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THE

Norway Aki Niemi Nokia.*-4t\ I Miikka Poikselkii Nokia. . . Finland \ne-1:: . \ n . . . Finland \orW UP=- Hisham Khartabil Telio. Finland 1@ t)!r":tn's i I JOHN WILEY & SONS. ' ti Georg Mayer Nokia.\u THE IP Multimedia Concepts and Services SECOND EDITION . .LTD .

111 River Street. or emailed to permreq@wi1ey. mechanical. Wiltshire.dc22 Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library British Library (HB) tsBN-13 978-0-470-01906-1 (HB) rsBN-l00-470-01906-9 Project management by Originator. It is sold on the understanding that the Publisher is not engaged in rendering professional services. Hoboken.wilev. 2. paper) ISBN-13: 978-0-470-01906-1 ISBN-l0: 0.Pub lication Data 2nd ed The IMS: IP multimedia concepts and services / Miikka Poikselkii . 3. Miikka. . Gt Yarmouth. Chippenham. England. Etobicoke. West Sussex POl9 8SQ. except under the terms of the Copyright.co. electronic. TK5l03 2. 12.].{4) 1243 770620 Designations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimed as trademarks. or faxed to (+. If professional advice or other expert assistance is required. Mobile communication systems. West Sussex POl9 8SQ. London WIT 4LP.uk. photocopying. Designs and Patents Act 1988 or under the terms of a licence issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency Ltd. Requests to the Publisher should be addressed to the Permissions Department. CA 94103-1741. NJ 07030. Boschstr. D-69469 Weinheim. I. Norfolk (typeset in 10/12pt Times). This book is printed on acid-free paper responsibly manufactured from sustainable forestry in which at least trvo trees are planted for each one used for paper production. Jin Xing Distripark. Canada M9W ll-l Wiley-VCH Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. All brand names and product names used in this book are trade names. Multimedia communications. Southern Gate. 42 McDougall Street. (cloth : alk. Inc. Ontario.. SouthernGate. The Atrium.fK 5\o B. Australia John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd. USA Jossey-Bass. Queensland 4064. 22 Worcester Road. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. without the permission in writing of the Publisher. : [et al. Printed and bound in Great Britain by Antony Rowe Ltd. II. Poikselkii. Chichester.L Copyright O 2006 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. England Telephone(+44) 1243779777 cs-books@wiley.cm. This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. UK.148 2006 2005026755 621. p. San Francisco. Wireless communication systems. scanning or otherwise. recording.470-01906-9(cloth : alk paper) l. stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means.uk service enquiries): Email (for ordersand customer Visit our Home Paeeon www. 90 Tottenham Court Road. Chichester.USA Verlag GmbH.382'12 .com "T+tr 2no ( All Rights Reserved. Germany John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd. The Publisher is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book. 2 Clementi Loop #02-01. Singapore 129809 John Wiley & Sons Canada Ltd. 989 Market Street. Milton.co. No part of this publication may be reproduced. The Atrium. trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. Title: IP Multimedia Subsvstem. Sonre content that appears in print may not be available in electronic books of C ongress C ataloging-in. Includes bibliographical references and index. the services of a competent professional should be sought Other Wiley Editorial Olfices John Wiley & Sons.

1 .1 Architectural requirements 2.Contents Foreword by Petri Piiyhiinen Foreword by Alan Duric Preface Acknowledgements List of figures List of tables xxxl PART I IMS ARCHITECTURE AND CONCEPTS J J Introduction 1. s Secure communication 2 .3 3GPPRelease 4 1.4 3GPPReleases 6 and 7 5.1 From GSM to 3GPPRelease 7 1.1.1.3. IP Multimedia Subsystem architecture 2.3 Wheredid it comefrom? 1.3.1.1 What is the InternetProtocolMultimedia Subsystem (IMS)? 1.3"2 3GPPRelease (3GPPR99) 99 1.2 IP connectivity 2.3 Ensuring quality of servicefor IP multimedia services 2.4 IP policy control for ensuring correctusageof media Iesources 2 .2 Exampleof IMS services 1.1 IP multimediasessions 2.3. 1 . 6 Charging arrangements 5 6 6 6 1 8 ll l1 ll 12 13 13 t4 t4 .1.

ll 2.10 Servicedevelopment Layered design 2.2 2.3.16 Mr reference point 2.4 2.2.12 Mj reference point 2.3.7 point Dh reference 2.1 Overview 3.3.1.5 Supportfunctions 2.3.12 Accessindependence Descriptionof IMS-relatedentitiesand functionalities (CSCF) Call Session Control Functions 2.3.3.13 Mk reference point 2.3.9 Service 2.2.7 points IMS reference point 2.14 Mn reference point 2.10 Mg reference point 2.Contents 2.2 point IMS Service Control (ISC) reference 2.5 Identification Identificationof users 3.5 point relerence 2.1.3.3.3.5.2.11 Mi reference point 2.2.3.3 point Cx reference 2.15 Ut reference point 2.1 Gm reference point Mw reference 2.4 point Dx reference 2.1.6 Sh point Si reference 2.5.5 2.3.8 controlmodel 2.3 Service Interworkingfunctions 2.2 Registration at multiple useridentities a go to 3.9 point 2.3.3.l.3 .3.3.8 point Mm reference 2.4 Session 3.2.2.1 (public service identities) Identificationof services 3.3 Mechanism register initiation 3.3.19 Gq reference points 2.1 Databases 2.3.2 ldentificationof network entities 3.7 Supportof roaming Interworkingwith other networks 2.6 Chargingentities GPRS entities 2.2 functions 2.1.5.3.1.18 Go reflerence point 2.3.2.17 Mp reference point 2.20 Chargingreference 15 l6 t7 t7 t7 l9 19 20 z) 24 26 27 28 28 28 29 30 30 JT 34 34 36 36 36 36 36 JI aa JI aJI 31 38 38 38 38 39 43 43 43 45 46 48 48 52 52 IMS concepts 3.

3 Interworking scenarios 3.9.7 Chargingidentifiers exchange function 3.2 CS-originated session toward a userin IMS Fixed and mobile convergence SIP compression Interworkingbetween IPv4 and IPv6 in the IMS 3.1l.13.4 Indicationof bearerrelease function 3.14.6.14.11.I 3.3 Removalof the QoS commit function 3.13.5 MaintainingS-CSCFassignment Mechanism controllingbearertraffic for 3.12 3.1 Introduction 3.9.11.13.1 S-CSCFassigrment during registration 3.9 3.14 3.2 Approval of the QoS commit function 3.1 Service provision Service 3.11.3 Selection AS of 3.5 Charging points reference 3.1 IMS-originated session toward a userin the CS core network 3.10.11.12.11.9.l Chargingarchitecture 3.10.17.17.17 Identity modules 3.13 3.1 IP Multimedia Services Identity Module (ISIM) 3.11.15 3.10 3.8 Usageof Gq reference point Charging 3.1I 3.17.10.9.6.1 Introduction 3.17.1 Bearerauthorization 3.5 Indicationof bearerloss/recovery 3.16 3.4 S-CSCF de-assisnment 3.8 3.Contents vu 3.3 S-CSCFassignment error cases in 3.4 Intra-domainscenarios 53 53 54 54 55 56 57 58 58 58 58 58 60 70 7l 7l 7l 7l 72 72 75 75 76 78 79 80 84 86 86 86 90 90 9l 93 94 94 94 95 96 97 98 98 r00 101 101 .4 AS behaviour Connectivity between traditionalCS usersand IMS users 3.9.10.3 Onlinecharging 3.6 Revokefunction 3.10.13.2 Creationof filter criteria 3.7 Charginginformationdistribution Userprofile profile 3.10.2 IPv6-onlyversusdual stack 3.2 UniversalSubscriber Identity Module (USIM) Sharinga singleuser identity betweenmultiple devices Discovering IMS entry point the S-CSCFassignment 3.10.10.6 J.6 Charging information correlation 3.2 Offiinecharging 3.2 S-CSCFassignment an unregistered for user 3.4 Flow-basedcharging 3.

4 Session-basedmessaging Deferred delivery messaging 5.11.1 Overview of IMS messaging IMS messagingarchitecture 5.18.1 PoC server PoC client 6.19.3 NetworkDomain Security services securityfor SlP-based 3.4 Subscribine to watcher information Messaging 5.ll Example signalling flows of presenceservice operation 4.5 IMS access l0r 101 103 t04 104 104 106 106 106 101 109 l12 115 PART II SERVICES rt7 ll9 119 Presence Who will use the presenceservice? 4.19.18.8 Settingpresenceauthorization Publishingpresence 4.2 Authenticationand Key Agreement (NDS) 3.18.2 lmmediatemessaging 5.3 Presencecontributing to business 4.19.1 services 4.19 Securityservices the IMS model 3.1 lPv4-onlyaccess services 3.2 Capabilityexchange CS 3.1.18 Combinationof CS and IMS services combinational 3.2 Successfulpublication of presenceinformation 4.19.7 Presentity list 4.1.17.vllt Contents scenarios 3.1 Introduction 3.1 IMS security (AKA) 3.11.ll.9 4.17.l Successfulsubscription to presence 4.4 What is presence? 4.4 IMS access services securitvfor HTTP-based 3.5 Inter-domain and bootstrapping 3.6 Configuration networks 3.5 Push to talk Over Cellular PoC architecture 6.3 5.6 Presenceservice architecture in IMS 4.11.17.5 SIP for presence 4.3 Parallel and IMS services in 3.1 6.10 Watcher information event template package 4.2 Presence-enhanced 4.3 Subscribing to a resource list 4.19.2 t20 t20 t2l l2l t22 t23 123 t24 124 r24 124 r24 125 125 t27 127 t27 t28 r28 130 131 131 133 135 .

3 Resource list 8.2.2.2.3 Example signalling flows of conferencing service operation 7.2.Contents lx 6.3.2.4 PoC features 6.6.1 Creating a conferencewith a conferencefactory URI 7.3 6.1 Overview 10.3 Subscribins to a conferencestate Groupmanagement 8.2 Talk burst control 6.3 PoC session establishment models 6.4 Transport .3.1 Talk bursts 6.I The example scenario 9.6 Group advertisement 6.1 PoC communication 6.3.2 Referring a user to a conferenceusing the REFER request '7.3.3.1 PoC group policy 8.6 PoC XDM application usages 8.4 IncomingPoC session treatment 6.5 Instant personal alerts 6.2 Basestandards 10 An exampleIMS registration 10.3 Quality feedback PoC service settings 135 135 136 137 r39 t42 r43 144 145 145 t46 146 148 149 151 151 152 152 152 153 153 Conferencing 7.6.2 Signalling PDP contextestablishment 10.3.2 PoC useraccess r55 156 156 t51 159 160 160 160 r62 165 167 t67 168 I7l I7l t73 t73 174 PART III DETAILED PROCEDURES Introductionto detailedprocedures 9.3 P-CSCFdiscovery protocols 10.8 Participantinformation User plane 6.4 XCAP usage resource for lists 8.2.1 Conferencing architecture 7.2 SIP event package for conferencestate 7.2.1 Group management's contributionto business 8.2 6.5 PoC XML DocumentManagement (XDM) specification 8.2.2 PoC sessions Simultaneous 6.7 Barringfeatures 6.2 What is group management? 8.

6.6.8.5.2 Establishing SA during initial registration an 10.5.5 From the I-CSCFto the S-CSCF 10.5.4 The Security-Server headerin the 401 (Unauthorized) respollse 10.9 The Path header 10.6.9 Compression negotiation 10.5.1 Overview 10.4 comp: SigCompparameter other requests in 10.7.7.5 Related standards 174 t74 t74 177 178 178 t79 180 180 181 181 183 t83 183 185 185 186 187 187 188 188 188 188 190 193 193 t97 t97 t97 t98 t99 200 200 201 202 203 203 204 204 205 205 .4 S-CSCFchallenges UE the 10.7 Relatedstandards 10.9.3 Sip-Sec-Agree-related in headers the initial REGISTER request 10.5.6.6 Authentication 10.5.1 Why the SIP SecurityMechanism Agreement needed is 10.10 Third-party registration applicationservers to 10.7.8.9.7 The 200(OK) response 10.6 Registration the S-CSCF at 10.5.5.9.2 Indicatingwillingness useSigComp to parameter 10.8.7 Relatedstandards 10.6 Integrityprotectionand successful authentication 10.9.5 Port setting and routing 10.5 SIP registration and registration routing aspects 10.1 Overview 10.1 Overview 10.3 Handling of multiple setsof SAs in caseof re-authentication 10.7.1 Access security IPsecSAs 10.6 Sip-Sec-Agree re-registration and 10.3 comp: SigComp duringregistration 10.7.2 HTTP digestand 3GPPAKA 10.4 SA lifetime 10.8.11 Related standards 10.1 Overview 10.9.8.3 Authentication informationin the initial REGISTER request 10.5 Sip-Sec-Agree headers the second in REGISTER 10.8.5.5.5 UE's response the challenge to 10.8 The Service-Route header 10.8 SIP SecurityMechanism Agreement 10.6.Contents 10.7.5.6 Relatedstandards 10.8.2 Constructing REGISTER request the 10.3 From the UE to the P-CSCF 10.4 From the P-CSCFto the I-CSCF 10.6.6.2 Overview 10.

Charging-related ll informationduring registration 10.13.14De-registration l0. dialog.12.ll Related standards 10.13.l5.1 User-initiated re-registration 10.8 Registration-state informationin the body of the NOTIFY request 10.1 Overview 11.transactions and branch 206 206 206 207 207 207 207 208 209 209 210 212 214 2t4 2t6 2t8 218 2r9 2r9 219 220 221 22r 221 223 225 226 226 226 228 23r 231 253 233 233 233 235 237 237 237 238 .3 Identification the callins user:P-Preferred-Identity and of P-Asserted-Identity 11.2 Early IMS security scenarios 11 An exampleIMS session I l.l2.2.12User identities 10.13Re-registration re-authentication and 10.2 Session.3 Network-initiated re-authentication 10.15.10.3 Identity derivationwithout ISIM header 10.10.12.12.9 Exampleregistration-state information information 10.2.2.2 Callerand calleeidentities 11.l4.l Overview ll.3 Network-initiated de-registration 10.I2.4 Relatedstandards 10.2 From and To headers 11.12.1 Overview 11.1 Overview for 10.14.5 UE's subscription registration-state to information 10.12.Contents 10.2 Public and privateuseridentities registration 10.4 Default public useridentity/P-Associated-URl information 10.3.2.3 Related standards 10.14.3.1 P-Access-Network-Info 10.3 Routing I 1.2.2 P-Visited-Network-ID 10.l ExampleIMS registration with fallbackto early IMS security 10.13.I2.12.2 Network-initiated re-authentication notification 10.10Access and locationinformation 10.12.14.2 User-initiated de-registration 10.5 Relatedstandards I 1.4 Relatedstandards 10.l Overview 10.10.4 Identificationof the calleduser 11.6 P-CSCF'ssubscription registration-state to information 10.15EarlyIMS Secuirty l0.13.12.10Multiple terminalsand registration-state l0.7 Elements registration-state of 10.

3 Correlation GCID and ICID of 11.3 Compression responses of 11.7.2 Mediaauthorization 11.8.1 User-initiated session release 11.6.9.4 Preconditions I 1.8.9 Release a session of I 1.9 Relatedstandards ll.2 Compression the initial request of 11.6 Media policing ll.4.1 Overview 11.3.7.9.5 Relatedstandards I 1.7.7 Controllingthe media ll.8 Routingto and from ASs I1.6.6.3 Grouping of medialines 11.3.7 Standalone transactions from one UE to another 11.7 .xll Contents Routingof the INVITE request Routing of the first response Re-transmission the INVITE request of and the 100(Trying) response 11.2 The 183(Session Progress) in response 11.5.4 Relatedstandards I1.5.1 Overview 11.5 Media negotiation 11.6 Routingof subsequent requests a dialog in 11.8.5 Separated flows ll.4 Distribution of chargingfunction addresses 11.4 11.1 Introduction 11.7.8 Charging-related informationfor sessions I 1.5 Related standards I 1.5.4.10.3.3 S-CSCFperformingnetwork-initiated session release 11.6.1 Relatedstandards 11.5.3.3 Arepreconditions mandatorily supported? 11.2 Exchange ICID for a mediasession of 11.3.10Alternativesession procedures establishment 11.9.1 Overview 11.4 Compression subsequent of requests 11.3 11.2 P-CSCFperformingnetwork-initiated release session 11.6 Resource reservation I | .3.4 Compression negotiation ll.l Overview ll.4.7.8.3 SDP offer/answer IMS in 11.2 IMS session setupwhen no resource reservation needed is 11.10.5 240 244 246 247 248 248 252 252 2s2 2s2 253 254 )54 254 254 256 257 262 263 263 264 265 266 271 272 272 213 274 274 214 275 275 275 275 278 279 280 281 28r 281 282 283 283 283 284 .6.5 Relatedstandards ll.8.3.'7.4 A singlereservation flow 11.4.4.2 Reliabilityof provisionalresponses I 1.l Overview 11.

3 Scenario routins from a PSI to anotherPSI 3: 287 290 293 293 294 294 297 299 299 299 300 302 303 303 304 304 305 305 306 306 306 307 307 309 310 3lt 312 313 313 313 314 3r7 3t7 318 318 319 319 320 PART IV 12 SIP 12.8 Registration 12.2 Response 12.ll.l Serverdiscovery 12.4.10.12.4 TU layer 12.12.4 PROTOCOLS Background Designprinciples SIP architecture Message format 12.3 Mechanisms and protocols 12.3 Proxy behaviour 12.10Sessions l2.l2.4 Session setupbetween IMS and a SIP end point outside IMS I l.4.5 Sendingrequestsand receivingresponses 12.3 IMS session setupwith resource preconditions ll.l The SDP offer/answer model with SIP 12.4.5 The SIP URI 12.ll.ll.11Security L2.2 The looserouting concept 12. I I Routing of PSIs ll.ll.l 12.3 Headerfields 12.4.l Threat models l2.2 Transportlayer 12.ll.3 12.7.11.12.1 Syntaxand encoding layer 12.4 Populatingthe request-URl 12.6 The tel URI 12.12Routing requests and responses l2.3 Transactionlayer 12.7.12.9 Dialogs 12.l0.1 Requests 12.Contents but reservation without 11.2 12.6 Receivingrequests and sendingresponses .l Scenario routingfrom a userto a PSI l: ll.7.7.7 SIP structure 12.4 Body 12.12.2 Securityframework l2.l0.2 Scenario routing from a PSI to a user 2: 11.

3.1 Modifying a session description 14.11Securitymechanism for agreement SIP 12.2 Puttine the mediastreamon hold 15 RTP 15.3 Medialine 13.13.2 SDP message format 13.10PrivateSIP extensions asserted for identitv within trusted networks 12.1.13.4 Reliabilityof provisionalresponses 12.l3.13SIP extension headerfor service route discovery during registration 12.15 Compressing SIP 13 SDP l3.1 RTP fixedheader fields 15.3 Offer/answer 14.2 Time description 13.13.3.1 RTP for real-timedata delivery 15.13.4 Attribute line 13.13.13.13.3.l SDP message contents 13.3.2 The answer processing 14.13.12PrivateSIP extensions media authorization for 12.6 Intesrationof resource manasement SIP and (preconditions) 12. 8The "message/sipfrag" MIME type 12.13. 1 3 .13.l The offer 14.1.5 The rtpmapattribute 327 328 329 330 330 331 JJJ JJJ JJJ 334 334 335 335 335 335 335 336 336 339 339 339 340 340 341 343 343 343 344 t4 The Offer/AnswerModel with SDP l4.5 The UPDATE method 12.2 Statepublication(the PUBLISH method) 12.2 What is iitter? .1 Protocolversion line 13.13SIP extensions 12.1.1.7 The SIP REFER method 1 2 .1.3.3.1 Session description 13.3 Mediadescription 13.3.3 SIP for instantmessaging 12.l Event notificationframework 12.3 Selected SDP lines 13.14Privateheaderextensions SIP for 3GPP to 12.13.13.xlY Contents 12.13.2 Connection informationline 13.9 SIP extension header for registering non-adjacent contacts (the Path header) 320 320 322 322 322 324 324 325 326 326 12.

1 Overview 17.3.4 PDP contextdeactivation points 17.2.2 RTCP 15.1 ENUM service for Of registration SIP Addresses Record (AoRs) 16.164to UniversalResource ldentifier(URD Dynamic (DDDS) application Delegation DiscoverySystem 16.1 NAPTR example 16.1 18.2.2 RTCP report transmission interval profile and payloadformat specifications 15.1 Primary PDP contextactivation 17.4. l DNS resource records 16.the E.2.5 19.2 PacketData Protocol(PDP) 17.3 Access 17.1 Staticand dynamicpayloadtypes l6 DNS l6.4 35s 356 356 356 356 357 359 359 359 360 361 363 363 364 364 365 366 366 368 Introduction TLS RecordProtocol TLS Handshake Protocol Summary t9 Diameter 19.2 Secondary PDP contextactivation 17.2.4 RTP profile and payload format specification audio and video for (RrP/AVP) 15.4.2.3.2 19.2.2 Payloadformat specification 15.1 SRV example 344 345 345 345 34s 345 346 346 349 349 349 350 35r 352 352 352 355 355 355 t7 GPRS 17.6 l9.2 The Naming Authority Pointer(NAPTR) DNS RR 16.3 18.1 19.7 Introduction Protocolcomponents processing Message Diameterclientsand servers Diameteragents Message structure Error handling .3 RTP 15.4 Service records(SRV RRs) 16.3 19.2.3 PDP contextmodification 17.2 18.1 RTCP packettypes 15.4 19.3.Contents 15.4 PDP contexttypes 18 TLS 18.1 Profilespecification 15.3 ENUM .

3 Compressing SIP message IMS a in 23.2 Compartments 23.3 COPSusage policy provisioning(COPS-PR) for 21.1 Introduction 20.2 Accounting 19.5 Summary .4 InternetKey Exchange 22.12Summary 368 369 369 370 370 )t) Jt) 20 MEGACO 20.3 InternetSecurity Association Protocol and Key Management (ISAKMP) (IKE) 22.8.9 Specific Diameterapplications usedin 3GPP 19.2 Connection model 20.1 Initializationof SIP compression 23.11Diametercredit control application 19.2 Compressing SIP message a 23.xYl Contents 19.3.3 Decompressingcompressed message a SIP 24 DHCPY6 24.6 Summary 37s 37s 375 375 3'.1 DHCP options 24.1 SigComparchitecture 23.8 Diameterservices 19.3.10Diameter SIP application 19.1 XCAP applicationusage .) IPsec 22.4 The PIB for the Go interface 21.3.2 DHCP optionsfor SIP servers 25 XCAP 25.79 379 380 383 383 383 385 385 386 386 387 387 388 389 389 390 390 390 391 391 393 394 394 395 395 23 SignallingCompression 23.l Introduction 21.2 Security associations 22.3 Protocoloperation 2l COPS 2l.8.1 Authenticationand authorization 19.5 Encapsulated Security Payload(ESP) 22.2 Message structure 21.1 Introduction 22.

2 Model and rule structure 26.1 Introduction 26.Contents 26 CommonPolicy 26.3 Data types and permissionprocessing References List of abbreviations Index 397 397 397 399 .

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Aki Niemi.We even have search engines to locate content sites.several technical audiences have an urgent need to understand how it works.IMS builds on top of this and provides a full suite of network operator capabilities enabling authentication of clients. This will enable a global market of multimedia terminals. A11this is essentialin order to build interoperating networks that. This book provides an essential insight into the architecture and structure of these new networks' petri pciyhdnen Vice President Nokia Networks * MP3 is the voice compressionmethod developedby the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG). . With increasingly attractive terminals. Telephony is sufficient for telephones. do we need Internet Protocol (IP) Multimedia Subsystem(IMS)? The problem is that we have no practical mechanism to engageanother applicationrich terminal in a peer-to-peersession. an MP3-coded music stream. which may have content relevant to us. As IMS is now emerging as the key driver for renewal of maturing mass-market communication services. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) enables clients to invite others to a session and negotiate control information about the media channels needed for the session. We have browsing so that we can read published content on known sites.in the spirit of good old telephony.Forewordby Petri Poyhonen We have telephony so that we can talk to each other.* a whiteboard to present objects and we will be exchanging real-time game data. Georg Mayer.Enormously successful mobile telephony shows that there is immense value in sharing with peers. Many of these will take place simultaneously. by meansof which the size of a voice-containing can be reducedto one-tenthof file the original without significantlyaffectingthe quality of voice. so. when combined.Multimedia terminals need IMS networks. There is undoubtedly the need to break into this completely new ground of communication. the sharing experience will become much more than just exchanging voice. network-to-network interfacesand administration capabilities like charging. can provide a truly global service. We will be sharing real-time video (see what I see). This may look as if we have a lot on our plate. Hisham Khartabil and Miikka Poikselk?iare major contributors to IMS industry development through their work in the standardization arena. We have messagingso that we can dispatch mail or instant notes.

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mobile accessto speech-enabledservices)is currently occurring and. conferencing. terrestrial and aerial infrastructure as well as in their modus operandi we have come a long way. place and time of electronic communications. communications were known as the ways in which people. The fact that the IMS service control architecture is standardized over SlP-based services makes SIP the ideal tool for the new world of electronic communications. being the focal point of the standardization and development efforts of the numerous vendors. With advances in naval. rich communications in the way it intersects with entertainment services and. optimizes services for the customer and strengthens the economy. letter writing and telephone calls. By using an holistic approach. IMS has attracted a lot of attention from the real-time communications industry. intelligent servicespossible as well as providing the necessaryfreedom of choice of device. interactive and location-based broadband services (video. ultimately. the perceived quality of services provided are moving to new heights. the authors have made this book 'The SwAK' (Swiss Army Knife) of IMS. The advent of electronic personal and business communications. The knowledge held within its chapters will benefit anyone dealing or working with IMS. chat. e-mail. and the way that electronic goods are being exchanged. thereby. as seenin the last few years with the rise of real-time IP communications. and. etc. During the last few years. . which is fostering innovative. Not only do people want to be mobile and achieve seamlessintegration of all applications (voice. It usually referred to roads and railways and their way of operating. These services. making such an emergenceof rich. will bring to service providers new business models and opportunities. file sharing. we have barely scratched the surface of what is about to come. presence.) on a single device. more recently. regardlessof the nature of access networks they operate currently.has revolutionized the communications industry. IM. but they also want freedom to change this device for different use scenarios. providing information that has up to now been missing and giving a solid foundation to those that are just about to start exploring the world of IMS. and has been followed with great expectations by a number of operators and serviceproviders.Forewordby Alan Duric For centuries. TV. contact information. creating and shaping the future for competition. identity. along with their personalization by matching the behavioral characteristics oftheir users. but. The emergenceof a new set of intelligent. along with them. video. goods and ideas move from one place to another. push to talk. accessnetwork and.

xxtl Foreword bv Alan Duric work. through standardization with the authors and have witnessedfirst-hand their passion in creating the modus operandiof theserich electroniccommunicationsservices which have now reached a pinnacleby bringing such efforts to fruition. I am privilegedand fortunate to work and cooperate. Ahn Duric Chief TechnologyOfficer and Co-founder of Telio .