-1
stretchwitha 4.62goals against
average. He allowedfour goals on
10shots inrelief inPhiladelphias
9-8loss toWinnipegonThursday.
Bryzgalovblamedhimself for
the defeat, callingit the lowpoint
of his career.
He was just fine against the
Hurricanes. The lone goal he
allowedwasnt evenhis fault.
Scott Hartnell slidheadfirst into
Bryzgalovina rushfor the puck,
knockingthe goalie off his feet and
onhis back, allowingJussi Joki-
nenanopenlookfor the tyinggoal
inthe secondperiod.
MapleLeafs4, Penguins3
TORONTOPhil Kessel
scoredhis league-leading10th
goal midwaythroughthe third
periodtolift Torontopast Pitts-
burgh.
Mikhail Grabovski, TimCon-
nollyandClarke MacArthur also
scoredfor the Maple Leafs.
Matt Cooke, Chris Kunitz and
Evgeni Malkinscoredfor the
wearyPenguins, whowere play-
ingfor the13thtime in26days.
Kessel andPittsburghs James
Neal enteredthe eveningtiedfor
the NHLleadingoals. Kessel
edgedaheadshortlyafter the
Penguins erasedtheir thirdone-
goal deficit of the game andPitts-
burghgoalie Jonas Gustavsson
made sure it stoodupbystacking
his pads ona great opportunityby
Neal withless than5minutes to
play.
Senators5, Rangers4, SO
NEWYORKMilanMichalek
cappedOttawas three-goal come-
backinthe thirdperiodandthen
nettedthe onlygoal inthe shoo-
tout as the Senators stormedback
tobeat the NewYorkRangers and
stretchtheir winningstreakto
five.
JasonSpezza startedthe rally
froma 4-1hole byscoringtwice,
andMichalektiedit withOttawas
thirdgoal ina 7:52spanwhenhe
put inhis seventhwith2:50re-
maining.
That wipedout a bigdayby
Rangers topforwards BradRi-
chards andMarianGaborik, who
were split upas linemates but
producedthree points each
withRichards scoringtwice.
Sharks3, Islanders2, OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Brent
Burns scoreda power-playgoal
1:07intoovertime togive surging
SanJose a victoryover the New
YorkIslanders.
Burns slammeda one-timer
fromthe topof the right circle past
RickDiPietroafter a disputed
delay-of-game penaltyonNew
YorkdefensemanTravis Hamonic.
SanJose has wonthe first five
games of its six-game roadtrip,
whichconcludes Mondaynight
against the NewYorkRangers at
MadisonSquare Garden.
The Islanders have lost five ina
row.
Panthers3, Sabres2
BUFFALO, N.Y. JasonGarri-
sons goal snappeda third-period
tie andliftedFlorida over Buffalo.
Marcel Goc andTomas Fleisch-
mannalsoscored, andJose Theo-
dore made 24saves for the Pan-
thers (6-4-0), whowonfor the
thirdtime intheir past four games.
Thomas VanekandJasonPo-
minville scored, andRyanMiller
finishedwith33saves for the
Sabres (6-4-0).
Tomas Kopeckyaddedthree
assists, while Garrisonalsohadan
assist.
Canadiens4, Bruins2
MONTREALBrianGionta
andDavidDesharnais scored
power-playgoals andCareyPrice
made 26saves as Montreal ex-
tendedits winningstreaktothree
witha winover Boston.
Lars Eller andTomas Plekanec
alsoscoredfor Montreal, which
won2-1inBostononThursday
night. The Canadiens improvedto
4-5-2after winningonlyone of
their first eight games.
Montreals winningstreak
beganafter assistant coachPerry
Pearnwas firedWednesdayprior
tothe teams 5-1winover Philadel-
phia.
Lightning1, Jets0
TAMPA, Fla. Dwayne Rolo-
sonmade 28saves inhis 29th
career shutout, Vincent Lecavalier
scoreda power-playgoal late in
the secondperiodandTampa Bay
beat Winnipeg.
Tampa Bayhas won12consec-
utive games against the Atlanta-
Winnipegfranchise. The last
victoryinthe series for the relocat-
edJets came onOct. 3, 2009,
whenAtlanta beat Tampa Bay6-3.
Predators3, Ducks0
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Pekka
Rinne made 20saves for the Nash-
ville Predators inhis100thcareer
win, 3-0over the AnaheimDucks
onSaturdaynight.
Rinne set a franchise record
with22shutouts, twothis season.
Wild1, RedWings0
ST. PAUL, Minn.JoshHard-
ingmade 36saves andDanyHeat-
leyscoredtolift the Minnesota
Wildtoa1-0victoryover the
slumpingDetroit RedWings on
Saturdaynight.
JimmyHowardmade19saves
for the RedWings, whohave lost
four games ina rowafter a 5-0
start.
N H L R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Philadelphia Flyers players, from left, Claude Giroux, Braydon Coburn and Jaromir Jagr celebrate after Scott Hartnell, in goal at right,
scored against the Carolina Hurricanes in the first period Saturday in Philadelphia.
Shot of Jagr cures Flyers ills
By the Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 13C
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PAGE 14C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
THE FACTORYVILLE
SPORTSMENS CLUB will hold
its annual turkey shoot and dinner
Sunday, Nov. 6, on the club
grounds. Competitions for turkey
prizes will begin at 9 a.m., and
dinner will be available from11:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This is a family-friendly event
and is open to the public. A full
turkey dinner will be served at a
cost of $8, and takeouts are avail-
able. For more information, visit
the club website, www.fscweb.org,
or call 378-2593.
NESCOPECK STATE PARK will
hold a professional development
workshop for educators Thursday,
Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Learn how you can motivate your
students to get up and active
during the winter through an
interdisciplinary set of lessons for
teachers created by the Penn-
sylvania Bureau of State Parks.
Lessons focus on health, fitness
and preparedness; snow, weather
and climate; history; and the arts.
The lessons meet physical educa-
tion and health standards, as well
as standards for history, science
and technologies, and the human-
ities. While the lessons are geared
toward middle school teachers,
they are adaptable for younger
and older grades.
A snowshoe field trip with
students will be shared.
Participants will be eligible for
four Act 48 hours. The cost for
this workshop (which includes
curriculum materials) is $20 per
person. Advance registration is
required.
To register, call the park office
weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
403-2006.
NESCOPECK STATE PARK will
hold the following events in No-
vember (for more information or
to register, call 403-2006):
Wednesday, Nov. 9 Hide-n-
Seekers Craft and Story Hour, 1-2
p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 12 Just for Kids:
Animals in Winter, 1-2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 13 Nescopeck
Trail Hike, 1-2:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 18 Raptors! 7-8:30
p.m.
O U T D O O R S N O T E S
Reservoirs open to public fishing
Pennsylvania American Water and
the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Com-
mission (PFBC) announced the
opening of five Pennsylvania Amer-
ican Water reservoirs in Lackawanna
County for public fishing. The five
new reservoirs that will be open
include Curtis, Dunmore No. 1, Elm-
hurst, Griffin, and Maple Lake. A
ribbon-cutting ceremony scheduled
for Oct. 27 was cancelled due to
weather conditions.
The creation of these new public
fishing areas was the result of a part-
nership between Pennsylvania Amer-
ican Water and the PFBC.
We are very fortunate in this area
to benefit from so many natural
resources, said Dan Hufton, senior
director, production, Pennsylvania
American Water.
This is a fantastic gift to anglers
and residents in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania, said John Arway, Exec-
utive Director of the Fish and Boat
Commission. Were excited any
time we can open waterways for
people to enjoy the sport of fishing.
To make five available at one time is
simply remarkable.
Shoreline fishing at the reservoirs
will be allowed, but wading will not
be permitted. Boats will not be per-
mitted on the waterways. Reservoirs
will be closed to fishing between the
hours of 9 p.m. and 5 a.m. Common-
wealth inland fishing rules and regu-
lations and PFBC property regu-
lations apply. The areas open to
fishing have been posted with signs
indicating the boundaries. Local
anglers can expect to find several
different and popular sportfish, in-
cluding bass, trout, perch and other
panfish.
All five reservoirs are located in
Lackawanna County: Curtis (Madi-
son Township); Dunmore No. 1
(Dunmore); Elmhurst (Roaring
Brook Township); Griffin (South
Abington and Scott townships); and
Maple Lake (Spring Brook Town-
ship.) They join two other reservoirs
in Northeast Pennsylvania previously
opened for shoreline fishing: Com-
fort Pond in Susquehanna County,
and Ceasetown Reservoir, located in
Jackson and Lehman townships,
Luzerne County.
Fly fishing film tour
Trout Unlimited will sponsor the
2012 edition of the Fly Fishing Film
Tour -- the largest film tour of its
kind -- with dozens of stops from
coast to coast and throughout Cana-
da.
The Fly Fishing Film Tour reac-
hes out to the entire fly fishing realm
and offers a bit of an escape to those
of us who unfortunately spend more
time dreaming than we do fishing,
said Chris Hunt, TUs director of
communications. Thats the audi-
ence that needs to hear TUs conser-
vation message. It is part of becom-
ing that well-rounded, complete
angler we all want to be.
This years tour stops will be for-
mally announced in December by
the producers. Film screenings will
start early in 2012 and likely contin-
ue through next fall.
This is a good partnership, said
Chris Keig of the Fly Fishing Film
Tour. "We believe that our audience
truly believes in conservation and
this partnership will allow them to
get out and help save and protect
their home waters through their
local TU chapters and conservation
groups.
Fly Fishing Film Tour screenings
are very well-attended events, simply
because the quality of the filmmak-
ing on display is unmatched. Many
of the events take place in more of a
concert atmosphere, where anglers
of all ages mingle with fishing bud-
dies and take in some of the most
breathtaking movie-making available
today.
Anyone interested in organizing a
production should call 303-815-1070.
OUTDOORS NEWS
The third and final hearing on
Sunday hunting was held in Har-
risburg on Thursday before
members of the House Game and
Fisheries Committee.
The next step in the process,
according to state Rep. Ed Sta-
back, who is minority chairman
of the committee, is todetermine
if there is enough support to
move House Bill 1760 to the floor
for a vote. HB 1760 would give
the Pennsylvania Game Commis-
sion the ability to implement
Sunday hunting.
The issue has attracted both
supporters and opponents, and
Staback said there are three pos-
sible options that could slightly
change the bill and increase its
chances of being passed.
The first option would be to
limit Sunday hunting to private
land only. That would be a hard
sell, Stabacksaid, because not ev-
ery hunter has access to private
property.
A second option would limit
Sunday hunting to private land
and State Game Lands, and not
allow it on State Forest lands.
Staback said he could support
such a change because it would
still keep some public property
open for Sunday hunting while
allowing non-hunters to utilize
state forests on Sundays.
A third option would make
trespassing a primary offense,
Staback said, adding as such it
wouldbe enforceable by the PGC
and would lessen the concerns of
private landowners opposed to
Sunday hunting.
Currently, someone has to
commit aprimaryGameLawvio-
lation first, and then trespass can
be tacked on if the person is tres-
passing, Staback said. Trespass
right nowis asecondaryoffense.
Eight individuals testified dur-
ing the five-hour hearing, and an
updated report on the financial
impact of Sunday hunting was
presented.
The first financial report on
Sunday hunting was written in
2005. That report, according to
Staback, determined that Sun-
day hunting would generate
more than $629 million for the
states economy and create 5,400
jobs.
The recent report which was
based on data from2010, predict-
ed that Sunday hunting would
generate more than $800 million
for the economy, create 7,400
jobs and bring in $57 million in
new tax revenue.
After the hearing, the Pennsyl-
vania Farm Bureau issued a re-
lease reaffirming its strong op-
position to Sunday hunting and
questioned why the bill was still
being pushed when it lacks the
support of most Pennsylvania
residents.
Staback said the Game and
Fisheries Committee will now
decide if the bill should be
amended to include on of the
three options, along with garner-
ing support, before it moves to
the floor.
That should happen soon if a
Sunday hunting vote is to be-
come a reality.
If we dont move this by the
end of this year, then Sunday
hunting is dead, Staback said.
Sundays
discussion
nears end
The Game and Fisheries
Committee held its final
hearing for Sunday hunting.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Andy Bensing offers a pretty good
reason why tracking wounded deer with
dogs should be allowed in Pennsylvania.
One man with a dog that doesnt bark,
is leashed at all times and is on the exact
trail of that deer is far less disturbance
than eight guys grid searching in the
middle of the woods on a Saturday after-
noon, he said.
And it gets better.
If the deer is dead, 90
percent of the time the dog
will find it, Bensing said.
Morally and ethically, theres
no downside to it.
Bensing is the director of
the 125-member group Deer
Recovery of Pennsylvania and
president of the national
organization United Blood
Trackers. Both groups are
hoping that legislators will soon allow
hunters to use dogs to track wounded
harvests in Pennsylvania, joining a list of
34 other states where the practice is
allowed.
House Bill 881 would permit the use of
a leashed dog to track a deer that has
been legally killed or wounded during
the season. The bill has been referred to
the House Game and Fisheries Commit-
tee and is scheduled to come up for a
vote to move it to the House floor on
Nov. 2.
Were looking forward to that, Bens-
ing said.
Although he cant track deer in Penn-
sylvania, Bensing does travel to Mary-
land and New Jersey, when called, to
help hunters find wounded deer. He uses
one of his two wirehaired dachshunds to
do the work.
Last year, Bensing took 47 calls, trav-
eled 6,500 miles and found 17 deer.
Each call follows a similar pattern, he
said.
A hunter shoots a deer, tries to find it
and cant. He gets his friends to help and
pretty soon they cant find any-
more blood or tracks, Bensing
said. Thats where the dog
comes in.
Most of the time, Bensing
arrives within 12-24 hours with
his dog. They start at the loca-
tion where the deer was hit and
go over the trail that the hunter
already found.
At that point the dog is con-
necting that wound scent to that
specific animal, he said.
Once the dog is connected, it can usu-
ally continue to track the deer even if the
blood trail vanishes. At the same time, by
watching his dog Bensing can determine
the travel pattern of the deer and predict
if it is recoverable. A wounded deer that
is being followed will generally travel in
loops to lose its pursuer, Bensing said.
If the deer is making a really small
circle a 150-yard radius, thats a mortal-
ly wounded animal, he said. It doesnt
have the strength to go very far.
If the loops are a half-mile in diame-
ter, chances are that deer will make it.
Tracking deer with dogs is popular in
the South, Bensing said, and crucial
because the warmer temperatures re-
quire a quicker recovery before the meat
spoils.
But even in Pennsylvania, when the
temperatures are cool for the majority of
the archery and rifle deer seasons, using
dogs makes just as much sense, Bensing
said, simply because it increases the
chances of finding and recovering the
animal.
The misery of losing an animal is not
a good feeling to any hunter, he said.
A tracking dog can help avoid such
misery.
According to Bensing, is a deer was hit
and ran before it died, a tracking dog can
find it nine out of 10 times.
Bensing said the use of a tracking dog
doesnt require much in the way of regu-
lations. The dog should be on a leash at
all times, he said, and that is a require-
ment in most states that allow the use of
tracking dogs for deer.
Theres really no downside to this,
Bensing said. The animal rights people
dont even argue with us.
Who let the dogs out? It might be the state legislature, as House
Bill 881 would allow for the use of recovery dogs while hunting.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
This Maryland buck was found by one of Andy Bensings dogs deep in a thicket that had been searched twice by hunters.
Bensing hopes Pennsylvania legislators allow the use of dogs to track wounded deer in the state.
Release the hounds
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
To learn more
about tracking
dogs for wounded
deer, visit
www.deerrecove-
rypa.org or www.u-
nitedbloodtrack-
ers.org.
T O L E A R N
M O R E
Andy Bensing has years of experience using
dogs to track wounded deer in other states
where the practice is legal. During that
time, Bensing has developed a pretty good
sense of how a wounded deer acts. Hes
tracked enough deer to form an interesting
opinion on the longstanding belief that a
wounded deer instinctively heads to water.
Bensing said thats not entirely true.
As trackers were in agreement that theres
not much to that, he said. We do find deer
in water, but usually theyre seeking the
thick cover that surrounds the water. Gen-
erally there is thick cover surrounding
streams and swamps, and a wounded deer
will cross water to get to those areas.
I dont hold much credence to the wound-
ed deer to water belief.
D E E R W I L L S E E K C O V E R
An amendment to House
Bill 881 would allow the use
of dogs to track deer. Heres
how the amendment reads:
It shall be lawful to make
use of a dog to pursue, chase,
scatter and track wild turkeys
during the fall wild turkey
season or to make use of a
leashed blood-tracking dog to
track a white-tailed deer in an
attempt to recover an animal
which has been legally killed
or wounded during any open
season for white-tailed deer.
The bill still prohibits the
use of a dog for hunting, pur-
suing, harassing, chasing,
scattering or injuring big
game.
The amended bill is cur-
rently before the House Game
and Fisheries Committee.
State Rep. Ed Staback, who
is the minority chair of the
committee, said he supports
the concept of using dogs to
track deer but has a few con-
cerns.
The problem I have is
theres nothing to certify that
a tracking dog works in a
silent mode. Using dogs to
find wounded deer isnt a bad
idea, but I dont think other
hunters in the woods would
appreciate a barking dog, he
said.
Staback also said if the deer
is found outside of legal hunt-
ing hours and isnt dead, the
law may have to be changed
to allow the dog handler to
carry a sidearm to dispatch
the animal. Such a change
may be difficult to accom-
plish, he said.
Amendment would allow for use of dogs
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 15C
C M Y K
PAGE 16C SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 39/31
Average 56/38
Record High 76 in 1946
Record Low 22 in 1940
Yesterday 30
Month to date 344
Year to date 430
Last year to date 449
Normal year to date 559
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.51
Month to date 3.70
Normal month to date 2.82
Year to date 53.86
Normal year to date 31.69
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 6.89 1.55 22.0
Towanda 4.63 0.30 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 4.03 -0.18 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 42-46. Lows: 23-28. Mostly sunny
skies.
The Poconos
Highs: 48-50. Lows: 32-40. Mostly sunny
and windy.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 46-50. Lows: 23-39. Mostly sunny
skies.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 42-46. Lows: 29-32. Sunny skies
today.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 48-53. Lows: 32-45. Mostly sunny
skies developing today.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 36/29/.00 35/24/sn 31/23/sn
Atlanta 74/44/.27 62/39/s 63/39/s
Baltimore 41/36/1.09 46/37/s 56/37/c
Boston 49/39/.31 47/31/sh 50/37/pc
Buffalo 42/34/.03 49/39/pc 56/45/sh
Charlotte 57/40/.37 61/33/s 58/39/pc
Chicago 54/37/.00 55/41/sh 54/43/pc
Cleveland 51/30/.00 50/41/pc 52/41/sh
Dallas 65/39/.00 73/46/s 75/48/s
Denver 62/30/.00 60/35/pc 62/34/s
Detroit 50/35/.01 51/43/pc 52/41/sh
Honolulu 84/72/.01 85/70/s 84/70/s
Houston 68/44/.00 75/51/s 79/53/s
Indianapolis 57/34/.00 58/41/pc 55/37/pc
Las Vegas 77/51/.00 78/55/s 79/59/s
Los Angeles 74/53/.00 75/57/s 70/55/s
Miami 87/76/.17 81/72/t 85/70/t
Milwaukee 53/36/.00 51/40/sh 50/40/pc
Minneapolis 52/31/.00 48/35/sh 53/40/pc
Myrtle Beach 59/48/.00 62/42/s 63/49/sh
Nashville 59/30/.00 64/42/pc 63/38/s
New Orleans 66/51/.00 67/52/s 72/52/s
Norfolk 64/43/.41 55/40/s 59/49/pc
Oklahoma City 63/35/.00 65/41/s 71/48/s
Omaha 62/30/.00 57/32/pc 64/43/pc
Orlando 77/69/.33 76/64/pc 80/62/pc
Phoenix 86/61/.00 92/59/s 92/60/s
Pittsburgh 39/33/.31 51/34/pc 53/34/r
Portland, Ore. 58/48/.00 58/45/sh 55/40/sh
St. Louis 63/37/.00 67/38/c 60/40/s
Salt Lake City 60/31/.00 62/43/s 63/43/pc
San Antonio 67/40/.00 76/51/s 79/54/s
San Diego 72/54/.00 77/55/s 70/58/pc
San Francisco 71/49/.00 69/52/s 68/51/s
Seattle 55/44/.00 56/46/sh 53/43/sh
Tampa 79/70/.01 78/62/pc 81/61/pc
Tucson 84/55/.00 86/55/s 86/56/s
Washington, DC 43/34/1.18 47/37/s 56/37/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 61/50/.00 58/53/sh 59/52/sh
Baghdad 79/59/.00 76/59/s 77/54/s
Beijing 61/39/.00 65/44/s 63/43/c
Berlin 61/37/.00 58/46/sh 56/47/sh
Buenos Aires 73/59/.00 73/50/s 72/56/s
Dublin 61/52/.00 59/50/sh 56/47/sh
Frankfurt 59/45/.00 60/44/sh 56/45/sh
Hong Kong 81/72/.00 82/75/s 81/73/pc
Jerusalem 73/54/.00 76/51/s 75/52/s
London 61/54/.00 63/57/c 59/52/c
Mexico City 73/45/.00 72/44/s 75/43/s
Montreal 41/27/.00 45/39/pc 48/34/s
Moscow 41/34/.00 42/37/c 43/38/c
Paris 63/55/.00 64/49/pc 65/50/sh
Rio de Janeiro 84/68/.00 81/69/t 71/66/sh
Riyadh 91/66/.00 90/60/s 87/59/s
Rome 72/54/.00 74/52/s 71/51/s
San Juan 88/74/.53 86/77/t 85/76/t
Tokyo 68/55/.00 70/60/pc 69/55/sh
Warsaw 54/36/.00 56/35/s 54/40/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
45/33
Reading
41/26
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
42/27
46/28
Harrisburg
46/32
Atlantic City
49/39
New York City
46/34
Syracuse
50/31
Pottsville
44/29
Albany
47/26
Binghamton
Towanda
46/29
45/26
State College
45/30
Poughkeepsie
45/19
73/46
55/41
60/35
75/48
48/35
75/57
70/53 60/35
59/42 56/46
46/34
51/43
62/39
81/72
75/51
85/70
43/38
35/24
47/37
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:32a 6:02p
Tomorrow 7:33a 6:01p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 11:51a 9:28p
Tomorrow 12:40p 10:33p
First Full Last New
Nov. 2 Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25
Snow totals are
between 4 to 8
inches with more
in higher eleva-
tions. The snow
on the ground
will make for a
cooler day today
with morning
lows around 28.
We will warm up
to 42 and it will
be cold with
breezy condi-
tions. Tonight we
will drop to 28
degrees and
have clear skies.
On Monday we
will have partly
sunny skies turn-
ing to overcast
later in the day
and a chance of
a shower. We will
reach a high of
45 and cool back
down to 26. With
below freezing
temperatures,
we could see a
flurry or two
early Tuesday
turning into a
shower as tem-
peratures rise.
The skies will
clear later in the
day and the sun
will come back
out.
- Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: As a strong low pressure system continues moving away from the Northeast,
some early rain and snowfall along with windy conditions will be likely for the far Northeast.
Meanwhile, a low pressure system near the Midwest could bring some scattered showers to the
region.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Mostly sunny, cold
MONDAY
Partly
sunny to
cloudy
45
26
WEDNESDAY
Mostly
sunny
52
33
THURSDAY
Partly
sunny
58
38
FRIDAY
Rain
55
40
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
55
40
TUESDAY
Sun, a
flurry
47
31
42

28

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
timesleader.com
OK, SOTOMORROW
is Halloween and
youll have plenty of
candy floating around
your house to give
away to trick-or-trea-
ters. But when the day
is done and all that
yummy candy is gone, the real deals
will begin.
Stores, especially Rite Aid, CVS,
Target and Walgreens will be placing
those extra left over bags of chocolate,
lollipops and candy on the clearance
racks. Most of themmark themdown
20-30 percent as soon as the day after
the holiday. But if you have the patience
to wait until next weekend, you may
find candy discounted up to 75 percent.
Grab themand your wallet, children
and dentist will thank you.
A local restaurant is offering free food
for kids in costume Monday night.
Old Country Buffet will give a free
dinner to kids when an accompanying
adult orders a meal. The offer starts at 5
p.m. and is limited to two childrens
meals per adult meal purchased.
Need a quick costume? Rite Aid has
all of theirs 50 percent off starting today
as long as you use your Wellness+ Card.
If youre expecting or already have
infants or small children, heres a good
way to spend some time today. Head
over to the Babyage.comoutlet store at
370 Stewart Road in the Hanover Indus-
trial Estates from1to 4 p.m. where the
stores already discounted merchandise
can be purchased with an additional 10
percent off.
Starting Tuesday, Cars 2 is will be out
on DVDand Blu Ray. Get a $10 rebate
when you purchase the movie and $20
of Kimberly-Clark products. Find out
more here: https://www.kcc.cr.kimber-
ly-clark.com/downloads/rebate.pdf
The offer ends Jan. 31.
Target will sell the DVDfor $15.99
and the DVD/Blu Ray combo pack
including the 3-Dversion of the movie
on Blu Ray for $29.99. If you go this
route, make sure you log on to tar-
get.com./disneycoupon for a $5 off
coupon.
This weeks best uses of the more
than $410 in coupons found in todays
Times Leader at area retailers are:
Use the $1off a Febreze Set and
Refresh air freshener at Weis and pay
just $1.50 for the item.
Redners Warehouse Market has
Febreze Air Effects air freshener for
$1.99. Use the $1off coupon to pay just
99 cents for one.
CVS has Old Spice body washes on
sale for $3.49. Get two for that price
when you use the buy-one, get-one-free
coupon.
CVS also has Puffs tissues on sale
for 99 cents. Use the $1off six boxes to
pay $4.94 for themall.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Halloween may be over after Monday but the deals certainly arent
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local steals or deals, espe-
cially those for veterans, send them to
aseder@timesleader.com and Ill include
them in next weeks column.
When the city of Chesapeake,
Va., considered closing a crum-
bling, 80-year-old bridge over the
Elizabeth River in 2008, local offi-
cials knew that neither the state
nor the federal government would
pay for a replacement. Just tear-
ing down the old one would cost
millions of dollars. So they sold it.
We paid them $10, said Bob
Hellman, one of the investors, but
what we gave them wasnt just
$10.
Hellmans investors group,
American Bridge Partners,
agreed to remove the old bridge
and to build a brand-new one,
solely withprivate money. Tolls of
about $2 a trip, upfromthe old75-
cent fee, will pay back the compa-
nys $130 million investment in
the new South Norfolk Jordan
Bridge, due to open in the spring.
This is a Christmas gift for the
city, said Chesapeake Mayor
Alan Krasnoff.
Its a gift cities and states are
asking for more than ever. The
goal is not to raise cash by selling
public infrastructure but to tap in-
to the private sector for money to
build bridges, roads or tunnels
possibly faster and cheaper than
the government otherwise could.
There are at least 70 privately
funded and managed infrastruc-
ture projects across the United
States in various stages of devel-
opment, according to a list com-
piled by the lawfirmAllen &Ove-
ry. These are part of a vast net-
work of roads, bridges and tun-
nels to say nothing of the
subways, ports, airports and wa-
ter systems crying out for at-
tention.
Consider this: Over the past 60
years, the United States has built
a 46,876-mile federal highway sys-
tem that is now in dire need of re-
pair. As a result, states have hadto
pour more of their transportation
dollars into fixing aging highways
and even in good times have little
or nothing left over for new con-
struction.
The Great Recession made that
harder. In many cases, financially
strapped states and cities have lit-
tle choice but to turn to the pri-
Private
investors
step up
By CEZARY PODKUL
The Washington Post
See INVEST, Page 2D
CREVE COEUR, Mo.
Monsanto Co., whose geneti-
cally modified corn and soy-
beans have reshaped Americas
heartland and rallied a nation
of fast-food foes, wants to revo-
lutionize the produce aisle.
The agribusiness giant al-
ready has quietly stepped into
the marketplace with produce
grown from its seeds.
Grocery customers are chop-
ping its onions that produce
fewer tears, stir-frying its broc-
coli that decreases cholesterol
and biting into tiny orange to-
matoes that last longer on the
shelf.
Soon, people will be thump-
ing melons bred to be a single
serving and shucking sweet
corn genetically modified to
enable farmers to spray the
fields with the companys weed
killer, Roundup.
To do this, its marrying con-
ventional breeding methods
with its vast technological re-
sources to bring about changes
in fruits and vegetables in
months or years, rather than in
decades.
Monsantos goal: to dom-
inate todays $3 billion global
market for produce seeds,
much as it already has done
with corn and soybeans.
This isnt a hobby. ... Were
serious about it, said Monsan-
to Chief Executive Hugh
Grant, who expects the compa-
nys vegetable seed revenue to
rival its $1.5 billion soybean
business in the coming decade.
The move has raised the
hackles of some environmental
and organic farming groups
that fear it will ultimately
squeeze out smaller, independ-
ent vegetable seed firms.
They also worry that the
company will use technology
to introduce revolutionary new
genes into vegetable plants,
just as Monsanto scientists
Monsanto sprouts a produce-seed line
By P.J. HUFFSTUTTER
Los Angeles Times
See PRODUCE, Page 3D
N
either Gerry ODonnell nor Ruth Corcoran were born or raised in the Wyoming Valley.
But both have come to call the region home, and both are being honored for their
efforts to make their adopted community a better place. ODonnell, president of
MotorWorld Automotive Group, will receive the Distinguished Citizen Award and Cork Res-
taurant and Corcoran Communications, owned by Ruth Corcoran, will receive the Small Busi-
ness of the Year Award at the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerces annual dinner
meeting on Nov. 15.
The Distinguished Citizen Award
is given to individuals who have
achieved the highest level of profes-
sional excellence and who, at the
same time, have given their best for
the betterment of the Greater Wilkes-
Barre area.
This awardrepresents recognition
of special persons that have made our
lives a little brighter and our area bet-
ter, and Gerry ODonnell has most
certainly done that, said Robert
Snyder, president and chief executive
officer of Luzerne Bank. He gives of
his time and talent to countless orga-
nizations inour com-
munity, and his cre-
ativity, energy and
drive have made a
difference to so
many people that
call our region
home.
Born and raised in
Boston, ODonnell entered the auto
industry as a management trainee for
Chrysler. As he moved up the ranks,
and then on to other auto companies,
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Gerry ODonnell of MotorWorld, will be honored by the chamber with the leadership award in November.
COMMUNITY
EXCELLENCE
Wilkes-Barre Chamber honoring two local citizens
By ANDREWM. SEDER aseder@timesleader.com
See HONOR, Page 3D
Corcoran
The Greater Wilkes-Barre
Chamber of Commerces
127th Annual Dinner will
be held on Nov. 15 at Ge-
nettis Hotel and Confer-
ence Center in Wilkes-
Barre. Reservations are
$75 for Chamber mem-
bers and their guests and
$95 for non-members. For
more information, call
823-2101, ext. 113 or visit
www.wilkesbarre.org/
calendar.
IF YOU GO
W
ith budget cutting all the rage
in Washington, it might be
instructive to look back at a
project that ran through millions in
taxpayer funds, shifted focus in mid-
stream and produced a self-congrat-
ulatory legacy report long on rhetoric
but short on concrete accomplish-
ments.
Wall Street West was born from
disruption in financial markets caused
by the 9/11 tragedy. Two years after
terrorists slammed hijacked jets into
the World Trade Center, federal agen-
cies that oversee the nations financial
system suggested (remember that
verb) that stock and bond exchanges
and traders have backup systems out-
side of the New York Metropolitan
area. That arrangement could poten-
tially avoid a shutdown like the week-
long hiatus that followed the attacks.
Some local economic development
and education leaders sensed an oppor-
tunity. To allow instantaneous copying
of information, the backup facilities
had to be within 100 miles of New
York, an area that included the nine
Pennsylvania counties that would make
up Wall Street West. Congressman
Paul Kanjorski, who held a position of
influence on a financial services com-
mittee, already had a blueprint in
place.
It all came together in a successful
pitch for a federal grant that would
provide $15 million over three years. It
seemed the area was on the brink of an
economic renaissance, as visions of
data centers, plush offices and high
salaries danced in our heads. It was up
to us only to provide a cadr of trained
workers to show up for the jobs that
were on the way.
There was one big problem, though;
as much sense as the recommendations
made, the target firms did not have to
implement them. The leaders of Wall
Street West, then, were left with a
build it and they will come strategy.
But little was built and few jobs
came.
One of the few concrete examples of
success is profiled in the opening pages
of the legacy report. A local employee
of Site2, a business continuity compa-
ny in Scranton, interned at the compa-
ny while studying at Johnson College,
with his second year funded by a Wall
Street West program. He eventually
completed his studies and was hired.
Hes still there, said Site2 co-founder
Mark Magdon.
But Site2 isnt here because of Wall
Street West, and neither is any other
company that comes to mind. Site2
started in 2004 in my basement in
Archbald, Magdon said. And while the
firm was part of the Wall Street West
milieu, nothing really evolved.
Today that heralded employee, who
Magdon said hit the ground running
because of his training, is one of four at
Site2. And the company, recognizing
reality, is not after huge financial ser-
vices firms but smaller support busi-
nesses that need its services but not
the expensive high-speed backup envi-
sioned by Wall Street West.
So, was Wall Street West a classic
boondoggle or a good idea whose
promise was stymied by the Great
Recession? To me, its a little of both,
and a lesson for the future.
Just as in business, government is
going to miss its target from time to
time. This, though, seemed like a clas-
sic case of too much money made
available with too little discipline.
Handing out millions to local offi-
cials with only squishy dreams as the
goal is no longer acceptable. What may
be is targeting funds like this toward
real training for real jobs that exist in
the real economy. I hope the leadership
in Washington grasps this soon, before
its too late.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
A local lesson
in questionable
govt spending
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
Dr. Susan Fort Sordoni, Harveys
Lake, was recently recognized by
Governor Tom Corbett and First
Lady Susan Corbett as one of
nine Distinguished Daughters of
Pennsylvania. The distinction
honors women who have shown
distinguished service through a
professional career and/or volun-
tary service. Over four decades as
a volunteer in the community,
Sordoni established an early
intervention program for devel-
opmentally disabled children as
well as the Circle of Friends at
Misericordia University, a program
for mentally challenged women
transitioning from high school to
the work place. In addition, she
gave leadership to the founding
of Volunteers in Medicine Clinic in
Luzerne County, a free health
clinic for the working uninsured,
where she continues to volunteer
as a physician. She also serves as
a board member of the Sordoni
Foundation, which provides civic,
cultural, health care, education
and social service support to the
greater Wilkes-Barre community.
Patrick J. Dempsey, chairman of
Dempsey Uniform & Linen Supply,
Inc., Jessup, received the Textile
Rental Services Association of
Americas Lifetime Achievement
Award. Dempsey, a company
owner in the textile services
business for 50 years, was honor-
ed for his efforts to guide his
contemporaries around the coun-
try by contributing to trade jour-
nal articles and speaking at indus-
try conferences and seminars.
Dempsey started the company
with his late brother Richard in
1959 in Dunmore. The company,
which has more than 300 employ-
ees, is recognized as the most
technologically advanced laundry
in Pennsylvania. It also serves
businesses in New York, New
Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, West
Virginia and Virginia.
Ernestine L. Smith and WilliamS.
Birch were recently honored by
the Pennsylvania Department of
Corrections for their volunteer
work with prison inmates. Smith
leads Protestant worship at SCI
Dallas and Birch leads Bible stud-
ies through the Gideons Interna-
tional for inmates at SCI Retreat.
BUSINESS AWARDS
Submit announcements of business
honors and awards to Business Awards
by email to tlbusiness@timeslead-
er.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250; or by fax
to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg
format may be attached to email.
RED CARPET LUNCH: Wednesday,
1 1:15 a.m.-1 p.m., Best Western
Genetti Inn & Suites, 1341 N.
Church St., Hazle Township. Guest
speaker will be Gov. Tom Corbett.
Hazleton Chamber members $20;
non-members $25. Reservations
required by Wednesday; call
570-455-1509, email lman-
tush@hazletonchamber.org, or
online at www.hazletonchambe-
r.org. No walk-ins will be al-
lowed.
EDUCATION AND HEALTH CA-
REER FAIR: Wednesday, 10 a.m.-4
p.m., PA CareerLink Wilkes-Barre
office, 32 E. Union St. Repre-
sentatives will be on hand from
area educational institutions and
health care employers. For more
information, call 570-826-2401.
PENN STATE W-B EXECUTIVE
MANAGEMENT SERIES: Thurs-
day, 7:45 a.m., Best Western
Genetti Hotel and Conference
Center, Wilkes-Barre. William
Rothwell, will explain how finding
the right staff to do the right work
is the answer to productivity. $15
per person. For more information
and to reserve, email
sxr50@psu.edu or call 570-675-
9253.
SOCIAL MEDIA AND YOUR
SMALL BUSINESS: Thursday,
8:30 a.m., the Greater Scranton
Chamber of Commerce, 222
Mulberry Street. Tips from experi-
enced professionals about build-
ing an online presence through
Foursquare, Facebook, Twitter and
LinkedIn. $35 per person. A webi-
nar will be offered for those that
cannot attend. To register, visit
www.MetroAction.org or call
570-341-0270.
BUSINESS AGENDA
BARBER FORD
Joseph Berretta has joined the
dealerships sales team at its
Wyoming
Avenue,
Exeter loca-
tion. A resi-
dent of the
Wyoming
Valley and
Wyoming
Area gradu-
ate, he has
been an automotive sales
professional with the Ford
brand for 22 years.
PENN STATE WILKES-BARRE
George Coroian was named an
assistant professor of adminis-
tration of
justice. Co-
roian is a
former law
enforcement
officer and a
licensed
attorney. He
earned a
Bachelor of
Arts degree and a Ph.D. in
criminology from Indiana
University of Pennsylvania and
a Juris Doctorate from Ohio
Northern University. He has
also served as a law clerk for
administrative law judges in
the Commonwealth of Penn-
sylvania.
Anson Carter was named a
mathematics
instructor.
Carter
earned a
Bachelor of
Science
degree in
mechanical
engineering
from Lehigh University. He also
holds a Master of Arts degree
in mathematics from Villanova
University and a Master of
Science degree in applied
mathematics from the Uni-
versity of Delaware. Prior to
joining the Wilkes-Barre cam-
pus, Carter was a mathematics
instructor at the Penn State
Hazleton campus.
Mike Aed was appointed the first
part-time athletic trainer in the
schools athletic history. Aed
served as the head athletic
trainer at Marywood University
for seven years and Wilkes
University for 16 years. He will
be covering all practices and
games, working with student
athletes to prevent injuries and
rehabilitating injured student
athletes.
Rachel Olszewski was named
communication specialist.
Olszewski is a
graduate of
the Uni-
versity of
Dayton, with
a Bachelor of
Arts degree
in communi-
cation and a
double minor
in English and political science.
She also holds a certification
for event planning from Clark
State College.
Albert Lozano-Nieto is on loan
for a year in a new appoint-
ment as interim director of
academic affairs. Lozano-Nieto
has been an
assistant
professor of
engineering
in the bio-
medical
engineering
program at
the university
for 15 years.
He earned his academic de-
grees from Polytechnic Uni-
versity of Catalonia. A new
board member and three
ex-officio members were ap-
pointed to the 2011-2012 Cam-
pus Advisory Board.
Richard Williams, a new board
member, is a shareholder in
the firm of Hourigan, Kluger &
Quinn, P.C., where he practices
in the firms
Kingston
office. He
earned a
Bachelor of
Science
degree from
Penn State
University
and his Juris
Doctorate
from the Dickinson School of
Law. He is admitted to practice
before the Pennsylvania Su-
preme Court, the United States
District and Bankruptcy Courts
for the Middle and Eastern
Districts of Pennsylvania and
the United States Supreme
Court.
Linda Barlett, president of the
Penn State Chapter of the
Wyoming Valley, is a lawyer
with Cefalo & Associates, West
Pittston. She is a graduate of
Penn State and spent a portion
of her college years studying
abroad in Germany and Aus-
tria. She is a former Woman of
the Year in Luzerne County
and enjoys running marathons.
Scott Finlon, president of the
Penn State Wilkes-Barre Alum-
ni Constituent Society, is an
information security engineer
at the University of Scranton.
He earned a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in information
science technology from Penn
State Wilkes-Barre and is a
former president of the Penn
State Wilkes-Barre Student
Government Association.
Dr. Thomas Winter, chair of the
Campus Faculty Senate, is a
professor of physics at Penn
State Wilkes-Barre and chair-
man of the math and science
faculty. Winter has been at the
university since 1976, excluding
his time spent on sabbatical at
Kansas State University, Rice
University and the Harvard-
Smithsonian Center for Astro-
physics. He holds a Bachelor of
Arts degree in mathematics
from Queens College of the
City University of New York
and a Ph.D. in physics from the
University of Wisconsin, Madi-
son.
CORPORATE
LADDER
Berretta
Coroian
Carter
Olszewski
Lozano-Nieto
Williams
Submit announcements of business
promotions, hirings and other
events to Corporate Ladder by
email to tlbusiness@timeslead-
er.com; by mail to 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250; or by
fax to (570) 829-5537. Photos in jpg
format may be attached to email.
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vate sector, even if it means
giving up revenue and selling
off an asset normally seen as
belonging to the public.
In Chesapeake, they were
looking at our bridge versus no
bridge, said Hellman, who
previously invested in pipe-
lines, coal, landfills and even
cemeteries. Thats ultimately
what youre looking at in many
of these circumstances.
States are facing a transpor-
tation funding crisis, said
Jaime Rall, transportation pol-
icy specialist at the National
Conference of State Legisla-
tures. But she does not pin the
blame for the crisis on the re-
cession alone. She also points
to the political reluctance to
raise the gas tax, she said.
The gasoline tax, which
feeds into the National High-
way Trust Fund for highway
projects, has stood at 18.4
cents a gallon since 1993. Ad-
justed for inflation, it would
need to be 29 cents a gallon
just to buy what it did then, ac-
cording to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. But Congress and
the White House oppose any
increase.
As a result, federal transpor-
tation finances are in even
worse shape than many states.
The highway trust fund ran out
of cash and had to be rescued
in 2008, 2009 and 2010 at a to-
tal cost to taxpayers of $34.5
billion. It is expectedrunout of
cash again next year.
While public coffers have
been running dry, a cottage in-
dustry has been built around
the concept of investing pri-
vate money ininfrastructure. It
has grown exponentially over
INVEST
Continued fromPage 1D
See INVEST, Page 4D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
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his family also moved. From
New England to New Jersey,
California to Florida, the Motor
City to the Steel City, he and his
wife Barbara and their four chil-
dren never stayed in any one
place very long.
When he took a job for Motor-
World in 1996, he thought hed
be in the Wilkes-Barre region for
a few years and then move
along. Instead, hes spent nearly
16years here the secondlong-
est hes ever lived in one place.
Andhes madesurehis timehere
has been well-spent.
We came here for the oppor-
tunity, ODonnell saidwhile sit-
ting in his office thats clad in
Boston Red Sox dcor. And I
love what Im doing and I love
the area.
He said he made an effort to
get both himself and the compa-
ny involved in the community
right on from the time he
moved here.
This is a small community
and MotorWorld needs to be in-
volved. If were going to be suc-
cessful then the community
needs to be successful, ODon-
nell, of Shavertown, said.
Growing up in the Jamaica
Plain section of Boston, he said
his parents told him that in life
hell encounter people with
more, people with less. Your re-
sponsibility is to help the people
with less. Those words are still
with me.
His involvement includes
serving on multiple boards of di-
rectors including at area colleg-
es and nonprofit organizations.
MotorWorld has been active in
raisingmoneyfor the RedCross,
the Osterhout Library and The
Times Leaders Newspapers In
Education program.
ODonnell said when he was
first informed hed be receiving
the award, he was honored and
flattered but felt there are a lot
more worthy people in the com-
munity than myself.
Ruth Corcoran
Like ODonnell, Corcoran
found herself in an unfamiliar
place. Recently divorced and liv-
ing in Pittston with two small
children, she could have moved
back to the Lehigh Valley where
she grew up and where her fam-
ily still lived. But the support
she drew from the community
convinced her the Valley With a
Heart was where she would re-
main.
Neighbors, new friends and
co-workers went out of their way
to help her and she never forgot
that assistance.
She does what she can to this
daytohelpothers inthecommu-
nity.
I am very community mind-
ed now, the 48-year-old Bear
CreekTownshipresident said. I
have to give back. I am this way
because people were so good to
me at that time.
Witha backgroundinbanking
she worked at both PNC and
then Mellon Corcoran began a
public relations firm as a way to
create a schedule and workload
that would allow time with her
children. Alongthe way, she met
Bill Corcoran, owner of Corco-
ran Printing, and the two mar-
ried.
Then her other love food
entered her life.
I look at eating as a kind of
event, she said. And it seemed
like the time was right.
She opened Cork Restaurant
and made sure her dining area
was made available for groups to
meet at and to be used for fun-
draisers for community organi-
zations.
David Payne, the chambers
chairman who works at PNC
Capital Markets, praised Corco-
rans business and community
acumens.
Ruth is one of those rare peo-
ple that not only runs one suc-
cessful small business but two.
Not onlyis Corkawonderful res-
taurant, but it serves as host fa-
cility for many special events
that benefit nonprofits through-
out the area, Payne said. She
has that combination of profes-
sional excellence and commit-
ment to community that we
look for in this award.
Corcoran said I strongly be-
lieve we have to give back when
we can. Im lucky Im able to do
that.
HONOR
Continued from Page 1D
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Ruth Corcoran, front, with her employees at Corcorans restau-
rant Cork in Wilkes-Barre. Ruth, who owns Corcoran Printing as
well, is being honored next month by the Greater Wilkes-Barre
Chamber of Commerce with the small business of the year
award. Gathered in photo with Ruth, from left, Katie Quinn,
Tammie Sciacca, Jeanne Keating, John Kachinsky, Jeff Kochan-
ski, Emily Dupak, Stacy Nice, Dorothy Haczewski, and Carolyn
Falzone.
have done in corn, soybeans and
cotton.
Clearly, the company wants to
keep its options open, said Doug
Gurian-Sherman, senior scientist
with the food and environmental
program at Union of Concerned
Scientists. But I think they under-
stand its a dicey proposition to
move into (genetically engineered)
foods that are widely consumed,
rather than foods that are highly
processed or used as animal feed.
Monsanto officials said the op-
portunities for growth in the vege-
table seed market were too good to
ignore. They saidthere were plenty
of ways to use technology to design
better-tasting vegetables, yet avoid
the financial and consumer hurdles
that would inevitably come with
rolling out genetically engineered
produce for a grocery store.
Theamount of arablelandworld-
wideisdwindling, whiletheworlds
population is forecast to jump to
more than 9 billion by 2050 from
nearly 6.9 billion today. Shifts in
weather patterns have caused re-
cent slumps in key crops.
All this, in turn, has water-
strapped countries eager to estab-
lish secure food supplies. Fast-
growing economies, such as those
in India and China, also are step-
ping up food imports to feed a bur-
geoning middle class.
Given these factors, Monsanto is
making a multibillion-dollar bet
that global farming conditions are
going to get tougher and farmers
aregoingtobehungryfor their veg-
etable and fruit seeds.
Monsanto moved aggressively
into the vegetable business in 2005
when it bought seed powerhouse
Seminis Inc. inOxnard, Calif. Since
then, it has acquiredfour other veg-
etable seed companies, opened 57
research centers worldwide and
hired a slewof seed geneticists and
agricultural researchers.
Today, Monsanto has about
4,000 employees nearly a fifth of
its 21,000 global labor force
working on its vegetable seed busi-
ness worldwide.
Monsanto officials are quick to
stress that they are not creating ge-
netically modified crops. In its
Roundup Ready soybeans, for ex-
ample, Monsanto developed seed-
lings with genes froma soil bacteri-
um to help the plant to survive be-
ing sprayed with its herbicide.
With vegetables, scientists are
looking for answers in the same, or
similar, varieties of plants. Soa trait
in one pepper, such as flavor, might
be meshed with the DNA of anoth-
er pepper. The technique has been
helpful developingvegetable plants
that can withstand certain pests,
said Consuelo Madere, vice presi-
dent of Monsantos global vegeta-
ble group.
But some scientists say this is ge-
netic modification just a differ-
ent type.
What they really are doing is
creatingsomethingwheretheprob-
abilityis verylowthat it wouldhave
happenedinnaturewithout human
intervention, said R. Paul Thomp-
son, director of graduate studies at
the University of Torontos depart-
ment of ecology and evolutionary
biology.
PRODUCE
Continued from Page 1D
MCT PHOTO
Martin Stoecker, a corn scientist
for Monsanto, walks along rows
of corn inside a greenhouse at
the biotech research facilities in
Chesterfield, Mo.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
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EQUIPMENT
Q.: About seven years ago, I
worked part-time at an after-
school day care program. My em-
ployment was terminated after I
complained to a parent about her
childs unruly behavior. Since
then, I have run a small home-
based business but plan to start
looking for work now that my
children are in school.
I have recently heard that the
day care company now claims I
never worked there. If I list this
jobonapplications, Imafraidem-
ployers may thinkImlyingabout
myworkhistory. I couldshowmy
old pay stubs as proof during an
interview, but how do I avoid be-
ingscreenedout duringtheappli-
cation process?
-- Erased
A.: I think you can stop worry-
ing, because most employers
dont check background informa-
tion until an applicant has made
the final cut and is considered a
viable candidate. You should
therefore have ample opportuni-
ty to explain this unusual circum-
stance during the interviewproc-
ess.
First, however, you need to de-
termine if the rumor is actually
true. This can be easily accom-
plished by calling the company
and asking to verify your dates of
employment. If they insist you
never worked there, the reason is
probably poor record-keeping,
not some nefarious plot.
To explain the situation, just
make a brief statement at the end
of your interviews. For example:
In case you do a background
check, I wanted to let you know
that ABC Daycare apparently
doesnt retain old personnel re-
cords. Since they cant verify my
employment, I brought pay stubs
showing the dates that I worked
there.
If you need additional verifica-
tion, consider using W-2 forms
from your tax return or your re-
cord of employment fromthe So-
cial Security Administration.
In reality, the daycare centers
shoddy documentation may
work to your advantage. If no one
recalls your employment, then
you dont need to worry about
howthey might describe your de-
parture.
Q: I work with a group of peo-
ple who goof off a lot, take fre-
quent coffee breaks, and make
prank calls to our customer ser-
vice employees. The owner of the
company is at a different loca-
tion, so whenever he pulls into
our parking lot, the security
guard calls and tells everyone to
get back to work.
I wouldlike toblowthe whistle
on their little game, but when an-
other employee wrote the owner
about this unprofessional behav-
ior, he never responded. His as-
sistant may have intercepted the
email, because she is one of the
biggest culprits. What can I do
about this?
-- Disgusted
A: Although your coworkers
are acting like a bunch of silly, ir-
responsible children, the main
question is whether their antics
are interfering with your own job
performance. If so, thenyouneed
to talk with your manager.
But if not, your best option
may be to simply ignore these
clowns and go about your busi-
ness.
Whileyour concernfor produc-
tivity is commendable, that prob-
lem really belongs to the owner,
whois obviously doinga dreadful
job of managing this company.
Since thats unlikely to change,
you may want to find an employ-
er who can appreciate your pro-
fessionalism.
OFFICE COACH
Explaining
ones past
employment
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
the past decade, thanks largely
to the worlds largest pensions,
which have come to view infras-
tructure as a separate invest-
ment category, much like a
stock or a bond.
Precise estimates are hard to
pin down, but in the past five
years, the 30 biggest investors in
infrastructure have channeled
as much as $180 billion into
these types of investments, ac-
cording to Infrastructure Inves-
tor magazine. These investors
include Macquarie, as well as
some of the largest pension
plans in Europe, Australia and
Canada.
More capital is on the way.
There are 100 private funds
seeking to raise $95 billion for
infrastructure investments glob-
ally, according to a tally by San
Francisco-based fund adviser
Probitas Partners, though not
all of themwill succeed. Of that,
about $11.5 billion would be tar-
geted for the United States, with
fund sizes ranging from $100
million to $3 billion.
The main draw for investors,
DePonte said, is the steady, pre-
dictable income that infrastruc-
ture assets can provide. People
need to get to work, use electric-
ity and flush toilets, so a toll
road, an electric utility or a wa-
ter utility tends to deliver cash
no matter what happens in the
stock market on any given day.
Recent research by Macquarie
shows infrastructure has outper-
formed the global stock market
by an average of about 0.5 per-
cent per month in the past 10
years.
Traffic on the road is highly
insensitive to stock market lev-
els, said Chris Camarsh, head
of investment process at Austra-
lian fund manager CP2. That
makes infrastructure a good way
to save for ones nest egg, since
there is goodpredictability that
the cash will be there when
youre older, he said.
Camarsh, for example, holds
shares in Transurban, an Austra-
lian toll road developer that
owns an 85-year contract to
build and operate an expansion
of the Capital Beltway in Fair-
fax.
Its my retirement, he said.
That has helped lure Canadas
$52 billion Ontario Municipal
Employees Retirement System,
whichprovides retirement bene-
fits to more than 400,000 mem-
bers. It has devoted about $8.25
billion, or 16 percent, of its port-
folio to infrastructure because it
matches the long-term returns
that we need for the pension
plan, said Michael Nobrega,
chief executive of OMERS. The
pension fund bid unsuccess
fully for the Chicago Skyway
and the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
INVEST
Continued from Page 2D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
Francesca Levy, Kristen Girard AP
SEARCH FOR RETURNS
Traders and individual investors have al-
ways looked for new ways to predict the
markets direction. They might want to look
to the Internet, or so says a new study by
researcher Ilaria Bordino and others. Bordi-
no looked at the stocks in the Nasdaq 100
and checked how many people searched
for them on Yahoo. The study found that
shortly after searches for a specific stock
spiked, trading volume also jumped. The
method isnt a way to beat the market -- it
shows which stocks are already getting the
most attention. But the study argues that by
looking at how much coverage a stock is
getting on search engines, economists can
predict a stock market panic. If Internet us-
ers are searching for a stock in unusual
numbers, it could mean that media attention
is driving that stock in a specific direction.
BETTER THAN AVERAGE
Dollar-cost-averaging might sound in-
timidating if you dont spend your
days studying investing strategy, but
the basic idea is simple. You invest in
a stock or asset over a period of time.
That can mitigate the losses you suf-
fer if the market plunges the day after
you invest a lump sum. At least, thats
the theory. It works only in certain cir-
cumstances, says a study conducted
by boutique investment firm Alliance
Bernstein. The study showed that
when the overall stock market is do-
ing extremely poorly, investors were
able to hold on to more of their money
by using dollar-cost-averaging. But
most of the time, when the market is
doing well or just so-so, the method
resulted in investors losing wealth.
BUMP AT THE TOP
Its a well-known adage:
The rich just keep get-
ting richer. New research
shows that its more than
just a saying. According
to a study released last
week by the Congressio-
nal Budget Office, sala-
ries for the top-tier earn-
ers grew more than any
other group between
1979 and 2007. They
chose to analyze the pe-
riod between those two
years so they could
compare years that were
in similar economic cy-
cles (both preceded a
recession).
SOURCES: Alliance Bernstein,
Standard & Poors, Riger G. Ibbotson
Additional wealth after one
year when dollar-cost aver-
aging is used
POOR MARKETS
11.6%
TYPICAL MARKETS
-2.9%
STRONG MARKETS
-13.4%
SOURCE: Congressional Budget Office
TOP 1 PERCENT OF HOUSEHOLDS
NEXT 19 PERCENT
NEXT 60 PERCENT
(MIDDLE-OF THE INCOME SCALE)
BOTTOM 20 PERCENT
18%
40%
65%
275%
Income growth between
1979 and 2000
Patrick Dunkerley, lead manager of
the Scout Mid Cap fund (UMBMX),
sees several positives for stocks, in-
cluding a recovering U.S. economy
and fewer worries that Chinas eco-
nomic growth will sharply slow. His
fund has returned an annual 30.5
percent over the last three years,
through Thursday. That makes it the
fourth-best mid-cap blend fund over
that period, according to Morning-
star. Mid-cap blend funds have re-
turned an average of 22.7 percent
over that time.
Alot of
mid-cap
companies
dont even
do business
in Europe,
yet their
stock prices
are affected
by worries
about the
regions
debt crisis.
Investors in
the U.S. are
being held hostage by the headlines
in Europe. When the headlines are
good, markets rise. When the head-
lines arent, markets fall. But the fun-
damentals of the company matter
more in the long run.
You own several consumer
stocks. Should investors pay
more attention to what consum-
ers are saying (theyre pessimis-
tic), or what theyre doing
(spending has held up)?
Probably what theyre doing. In the
consumer space, we like companies
not so much for a macro reason but
just because we like the companies.
Thats really a stock pickers sector.
In staples, we like Herbalife. They
sell weight-loss and nutrition prod-
ucts in 76 countries. The key drivers
of their fundamentals are (increasing
numbers of people fighting) weight
gain, particularly in emerging mar-
kets. People need weight loss solu-
tions. Their formula and (meal re-
placement) shake is doing really
well. They have a new marketing
strategy where consumers pay daily,
rather than pay for monthly supply.
Theyre bringing their manufacturing
of product in house. That should
help their profit margins.
And AutoZone?
Theyre a great merchandiser of au-
to parts. They use a lot of private la-
bel, which boosts their margins.
Theyre benefiting from the old age
of the U.S. auto population, which is
basically at a record (because driv-
ers put off buying new cars). They
have good retail execution. Theyre
buying back shares. ... Thats a nice
boost to growth (because AutoZone
investors are splitting the companys
profit over a smaller number of
shares.)
You also own Expedia, whose
stock has been volatile.
Its been a laggard. Theyre upgrad-
ing the Expedia.com website, and
they did this with the hotels.com
website with good results. Were
positive on that change. Theyre
spinning off their TripAdvisor busi-
nesses, and that could come even
this quarter possibly.
But wouldnt a weak economy
mean fewer vacation and busi-
ness travel plans, which would
mean less business for Expedia?
The U.S. economy is picking up. ...
Theres plenty of liquidity to get the
economy growing. Interest rates are
low, so the people who can afford to
can refinance their home. Things are
getting a little better. It may not feel
like it (because the unemployment
rate has been at or above 9 percent
since April.)
One of your stocks, HealthSpring,
jumped 34 percent in one day last
week after getting bought.
Takeovers have been happening
here and there. Lubrizol was bought
out of the fund in the first quarter.
Now HealthSpring in this quarter.
What they have in common is
theyre good businesses that gener-
ate lots of cash, and companies like
to buy them.
Looking up
InsiderQ&A
Dunkerley
Chip Cutter, Kristen Girard AP
Shipping
Forecast
But the companies arent quite in
synch in their outlook.
UPS said in its earnings report
Tuesday that the economy appears
healthier than it did a few months
ago. UPS reiterated its earnings
forecast for the year.
FedEx was less optimistic last
month. It lowered its forecast. But it
also said customers werent panick-
ing. And Monday, it predicted ship-
ments would rise 12 percent during
the holiday season from 2010.
Joel Naroff, president of Naroff
Economic Advisors, said the ship-
ping companies assessments sug-
gest were not headed for another
recession. It reconfirms the other
data that seems to point to a better
economy, he said.
And Kurt Rankin, an economist at
PNC Financial Services Group, said
the companies are indicating that
consumer spending remains strong.
Chip Cutter Kristen Girard
UPS sounds more optimistic than
it did Sept. 15, when it warned of a
bumpy ride. CEO Scott Davis
said, We have had a lot of good
economic reports in the U.S. He
said retail sales look better, un-
employment claims are improv-
ing, manufacturing is getting bet-
ter and banks are lending more.
We feel a little bit better, he
said. UPS repeated its forecast
that the economy will grow be-
tween 1 percent and 3.5 percent
in the second half of the year.
A look at what FedEx and UPS had to say:
FedEx doesnt expect the
economy to fall into another
recession. But, "we expect
sluggish economic growth will
continue around the world,
CEO Fred Smith said last
month. FedEx cut its earnings
forecast for its fiscal year, which
ends in May. That indicated it
expects slower economic growth
into 2012. Still, its announce-
ment Monday that it expects a
big increase in shipments was
heartening for economists and
investors. They sent the stock up
nearly 3 percent.
Air Products APD 72.26 7 98.01 89.41 6.67 8.1 s s -1.7 +7.62 2 7.5 16 2.6
Amer Water Works AWK 23.44 0 31.08 30.43 -0.08 -0.3 s s 20.3+31.05 119.5a 18 3.0
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 6 51.50 44.82 -0.10 -0.2 s s -8.2 +3.00 3 12.9 28 6.6
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 7 23.79 22.28 0.33 1.5 s s -0.9 +6.96 2 0.3 22 3.0
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 5 38.02 30.34 1.75 6.1 s t 0.9 7.41 4 -3.4 10 2.1
AutoZone Inc AZO 232.94 0337.23 327.82 0.32 0.1 s s 20.3+38.44 1 24.2 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 5.13 3 15.31 7.35 0.89 13.8 s t -44.935.91 5-25.1 ... 0.5
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 4 32.50 22.41 1.84 8.9 s t -25.8 9.06 4 -5.7 10 2.3
Bon Ton Store BONT 3.91 2 17.49 5.35 0.37 7.4 s t -57.751.67 5-30.4 21 3.7
CIGNA Corp CI 34.87 7 52.95 46.63 1.93 4.3 s t 27.2+30.87 1 3.5 8 0.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 29.45 8 39.50 36.84 1.29 3.6 s s 6.0+21.79 2 4.3 15 1.4
CocaCola KO 60.30 8 71.77 68.93 0.74 1.1 s s 4.8+15.63 2 10.4 13 2.7
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 6 27.16 23.85 -0.48 -2.0 s t 9.1+16.40 2 -1.2 17 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 7 28.95 26.08 0.50 2.0 s s -6.1+16.74 2 5.5 13 3.7
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 2 42.50 17.91 -0.75 -4.0 s t -52.138.85 5 -11.3 6 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 3 13.63 7.03 0.96 15.8 s t -39.316.11 4-18.7 6 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 5 21.02 15.38 2.02 15.1 s s -1.5+35.27 1 -0.6 11 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 5.33 3 9.84 6.28 0.15 2.4 s t -35.519.20 4 -5.8 39 11.9
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 7 18.16 16.41 0.60 3.8 s t 8.0 +4.92 335.5a 22 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 4 13.74 9.08 0.37 4.2 s s -28.924.29 4-16.4 13 3.5
Heinz HNZ 46.99 9 55.00 53.94 0.59 1.1 s s 9.1+13.00 2 8.2 17 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 45.67 8 60.96 57.45 -2.81 -4.7 t s 21.8+19.13 2 3.9 21 2.4
Kraft Foods KFT 29.80 9 36.30 35.40 0.20 0.6 s s 12.3+13.75 2 3.5 20 3.3
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 4 27.45 21.37 -0.76 -3.4 s t -14.8 +2.29 3 -5.2 14 2.6
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 5 91.05 78.30 3.36 4.5 s t -10.1 +8.63 2 -5.4 11 3.6
McDonalds Corp MCD 72.14 0 93.84 93.29 0.97 1.1 s s 21.5+23.55 1 20.1 18 3.0
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 7 24.98 21.86 0.82 3.9 s t -9.5 +3.47 3 1.0 13 3.7
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 4.25 9 10.28 9.09 0.58 6.8 s s 51.8+61.46 1 20.2 \>99 ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 6 65.19 55.07 1.01 1.9 s s -9.3 +4.81 3 -1.7 9 2.5
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 0 29.78 29.70 0.28 1.0 s s 12.8+17.62 2 0.6 12 4.7
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 13.16 0 20.63 20.32 0.15 0.7 s s 53.6+42.60 1 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 4 17.34 10.19 1.50 17.3 s t -29.922.93 4-16.7 ... 5.9
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 4 71.89 63.20 0.92 1.5 s t -3.3 +.28 3 2.5 16 3.3
Philip Morris Intl PM 55.85 0 72.74 72.12 2.12 3.0 s s 23.2+26.24 123.1a 15 4.3
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 8 67.72 64.73 -1.53 -2.3 s s 0.6 +5.69 3 2.9 16 3.2
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 6 67.52 57.30 4.07 7.6 s t -2.4+10.22 2 -4.4 8 2.0
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 5 17.11 13.65 -0.34 -2.4 s t 8.4+15.80 2-21.5 14 2.9
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 39.65 2 60.00 43.05 -0.15 -0.3 t t -1.7 ... 0.0 ... 10.8
Southn Union Co SUG 23.60 9 44.65 42.33 0.84 2.0 s t 75.9+73.59 1 10.3 22 1.4
TJX Cos TJX 42.55 0 61.28 60.37 0.53 0.9 s s 36.0+31.46 1 16.9 18 1.3
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 6 33.53 28.99 1.03 3.7 s t -8.2 +.44 3 4.8 13 3.6
Verizon Comm VZ 31.60 9 38.95 37.63 0.21 0.6 s s 5.2+22.16 1 5.9 15 5.3
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 0 57.96 57.15 0.23 0.4 s s 6.0 +8.26 2 4.3 13 2.6
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 5 42.20 39.31 0.06 0.2 s t -2.5 +3.77 3 2.1 15 3.1
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
Small stocks, big potential
Stock
Screener
Smaller companies are beginning to look more appealing to investors.
The Standard & Poors 600 index, a benchmark for small-cap stocks, is
up 18 percent this month. Thats more than the Standard & Poors 500
index, which is up 14 percent.
Investors buy small caps when theyre willing to take on risk. While small
companies typically have less cash on hand to weather economic
downturns, theyre attractive because they have more growth prospects
ahead of them.
Lori Calvasina, a research analyst at Credit Suisse, put out a report on
Thursday urging investors to consider smaller stocks. She noted that small
caps typically outperform large-caps over time.
So this screen, powered by FactSet, highlights companies in the
small-cap Standard & Poors 600 index that have risen the most this year.
All the stocks have target prices that suggest they have additional room
to rise.
The top stock on the list, Questcor Pharmaceuticals, has risen 183
percent this year. It said this past week that its third-quarter profit nearly
doubled thanks to a big increase in the number of prescriptions for its
multiple sclerosis treatment.
The average target price on the stock is $43.83, suggesting it can go up
another 5 percent over the next 12 months.
Data through Oct. 28
Questcor Pharmaceuticals QCOR $41.73 $43.83 183.30% $2.6
Liquidity Services LQDT 32.70 35.17 132.74 0.9
Select Comfort SCSS 20.53 22.25 124.86 1.2
HealthSpring HS 54.18 51.70 104.22 3.7
Cubist Pharmaceuticals CBST 38.99 46.38 82.20 2.4
RightNow Technologies RNOW 43.10 41.90 82.09 1.4
PRICE YTD COMPANY TICKER
AVERAGE
TARGET
PRICE
MARKET
VALUE
(BILLIONS)
American Funds BalA m ABALX 18.57 +.47 +8.2 +9.2/A +3.2/B
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.51 +.06 +.5 +3.7/C +3.6/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 50.15 +.96 +6.7 +4.6/B +2.0/D
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 34.20 +1.39 +11.6 -.5/D +1.3/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 39.09 +2.44 +13.1 -3.2/D +1.5/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 36.58 +1.39 +12.3 +7.0/D +1.7/A
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 30.21 +1.10 +10.6 +5.1/E +.8/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 16.87 +.37 +7.5 +7.4/B +2.4/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 27.89 +.85 +11.5 +5.3/E +.1/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 28.22 +1.40 +11.4 +3.1/C +3.0/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 28.60 +.77 +10.5 +12.6/A +.7/B
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 19.50 +.78 +6.9 +4.9/ +5.4/
BlackRock GlobAlcC m MCLOX 18.16 +.73 +6.9 +4.2/ +4.6/
BlackRock GlobAlcI d MALOX 19.60 +.78 +6.9 +5.2/ +5.6/
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.39 +.10 +1.1 +4.1/B +6.5/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 33.27 +1.93 +14.7 -3.9/E /A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 105.40 +4.43 +12.6 +5.4/D -2.8/D
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 70.25 +2.65 +9.7 +9.3/C +4.0/B
Fidelity DivrIntl d FDIVX 28.61 +1.80 +13.2 -1.0/B -1.6/C
Fidelity Free2020 FFFDX 13.91 +.44 +7.1 +5.5/B +2.3/C
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 89.29 +4.41 +11.0 +15.5/A +6.1/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 37.41 +1.73 +12.5 +11.5/A +4.1/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInv FUSEX 45.53 +1.66 +11.8 +10.7/A +.7/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.15 +.07 +7.6 +7.1/A +3.7/C
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.17 +.07 +8.0 +6.5/A +3.3/C
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 13.32 +.40 +4.9 +3.1/C +10.6/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 13.28 +.39 +4.9 +3.4/C +10.9/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 58.91 +3.99 +16.0 +.9/A +2.8/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 28.20 +.89 +8.5 +7.1/B +5.2/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.22 +.40 +5.5 +4.1/C +6.2/A
PIMCO ComRlRStI PCRIX 8.04 +.38 +6.2 +6.8/B +3.1/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 10.83 +.09 +.5 +.4/E +7.4/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 10.83 +.09 +.5 +.6/E +7.6/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 10.83 +.09 +.6 +.8/E +7.9/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 10.83 +.09 +.5 +.5/E +7.6/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 23.60 +.87 +10.3 +9.2/ +.2/
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 33.38 +1.55 +11.0 +9.9/C +2.9/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 60.19 +2.82 +12.5 +13.6/B +6.9/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.61 +.01 -.1 +3.1/ +6.4/
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 118.50 +4.33 +11.8 +10.8/A +.8/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 118.48 +4.32 +11.8 +10.6/B +.7/B
Vanguard GNMA VFIIX 11.11 +.03 +5.6/A +6.8/A
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.11 +.03 +5.7/A +6.9/A
Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX 14.09 +.08 +.5 +8.1/A +7.1/B
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 117.71 +4.30 +11.8 +10.8/A +.8/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 117.72 +4.31 +11.8 +10.8/A +.8/B
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 13.71 -.01 -.7 +3.2/B +4.6/B
Vanguard STCor VFSTX 10.68 +.02 +.3 +1.3/B +4.4/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.68 +.02 +.3 +1.4/B +4.6/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 12.91 +.45 +9.1 +7.0/A +2.5/B
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.94 +.02 -.2 +4.5/B +6.4/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.94 +.02 -.2 +4.6/B +6.4/B
Vanguard TotIntl d VGTSX 14.86 +.93 +13.7 -2.4/D -.2/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 32.10 +1.29 +12.4 +10.8/A +1.4/B
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 32.11 +1.30 +12.4 +10.8/A +1.4/B
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 32.09 +1.29 +12.3 +10.7/A +1.3/B
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 31.77 +.83 +8.2 +8.2/A +4.2/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 54.88 +1.44 +8.2 +8.3/A +4.3/A
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 26.31 +.93 +12.4 +10.0/B -.4/B
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 12.45 +.32 +5.2 +5.6/ +3.4/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+3.6%
+12.1%
Nasdaq
+3.8%
+13.3%
S&P 500
+3.8%
+13.6%
Russell 2000
+6.8%
+18.1%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
q
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+5.7%
+3.2%
+2.2%
-2.9%
Yields fall on debt doubts
Treasury prices plunged on news that Europe
settled on a plan to contain the Greek debt crisis.
That made traders more confident about buying
stocks and less likely to seek safety in government
debt. They rose again on Friday, when analysts
raised questions about the plan. The yield on the
10-year Treasury, which moves opposite its price,
fell to 2.32 percent.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Flex-funds Money Market/Retail 0.10 $ 2,500 min (800) 325-3539
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 0.09 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578
Broad market Lehman 2.53 0.05 s t -0.02 3.29 2.15
Triple-A corporate Moodys 4.07 0.09 s t -0.73 5.31 3.79
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.79 -0.05 t s 0.12 4.22 3.36
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.02 0.04 s t 0.09 5.95 4.87
U.S. high yield Barclays 8.17 -0.72 t s 0.85 10.15 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.26 0.06 s t -0.19 2.46 0.96
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.01 -0.01 t t -0.11 0.16
1-year T-Bill 0.17 0.02 r t -0.05 0.34 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.05 0.01 r t -0.12 0.20 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.29 0.02 s t -0.06 0.83 0.16
5-year T-Note 1.13 0.06 s t -0.10 2.39 0.78
10-year T-Note 2.32 0.11 s t -0.34 3.72 1.72
30-year T-Bond 3.38 0.12 s t -0.67 4.77 2.72
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
timesleader.com
HIPPOCRATES of
ancient Greece wrote
that, Healing is a
matter of time, but it
is sometimes also a
matter of opportuni-
ty.
Time, and opportu-
nity.
Hippocrates has long been consid-
ered the father of modern medicine.
He is thought to have survived to the
age of 90, possibly even 100, after
spending nearly 20 years in Greek
prisons for his scientific beliefs. His
writings and teachings gave life to the
Hippocratic Oath, a physicians creed
meant to guide the mind and healing
hand of his students, followed to this
very day.
The body politic of Luzerne County
also needs to heal. But in this region,
at this time, on this Election Day, it is
you the voter, and only those so regis-
tered, that are licensed to treat the
critically ill patient upon the table. The
future of so many depends upon the
mind and healing hand of thousands of
voters who will make their way to the
polls in nine days and apply the civic
remedy to heal the sickness.
Healing is a matter of time. If that
is so, over the last 12 months your time
has been spent well. The members of a
Government Study Commission, that
you approved, recommended a new
constitution that called for establishing
an entirely new government for Lu-
zerne County, and you adopted it.
In May, the two major parties nomi-
nated their candidates for the 11 impor-
tant seats on the crucial county council
that you created. Your message of hope
and reform also enticed three Inde-
pendents and three Libertarian candi-
dates to join race.
Among their many responsibilities,
the 11 people ultimately elected to
county council will choose the county
manager who will run the show. The
man or woman so selected will become
the CEO, COO, governor and pre-
eminent leader of Luzerne County.
Elect the wrong candidates to coun-
ty council and you might well see the
coronation of a well-connected, good-
ole-boy as county manager, retuning
everything back to the future and the
stumbling, fumbling, bumbling days of
yesteryear.
Healing is sometimes also a matter
of opportunity. If that is true, the rare
opportunity, to lock in the reforms and
hope you have long cherished, now
awaits you. For neither the Repub-
licans, nor the Democrats nominated
11 well-qualified individuals for the
difficult and complex job of governing
this large county.
If the county council is to be the very
best, it requires that we vote for a
blend of Republican, Democratic and
Independent council candidates.
Therefore, regardless of your politi-
cal affiliation, will you join in this his-
toric opportunity and vote for the very
best that each party has to offer?
After a year of study and careful
consideration, In the Arena is pre-
pared to endorse 11 individuals for
election to the 11 seats on Luzerne
County Council. Surprisingly, perhaps
fortuitously, the roll call of the very
best includes four Republicans, four
Democrats, one Libertarian and two
Independent candidates.
To begin the healing process, to lead
Northeastern Pennsylvania toward a
better and brighter future, In the
Arena enthusiastically endorses the
following candidates for Luzerne
County Council:
Rick Morelli
John Ruckno
Harry Haas
Eugene Kelleher
Jim Bobeck
Edward Brominski
Jane Walsh-Waitkus
Elaine Maddon Curry
Tim Mullen
Jere Packard
Rick Williams
Feel free to clip this list and carry
these 11 names with you to the polls on
Nov. 8. Let the healing begin. VOTE.
IN THE ARENA
K E V I N B L A U M
Nows the time
to bring county
back to health
Kevin Blaums column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
MORETHANFIVE
years ago I returned to
Wilkes-Barre to buy
The Times Leader. On
Friday I announced my
departure by the end of
the year fromthe
Wilkes-Barre Publishing
Company, which I founded in 2006, resur-
recting the former name of the local news-
paper firm. These have been fulfilling
years.
If our company had not bought The
Times Leader in 2006, there was a real
fear that more than 200 persons would
lose their jobs.
Painfully, we have had to adjust to eco-
nomic conditions and downsize our em-
ployee force, but our businesses have
survived and are well-positioned for the
future. We brought back solid journalism
and have served our communities and
nonprofits generously. At the same time,
we have laid a newfoundation for the
business, investing in digital infrastruc-
ture, increasing paid, daily and Sunday
circulation, bringing advertisers back in
the fold, and even starting newnewspa-
pers such as Go Lackawanna.
This is a difficult business these days,
but there are still many opportunities to
improve journalism, better serve our
communities and transition digital jour-
nalisminto a solid financial business
model.
There are still a large number of news
readers and advertisers. Newspapers have
a gloomy future in big city markets but
smaller, regional newspapers and websites
continue to have bright futures.
The media business, both broadcast and
print, has usually been slowto adapt to
change but eventually it does and it suc-
ceeds. That trend will continue because
we employ the best journalists in the
world and talented sales executives. Ad-
vertising pays the bills and, luckily, still
works.
When a person says they are leaving a
job there comes the inevitable question:
what are you going to do next? Ive been in
the media business for 40 years and intend
to be in it for at least another 20.
Just like one of my friends, the late
Russell Wiggins, editor of The Washing-
ton Post and later, owner of a small coun-
try weekly, I plan to work in this business
into my nineties. I knewanother newspa-
per owner who died at ninety-something
at his desk on a Saturday night, no less.
As for the Wyoming Valley, well, Ive
never left - at least in my heart. My best
friends are still here. We own a home here
and will continue to own that home. We
will continue to do our work here.
News is my avocation and hobby. Being
in this business has the benefits and thrill
of free enterprise, but the real satisfaction
comes in addressing political and social
ills.
What comes next for me will be to
continue to devote my efforts to journal-
ism, fairness in reporting, and the chal-
lenge we all face of building a solid digital
business foundation for this industry.
RICHARD L. CONNOR
O P I N I O N
A devotion
to journalism
thats lifelong
Richard L. Connor is editor and publisher of
The Times Leader. Reach him at rcon-
nor@timesleader.com.
PETE G. WILCOX FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
Richard L. Connor meets with Times
Leader employees following the an-
nouncement of the newspapers sale to
Connors publishing company, Wilkes-
Barre Publishing Company in 2006.
T
OWANDA, Pa. In a modern-day echo of the raucous Old
West, small towns enjoying a boom in oil and gas drilling
are seeing a sharp increase in drunken driving, bar fights
and other hell-raising, blamed largely on an influx of young men
who find themselves with lots of money in their pockets and noth-
ing to do after they get off work.
Authorities in Pennsylvania and other
states are quick to point out that the vast
majorityof workers streaminginarelaw-
abiding. But they also say the drilling in-
dustry has brought with it a hard-work-
ing, hard-drinking, rough-and-tumble
element that, in some places, threatens
to overwhelm law enforcement.
Somepolicedepartments aretryingto
hire more officers but are hard-pressed
to compete with the industry for appli-
cants.
On one hand, we need to count our
blessings, saidSheriff Scott Buschingof
Williams County, N.D. On the other
hand, we need to see if we can control
this soit isnt chickens onedayandfeath-
ers the next. ... We have come to the
point here where were almost over-
whelmed. Its very close.
In Bradford County, Pennsylvanias
most heavilydrilledcountyinthe 3-year-
old rush to tap the Marcellus Shale, the
nations largest-known natural gas reser-
voir, the stream of men from Texas, Ok-
lahoma, Louisiana and elsewhere has
been accompanied by increases in ar-
rests, traffic violations, protection-from-
abuse orders and warrants issued for
people who dont show up in court, law
enforcement officials said.
Inthe heart of westernNorthDakotas
oil patch, driving under the influence
andassaults have spikedafter thousands
of workers descended on the area and
settled in apartments and trailer villages
known as man camps. Southwestern
Wyomings booming gas fields also have
seen a rise in rowdy behavior.
We definitely do drink a lot. I aint go-
ing to lie, said Jordon Bourque, a 23-
year-old pipe inspector from Lafayette,
La., whowas drinkingbeer at a bar inthe
Williamsport, Pa., area one recent night.
But he said that many in the industry
obey the law and that authorities in
Pennsylvania have less tolerance for
troublemakers than police in small-town
AP PHOTO
Workers move a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy well
site in Bradford County in April of 2010.
Towns see crime surge amid gas boom
By MARC LEVY Associated Press
See DRILLING, Page 6E
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/Impressions Media
Editorial Board
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
PRASHANT SHITUT
President
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
G
IVE LUZERNE COUNTY a
fighting chance by voting for
these 11 candidates to serve on
its first county council.
James Bobeck
Elaine Maddon Curry
Harry Haas
Eugene Kelleher
Michael Lacey
Tim McGinley
Rick Morelli
Jeremy Packard
Stephen A. Urban
Jane Walsh-Waitkus
Rick Williams
These men and women, many of
whose names and faces might not be
familiar to you, are among 28 county
residents vying to serve on the 11-per-
son council a startup group that in
January will replace the traditional
commissioner trio and take the reins
of county government. Its a massive
change for Luzerne County, a chance
for a fresh start.
Voters will make their picks Nov. 8,
deciding which contenders from the
field will get one of the $8,000-per-
year council posts.
Choose with care which is to say,
better than some voters did during the
May primaries when several stellar
candidates were snubbed in favor of
certain sub-par and mediocre ones.
Since then, the field has been further
shuffled by the addition of third-party
candidates.
Bottom line: Theres still an oppor-
tunity for voters to install a sensation-
al county council; theres also a chance
theyll blow it by resorting to old hab-
its.
If you vote for a county council can-
didate solely because of his or her po-
litical party affiliation, you could be
making a mistake. Ditto if your deci-
sion is based purely on geography; just
because the candidate lives in your
corner of the county, doesnt make
him or her capable of doing this job.
In fact, if you vote for someone sim-
ply because the candidate is a former
classmate or a coach, a fellow club
member or a coworker, a friend of a
friend or the photogenic sort, you
could be setting up the county for all
kinds of trouble.
At this critical time in its history, as
it tries to recover from stunning cor-
ruption and staggering debt, Luzerne
County will not be best served by a full
Democratic slate. Or the full Republi-
can slate. Or the union-backed slate.
Or any other pre-packaged, pre-ap-
proved, agenda-oriented team of
candidates.
Luzerne County needs independ-
ent-thinking, reform-minded leaders
to serve on council. It needs moderate
voices, people who are willing to lis-
ten to and consider a variety of
viewpoints. It needs people with rele-
vant experience in running businesses
and overseeing big operations. (This
is, after all, a county government with
nearly 1,700 workers and an annual
budget of about $125 million.)
Most important, Luzerne County
needs council members who are brai-
ny but not lacking in common sense.
The Times Leaders endorsement
board feels these 11 candidates fit the
bill perfectly. They are the best-suited
of the bunch to represent Luzerne
Countys 300,000-plus residents.
The councils initial members will
tackle the arduous task of implement-
ing the home rule charter approved by
voters last year. They will be respon-
sible for hiring a county manager,
someone with the enormous respon-
sibility of running the countys day-to-
day operations.
Council members also will appoint
area residents to Luzerne Countys
many critical authorities, board and
commissions. Each month, theyll
convene at least two public meetings
to conduct the publics business: ap-
proving a county budget, its tax rate,
union contracts and policies.
The new council members should
not indeed, under the rules of the
charter, dare not micromanage, in-
terfering in the workaday tasks of
county employees.
The 11 council posts, although con-
sidered part-time offices, will be
nothing of the sort for several months,
even years, if the officeholders are tru-
ly intent on getting Luzerne County
on solid footing.
Can other council contenders, those
who didnt get our recommendation,
do an admirable job? No doubt. The
field includes many fine people with
keen understandings of the issues.
Are there a few entrants who, while
perhaps well-intentioned, probably
dont belong in this race? Afraid so.
Our endorsement boards members
can say this with authority, having in-
terviewed all of the candidates who
accepted invitations to meet with us
in the spring (46 of them), and again
this month (24 of them). We asked
them about their educational back-
grounds and careers. We questioned
themon potential conflicts of interest,
basic county operations and their
views on a variety of important sub-
jects: contract negotiations, county
services and debt. (You can viewthese
interviews by visiting www.time-
sleader.com.)
To identify the best of the best for
these important council offices, The
Times Leader devoted more staff time
and effort this year than any other
news outlet. We did it because The
Times Leader had vigorously advocat-
ed for home rules adoption last year
and we want to see this new style gov-
ernment succeed.
We did it because its part of our pub-
lic service mission to provide thought-
ful endorsements.
We winnowed the field of conten-
ders to this 11 because we care deeply
about this county, its reputation and
its residents welfare. We did it, frank-
ly, because we live here, too. And we
desperately want good government.
We hope you do as well.
Vote wisely.
OUR ENDORSEMENT: LUZERNE COUNTY COUNCIL
These candidates can help new government succeed
Read all of The Times Leaders endorsements for the Nov. 8 election. Also, watch the
candidates interviews with our endorsement board and find related news articles at
www.timesleader.com.
Thursday: Luzerne County district attorney
Friday: Wilkes-Barre mayor
Saturday: Luzerne County judges
TODAY: Luzerne County Council
O U R E N D O R S E M E N T S F O R E L E C T I O N 2 01 1
The Butler Township resi-
dent, 64, served for eight years
on the Hazleton Area School
Board, overseeing a budget and
staff comparable to Luzerne
Countys government. She
works as supervisor of library
services for the Greater Hazle-
ton Health Alliance. "I think
that I bring a level of experi-
ence to the table," she said,
"and I come with a background
that would help us with this
new beginning."
ELAINE MADDON CURRY
The Sugarloaf Township
resident, 40, is the only candi-
date in the field who can claim
to have been with home rule
since the beginning, serving on
both the Luzerne County Gov-
ernment Study Commission
and the subsequent transition
committee. Aside from valuable
knowledge, he has an inde-
pendent streak. "Im no ones
rubber stamp," he said. "Im
going to be vocal and thats
what Im going to continue to
bring to the table."
RICK MORELLI
The Wilkes-Barre resident,
36, teaches history at Dallas
Middle School. He also serves
as an instructor of a citizenship
class for Luzerne County Com-
munity College in Hazleton.
"We need people (on county
council) who are going to come
in and work together as
adults," he said, "to balance the
budget, to bring decency and
respect back to the county "
HARRY HAAS
The Kingston resident, 73,
retired as president of Wyom-
ing Seminary in 2007. He is an
adjunct, part-time history facul-
ty member at Misericordia
University in Dallas Township.
He joined the campaign as an
Independent candidate. "If
there is no independent voice
on some issues," he said,
"theres no question that party
loyalty and party persuasive-
ness will influence the forma-
tion of a majority."
JEREMY PACKARD
The Kingston resident, 31,
won the admiration of many
people for capably serving as
chairman of Luzerne Countys
Home Rule Transition Commit-
tee, charged with crafting pol-
icies and laying groundwork for
the incoming county council
members. An attorney for a
Plymouth firm, he would be an
invaluable asset to the council
when it takes charge in Janu-
ary. "We all have to be on the
same page," he said.
JAMES BOBECK
The Dorrance Township resi-
dent, 63, works as an English
and American studies professor
at Penn State Hazleton. She
formerly owned a real estate
company and previously served
as president of Laflins borough
council. "I know how to budget,
I know how to manage," she
said. "I know what to look for
when we need to hire people."
JANE WALSH-WAITKUS
The Dallas Township resident,
67, is a retired mathematics
teacher and formerly served on
Plymouths borough council. He
knows numbers and expresses
a desire to see a significant
shift in the way this debt-heavy
county operates. "We need an
electorate who will commit to
vote for people who are not
politicians, but those who are
willing to be servants, do their
job and not worry about being
re-elected," he said.
EUGENE KELLEHER
The Wilkes-Barre resident, 59,
has served as a Luzerne County
commissioner since 2000 and
participates on the Home Rule
Transition Committee. His know-
howabout county operations
could spare the newcouncil from
many blunders. "Ive always
believed that you have to have
some core competency before
you make a vote," he said. "You
should knowthe facts before you
speak, and Imwilling to share
that information with other coun-
cil members."
STEPHEN A. URBAN
The Franklin Township resi-
dent, 53, has owned a pharma-
cy in Freeland for 17 years. He
advocates for a "team effort"
between county employees and
the new council. "We need to
have that dialogue with the
folks that are working in the
county, because I think they
hold a lot of the answers to
improving budget issues,
(bringing) new ideas."
MICHAEL LACEY
The Kingston resident, 64, is
a partner in a Wilkes-Barre
architectural firm. An Inde-
pendent candidate, he sees the
folly of injecting politics into
nuts-and-bolts county business
involving roads, parks and
other services. "My hope is that
the new council comes togeth-
er as cooperative people who
sit down and listen, analyze,
ask for the information, discuss
things, listen to the voters and
listen to themselves - and then
vote their conscience."
RICK WILLIAMS
The Kingston resident, 64, is
a former chemistry teacher,
now working as director of
administration for the Commis-
sion on Economic Opportunity,
based in Wilkes-Barre. He
knows the delicate nature of
group dynamics. "I know we
have to build a consensus
among the council members,
and we have to work at that
so that everybody can support
the decisions that come out of
the council."
TIMMCGINLEY
These 17 council candidates
didnt win our endorsement
boards support but they did
earn our respect merely for
running: Michelle Bednar, Brian
Bergman (who did not inter-
view during October with The
Times Leader), Edward Bromin-
ski, Michael Cabell, Kathleen
Dobash, Joyce Dombroski-
Gebhardt (did not interview),
Blythe Evans III (did not in-
terview), Charles Hatchko,
William Bill James, Salvatore
Licata, Linda McClosky Houck,
M. Theresa Morcavage, Tim
Mullen, Gina Nevenglosky (did
not interview), John Ruckno,
Eileen Sorokas and Stephen J.
Urban.
Luzerne Countys home rule
charter, approved by voters in
November 2010, was intended,
in part, to promote greater
citizen participation and in-
terest in county government. If
this race is any measure, the
charter has succeeded.
Please, stay involved.
The other
candidates
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3E
F O R U M
YOUVE GOT
your Mexican
standoff, your
Russian rou-
lette, your
Chinese wa-
ter torture.
And now,
your Libyan crossfire. Thats
when a pistol is applied to the
head and a bullet crosses from
one temple to the other.
Thats apparently what
happened to Moammar Gad-
dafi after he was captured by
Libyan rebels died in a
crossfire, explains Libyas
new government. This has
greatly agitated ACLU types,
morally unemployed ever
since a Democratic adminis-
tration declared Guantanamo
humane. The indignation has
spread to human rights groups
and Western governments,
deeply concerned about the
manner of Gaddafis demise.
Lets begin at the beginning.
Early in the revolution, Gad-
dafi could have had due proc-
ess. Indeed, he could have had
something better: asylum (in
Nicaragua, for example) with
a free pass for his crimes. If he
stepped down, thereby avoid-
ing the subsequent civil war
that killed thousands of his
countrymen, he could have
enjoyed a nice fat retirement,
like that of Idi Amin in Saudi
Arabia.
Like Amin, Gaddafi would
not have deserved a single day
of untroubled repose. Such an
outcome would itself have
been a gross violation of jus-
tice, as hed have gone unpuni-
shed for his uncountable
crimes. But it would have
spared his country much
bloodshed and suffering.
Such compromises are fully
justified and rather common.
They are, for example, the
essence of the various truth
and reconciliation commis-
sions in countries transition-
ing from authoritarianism to
democracy. In post-Pinochet
Chile and post-apartheid
South Africa, it was decided
that full justice punishing
the guilty would be sacri-
ficed in order to preserve the
fragile social peace of the new
democracy.
The former oppressors
having agreed to a peaceful
relinquishing of power, full
justice might have ignited
renewed civil strife. There-
fore, these infant democracies
settled for mere truth: a metic-
ulous accounting of the
crimes of the previous regime.
In return for truthful testimo-
ny, perpetrators were given
amnesty.
Under the normal rule of
law, truth is only a means for
achieving justice, not an end
in itself. The real end is deter-
mining guilt and assigning
punishment. But in war and
revolution one cannot have
everything. Justice might
threaten peace. Therefore
peace trumps full justice.
Gaddafi could have had
such a peace-over-justice com-
promise. He chose instead to
fight to the death. He got
what he chose.
That fateful decision to
fight and kill is the prism
through which to judge the
cruel treatment Gaddafi re-
ceived in his last hours. It is
his refusal to forgo those final
crimes, those final shellings of
civilians, those final execu-
tions of prisoners that justifies
his rotten death.
He could have taken a de
facto amnesty for all his previ-
ous crimes, from Pan Am103
to the 1996 massacre of 1,200
inmates at Tripolis Abu Salim
prison. To reject that option
and proceed to create an en-
tirely new catalog of crimes
for that there is no forgive-
ness. For that you are sen-
tenced to die by crossfire.
So he was killed by his cap-
tors. Big deal. So was Mussoli-
ni. So were the Ceausescus.
They deserved far worse. As
did Gaddafi. In a world of
perfect justice, this Caligula
should have suffered far more,
far longer. He inflicted un-
imaginable suffering upon
thousands. What did he suf-
fer? Perhaps an hour of tor-
ment and a shot through the
head. By any standard of cos-
mic justice, thats mercy.
Moreover, Gaddafis sorry
end has one major virtue:
deterrence. You are a murder-
ous dictator with a rebellion
on your hands. You have a
choice. Relinquish power and
spare your country further
agony, and you can then live
out your days like Amin or
like a more contemporary
Saudi guest, Tunisias Zine
el-Abidine Ben Ali. Otherwise,
you die like Gaddafi, dragged
from a stinking sewer pipe,
abused, taunted and shot.
Call it the Gaddafi Rule:
Give it up and go, or one day
find death by Libyan cross-
fire. Followed by a Libyan
state funeral. Thats when you
lie on public view for four
days, half-naked in a meat
locker.
Gaddafi made choice
that sealed his fate
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
D
oes the dam grow weary of holding back the water, oblivious that it pro-
duces a calming pool on one side and, on the other, a dazzling light show?
Do the rocks complain that they receive a relentless pounding, unmindful that
they collaborate to make natures music? And what of your contributions?
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
THERE ARE
certain sounds
that are pure
childhood joy.
One is the
clomping of
little feet up
the stairs.
Another is the squeal of delight.
Earlier this month, in a fresh-
ly renovated house in Detroit,
those two sounds came togeth-
er. Seven children. Running up
the stairs. Running into bed-
rooms.
Cue the squeals.
I call this one! ... This one!
... I got the top one! They
were laying claim to something
every child ought to have a
bed but they were giddy be-
cause they had been sleeping
three to a mattress in a dingy
house infested with mold.
Now this?
I got top bed! ... I got bot-
tom bed!
Their mother, Kristy Wilson,
followed in behind them. Her
eyes were wider than a moving
truck, and she kept turning left
and right, putting her hand on
her heart or her cheek.
Whose room is this? she
asked, entering a bedroom with
a queen-size mattress on a new
frame.
Yours and your husbands,
she was told.
She fell to her knees, laid her
head on the bed and began to
cry.
A few weeks ago, in this
space, we learned about Kristy
and her husband, Amando, poor
working parents who simply
couldnt make ends meet at
least not enough to escape a
bad-deal rented Detroit house
where the landlord never both-
ered to fix the mold, sewage or
other issues.
At the time, there seemed no
way out. But then something
happened.
A house was in need of repair.
A family was in need of a
home.
One plus one equals ...
I have never had a washer or
dryer before, Kristy said. She
was standing in the basement of
this tidy home, looking at the
laundry area, astonished that
other people would do this for
her.
But they did and they do.
Michigan is full of people like
that. Dozens of them came
down and volunteered their
time, their hammers, their nail
guns, their ladders, their paint-
ing, their carpeting skills, their
electrical expertise. They donat-
ed furniture, windows, basic
necessities.
And because of that, through
a new program Im co-launching
with the Detroit Rescue Mission
Ministries called Working
Homes/Working Families, the
Wilsons now have a place to
live, not a place to survive.
Mama! Sit on the couch! the
kids yelled.
The idea is simple: There are
too many empty or abandoned
houses in Detroit. And there are
too many families working
families forced to live in shel-
ters or inadequate housing with
crazy rates. The mold pit that
was the Wilsons previous ad-
dress charged $650 a month. Its
astounding in a city where you
can buy a house for $7,000 that
landlords can regularly be exact-
ing rents like that.
But they do. And it keeps a
cycle of poverty intact, while
blocking Detroit neighborhoods
from any kind of renaissance.
It neednt be that way. If you
have or know of a house that is
empty, or the owner is looking
to donate for a loss or a deduc-
tion, Working Homes/Working
Families could be an answer.
One plus one equals ...
My husband and I were
sleeping in the attic, Kristy
said. We didnt have luxuries.
At the end of the month, it was
a choice between feeding all the
kids or paying the rent.
Under the Working Homes/
Working Families program, the
family must pay only the util-
ities and the taxes. But they also
must keep working this is not
a handout and the house must
be maintained at the same level
it was given. If these require-
ments are met for a certain
number of years, then the family
might be given ownership.
In the meantime, the pairing
of families trying to make it
with houses trying to stay up-
right seems a logical match. Its
lemons to lemonade, right?
The Wilsons have slept in
homeless shelters, in a space
above a church and in dilapi-
dated housing. For the last few
days, they have slept in a home.
It is not fancy by suburban stan-
dards. But it is clean, it is mold-
free, and it is full of children
making the kind of noise they
should make squeals, foot
thumps, bed bounces.
This is a miracle, Kristy
said.
Not really. Just people helping
other people. Thank you to
those who made this possible,
and those who will do more.
You can learn about it at
www.workinghomesworking-
families.org.
A house in need of attention.
A family in need of a home.
One plus one equals ...
A community.
Empty house becomes home for needy family
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Readers may
write to him at: Detroit Free Press,
600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or
via email at malbom@freepress.com.
There are too many empty or
abandoned houses in Detroit.
And there are too many
families working families
forced to live in shelters or
inadequate housing with crazy
rates. The mold pit that was
the Wilsons previous address
charged $650 a month.
Couple enjoys
bike program
W
e thank everyone in-
volved in the Wilkes-
Barre Bike Share Pro-
gram. My husband and I en-
joyed riding the bicycles and
benefited greatly from the
exercise.
We hope the program will
continue next year.
Elaine Czarnecki
Pittston
Woman offers
comfort at scene
I
thank the wonderful wom-
an who came to the aid of
my daughter and me after
our dog slipped out of its
collar and got hit by a vehicle
on Lakeside Drive, Harveys
Lake.
Our dog, Joon, a young
foxhound, became spooked
and ran into a car. Then she
took off, and I had to chase
after her.
This nice woman, whom I
have spoken to before while
walking, stayed with my
daughter and our other dog.
My daughter was hysterical,
and the woman comforted her
and called 911.
Thank you also to the man
in the truck, who stopped to
make sure everything was
okay. It was in no way his
fault.
Joon seems to be okay,
scared and banged up, but
good. Thank you again to both
of you.
Jennifer Evans
Harveys Lake
Carey supports
cancer drug fund
O
ur office wishes to ac-
knowledge the incredible
contribution of Ken Carey
of the Tipsy Turtle to our
Patient Prescription Assist-
ance Fund at Medical Oncol-
ogy Associates.
The fund was started eight
years ago so that financial
assistance would be available
to our cancer patients for the
purchase of pain medication,
nausea medication, antibiotics
and occasionally even chemo-
therapy drugs. Support for our
fund has come from many
patients, patients families,
friends and our staff through
gifts made to honor or memo-
rialize loved ones.
We believe that Ken Carey
should be recognized for the
extraordinary effort he has put
forth to raise money for this
fund. He has established an
annual golf tournament, raffle
and other events specifically
to raise money to help cancer
patients.
Through Kens effort, the
fund has been able, over the
last several years, to assist
needy patients with travel
expenses for out-of-town con-
sultations and with medical
insurance premiums for many
who have lost their medical
insurance along with their
employment. We even have
been able to help several of
our patients impacted by the
recent flooding in the Wyom-
ing Valley.
Yes, Ken is a grateful patient
who has survived cancer and
has experienced firsthand
what other cancer patients are
going through. But he is much
more than that.
He is truly a compassionate
individual imbued with em-
pathy and a sincere concern
for the welfare of others. His
generosity of caring and giv-
ing is an example of the best
of the human spirit.
The staff of Medical Oncol-
ogy Associates thanks Ken
Carey, his family, his helpers
at the Tipsy Turtle and his
friends for improving the lives
of so many cancer patients in
Northeastern Pennsylvania.
Dr. David W. Greenwald
Dr. Bruce Saidman
and
The staff of Medical Oncology
Associates
Kingston
Reporter recalled
as mentor, friend
T
he Times Leaders stirring
tribute to Marita Lowman
captured a gifted reporter
who was persistent, fervently
accurate, curious and always
human.
I worked at The Times
Leader from1989 to 1998.
Marita was my editor for the
first couple of years and would
become both a mentor and
friend. My greatest memory of
Marita was when I covered
the fatal killing of 16-month-
old Brian Huntzinger at the
hands of Steven Dunn. In the
first days of that tragedy, I was
overtaken emotionally, seeing
the horrific pictures of a once-
beautiful tot.
Marita, who was as hard-
nosed as any reporter for
whom Ive worked, showed a
different side. She was warm,
a great listener and empathet-
ic. She helped to guide me
through and to focus on how
best to give meaning to
Brians life. Eventually, we
would help change the child-
welfare laws in the state to
better protect vulnerable chil-
dren.
After I left The Times Lead-
er, we kept in periodic touch,
especially during the turbu-
lent times following her sons
death, and then when she was
struck with the illness that
eventually took her life.
Through it all, Marita re-
tained a positive outlook an-
chored in a faith that tran-
scended any formal religion.
She was both strong and hum-
ble to the end. Ill miss her
very much.
Mitch Morrison
Passaic, N.J.
Road master
lauded
in Plymouth Twp.
W
e thank township road
master Joe Yudichak for
all his hard work in secu-
ring funds for the reconstruct-
ion of the flood-damaged road
and opening of the bridge in
our neighborhood. Its been a
long haul. Were thankful for
everything.
Thanks also to the Conrad
family for the use of their
land.
Len and Elizabeth Tkaczyk
Plymouth Township
Family thanks
Meadows staff
W
e express our thanks to
the Meadows Nursing
and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, especially the nurse and
aides on the second floor, and
also to the Hospice of the
Sacred Heart staff for the
wonderful care and compas-
sion they gave to our mother.
God bless you all!
Barbara Biga
On behalf of the family
of Isabelle Maslar
Dallas
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters from readers
conveying thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help
or kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E R S P E C T I V E S
7
2
0
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0
Take the time
to honor veterans
T
he 60th annual Veterans
Day parade will be held
Nov. 6 beginning at King-
ston Corners on Wyoming
Avenue, Kingston, and ending
at Wilkes-Barres Public
Square.
An added incentive to cele-
brate and honor our veterans
is the fact the war in Iraq is
ending. After eight years,
some 4,400 Americans were
killed and tens of thousands
were injured, including many
who are amputees and many
suffering from battle trauma.
Thousands of American lives
will never be the same. Fam-
ilies have been separated,
couples have divorced and
there have been suicides as
well. The wars financial costs
have been estimated as high
as a trillion dollars.
Most, if not all, the troops
will be home for the holidays.
How can we show our ap-
preciation for the veterans of
the Middle East wars and all
wars in our nations history?
Become a part of the Veter-
ans Day parade.
If not a participant, be an
observer, carry an American
flag, wear your veterans cap
or some other symbol in-
dicating your service to your
country. Salute the flag as it
passes by and display our
nations flag in front of your
home, church, school or busi-
ness.
Take time off from the foot-
ball games, etc., and show our
veterans we appreciate their
sacrifices in defending our
freedoms.
A good way to start the day
would be by attending your
place of worship and thanking
God for the freedoms we en-
joy.
Another good idea would be
for area mayors to issue proc-
lamations for all residents and
business establishments to
display our nations flag
throughout the Valley and to
thank God for the end of the
war in Iraq and safe return of
our troops.
The veterans have sacrificed
for us. Now, lets show our
appreciation. Anything less is
unacceptable.
Be a flag waver, so long as
its the American flag you are
waving. I am and proud of it.
Long may it wave oer the
land of the free and the home
of the brave.
Jim Walsh
Wilkes-Barre
Drilling heightens
voting importance
T
he Back Mountain area of
Luzerne County is chang-
ing rapidly and, sadly,
these changes are not for the
good.
When we first learned of the
Marcellus Shale natural gas
explorations, I dont believe
that any of us imagined the
impact that it would have on
our serene rural communities.
We are not yet peppered with
gas wells like our neighboring
counties, but battles rage over
safely locating metering sta-
tions, and pipeline construc-
tion has inflicted terrible scars
on our countryside.
Opponents of this industry
preach that this is only the
beginning. In all likelihood,
they are correct.
This invasion is under way
with little or no local regu-
lation. In Dallas Township,
residents are confused by the
attitude of their elected offi-
cials. They feel that their cries
for more stringent regulation
of the gas and pipeline compa-
nies are falling on deaf ears.
The upcoming election
should prove to be an accurate
measurement of community
discontent.
Liz Martin is campaigning
for a position as a Dallas
Township supervisor. She is
aligned with organizations
that strongly favor regulating
the gas industry and she is
well-schooled in and savvy
about other pressing township
issues. Liz is articulate, honest
and diligent. Her passion for
the preservation of the Back
Mountain is evident whenever
she speaks.
Your ballot is your sharpest
tool. Choose wisely.
Jim Skrypek
Dallas
Writer promotes
pro-life candidates
P
lease vote on Nov. 8 for
candidates who could
impact the future of pro-
life legislation in Pennsylva-
nia.
The Pennsylvania Pro-Life
Federation PAC has recom-
mended the following candi-
dates:
For judge of state Superior
Court: Vic Stabile.
For judge of Commonwealth
Court: Anne Covey.
Please vote yes to retain
the following: Supreme Court
Justice J. Michael Eakin, Supe-
rior Court Judge Mary Jane
Bowes and Commonwealth
Court Judge Robin Simpson.
A childs life is in your
hands. Choose life by voting
for it.
Ada Magni
West Wyoming
Deeds outweigh
political motives
O
n July 3, Plymouth suf-
fered a horrific flood when
a torrential rainfall caused
Coal Creek to leave its banks.
The event caused countless
heartaches among the effected
people. Property damage
amounted to $3 million. Dur-
ing this dreadful period, many
people volunteered their help,
and we thank them.
One month later, along
came Hurricane Irene, fol-
lowed, in a matter of days, by
Tropical Storm Lee, causing
more suffering among many of
our residents who saw their
properties adversely impacted.
Once again, many volunteers
came to our aid.
Plymouth Mayor Dorothy
Petrosky, borough council and
staff extend their appreciation
and gratitude to the proprie-
tors of Classic Pizza, Happy
Pizza and Donnies Hoagies
for their generous donations.
A special thanks goes to our
fire, police and road depart-
ments, all of which surpassed
the call of duty. Volunteers
from within the community
and around the state came to
assist in the cleanup and help
with other chores, and we are
grateful.
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, Con-
gressman Lou Barletta, state
Sen. John Yudichak and state
Rep. Jerry Mullery were on
scene and pledged their sup-
port in the recovery effort.
Unfortunately, three individ-
uals who are aspiring for bor-
ough council failed to come to
the borough to offer their
services. Conspicuous by their
absences, nonetheless they
seemingly used the misery of
others to further their political
agendas by condemning the
actions of those people who
tried to do their best during
these emergencies.
May I suggest that when
you have three opportunities
to help your community and
you dont step up to the plate,
its three strikes and youre
out?
Thank goodness the actions
of these three are dwarfed by
the good deeds of all who
volunteered to help the Ply-
mouth community.
Joseph A. Mazur
Borough administrator
Plymouth
Council forum
deemed success
T
he Downtown Residents
Association in Wilkes-
Barre thanks The Times
Leader for agreeing to partner
with us in presenting a forum
on Oct. 17 of the candidates
for Luzerne County Council.
We feel that the event met
our goal of providing an op-
portunity for the residents of
Luzerne County to see and
hear the candidates. Thank
you for your support in provid-
ing publicity and the support
given to our event by Kevin
Blaum in two of his columns.
We were pleased that 24 of
the candidates accepted our
invitation to the forum. Eileen
Sorokas was present for the
first part of the program but
had to leave before the ques-
tion-and-answer session, so
her name was not included in
The Times Leaders article on
Oct. 18. Eugene Kelleher
called us late Monday after-
noon with regrets that his
previous engagement had run
late and he would not be able
to get back to Wilkes-Barre in
time. Stephen J. Urban had
accepted conditionally, stating
that he has started a new job
and would come if his work
hours permitted it.
We felt the candidates pre-
sented good information and
all seemed willing to work
together to improve Luzerne
County.
We hope that Luzerne
Countys residents will take
the time to vote for the best
candidates for the council.
Pat Parks
Coordinator, Downtown
Residents Association
Wilkes-Barre
Leighton should
retain position
I
observed the skill and lead-
ership of Wilkes-Barre May-
or Tom Leighton before,
during and after the flood of
2011.
I never thought that I would
see the downtown mayor
take such a personal interest
in protecting the neighbor-
hoods. But the mayor and his
staff frequently visited the
area during the crisis to make
sure that the flood-protection
systems were holding and to
direct the cleanup efforts
when it became unavoidable.
There was no one more
suited to the job. The people
of Wilkes-Barre were well-
served by the mayor and his
team.
Over the last seven years,
Mayor Leighton has consis-
tently proven beyond a doubt
that he is the right person to
continue to revolutionize
Wilkes-Barre into the pioneer-
ing 21st-century city that it
has become. No longer are
people ashamed to admit that
they live in Wilkes-Barre, but
instead, they are proud to call
Wilkes-Barre home. The state
of the city is a testament to his
character, experience and
leadership, and I am proud to
support Tom Leighton to
continue to be the mayor.
I often am jokingly called
the mayor of Miners Mills,
but there is only one person
who has truly earned that title
and he deserves to be elect-
ed.
Gerald Norakus
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5E
P E R S P E C T I V E S
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Urbans campaign
called negative
T
o the residents of Wilkes-
Barre City Council District
D:
Since the primary election,
Linda J. Urban has been ac-
tively involved in a negative
election campaign for city
council. Mrs. Urban recently
has resorted to distributing
misleading postings and mail-
ings. She claims to have resid-
ed in the district most of my
life, when in fact, after losing
the election for mayor and city
council in 2007, she put her
house up for sale and went to
Florida.
Mrs. Urban repeatedly crit-
icizes council benefits, in-
cluding health care, gas reim-
bursements, etc. What Mrs.
Urban fails to mention is that I
have never accepted council-
related health care benefits, or
any buyout incentives. In
addition, she fails to mention
that I do not contribute and
never have participated in the
council pension plan. This was
a promise that I made to resi-
dents of Wilkes-Barre when
first elected, and I will contin-
ue to honor that promise.
She continues by saying
that this is not a full-time
job. I couldnt disagree more.
This is much more than a job;
it is a commitment to serve
the residents of the city, no
matter what it takes or how
long it takes to accomplish
our goals.
As far as qualifications, I
also am a veteran (U.S. Army,
Vietnam era), attended Kings
College, the Pennsylvania
State Police MPO Academy
and the FBI National Acade-
my in Quantico, Va. I have
more than 28 years of progres-
sive law enforcement experi-
ence with the Wilkes-Barre
Police, retiring as chief of
police. I am currently employ-
ed by an area college as a
safety and security director.
Please be assured that in all
my years of public service, my
honesty and integrity have
never been challenged.
Mrs. Urbans references to
ingrained corruption, nepo-
tism, graft and threats to our
Bill of Rights in her very
negative mailings are blatant
attacks and an insult to other
veterans, government officials
and public servants who are
proud of what they do every
day and hold their personal
integrity in high esteem.
I am humbly requesting
your vote for re-election to
Wilkes-Barre City Council
District D on Nov. 8, which
will allow me to continue to
represent and serve all the
residents of our great city.
Bill Barrett
Councilman
Wilkes-Barre
Williams will do
the county proud
T
he second most important
governing election in Lu-
zerne County history will
occur on Nov. 8. The first was
last years election when coun-
ty voters adopted a home rule
charter that replaces our cur-
rent, three-commissioner
structure with an 11-member
council with an appointed
county manager. The home
rule charter takes full effect on
Jan. 2, 2012.
With a new framework in
hand for restoring integrity to
county governance, its the
responsibility of voters to
populate the council with
members who will validate the
goals of home rule. I strongly
urge voters to review the pro-
files and credentials of all the
council candidates and ask:
Will this candidate be the
best choice for implementing
the positive changes needed
to restore voter confidence in
county government?
The importance of selecting
the best candidates cannot be
overstated.
Home rule will not achieve
the level of government re-
form that residents deserve if
candidates are elected for the
wrong reasons or if they in-
tend to corrupt the home-rule
process by bringing backward-
thinking politics to the table.
Our county deserves forward-
thinking, independent voices
such as Rick Williams, who
have no other agenda beyond
maximizing the potential of
the home rule charter to bring
honesty, integrity and fairness
back to county government.
Vote Rick Williams and help
lock in a new era of govern-
ment that makes us proud to
be Luzerne County residents.
Sid Halsor
Harveys Lake
Consider Mullen
on Election Day
L
ibertarian refers to liber-
ty. And it is Libertarian
candidate Tim Mullens
mission to liberate taxpayers
from the yoke of higher taxes.
Tim Mullen, a candidate for
Luzerne County Council, is a
decorated combat veteran, but
now he wages a different kind
of campaign. He aims to show
the same valor he showed on
the battlefield in combating
corruption in the Luzerne
County Courthouse.
I know that he is fiercely
independent, but also very
thoughtful and honest. Hes
also quite street smart and
sees through baloney. He will
be neither deceived nor intim-
idated if elected.
One of his primary goals is
to address the countys enor-
mous debt before interest
rates rise. Libertarian Party
members such as Mullen have
a firm resolution to support a
small, efficient government
that allows for maximum
liberty. It is this principle that
allows them to see through
schemes. This means that
Mullen will be able to advise
the county manager as to
which endeavors should be
avoided.
But Tims defining attribute
is his heart; and this is why he
can be seen each week at the
Farmers Market or at bazaars,
handing out his campaign
cards and meeting people. I
believe that his heart is also
what led him to run as a third-
party candidate.
Tim isnt perfect, and he
readily admits the he is not
the best candidate in every
category. But Mullen has all
the intangible traits: firm
principles, bravery, wits and
the dedication necessary to
carry out his duties well.
I am grateful that I have a
candidate for whom to vote as
good as Tim, since they are
hard to come by. I encourage
all voters to consider him Nov.
8.
Joseph George
Harveys Lake
Board candidates
vow to cut costs
W
e, as candidates for
Wyoming Area School
Board, are sensitive to
the ongoing economic condi-
tions. We all are experiencing
higher grocery bills, increased
home heating costs, escalating
gas prices, along with the
pain, suffering and devastation
that the recent flooding has
caused. We are aware that
these challenging times have
put an extra strain on family
budgets.
Unfortunately, this situation
is compounded by the recent
mailings of school taxes,
which are due at the end of
the year. We know of the chal-
lenges you face and, as your
elected officials, we too are
faced with the daunting chal-
lenge of balancing the district
budget while being fair to you,
the taxpayers.
We see the major issue
facing the district as surging
health care costs. Family cov-
erage for a district employee
(husband, wife and child)
costs the district more than
$21,000 per year. The districts
yearly cost for employee
health care is $2.8 million,
with zero contributions from
union-represented employees.
In addition, state reimburse-
ment under Gov. Tom Cor-
betts administration has de-
clined more than $1 million
for the fiscal year 2011-12.
We propose to cut expendi-
tures by asking that teachers
take part in contributing to
their own health care, as we
do, and as all other profession-
als and members of the pri-
vate sector do. We think thats
fair.
That is why we both voted
no to increased taxes at the
June budget meeting. We
believe the answer for our
school district is in cutting
expenditures, not increasing
your taxes.
We recognize that the great-
est source of our success as a
district lies with its people,
our outstanding teachers and
dedicated employees. Our
pledge to you is that during
these difficult economic times,
all of our decisions will be
made in the best interest of
students, always keeping in
mind our already overbur-
dened taxpayer, without com-
promising the quality educa-
tion that Wyoming Area stu-
dents and our community
expect.
Nick DeAngelo
and
Toni Valenti
Candidates
Wyoming Area School Board
Writer: Duo fails
for Wyoming Area
T
he clich ignorance is
bliss must have been
coined by people who
desired to maintain control
without interference from
those who were being con-
trolled. This philosophy seem-
ingly has been the motto of
the Wyoming Area School
Board majority for a good
many years and has led to the
financial crisis facing the sdis-
trict today.
Now more than ever, trans-
parency in governance is es-
sential.
Over the past few years, too
little has been done by the
Wyoming Area board majority
to manage expenditures, de-
spite concerns voiced by my-
self and the business manager.
And here is where the prob-
lem lies.
We have heard about the
$20 million loan that was
taken out in 2005 for high
school construction and how
the new school board majority
saved the day by scaling back
the construction to save mon-
ey. Well, since that time, about
$1.5 million of that money has
been used each year to help
balance the budget by paying
the interest on loans. As I
predicted in a letter to the
Sunday Dispatch in 2009, this
money will be depleted by the
end of 2011. Well, guess what?
Yep, its 2011.
Because of this practice,
over the past few years, the
fund balance has dropped
from about $4 million in 2003-
2004 to less than $1 million in
2011-2012. Unfortunately, the
current fund balance could
easily be used up to pay for
the flood-damage repairs to
Montgomery Avenue Ele-
mentary if payments are not
made available from insurance
and/or the Federal Emergen-
cy Management Agency.
The recent flooding of
towns in the Wyoming Area
district will result in less local
revenue generated from prop-
erty taxes because some busi-
nesses will not be returning
and some homes have been
condemned. This represents
yet another unanticipated
blow to the budget.
Not only is revenue going
down, but expenditures are
going up. Health care costs
are projected to increase by 15
percent, the state has indicat-
ed that retirement contribu-
tions provided by the district
will increase, and then there is
the usual inflation rate that
increase the costs of running a
district.
Please be aware that the
financial crisis facing Wyom-
ing Area did not happen with-
out the warnings. Much more
could have been done over the
past few years to soften the
blow. But the board majority
refused to be proactive!
Wyoming Area taxpayers,
ignorance is not bliss. The
fiscal crisis at Wyoming Area
is a reality, and while it is due
in part to the nature of our
nations economy, it is due in
large part to a school board
majority that put its interests
ahead of yours. Now it is up to
you to do your part and vote
for candidates who value
transparency, accountability,
honesty, and intelligence not
the politics as usual for which
Toni Valenti and Nick DeAn-
gelo stand.
Estelle Campenni
School director
Wyoming Area
West Pittston
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Texas, where rig workers are
used to raising hell and getting a
pass from law enforcement.
Youcando that (stuff) andget
away with it, Bourque said. In
Pennsylvania, they look at it to-
tally different.
Leaving a diner in Towanda in
northern Pennsylvania, Jason
Phillips, a 30-year-old drilling-
equipment supervisor from
Coldspring, Texas, said the prob-
lem is not really the drilling in-
dustry its young people mak-
ing a lot of money. As for him-
self, he said, Imnot too much of
a wild person.
The boom in drilling has been
made possible by horizontal drill-
ing and hydraulic fracturing, or
fracking, a technique that cracks
open rock layers to free natural
gas. Large numbers of workers
are needed to operate drilling
equipment, drive trucks, handle
chemicals, lay pipeline and per-
form other tasks.
The hours are long. Some em-
ployees put in two weeks on, two
weeks off. But entry-level labor-
ers or truck drivers can make
$40,000 or more, while workers
on the drilling rigs can easily pull
down twice that. Their employ-
ers often pick up the tab for ho-
tels, meals and practically every-
thing else.
In Sweetwater County, Wyo.,
where natural gas exploration
boomed about a decade ago, the
population increased from
37,600 in 2000 to 43,800 in 2010,
and arrests for drunkenness,
drugs and DUI more than dou-
bledfrom603 in2000 to a peak of
1,535 in 2008, according to state
figures.
Since then, the numbers have
eased to 1,128 in 2010, a decline
that sheriffs spokesman Detec-
tive Dick Blust Jr. credited to the
sluggish national economy.
In Pennsylvanias Bradford
County, DUI arrests by state
troopers are on track to rise 40
percent this year after climbing
60 percent last year, District At-
torney Dan Barrett said. The
number of sentences handed out
for criminal offenses was up 35
percent in 2010, he said.
Sheriff ClintonWalters saidhis
officers are handling about a 25
percent increase fromlast year in
everything from warrants for
people who fail to appear incourt
to protection-from-abuse orders.
The flood of arrests is such that
his offices van is no longer big
enough to transport all the in-
mates at once from jail to court,
Walters said.
Stories abound about friction
between locals and out-of-town-
ers, whether road rage incidents
or fights over women.
Renee Daly, 27, of Montrose,
Pa., said she knows of at least
three marriages that ended when
local women abandoned their
husbands for gas-field workers.
Its because of these Southern
gentlemen, with their Southern
accents, and the girls move in
with these guys to take care of
them, she said. You get to
spend their money, and theyre
gone two weeks at a time.
Wearing a T-shirt emblazoned
My Indian name is crawling
drunk, Jeanette Pratt, a title
searcher from Monroe, La., who
travels the country for the gas in-
dustry and was on assignment re-
cently in Montrose, said the dif-
ference is that the out-of-town rig
workers have a lot more money
to party with than the locals.
In the North Dakota boom-
townof Williston, somebars have
become rough, and the number
of domestic-disturbance calls
and arrests for such crimes as
DUI, assault and theft in just the
first half of 2011was twice the to-
tal for all of 2010, said Busching,
the sheriff.
Busching and Williston police
are scrambling to hire but say
they cant pay enough for their
new officers to afford the high
rents, and many would-be local
applicants have opted for a high-
er paycheck in the drilling indus-
try.
I have increased staff, and Im
going to increase again, but I
cant until I find a place for them
to live, Busching said. Williston
Police Capt. Tom Ladwig said he
has been hiring from police aca-
demies inMinnesota andhas offi-
cers staying on couches in col-
leagues apartments until they
can find their own places.
Doctors are treating more pa-
tients for chlamydia, a sexually
transmitted disease, in some of
the biggest oil-producing coun-
ties in western North Dakota
237 cases in 2010 compared with
145 in 2008 although the
states disease-control chief, Kir-
by Kruger, said that it is difficult
to call three years of data a real
trend.
Therearealsorumors of prosti-
tution.
In rural southern Texas, where
exploration for oil and gas in the
Eagle Ford Shale is just getting
under way, Robert Garza, police
chief inthe townof Dilley, saidhe
has heard talk about plans to
build a club down in the boo-
nies that would supply prosti-
tutes to drilling industry work-
ers.
Police departments in the area
have reported unusual activity in
recent months: early morning
traffic stops with very young, at-
tractive girls in BMWs from the
Houston area, at least a five-hour
drive from Dilley, Garza said.
Back in Pennsylvania, a Brad-
fordCounty commissioner, Doug
McLinko, said the crime spike
doesnt change his mind about
the importance of the drilling
boom to the local economy. Oth-
er states, he said, would cut an
arm off to have such a surge.
Im always a little apprehen-
sive about painting this as a big
problem around the county, be-
cause it just isnt, McLinko said.
A lot of these people are really
well-behaved. ... To a large de-
gree, is it out of control or a major
issue? Absolutely not.
DRILLING
Continued from Page 1E
AP PHOTOS
Jordon Bourque, a 23-year-old pipe inspector from Lafayette, La.,
talks to a reporter at a bar in the Williamsport, Pa.
A drilling rig is installed near
Dilley, Texas.
In Pennsylvanias Bradford County, DUI
arrests by state troopers are on track
to rise 40 percent this year after climbing
60 percent last year, District Attorney Dan
Barrett said. The number of sentences
handed out for criminal offenses was up
35 percent in 2010.
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
V I E W S
WASHINGTON Mitt
Romney may need a censor.
For himself.
In the last few weeks in Ne-
vada, the man who owns sever-
al homes told the state hit
tough by the housing crisis:
Dont try and stop the foreclo-
sure process. Let it run its
course and hit the bottom.
At one point in Iowa, earlier
this year, the former venture
capitalist uttered, Corpora-
tions are people, with the
country in the midst of a de-
bate over Wall Street vs. Main
Street. At an event in econom-
ically suffering Florida, the re-
tiree who is a multimillio-
naire many times over told
out-of-work voters, Im also
unemployed.
Over the past year, the Re-
publican presidential candi-
date has amassed a collection
of off-the-cuff comments that
expose his vulnerabilities and,
taken together, cast himas out-
of-touch with Americans who
face staggering unemploy-
ment, widespread foreclosures
and a dire outlook on the econ-
omy.
So far, the foot-in-mouth re-
marks havent seemed to affect
his standing in the nomination
race.
Romney has run a far more
cautious and disciplined cam-
paign than his losing bid of
four years ago. Hes kept the fo-
cus on his core message: Hes
the strongest candidate able to
beat President Barack Obama
on the biggest issue of the cam-
paign, the economy. He still
enjoys leading positions in
public opinion polls in early
primary states and across the
nation. Few, if any, of the other
Republicans in the race have
turned his remarks against
him.
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Rom-
neys chief rival with the mon-
ey to prove it, is all but certain
to try. Perry has already start-
ed suggesting that Romney
lives a life of privilege while he
comes from humble roots. In
an interview Friday with CNN,
another GOP candidate, for-
mer Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman,
paintedRomney as a perfectly
lubricated weather vane on the
important issues of the day.
And Romneys eyebrow-rais-
ing comments are tailor-made
for critical TV ads.
Look no further than the
Democratic Party andObamas
advisers for proof of that.
Each time Romney says
something that makes even his
closest aides grimace, Demo-
crats quickly put together a
Web video highlighting the re-
mark a preview of certain
lines of attack come the gener-
al election should the former
Massachusetts governor win
the nomination.
Mitt Romneys message to
Arizona? Youre on your own,
says a newad by the Democrat-
ic National Committee that
jumps on Romneys foreclo-
sure remarks.
Romneys team publicly dis-
misses their bosss occasional
loose lips, dismissing them as
inconsequential to voters fo-
cused on an unemployment
rate hovering around 9 per-
cent.
Its a long campaign and at
the end of the day people are
going to judge Gov. Romney
and his ability to take on Presi-
dent Obama over jobs and the
economy. And certainly there
will be a lot of back and forth as
the campaignprogresses, said
Russ Schriefer, a Romney strat-
egist.
This election will be decid-
ed on big issues because the is-
sues are so big and so impor-
tant, Schriefer said. And not
on a gaffe or a mistake or a mo-
ment, any particularly mo-
ment.
Expect to hear Romneys im-
politic comments frequently as
Republicans and Democrats
alike try to derail Romney.
Off-the-cuff remarks
doing Romney no good
By PHILIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
It wasnt love at first sight.
When I was a little girl, my fa-
ther bribed me to practice with
candy, ice cream, toys, whatever
a kid wants. If I practiced well, I
would get a Snickers Bar, said
Gohar Vardanyan, 26, who began
to appreciate the classical guitar
about eight years later, as a 13-
year-old student in the pre-col-
lege division of the Juilliard
School.
Other kids my age were taking
it seriously. I
wasnt the only
one anymore,
she said. It was
cool.
The ac-
claimed guita-
rist, who won
the prestigious
Amadeus Award
in her native Ar-
menia as a
youth, will give
a free concert at
3 p.m. today in
Wilkes-Barres
Jewish Commu-
nity Center with
harpist Megan
Davis.
The program
will include such lively pieces as
Sevilla by Isaac Albeniz and
Hungarian Fantasy by Johann
Kaspar Mertz, said Vardanyan,
who has been described by Gui-
tar International Magazine as
the complete package of an ac-
complished and engaging musi-
cian.
The two artists will perform
separately as well as together,
with Vardanyan accompanying
Davis as she sings. Afterward, a
reception will honor the duo,
who were roommates at the Pea-
body Institute at Johns Hopkins
University in Baltimore and re-
main friends.
Shes in Philadelphia now, and
Im in New York. At least four or
five times a year one of us hops a
bus to see the other, Vardanyan
said.
Harpist and singer Megan Davis,
left, will join classical guitarist
Gohar Vardanyan in a concert at
the Jewish Community Center in
Wilkes-Barre this afternoon.
Free
classical
concert
What: A free
concert by
classical guita-
rist Gohar
Vardanyan and
harpist/vocal-
ist Megan
Davis
When: 3 p.m.
today
Where: Jewish
Community
Center, 60 S.
River St.,
Wilkes-Barre
More info:
570-824-4646
IF YOU GO
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
Not many Grateful Dead fans are
afforded the chance to play with their
heroes. Then again, not many have
the talents of John Kadlecik.
A self-taught guitar whiz its one
of multiple instruments hes mas-
tered the Iowa-born free spirit took
his love and respect for the songs of
the seminal rock-folk-bluegrass band
and decided to re-create them on
stage with a group of fellow Dead-
adoring musicians.
The result was Dark Star Orches-
tra, one of the pre-eminent Grateful
Dead tribute acts, which Kadlecik
co-founded in 1997.
Fast forward to 2009, and Kadlecik
was tendered an offer that would al-
low him to dig even deeper into the
catalogue he so admires: the oppor-
tunity to join former Dead members
Bob Weir and Phil Lesh in Furthur,
the pairs eclectic jam band.
The tour stops in Wilkes-Barre on
Saturday night, playing what likely
will be a lengthy set of Grateful Dead
classics and rock standards at the
Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza.
To play with Bob and Phil is an
honor. Everyone in the band is top-
notch, but obviously Bob and Phil
have quite a history, Kadlecik says.
Indeed they do. The two co-found-
ing members of the Grateful Dead
are revered as both musical and cul-
tural figures, along with beloved vo-
calist-guitarist Jerry Garcia, who
died of a heart attack in 1995.
Its Garcias guitar and vocal parts
that Kadlecik primarily handles on
stage, but he bristles at the notion
hes replacing anyone and waves off
any comparison to the plot of the
2001 film Rock Star, in which a trib-
ute artist is asked to join the band he
idolizes.
There are some big distinctions,
and Im not replacing a guy who got
fired, Kadlecik says of the differenc-
es in his story. Id like to think that it
was my familiarity with the reper-
toire that got me the gig more than
being a sound-alike.
Kadlecik attended his first of more
than 60 Dead concerts in 1989 at the
Rosemont Horizon outside Chicago,
where he lived for 15 years. At the
time, he was already a devoted stu-
dent of music and music theory but
found it difficult not to be inspired by
Furthur will play a lengthy set of Grateful Dead classics and rock standards
Saturday night at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes-Barre.
Furthur honoring the Grateful Dead classics
See FURTHUR, Page 4F
By JOSEPH HUDAK
For The Times Leader
What: Furthur, with Bob Weir and Phil
Lesh of the Grateful Dead
When: 7 p.m. Saturday
Where: Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey
Plaza, Wilkes-Barre Township
Tickets: $55, $45
Call: 1-800-745-3000 (or visit www.ticket-
master.com.)
IF YOU GO
T
rans-Siberian Orchestra has
been bringing its dazzling holi-
day showto Northeastern Penn-
sylvania for more than10years, but it has
never kickedoff oneof its highlysuccess-
ful tours in Wilkes-Barre. Until now.
The popular combination heavy-metal
band and symphony orchestra will take
over the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey
Plaza for two shows Friday. The matinee
begins at 4 p.m., while the nightcap gets
under way at 8 p.m.
For some reason, I love Wilkes-
Barre in particular, TSO founding
member and composer/arranger/
producer/guitarist Paul ONeill told
The Times Leader a fewdays before
beginning rehearsals. Years ago,
the water was out inthe entire build-
ing, and we thought no one would
show up; the place was packed.
Wilkes-Barre has always been a
special place for the band, ONeill
continued. That wholearea has just
embraced the band from the begin-
ning. We usually start our tours in
Ohio, but this year we decided we
would kick it off in Wilkes-Barre.
This years show will highlight
TSOs triple-platinum debut album
Christmas Eve and Other Stories
in its entirety in the first half and
songs from new project Gutter Bal-
let and The New York Blues Ex-
press in the second.
The latter is an example of what
ONeill calls Rock Theater.
It takes the best of what Broad-
way has to offer, the easy-to-follow,
great storytelling, and marries it
with rock-n-roll standards of great
singing and great musicianship, he
said.
Fans canget a front-rowseat at the
creation of the genre in TSOs latest
PBSspecial, TheBirthof RockThe-
ater, which offers live performanc-
es from Beethovens Last Night
(the groups first foray outside of its
Christmas trilogy) and Night Cas-
tle (its latest, Top 5 album).
After a successful career that be-
What: Trans-
Siberian Or-
chestra
When: 4 p.m.
and 8 p.m.
Friday
Where: Mohe-
gan Sun Arena
at Casey Plaza,
Wilkes-Barre
Twp.
Tickets: $31.50
to $59.50
Call: 1-800-
745-3000 (or
visit www.tick-
etmaster.com.)
IF YOU GO
By BRAD PATTON bpatton@timesleader.com
See ORCHESTRA, Page 6F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Youll be in tune with what
your body needs and
doesnt need, for that
matter. You may crave an
unusual food, decide to try
a new kind of movement
or give up a habit thats
producing less than opti-
mum results.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Whats right for you isnt
the same thing thats rec-
ommended by the teach-
ers, leaders and experts
around you. It takes cour-
age to go forward without
evidence that your way
will work. Your gut instinct
wont lie, though.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You know youre support-
ed, even though that sup-
port may be rather intan-
gible right now. Friends are
wishing you well, and you
can feel their encourage-
ment on the breeze.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Your heroes started out
with a lot less material
wealth and knowledge and
fewer resources than you
have available to you right
now. Ask them for help, if
only in your head. Call on
them to open your eyes to
opportunity.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
Someone recognizes your
deep, soulful desire even
though you never said
out loud what it is. This
is no small coincidence;
its a sign of an unfolding
miracle.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Negative thoughts become
reality just like positive
thoughts do. Stay posi-
tive. Your connection with
a fellow earth sign will
help matters and thats
Capricorn or Taurus.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You have dreams that
have never seen the light
of day. Maybe you havent
even uttered them to your
nearest and dearest. They
need air to grow. Bring
them into the open. Write
them in a notebook. Its an
excellent start!
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Youll make phone calls,
line up appointments and
generally get busy prepar-
ing for a certain reality.
Make sure its the reality
you want instead of the
one you fear.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Youre not alone.
You have lots of friends,
many of whom are invis-
ible. Thats why, even
when youre by yourself,
you feel a wonderful sense
of belonging. A silent
community showers you
with love.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Your mood may go
up and down if you allow
yourself to be a victim of
circumstances. So dont
allow it. Remind yourself
that youre the creator
here, and you can create
happiness from wherever
you are.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Every time you read, you
learn something. But its
action that will really drive
the lesson home. Youll get
your hands dirty with the
nuts and bolts of making
a project work, and youll
love every minute.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
You wont waste time try-
ing to make things fit that
just dont. Your life is like
a puzzle. The pieces that
dont belong in your pic-
ture will be gently cast to
the side. They are part of
another puzzle.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Oct.
30). Your productiv-
ity will be astounding
through the end of the
year. Whoever resisted
you or stood in your way
will retreat and allow you
to do your thing for the
next 10 weeks. Youll flesh
out a romantic notion in
November. January brings
an important sale. In April,
your bold action will win
over a VIP. Capricorn and
Sagittarius people adore
you. Your lucky numbers
are: 7, 10, 34, 40 and 15.
MY EX WAS A MONSTER!
Jonathan L. ORourke
10/30/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
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PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
10/30
10/30
10/30
10/30
10/30
1. One U.S. President made a lot of
practical, if hasty decisions: Hurry
Truman.
2. George Washington was true to
his goals and a great statesman, as
he never blamed the nations
problems on the previous
administration!
3. Forget "once upon a time."
Modern fairy tales all start with the
ugly words, "If I am elected, I
promise....."
4. All office holders should heed a
powerful political fish in
Washington, D.C.: the Senate
herring.
DEAR ABBY
Woman is mad that her
boyfriends dad cheats
Dear Abby:
I have been
dating Cam-
eron for five
years. Were
in graduate
school, have
a wonderful relationship and
are discussing marriage. I
get along well with his par-
ents, but some things have
just come out about his fa-
ther and I dont know how to
deal with it.
Two years ago we discov-
ered that Camerons father
had been having an affair.
He promised to stop seeing
the woman, get a restrain-
ing order so shed leave
him alone and work on his
marriage. It seems he lied.
We have found out (again)
that he has continued to
see her. Cameron was morti-
fied both times and sad his
father would treat his moth-
er this way.
His mother said shed
try counseling with him,
and if he didnt live up to
his promise, shed divorce
him. It has been months and
theyre still in counseling.
His dad isnt allowed to live
at home with her.
Im furious with Camerons
father for being such an
idiot. I dont want to see
him (one of Camerons sis-
ters has cut him out of her
life completely), but Cam-
eron thinks his father will
hurt himself if we all leave
him. Please tell me how
to handle this because
although I never want to
see the man again, I may
have to.
Walking On Eggshells in
Delaware
Dear Walking On Egg-
shells: Camerons parents
marriage has hit a rough
patch. However, theyre
both trying to repair it.
While you may be disgusted
with Camerons father,
you have no reason to be
furious with him his
wife does. So for everyones
sake, cool off and think
rationally.
If your boyfriends
parents manage to reconcile,
youll be seeing them
with some regularity
and they will need all of
the emotional support they
can get. If they decide to
divorce, it will be up to
Cameron to decide how
close he wishes to remain
with his father. Please do
not add fuel to an already
explosive situation.
Everyones suffering
enough as it is.
To receive a collection of Abbys
most memorable and most fre-
quently requested poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keep-
ers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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the expert playing he wit-
nessed that night.
I was already an aspiring
artist, so I was trying to not be
overly influenced. I wasnt try-
ing to analyze details or get to
the front row so I could watch
Jerrys fingers or
whatever. I just
enjoyed it for
what it was, he
says. But the ac-
tual soloing and
style of it came to
me almost instant-
ly. That happens
with almost any
guitar player that
I enjoy and see
live more than
once. Their play-
ing is going to in-
fluence me, and I
dont really have a
choice.
Because of that,
Kadlecik, who al-
so fronts his own
group, the John K
Band, in the Wash-
ington, D.C., area,
usually seeks out
the more abstract
sounds of jazz on
nights off. That type of music
is harder for me to latch on to.
I tend to go see stuff like that
because it doesnt instantly
turn into a transcription in my
head, he laughs.
While Weir and Lesh right-
fully steer the Furthur ship,
Kadlecik says the other mem-
bers of the seven-piece band
are encouraged to offer their
ideas for each nights spraw-
ling set lists. At a pair of recent
performances in Los Angeles,
the band touched on every-
thing from Attics of My Life
and Ripple to Sugar Magno-
lia and a cover of Traffics
Dear Mr. Fantasy.
Theres no telling what the
musicians might decide to
play Saturday night at the Mo-
hegan Sun Arena, but that leg-
endary Dead vibe of peace,
love and unpredictability is
guaranteed.
Furthur is about the live ex-
perience more than a nostalgia
thing. Its the idea of trying to
be present in the
moment. That ex-
perience is why
the age difference
(at Dead shows)
got wider and
wider while Jerry
was alive, Kadle-
cik says, going on
to offer a 21st-cen-
tury reason for the
enduring popular-
ity of the group.
The fact that the
band has allowed
their music to be
online in their ar-
chives is part of
why there are
younger fans get-
ting on board now.
Theyre like,
heres this band
that is offering
thousands of
hours of music for
free. I think thats
a big one.
Still, Kadlecik says, apart
from the music, it all comes
back to that liberating experi-
ence, the tradition of following
the band wherever the road
might take you.
The Dead were romanticiz-
ing the days of hopping a
freight, he says. They were
one of the last American ad-
ventures that you could em-
bark upon.
FURTHUR
Continued from Page 1F
Furthur is
about the live
experience
more than a
nostalgia thing.
Its the idea of
trying to be
present in
the moment.
That experience
is why the age
difference (at
Dead shows) got
wider and wider
while Jerry
was alive.
John Kadlecik
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5F
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Charles Dickens publishedhis
first story ina Londonmonthly
at age 22. Althoughhe wasnt
paidandit appearedwithout his
name, he was so overcome with
joy andpride it took himhalf an
hour to recover. Whenhe diedof
a stroke 36 years later, he had
earneda fortune many times
over andhadbeenhailedas the
greatest novelist of the19th
century.
The story of howDickens rose
to suchheights froma modest
background, forcedto leave
school at 15 by his parents, who
couldno longer affordthe fees, is
no less epic thanhis sprawling
novels. Now, a splendidhistory
by the notedEnglishbiographer
andjournalist Claire Tomalinhas
beenpublished, just months
before the bicentennial of Dick-
ens Feb. 7, 1812, birth.
It is a tale of two Dickens: the
tenderheartedsocial critic witha
soft spot for prostitutes, orphans
andthe disabled, andthe raging
egomaniac, who dumpedthe
wife who bore him10 children
because she was fat anddull and
he hadfallenhardfor anactress,
Nelly Ternan, 27 years his junior.
Scholarly but accessible, the
book vividly conjures the idyllic
countryside outside London,
where Dickens spent his boy-
hood, andthenthe sooty dis-
tricts of the rapidly industri-
alizing city, where he set himself
onthe pathto becoming a writer.
Tomalinskillfully presents the
chief trauma of Dickens young
life being sent to work ina
factory at age12, after his father
was imprisonedfor debt and
suggests the ways it left a lasting
mark, fromhis sympathy for the
working class to his towering
ambitionandHerculeanwork
ethic.
ThoughTomalinrightly cele-
brates Dickens genius, she is
cleareyedabout his faults, as a
writer anda humanbeing.
She quotes his daughter Ka-
tey: He was not a goodman...
but he was wonderful! Among
his sins, the creator of Tiny Tim
andLittle Nell neglectedhis own
children. Of the10, only two
forgedanything like aninde-
pendent pathto success.
It didnt muchmatter; Dickens
knewwhat his legacy wouldbe.
His will stipulates no memorial.
I rest my claims to the remem-
brance of my country uponmy
publishedworks, he wrote.
Andhe was right to do so.
Ebenezer Scrooge, Oliver Twist,
the Artful Dodger, Faginthese
andso many other unforgettable
characters he createdwill live
forever inour imagination.
Dickens bio
in time for
bicentennial
By ANN LEVIN
For The Associated Press
Charles Dickens: A Life (The
Penguin Press), by Claire Tomalin:
A
nne Enright doesnt believe in leading readers gently into any-
thing certainly not an affair. In The Forgotten Waltz, the
Irish writer plunges us headlong into the world of Gina Moynihan,
youngITconsultant andadulteress at large.
Gina is not so much an unreliable
narrator as someone obsessed with
her own unreliability. Dissecting her
love affair with married man Sean Val-
lely, she constantly doubles back on
her own thoughts and memories,
gamelytryingtopinpoint the moment
when her conventional middle-class
life complete with husband and
mortgagedissolvedintosomething
darker and more complicated.
Her tone is oftenwry. : That all you
have todois sleepwithsomebody and
get caught and you never have to see
your in-laws again. Ever. Pffft! Gone.
Its the nearest thing to magic I have
yet found, Gina brags.
The real magic is in Enrights prose,
whichburrows intocharacters like fin-
gernails into skin, peeling back the
hidden layers of ordinary interactions
and momentary thoughts. Material
that another writer might string
across a whole book, Enright burns up
in a page, like its nothing, using it to
create a jagged portrait of Dublin dur-
ing the recent boom.
When the novel opens, the air is
crackling with real estate lust and In-
ternet startups. Gina collides with
Sean at a European conference: Shes
there for a panel on International In-
ternet Strategy, while hes presenting
The Culture of Money. They find
themselves sleepingtogether, withve-
ry little ceremony: It seemed that
choice had nothing to do with it, or
that I had chosen a long time ago. Not
him, necessarily, but this; waiting for
the lift in sudden silence with a man
whodidnot evenbothertocourt me. ...
Maybe it was the drink, but my sense
of time was undone, as idly as a set of
shoelaces, that you do not notice until
you look down.
Althoughsheis alreadymarriedtoa
sweet tech guy who is working all
hours tokeepupwiththemortgageon
their apartment, Gina throws herself
into a sexual dalliance with Sean as if
its a grand adventure. But even as she
is remembering the gorgeous highs of
flirting and secrecy, Gina recounts her
ambivalence. After we made love
which we always did first, for fear, al-
most, of becoming friends after-
wards, when it was safe, Sean would
talktome about his life andI wouldbe
interested.
Other details temper Ginas lovers
tale the fact that she is so busy with
Seanthat she doesnt notice her moth-
By JOY PRESS Los Angeles Times
The Forgotten Waltz by Anne Enright; W. W. Norton & Company (263 pages, $25.95)
A womans life is turned upside down by an affair
See AFFAIR, Page 6F
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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er slipping from flakiness into ill-
ness, forinstance. Orthat theecon-
omy is collapsing around them,
pulling mortgages under water
and forcing Gina to lay off her col-
leagues.
Theres also the nagging prob-
lemof Seansyoungdaughter, Evie.
Hovering over the novel like a
chubby, unpredictable ghost, Evie
has some kind of mysterious issue
aneurological condition, maybe
that causes her parents endless
anxiety. AndthoughGina revels in
her own freedom, the little girl is a
reminder that the affair has the
power to derail several lives.
(T)hat is thethingabout stolen
love, it is important toknowwhoit
is you are stealing from, Gina
notes archly.
Enrights early fiction was filled
withwisps of fantasy (inThe Wig
My Father Wore, an angel moves
inwithaTVgameshowproducer),
whileher2007novel, TheGather-
ing, which won the Man Booker
Prize, offered something more
denseandmournful initsstoryof a
woman trying to understand her
brothers suicide.
In The Forgotten Waltz, En-
right balances rapture and grief
as Gina discovers while trying to
explain events in an orderly way,
thesethingstendtobleedtogether.
The novel does lose some of its
buoyancy as the love and money
bubbles start to waver, though.
Things that once looked so tempt-
ing now feel threadbare and rou-
tine.
But there are no simple judg-
ments in this darkly funny book
about adultery: just aclear-eyedac-
counting of what was spent and
what was lost. As Gina quips,
Who would have thought love
could be so expensive?
AFFAIR
Continued from Page 5F
gan in the 1970s as a guitarist
with touring productions of Je-
sus Christ Superstar and
Hair, ONeill became a pro-
ducer with Aerosmith, working
on the groups albums Classics
Live I and Classics Live II. He
then worked extensively with
the band Savatage, which intro-
duced himto such people as Jon
Olivia, Bob Kinkel, Al Pitrelli
and renowned studio engineer
Dave Wittman, all of whom be-
came integral collaborators in
ONeills next grand project,
Trans Siberian-Orchestra, in
1994.
TSOs Christmas trilogy
1996s Christmas EveandOther
Stories with smash hit Christ-
mas Eve/Sarajevo 12/24,
1998s The Christmas Attic
with Christmas Canon, and
2004s The Lost Christmas
Eve with Wizards in Winter
has sold nearly 7 million copies
total and is reintroduced each
holiday seasontoradiolisteners.
The groups non-holiday pro-
jects, 2000s Beethovens Last
Night and 2009s Night Cas-
tle, also have been big sellers.
ONeill and his cohorts are
now at work on two more al-
bums, one the long-fabled Ro-
manov project that was origi-
nally to be the bands first re-
lease.
They also are working on the
groups first Broadway show, a
pair of graphic novels, and plan-
ning a spring tour reprising
Beethovens Last Night.
But first comes the annual
winter tour, complete with its
truckloads of lights, pyrotech-
nics and spectacle. This years
showwill alsoincludeanempha-
sis on dancing for the first time.
TSOshows have always given
a lot of entertainment for the
concert-goers dollar, but thats
even more important to ONeill
this year.
Every time I think the econo-
my cant get any worse, it does,
ONeill said. Our show is three
hours of positive feelings where
you can forget about your prob-
lems outside of the building.
Our mission is to keep trying
to do it better, keep pushing the
envelope, and keep it affordable
for everyone.
ORCHESTRA
Continued from Page 1F
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. Mil-
itary museums allow visitors to
experience the rough and tumble
jerk of a parachute jump, the
barked orders of an Army drill
sergeant or the segregated train-
ing endured by the first African-
Americans to enter the Marine
Corps.
Whether you are a hardened
military veteran or one whos
never worn a uniform, several
military museums in the Caroli-
nas offer extensive lessons inmil-
itary service as the Nov. 11 Veter-
ans Day draws near.
In Fayetteville, N.C., the soar-
ing Airborne and Special Oper-
ations Museum attracts between
120,000 to 175,000 visitors every
year and tells the story of how
Americas military developed the
strategy of dropping fully-armed
soldiers into battle from the
skies. A 15-foot sculpture of the
paratrooper dubbed Iron Mike
stands guard at its glass-and-gir-
der front entry, which evokes
both the 250-foot jump towers
that paratroopers use to trainand
the wingspan of the C-47 aircraft
that droppedsoldiers onto battle-
fields in World War II.
Located just minutes off Inter-
state 95 in downtown Fayette-
ville, N.C., the museum is hold-
ing a weeklong celebration in ad-
vance of Veterans Day, says Paul
Galloway, executive director of
the foundation that supported
construction of the $25 million
building.
Well be hopping and pop-
ping. We do a salute to veterans
every year, Galloway said. A
weekof films about the Army and
paratroopers will be held the
week prior to the holiday, as well
as other events to honor military
men and women, Galloway said.
As soon as you enter the mu-
seum, youspot a WorldWar II-era
paratrooper in combat gear float-
ing out of the sky under a yellow
28-foot-wide parachute. Behind
him, another model drops from
the heavens, a modern Army
Ranger buoyed by a light green,
honeycombed parachute used by
U.S. Special Forces.
A wild ride can be had in the
museums 24-seat platform mo-
tion simulator, recreating the
bumps and jumps of parachute
drops and rides in military vehi-
cles.
To highlight some of the major
events of wartime paratroopers,
visitors first stroll through a rec-
reated village in Normandy. Re-
cordings from the June 1944 Al-
lied invasion to liberate France
from Nazi Germany put visitors
in the heat of the battle, with
rockets andbullets screechingby.
Overhead, a C-47 Skytrain air-
craft hovers with a U.S. Army
paratrooper poised to jump out
an open door.
Walkways are papered with
still photos, videos and murals
that showthe history behind U.S.
forces that evolved into the
famed Special Operations units,
designated to take on unconven-
tional warfare and special mis-
sions in foreign lands.
Displays from the war in the
Pacific, the Korean War and Cold
War are shown. In one display,
soldiers jump from a UH-1
Huey helicopter into a jungle
battle raging in Vietnam. Other
displays detail the history of U.S.
involvement in the Dominican
Republic, Panama and Grenada.
Americas conflicts in the Mid-
dle East are recalled with models
of camouflaged soldiers crouch-
ing in desert hideouts in Iraq.
Others depict U.S. Special Oper-
ations forces meetingfor tea with
Afghan villagers or medical cen-
ters where military medics tend
to local children.
The latest addition to the Ar-
mys military museums is the Ar-
mys Basic Training Combat Mu-
seum located on Fort Jackson, in
Columbia, S.C., which reopened
in July after a two-year renova-
tion.
More than 60,000 male and fe-
malesoldiers graduateeveryyear
from basic training at Fort Jack-
son, which is the Armys largest
training site. The museum offers
guests and family members a
taste of their grueling10 weeks of
indoctrination and combat train-
ing.
The museum boasts a num-
ber of high-speed exhibits that
zoomin directly on howcivilians
are turned into soldiers, interwo-
ven with Fort Jacksons past,
said the two-star general in
charge of the post, Maj. Gen.
James Milano.
Visitors may be startledby drill
sergeants who appear in holo-
graphic images bellowing com-
mands, allowing them to feel as
if he or she has enlisted in the Ar-
my and is standing there in their
Army Combat Uniform, Milano
says.
Check out a fully loaded duffel
bag, or try to lift and shoot an Ar-
my rifle. Listen as soldiers march
by and learn some of the drill ser-
geants cadence calls that keep
soldiers sharp and in step.
The museum gives visitors a
sense of howrough training once
was with displays of World War I-
era barracks, complete with
wood-burning, pot-bellied
stoves, metal beds andmodest ra-
tions.
While most Marines recall
their basic training taking place
either at Parris Island, S.C., or
Camp Pendleton, Calif., there is a
third site few know about: the
MontfordPoint MarineMuseum,
located near Camp Lejeune,
N.C., at Camp Gilbert H. John-
son.
We are the Marine Corps ba-
sic training site youve never
heard of, jokes Finney Greggs, a
retiredMarine anddirector of the
small museum located in one of
the original white wooden, single
story barracks buildings where
African-Americans were segre-
gatedfromwhite Marines as they
trained from1942 to 1949.
The museumholds photos, let-
ters, uniforms and other memen-
tos from blacks who endured
tough training to earn the eagle,
globe and anchor Corps insignia
and disprove the notion they we-
rent worthy because of the color
of their skin.
African-Americans gained en-
try to the Marines after President
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an
executive order forcing the com-
mandant to allow them to train.
In 1948, President Harry S Tru-
man signed an executive order
that desegregated the military
services, and all Marines went to
boot camp at either Parris Island
or Camp Pendleton.
Greggs says the museum is
seeking material for displays and
is looking for information about
any veterans who may have
trained at Montford Point and
saw duty in World War II. Orga-
nizers are also looking ahead to
building a second phase dealing
with the history of these Marines
in the Korean War and Vietnam.
MILITARY
MUSEUMS
AP PHOTO
The soaring Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville, N.C., attracts between 120,000 to 175,000 visitors each year
and tells the story of how Americas military developed the strategy of dropping fully armed soldiers into battle from the skies.
offer thrills, noted collections
By SUSANNE M. SCHAFER
Associated Press
Security: While Fayettevilles
Airborne and Special Operations
Museum is not on a military in-
stallation, most others are, and
that means undergoing required
security and document checks. In
most cases, driver licenses, photo
IDs for adults and proof of car
insurance and registration are
reviewed at entrance gates if
visitors do not have military iden-
tification. Visitors may be asked to
exit the vehicle, open doors,
trunks and engine hoods as secu-
rity officers check the car.
Airborne & Special Operations
Museum: 100 Bragg Blvd., Fayette-
ville, N.C.; http://www.asomf.org or
910-643-2766. History of the
militarys airborne divisions and
airborne Special Forces. Free
admission. A $4 fee for the motion
simulator can be dropped for
students if arrangements are
made two weeks in advance. Open
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday
and noon- 5 p.m. Sundays. Closed
Mondays except for federal holi-
days.
82nd Airborne Division War
Memorial Museum: Building
C-6841, Ardennes St., Fort Bragg,
N.C.; http://www.82ndairbornedi-
visionmuseum.com or 910-432-
3443. Collection dates to forma-
tion of the division in 1917 through
present day, plus outdoor display
of classic military aircraft, vehicles
and artillery. Free admission. Open
10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday to Sat-
urday. Closed Mondays except for
federal holidays.
JFK Special Warfare Museum:
Ardennes and Marion streets, Fort
Bragg, N.C., 910-432-4272. Collec-
tion includes Army Indian Scouts
of the 19th century through special
operations units in the Vietnam
War. Free admission. Open 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday.
Montford Point Marine Museum:
Building M101, Camp Johnson,
Jacksonville, N.C., http://
www.montfordpointmarines.com
or 910-450-1340. Museum honors
the 20,000 African-Americans
who trained at the site from1942-
1949. Free admission. Open Tues-
day, Thursday, Saturday (call for
exact schedule). Other times may
be arranged by appointment.
U.S. Army Basic Combat Train-
ing Museum: 4442 Jackson Blvd.,
Fort Jackson, S.C., http://
www.jackson.army.mil/sites or
803-751-7419. Exhibits on basic
combat with hands-on and inter-
active displays, historical artifacts
from past conflicts, including
tanks, jeeps, weaponry. Free ad-
mission. Open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon-
day to Friday.
U.S. Army Chaplain Museum:
101000 Lee Road, Fort Jackson,
S.C. 803-751-8079. History of U.S.
Army Chaplain Corps from1775 to
now, including exhibit on Civil War
chaplains. Memorial garden for
chaplains who died in the line of
duty. Free admission. Open 9
a.m.-4 p.m. Monday to Friday.
IF YOU GO
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 1G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
543 Pierce Street Kingston, PA 18704 570-288-3000
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WVONMO VALLEV
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
*For qualied Buyers. Bi-weekly payments greater than 17
1/2% of monthly net income, additional
down-payment may be required. Costs to be paid by Buyer at delivery: registration, taxes, title, doc fee.
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412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.
713 North State Street Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-6676 fax: 570-586-9466
www.chermaksaab.com
Intelligence
goes a long way.
Intuitive technology. Brilliant design. A legendary Saab Turbo engine
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20XX Saab Model
$
000/ mo. for XX mos. For qualied lessees
1
20XX Saab Model 0
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APR for XX mos.
for qualied buyers
2 $0,000 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.
713 North State Street, Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-6676 fax: 570-586-9466
www.chermaksaab.com
Intuitive technology. Brilliant design. A legendary SaabTurbo engine
with an EPA-est. 33 mpg hw. Add road-gripping AWD and its a
no-brainer.The all-new 9-5 Sports Sedan. Its a thinking mans machine.
1Low-mileage lease of a specially equipped 2011 SaabTurbo. Example based on survey. Each dealer sets its own price.Your payments may vary. Payments are for a specailly equipped 2011 SaabTurbo with an MSRP of $40,700. 39 monthly payments total $15,556.
Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at lease signing. Must approve lease. Must take delivery from dealer stock by 05/31/11. Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 32,500 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. Payments
may be higher in some states. Not available with other offers. Residency restrictions apply. Vehicle subject to availability.
2011 SaabTurbo
$
399/mo. for 39 mos. For qualied lessee
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MARKETPLACE
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
ALL
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CAR &
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Highest Prices
Paid!!!
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Call
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288-8995
LOST CAT: Female,
white and tabby
markings. Last seen
in Harding. Answers
to Binx
570-954-5710
LOST MALE CAT
Name is Austin, he
is a domestic medi-
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black strips and a
white belly and
paws. Has blue/
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LOST. Littmans
beaded, silver
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reads MOM.
Call 570-854-8513.
120 Found
All Junk
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Wanted
Highest
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570-574-1275
FOUND Sony cam-
era at the Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton air-
port. Call to
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FOUND, Jack Rus-
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female, at Frances
E. Walter Dam on
October 26.
570-443-7694
LINEUP
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ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
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PAGE 2G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF TIME
THIS HOLIDAY SEASON.
Hire a PERSONAL ASSISTANT to take care of
all of the things on your holiday to-do list.
Take the stress away, enjoy your holidays
and allow me to do services such as:
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Gifts * Groceries
ERRANDS
Dry cleaning * Package delivery * Pharmacy
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Invitations * Thank yous * Party supplies
Available for all types of services
to help create more time in
your day throughout the year.
Contact Monica at 570-328-2074.
References & rates available upon request.
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Item!! Item!!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LUZERNE COUNTY Authorities,
Boards & Commissions Application
The Luzerne County Home Rule Transition
Committee is currently accepting applica-
tions for Luzerne County citizens interest-
ed in serving on Luzerne County Authori-
ties, Boards and Commissions under the
new Home Rule structure of government
beginning in January 2012.
The following is a list of Luzerne County
Authorities, Boards, and Commissions:
Accountability, Conduct, and
Ethics Commission
Agriculture Board
Area Agency on Aging
Board of Elections and
Registration
Board of Tax Assessment
Appeals
Children and Youth
Commission for Women
Comprehensive Economic
Development Strategy Committee
Conservation District
Diversity Commission
Drug and Alcohol
Forty Fort Airport
Advisory Board
Housing Authority
Industrial Development Authority
Joint Airport Board
Luzerne County Community
College Board of Trustees
Levee Raising Project Mitigation
Board
Luzerne County Convention
Center Authority
Luzerne County Flood Protection
Authority
Luzerne County Municipal
Cooperation Commission
Luzerne County Open Space and
Recreation Feasibility Study
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
MH/MR Program Advisory Board
Northeastern PA Hospital and
Higher Education Authority
Planning Commission
Redevelopment Authority
Retirement Board
Tourist Promotion Agency
Transportation Authority
Workforce Investment Board
Zoning Hearing Board
While some of the Authorities, Boards, and
Commissions may not have immediate
vacancies available any applicants will
remain on file throughout 2012 for consid-
eration as vacancies occur.
Application form and instructions are
available on line at the Luzerne County
website
http://www.luzernecounty.org/content/File
/HRTC%20County%20ABC%20Applica-
tion%20revised%2010-13-11.pdf
or
Can be obtained upon request to:
Luzerne County Commissioners Office
ATTN: ABC Applicant Form
Luzerne County Courthouse
200 North River Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-1001
Phone 570-825-1500
LEGAL NOTICE
COUNTY OF LUZERNE
OFFICE OF HUMAN SERVICES
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR
OFFICE SPACE
Ref. #102711RFP1OHS
This request for proposal (RFP) is being
solicited by Luzerne County for the leasing
of approximately 8,900 square feet of
office space within the City of Wilkes-
Barre for use by Office of Human Services,
Area Agency on Aging and Children and
Youth Services Department of Luzerne
County.
This RFP is issued by the Luzerne County
Purchasing Department. The Issuing
Office is the primary point of contact for
this RFP. The Luzerne County Engineers
Office is the secondary point of contact for
this RFP.
The RFP contains instructions to prospec-
tive responders and specifications gov-
erning the proposed lease agreement.
Proposals must be submitted to the pri-
mary issuing office no later than Novem-
ber 10, 2011 at 10:00 A.M. to Mr. Frank A.
Pugliese, Jr., Luzerne County Purchasing
Director, at 200 North River Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18711.
Luzerne County is soliciting this request
for proposal for leasing approximately
8,900 square feet of office space for use
solely by the Luzerne County Area Agency
on Aging and Children and Youth Services
Department for a period of two (2) years
with an option for two (2) additional two
(2) year terms.
A detailed scope of work is available from
the Luzerne County Engineers Office 65
Reichard Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711,
telephone (570) 825-1600 or by emailing:
Mr. Joseph J. Gibbons, P.E., Luzerne
County Engineer at
joe.gibbons@luzernecounty.org.
All respondents are required to submit an
original and three copies of their proposal
in a plain envelope with the project title
clearly marked on the outside to the enve-
lope.
The County reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals if it feels it is in the best
interest of the County.
The County of Luzerne does not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race, color, national
origin, sex, religion, age, family, and hand-
icapped status in employment or the pro-
vision of services.
The County of Luzerne is an Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer.
Douglas A. Pape
Chief Clerk
PUBLIC NOTICE
THE COUNTY OF LUZERNE INVITES QUAL-
IFIED AGENCIES AND INDIVIDUALS TO
SUBMIT A PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE THE
FOLLOWING:
LUZERNE COUNTY OFFICE OF
HUMAN SERVICES
LEASING OF OFFICE SPACE
REF. #102711RFP1OHS
RESPONSES FOR THE LISTED REQUEST
FOR PROPOSAL MUST BE SUBMITTED TO
THE LUZERNE COUNTY PURCHASING
DEPARTMENT, C/O FRANK A. PUGLIESE,
JR., 20 NORTH PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE,
WILKES BARRE, PA 18701 BY NOVEMBER
10, 2011 NO LATER THAN 10:00 A.M.
FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUC-
TIONS MAY RESULT IN RFP REJECTION.
RFPS MAY BE RECEIVED WEEKDAYS
BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 9:00 AM TO
4:00 PM. ONLY (EXCLUDING HOLIDAYS).
RFP packages may be obtained at the
offices of Luzerne Purchasing Department
in the Penn Place Building, 20 North Penn-
sylvania Avenue, Wilkes Barre, Pa 18711,
and on the website at
www.luzernecounty.org.
THE COUNTY OF LUZERNE DOES NOT
DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE,
COLOR, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELI-
GION, AGE, FAMILY, AND HANDICAPPED
STATUS IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVI-
SION OF SERVICES.
THE COUNTY OF LUZERNE IS AN
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
FRANK A. PUGLIESE, JR, DIRECTOR
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT
ADVERTISEMENT PUBLISHED BY ORDER
OF:
DOUG A. PAPE, CHIEF CLERK
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD OCTOBER 31
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
AGGRESSIVE &
Affordable DUI
Defense
Law Office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITOS
&
GINOS
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
Adoring couple
longs to adopt new-
born. Secure end-
less love awaits
your baby. Kelly and
Joe 800-551-3297
Expenses Paid
Sophia Coppola
wore a lavender
wedding dress.
Are colored
wedding dress-
es going to be
a new trend?
bridezella.net
DID YOU USE THE
OSTEOPOROSIS
DRUG FOASAMAX
(alendronate)? If
you experienced
femur fracture
(upper leg), you
may be entitled
compensation. Con-
tact Attorney
Charles Johnson
1-800-535-5727
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
VOTE
Damentis Restaurant
ON FACEBOOK
WWW.DAMENTIS.COM
310 Attorney
Services
AGGRESSIVE &
Affordable DUI
Defense
Law Office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
in my Kingston
home. Licensed.
Accepting
Lackawanna &
Luzerne CCC.
570-283-0336
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www.
CenturaOnline.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,695 takes it
away.
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
HONDA`09 RECON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
REDUCED
$3,650.
(570) 814-2554
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CADILLAC 03
DeVille. Excellent
shape, all leather.
$4650. BUICK 03
Century. Great
shape $3400
570-819-3140
570-709-5677
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$3,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY 03 CAVALIER
One owner, 98k,
new inspection, 4
door. $5495
CHEVY 95 BLAZER
4 door. 92 K.
New brakes &
gas tank. New
inspection.
$3,895
409 Autos under
$5000
DODGE `95 DAKOTA
2WD V6. Regular
Cab/6Ft. 5 speed.
113,000 miles. Runs
like a champ. Needs
some work. $1,400.
570-814-1255
FORD 99 ESCORT
STATION WAGON
One owner, 91k,
new inspection.
$3495
FORD 99 EXPLORER
4 door 4x4. New
inspection.
$3,895
GMC 96 JIMMY SLE
4WD, Hunter
Green, 4 door, CD,
168,000 miles.
$2,100 obo.
(570) 262-7550
LEOS AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
PONTIAC 01 SUNFIRE
2 door 4 cylinder,
auto, new tires,
excellent condition
$2,150
CHEVY 98 MALIBU
4 door, 4 cylinder
auto. $1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
NISSAN 01 SENTRA
4 door. Auto.
Power galore.
New inspection.
$4,495.
SATURN `04 VUE
65K, Auto, Loaded.
Needs transmis-
sion/airbags. Book
value $10,000. Sell
$3,000 or best offer
(570) 829-2875
(570) 332-1252
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,1
owner, garage kept,
camel leather interi-
or, 3.2L / 6 cylinder,
5-speed automatic,
front/rear & side
airbags, ABS
Navigation System,
8-speaker surround
system DVD/CD/AM
/FM/cassette,XM
Satellite Radio,
power & heated
front seats,power-
door locks & win-
dows, power moon-
roof, 4 snow tires
included!....and
much, much
more! Car runs and
looks beautiful
$17,500 Firm
See it at
Orloskis Car Wash
& Lube
295 Mundy Street
(behind Wyoming
Valley Mall)
or Call 239-8461
AUDI `01 A6
QUATTRO
123,000 miles, 4.2
liter V8, 300hp, sil-
ver with black
leather,heated
steering wheel, new
run flat tires, 17
rims, 22 mpg, Ger-
man mechanic
owned.
$7,500. OBO.
570-822-6785
AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO
3.0 V6. Silver. New
tires & brakes. 130k
highway miles.
Leather interior.
Heated Seats.
$7,500 or best offer.
570-905-5544
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI `05 A4 1.8T
Cabriolet Convert-
ible S-Line. 52K
miles. Auto. All
options. Silver.
Leather interior.
New tires. Must
sell. $17,500 or best
offer 570-954-6060
AUDI `05 A6
3.2 Quattro AT6.
Auto tiptronic 6
speed. Black with
black leather. Garage
kept. Fully loaded,
gps, cold weather
package. 78K miles.
Asking $17,400. Call
570-814-6714
AUDI `96 QUATTRO
A6 station wagon.
143k miles. 3rd row
seating. $2,800 or
best offer. Call
570-861-0202
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $13,000
OBO. 570-466-2630
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
BMW 04 325 XI
White. Fully
loaded. 120k
miles. $10,500
or best offer.
570-454-3287
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
BUICK `01 CENTURY
4 door. 6 Cylinder.
Power windows &
locks. 55K. Looks &
runs well. $4,800.
DEALER
570-868-3914
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `05 LESABRE
Garage kept. 1
owner. Local driv-
ing, very good
condition.
53,500 miles.
Asking $9,700
(570) 457-6414
leave message
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $5,000.
OR BEST OFFER
(570) 709-8492
CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY 01 CAVALIER
4 door. Automatic.
58K. Runs & looks
well! $4,295.
DEALER
570-868-3914
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
DODGE `97 INTREPID
Red. 103,000 miles.
AM/FM/Cassette.
Good tires. Clean
interior. Runs excel-
lent, good reliable
transportation.
Inspection good
until April 2012.
$2,700
Price Negotiable
(570) 674-5655
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY 11 MALIBU LT
Moonroof.
7K miles.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHRYSLER 04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5400.
570-991-5558
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$12,699
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
34K, Red $15,399
08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42k, 5 speed, AWD.
Factory warranty.
$13,899
08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
4 cylinder, 40k
$11,899
08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4, Regular Cab,
63K, Factory War-
ranty $13,699
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$12,299
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 60k. Factory
warranty. $10,399
05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner, just
traded, 65k
$13,499
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,899
08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING CONVERT-
IBLE Touring. White
& Gray. Only 27K.
$15,299
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. $14,899
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W W E E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
412 Autos for Sale
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
Line up a place to live
in classified!
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,400
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `08 ESCAPE
XLT. 56,800 miles.
Grey metallic with
grey cloth interior.
2WD. Auto. Power
windows & locks.
Dual air bags. A/C.
Alloy Wheels. Excel-
lent condition.
$14,500
Trades Welcome
570-328-5497
FORD `90 MUSTANG GT
Must See. Sharp!
Black, new direc-
tional tires, excel-
lent inside / outside,
factory stock, very
clean, must see to
appreciate. $3,500.
For more informa-
tion, call 570-269-
0042
Leave Message
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 3G
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs .
All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au g 2 0 11.

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
THE NUM BER 1NISSAN DEAL ER IN
THE NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N**
S C AN HERE FO R
S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S
We Will Sell
We Will Sell
39 Altimas
39 Altimas
and
and
34 Rogues
34 Rogues
R
O
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U
E
C
O
U
N
T
D
O
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N
A
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DUELING
DUELING N ISSAN S DUELING
*$159 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,435; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te & $500 NM AC Ca p tive Ca s h.
30
AVAIL AB L E
AT TH IS
P R ICE!
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
2 0 12 N ISSAN ALTIM A
2 0 11 N ISSAN R OG UE
STK#N20528 M O DEL# 13112
M SRP $23,820
L EAS E FO R :
$
159
*
P ER
M O.
P lu s Ta x.
B U Y FO R
$
19,495
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
O R
*$199 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $13,148; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2150 Ca s h Do w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h.
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $750 Nis s a n Reb a te.
L EAS E FO R :
$
199
*
P ER
M O.
P lu s Ta x.
B U Y FO R
$
20 ,995
*
W / $750 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
M SRP $23,905
STK#N20680 M O DEL# 22211
VS.
VS. VS.
2 .5 S SED AN S AW D
30
AVAIL AB L E
AT TH IS
P R ICE!
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4
STK#N20967
M O DEL# 25211
M SRP $34,930
V6, Au to , A/ C, AM / F M / CD, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts !
S A V E OV E R
$5000ON
A L L 2011
P A THFIN DE RS
IN S TOCK !
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
STK#N20706
M O DEL# 23211
M SRP $32,130
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S COUPE 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S COUPE
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts
7COUP E S
A V A IL A BL E !
4CYL & V 6
TOO!
STK#N20905
M O DEL# 15112
M SRP $25,040
B U Y FO R
$
21,495
*
W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
229
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$229 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,523; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5S SEDAN 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5S SEDAN
V6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Po w erS ea t, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
STK#N20827
M O DEL# 16111
M SRP $32,885
B U Y FO R
$
26,995
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
259
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$259 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,757; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $1000 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
12
M A XIM A S
A V A IL A BL E !
S & S V TOO!
B U Y FO R
$
29,8 95
*
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
329
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$329 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,718; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $2345 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
B U Y FO R
$
26,8 95
*
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
O R $
299
*
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
L EAS E FO R
*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,743; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity & Regis tra tio n F ees . $750 NM AC L ea s e Ca s h In clu d ed .
S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d e $2500 Nis s a n Reb a te.
20 2011
M URA N OS
A V A IL A BL E !
19
14
14 10
H U R R Y
S AL E EN D S
10 /31/11
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 5G
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months
payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate.
Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. BUY FOR prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of
vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends OCTOBER 31, 2011.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDEXPLORER 4X4
3.5L Engine, PL, MyFord
Display. Rearview Camera, PW, Dual Auto.
Climate Control, Pwr. Mirrors, 17 Steel
Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry,
MyKey, Cruise Control
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
Auto., 16 Steel Wheels,
Air, Keyless Entry with
Remote, PL, PW, Safety
Canopy, Side Air Bags
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
NEW2012 FORDFOCUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
Remote Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD,
Power Door Locks, Air Conditioning,
Anti-Theft System, Side Curtain Air
Bags, Side Impact Air Bags,
Message Center, MyKey
NEW2012
FORDFUSION
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 27 month lease 23,625 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/11.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDFIESTA
Automatic, Air Conditioning, Pwr., Mirrors,
Advance Trac with Electronic Stability Control,
Side Curtain Air Bags, AM/FM/CD,
Pwr. Door Locks, Remote
Keyless Entry, Tilt Wheel
NEW2012 FORD
FUSION SE
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr.
Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDTAURUS SEL
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse Sensing
Sys., AM/FM/CD, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, PDL, PW, 18 Alum
Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter
Alarm, Sirius Satellite Radio
27
Mos.
27
Mos.
M
O
S.
A
P
R
PLUS
Auto., AM/FM/CD, 16 Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Anti-Theft Sys., 1st & 2nd
Row Air Curtains, Side Impact Air Bags, Keyless
Entry, Message Center, Cruise Control
M
O
S.
A
P
R
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
All Wheel Drive, XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Pwr. Seat, Auto., PDL, PW, CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy
Glass, Roof Rack, 16 Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience
Pkg.,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 27 month lease
23,625 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/31/10.
27
Mos.
NEW2012 FORDESCAPE XLT 4X4 NEW2012 ESCAPE XLS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 7G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
/Ok /Ok/ /N/Ok//!/ON, v/5/! O0k /OC// 5/OwkOO/!Ou/ Ok /C0k/.CO/.
* See dea|er Ior warranty deta|s. Warranty Iromorgna| n-servce date. 2011 Acura. Acura and 1L are trademarks oI Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
412 Autos for Sale
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
FORD 06 MUSTANG
GT CONVERT.
One owner. Extra
clean. Only 15K
miles. $19,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
GEO `93 PRIZM
91,000 miles. Looks
& runs like new.
$2,300 or best
offer, please call
570-702-6023
HONDA `05 ACCORD
EXL. Titanium exteri-
or, grey leather inte-
rior. Dual Airbags.
ABS. Bucket Seats.
CD changer. Cruise.
Fog lights. GPS. All
power. A/C. 104k.
Sunroof / moonroof.
$9,500. Please Call
570-814-0949
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDA 07 CIVIC
Alloy & moonroof.
$13,770
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI `02
ELANTRA
129,995 miles,
manual, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors, CD
player, leather inte-
rior, sun roof, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
GREAT ON GAS.
REDUCED $3,000.
570-654-8469
412 Autos for Sale
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
HYUNDAI 06
ELANTRA
Tan, 4 door,
clean title, 4
cylinder, auto,
155k miles.
Power windows,
& keyless entry,
CD player,
cruise, central
console heated
power mirrors.
$4400
570-991-5558
HYUNDAI 10
ELANTRA GLS
Only 8,200 miles!
1 Owner.
$16,952
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
To place your
ad call...829-7130
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,750
Call (570) 288-6009
JAGUAR `98 XK8
Convertible. 40k
miles. Great condi-
tion. Silver with black
interior. Garage
kept. Recently
inspected. V8/auto/
AC. AM/FM / 6 disc.
$12,000 or best
offer. 570-310-1287
412 Autos for Sale
JAGUAR 94
XJS CONVERTIBLE
Mint Condition
Magnolia red,
with palomino
beige leather
interior. A
cream puff
inside & out.
4 new tires and
services. Florida
car. $14,900.
570-885-1512
JEEP `04
WRANGLER
4 lift, 33 BFG
base KM2, 5
speed, excellent
condition, 46,200
miles. $12,500.
OBO.
Call 570-592-1829
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LINCOLN 06
Town Car Limited
Fully loaded.
50,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$16,900.
(570) 814-4926
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
412 Autos for Sale
MAZDA `08 MIATA
MX-5 CONVERTIBLE
Red. Power steer-
ing, auto, AC, CD.
ONLY 5,500 MILES.
$18,000
(570) 883-0143
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
MERCEDES BENZ
`97 C230
Black with Tan
leather interior.
Sunroof. Power
windows & locks.
A/C. 122k miles.
Asking $4,900.
Trades Welcome
570-817-7878
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition,
No Accidents.
Classy Car.
New Price!
$5,000
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MERCURY `95
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, V8, fully
loaded, moon roof,
new tires & brakes.
Interior & exterior in
excellent shape. 2
owners. Call
(570) 822-6334 or
(570) 970-9351
NISSAN `08 SENTRA
58K miles. 4 cylin-
der, 6 speed manu-
al. Great condition.
All power. A/C.
Cruise. $10,500.
Call 570-333-4379
after 6:30 pm
412 Autos for Sale
NISSAN `08 XTERRA
Grey, Mint condition.
35K miles. New, all-
season tires. Sirius
radio. 2 sets of
mats, including
cargo mats.
$18,400. Call
570-822-3494 or
570-498-0977
OLDSMOBILE 01 ALERO
4 door. V6. 68K.
Sunroof. Power
windows & locks.
Cruise. Looks &
runs well. $4,295.
DEALER
570-868-3914
PONTIAC `04 VIBE
White. New manual
transmission &
clutch. Front wheel
drive. 165k highway
miles. Great on gas.
Good condition,
runs well. $4,500 or
best offer
570-331-4777
PONTIAC 04 SUNFIRE
2 door. Automatic.
42K. Sunroof.
Power windows.
AC. Runs & looks
great! $5,495.
DEALER
570-868-3914
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
ROWLANDS
Mountainside Auto, Inc.
Used car sales.
1157 S. Main Rd.
Dorrance
570-868-3914
SAAB `06 93
A E R O s p o r t .
Leather interior.
Heated seats. Sun-
roof. Good condi-
tion. $8,000. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-760-8264
SUBARU `02 FORESTER
L. AWD. Red.
$2,850. Hail dam-
age. Runs great.
Auto, air, CD, cas-
sette, cruise, tilt. All
power. 174K miles.
Mechanical inspec-
tion welcomed. Call
570-561-9217
Line up a place to live
in classified!
SUBARU `98
IMPREZA
144,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door,
$2,1,95.
570-498-5127
412 Autos for Sale
SUBURU 06 LEGACY
GT LIMITED SEDAN
4 door, black,
approximately
76,000 miles. 2.5
liter engine, auto.
asking $12,000.
570-510-3077
SUZUKI 10 SX4
4x4 6,000 miles.
$14,500.
95 Mercedes
66,000 miles.
$8,995.
08 Ford F250, 4x4
4,000 miles, 4 door,
8 foot bed/with
plow. $45,000.
All showroom new!
570-826-0200 or
570-868-3968
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA 00
SOLARA SE
SUPER CLEAN
All power, new
tires, new back
brakes. 125,000
miles. $8000 OBO
570-417-8353
TOYOTA 07 CAMRY LE
Low miles. One
owner. $14,250
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$16,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 10 PRIUS
Save at the
pumps! $21,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
VOLKSWAGEN 00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
R
Sponsored by:
timesleader.com
THE
ONE
AND
ONLY.
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM
24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD.
STUCK WITH
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS?
Then sell them in our classied section for FREE! If you ran a
garage sale ad with us and everything didnt sell, well run an ad
for you for nine days listing the items.* Absolutely FREE!
* Certain restrictions apply.
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriffs Ofce
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
(570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0 (570) 341 -1 400 1 -800-822-21 1 0
M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30 M onda y - T hu rs da y 9-8:00 F rida y 9-5 & S a tu rda y 9-3:30
1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509 1 1 1 0 W Y O M I N G A V E . S C R A N T O N , PA 1 8509
w w w .m a ttbu rnehonda .com
M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R M ATT B U R N E H O N D A PR E -O W N E D CE N TE R
SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM SH OP AT W W W .M ATTBURNE H OND A.COM CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A CAL L :1-800-NE XTH OND A
M ATT BURNE H O NDA
M ATT BURNE H O NDA M ATT BURNE H O NDA
1110 WYOMINGAVE. SCRANTON 1-800-NEXT-HONDA
www.MattBurneHonda.com
*BAS E D ON 2008-2009 E PA M IL E AGE E S T IM AT E S , RE F L E CT ING NE W E PA F UE L E CONOM Y M E T HODS BE GINNING W IT H 2008-2009 M ODE L S . US E F OR COM PARIS ON PURPOS E S ONL Y . DO NOT
COM PARE T O M ODE L S BE F ORE 2008. Y OUR ACT UAL M IL E AGE W IL L VARY DE PE NDING ON HOW Y OU DRIVE AND M AINT AIN Y OUR VE HICL E . AL L OF F E RS E XPIRE 10/ 31/ 2011.
G AS
M ILEAG E
17CITY/ 24HW Y
250-hp 24-V alve SO HC i-V TEC 5-Speed A utom atic Transm ission 8 Passenger
Seating V ariable Torque M anagem ent 4-W heelDrive System (V TM -4 )
V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ) w ith Traction C ontrol Pow er W Indow s/Locks/
M irrors Front and Rear A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System 229-W att
A M /FM /C D A udio System w ith 7 Speakers including Subw oofer Rem ote Entry
A BS Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags (SRS) Front Side A irbags
w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS)
2012 Hon d a
A CCORD L X
M odel#C P2f3C EW 177-hp 16-V alve DO HC i-V TEC Engine 5-Speed
A utom atic Transm ission Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors Rem ote Entry
C ruise C ontrol A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System 160-W att A M /
FM /C D A udio System w ith 6 Speakers V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA )
w ith Traction C ontrol A BS Sual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front A irbags
(SRS) Dual-C ham ber Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant
Position Detection System (O PDS) Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
21CITY/ 27HW Y
2011 Hon d a
CR-V L X
M odel#RE4H3B32 180-hp,DO HC i-V TEC 4-cylinder engine 5-speed
autom atic transm ission RealTim e
TM
4W D system V ehicle Stability A ssist
TM
(V SA ) w ith traction control A nti-lock braking system (A BS) Dual-stage,
m ultiple-threshold front airbags (SR5) Front side airbags w ith passenger-
side O ccupant Position Detection System (O PDS) Side curtain airbags w ith
rollover sensor C D Player Pow er W indow s/Locks/M irrors A /C
M odel#FB2F5C EW 140-hp 16-V alve SO HC i-V TEC 5-Speed A utom atic
Transm ission A ir C onditioning w ith A ir-Filtration System Pow er W indow s/
Locks/M irrors C ruise C ontrol Rem ote Entry 160-W att A M /FM /C D A udio
System w ith 4 Speakers A BS Dual-Stage,M ultiple-Threshold Front
A irbags (SRS) Front Side A irbags w ith Passenger-Side O ccupant Position
Detection System (O PDS) Side C urtain A irbags
G AS
M ILEAG E
28CITY/ 39HW Y
2012 Hon d a
CIV IC L X
$0DO W N
$
239/M O.*
$
239/M O.*
$
239/M O.*
*LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS , 3 6K THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE
AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $14,852.10
$0DO W N
****LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $18,528.00
2012 Hon d a
P IL OT L X
$
305/M O.****
$
305/M O.****
$
305/M O.****
D isclosure:1.9% - 36 m os,2.9% - 60 m osthru A .H .F.C .W -A -C on C ertified A ccords.C ertified H ondashave
1yr - 12k B asic W arranty.B alance of7yr - 100K P ow ertrain W arranty from in-service date.
09 PILO T EXL S ilver,29K.....................................NO W $28,950
PIL OT 4W D
H O N D A S
07 ELEM ENT EX R ed,67K M iles.........................NO W $14,950
08 ELEM ENT LX R ed,68K M iles.........................NO W $15,750
08 ELEM ENT LX S ilver,56K...............................NO W $16,500
09 ELEM ENT EX R ed,11K M iles.........................NO W $20,900
EL EM EN T 4W D
10 INSIG HT EX B lue,21K M iles...........................NO W $17,950
10 INSIG HT EX G ray,22K...................................NO W $18,950
IN S IGHT HYBRID
06 C RV EX M oss,32K............................................NO W $16,950
07 C RV EXLG old,78K...........................................NO W $17,950
09 C RV LX G reen,34K............................................NO W $19,750
08 C RV EX S ilver,37K.............................................NO W $19,850
08 C RV EXLR ed,63K............................................NO W $20,500
CRV 4W D
06A C C O RD LX SDN G old,37K.................................NO W $13,950
06A C C O RD EXLV 6SDN G old,56K.....................NO W $13,950
07A C C O RD EX SDN G ray,51K..................................NO W $16,750
08A C C O RD LXS C PER ed,48K.......................................NO W $16,500
08A C C O RD LXP SDN N avy,24K.............................NO W $16,950
09A C C O RD LXP SDN B urgandy,26K..............................NO W $17,950
10A C C O RD LX SDN S ilver,28K................................NO W $17,950
09A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,35K................................NO W $17,950
08A C C O RD EX SDN S ilver,42K................................NO W $17,950
10A C C O RD LX SDN W hite,19K................................NO W $19,500
09A C C O RD EX SDN G reen,21K...............................NO W $19,950
(2)09A C C O RD EX SDN B lack,19K.......................NO W $19,950
09A C C O RD EXLSDN B lack,21K.............................NO W $20,750
09A C C O RD EXLSDN R ed,21K...............................NO W $20,750
10A C C O RD EXLSDN W hite,25K............................NO W $21,750
ACCORDS
$
215/M O.**
$
215/M O.**
$
215/M O.**
$0DO W N
**LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $13 ,770.00
2.9%
60 m os
1.9%
36 m os
0.9% for24-60 m on ths on a ll n e w 2011 A c c ord ,
A c c ord Cros s tour, a n d P ilotm od e ls
0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60
m on ths on a ll n e w 2012 A c c ord , Cros s tour,
Civic (e xc lud e s Hyb rid s ), Od ys s e y, a n d P ilotm od e ls
0.9% for24-36 m on ths a n d 1.9% for37 to 60 m on ths on a ll n e w 2011 CR-V ,
Fit, a n d Od ys s e y m od e ls
A CCO R D S
1
.9%
1
.9%
36 M O S. 36 M O S. 2
.9%
2
.9%
60 M O S. 60 M O S.
09 O DY SSEY LX M oss,25K..............................NO W $22,500
ODYS S EY
CIV IC
08 C IV IC EX SDN W hite,41K,5 S peed...................NO W $15,950
09 C IV IC LX C PE N avy,30K................................NO W $16,350
08 C IV IC EXL SDN G ray,34K............................NO W $16,750
09 C IV IC LX SDN R ed,21K................................NO W $16,750
10 C IV IC LX SDN S ilver,17K.............................NO W $17,500
10 C IV IC LXS SDN S ilver,16K...........................NO W $17,750
G AS
M ILEAG E
23CITY/ 34HW Y
***LEAS E 3 6 M ONTHS THROUG H AHFC . $0 DOW N. 1S T PAY M ENT AND TAG S
DUE AT DELIV ERY . RES IDUAL $12,626.25
$
205/M O.***
$
205/M O.***
$
205/M O.***
$0DO W N
03 HO NDA A C C O RD
EXL V 6 SDN
G old,73K M iles,W as$13,500
Now $11,500
07 SUBA RU
IM PREZA A W D
S ilver,39K,W as$17,950
Now $16,950
09 HY UNDA I
SO NA TA G LS SDN
B row n,40K M iles
Now $14,500
08 PO NTIA C
G 6 SDN
B lack,41K M iles,W as$13,950
Now $13,500
03 JEEP
LIBERTY 4W D
S ilver,45K M iles
Now $10,950
10 TO Y O TA
C A M RY LE SDN
G old,28K M iles
Now $16,950
07 FO RD EXPLO RER
BA UER 4W D
62K M iles,B row n
Now $16,950
07 M A ZDA C X-7
TO URING A W D
B lack,58K M iles
Now $17,950
09 TO Y O TA
M A TRIX SXR
S ilve,38K M iles
Now $16,950
08 DO DG E G RA ND
C A RA V A N SXT
W hite,79K M iles
Now $13,950
08 SUBA RU
LEG A C Y LTD A W D
G rey,48K M iles
Now $18,500
03 TO Y O TA
C A M RY XLE SDN
G ray,83K M iles,W as$11,950
Now $9,950
05 FO RD EXPLO RER
BA UER 4X4
W hite,72K,W as$14,500
Now $11,950
08 TO Y O TA TA C O M A
C LUB C A B TRD 4X4
N avy,46K M iles,W as$26,500
Now $24,500
08 NISSA N
A LTIM A S SDN
W hite,13K M iles,W as$18,950
Now $16,950
HO NDA C RV 4W D
02 EX,S ilver,98K $10,500
04 LX,G old,95K $10,500
06 C HEV Y
TRA ILBLA ZER 4W D
S ilver,61K,W as$13,750
Now $12,950
05 HO NDA
C RV EX 4W D
G ray,55K M iles
Now $14,950
07 JEEP C O M PA SS
LTD A W D
Khaki,60K M iles
Now $13,500
07 DO DG E RA M 1500
Q UA D SLT 4X4
S ilver,61K,W as$17,950
Now $16,950
09 SUBA RU
IM PREZA A W D
B lue,46K M iles
Now $16,750
05 HO NDA
C IV IC LX SDN
G ray,79K M iles
Now $8,750
02 TO Y O TA C A M RY
LE SEDA N
G ray,79K M iles
Now $9,950
09 TO Y O TA
C O RO LLA LE SDN
G ray,34K M iles
Now $14,500
03 DO DG E DA KO TA
C LUB C A B SXT 4X4
G ray,56K M iles
Now $11,950
06 INFINITI
G 35 A W D SDN
G old,62K M iles
Now $16,750
P SST!
W E A R E H A VIN G A SA L E !
07 FIT S ilver,36K.......................................................NO W $11,750
FIT
99 PO NTIA C
BO NNEV ILLE SDN
S ilver,105K M iles
Now $4,950
B ronze,54K M iles
Now $7,950
02 BUIC K
C ENTURY SEDA N
10 TO Y O TA Y A RIS
SEDA N
B lack,22K M iles
Now $11,950
08 C HEV Y S-10
Q UA D C A B 4X4
P ew ter,55K M iles
Now $13,750
08 NISSA N
Q UEST S
G ray,48K M iles
Now $16,750
08 SUBA RU
LEG A C Y 2.5I
Tan,28K M iles
Now $17,950
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 9G
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5
QUATTRO CONVERTIBLE
Sprint blue/black &
tan leather, 7
speed, auto turbo,
330 HP,
Navigation, (AWD)
08 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX SE
blue, auto V6
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD AWD silver,
grey leather
06 PONTIAC G6
Silver, 4 door auto
06 DODGE STRATUS SXT
RED.
05 DODGE NEON SXT
Red, 4 cy. auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
Burgundy tan
leather, sunroof
05 TOYOTA CAMRY
XLE silver, grey
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
Maxx White, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 CADILLAC SEDAN
Pearl white, tan
leather, 73k miles
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO
Mid blue/light grey
leather, Naviga-
tion, (AWD)
01 SATURN LS 300
Blue
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
99 CHRYSLER
CONCORDE gold
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS black
98 SUBARU LEGACY
SW white, auto,
4 cyl. (AWD)
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 JEEP PATRIOT
SPORT silver
5 speed 4x4
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 FORD ESCAPE XLT
green/tan lint 4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
passenger mini van
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS V6 4 X 4
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
Blue auto, V6, awd
06 PONTIAC
TORRANT
Black (AWD)
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
00 ISUZU RODEO
silver, auto 4x4
05 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Blue, auto, 4x4
05 EXPLORER XLT
WHITE, AUTO, 4X4
05 FORD F150 XLT
SUPER CREW TRUCK
Blue & tan, 4 dr. 4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Silver 4 x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
Graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
04 CHEVY TAHOE LS
grey, 3rd seat 4x4
04 FORD EXPEDITION
Eddie Bauer,
white & tan,
tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
passenger mini van
02 BUICK
RENDEXZVOUS
CXL, blue 3rd
Seat, FWD
02 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
Burgundy AWD
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
Reg. Cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 HYUNDAI SANTE FE
GLS silver, auto
AWD
01 FORD F150 XLT
Super Cab 4x4
truck, white & tan
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
Black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
00 FORD EXPEDITION
XLT, white,
3rd seat, 4x400
00 ISUZU RODEO
silver, auto 4x4
00 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO XCAB
2wd truck,
burgundy & tan
98 FORD EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer,
white, tan leather,
sunropof, 4x4
98 EXPLORER XLT
Blue grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
97 DODGE RAM 1500
XCAB TRUCK
red, auto, 4 x 4
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `71
MONTE CARLO
$2,000 or best offer
(570) 650-8687
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES 76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
interior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$2,300 or
best offer
570-693-3263
Ask for Paul
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
All original
45,000 miles
350 Rocket
engine
Fender skirts
Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
PONTIAC `68 CATALINA
Convertible. 400
engine. 2 barrel car-
buretor. Yellow with
black roof and white
wall tires. Black
interior. $4,500
negotiable.
570-696-3513
PONTIAC 1937
Fully restored near
original. New paint,
new interior, new
wiring, custom tint-
ed glass, new motor
& transmission.
Spare motor &
trans. 16 wide
white walls car in
excellent condition
in storage for 2
years. $14,000 or
best offer. Serious
inquiries ONLY.
Call 570-574-1923
PORSCHE 78
911 SC TARGA
60,000 miles. 5
speed. Air. Power
windows. Metallic
brown. Saddle Inte-
rior. Meticulous
original owner.
Garaged. New
Battery. Inspected.
Excellent Condition.
$25,000. OBO
(610) 797-7856
(484) 264-2743
421 Boats &
Marinas
CABELAS FISH
CAT PANTHER
9. Approximately 5
years old. Retails
$699, selling $350.
FIRM 570-288-9719
424 Boat Parts/
Supplies
LADDER, folding
boat ladder, 3
steps, excellent
condition, $20. Call
570-328-5611
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY `04 DUMP TRUCK
36k miles. 96 Boss
power angle plow.
Hydraulic over elec-
tric dump box with
sides. Rubber coated
box & frame. Very
good condition.
$22,500 firm. Call
570-840-1838
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
GMC SIERRA 98 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
96 HONDA
American Classic
Edition. 1100 cc. 1
owner, under
20,000 miles. Yel-
low and white,
extra chrome, VNH
exhaust, bags,
lights, MC jack, bat-
tery tender, hel-
mets. Asking $3500
570-288-7618
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY 73
Rat Rod. 1,000 cc.
Must see. Price
reduction - $2,300
(570) 510-7231
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON
03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$15,000
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$10,500.
or best offer.
Tony 570-237-1631
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006 NIGHTTRAIN
SPECIAL EDITION
#35 of 50 Made
$10,000 in acces-
sories including a
custom made seat.
Exotic paint set,
Alien Spider Candy
Blue. Excellent con-
dition. All Documen-
tation. 1,400 Asking
$15,000
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995
570-905-9348
HONDA 84
XL200R
8,000 original miles,
excellent condition.
$1,000.
570-379-3713
HYOSUNG `04 COMET
250. 157 Miles.
Excellent Condition.
$1,200. Call
570-256-7760
KAWASAKI 03
KLR 650. Green.
Excellent condition.
6K Miles. $3,000
(570) 287-0563
KAWASAKI 05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$3,800.
570-574-3584
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
439 Motorcycles
POLARIS 00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
SUZUKI 77
GS 750
Needs work.
$1,200
or best offer
570-855-9417
570-822-2508
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
UNITED MOTORS
08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER
150cc. Purple &
grey in color. 900
miles. Bought brand
new. Paid $2,000.
Asking $1,600 or
best offer.
(570) 814-3328 or
(570) 825-5133
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
CHEROKEE 10
Travel trailer. 39 ft.,
4 slide outs, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, microwave,
awning, tinted win-
dows, Brand new.
Have no pets or
smokers. Much
more!!!!!
$33,000
(cell) 682-888-2880
DUTCHMAN 96
5TH WHEEL
with slideout & sun
room built on. Set
up on permanent
site in Wapwallopen.
Comes with many
extras. $6,500.
(570) 829-1419 or
(570) 991-2135
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20 long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,595
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
LAYTON 02
TRAVEL TRAILER
30 ft. Sleeps 9 - 3
bunk beds & 1
queen. Full kitchen.
Air conditioning/
heat. Tub/shower.
$6,900
(570) 696-1969
PACE 99 ARROW VISION
Ford V10. Excellent
condition. 8,700
miles. 1 slide out. 2
awnings. 2 colored
TVs, generator,
back up camera, 2
air conditioners,
microwave/convec-
tion oven, side by
side refrigerator
with ice maker,
washer/dryer,
queen size bed.
$37,900 negotiable
(570) 288-4826
(570) 690-1464
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25 travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,200.
(570) 540-0975
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22 rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
CHEVROLET `10
SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab V71
Package 4x4. Bed-
liner. V-8. 5.3 Liter.
Red. Remote start.
Garage kept. 6,300
miles $26,000
(570) 639-2539
CHEVROLET `97
SILVERADO
with Western plow.
4WD, Automatic.
Loaded with
options. Bedliner.
55,000 miles.
$9,200. Call
(570) 868-6503
CHEVY `00 SILVERADO
1500. 4x4. 8 box.
Auto. A/C. 121K
miles. $5,995.
570-332-1121
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$6,200 or best offer
570-823-8196
CHEVY 07 HHR LT
Moonroof
$11,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY 90 CHEYENNE
2500 series. 8 ft
box with tool box.
Heavy duty ladder
rack. 150K miles.
Great work truck.
$1,500
570-406-5128
CHEVY 95 ASTRO
AWD. Good tires.
V6. Auto. 149,000
miles. Power every-
thing. Heavy duty
tow package. Runs
good. Just passed
inspection. Kelly
Blue Book $2,500.
Selling: $1,650
(570) 855-8235
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `00
CARGO VAN 1500
88,500 miles. V6.
Automatic. Good
Condition. $2,300
(570) 793-6955
DODGE 07 RAM
4 W.D. HEMI
engine. Full bed.
1500. Extended
cab. Excellent con-
dition. 49,6128
miles. $19,000
570-954-3650
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
FORD `90 TRUCK
17 box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 99 F150
Shortbox. 1 owner.
New truck trade!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD 03 RANGER
$8,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 04
EXPLORER XLT
4x4. Absolutely
like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
HONDA 06 CRV SE
Leather &
Moonroof.
$15872
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
Trade ins accepted.
570-466-2771
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
JEEP `04
CHEROKEE
135,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, $6,500.
(570) 237-6979
JEEP 03
GRAND CHEROKEE
4x4. Immaculate
condition. New
inspection. 1 year
warranty.
$5,995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 04 LIBERTY
Auto. V6.
Black Beauty!
$6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP 07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$16,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP 07 PATRIOT
4WD - Alloys
$14,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP 08 COMPASS
4 WD. Auto. CD.
$13,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LEXUS `96 LX 450
Full time 4WD, Pearl
white with like new
leather ivory interi-
or. Silver trim.
Garage kept. Excel-
lent condition.
84,000 miles, Ask-
ing $10,750
570-654-3076 or
570-498-0005
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 03 MPV VAN
V6. CD Player.
1 owner vehicle!!
$3,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MERCEDES-BENZ
`99 ML 320
Sunroof, new tires,
115,930 miles
MUST SELL
Only $200/ month
(570)760-0511
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. Luxury
4x4. garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion, fully loaded,
every option
34,000 miles.
GREAT DEAL
$14,500
(570)825-5847
MITSUBISHI `08
RAIDER
VERY GOOD CONDITION!
29,500 miles. 2-
4X4 drive option, 4
door crew cab,
sharp silver color
with chrome step
runners, premium
rims, good tires,
bedliner, V-6, 3.7
liter. Purchased at
$26,900.
Asking $16,500
(570) 545-6057
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18 alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only
4,800 miles. 10
year, 100,000 mile
warranty. $23,500.
Willing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
MITSUBISHI 05
ENDEAVOR LS
4WD. One owner.
$12,850
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL
AWD. Gray. Sun-
roof. Bose stereo
system. Black,
heated leather
seats. Sunroof
6,000 miles.
$24,000
(570) 696-2777
NISSAN 08 ROGUE S
AWD. Auto
$17,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
NISSAN 10
FRONTIER SE
6K miles! Auto-
matic. $16,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
SUZUKI `03 XL-7
85K. 4x4. Auto.
Nice, clean interior.
Runs good. New
battery & brakes. All
power. CD. $6,800
570-762-8034
570-696-5444
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TOYOTA `00 TACOMA
4WD. Extra cab. 4
cylinder. Automatic.
120K miles. Remote
start. Fiberglass cap
& tonneau cover.
$8,200
570-779-5812
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BAR/TAVERN
FOR SALE
Turn key business.
Liquor license &
patio license. Air
conditioned. Lower
level 1 bedroom
apt. Reduced to
$159,000 Owner
Retiring.
570-929-3214
JAN-PRO
Commercial Cleaning
Of Northeastern PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or Part
time. Accounts
available NOW
throughout Luzerne
& Lackawanna
counties. We guar-
antee $5,000 to
$200,000 in annual
billing. Investment
Required. Were
ready are you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
LIQUOR LICENSE
LUZERNE COUNTY
$25,000
215-595-8747
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
HESS TRUCKS new
from 1990 to 2008
$450. plus 11 extras
@20. 570-825-3688
HESS TRUCKS new
in boxes 2000-2008
$60.-$100.
570-675-4383
JACKO ANTIQUES
134 Route 11,
Larksville
(Next to Woodys
Fireplace & Pro-Fix)
Oak Icebox.
Mahogany Stack
Bookcase, Oak
Stack Bookcase.
Lionel & American
Flyer Trains, Coins.
We do upholstery,
furniture repair,
chair caning, re-glu-
ing, cloth & rush
seats. We also buy
Gold, Silver & Coins.
570-855-7197 or
570-328-3428
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
710 Appliances
APPLIANCES (4)
washer, dryer,
stove, dishwasher,
Kenmore, 3 years
old $300. each Four
for $1,000.
570-235-7170
KITCHEN UNIT ideal
for cabin, cottage or
camper. Unit a king
unit consists of 2
burner electric
stove top, stainless
steel sink, under
counter refrigerator
with freezer, meas-
ures 4wx23 deep
X41h, covered with
formica lid. $100.
firm. 570-735-2694
REFRIGERATOR
almost new
Frigidaire, white 29
1/2 W, freezer on
top, pickup in
Exeter, $275.
570-362-2766
REFRIGERATOR:
small cube, very
good condition,
$35. 570-675-4383
RETIRED REPAIRMAN
Top loading
Whirlpool & Ken-
more Washers, Gas
& Electric Dryers.
570-833-2965
570-460-0658
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WASHER $15 Dryer
$10. $20 for
both, must haul
away. 406-5857
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
CHANGING TABLE -
nursery with 2
shelves, brand new,
3 drawer dresser.
Cherry finish, still in
box. $100 each or
$175 for both.
570-406-4366
CRIB MATTRESS
Kolcraft, like new.
Well protected by
mattress cover.
$35. 570-333-0470
716 Building
Materials
FLOOD CONTROL
USED CONCRETE
BARRIERS FOR SALE
Available for pick up
in Clarks Summit
12x52 $10/l.f.
12x34 $8/l.f.
20x34 $12/l.f.
Delivery Available @
$100 per hour.
Grabber Rental
Fee $400
570-586-2145
KITCHEN CABINETS
flat doors, approxi-
mately 10 linear ft.
Top & bottom with
formica counter top
bathroom sink with
faucet. $600. Call
570-301-8200
STEEL BUILDINGS
Reduced Factory
Inventory
36x58
Reg $20,300
Now $16,930
48x96
Reg $42,400
Now $36,200
570-504-1560
Source# 063
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lots available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $2,400.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
726 Clothing
COAT long, black
leather, size large,
never worn, tags
still on $50.
570-606-1136
COATS 3 cashmere
size 6 $40 each.
Toddler bed & bed-
ding, toybox, rug,
complete $50.
Phaltzgraph dishes
over 100 pieces
sacrifice $150. or
best offer. 6 wood-
en folding chairs
$40. Rocking chair
$30. Wood mirror
full length $25.
Antique victorian
floor lamp $200.
570-592-8414
GIRLS CLOTHING
3T winter $5. 4 win-
ter $10. 5 winter
with boots $10.
570-868-0481
UGGS girls size 2,
short chestnut. $75.
570-474-0753
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER Dyno Glo
kerosene heater
23,000 BTU, like
new includes
kerosene container
& fuel. $50.
570-868-6655
WOODBURNER
750 Taylor
outside, heats
4,000 sq. ft. Need
more info call
Karen. $4,500.
570-675-4206
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
VENT FREE
propane & natural
gas heaters brand
new in unopened
box, can be mount-
ed on wall or floor.
has thermostat &
blower Full manu-
facturer warranty
20,000 btu -
$190.00, 30,000 btu
- $220.00
(570)675-0005
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUES: book-
case desk $2,100.
Victorian wicker
$100. Oak dining
table $375. Pine 3
drawer chest $90.
Bamboo book shelf
$85. Step end table
$65. Limoges china
bowl $100. Other
items, oak 5 shelf
wardrobe $175.
Small pine table
$75. Fabric 5 panel
screen $155.
570-675-0586
BED, single twin,
double dresser,
night stand $50.
570-674-5553
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, gray, full size
bed new $150.
beige sofa bed
$100. Living room
end tables $25,.
Metal desk $50.
570-417-3940
DINING ROOM SET
solid oak table with 1
leaf, 6 chairs, light-
ed hutch. $500.
Recliner sofa & love
seat blue velour,
$275. End tables 2
light color wood,
$100. 570-954-1440
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE SALE
Virginia House Oak
Dining Room Set:
Includes 1 hutch, 1
buffet, table with 2
leaves, 2 arm chairs,
6 side chairs. Excel-
lent condition,
$1,750. Call
570-262-5028
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
bedroom set,
French Provincial
set includes 2 twin
beds, dresser with
mirror & chest $125.
Loveseat, sea foam
green, very good
condition $75.
570-826-1407
LAMPS 2 solid
brass, never used
$100. 822-9697
AFFORDABLE
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
ROCKER/RECLINER
black vinyl, like new
$135. 793-4000
TV STAND black
with 3 shelves bare-
ly used $100.
570-592-7723
EXETER
293 SCHOOLEY AVE.
Sat., Oct 29th.
10 am - 4 pm &
Sun., Oct 30th
10 am -3 pm
It was the late
1960s to the
1980s and an
antique dealer had
a thriving shop in
Jim Thorpe.
Stored for
decades, this sale
offers antique
treasures & curios
from this collec-
tion. Large
antique & vintage
ephemera adver-
tising collection,
advertising signs,
posters & tins.
Antique & vintage
books, beauty,
soap & shaving
curios. Milestone
newspapers, and
more. Something
for everyone.
Outdoor event at
Advance Self
Storage Facility,
off Wyoming
Avenue, and near
Highland Manor
intersection of
back road.
Dress warmly
No early birds
Not to be missed!
PITTSTON
37 N. Main St
Sunday, 9am-4pm
Hydraulic Chairs,
pictures, cabinets,
fixtures & other
assorted salon
products. Every-
thing must go!
SALON SALE
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS!
PLYMOUTH
37 Vine St
FRI, 10/28 10AM-4PM
SUN, 10/30 9AM-4PM
Tools, Collectibles,
household and holi-
day items. Indoor
and outdoor!
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 11G
A Benson Family Dealership
Bad Credit, No Credit
New Credit Hotline
WE CAN HELP!
1-855-313-LOAN
T
O
L
L
F
R
E
E
!
Get
Cash
Now
WE BUY
CARS!
2010 JEEP PATRIOTS & COMPASS 4X4s
Starting at Only $15,995
NEW CARS
2011 GMC YUKON XL
4X4
$
48,795
SLT Equipment Pkg, Moonroof,
Heated & Cooled Leather
Seating, 20 Polished Wheels
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $6,715
2012 GMC ACADIA DENALI
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
$
43,995
White DiamondTri Coat Paint Over Cashmere Leather
1.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $3,490
2012 GMC CANYON
CREW CAB 4X4
$
28,373
Choose from 3, SLE Pkg, Z-71 Pkg
3.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $2,452
2011 GMC SIERRA
EXT CAB 1500 4X4
$
28,250
Power Tech Pkg, Choose From 15,
Ext & Crew Cabs
FROM
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
2011 BUICK REGAL CXL
TURBO
$
29,741
Choose From 3, Too Many Options To List
FROM
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $3,449
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
CXL
$
40,280
All Wheel Drive, Leather, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $4,105
2012 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL
$
32,460
Leather Group, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels
2.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $2,140
2011 GMC TERRAIN
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
$
25,995
SLE Equipment Pkg, Rear Camera
2.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $1,065
2011 GMC TERRAIN
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
$
33,499
SLT-2 Pkg, Leather, V6, Moonroof, Chrome Wheels
2.9%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $1,556
2011 GMC YUKON 4X4
$
38,191
SLE Equipment Pkg, Pure Silver Beauty!
0%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
SAVE $5,764
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & Tags, All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approved thru ally bank. See dealer for details.
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Low Miles............................................ $14,995
2010 DODGE CHARGER
Must See............................................. $16,995
2010 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO
4X4, 25K Miles ..................................... $21,995
2011 BUICK REGAL CXL
Heated Seats, 2 In Stock........................ $22,995
2011 CHEVY MALIBU
Stk#1799, Only..................................... $15,995
2010 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING
Stk#1797, Reduced................................ $16,995
2010 DODGE GR. CARAVAN
Stk#1796, Only..................................... $17,995
2010 JEEP WRANGLER 4DR
4X4 .................................................... $22,995
2011 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE LAREDO
4X4 .................................................... $25,995
2011 FORD ESCAPE
4X4 .................................................... $22,995
2010 DODGE JOURNEY RT
Leather ............................................... $21,995
2010 DODGE SEBRING CONV
Sharp ................................................. $17,995
2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
Hard to Find ........................................ $24,995
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
Crew Cab, 4x4...................................... $24,995
2010 CHEVY MALIBU
Stk#1740, 1 Owner ................................ $15,995
2010 DODGE AVENGER
Leather, Must See!................................ $15,995
2010 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR
4X4 .................................................... $18,995
2011 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED
4X4, Leather ........................................ $24,995
2011 DODGE NITRO 4X4
Sharp ................................................. $18,995
2010 CHEVY TRAVERSE
4X4 .................................................... $24,995
2010 JEEP COMMANDER
4X4 .................................................... $21,995
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
1 Owner .............................................. $15,995
2010 KIA RIO
2 In Stock............................................ $11,995
2010 CHEVY TAHOE
Stk#1681, 20 Chromes ......................... $32,995
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT
26K Miles............................................ $11,995
2011 CHEVY SUBURBAN
4X4, 17K Miles ..................................... $35,995
2010 FORD EXPLORER XLT
14K Miles, 4x4...................................... $22,995
2010 CHEVY EXPRESS CARGO VANS
2 In Stock............................................ $18,995
2010 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS
17K Miles ............................................ $16,995
2010 HONDA CIVIC
14K Miles, Only .................................... $16,995
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab, 4x4, 18K Miles................. $23,995
2010 DODGE RAM CREW CAB
4X4, 13K Miles ..................................... $24,995
2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED
12K Miles ............................................ $24,995
2008 HUMMER H3
Local Trade, Must See ........................... $21,995
2009 CHEVY COLORADO CREW CAB
Z-71 Pkg, 4x4....................................... $23,995
2009 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab, 4x4, 12K Miles................. $24,995
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
12K Miles, AWD, Sharp .......................... $25,995
2009 PONTIAC G5
21K Miles, Only.................................... $12,995
2009 CHEVY IMPALA
Only 31K Miles..................................... $14,995
2006 FORD 500
Only 16K Miles, Dont Miss It .................. $13,995
USED CARS
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
Need A Car,
Bad Credit
No Credit
Forget It
CALL NOW FOR YOUR NEXT CAR
TOLL FREE 1-855-313-5626
7
0
2
7
0
0
197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
AUTO SALES INC. AA
SERVICED, INSPECTED, & WARRANTIED
FINANCING AVAILABLE
www.WyomingValleyAutos.com
MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM
4x4 SALE
07 BMW X3 Panoramic Roof ....
$
17,500
04 SUBARU FORRESTER 41K.....
$
9,955
07 FORD ESCAPE AWD.................
$
8,995
04 SUBARU OUTBACK One Owner..
$
7,995
04 BUICK RENDEZVOUS AWD......
$
7,995
02 SUBARU OUTBACK....................
$
7,525
03 SUBARU BAJA.............................
$
6,995
00 CHEVY TRACKER 39K ..............
$
6,995
03 CHEVY TRACKER......................
$
5,995
01 SUBARU FORRESTERMoonroof.
$
5,995
99 FORD EXPLORER.......................
$
3,995
98 CHEVY BLAZER Moonroof .........
$
3,650
BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
694 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 287-2117
$
179
*
/Mo.
Chevy Runs Deep
2012 CHEVROLET
MALIBU LS
STARTING AT
39 month lease
12k a year
$2300 Cash Down
Bluetooth Keyless Entry 32 MPG
$
19,999
*
or
*Prices plus tax & tags, Lease payment is plus tax. Not responsible for typographical errors.
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 11pm
SUGAR NOTCH
226 Oak St
Saturday & Sunday
9am - 1pm
Furniture, Tupper-
wear, wicker bas-
kets, lamps, xmas
decor, mirrors,
ladys skis / boots
(size 8) & more!
SWOYERSVILLE
1 54 Owen Street
Sat. Oct. 29th &
Sun. Oct 30th
9am-2pm each day
Full bedroom set,
recliners, micro-
wave and stand,
coffee & end tables,
gun cabinet, lamps,
dresser, great cabin
items, holiday items,
and much more.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WARRIOR RUN
472 Beaumont St.
Sunday, Oct., 30
9am - 2pm
bakers rack, weight
bench kids clothes
household, much
more. EVERYTHING
MUST GO!
S WO Y E R S V I L L E
195 Slocum St.
570-718-1123
Minutes from
Wilkes-Barre
Antiques,
Collectibles, Coins
& MUCH MORE!
Flea Market Spaces
Currently Available.
Attention:
No Bid Board this
month, watch for
our grand opening
in Edwardsville
FLEAMARKET
& BID BOARD
TRUCKSVILLE
46 Atherholt Road
Sat., Oct., 29th 9-3
Sun., Oct.,30th 9-3
Apartment size dry-
er, hardwood floor-
ing, trailer hitches,
microwave,2 dress-
ers, DVDs, floral
crafts, Craftsman
snowplow, phone
bench, hand pump,
tableclothes, old ice
cooler, VHS tapes.
Something for
everyone!
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SPACE
AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
ACRES OF
PARKING
OUTSIDE
SPACES - $10
INSIDE SPACES -
$60 AND UP
(MONTHLY)
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
FLEA
MARKET
WILKES-BARRE
22 Forrest Street
11-6 Sat - Mon
Antique Collector
Vintage Clothing &
Accessories,
Sewing & Craft,
Ephemera, Comic
Books, LPs, 45s,
78s, Antique Music
Sheets, Frames,
Old Books, Tools &
Hardware, Display
pieces, Toys, Baby
Girl Clothes to 24
months (some
new), Tons of Cool
Stuff! Everything
must go! Special
Deals on Monday!
WYOMING
448 West Third St.
Sunday, Oct-30
9am-1pm
Furniture, clothing &
household items.
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
Patrick & Debs
Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
WOOD CHIPPER
/LEAF SHREDDER
CRAFTSMAN 5 HP,
excellent condition,
$200.
570-256-8619
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SAWMILLS: from
only $3997, make
money & save
money with your
own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimen-
sion. In stock ready
to ship. Free info &
DVD. www.Nor-
woodSawMills.com/
300N. Ext 300N
1-800-578-1363
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW THROWER,
Craftsman 26 4
cycle Tecumseh
Snow King engine,
rarely used. $475.
570-288-4340
756 Medical
Equipment
BRUNO STAIR LIFT
For a bi-level home.
Like new. Paid
$12,000. Selling for
$4,500, negotiable.
Call 570-752-4869
COMPASS POWER
WHEELCHAIR
By Golden. Red.
Like new. With
Ramp. $2,000
negotiable. Call
570-752-4869
DYNEX II Neurostim-
ulator (TENS unit) all
necessary equip-
ment included.
$150. 570-829-1611
HOSPITAL BED.
All electricaly con-
troled, in good con-
dition. Delivered.
$295.00
(610)589-9902
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BABY GIRL clothes
size 0-24 months,
large crate $100.
Graco high chair
$30. Mizuno golf
cart bag $25.Bo-
flex XTL, lat bar, leg
machine all acces-
sories included
$200. Strollers
Graco $30. Safety
1st $30. Pink
umbrella stroller $5.
Black leather rock-
ing chair with rock-
ing footrest $75.
Klipsch home the-
ater system in-
cludes 2 front, cen-
ter & sub $250.
Sony 19 flat screen
computer monitor
with speakers $100.
AB shaper & sit up
bench $25. Evenflo
booster car seat
$35. 570-212-2347.
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Good, Clean & Use-
ful. TAKE ALL FOR
FREE. 820-3359
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Sturdy 42 oak table
$15. Twin bed frame
with bookcase
headboard, $15.
Wooden carrom
board $15. Big
Bertha leather clas-
sic golf bag $10.
570-678-5488
GROOMING table,
small $60. Twin
Aero bed $30.
Byers choice
Thanksgiving car-
oliers $140.
570-829-1007
GUITAR acoustic
guitar & hardcase.
$295. 823-3835
PORTAPOTTI new
for trailer or boat,
$20. Beech wood
firewood in 2
lengths, about a
cord, $25. 328-5611
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 13G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchen
& Baths
Call the
Building
Industry
Association of
NEPA to find a
qualified mem-
ber for your
next project.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates
570-899-4713
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CAVUTO
CHIMNEY
SERVICE
& Gutter Cleaning
Free Estimates
Insured
570-709-2479
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
1048 Computer
Repairs
CB COMPUTER CARE
Virus, Spyware,
Malware & Worm
Removal. General
maintenance.
Loaners available.
Free Pick up &
delivery local area.
570-814-2365
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
A+ MASONRY
All aspects of
Masonry. Specializ-
ing in waterproofing
basements with
stone walls.
Lic. & insured.
570-468-3988
570-780-8339
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
***
AFFORDABLE
***
General Masonry
& Concrete
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR TOO SMALL!
Masonry /Concrete
Work. Licensed &
insured. Free est.
John 570-573-0018
Joe 570-579-8109
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
PRICE CONSTRUCTION
Full Service
General Contractor
BASEMENT > ROOFING
> KITCHENS > REMOD-
ELING > BATHROOMS
LJPconstructioninc.com
570-840-3349
1078 Dry Wall
DAUGHERTYS
DRYWALL INC.
Remodeling, New
Construction, Water
& Flood Repairs
570-579-3755
PA043609
MARK ANDERSON
DRYWALL COMPANY
SINCE 1987
Hanging & finishing.
Swirreled & Tex-
tured ceilings.
Water damage &
Plaster Repair
570-760-2367
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
570-328-1230
MIRRA DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Drywall Repair
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
AT HOME
SELECTIONS
Carpet, hardwood
vinyl. Free carpet
removal. Free
installation. Zero
interest financing.
Free Estimates.
570-655-8004
C & S CARPET
INSTALLATION
27 YRS EXPERIENCE
Professional,
Courteous Service
Discount To
Flood Victims
570-736-6204 or
570-991-3219
90 N. First Street
Stroudsburg, PA
800-600-3033
Free shop at
home service.
HIC PA026831
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
FALCONES CITY
CARPET CENTER
35 N. Main St, Pittston
Flood damage free
estimates! All your
flooring needs &
window treatments
570-498-0977, 570-
822-3494, or 570-
592-4060.
KING GLASS & PAINT
1079 Main St, Swoyersville
Over 50 years experience!
Paints & supplies
for residential &
commercial.
Flooring: Carpet,
Vinyl, Ceramic tile,
Laminate, Hard-
wood and more.
Certified Installa-
tion Crews.
Specials:
Carpet starting at
82/sf
Ceramic &
Laminate starting
at $1.20/sf
Material only
Installation
available
Pittsburgh Interior
Paints: 14-110 Flat
$9.69/gal. 14-510
Semi Gloss
$12.99/gal.
14-310 Eggshell
$12.05/gal.
All materials plus tax
and freight when
applicable.
FREE ESTIMATES.
Store Hours
MONDAY-FRIDAY 7-5
SATURDAY 8-12:30
CLOSED SUNDAY
EVENING APPOINT-
MENTS AVAILABLE
UPON REQUEST.
570-288-4639
10% off our
everyday low
prices with
this ad!
We offer additional
discounts to all
Flood Victims.
Excludes specials.
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning.
Regulars, storms,
etc. Pressure
washing, decks,
docks, houses,Free
estimates. Insured.
(570) 288-6794
Professional
Window & Gutter
Cleaning
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
1132 Handyman
Services
All in a Call
FLOOD CLEAN UP,
hardwood floors, tile
vct, drywall / finish-
ing, painting, power
washing. Free Est.
Dependable & Reli-
able. Package deals
available. Call
570-239-4790
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
1132 Handyman
Services
ALL
MAINTENANCE
WE FIX IT
Electrical,
Plumbing,
Handymen,
Painting
Carpet Repair
& Installation
All Types
Of Repairs
570-814-9365
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
FLOOD VICTIMS
FOR
CONSTRUCTION
& DEMOLITION
CALL
LICENSED GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Plumbing, heating
electrical, painting,
roofs, siding, rough
& finished carpentry
- no job too big or
small. Free Esti-
mates. Call anytime.
570-852-9281
POCAHONTAS
Problem Solvers
Power washing,
landscaping, tree
removal, grass cut-
ting, home repairs,
plumbing, sheet
rock, painting, fall
clean ups.
Insured & Licensed
570-751-6140
RUSSELLS
Property Maintenance
LICENSED & INSURED
30+ years experi-
ence. Carpentry,
painting & gener-
al home repairs.
FREE ESTIMATES
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
AAA Bob & Rays
Hauling: Friendly &
Courteous. We take
anything & every-
thing. Attic to base-
ment. Garage, yard,
free estimates. Call
570-655-7458 or
570-905-4820
Land for sale?
Place an ad
and SELL
570-829-7130
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AFFORDABLE
JUNK REMOVAL
Cleanups/Cleanouts
Large or Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 817-4238
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Mikes $5 & Up
We do cleanups -
basements,
garages, etc. Yard
waste removal,
small deliveries.
Buying Old Wood
Furniture
Same day service.
793- 8057 826- 1883
WILL HAUL ANYTHING
Clean cellars,
attics, yards &
metal removal.
Call John
570-735-3330
1138 Heating
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BRUSH UP TO 4
HIGH, MOWING,
EDGING, TRIMMING
SHRUBS, HEDGES,
TREES, MULCHING,
LAWN CARE, LEAF
REMOVAL, FALL
CLEAN UP. FULLY
INSURED. FREE
ESTIMATES
570-829-3261
TOLL FREE
1-855-829-3261
JOHNS
Landscaping/Hauling
Bobcat:Grading/
Stone. Snow Clearing
Shrub / Tree Trimming
Handyman - All types
7Holiday Lighting 7
& more! 735-1883
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
Patrick & Deb Patrick & Debs s
Landscaping Landscaping
Landscaping, basic
handy man, clean-
ing, moving & free
salvage pick up.
AVAILABLE FOR
FALL CLEAN UPS!
Call 570-793-4773
Tree Removal,
Stump Grinding, Haz-
ard Tree Removal,
Grading, drainage,
lot clearing, snow
plowing, stone / soil
delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1183 Masonry
STONE MASON
47 Years Experience
Creative. All types
of masonry. Pre-
cast stone, pavers,
stucco & general
remodeling. Call
570-301-8200
TOMS
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drives, stucco, stone,
steps, chimneys
porches and repairs.
Lic. & insured.
570-283-5254
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A+ CLASSICAL
All phases.
Complete int/ext
paint &renovations
Since 1990 Since 1990
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
570-283-5714
A QUALITY PAINTING
Interior specialist,
residential/commer-
cial. $0 money
down! Pictures &
references avail-
able! 570-328-2072
570-714-2202
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
House in Shambles?
We can fix it!
Cover All Painting & Cover All Painting &
General Contracting General Contracting
PA068287. Serving
Northeast PA &
North Jersey since
1989. All phases of
interior & exterior
repair & rebuilding.
Call 570-226-1944 Call 570-226-1944
or 570-470-5716 or 570-470-5716
Free Estimates
And yes, I am a
lead paint removal
certified contractor
JASON SIMMS PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Free Estimates
21 Yrs. Experience
Insured
(570) 947-2777
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719 or
570-288-4311
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARDS ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
Modified stone,
laid & compacted.
Hot tar and chips,
dust and erosion
control. Licensed
and
Insured.
Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
EXPERT PLUMBING,
HEATING & ELECTRICAL
30 years experience
Free Estimates
570-824-1559
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
REMODELING/RESTORATION
from ceilings to
floors, plastering,
drywall, painting,
carpeting, linoleum,
also stucco, dryvit,
foundation repairs.
Residential/Com-
mercial. 30+ years
experience.Insured.
Call John
570-235-5185
1252 Roofing &
Siding
FALL
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PLACE
YOUR
OWN
CLASSIFIED
AD
ONLINE!
ITS FAST AND EASY!
PLUS, YOUR AD WILL
RUN FREE FOR ITEMS
PRICED UNDER $1000.
GO TO CLASSIFIED ADS
AND CLICK ON
PLACE YOUR AD.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings,
Merchandise, Pets & Animals, Real
Estate and Garage Sales.
Customize the way your ad looks
and then nd it in the next days
edition of The Times Leader, in our
weekly newspapers and online at
timesleader.com.
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
*Your ad will appear in the next days paper if placed online
before 4 p.m. Mon. through Thurs. Place on Friday before
1 p.m. for Saturdays paper and before 4 p.m.
Our online system will let you place
Announcements, Automotive Listings, gg
758 Miscellaneous
TIRES: 2 General
Grabber 275x40
x20, excellent con-
dition $300.
570-823-3425
776 Sporting Goods
BACK PACK
Lightweight, navy,
like new $50.
570-675-4383
BIKE: Peugeot 12
speed english rac-
ing bike $50.
570-696-4912
Line up a place to live
in classified!
BOOTS Burton snow
board, size 9. Excel-
lent condition $50.
at 570-301-3484 or
570-631-6635.
BOWFLEX XTREME
2, like new. $800.
Weslo treadmill
$125.570-542-5823
EVERLAST HEAVY
BAG, 100 pound,
canvas, great con-
dition $80.
570-474-0753
HOME GYM Schwin
Bowflex, bench,
incline, latpull down,
leg extensions, slid-
ing seat for aerobic
rowing $250.
484-219-3346
RECUMBENT BIKE
Edge 288R magnet-
ic $100. 570-901-
1095 or 594-0057
776 Sporting Goods
WEIGHT BENCH &
weights, stationary
bike, powerhouse
fitness gym, ab
lounger, will sell all
for $250. or sepa-
rately. 654-1820
784 Tools
COMPOUND MITER
SAW, Chicago Elec-
tric Power Co. 10
blade, 15 amp, 5300
RPM includes dust
bag, extension
wings, 60 tooth car-
bide blade, spring
load blade guard,
table tilts 45
degrees. New,
never used $50.
Delta bench saw 10
blade, 120v, 13mps,
Type 2, angle cut
bracket $50.
570-735-2694
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
HOT TUB / SPA
QCA turquoise + 3
deluxe deep depth.
Accommodates 6
people. 32 water
jets. 10 air jets. 82
x 79 x 38 1/2.
$1,500. Chemicals
included with tub.
For for info, call
570-823-1686
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
XBOX LIVE GOLD
Xbox Live 12 Month
Prepaid Card. I pur-
chased from
Gamestop a week
ago but didnt need
it and cannot return
it. Can redeem on
the spot via com-
puter. Legitimate,
physical card, not a
hacked code. $40.
570-814-3383
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING COINS,
gold, silver & all
coins, stamps,
paper money, entire
collections worth
$5,000 or more.
Travel to your home
CASH paid. Marc
1-800-488-4175
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
NEED CASH?
We Buy:
Gold & Gold coins,
Silver, Platinum,
old bills, Watches,
Costume Jewelry,
Diamonds, Gold
Filled, Sterling Sil-
ver Flatware,
Scrap Jewelry,
Military items, old
Tin & Iron Toys,
Canadian coins &
paper money,
most foreign
money (paper/coin).
Visit our new loca-
tion @ 134 Rt. 11,
Larksville
next to WOODYS
FIRE PLACE
& PRO FIX.
We make house calls!
Buyer & seller of
antiques! We also
do upholstering.
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVDs, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm 6pm
570-822-9929
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570- 484- 6538)
Highest Cash Pay
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT free to good
home, grey male, 1
year old, gentle &
loveable, all shots,
neutered. 561-5336
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS Free to
good home. 2
orange male tabbys
left. Litter trained. 8
weeks old.
570-771-6347
815 Dogs
AKC Registered
Black Great Dane
Puppies. Vet
checked, shots,
wormings, micro-
chipped. Tempera-
ment tested. Ear
cropping available.
$500.
570-384-0593
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
815 Dogs
BOSTON TERRIER
Male 3 years old.
Papers. Not
neutered. $450.
BOSTON TERRIER PUG
Female. 1.5 years
old. Not spade.
$375.
* PUPPIES *
Boston Terrier, Pug
2 males. Born
8/11/11. $275. 1
male. Blue eyes
(rare). $375.
Ready to Go!
Call 570-825-5659
or 570-793-3905
CHOW CHOW
Loving,caring,
gentle, adorable
puppies available
11/12/11. Papers and
first shots included.
570-655-3189
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES - AKC
Great Pedigrees.
Multiple V ratings.
Titled from
Schutzhund to ther-
apy dog. Father
imported from Ger-
man. Call for more
info. 570-474-5409
GERMAN SHORT-
HAIRED POINTER
pups, excellent pets
and hunters, par-
ents are health test-
ed, sire is AKC
titled. $350 to $550.
570-926-0873
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
V A L L E Y
CHE V ROL E T
K E N W A L L A CE S
*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Low APR to well qualified buyers. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30-8:00pm; Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 K IDDE R S TRE E T, W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A
1.9
%
APR
O n Select
C ertified
Preow ned Til
10/31
V ISIT U S 24/7 w w w .valleychevrolet.com
#12045B,1.8LEC O TEC VVT
D O H C 4 C yl.,6 Speed M anualTrans.,
A /C ,PW ,PD L,FrontBucketSeats,
16SteelW heels,XM Satellite Radio,
O nStar w /A uto C rash
Response & Turn-By-Turn
N avigation,A M /FM /C D /M P3
$
13 , 9 47
$
13 , 9 47
* $
1 3 , 9 4 7
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y C R U Z E L S 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y C R U Z E L S
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
#Z2560,2.2LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,
D eluxe FrontBuckets,Running Boards,
Traction C ontrol,XM Satellite Radio,
O nStar w /Turn-By-Turn N avigation,
Luggage RoofRails,Pow er D rivers Seat
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y H H R L S 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y H H R L S
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
#Z2550,3.5LV6,A uto.,A /C ,
PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors,Pow er
Seats,Rem ote Start,A M /FM C D ,
H eated FrontBucketSeats
$
15 , 48 0
$
15 , 48 0
* $
1 5 , 4 8 0
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y IM P A L A L T 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y IM P A L A L T
SALE PRICE starting at
10
AVA IL.
#Z2556,2.4LD O H C A utom atic,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er
M irrors,A M /FM C D ,FrontBucketSeats,
Body Side M oldings
$
15 , 9 8 5
$
15 , 9 8 5
* $
1 5 , 9 8 5
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y M A L IB U L T 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y M A L IB U L T
SALE PRICE starting at
4
AVA IL.
#Z2519,2.4LD O H C
A utom atic,A /C ,
D eep Tinted G lass,C ruise,
Steering W heelRadio
C ontrols,A M /FM C D ,
Pow er H eated M irrors,
Rem ote Keyless Entry
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y E Q U IN O X L T A W D 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y E Q U IN O X L T A W D
SALE PRICE starting at
2
AVA IL.
#Z2538,3.6LV6 A uto.,
Traction C ontrol,A /C ,8 Passenger,2nd
& 3rd Row SplitBench,Pow er O ptions,
Pow er D river Seat,Rear Spoiler,18
A lum .W heels,U ltra Sonic Rear Parking
A ssist
2 0 1 1 C H E V Y T R A V E R S E A W D 2 0 1 1 C H E V Y T R A V E R S E A W D
SALE PRICE starting at
5
AVA IL.
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
1.9
%
APR
from
S
p ecial
P
urchase
S
p ecial
P
urchase
W hatisGM Certified?Itisan additional...
12 m os. 12,000 M ile Bum per-to-Bum perW arranty
up to48 M os48,000 M ILES
plus5 year100,000 m ilePow ertrain LTD W arranty
$
26 , 9 21
$
26 , 9 21
* $
2 6 , 9 2 1
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
35,790
$
24, 5 0 0
$
24, 5 0 0
* $
2 4 , 5 0 0
$
14, 9 7 5
$
14, 9 7 5
* $
1 4 , 9 7 5
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
17,895 O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
21,299
O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
26,210 O riginalM SRP W hen N ew
$
23,941
7
1
5
1
9
4
Need Extra Cash?
Deliver
To nd a route near you and start
earning extra cash, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Nanticoke (Hanover Section)
$550 Monthly Prot + Tips
112 daily papers / 125 Sunday papers
Center Street, Espy Street, Meadow Crest Drive,
Oak Street, Phillip Street
Parsons/Wilkes-Barre North
$930 Monthly Prot + Tips
187 daily papers / 216 Sunday papers
Wyoming Street, Brookside Street, E. Chestnut Street,
N. Franklin Street, Madison Street, N. Washington Street
Swoyersville:
$420 Monthly Prot + Tips
93 daily papers / 102 Sunday papers
Chestnut Street, Diamond Street, Grandville Drive, Main Street
Larksville
$680 Monthly Prot + Tips
136 daily papers / 157 Sunday papers
1st Street, 2nd Street, Barney Street,
West Broadway Street, Brown Street
Luzerne:
$440 Monthly Prot + Tips
103 daily papers / 115 Sunday papers
Bennett Street, Charles Street, Hughes Street, Main Street
Wilkes-Barre North:
$880 Monthly Prot + Tips
222 daily papers / 251 Sunday papers
Coal Street, Custer Street, North Empire Street,
Logan Street, New Market Street, North Sherman Street
Shickshinny/Mocanaqua:
$420 Monthly Prot + Tips
East Butler Street, North Canal Street, Church Street,
West Union Street, Italy Street, Jeanette Street
Main Street
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons)
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
815 Dogs
PEKINGESE
AKC White Female.
3 years old. Spade.
House broken. Up
to date on all shots.
Very good pedigree.
Male puppy
pekingese. Farm
sable with black
mask. 6 months old.
House broken. Up
to date on all shots.
Very good pedigree.
(570) 752-7066
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $350
Pomeranians - $500
607-217-8303
St. Bernard, Poms,
Yorkies, Maltese,
Husky, Rotties,
Doberman, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
STANDARD POODLE
PUPS
AKC & ACA full
registration. Cham-
pion blood lines,
show quality, shots,
wormed, and
guaranteed. $225.
570-458-6947
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 15G
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Ready for a New Home?
Call the experts. We can help.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Ofce
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT! *
17 GENERAL PULASKI ST
MOUNTAINTOP
DIR: Take RT 309S turn right on S. Main Rd, turn right on Nuan-
gola Rd go .5 miles turn right on Aleksander into Polonia Estates,
turn right on General Pulaski. Jennifer Winn (570) 760-1622
MLS#11-3684 $269,000
17 DONALD CT., WILKESBARRE
DIR: Take Carey Ave to Simpson St., turn right onto Plymouth
St., turn left onto Willow St., then turn left onto Donald Ct.
Donna Clarke 570-262-0608
MLS#11-2969 $197,900
620 HOOVEN ST., DURYEA
DIR: Main Street through Pittston, R onto Parsonage Street
which turns into Foote Ave, Left onto Hooven @Town Tavern.
Home on Left. Anne Marie Janus; (570)899-0704
MLS#11-1457 $85,600
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12:00-1:30
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 1:00-2:30
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11 DIVISION ST ,
SHAVERTOWN 11-1873
Lead a happy life in this
spacious 3 bedroom
home on a double lot.
Enjoy the tranquility of a
quiet neighborhood.
Lovely details in this
outstanding home
include finished walk-out
basement with fireplace,
hardwood floor in dining
room, whirlpool tub,
covered patio and an oversized 2 car garage.
CALL CARY 240-3552 $160,000
DIR: From Dallas--Rte 309S to left on E Center Hill (at Burger King),
right onto Lehigh to right on Division.
Open House!
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11-3875
Old fashioned
charm abounds in
this 3 bedroom,
2-story on 5.95
acres. Huge master
bedroom with
vaulted ceilings,
den with gas
fireplace and
pegged oak floors.
Spacious Living Room/Dining Room combo with fireplace,
modern kitchen with breakfast nook, 2 car garage and
wonderful country acreage yet close to everything!
CALL LYNNE 574-7093 $269,900
New Listing!
D
a
lla
s
11-3803
E s t a b l i s h e d
Bar/Restaurant
in a nice
Neighborhood.
Turn Key
operation! Great
opportunity to
fulfill your entrepreneurial dreams!
CALL PAT 793-4055 $189,000
New Listing-Turn Key Business!
S
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GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE,
INC.
288-2514 EMAIL: JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM
Pat Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For You!
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
Each Ofce is Independently Owned And Operated.
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE
This home features a nice
kitchen, 2 full baths, living
room, dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, comfortable gas,
terrifc yard and garage.
Better Hurry!
Call Jerry Busch $79,900
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE
This home features a
nice modern eat in kitch-
en, living room, den, good
size bath, 3 bedooms,
comfortable gas heat
and yard.
Call Jerry Busch Jr
$59,900
KINGSTON
VICTORIOUS VICTORIAN!
Genuine character is expressed
throughout every inch of this clas-
sic home situated on a lovely resi-
dential street. It features 9 rooms,
5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, modern
kitchen with granite counter tops
and stainless steel appliances, lots
of woodwork - huge newel post. Wrap
around porch , screened porch, deck
and a two car garage. And Yes.... It
does have a Turret! $259,000
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
EDWARDSVILLE -
GREAT LOCATION!
Pretty home with updates; vinyl
siding, replacement windows
and more. 5 rooms, large eat-
in kitchen, 2 large bedrooms,
2 full baths. Private enclosed
yard. You must see it with Jerry
Busch Jr. MLS#10-3858
$59,900 Make an Offer!
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 www.atlasrealtyinc.com
OPEN HOUSES TODAY!
Proudly serving our community for 23 years.
1702 W. EIGHTH ST.,
WEST WYOMING
Excellent starter house with a paved
driveway,all new energy star replace-
ment windows, 15x13 deck on side of
home. MLS#11-2912.
$89,500 Call Fred 817-5792
Dir: Rt. 11 to 8th St. apx 4 miles
15 MILLER ST.,
WEST PITTSTON
Four bedroom home with frst foor master,
hardwood foors, central air in great loca-
tion in the garden village. MLS #11-3645.
$129,900 Call Tom 262-7716
Dir: Exeter Ave to Tunkhannock Ave. left
on Miller, home on left.
128 JEAN ST., EXETER
Nice bi-level home on quiet st, updated
exterior, large family room, extra deep
lot, 2 car garage, enclosed rear porch
and covered patio. MLS #11-2850.
$184,900 Call Charlie 829-6200
Dir: Wyoming Ave turn west on Lincoln
St, right on Warsaw, left on Jean.
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Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
DJWojciechowski 283-9100
MLS#11-2837 $124,900
Tis property was not ooded!
Tree large bedrooms, 2.5 baths,
lots of roomfor this price! Large
garage, oce andlaundry room,
formal dining room, eat-in
kitchen, private driveway
anda fencedyard
EddieHeck283-9100x41
MLS#11-3500 $150,000
Muchmore thanmeets the eye
inthis updated3 bedroom,
2 bathwithwalk-upattic,
hardwoodinliving room&
dining roomandnishedlower
level. Private drive withdetached
garage all ina convenient
Kingstonlocation.
Always wanteda home onthe
lake, at this price youcannot
go wrong!!! Living roomis
accentedby a replace, cathedral
ceiling andis nishedincedar.
2 bedrooms, modernkitchen,
1 full bath, private driveway.
Gardenstyle rear yard,
Bob 696-6555/Jill 696-6550
MLS 11-2700 $129,500
MaribethJones 696-6565
$499,000 with 37 acres!
Time to buy? Price reduced!
37 private acres anda large
4 bedroomhome. Interest rates
couldnt be better! Locatedin
the Dallas School district and
close to town.
Owner says sell!
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
Harveys Lake-Great View! Kingston-Updated!
NO TRICKS. . . ONLY TREATS!
W. Pittston-Not Flooded! Kingston Twp.-Very Private!
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57 North Main St., Shavertown, PA
Time Plaza, Rt. 115, P.O. Box 1051, Blakeslee, PA
You We are number 1,
because we care.
Follow Us On:
Exeter Park Back Mountain
WAREHOUSE WONDER Much
needed warehouse space
close to back road on 1.29
acres includes 2 overhead
doors and attractive block
construction. Needs a roof..
worth much more than the list
price of $99,000...
Call Tracy for info
696-2468.
AUTUMNS ARTISTRY atop 3.86
acres will be yours to enjoy in this
4 BR, with frst foor Master suite
with jacuzzi type tub, sep. shower, 2
walk-in closets, opens to deck and
inground pool,2 story family room
warmed by a gas freplace w/2 sets
of French doors to deck, appealing
granite kitchen and natural wood
cab., bright breakfast nook, Country
charm halfway to Heav-
en. MLS# 11-3972
Call Tracy 696-2468.
$340,000
NEW LISTING!
NEW LISTING!
White Haven
Raised Ranch in Hickory Hills!
Master Bed w/full Mstr Bath,
LVRM & eat-in kit. Front porch,
large rear deck, partially fn-
ish bsmnt, & built-in 1 car
garage. Call Stacey L Lauer
Mobile :
(570) 262-1158.
MLS# 11-3629
$58,140
RAISED RANCH
Ti Ti Ti TTT me me me PPl
FFF
Now Hiring NewAgents To Help Service Our Growing Inventory
White Haven
Builders custom home. Superi-
or walls in basement and plumb
for third bathroom already in so
you can fnish the basement for
more living space. Rural setting
minutes to Mountaintop or inter-
staes for commuters. Work hard
and come home to your own
paradise. Make this one yours!!!
Call Shirley Brower:
(570) 242-2795.
MLS# 11-2478
$265,000
RURAL SETTING
Four Star McCabe Realty
(570) 674-9950 (570) 824-1499 (570) 654-4428
$298,500
YATESVILLE
NEW LISTING
Beautiful home in
WILLOW VIEW
that shows Pride
of Ownership....
Spacious Florida
Room leading to
a private back yard
W/ extensive landscaping, 2 car garagebrand new roof, 3 baths , 4
BRs & LL Family room. Lovely home!
$247,000
HARVEYS LAKE
NEW LISTING
Unique Contemporary
Log home W/ 2 levels,
W/ tons of charm and
character throughout!
High on the hill W/ a
wonderful view of the lake & private setting on a dead end street.
In ground heated pool nestled up to the woods, vinyl fencing, 2
baths, newer roof, ductless A/C & more! Only 3 minutes from the
public boat launch. *Owner is licensed agent
LARKSVILLE $184,900
Nicely situated in Larkmount Manor 4 BR Ranch W/ large yard, cen-
tral A/C, 3 season sunroom overlooking the In Ground pool & nished
20x25 LL family room.
$184,500
PLAINS
3 BR Townhouse
W/ 2.5 baths,
formal DR &
large eat in kitch-
en. New rugs
throughout & all
rooms freshly
painted.
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
Story and Photos by
Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
Thanks to renovations just four years
ago, this 3,000 square foot Cape Cod in
the Hilltop Manor section of Lain is in
like-new condition. Freshly painted in
easy-to-decorate neutral colors, this four-
bedroom home at 22 Dogwood Dr. has
been lovingly updated and is in move-in
condition.
Listed by Chris Jones of Prudential
Poggi & Jones Real Estate for $218,900,
the property includes a .45-acre lot on
a dead-end street with plenty of mature
landscaping and a multi-tiered deck for
enjoying the wooded setting.
See all this property has to of fer at
an Open House today from 12 noon
until 1:30 p.m.
The exterior is wrapped in vinyl siding
with Colonial red shutters and front door.
Guests are welcomed though the front
door, which leads into the 12-by-15 dining
room. It is here that you get the rst look
at striking hardwood oors that span
much of the main level of the home. This
dining room has tan walls, a staircase to
the second oor and two single windows
front.
The hardwood continues to the right
into the adjacent 20-by-15 living room.
This room also has tan walls that are ac-
cented by an oak chair rail. It is a bright
room, lled with natural light, thanks to
a double window front and sliding doors
that open rear to the deck. Slate tile
forms a threshold inside the patio doors
forming a walk-way leading to the nearby
door that opens to the attached two-car
garage.
The nearby kitchen has a large eat-in
area and shares in the view provided
by the nearby sliding doors. Here, oak
cabinets have newly installed black and
tan speckled laminate countertops and
are accented by a new stove and new
dishwasher. There is a large amount of
countertop workspace and cabinet stor-
age, including a pantry closet. There is
also an appliance garage and a double
stainless steel sink with a window above
that opens rear. A refrigerator is also
included.
A nearby hallway offers a door to the
basement and leads to the two bedrooms
and full bath on the rst oor.
The bath offers a tan ceramic tile oor
and an oak vanity with a cream, blue and
white cultured marble sink. A one-piece
tub and shower surround and linen closet
complete the picture.
The rst bedroom on this level mea-
sures 18-by-15 and features more of the
oak hardwood ooring, tan walls and two
Like-new flooring highlights Laflin Cape Cod
Continued
OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 12-1:30 P.M.
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
single windows front. This bedroom has sliding
doors on a large double closet.
The second bedroom is much the same, measur-
ing 12-by-12 with a similar decor.
Upstairs, the master bedroom is a comfortable
20-by-18 and has pale gray walls and midnight blue
carpeting. There is plenty of natural light thanks
to a dormered window front and a single window
rear. A double closet with sliding doors provides
storage.
The fourth bedroom measures 10-by-15 and also
has a dormered window front along with windows
side and rear. This room has antique white walls
and teal carpeting, along with a double closet and
access to under-eave storage.
The full bath on this level has an oak vanity,
cream vinyl ooring, with gray accents, and a one-
piece tub and shower surround. This bath has its
own linen closet and a window rear.
The unnished basement has a painted concrete
oor and painted cinder block walls. A separate
utility and storage room hosts washer and dryer
hook-ups.
This home has gas forced air heat and public
sewer and water connections.
To get to todays Open House from Wilkes-Barre
take Route 315 north and make a left onto Lain
Rd. Take the second left onto Pinewood Dr., and
the second left on Hickorywood Dr. which turns
into Cherrywood. Make a left onto Dogwood Dr.
and 22 Dogwood is the last house on the right.
To make an appointment to see this home,
contact Chris Jones at Prudential Poggi & Jones
Realtors, (570) 696-6558; email cjones@poggi-
jones.com.
SPECIFICATIONS
Cape Cod
3,000 square feet
BEDROOMS: 4
BATHS: 2
PRICE: $218,900
LOCATION: 22 Dogwood Dr., Lain.
AGENT: Chris Jones
REALTOR: Prudential Poggi & Jones Real Estate,
cjones@poggi-jones.com
Ofce: (570) 696-2600
(570) 696-6558
Laflin
Continued from front page
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ASHLEY
19 Davis St.
Very affordable sin-
gle family, 3 bed-
room, 2 bath
starter home in a
good location.
MLS #10-4026
$29,900
Call Jay Crossin
Ext. 23
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
BACK MOUNTAIN
Beautiful 5 bed-
room, 2.2 baths &
FANTASTIC Great
Room with built in
bar, private brick
patio, hot tub &
grills! 4 car garage
with loft + attached
2 car garage.
Situated on over 6
acres of privacy
overlooking Francis
Slocum with a great
view of the lake!
Lots of extras & the
kitchen is out of this
world! MLS#11-3131
$625,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
BACK MOUNTAIN
NEW LISTING
Wonderful Back
Mountain find in
Elmcrest develop-
ment. Big enough
to raise four daugh-
ters with 3
bedroms, 3 baths,
woodburning fire-
place, hot tub,
replacement win-
dows and hard-
wood floors under
new carpeting, all
on a large lot with
fieldstone walls.
MLS#11-3279
$247,500
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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BACK MOUNTAIN
1215 Mountain Rd.
Well maintained
ranch home set on
2 acres with apple
trees on property.
This home offers 3
bedrooms, sunroom
& enclosed porch.
Lower level with
brick fireplace. 2
car garage.
$172,500
MLS# 11-2436
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion membership.
(membership
optional). Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $259,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
BERWICK
FOR SALE BY OWNER
50% below Market
Value. Fixer upper.
Not in flood zone. 3
bedroom, 1 bath.
Corner lot. $46,500.
(570) 394-9537
CENTERMORELAND
Wyoming County
30 Acres
This country estate
features 30 acres of
prime land with a
pretty home, ultra
modern kitchen, 2
full modern baths,
bright family room,
den, living room and
3 good sized bed-
rooms. This proper-
ty has open fields
and wooded land, a
stream, several
fieldstone walls and
lots of road
frontage. Equipment
and rights included.
$489,000. 11-3751
Call Jerry Bush Jr.
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate
570-288-2514
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Proposed new
construction
Ranch Condo
in Green Briar with
a 1 car garage,
community pool &
tennis in a great
adult community.
$229,900
MLS# 10-1105
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
Fantastic home with
a large family room
with fireplace. You
will love the kitchen
and get ready for
Summer Fun
in the private in
ground pool.
MLS# 11-1141
$257,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
Nice 3 bedroom
home on a deep lot
with large eat in
kitchen.
MLS#11-3387
$118,800
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DALLAS
1360 Lower
Demunds Rd.
A grand entrance
leads you to this
stunning Craftsman
style home on 11+
acres complete with
pond, stream &
rolling meadows.
This dramatic home
is in pristine condi-
tion. The 2 story
great room with
stone fireplace &
warm wood walls is
one of the focal
points of this home.
Offers modern
kitchen/baths, for-
mal dining room &
family room.
Recently built 3 car
garage with guest
quarters above is a
plus. Youll spend
many hours on the
large wrap around
porch this Fall,
Spring & Summer
overlooking your
estate. Rarely does
a home like this
come on the mar-
ket. MLS# 11-1741.
$499,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
138 White Birch Ln
Charming two story
on nice lot features,
living room, dining
room with hard-
woods, modern Oak
kitchen, first floor
family room, 4 large
bedrooms, 2 full & 2
half baths. Deck
overlooking level
rear yard. 2 car
garage. Gas heat,
Central air. (11-3115)
$318,000
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DALLAS
23 Rice Court
If you've reached
the top, live there in
this stunning 3,900
sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 4
bath home in a
great neighborhood.
Offers formal living
room, dining room,
2 family rooms, flori-
da room, and
kitchen any true
chef would adore.
Picture perfect con-
dition. The base-
ment is heated by a
separate system.
SELLER PROVIDING
HOME WARRANTY.
MLS#11-1005
$349,900
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
DALLAS
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$125,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
400 Shrine View
Elegant & classic
stone & wood
frame traditional in
superb location
overlooking adja-
cent Irem Temple
Country Club golf
course. Living room
with beamed ceiling
& fireplace; large
formal dining room;
cherry paneled sun-
room; 4 bedrooms
with 3 full baths &
2 powder rooms.
Oversized in-ground
pool. Paved,
circular drive.
$550,000
MLS# 11-939
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
NEW CONSTRUCTION
2,400 sq feet
$329,000
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAYS, 11-1
patrickdeats.com
570-696-1041
DALLAS SCHOOL
DISTRICT
100% Financing
Wooded and private
Bi-Level in Dallas
School District. This
home features 1 Car
Garage, 3
Bedrooms, 1 3/4
Bath and nice
updates. Plenty of
room on your pri-
vate 2 acre lot.100%
USDA Financing
Eligible. Call for
details.
REDUCED PRICE
$166,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
SHORT SALE!
Charming 3 Bed-
room Cape Cod
with 1 Car Garage in
great neighborhood.
Close to Park/Rec
Center. Dallas
School District.
Priced as Short
Sale, subject to
bank approval.
$92,000
Call Cindy
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
DALLAS
800SF ranch featur-
ing 2 bedrooms, liv-
ing room, kitchen,
one bath & laundry
room. Perfect for
the person who
travels; updated
kitchen, bath, car-
peting, drywall.
MLS#10-3628
Reduced to
$79,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DALLAS
FRANKLIN TWP.
Orange Road
Lush setting on
almost 5 acres bor-
dered by magnifi-
cent stone walls.
Fish pond, large
garage, barn, sepa-
rate offices for stor-
age or in-house
business, home with
9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 3 baths, 2
half baths all on 3
floors. 4400SF in
total. Home needs
TLC! MLS#11-1628
Reduced to
$299,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Reservoir Road
Privacy on this one
acre parcel with a
Cape Cod home.
Hardwood floors,
two bedrooms and
one bath on first
floor, great room
and library with
bedroom and bath
on second floor.
Workshop base-
ment, pond,
attached garage.
Must see!
MLS#11-2966
$219,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DRUMS
OCTOBER 9
12 - 2PM
Sand Springs
12 Sand Hollow Rd.
Nearly new 3 bed-
room, 2.5 bath
town home. Huge
Master with 2 clos-
ets full bath. 1 car
attached garage,
wooded lot, end
unit. Cul-de-sac.
Great golf
community.
MLS 11-2411
$172,000
Call Connie
Eileen R. Melone
Real Estate
570-821-7022
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
2 story home with
garage and drive-
way. Newer kitchen
and bath. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Single family home
with a separate
building containing
a 1 bedroom apart-
ment and 5 car
garage all on 1 lot.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2828
Price reduced
$82,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
38 Huckleberry
Lane
Blueberry Hills
4 BEDROOMS, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$329,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$112,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
805-807 Main
St.
Multi-Family.
Large side by
side double with
separate utili-
ties. 3 bed-
rooms each side
with newer car-
pet, replace-
ment windows
and newer roof.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3054
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
DURYEA
BLUEBERRY HILLS
Newer construc-
tion, 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family
room with gas fire-
place. Formal dining
room. 2 car garage,
gas heat, large
deck, above ground
pool. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3858
$289,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA
NOT IN FLOOD
ZONE
5 rooms. For sale
by owner. 2 bed-
rooms and bath
upstairs, 3 rooms
and 1/2 bath
downstairs, cor-
ner lot with small
yard. $56,000
570-885-4913
570-885-3367
DURYEA
PRICE REDUCED!
314 Bennett Street
Refashioned 3 or 4
bedroom, two full
modern baths. Two
story, 2300sf, with
level yard with love-
ly new landscaping
and 1 car garage.
New EVERYTHING
in this charming
must see property.
Custom blinds
throughout the
home. Great neigh-
borhood with Park
beyond the back-
yard. MLS# 11-3776
$174,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 17G
~ McCabe Offers ~
LOW DOWN PAYMENT OPTIONS
Free up money for:
Savings New Furniture Decorating
Renovation Unexpected Expenses
Hard to come up with
20%DOWN
TO PURCHASE YOUR NEWHOME?
You dont have to!
$0 Down Rural Housing Loans
$0 For Qualified Veterans
CALL US TODAY TO EXPLORE YOUR LOW DOWN PAYMENT OPTIONS!
Based on a 30 year fixed rate loan in the amount of $200,000: 20% Downpayment of $40,000, 4.625%/4.678% APR; 3.5% Downpayment of $7,000, 4.75%/5.651% APR; 5% Downpayment of $10,000, 4.75%/5.438% APR. Rates provided as of 8/2/2011. Superior Home
Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group is a private corporation organized under the laws of the State of New Jersey. It has no affiliation with the US Dept of Housing and Development, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Agriculture or any
other government agency. Some products may not be available in all states where Superior Home Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group operates. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs,
rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice.
570-714-4200
www.mccabemortgagegroup.com
400 Third Avenue, Suite 100 Kingston, PA 18704
Superior Home Mortgage Corp. d/b/a McCabe Mortgage Group licensed in PA: Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking . Company NMLS# 2743. Branch NMLS# 386319.
3.5% Down on FHA Loans
5% Down Option on Conventional Loans
418 Ice Harvest Drive,
Mountaintop
Te Ice Lakes - Beautiful custom built and
nished three year old home on a lakefront
lot. Fabulous custom kitchen with Viking
appliances. Two story family room with re-
place. Master suite includes outside balcony,
pretty tile bath and huge walk-in closet with
built-ins. Extensive trimand hardwood oors
throughout. Easily nished walk out base-
ment, four car garage and much more!
DIR: Turn onto Ice Harvest Dr. from Nuan-
gola Rd. Proceed 2 blocks to house on R.
$685,000
Call David P. Hourigan
570-474-6307 570-715-7750
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Mountaintop 570-474-6307
David P. Hourigan
441 41 41 418888 IIce HHHHarvest DDDDDriiive,
Dav Dav David idd P. P. P. Hou Hou ourig rig rig
Open House Today 1:00-3:00PM
F
C
C
arey
rank
onstruction, Inc.
Where High Quality
Is Te Standard
New Residential
Construction
Custom Remodeling
Kitchen and Baths
Land Development
www. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m
Ofce: 570-655-2374
Direct: 570-237-1444
STORM
DAMAGE?
Roong Siding Structural Repairs
and Replacement Drywall
Interior Damage
We Will Work With Your
Insurance Company!
MICHAEL DOMBROSKI CONSTRUCTION
570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682
25 Years Experience
Prompt Reliable Professional
ALL TYPES OF REMODELING
PA#031715 Fully Insured
615 Charles Avenue,
Kingston
Stately brick 2 story featuring
formal living room with replace,
formal dining room, cherry kitchen,
knotty pine study, spacious family
room, sunroom, computer room, TV
room, 4 bedrooms, 5 baths. Finished
Basement. Lovely fenced yard, 1 car
garage. Well built steel constructed
home in a great location!
$339,000
DIR: E. Dorrance Street to Charles
Ave. Home on right.
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Mountaintop 570-474-6307
CALL RUTHHOLLANDER570-287-1196 / 570-714-6110
Open House Sunday, October 30th 1:00-3:00PM
586.9636
383-0001
Call Us Today!
836.3171
346.5736
842.9531
www.ColdwellBankerNEPA.com
Town & Country
Properties
201 TOMPKINS ST., PITTSTON
Dont let this one slip away! Top quality, end-unit townhouse boasting
features that include hardwood oors, master bedroom with bath and
two closets, gas heat, central air, oversized one-car garage as well as three
additional parking spots. First oor laundry and walk-in pantry with
built-in shelves. Appliances included. Genuine copper paint on stairway
wall - Beautiful! Come take a tour today!! $146,500 11-3053
Directions: William St (Pittston), left on Kennedy Blvd, slight right
on S Main St, straight on Plank St, next right on Cleveland St, home is
directly in front of you, sign. Marcia Walsh 650-2211
84 SEARLE ST., PITTSTON
All you need to do is move right in! Tastefully remodeled three bedroom
two-story on corner lot. Formal living and dining rooms with hardwood
oors. Large modern kitchen with breakfast area, stainless appliances,
hardwood oors. Large, bright rst oor laundry room with washer and
dryer, o kitchen. Spacious remodeled bathroom. Tons of closets! O-
street parking on new concrete pad. $100,000 11-2537
Directions: William St (Pittston) towards Main St, right on Church St,
right on Mill, left on Searle, home on left (corner of Seneca and Searle),
sign. Marcia Walsh 650-2211
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, OCT 30
TH
2-3:30PM OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, OCT 30
TH
12-1:30PM
Open House Sunday, October 30th
1
:
0
0
-
4
:
0
0
P
M
129 TOWNSEND AVE.,
SWOYERSVILLE
House features 3-4 BRs,
Berber carpet in LR and
hardwood fr in DR, ce-
ramic tile kitchen and bath
(1 1/2), fnished basement,
extra room formally used
as a beauty salon with sep-
arate entrance on 1st level,
and vinyl fenced yard with
heated fberglass inground
pool.
Directions: Turn on Denni-
son St off of Wyoming Ave
near the Midway Shopping
Center
Asking $239,900
CALL 570-288-3380
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
1140 SPRING ST.
Large 3 bedroom
home with new
roof, replacement
windows, hardwood
floors. Great loca-
tion! For more infor-
mation and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2636
$104,900.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
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Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DURYEA
REDUCED
411 JONES ST.
Beautiful 2 story
English Tudor with
exquisite gardens,
surrounding beauti-
ful in ground pool,
private fenced yard
with a home with
too many amenities
to list. Enjoy the
summer here!
Screened in porch
and foyer that just
adds to the great
living space
of the home
For more info
and photos:
visit:www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2720
$229,900
Call Phil
570-313-1229
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
9 Williams St.
Large 4 bedroom
home with nice rear
deck, replacement
windows, off street
parking. Possible
apartment in sepa-
rate entrance.
Loads of potential.
For more info and
pictures visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2091
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
EXETER
Vinyl sided 4 bed-
room spacious
home with a great
eat in kitchen,
1 3/4 baths & much
more. Near the
local schools.
PRICE REDUCED
$119,900
MLS# 11-1144
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
EXETER
Nice size 4
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
PAGE 18G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Great buys VERY HIGH AND VERY
DRY !!!! The Views at Eagle View in Jenkins
Township are outstanding. All rear yards
offer breathtaking views of the river and
valley. Youll never nd a better time to
buy your lot. Put a deposit on any lot and
build when you are ready. We are a custom
builder and will build to your plan or modify
one of ours to be your Dream Home.
We have started our landscaping at Eagle
View. making these spectacular lots even
more outstanding. Buy the lot or a lot/
home package. Single homes at $325,000
or Double Ranch at $299,000
Great home. First oor Master
Bedroom, walk-in closet, Master
bathroom suit with sunken tub
and tile shower. Family room
overlooking the patio, valley and
river. Breathtaking views from
the gourmet kitchen. VERY HIGH
AND VERY DRY !!!!
Pick your lot now.$325,000
RIVER SHORES We still have
two great properties in West
Pittstons River Shores.. We
have a ranch with 3400 square
feet of living space with huge
home theater and loft, high
ceilings and two Fps. We also
have a building lot for a custom
home of any size in this great
neighborhood.
Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing
No Hidden Costs
No Hidden Upgrades
2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway
Blakely, PA 18447
570-383-2981 www.heritagehomesltd.com
Featuring:
Northeastern Pennsylvanias
builder for over four decades
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Te Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft.
Starting at $211,900
Te Brentwood - 2,131 sq. ft.
Starting at $177,800
Te Mayeld - 2,202 sq. ft.
Starting at $196,300
Te Bedford C - 2,098 sq. ft.
Starting at $176,800
Scan to visit our website!
HUNLOCK CREEK
18 Meadow Lane
3BR/3BA Log Home. MLS#11-1855
Dir: 309N, L on 118, L @ Olives Diner, 4 mi,
@ fork sharp R to Grassy Pond Rd, 300 yds, L
on Meadow Ln, home 2nd on L
$314,900
Hosted By: Darcy Usavage 570-239-0558
WEST PITTSTON
235 Damon Street
4BRTwo Story. MLS#11-1647
Dir: Wyoming Ave, L on Tunkhannock Ave, R
on Luzerne Ave, L on Damon St
$99,000
Hosted By: Chris Gula 570-466-6909
Open House 1:00-2:30 Open House 12:00-2:00
KINGSTON CLARKS SUMMIT NORTH POCONO TUNKHANNOCK POCONO MOUNTAINS
*JLP PROVIDEDTHROUGHTHE SAVE PROGRAM
*CLOSEDSALES BASEDONCOMPANYWIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERNPAFROM1/1/2010 to 12/31/2010
*Ranking as of Jan. 2011
NEPAS #1 Real Estate Website!
Steve Farrell
Owner/Broker
992 SALES IN2010*
KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700
Top 500 Largest
Brokers in the U.S.
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$123,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular, 2
story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5
baths, new rear
deck, full front
porch, tiled baths
and kitchen, granite
countertops, all
Cherry hardwood
floors throughout,
all new stainless
steel appliances
and lighting, new oil
furnace, washer
dryer in first floor
bath. Great neigh-
borhood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$184,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
GREAT REDUCED
PRICE!
Charming home
with hardwood
floors, fireplace &
Built in's, formal
dining room, 2 car
garage, sunporch
& neat as a pin
throughout! Nice
location on a tree
lined street away
from the hustle
& bustle!
$114,900
MLS# 10-4472
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
FORTY FORT
70 Wesley Street
Very nice, move-in
condition or good
rental property. 1.5
double, 3 bedroom,
living room, kitchen,
dining room, base-
ment & full attic.
Great deal, must
sell, only $30,000.
Call (570) 762-5119
FORTY FORT
REDUCED!
1301 Murray St.
Very nice duplex,
fully rented with
good return in great
neighborhood. For
more information
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2149
$124,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
FRANKLIN TWP.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Chalet style split
level in country set-
ting. 3 bedrooms,
den with wood
burning fireplace,
living room, dining
room, kitchen &
family room. Fin-
ished basement. 1
car attached
garage. Must see!
$189,900
Call (570) 333-4987
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
GLEN LYON
Youll look long &
hard to ever find a
beautiful Double like
this one! Huge
120x130 lot with
detached 2 car
garage & loft ,
modern kitchens,
1.5 baths , pocket
doors & so much
more!
$118,500
MLS# 11-1167
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Reduced!
Bi-Level. 1,750 sq ft.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, 1 car garage.
New carpeting,
paint, etc. Large lot.
Asking $99,900.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
This home says
come in! Youll feel
right at home the
moment you step
inside. 3 large bed-
rooms, 2 modern
baths, modern
kitchen, living room,
dining room with
hardwood floors,
office, laundry room,
comfortable gas
heat, cool central air
and 2 car garage.
You have to see the
patio! MLS 11-2487
$235,000
Call Jerry Bush Jr.
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate
570-288-2514
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
187 South Street
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, modern
kitchen, security
system, beautifully
landscaped patio,
pond & above
ground pool are just
a few of the touch-
es that make this
home so appealing.
Great neighbor-
hood! Close to
major highways.
MLS #11-2370
$129,000
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
HANOVER TWP
710 Church Street
Exceptionally well
care for home in
move in condition.
Everything is new,
roof, siding, win-
dows, porches,
kitchen and baths.
MLS 11-2309
$119,000
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue, LIBERTY HILLS
Fantastic view from
the deck and patio
of this 4 bedroom,
2.5 bath vinyl sided
2 story home. Four
years young with so
many extras. A
dream home!
MLS# 11-2429
$299,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$179,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Dont worry
about winter in
this fully insulat-
ed home with
new windows. 3
floors of living
space lets you
spread out and
enjoy this
house. Large
family room
addition plus 4
bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, 1st floor
laundry, large
corner lot. Mod-
ern kitchen with
granite coun-
ters. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-622
$119,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Attractive, Well
Maintained & Constructed!
3 bedroom, living
room, dining room,
new carpet, new
kitchen (appliances
included), enclosed
patios, floored attic
with electricity, 1.5
baths, hardwood
floors, storage
sheds, new roof,
windows, vinyl sid-
ing, central air, gas
heat, in-ground pool
with new liner,
washer & dryer
included, heated
garage. Excellent
location & much
more! $182,500.
For more informa-
tion: 570-824-7196
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HANOVER TWP.
KORN KREST
322 Spring Street
Out of the flood
area. 2 family
home. One with 2
bedrooms, the
other with 3 bed-
rooms. Needs TLC.
50x125ft lot. Walk-
ing distance to
schools grade 7-12,
kindergarten & 1st.
$49,000.
Kwiatkowski Real Estate
570-825-7988
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
MLS # 10-4324
Reduced to
$44,000
Call Ruth at
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Seller willing to help pay
Buyer's closing costs!!
19 Garrahan Street
Attractive 2-story in
great neighbor-
hood. Newer roof,
newer 2nd floor
replacement win-
dows, newer split
A/C system, large
eat-in kitchen, bed-
room pine flooring,
walk-up attic & a
mostly fenced yard.
REDUCED
$59,900
MLS#11-1754
Call Steve Shemo
(570) 288-1401
(570) 793-9449
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
131 THEODORE ST.,
Beautiful bi-level
located in Hex
Acres, a quiet
country setting, yet
minutes from town.
This home features
quality workman-
ship and finishes
and is in absolute
move-in condition.
Features modern
kitchen and baths,
lower level family
room, sunroom,
deck and above
ground pool. All on
a large nicely land-
scaped lot.
MLS#11-2901
$160,000
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
310 Lockville Rd.
SERENITY
Enjoy the serenity
of country living in
this beautiful two
story home on 2.23
acres. Great for
entertaining inside
and out. 3 car
attached garage
with full walk up
attic PLUS another
2 car detached
garage. WOW! A
MUST SEE! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#11-831
$267,000
Call Nancy
570-237-0752
Melissa
570-237-6384
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 19G
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
Title Insurance
Rapid Title Search & Closing
Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
1
4
0
7
8
For more information or to
schedule an appointment, contact:
Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569
DIR: South Main St., Hanover to right on
Bunker Drive.
MLS#10-2222
Home and Lot Packages
Available!
Only 10 6 Lots Left!!!
Fairway Estates Phase II, Hanover
Home and lot packages available!
Bring your house plan and choose your lot!
Construction by:
Premiere Home Builders, Inc.
Dave & John Pieczynski
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA
Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207
Fax: 696.0677
Direct: 696.6569
cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com
www.poggi-jones.com
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
For more information or to schedule an appointment contact: Christine Pieczynski at 696-6569
DIR: Middle Rd. towards Nanticoke; LEFTonMcGovernHill Road; RIGHTintoLedgewood.
Somerset Drive, Hanover Township
Maintenance Free
Living In
Ledgewood Estates!
Luxury Town
Homes!
Construction by: Premiere
Home Builders
Dave & John Pieczynski
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA
Phone: 696.2600 ext. 207
Fax: 696.0677
Direct: 696.6569
cpieczynski@poggi-jones.com
www.poggi-jones.com
Two-Story units available!
Master bedroom on rst oor.
Ranch units under construction
starting at $199,900
MLS#10-1824 & 11-2625
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Afliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
605 Apple Tree
Road
NOT AFFECTED BY
THE SEPTEMBER
2011 FLOOD.White
split stone Ranch
with 1500 sq. ft. of
living space. 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
propane gas fire-
place with stone
mantel. Custom
kitchen with oak
cabinets with pull
outs. Granite count-
er tops and island,
plaster walls, mod-
ern tile bath, open
floor plan. 2nd
kitchen in lower
level. Electric heat,
wood/coal burner in
basement. Central
air, 2 stoves, 2
dishwashers, 2
microwaves, 2
fridges, front load
washer and dryer
included. Automatic
generator. Attached
2 car garage and
detached 3 car
garage. Home in
near perfect
condition.
For more info and
photos view:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2968
$229,900
Call Lu Ann
570-602-9280
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
HARDING
Route 92
Picture Perfect
View. If you are
looking for excep-
tional value in a rural
property, then dont
pass up this 4 bed-
room, 2 bath home.
Beautiful Landscap-
ing. Includes river-
front property. 1/2
mile from public
boat launch. Not in
Flood Zone.
$150,000
MLS 11-2996
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
New Listing. Unique
Contemporary Log
home with full fin-
ished lower level
family room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
beautiful stone fire-
place, heated In
ground pool & a
great view of the
lake! Very private
setting nestled up
against the woods,
high on the hill.
Loads of charm &
character, One of a
kind home. *Agent
owned. MLS11-3754
$247,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
HARVEYS LAKE
Pole 165
Lakeside Drive
A truly unique
home! 7,300 sq.ft.
of living on 3 floors
with 168' of lake
frontage with
boathouse.
Expansive living
room; dining room,
front room all with
fireplaces.
Coffered ceiling;
modern oak kitchen
with breakfast
room; Florida room;
study & 3 room &
bath suite. 5
bedrooms & 4
baths on 2nd.
Lounge, bedroom,
bath, exercise room
& loft on 3rd floor.
In-ground pool & 2-
story pool house.
AC on 3rd floor.
$1,149,000
MLS# 10-1268
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
HAZLE TOWNSHIP
738 Pardeesville Rd.
Homeowners
Warranty Included
Pardeesville,Beauti-
ful 6 Year Old, 2
Story Colonial 3
Bedrooms, 2.5
Baths, Modern Eat
In kitchen, Formal
Dining Room, Divid-
ed Living Room,
French doors
between kitchen &
Dining Room. Light-
ed Stairway. Great
location for some-
one working at
Humboldt or Val-
mont industrial
parks that does not
want to live in the
city. Basement has
superior wall sys-
tem and is plumbed
for another Bath
room. MLS 11-3175
$220,000
Call Tony Wasco
570-855-2424
Trademark
Realtor Group
570-613-9090
HUGHESTOWN
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$104,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
JENKINS TWP.
(Eagle View)
Home/Lot Package
Beautiful custom
built home with a
stunning river view
overlooking the
Susquehanna River
and surrounding
area. Custom built
with many ameni-
ties included. A few
of the amenities
may include central
A/C, master bed-
room with master
bath, ultramodern
kitchen, hardwood
floors, cathedral
ceiling, and a 2 car
garage. There are
are many other
floor plans to
choose from or
bring your own!
For more details &
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2642
$375,000
Call Kim
570-466-3338
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
10 Miller Street
3 bedroom, 1 bath
ranch recently dam-
aged by flooding.
No structural
issues, roof is
good, will need
basement and first
floor renovations.
Large lot, off-street
parking with car-
port, nice location.
MLS#11-3646
Originally 129,000
Reduced to
$42,500!
Eric Feifer
570-283-9100 x29
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
A HOME FOR A HOME FOR
THE HOLIDA THE HOLIDAYS! YS!
Classic 2 story
home with 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths, 2
car garage. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet, private
yard with above
ground pool,
kitchen overlooks
large family room.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2432
$259,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
475 S. Main St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story home with
vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl sid-
ing, large yard and
off street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3545
Price reduced
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
BACK ON THE
MARKET
23 Mead St.
Newly remodeled 2
story on a corner
lot with fenced in
yard and 2 car
garage. 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
1,660 sq. ft. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$84,900
MLS 10-3684
Call Bill
570-362-4158
KINGSTON
Very attractive
home with a 2
car garage, new
family room &
stainless steel
appliances. Ample
off street parking.
NEW PRICE
$142,600
MLS# 10-4452
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
KINGSTON
Seller Wants To Deal!
Stately home on a
corner lot with a lot
of nooks, crannies
& built-ins. Lower
level living quarters
that would be a
Teens dream!
Formal dining room,
fireplace, formal
entry & more!
$199,500
MLS# 11-1452
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
KINGSTON
125 3rd Ave
Well kept 2 story
with 3 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths situat-
ed on a nice street
in Kingston. Newer
roof, furnace, water
heater, electric
service. Replace-
ment windows
throughout. Base-
ment has high ceil-
ings, ideal for re-fin-
ishing or workshop!
MLS 11-2167
$144,000
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
129 S. Dawes
Ave.
4 bedroom, 1
bath, large
enclosed porch
with brick fire-
place. Full con-
crete basement
with 9ft ceiling.
Lots of storage, 2
car garage on
double lot in a
very desirable
neighborhood.
Close to schools
and park and
recreation. Walk-
ing distance to
downtown Wilkes-
Barre. Great fami-
ly neighborhood.
Carpet allowance
will be consid-
ered. For mor info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realty.inc.com
$129,900
MLS #11-1434
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic and a lower
level bonus recre-
ation room. Great
location, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-612
KINGSTON
621 Gibson Avenue
BY OWNER.
Brick Cape Cod
with hardwood
floors. 3 bedroom,
family room, 2 bath,
living room with
fireplace, two car
garage with loads
of storage, partially
finished basement.
Price Reduced!
$179,900
Call (570) 333-5212
No Brokers Please.
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
663 Westmoreland
Avenue
Charming 2-1/2
story with 3 bed-
rooms on 2nd + a
4th (12x24) on 3rd,
full bath upstairs,
half bath with laun-
dry on 1st floor, lots
of closet space, fin-
ished walk-out
basement and much
more! MLS 11-2340
$185,000
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Very well main-
tained 2 bedroom
home with updated
kitchen with granite
counter. Large sun-
room over looking
private back yard.
Attached garage,
large unfinished
basement. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2278
$129,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace & more.
$105,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-5pm
46 Zerby Ave
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with
5% down; $6,750
down, $684/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
REDUCED
167 N. Dawes Ave.
Move in condition 2
story home. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
hardwood floors,
ceramic throughout.
Finished lower level,
security system
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1673
$154,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Spacious 2 story
home on lovely tree
lined street.
Includes 3 bed-
rooms, 3 baths (1
on each floor), Liv-
ing room, dining
room, family room,
office and kitchen.
All new windows,
fresh paint.
MLS 11-2676
$136,000
Call Kathy
570-696-5422
SMITH
HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
SUNDAY, OCT-30
1:00PM-3PM
Stately brick 2-story
featuring formal liv-
ing room with fire-
place, formal dining
room, modern cher-
ry kitchen, knotty
pine study, spacious
family room, sun-
room, computer
room, TV room, 4
bedrooms, 5 baths.
MLS#11-2250
$339,000
Call Ruthie
570-714-6110
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
570-287-1196
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
KINGSTON
SALE BY OWNER!
Charming, histori-
cal & well main-
tained. Front
porch, foyer
entrance, hard-
wood floors,
granite kitchen, 4
bedrooms, living
and dining room,
2 fireplaces, 2.5
baths, sun room,
basement with
plenty of storage.
Lovely back yard.
$195,000
570-472-1110
LAFLIN
Spacious ranch with
4 bedrooms, 1 3/4
baths, 18x22 Family
room with fireplace
on a 102x150 lot.
Fantastic view from
the rear deck!
MLS# 11-2609
$147,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
5 Fairfield Drive
Motivated seller!
Move right in just in
time to entertain for
the holidays in this
3 bedroom 2.5 bath
home in a private
setting. Prepare for
the festivities in this
spacious gourmet
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and Subzero
refrigerator. Your
guests can enjoy
the spectacular
view of the West
mountains. Must
see to appreciate
all of the amenities
this home has
to offer. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1686
$314,900
Call Keri
570-885-5082
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LAFLIN
22 Dogwood Drive
Beautifully kept
home on a quiet
dead-end street.
Handicap accessi-
ble. Convenient
Laflin location, close
to interstate and
turnpike. Last home
on street makes it
very private and
quiet! Home fea-
tures large base-
ment with extra ceil-
ing height, living
room opens to mod-
ern, eat-in kitchen,
4 bedrooms, 2 full
baths. Beautifully
landscaped yard
with large deck and
pond. MLS#11-3432
$218,900
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
PAGE 20G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown, PA 18708
Phone: 570-696-2600
Fax: 570-696-0677
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort, PA 18704
Phone: 570-283-9100
Fax: 570-283-9101
Edmund H. Poggi, III
President/Owner
Visit Our Website: www.poggi-jones.com
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affliates, Inc., a Prudential
Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many
jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.
How would you like to receive
a weekly report showing whos
been searching for your home online?
With Online Sellers Advantage you can!
OSA automatically keeps you up-to-date on
both your house and local market conditions.
Its an exclusive tool that distinguishes your
property from competing listings.
OSA maximizes your homes exposure.
Only one real estate company has it,
Prudential Poggi &Jones, REALTORS.
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2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. Prudential Real Estate brokerage services are offered through the independently owned and operated franchisees of
l Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered services marks of Prudential Financial, Inc,
Equal Housing Opportunity.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY,OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 21G
906 Homes for Sale
LAKE SILKWORTH
Lake house com-
pletely remodeled
interior and exteri-
or. 2 bedroom, 1
bath, laundry room
and carport. Deed-
ed lake Access
MLS 11-2345
$88,000
Barbara Strong
570-762-7561
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES
570-735-7494
LARKSVILLE
Losing Hair House
Hunting? Reduce
the anxiety with
triple assurance of
good location,
extensive renova-
tions and new
kitchen and baths
that come with this
lovely two story with
great rear deck.
Comforting price
too - just $119,900.
MLS 11-1856. Call
Tracey McDermott
570-696-2468
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in move
in condition with
updated kitchen
and baths. Nice
yard with shed and
potential off street
parking. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LUZERNE
4 bed, 1 1/2 bath.
WOW - Talk about
Charm! Stained
glass windows,
HUGE rooms, beau-
tiful woodwork and
wood floors plus
storage. Nice 162
sq ft enclosed
porch, 1886 sq ft.
Massive storage
unit outback, can be
converted to a mul-
tiple car garage.
Endless possibilities
here. Just needs the
right person to love
it back to life. MLS
11-3282. $139,900.
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
LUZERNE
867 Bennett
With just a minimum
amount of TLC, this
is a great starter
home. Nice location
with great view of
Wyoming Valley and
beyond, off street
parking in rear via
alley. All measure-
ments approximate.
BeinG sold as is.
MLS 10-2774
$60,000
Call Michelle
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LUZERNE
REDUCED!
262 WALNUT ST.
Nicely redone 2
story on large
fenced corner lot.
Updates include,
vinyl siding, win-
dows, electric serv-
ice & wiring, newer
carpeting, 2 zoned
gas heat and all
new 2nd floor (gut-
ted and reinsulated.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
large eat in kitchen,
1st floor laundry and
attached shed that
could be a nice 2nd
bath. Shed and off
street parking
for 6 cars.
MLS 11-2564
$104,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
MESHOPPEN
Novak Road
Lovely, nearly com-
pleted, renovated
Victorian farmhouse
sits high on 7.81
acres featuring
panoramic pastoral
views, high ceilings,
original woodwork,
gutted, rewired,
insulated and sheet-
rocked, newer roof,
vinyl siding, kitchen
and baths. Gas
rights negotiable.
Lots of potential
with TLC. Elk Lake
$129,900
MLS# 11-525 Call
570-696-2468
MOUNTAIN TOP
257 Main Road S
2 bedroom Ranch.
Large rear yard.
Hardwood floors!
Large eat-in
kitchen. Large living
room with hard-
wood and family
room with carpet.
New roof in 2011!
Ideal starter home.
MLS#11-1966
$119,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 story, 5 bedroom
home completely
remodeled in & out.
$245k with owner
financing with
20% down or will
lease with option
to purchase.
tj2isok@gmail.com
MOUNTAIN TOP
NEW LISTING
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night. Price
to sell, $185,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage
leads to finished
lower level. Modern
kitchen & bath, tile
floors. MLS#11-2500
$184,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#11-2600
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
HEIGHTS SECTION
ENORMOUS 4+ bay
garage!! Plus 1
more garage for
gadgets! Pretty 4
bedroom Cape with
a supplemental coal
unit and a beautiful
view from the
back yard.
NEW PRICE!!
$85,900
MLS# 11-2088
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
This very nice family
home, as it has
been for many
years, with a
detached garage,
1 3/4 baths, 4 bed-
rooms & so much
more is waiting for
your private tour.
MLS #11-2654
$78,600
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
111 E. Grand St.
One half double
block. 3 bedrooms,
plaster walls, alu-
minum siding & nice
yard. Affordable @
$34,900
Call Jim Krushka
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
414 E. Grove Street
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
2 story with off
street parking,
backyard, new oil
furnace, windows,
wiring, kitchen,
bath, flooring &
paint. Excellent
condition. $86,000.
Call Bill Remey @
570-714-6123
NANTICOKE
W. Green St.
Nice 2 bedroom
Ranch style home,
gas heat, finished
basement, vinyl sid-
ing, deck. Move in
Condition. Affordable
@ $89,500. Call Jim
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NEW COLUMBUS
19 Academy St
Peaceful living with
easy drive to town.
Beautifully main-
tained 3Bedroom
Ranch on 1.5 acres,
2 car garage, gas
fireplace, hard-
woods, large
deck... Lots to see.
Call today for a pri-
vate showing.
MLS 10-3480
$138,700
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
PENN LAKE
HOME FOR SALE
Crestwood School
District. Stunning
Cape Cod (architec-
turally designed).
Three bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths 2 car
garage on one acre.
Features include:
large front porch,
deck, beautiful
kitchen with corian
countertops, break-
fast nook & island.
black appliances;
hardfloors, formal
dining room with
wainscoting. Two
story vaulted family
room with fireplace;
first floor master
bedroom/ bath with
jacuzzi, walk in
shower & vanity
dressing area built
in; abundant clos-
ets, den on first
floor plus laundry;
second story has 2
additional bedrooms
& bath. Full base-
ment. Please call or
email for details.
$349,900
Dee Fields,
Associate Broker
570-788-7511
deefieldsabroker@gmail.com
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch??? Check
out this double wide
with attached 2 car
garage on a perma-
nent foundation.
Large master bed-
room suite with
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal dining
room, vaulted ceil-
ings throughout and
MORE!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
Privacy abounds
this beauty on
almost 3 acres of
Pure Privacy
tucked away from
the hustle & bustle
of everyday stress.
4 bedrooms, 1 3/4
baths with a 2 car
detached garage &
workshop. This
19x30 master bed-
room will knock
your socks off!
MLS #11-2705
$252,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$89,900
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON
214 Elizabeth St.
3 bedroom, Victori-
an, semi modern
kitchen, 1 full - 2 1/2
baths. 1st floor
laundry, gas heat,
finished lower level
with walk out, large
shed. A must see at
this price.
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1677
$79,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
44 Lambert St
Beautiful, cozy
home. Upstairs
laundry, lots of clos-
et space.Tastefully
renovations. extra
large driveway.low
maintenance.ther-
mostats in each
room. all measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 11-2210
$89,900
David Krolikowski
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
51 Plank St.
4 bedroom Vic-
torian home
completely
remodeled with
new kitchen &
baths. New
Berber carpet,
modern stain-
less steel appli-
ances in
kitchen. Private
yard, wrap
around porch,
corner lot with
off street park-
ing. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2864
$99,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
PITTSTON
64 Thistle St
Great family home
with 3 bedrooms,
family room off semi
modern kitchen.
Nice woodworking,
newer roof, and
upgraded electrical
& over sized 1 car
garage.
MLS 11-2306
$89,900
Call Nancy
Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P.
GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
85 La Grange St
Good investment
property. All units
are rented. All utili-
ties paid by tenants.
MLS 11-1497
$83,900
Gloria Jean Malarae
570-814-5814
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
ext. 1366
PITTSTON
99 1/2 Pine St.
The owner of this
house took pride in
its upkeep. It is
meticulous. Home
has 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, eat in kitchen,
living room and din-
ing room. Walkout
basement with pan-
eled walls and heat.
Large yard with
newer one car
detached garage,
accessed from rear
alley. MLS 11-3555
$48,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
Handy Man Special
Double Block on
Cornelia Street.
BEING SOLD AS
IS NOT IN FLOOD
ZONE. 6 rooms per
side. Newer fur-
nances & roof.
Large lot & nice
neighborhood.
$35,000
ALL SERIOUS OFFERS
CONSIDERED
570-655-9731
PITTSTON
Handyman Special
Pine Street
House, and/or sep-
arate corner lot
property $10,000.
each, or $15,000.
for both.
Call (215) 295-6951
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$59,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
SUSCON AREA
New Listing. Won-
derful home on a
huge country size
lot, in a private set-
ting, just off the
beaten path. Eco-
nomical Dual heat
system, central A/C
plus ductless unit,
Lower Level family
room, detached 2
car garage, fire-
place & a great
view from the front
porch! MLS 11-3733
$229,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PITTSTON TWP.
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$172,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PITTSTON TWP.
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$69,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP.
48 Lewis St.
Move right into this
cute Cape Cod. It is
in a nice neighbor-
hood and has a first
floor master bed-
room. This is a
must see!
MLS 11-3277
$149,900
Call Joe Caprari
570-239-9663
PITTSTON TWP.
754 Laurel St.
Absolutely beau-
tiful move in
condition. This 2
bedroom Ranch
home with fully
finished base-
ment is in excel-
lent condition.
Come and see
for yourself. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3796
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
993 Sunrise Dr.
Horizon Estates
Fabulous end unit
townhome provides
luxurious, carefree
living. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 1st
floor master suite.
Ultra kitchen with
granite and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room with
built in cabinet. 2
story living room
with gas fireplace
and hardwood. 2
car garage, mainte-
nance free deck,
nice yard that can
be fenced. Low
HOA fee for snow
removal and grass
cutting. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3488
$289,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
122 PARNELL ST.
Beautiful bi-level
home on corner lot.
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, newer roof
and windows.
Fenced in yardFor
more info and phtos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.om
MLS 11-2749
$189,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PLAINS
Large 4 bedroom, 1
bath home on extra
deep lot with
frontage on 2
streets. Multi family
unit (MLS #11-2244)
next door also for
sale. Possible com-
mercial use with
rezoning.
$93,500
MLS# 11-2228
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
3 unit income prop-
erty on extra deep
lot with frontage on
2 streets. Single
family home next
door (MLS#11-2228)
also for sale.
Possible commer-
cial use with
rezoning.
$78,000
MLS#11-2244
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
PLAINS
17 N. Beech
Road
(N. on Main St.,
Plains, turn right
in Birchwood
Hills and onto
Beech Rd,
House on right)
Lovely updated
Ranch home
with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. 1
car garage in
the very desir-
able Birchwood
Hills develop-
ment. Electric
heat, newer
roof, great curb
appeal. Huge
fenced in back
yard with new
shed, plenty of
closets and
storage.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3003
$139,900
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
S
O
L
D
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PLAINS
KEYSTONE SECTION
9 Ridgewood Road
TOTAL BEAUTY
1 ACRE- PRIVACY
Beautiful ranch 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
attic for storage,
washer, dryer & 2
air conditioners
included. New
Roof & Furnace
Furnished or unfur-
nished.
Low Taxes! New
price $118,500
570-885-1512
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
Updated 2-story, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home has 1 car
garage & carport,
fenced rear yard
with tiered deck and
more. MLS#11-3655
$152,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fend in yard.
3-4 bedrooms and
1.5 baths. Finished
lower level, office
and laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$104,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PLYMOUTH
6 Mooney Road
Mobile home on
permanent founda-
tion with basement
& built-in garage.
Two parking areas,
rear patio. Pleasant
road off the beaten
path. 11-3372
$36,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-612
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 1791 sq. ft.
1/2 double with
wrap around porch,
shed & garage.
Semi modern
kitchen & bath. 3
bedrooms with gas
heat and plenty of
storage. $24,900.
Possible rent to own
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
SHAVERTOWN
200 Woodbine Road
Distinctive 2 story.
Outstanding outside
and in. Beautiful
brick paver drive-
way and walkway
lead into a grand
foyer with oak stair-
case. Hardwoods
and marble floors
throughout. Retreat
to a full finished
basement with
stone fireplace, wet
bar and full bath.
Deck, patio and
sprinkler system.
MLS 11-1463
$429,900
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
Lovely 3 bedroom
2400 sf Cape Cod
with modern eat-in
kitchen, large sun-
room & family room.
Master bedroom
with master bath.
Central air, gas heat
& 2 car garage.
Very well land-
scaped with beauti-
ful paver sidewalks.
Quiet neighborhood.
Possible 6 month
rental for the right
tenant. $229,000
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
SHAVERTOWN
Woodridge I
This spacious 2
story sits on a pri-
vate partially wood-
ed lot with inground
pool. Plenty of living
space, living room
with fireplace, first
floor den, and laun-
dry, needs some
attention but well
worth the price.
$159,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654
570-760-6769
SHICKSHINNY
17 Main Road
REDUCED
Lovely Country set-
ting for the cute Bi-
Level on 5.34 acres.
Property features 4
Bedrooms, 1.75
baths, living room,
kitchen, family room
& laundry room.
Plus 2 car attached
garage, 30' X 35'
detached garage
and 14' X 28' shed.
MLS 11-1335
$210,000
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SWEET VALLEY
23 Wesland Avenue
Immaculate 2 story
home in nice area
with kitchen, living
room, dining room,
family room, laundry
& 3/4 bath on 1st
floor. 4 Bedrooms,
full bath & walk-in
closet on 2nd floor.
Plus new roof, 2 tier
deck, 2 car garage,
paved driveway &
above ground pool.
MLS 11-1526
$230,000
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice Country Bi-
Level on 40 acres
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, kitchen,
living room, family
room, office & laun-
dry room. Plus
attached oversized
2 car garage with
workshop, rear
deck & 3 sheds.
MLS 11-1094
$319,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED!
4 Oliver Road
Located in the back
part of Oliver Road
in a very private part
of North Lake in
Sweet Valley. Yearn-
ing to be restored,
lake front cape cod
in a very tranquil
setting was formerly
used as a summer
home. MLS 11-2113
$99,000
Jay Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
2 Unit Duplex &
Double Block
with a
4 Bay Garage.
Family owned for
many years.
BIG REDUCTION
$100,000
MLS# 09-1643
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288--0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
171 Oliver St.
Very well main-
tained 2 story
home. 3 bedrooms
and a bath with gas
heat. Front room
was former store
front which would
make a nice size
family room/den!
Many possibilities
MLS 11-1451
$74,000
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
33 Oliver St.
FOR FOR SALE SALE
BY BY OWNER OWNER
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
nice level yard,
wonderful neighbor-
hood completely
out of flood plane.
$66,900
570-472-3334
570-239-1557
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautiful 2 story, 3
bedroom home.
Modern kitchen &
bath. Nice yard. Gas
heat. $69,900. Call
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SWOYERSVILLE
Luxurious End Townhouse
3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, hardwood
floors, gas heat,
Central Air, master
bath with whirlpool
tub plus shower,
2nd floor laundry,
lovely landscaped
fenced yard, 1 car
garage.
MLS#11-3533
$209,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
SWOYERSVILLE
OUT OF FLOOD
ZONE
Estate. Nice brick
front ranch home on
a corner lot. 1 car
attached garage,
circle driveway,
central air. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath
with 2 showers, Full
basement with
brand new water
proofing system
that includes a war-
ranty. Great loca-
tion. MLS 11-2127
$108,500
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond!
$99,700
MLS#11-2253
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
T I M E S L E A D E R PAGE 22G SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 PAGE 23G
Call Marcie Petrucelli 570.714.9267 or Marie Montante 570.714.9279
Lewith&FreemanReal Estate, Inc.
570.288.9371 www.lewith-freeman.com
LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS
2-3 Bedrooms with 1st Floor Master
Distinctive Design &Architecture
Unit pricing starts at $269,000
Project now
owned and under development by
Audi Management IV LLC
www.gordonlong.com
MAIN ROAD,
SWEET VALLEY
Country charm in
this 3,000 sq. ft.
home + large garage.
May be used as
commercial.
$199,000
Call Cherub 792-4641
Listing#11-2554
1046 N. Memorial Hwy., Dallas
Across From Agway
(570) 675-4400
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
Smith Hourigan Group
358 South Memorial Highway, Shavertown
(570)696-1195
Visit Us @ century21SHGroup.com
Im Sue Barre. I sell houses,
and I can sell yours. (570) 696-5417
Over 6000 sf of storage or
warehouse space. Some
open, some divided space.
Two 14 foot high doors, one
single one double to back in
trucks.Ofce space w/loads
of workspace & shelving,
heated AC, small kitchen
half bath & bath w/shower.
200 amp elec, large parking
lot with space for at least 6
cars. Forklift in Bldg sold
separately. $169,900
411 N. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Visit Us @ ce
Warehouse Dropped $30,000!!
NORTH LAKE WYOMING
DALLAS
WILLOW VIEW Beautiful custom Willow View 3 story features
HW foors on 1st foor, modern kitchen, great windows & design,
fnished LL, patio & C/A. MLS# 11-3888
VIRGINIA 714-9253 $399,000
SHAVERTOWN Not a cookie cutter! Spacious fexible rooms. Af-
ford easy lifestyle changes. Enjoy summer on the porch or walk
the land. MLS# 11-786
BARB B. 696-0890 $419,000
10 Dakota Dr
DALLAS DAKOTA WOODS - Carefree Condo -Bright & spacious
w/3 BRs, 1st fr master, study/library, kit w/granite & upscale
appls, 2 car gar. MLS#11-3208 RHEA 696-6677 $379,000
Dir: Rt 309N to R into Dakota Woods.
34 S. River Street
WILKES-BARRE Outstanding brick bldg! Great for professional
offces. Parking for 7-10 cars.
MLS#08-2790 PEG 714-9247 $515,000
DALLAS This outstanding Federal brick & stone home is situated on 7acres
& overlooks the Huntsville Reservoir. Inviting foyer w/lovely curved stair-
case - spacious rms offer HW frs, period moldings & cabinetry & wonderful
arched doorways. Stunning kitchen is classic yet ultra modern w/Viking &
Sub-Zero - 5BRs, 4 baths - Beautifully landscaped property is complete with
a carriage house & Bocce court. MLS# 11-2533
RHEA 696-6677 $785,000
EXETER Well maintained 6yr old 2 story w/4BRs, 3 baths, of-
fce, large Master Suite, HW foors, 2 car garage, large yard on a
quiet cul-de-sac. MLS# 11-2678
MIKE D. 714-9236 $269,000
DALLAS A grand entrance leads you to this stunning Craftsman style home on 11+
acres complete w/pond, stream & rolling meadows. This dramatic home is in pristine
condition. The 2 story great room w/stone FP & warm wood walls is one of the focal
points of this home. Offers modern kitchen/baths, formal LR & family room. Recently
built 3 car garage w/guest quarters above is a plus. Youll spend many hours on the
la