You are on page 1of 29

Paper Reference(s

)

6683

Edexcel GCE
Statistics S1 Advanced Subsidiary
Specimen Paper Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Materials required for examination Answer Book (AB16) Mathematical Formulae (Lilac) Graph Paper (ASG2) Items included with question papers Nil

Candidates may use any calculator EXCEPT those with the facility for symbolic algebra, differentiation and/or integration. Thus candidates may NOT use calculators such as the Texas Instruments TI 89, TI 92, Casio CFX 9970G, Hewlett Packard HP 48G.

Instructions to Candidates In the boxes on the answer book, write the name of the examining body (Edexcel), your centre number, candidate number, the unit title (Statistics S1), the paper reference (6683), your surname, other name and signature. When a calculator is used, the answer should be given to an appropriate degree of accuracy. Information for Candidates A booklet ‘Mathematical Formulae and Statistical Tables’ is provided. Full marks may be obtained for answers to ALL questions. This paper has eight questions. Advice to Candidates You must ensure that your answers to parts of questions are clearly labelled. You must show sufficient working to make your methods clear to the Examiner. Answers without working may gain no credit.

This publication may only be reproduced in accordance with London Qualifications Limited copyright policy. Edexcel Foundation is a registered charity. © 2003 London Qualifications Limited

1.

(a) Explain what you understand by a statistical model. (2) (b) Write down a random variable which could be modelled by (i) a discrete uniform distribution, (ii) a normal distribution. (2)

2.

A group of students believes that the time taken to travel to college, T minutes, can be assumed to be normally distributed. Within the college 5% of students take at least 55 minutes to travel to college and 0.1% take less than 10 minutes. Find the mean and standard deviation of T. (9)

3.

The discrete random variable X has probability function ìkx, x = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, P( X = x ) = í î 0, otherwise. 1 (a) Show that k = . 15 (3) Find the value of (b) E(2X + 3), (5) (c) Var(2X - 4). (6)

2

s revolutions per minute. are collected. h hours. For convenience the data are coded so that x = s – 20 and y = h – 100 and the following summations obtained. Sxy = 484. (2) Estimate the life of a drill revolving at 30 revolutions per minute. 15 pairs of observations relating to speed. Sy 2 = 22441. (a) Find the equation of the regression line of h on s.4. Sx 2 = 2413. Over several months. but in general the higher the speed the sooner the drill needs to be replaced. Sy = 391. (2) 3 . Sx = 143. A drilling machine can run at various speeds. and life of drill. (10) (b) Interpret the slope of your regression line.

(a) Explain briefly the advantages and disadvantages of using the quartiles to summarise a set of data. An outlier is an observation that falls either 1. (c) Draw a box plot for School B. The three quartiles were 17. A and B. (4) Q . The data for School A are summarised in Diagram 1. the least distance travelled was 3 km and the longest distance travelled was 55 km. Diagram 1 School A 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Distance in kilometres For School B. travelled to school by the teachers in two schools. 24 and 31 respectively.5 ´ (interquartile range) above the upper quartile or 1. in the same town were recorded.5 ´ (interquartile range) below the lower quartile. (5) (d) Compare and contrast the two box plots.5. (4) (b) Describe the main features and uses of a box plot. (3) The distances. in kilometres.

(3) Two married couples are chosen at random. is . (e) Find the probability that only one of the two husbands and only one of the two wives have degrees. (6) END 5 . 24 (2) (b) Draw a Venn diagram to represent these data. (2) (d) neither of them has a degree. the probability that the husband has 3 1 and the probability that the wife has a degree is . (5) Find the probability that (c) only one of them has a degree. (a) Show that the probability that both of them have degrees is 11 . The probability that the a degree is 5 2 11 husband has a degree. For any married couple who are members of a tennis club. 12 A married couple is chosen at random. given that the wife has a degree.6.

other name and signature. © 2003 London Qualifications Limited . TI 92. Casio CFX 9970G. Thus candidates may NOT use calculators such as the Texas Instruments TI 89. Instructions to Candidates In the boxes on the answer book. You must show sufficient working to make your methods clear to the Examiner. candidate number. the answer should be given to an appropriate degree of accuracy. write the name of the examining body (Edexcel).Paper Reference(s) 6684 Edexcel GCE Statistics S2 Advanced Level Specimen Paper Time: 1 hour 30 minutes Materials required for examination papers Answer Book (AB16) Mathematical Formulae (Lilac) Graph Paper (ASG2) Items included with question Nil Candidates may use any calculator EXCEPT those with the facility for symbolic algebra. When a calculator is used. the paper reference (6684). This paper has seven questions. This publication may only be reproduced in accordance with London Qualifications Limited copyright policy. differentiation and/or integration. the unit title (Statistics S2). your centre number. Answers without working may gain no credit. Full marks may be obtained for answers to ALL questions. Advice to Candidates You must ensure that your answers to parts of questions are clearly labelled. Edexcel Foundation is a registered charity. Hewlett Packard HP 48G. your surname. Information for Candidates A booklet ‘Mathematical Formulae and Statistical Tables’ is provided.

find the probability that in a box containing 20 chocolates there are (a) equal numbers of soft centred and hard centred chocolates. (2) 7 . 10 and 11 which was attended by 500 pupils. They designed a questionnaire to obtain information from those who attended. The random variable X represents the length. (2) (b) Suggest a suitable sampling frame. (1) 2. (4) (c) Write down P(X < 4). (3) (b) fewer than 5 hard centred chocolates. in cm. A child cuts the string at a randomly chosen point P. (1) 3. The disco organisers were keen to assess the success of the event. A piece of string AB has length 12 cm. The pupils were registered as they entered the disco. (a) State one advantage and one disadvantage of using a sample survey rather than a census. (a) Suggest a suitable model for the distribution of X and specify it fully (2) (b) Find the cumulative distribution function of X.1. A manufacturer of chocolates produces 3 times as many soft centred chocolates as hard centred ones. (1) (c) Identify the sampling units. (2) A large box of chocolates contains 100 chocolates. Assuming that chocolates are randomly distributed within boxes of chocolates. (c) Write down the expected number of hard centred chocolates in a large box. into two pieces. A school held a disco for years 9. of the piece AP.

test. The director wishes to test whether or not this represents evidence that the number of errors per page made by the secretary is now less than 2. of pages 0 37 1 65 2 60 3 49 4 27 5 12 (a) Show that the mean number of errors per page in this sample of pages is 2. In Manuel’s restaurant the probability of a customer asking for a vegetarian meal is 0. at the 5% level of significance. (1) U . (5) Manuel’s chef believes that the probability of a customer ordering a vegetarian meal is 0. use a suitable approximation to find the critical region for this test. (2) (b) Find the variance of the number of errors per page in this sample. (a) Stating your hypotheses clearly. whether or not the proportion of vegetarian meals ordered that day is unusually low. A company director monitored the number of errors on each page of typing done by her new secretary and obtained the following results: No.5%.10.30. (d) Assuming a Poisson distribution and stating your hypothesis clearly. of errors No. (2) (c) Explain how your answers to parts (a) and (b) might support the director’s belief that the number of errors per page could be modelled by a Poisson distribution. Use a 5% level of significance. (6) (c) State the significance level of this test giving your answer to 2 significant figures. (1) Some time later the director notices that a 4-page report which the secretary has just typed contains only 3 errors. (b) Stating your hypotheses clearly. (6) 5. carry out this test. The chef proposes to take a random sample of 100 customers to test whether or not there is evidence that the proportion of vegetarian meals ordered is different from 0.10. During one particular day in a random sample of 20 customers at the restaurant 3 ordered a vegetarian meal. The probability for each tail of the region should be as close as possible to 2.4.

the average number of sheep per square is 20 and the sheep are randomly scattered throughout the field.25. The sheep are randomly spread throughout the field. A biologist is studying the behaviour of sheep in a large field. (a) Suggest a suitable model for the number of sheep in a square and give a value for any parameter or parameters required. (7) 9 . (e) Using a suitable approximation. (1) (c) more than 2 sheep. find the probability that a randomly selected square contains fewer than 15 sheep. (4) A sheepdog has been sent into the field to round up the sheep.6. (1) In another field. The field is divided up into a number of equally sized squares and the average number of sheep per square is 2. (d) Explain why the model may no longer be applicable. (1) Calculate the probability that a randomly selected sample square contains (b) no sheep.

(3) (c) Show that the standard deviation of X is 0.1 and specify fully the cumulative 80 ( ) (f) Use this formula to estimate the interquartile range in this case. and comment. P(X £ x) is given by distribution function of X. The continuous random variable X has probability density function f(x) given by 1 ì 20 x 3 .7. (3) (d) Show that for 1 £ x £ 3. (4) Some statisticians use the following formula to estimate the interquartile range: interquartile range = 4 × standard deviation.459 to 3 decimal places. (5) (e) Find the interquartile range for the random variable X. (3) (b) Calculate E(X). 1£ x £ 3 otherwise (a) Sketch f(x) for all values of x. 3 1 4 x . f (x ) = í î 0. (2) END 10 .

Edexcel Foundation is a registered charity. differentiation and/or integration. Hewlett Packard HP 48G. Advice to Candidates You must ensure that your answers to parts of questions are clearly labelled. TI 92. Answers without working may gain no credit. candidate number. This paper has six questions. your surname. your centre number. other name and signature. write the name of the examining body (Edexcel). Information for Candidates A booklet ‘Mathematical Formulae and Statistical Tables’ is provided. the answer should be given to an appropriate degree of accuracy. This publication may only be reproduced in accordance with London Qualifications Limited copyright policy. Instructions to Candidates In the boxes on the answer book. the unit title (Statistics S3). Full marks may be obtained for answers to ALL questions. Thus candidates may NOT use calculators such as the Texas Instruments TI 89. the paper reference (6670). © 2003 London Qualifications Limited .Paper Reference(s) 6670 Edexcel GCE Statistics S3 Advanced Level Specimen Paper Time: 1 hour 30 minutes Materials required for examination papers Answer Book (AB16) Mathematical Formulae (Lilac) Graph Paper (ASG2) Items included with question Nil Candidates may use any calculator EXCEPT those with the facility for symbolic algebra. When a calculator is used. Casio CFX 9970G. You must show sufficient working to make your methods clear to the Examiner.

Task A B C Mean 225 165 185 Standard deviation 38 23 27 Assuming that the times for the three tasks are independent. The three tasks most frequently carried out in a garage are A. (5) NO . taken by the garage mechanics are assumed to be normally distributed with means and standard deviations given in the following table. the mean weight of the 16 pears. (a) Explain how the committee could use a table of random numbers to take a systematic sample. in minutes. P grams. The committee wishes to select a sample of 30 members to fill in a questionnaire about the facilities the club offers. The weights of pears. (2) (b) Find P(110 < P < 113). Geoff buys a bag of 16 pears. (5) (b) a randomly chosen mechanic takes longer to carry out task B than task C. B and C. (1) 2. (3) (b) Give one advantage of this method over taking a simple random sample. are normally distributed with a mean of 110 and a standard deviation of 8. calculate the probability that (a) the total time taken by a single randomly chosen mechanic to carry out all three tasks lies between 533 and 655 minutes. For each of the tasks the times. (a) Write down the distribution of P . The 240 members of a bowling club are listed alphabetically in the club’s membership book.1. (3) 3.

the number showing on the uppermost side after the die has been rolled. Use a 5% level of significance and state your hypotheses clearly. 58.4. (5) (b) Stating clearly your hypotheses and using a 5% two-tailed test. (2) (b) State the name of the distribution. 52. 37 and 63 respectively. Club Position Average A 1 37 B 2 38 C 3 19 D 4 27 E 5 34 F 6 26 G 7 22 H 8 32 (a) Calculate the Spearman rank correlation coefficient between position in the league and average home attendance. (a) Write down the probability function for the random variable X. (1) A student wishing to check the above assumption rolled the die 300 times and for the sides 1 to 6. 49. obtained the frequencies 41. (c) Explain briefly how tied ranks can be dealt with. (4) Many sets of data include tied ranks. (c) Analyse these data and comment on whether or not the assumption is valid for this die. (8) 13 . For a six-sided die it is assumed that each of the sides has an equal chance of landing uppermost when the die is rolled. interpret your rank correlation coefficient. At the end of a season a league of eight ice hockey clubs produced the following table showing the position of each club in the league and the average attendances (in hundreds) at home matches. (2) 5.

2.6. 15. (5) Over the years. (c) Use your interval to comment on the meteorologist’s claim.1.2. (a) Find unbiased estimates of the mean and variance of T. 9. (5) A meteorologist claims that the mean temperature at noon in Sunnymere on 21st March is 4 °C. The results are summarised below. on 21st March at Sunnymere. 1. (11) Observations have been made over many years of T. 13. –1. test whether or not the two groups differ in the mean amounts spent on tobacco. the standard deviation of T has been found to be 5. A group of 50 male and 50 female students were asked whether they passed or failed their driving test at the first attempt. The results were as follows. 5.3.4.8.6. 3. at the 10% level. (2) 7.69 £8. 2. A sociologist was studying the smoking habits of adults. 12. A random sample of 300 adult smokers from a low income group and an independent random sample of 400 adult smokers from a high income group were asked what their weekly expenditure on tobacco was. END NQ .5. (9) (b) Explain briefly the importance of the central limit theorem in this example.40 £7.7.42 s. (b) Assuming a normal distribution find a 90% confidence interval for the mean of T. whether or not there is any evidence of an association between gender and passing a driving test at the first attempt. 4.5.13 (a) Using a 5% significance level. All the students asked had taken the test. Male Female Pass 23 32 Fail 27 18 Stating your hypotheses clearly test.6. 8.d.3. Low income group High income group N 300 400 mean £6. the noon temperature in °C. (2) 8.1. 10. A survey in a college was commissioned to investigate whether or not there was any association between gender and passing a driving test. The records for a random sample of 12 years are given below. £6.

0902 s \ 55 .m = 1.001 10 . 0.m ö æ \ Pç Z > ÷ = 0.6449 B1 Standardising M1 Completely correct A1 Þ 55 .0902 B1 Standardising M1 Completely correct A1 Þ 10 .5035 Attempt to solve M1 m = 39.05 s ø è 1. (ii) The height of adult males.m = 1.0902 0 1.m = -3.4 A1 s = 9.m ö æ \ Pç Z < ÷ = 0.6449 s P (T < 10) = 0.0902s \ m = 39.6449 P(T > 55) = 0.6449s 10 . (a) Scheme A statistical process devised to describe or make predictions about the expected behaviour of a real-world problem.368 s = 9. Marks B1 B1 B1 B1 (2) (4 marks) (2) (b) (i) The number showing on the uppermost side of a die after it has been rolled.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 1. f(z) 2.50 A1 (9) (9 marks) 15 .1% 5% Z= T -m s –3.05 55 .001 s ø è -3.m = -3.

4)= 4 Var (X) = Use of Var(aX) = a2Var(X) M1 A1 ft (6) 56 9 (14 marks) NS . (a) k (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5) = 1 Þk= Scheme Use of Marks å P( X = x ) = 1 M1 A1 A1 (3) 1 15 * (b) E(X) = 1 {1 + 2 ´ 2 + … + 5 ´ 5 } 15 Use of E (X) = å xP( X = x ) M1 A1 A1 M1 A1 ft (5) = 15 \E(2X + 3) = 2E(X) + 3 = 31 3 (c) E(X2) = 1 {1 + 22 ´ 2 + … + 52 ´ 5} 15 = 15 2 Use of E X 2 = å x 2 P( X = x ) Use of Var (X) = E (X2) .EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 3.ç ÷ è3ø 14 = 9 Var (2X .[E(X)]2 ( ) M1 A1 M1 A1 æ 11 ö Var (X) = 15 .

3.3.143 ´ 391 15 ´ 2413 .3.(143)2 Marks M1 A1 AWRT –3.0899 )ç ÷ 15 è 15 ø = 55.09(s .3.20) \ h = 217.52 . Scheme b= 15 ´ 484 .6 AWRT 125 M1 A1 ft (2) (14 marks) 17 .5237 \ y = 55.09 A1 M1 A1 AWRT 55. 3.0899 a= 391 æ 143 ö .100 = 55.5 A1 B1 ft M1 A1 ft AWRT 217.3.09x \ h . (c) s = 30 Þ h = 124.(.52 .09s (b) For every extra revolution/minute the life of the drill is reduced by 3 hours.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 4.32 .09 A1 B1 B1 (10) (2) (a) = .

5(Q3 – Q1) = 52 Þ an outlier (55) above upper quartile B1 B1 B1 (3) B1 B1 School B 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Distance in kilometres Same scale and label B1 Q1. e. Q2. IQR/STQR Disadvantages: Not always a simple calculation. Scheme Advantages: Uses central 50% of the data Not affected by extreme values (outliers) Provide an alternative measure of spread to the variance/standard deviation. Q3.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 5. 3.e. 52 B1 55 B1 (3) continued over… NU .g. interpolation for a grouped frequency distribution Different measures of calculation – no single argued method Does not use all the data directly Any 4 sensible comments – at least one advantage and one disadvantage Marks (a) B1 B1 B1 B1 (4) (b) Indicates maximum/minimum observations and possible outliers Indicates relative positions of the quartiles Indicates skewness When plotted on the same scale enables comparisons of distributions Any 4 sensible comments (c) Q1 – 1. i.5(Q3 – Q1) = –4 Þ no outlier below lower quartile Q2 + 1.

Q2 – Q1 = 10 Þ symmetrical B: Q3 – Q2 = 7. Q2 – Q1 = 7 Þ symmetrical ü both distributions ý þ are symmetrical Marks (d) Median B (24) > Median A (22) Þ on average teachers in B travel slightly further to school than those in A Range of B is greater than that of A 25% of teachers in A travel 12 km or less compared with 25% of teachers in B who travel 17 km or less 50% of teachers in A travel between 12 km and 32 km as compared with 17 km and 31 km for B Any 4 sensible comments B1 B1 B1 B1 (4) (16 marks) 19 . Scheme A: Q3 – Q2 = 10.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 5.

(H ¢W ¢)(HW ) Any one B1 All correct B1 17 1 ö æ 11 43 ö æ \P (only 1 H or 1 W) = ç 2 ´ ´ ÷ + ç2´ ´ ÷ 120 24 ø è 24 120 ø è 2´ 2´ 17 1 ´ 120 24 11 43 ´ 24 120 49 144 B1 ft B1 ft = 49 144 Adding their probabilities M1 A1 (6) (18 marks) OM . Scheme P(H Ç W) = P(H | W )P(W ) = Marks M1 A1 (2) (a) 11 1 11 ´ = * 12 2 24 (b) H 17 120 11 24 1 24 W Diagram M1 H Ç W¢ 43 120 M1 A1 A1 B1 (5) H¢ Ç W HÇW (c) P (only one has a degree) = (d) P (neither has a degree) = 17 1 11 + = 120 24 60 ì 17 11 1 ü = 1. (HW )(H ¢W ¢) . (H ¢W )(HW ¢) .í + + ý î120 24 24 þ M1 A1 (2) M1 A1 A1 (3) 43 120 (e) Possibilities .EDEXCEL STATISTICS S1 (6683) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 6.(HW ¢)(H ¢W ) .

010 B1 M1 awrt 0.4148 (c) Expected number = np = 100 ´ 0. Scheme B1 B1 B1 B1 Marks (a) Advantage: eg quicker/cheaper Disadvantage: eg doesn’t give the full picture (b) The register of pupils attending (c) The individual pupils (2) (1) (1) (4 marks) 2.415 A1 M1 A1 (2) (2) (7marks) P (X = 10) = 0.25 = 25 (3) 21 .0.12] B1. (a) (b) A 1 B x R ì 0.25) can be implied B1 awrt 0. (a) P(SC) = 3 1 .0100 (b) P (X < 5) = P (X £ 4) = 0. ï12 ï 1 î x<0 0 £ x £ 12 x > 12 X ~ U[0.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S2 (6684) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 1. P (HC) = 4 4 either B1 Let X represent the number of HC chocolates \X ~ B(20.9961 . ïx ï \ F( x) = í . B1 (2) M1 A1 B1 ft (centre) B1 (ends) (4) B1 ft (1) (7 marks) P(X £ x) = ò 0 12 dt = 12 x 4 (c) P (X < 4) = 12 = 1 3 3.9861 = 0. 0.

b such that P(Y £ a) » 0.10) Þ Y » P0 (10) (5) (b) H0 : p = 0.4 = 1. B1 B1 B1 M1 M1 A1 A1 ft (1) P(X £ 3) = 0.10 Y = number ordering vegetarian meal M1 Need a.0424 This is less than 5% so a significant result and there is evidence that the secretary has improved.0293 and P(Y £ 16) = 0. 5.22 = 1478 . (6) (11 marks) (a) H0 : p = 0. 0.0563 (5.9196K) 250 250 (c) For a Poisson distribution the mean must equal the variance. Under H0 X ~ P0(8).e. (d) H0: m = 2.025 and P(Y ³ b) » 0.30) under H0 P (X £ 3) = 0. Scheme x= 0 ´ 37 + 1 ´ 65 + 2 ´ 60 + K + 5 ´ 12 500 = =2 37 + 65 + 60 + K + 12 250 Marks M1 A1cso M1 A1 (2) (2) (a) (b) var = å x2 . parts (a) and (b) are very close. H1: m < 2 X = number of errors over 4 pages. A1 A1 ft H1 : p ¹ 0.30 X = number ordering vegetarian meal H1 : p < 30 B1 B1 X ~ B (20. 0.0270 \Y £ 4 and Y ³ 17 M1 A1 A1 (6) (c) Significance level is 0. so a Poisson might be a suitable model. no reason to suspect proportion is lower M1.10 B1 B1 Y ~ B(100.025 From tables: P(Y £ 4) = 0.0293 = 0.1071 >5% \Not significant i.9730 ÞP(Y ³ 17 = 0.6%) B1 ft (1) (12 marks) OO .EDEXCEL STATISTICS S2 (6684) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 4.912 (or s 2 = 1.0270 + 0.

=1– e.25 + (c) ú 2! ú ê ë û 1 . m = 20.0.60933… = 0.25 = 0.25) Marks B1 (1) (1) M1 (a) X = number of sheep per square (b) P( X = 0 ) = e-2.391 A1 B1 M1. M1 A1 = 1 . A1 ± 1 2 é (2.39066 (d) Sheep would tend to cluster – no longer randomly scattered (e) Y ~ P0 (20) Þ normal approx.1093 AWRT 0.25)2 ù P (X > 2) 1 .109 M1 A1 (7) (14 marks) 23 .8907 = 0.5 .25 ê1 + 2.2298…) M1. awrt 0.105 B1 M1. A1 awrt 0.P (X £ 2).5).20 ö æ P (Y < 15) = P (Y £ 14.. = Pç Z £ ÷ 20 ø è = P (Z £ -1..105399 .0. Scheme X ~ P0 (2.2. s = 20 (4) (1) 14.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S2 (6684) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 6.

25 Þ F(q ) = 0.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S2 (6684) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 7.79 ..(2.1 = \ p 4 = 21 Þ p = 2.g.. centre B1 ends M1 A1 A1 A1 ft B1 B1 (5) (e) F( p ) = 0.42 x dx = ê ú = 20 ë100 û 1 100 3 3 M1 [M1] A1 M1 [M1] A1 cso (3) (c) s = ò é x6 ù 1 5 728 2 2 x dx . 80 4 1 4 3 q .612 .459 = 0.14 . Scheme Marks B1.459 (3) (d) P( X £ x ) = ò1 x é t4 ù 1 3 x4 1 t dt = ê ú = 20 ë 80 û 1 80 80 x x M1 [M 1]1 A1 cso ì 0 ï 1 4 F(x ) = í x -1 ï 80 1 î ( ) x £1 1< x < 3 x³3 B1 ft. 3 (4) Sensible comment.1 = \ q 4 = 61 Þ q = 2.75 Þ 1 4 1 p .m = ê .. e.42 )2 = 0. ÷ è 20 20 ø (a) (3) (b) E( X ) = ò 2 3 1 3 1 é x5 ù 1 4 242 = 2..21026 ú -m = 20 120 ë120 û 1 \ s = 0. 80 4 ( ) ( ) IQR=0.65 (f) IQR » 4 ´ 0. reasonable approximation or slight underestimate (2) (20 marks) OQ . B1 B1 æ 1 27 ö ç .

433 A1 (3) (5 marks) = P (0 < Z< 1.110 ö æ P 110 < P < 113 = Pç 0 < Z < ÷ 2 è ø ( ) Standardising M1 A1 ft AWRT 0.4332 3.81 < Z < 1. 22 P ~ Nç 16 ÷ ø è ( ) Normal B1 110.e.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S3 (6670) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 1. efficient. (a) Let T represent total time \E (T) = 225 + 165 + 185 = 575 575 B1 2702 B1 Standardising M1 A1 ft (5) Var (T) = 382 + 232 + 272 = 2702 \P (533 < T < 655) = P (-0. B .7292 (b) \ E(D) = 165 .5) = 0.54) = 0.C) B1 B1 Standardising M1 A1 . 22 B1 (2) (b) 113 . faster etc.20) ö æ = Pç Z > ÷ 1258 ø è = P(Z > 0.g. 6. 1258 Var(D) = 232 + 272 = 1258 \ P (D > 0 ) 0 . 22.(.g. (3) (1) (4 marks) 2.729 A1 Let D represent the difference in times for tasks B and C (i.14. …) (b) e. ÷ ie : P ~ N 110.20.: More convenient. (a) æ 82 ö ç110.56) = 0.2877 ft AWRT 0.185 = -20 AWRT 0. Scheme B1 B1 B1 Any 1 B1 Marks (a) Label members 1 → 240 Use random numbers to select first from 1 – 8 Select every 8th member (e.288 A1 (5) (10 marks) 25 qìêå=lîÉê .

3.76 is not in the critical region there is no evidence to reject H0 and thus A1 ft (8) the data is compatible with the assumption.. 6 H o : Discrete uniform distribution is a suitable model H1 : B1 B1 B1 B1 B1 B1 B1 (2) (1) (b) Discrete uniform distribution (c) Discrete uniform distribution is not a suitable model CR: c2 > 11.7381) then there is no evidence to reject H o and it can be concluded that at the 5% level there is no evidence of correlation between league position and attendance Correct comparison M1 Conclusion A1 ft (c) Share ranks evenly. Use product moment correlation coefficient on ranks. critical value is 0. H 1 : r ¹ 0.7381 awrt 0. 6 .7381 B1 Since 0.4286 (b) H o : r = 0.429 is not in the critical region ( r < -0.7381 or r > 0. 2. (4) (a) 1 P( X = x ) = . 8. 6. (11 marks) OS .05 n = 5. 4 M1 A1 M1 (5) rs = 1 - 6 ´ 48 8 ´ 63 = 0. 5.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S3 (6670) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 4. x = 1.070 1 2 2 9 + 1 + 2 2 + 82 + 132 + 132 50 a = 0.429 A1 ft both B1 0. 7.E )2 E M1 A1 Since 9.76 50 å (O .E )2 E = = { } All E’s=50 B1 448 = 9. å d2 = 48 Scheme B1 Attempt to find å d 2 Substitution of their å d 2 Marks (a) Attendance ranks 2. å (O . 1.. . With n=8. . B1 B1 (2) (11 marks) 5.

96 or z > 1.692 + 400 300 Marks B1 B1 Substitute into s.132 6. M1 ) AWRT ±1.05 Þ C.e. = 8.819 is not in the critical region then there is no evidence to reject H0 and thus it can be concluded that there is no difference in mean expenditure on A1 ft tobacco.40 . Scheme H o : m L = m H . (b) C.5607 a = 0.7.561 A1 ±1.x H / their s. L or H B1 (2) (11 marks) (9) Normal B1 27 .R: z < -1. Theorem enables use of L ~ Normal and H ~ Normal . L.819 0.42 = -1.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S3 (6670) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number (a) 6. M1 Complete correct expression A1 AWRT 0.e.96 B1 = 0.82 A1 Since –1.e.96 6.5607 Test statistic: z = (x L . H1 : m L ¹ m H s.

27 a = 0.705 B1 A1 ft (11) (11 marks) OU .5 45 Total 50 50 100 Use of R T ´ CT 100 M1 27. Scheme Observed Frequencies Marks Pass Male Female Total 23 32 55 Fail 27 18 45 Total 50 50 100 Expected Frequencies Pass Male Female Total 27.705 v = 1 B1 Since 3.5 å (O .27.5 (18 .5 A1 22.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S3 (6670) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 7.22.5)2 E 27.10 Þ c2 > 2.5 55 Fail 22.E )2 = (23 .27 is in the critical region there is evidence of association between gender and test result.E )2 E M1 A1 A1 = 3.5 27.5)2 +K 22. 2.5 A1 H o : No association between gender and test result H1 : B1 B1 Use of Association between gender and test result å (O .5 22.

AWRT (4.1 12 x ± za . 9.68. Thus the claim is not substantiated.(4.EDEXCEL STATISTICS S3 (6670) SPECIMEN PAPER MARK SCHEME Question Number 8.4 A1 (5) (b) Confidence interval is given by 7.6449 B1 ie:.6449 ´ 5.52) A1 A1 B1 B1 (2) (12 marks) (5) 29 .2 = 7.6783.18 11 ï 12 î = 27.5216) (c) The value 4 is not in the interval.10 12 2ü (85. 9.2) 1 ì ï s = í906.3873 ï ý ï þ Substitution in correct formula M1 Complete correct expression A1 ft AWRT 27.10 ± 1. 2 s n M1 A1 ft Correct expression with their values 1. Scheme x=m = 2 Ù Marks M1A1 (a) 85.