SUMMER 2011

What We Did
Differently This Year
DiversityInc Top 50
Facts & Figures
Why All the Volatility on Our
DiversityInc Top 50 List?
Four Case Studies Showing the Impact
of Leadership Commitment
June_Cover5.indd 61 8/8/11 10:52 AM
DiversityInc
DiversityIncBestPractices.com
is now a living textbook
on diversity management.
We’ve created an outline of
critical topics and subtopics,
organized for your easy use by subject matter.
The topics include our
latest data-based research
and interviews with diversity leaders about best
practices they employ and substantive results.
The redesigned site will help you find
data, solutions & best practices
to diversity-management questions and strategies.
The “living” part of the textbook means
this site is constantly evolving,
like diversity-management itself,
and will be updated frequently as best practices
and results improve.
THE LIVING
TEXTBOOK OF
DIVERSITY
MANAGEMENT
For information about how to become
June_DBP Ad 5.indd 2 8/5/11 2:39 PM
NEW AND IMPROVED FEATURES
BestPractices.com
Direct Alignment
With Editorial Calendar
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Webinar Library
Ask DiversityInc
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All DiversityIncBestPractices.com content now lines up
specifcally with our editorial calendar, including
DiversityInc magazine features, webinars and subject-matter
benchmarking reports so you can receive a complete
picture of the vital areas of interest to you.
TOPICS INCLUDE:
• CEO Commitment • Workforce Diversity • Recruitment
• Retention • Work/Life • Talent Development • Mentoring
• Employee-Resource Groups • Diversity Councils
• Supplier Diversity
DiversityInc’s Webinar Series is a monthly
live audio PowerPoint presentation based on
DiversityInc Top 50 data and best practices.
All presenters are executives from the
DiversityInc Top 50, not consultants. The
webinars include the opportunity to ask
questions via live web chat.
All DIBP subscribers can participate live
in the webinars or watch and listen to any
webinar in the library.
Our interactive courses deliver 30–60 minutes of
instruction focused on key diversity-management topics.
Content is based on research fndings, DiversityInc
data and case studies from The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity. Course topics available now
are Mentoring, Employee-Resource Groups and
Diversity Councils.
These courses are ideal for line managers, members
of employee-resource groups, recruiters,
diversity-council members, mentors and mentees.
Ask DiversityInc is a forum for companies to
pose diversity questions to our expert team
of benchmarking analysts. Our analysts base their
responses on 12 years of data collected for the
DiversityInc Top 50 survey.
a corporate subscriber, email sales@DiversityInc.com
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16
28
32
18
102
Improved Methodology
4 Case Studies: Why Companies Rise and Fall
on the DiversityInc Top 50
Case studies of four companies and the impact of leadership and
clear communications.
DiversityInc Top 50 Facts & Figures
DiversityInc Top 50 Company Profiles
DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards
We honor eight companies for Community Development, Talent
Pipeline, Executive Development, Global Cultural Competence,
Working Families, Employee-Resource Groups and (two
companies) Diversity-Management Progress.

|
4 READER COMMENTS
|
8 CEO’S LETTER
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12 EDITOR’S LETTER
|
182 COMPANY INDEX IN EVERY ISSUE
CONTENTS
SUMMER 2011
14
2 DiversityInc
COVER STORY
The 2011
DiversityInc
Top 50
Companies
for Diversity
The survey, now in its
12th year, is the leading
assessment of diversity
management in corporate
America. The DiversityInc
Top 50 Companies for
Diversity survey is an
empirically driven ranking,
divided into four key
areas: CEO Commitment,
Human Capital, Corporate
and Organizational
Communications, and
Supplier Diversity. There
were 535 participants this
year (up 19 percent) and
there was considerable
movement on the list.
June_TOC.indd 2 8/4/11 3:25 PM
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITY
DiversityInc Magazine Online Would you like to get access to the latest issue of
DiversityInc magazine as soon as it becomes available? Read every issue at www.DiversityInc.com/magazine
Legal Update
‘I Didn’t Get the Job
Because I’m Black’
Inside View
Affirmative Action &
Diversity
Diversity Leadership
Dell’s Lisa Mink uses her life experience
with difference and discrimination to build
racial and gender diversity in IT.
Donnie Perkins of University Hospitals
manages the challenges for a hospital
system facing healthcare reform and an
increasingly diverse patient population.
Rutgers Future Scholars
Meet the Class of 2020
Rutgers Executive MBA
The Class of 2012 in China
People on the Move
People & Events
Ask the White Guy
Can a White Man
Speak With Authority
on Diversity?
By What Measure
Can We Abolish the
Diversity Department?
Ask DiversityInc
How Does DiversityInc
Determine the Top 50?
Can you game the DiversityInc Top
50? CEO Luke Visconti provides
inside info on what you can—
and can’t—do.
Supplier Diversity in
Health-Insurance Industry
What lessons can health-insurance companies learn
from three companies in the DiversityInc Top 50?
Trends in DiversityInc’s Top Companies for
Asian Americans
What matters more for Asian-American employees:
sheer numbers or the level of inclusion?
Find out how DiversityInc rates companies.
Where’s the Diversity in
Fortune 500 CEOs?
There’s a dearth of Black, Latino, Asian and women
CEOs running major companies—but the DiversityInc
Top 50 companies have better stats.
How to Start ERGs Based on
Generations, Disabilities
What’s the business case for employee groups based on
age or disability? Here’s what the data shows and how
other companies document success.
116 109
126
132
135
138
144
LGBT Civil Rights: How Everyone Benefits
) Same-Sex Marriage: What It Means to You
) When Should Your Company Take a Stand Against LGBT Bias?
) Timeline of Events
) Facts & Figures
Diversity: The Driving Force of Innovation
Academic research demonstrates how diverse teams solve more
problems creatively than homogeneous teams.
Decision Making, Clarity of Values and What to Do When It
Goes Horribly Wrong
Under the spotlight? Be careful how you react, and use your
values as a guide.
Women, Banking and Careers
Wells Fargo Regional President Lucia Gibbons shares her experiences
and career advice with DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti.
Successful Career Paths for Women in Corporate Sales
Moving women into line-management jobs and REALLY letting them
have work/life success doesn’t happen often. Here’s how to do it right
from seven companies.
The Dangers of the Walmart Class-Action Decision
The Supreme Court decision makes it all the more important
for everyone to truly inspect their employers, their vendors and their
customers.
OUR ANALYSTS
ANSWER YOUR
DIVERSITY-
MANAGEMENT
QUESTIONS
NEW!
DEPARTMENTS
FEATURES
152 164 160
162
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184
154
DiversityInc 3
116 135 164 138
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June_TOC.indd 3 8/5/11 12:09 PM
4 DiversityInc
Original articles and more:
www.DiversityInc.com/
affrmative-action-articles
DiversityInc
CEO Luke Visconti
invited anti-
affirmative-action
leader Ward Connerly
to speak at our spring
learning event.
Connerly talked
about banning race-
and gender-based
affirmative action
in college admissions
and hiring.
Visconti led a panel
of civil-rights
experts and lawyers
refuting Connerly.
Here’s what
DiversityInc readers
had to say about
the exchange:
ANGER AT CONNERLY
I commend you for inviting Ward Connerly and him for
accepting the invitation. Nonetheless, it is painful to see a
Black man with over seven decades’ experience in America
continue to espouse views and positions that are at once
naive, ill-informed and destructive.
It is extremely difficult to separate Mr. Connerly from those elements—
particularly on the right—who proffer him (and his views) as validation of
their own false claims of victimhood and hateful rhetoric. That said, it appears
that the debate over affirmative action will continue ... but instead of each
side engaging in verbal bomb throwing, perhaps the debate will be reshaped
using the facts that numerous businesses have accrued over the years. I think
the most cogent comment came from Weldon Latham of Jackson Lewis
when he said, “You [Connerly] want to fight hard to eliminate the solution
before you eliminate the problem.” I doubt that the panel had any impact on
Ward Connerly’s views, but as the positive impact affirmative action has had
on business is the prevailing reality, I suspect Connerly will fade into what I
believe will be a well-earned oblivion if not ignominy.
Jonscott Williams
É
To hear people talk about the unfairness of affirmative action is
ridiculous. We were once told in a seminar for supervisors that the most un-
fair thing we could do in supervising a group of people is to treat everybody
the same. This is the nature of affirmative action. We cannot achieve fairness
(a level playing field) by treating everybody the same. Those who complain
about affirmative action being unfair have no credibility because things
never were “fair.” Since we didn’t hear their righteous indignation when the
“unfairness” was on the other foot, it becomes obvious that fairness is not
the issue with them at all. DiversityInc.com comment
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Affirmative
Action:
Still
Relevant?
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June_Letters2.indd 4 8/5/11 12:13 PM
CONTACT US We welcome your comments. Letters must include your name and, if applicable, company
affiliation and title. Email letters to editor@DiversityInc.com. We reserve the right to edit all submissions.
DiversityInc 5
É
Racism is a cultural, institutional, generational dynamic that was here
before affirmative action and will be here after affirmative programs are gone
or changed. Until the above dynamics about race in this country are changed,
there will always be a need for affirmative action to level the playing field.
DiversityInc.com comment
NOT A PERFECT WORLD
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FROM LEFT: Ward Connerly President,
American Civil Rights Institute; Luke
Visconti CEO, DiversityInc; Dr. Ella Bell
Professor, Tuck School of Business,
Dartmouth College, and Founder, ASCENT;
Weldon H. Latham Senior Partner, Jackson
Lewis; Lora Fong Corporate Counsel,
Salesforce.com; Gilbert Casellas Former
Head of the Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission
É
Ward Connerly states that “I’ve
always believed that if everyone
had an equal chance to compete
and if we believe that we’re all cre-
ated equally by the good Lord, then
diversity will be the outcome.” But
we don’t live in a perfect world
where everyone has an equal
chance to compete, and we can’t
ensure fairness by merely doing
nothing. Human beings tend to
make subjective decisions, and we
can’t rely on all people doing the
right thing. In that case, we wouldn’t
need any government laws or poli-
cies, including affirmative action.
DiversityInc.com comment
É
I find it interesting that the
memory of Connerly is so short.
He has forgotten that the
Constitution was supposed to
afford all Americans equal treat-
ment, yet the government let the
people that oppose equal rights
thrive for a couple hundred years.
So now he says the same govern-
ment will do what is right without
the use of law! Please allow me the
opportunity to have free labor for
200 years and deny those workers
education and related rights so I
can become rich enough to say “I’m
sorry, and let’s not make any laws so
those folks we got so wealthy off of
can catch up.” What is wrong with
that picture? Robert Branscomb
É
Connerly’s words sound like
those of a beauty-pageant contes-
tant: “My goal is to end all wars and
world hunger.” Who would possi-
bly be against such a utopic idea?
The real world makes this lofty
idealistic mantra sound naive,
uninformed and without compas-
sion for those who are the objects
of oppression, suffering from
current acts of discrimination.
Connerly also perpetuates “The
BIG LIE”—that affirmative action
is synonymous with “preferential
June_Letters2.indd 5 8/5/11 12:14 PM
6 DiversityInc
difficult for me to believe that
Mr. Connerly believes systemic
and blatant racism would not
find its way back into our culture
(indeed, I would argue that it
has never left) full blown. To Mr.
Connerly, I say that I am happy you
were able to achieve your successes,
but don’t begrudge others who are
still struggling to achieve and may
and will need government assis-
tance in order to do so. DiversityInc.
com comment
É
Experience has proven that
a colorblind state has only been
achieved through “total blindness.”
Experience has proven that laws
are made when the issues under
their protection have been violated.
Experience has also proven that
laws are often broken and just as we
have police, courts and penalties to
remedy violations, we have affirma-
tive action to prevent discrimina-
tion. Our efforts are not perfect
nor totally successful, but until
we find a better solution, they are
all we have. Mr. Connerly tells us of
his beliefs, but what are his experi-
ences, his reality? Joyce Pratt
treatment.” Sadly, the world that
Connerly describes, where we are
all in a level playing field, does not
exist. Therefore, one is compelled
to analyze Connerly’s ability to
accurately assess the “real world”
or question if there is some other
motive for his promotion of such
absurdity. The truth unfolds by
following the “money trail.” Review
Connerly’s financial support and
income growth since he began
advocating this concept and the
masked man is fully exposed.
Steven Gutierrez
É
For a man who stands where
he stands today—in this coun-
try, at this time in history—Ward
Connerly is remarkably, offensively
blind to the role affirmative ac-
tion has played in his own rise to
success. By his logic, the United
States should never have inter-
fered with slavery, leaving each
indentured man, woman and
child to negotiate their per-
sonal freedom from Southern
masters who would without a
doubt first weigh the economic
consequences of freeing a slave
to the widely held opinions of
whites that Blacks were, first,
animals; next, rightfully owned
chattel; [and third], incapable of
the level of intellectual ability of
any whites. Ridiculous! I suppose
were this country somehow able to
“forget” its 400+ years of history—
wiping the legacy and memory of
subjugation, persecution, discrimi-
nation and still widely held belief
in white superiority from the minds
of 50 percent of the U.S. population
who hold those beliefs, ingrained
and passed down for genera-
tions—it may be possible for today’s
society to wipe the slate clean and
become colorblind in all its institu-
tions, both public and private. But I
don’t think so. Perhaps it would’ve
been better—prior to making such
a grand stand for the exact op-
posite of the still much-needed
É
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: STILL RELEVANT?
observance and adherence to fed-
eral diversity laws—that Connerly
either tune in to CNN or the New
York Post, or maybe ask any Black
person who crosses his path how
that whole “birther” thing worked
out for President Obama. Linda L.
É
The curse and blessing of
privilege has robbed Mr. Connerly
of clear sight. In a perfect world,
his idealism would be ideal. This
society is far from poised to
apply his beliefs on affirmative
action. As long as we have to ask
the question about race, with the
same group outperforming in terms
of education, career opportunity
and wealth, there will never
be equal opportunity to assess
the American dream. Too many
broken promises, false starts and
self-entitled over-consumption
in America to nurture this kind of
idealism. Get real, Mr. Connerly.
DiversityInc.com comment
É
Allow me to translate Mr.
Connerly’s perspective: I got
mine, now you get yours. That’s
what he’s really saying. It is
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Audience members had
some heated comments in response
to Ward Connerly at our event.
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June_Letters2.indd 6 8/4/11 3:51 PM
Month/Month 000
WHO REALLY BENEFITS?
É
Responding to “who benefits,” I agree with the article. I had thought
previously that it was white women who benefited the most. I can see
when we add the veterans who are given extra points into the equation
that white men would outnumber white women. Thanks for the update.
Keep up the good work. It always amazes me the misinformation that
is presented as “fact” to keep the status quo in place. Karen Sallis
É
I have been against racism and discrimination for over 40 years, long
before it was considered “OK” to do so. I applaud our first female African-
American CEO, Ursula Burns, and our first biracial president, Barack
Obama; they are both long overdue, but so is a female president; both a
male and female Hispanic president; a male and female Asian president;
and good Lord, a male and female American Indian president. The efforts
to be inclusive and encourage diversity in the workplace are GREAT
but I believe in my heart that our society must embrace all people
and cultures throughout our society, but NOT just in the workplace.
Let us celebrate our country’s diversity every day, everywhere and in every
way! It is only then that we will truly be nearly as good as we so often
arrogantly say we are! James Moyer Sr., Second Generation U.S. Marine
Veteran
É
I would agree with Ward Connerly if bias in hiring didn’t exist. I can’t
tell you how often I have heard smart, educated people involved in
the hiring process tell me why certain people are right for jobs, based
on gender, race, age, etc. My questions to Ward Connerly would be,
“What are you doing to erase bias and discrimination in hiring, and what
do you do when you find bias and discrimination in hiring?” “Hiring the
most qualified person” is a myth.
Simma [no last name given]
FAITH AT WORK
Creating an
Inclusive
Environment
for All
Religions
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
www.Diversityinc.com/inclusive
O
ne’s religion usually
makes up part of who
one is, just as much
as lifestyle and extra-
curricular activities. Saying
that one should leave those
at home is unreasonable. I’m
not saying that proselytizing
should be allowed, but assum-
ing one can work fve days a
week without having some
part of one’s religion seep
through isn’t going to happen.
My faith makes me who I am
today. If I want to pray over my
food before I eat it, I shouldn’t
have to worry about breaking
some company policy. Just as I
should be free to do that, how-
ever, others should be free to
set aside time for prayer/fast-
ing as they see ft. Surely, living
my own faith without cramming
it down others’ throats should
be allowed.
April Klungland
Y
ou forgot “call a spade
a spade.” If someone’s
religious values are out
of line with company values
(e.g., hating gays), then tell
them clearly that they can have
their values, but at work, those
values aren’t welcome. Also,
don’t forget there are atheists
out there too. It’s very easy to
forget that there’s a right to
be atheist as well and people
shouldn’t have to hide for what
they don’t believe any more
than for what they do believe.
Jason [no last name given]
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June_Letters2.indd 7 8/4/11 3:54 PM
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I
was invited to speak at Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield, a division of WellPoint, No.
36 on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. After I spoke, their
President and CEO Mark Wagar talked about his business, specifically about the com-
pany’s customers and employees, and consistently and emotionally used the words “us,” “our”
and “we.” There was no mention of “those people” or “them.” Mr. Wagar sees people as his
brothers and sisters.
He also spoke, with deep
respect, of his community’s diver-
sity and the need to focus on it—in
the context of service.
Earlier in the year, I was
invited to speak to the Wells Fargo
Advisors (whose parent company,
Wells Fargo & Co., is No. 40 in the
DiversityInc Top 50). Their presi-
dent and CEO, Danny Ludeman,
closed out the event. Speaking to
the audience of roughly 200 senior
leaders, he asked how many of the
(mostly white) men had attended
an employee-resource-group meet-
ing; about one-third of the hands
went up. Mr. Ludeman said: “The
next time we meet, it had better be
all of you.”
Point made. I’ll bet it will be.
Ten years ago, I did not see the
consistency of switched-on leader-
ship that I see today. More than
half of Fortune 500 companies had
no diversity efforts; today, I’d esti-
C‘WE’ AND ‘US’C
The Power of
Language and
Accountability
To read more on diversity-management trends, go to www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
mate that more than half do (even
if a significant number of those
companies’ diversity efforts are
little more than having tacos in the
cafeteria on May 5).
Recently, I was asked an inter-
esting question. A senior executive
of a firm at the top of our list asked
me if I felt that the questions we
ask on our survey end up directing
the reality we measure. In other
words, if we focus on management
techniques like mentoring and
employee-resource groups, isn’t
that what we end up seeing in our
numbers?
No doubt there is a trailing
effect of those questions on
decisions being made by companies
just starting out on the path of
managing diversity, but there’s a
definite path.
The DiversityInc Top 50 survey
(www.DiversityInc.com/top50) has
evolved over the past 12 years, but it
is an evolution based on cause and
effect. Our ability to measure out-
come as expressed in human capital
(there are other measurements of
the outcome of corporate culture,
but none as accurately and consis-
tently measured by every company
as human capital) has allowed us to
ask questions about best practices.
Given our enormous base of 535
participants, it enables us to see, by
correlation, what works.
Management best practices,
such as diversity councils,
employee-resource groups,
structured mentoring, goal-
setting and, most importantly,
accountability, have statistically
valid correlations to equitable
outcome in accomplishment.
In other words, we’re not mak-
ing this stuff up—we’re reporting
data-driven results.
For articles and information
on diversity councils, employee-
8 DiversityInc
It is the personal commitment of those at the top of organizations
that makes the success or failure of managing diversity.


June_CEOLetter.indd 8 8/3/11 5:57 PM
When different people come together,
it’s not just beautiful, it’s priceless.
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See how diversity drives us at mastercard.com/diversity.
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DiversityInc Magazine (ISSN 1540-1502) is published fve times a year by DiversityInc Media, LLC, 570 Broad Street, 15th f., Newark, N.J. 07102. Periodical Postage Paid at Newark, N.J., and at additional mailing offces. U.S. rates: Single
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EDITORIAL/DIVERSITYINCBESTPRACTICES.COM
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Senior Vice President, Executive Editor
(973) 494-0515 | bfrankel@DiversityInc.com
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CONTRIBUTORS
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EDUCATION AND TRAINING
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DIVERSITYINC CAREERS
Luke Visconti Chief Executive Officer
VOLUME 10 NUMBER 3 | WWW.DIVERSITYINCBESTPRACTICES.COM
resource groups, mentoring,
goal-setting, accountability
and more, visit the new www.
DiversityIncBestPractices.com.
Our ability to accumulate the
data—and disseminate it through
our publication (www.DiversityInc.
com/magazine), events (www.
DiversityInc.com/events) and
our benchmarking service (www.
DiversityInc.com/benchmarking)—
has certainly encouraged a direct
path to the most rapid improve-
ment for hundreds of companies. In
turn, they have asked their sup-
pliers for their diversity questions
on RFPs and by tracking Tier II
(subcontractor) supplier diversity.
So yes, there is a connection
between the questions we ask and
the reality we measure, but it is one
created by the companies them-
selves. For example, the percent-
age of managers in mentoring
and people in employee-resource
groups has more than doubled
in the past five years. Yes, we’re
measuring both, but our measure-
ment of those programs wouldn’t
continue if there weren’t corre-
sponding benefits.
In my opinion, the most impor-
tant best practice we measure is the
percentage of CEO direct reports’
bonuses that is tied to diversity-
management results. This has gone
CEO@DiversityInc.com
Luke Visconti, CEO
10 DiversityInc
from 5 percent to 12.3 percent in
the past five years. It’s not logical
to think that this level of reward
is because of our competition—it
has increased because smart CEOs
want to make sure they’re putting
the spurs to their diversity efforts.
It is the personal commitment
of those at the top of organizations
that makes the success or failure of
managing diversity.
June_CEOLetter.indd 10 8/5/11 12:15 PM
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At Abbott, we are committed to developing the diverse
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June.2011 Ads.indd 5 5/3/11 10:15:43 AM
E
D
I
T
O
R

S
L
E
T
T
E
R
R
ockwell Collins exemplifies what being on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for
Diversity list is all about. This company started participating five years ago and at first
glance had a couple of major strikes against it: It’s a defense contractor, in an industry
that is historically very male and very white; and it’s headquartered in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, which
has very little racial diversity and isn’t on anyone’s list of cultural hubs. To make it even more
challenging, the company was just getting started with its diversity-management initiatives and
didn’t have a clear focus of what to do.
Rockwell Collins did have two
significant advantages: remarkable
and focused commitment from
Chairman, President and CEO Clay
Jones, and a dedicated group of
employees who wanted to know
what they could do to create a more
inclusive culture and change the
demographics of their workforce
and management.
Both DiversityInc CEO Luke
Visconti and I have gotten to
know this company well through
our benchmarking service and
have seen an extraordinary
transformation. While there
still are plenty of opportunities
for diversity-management
improvement, especially as the
competition inside and outside
of its industry heats up, it’s now a
recognized diversity leader and its
human-capital demographics reflect
its increasing emphasis on diversity.
CENHANCING RELATIONSHIPSC
My Kind of
Company
editor@DiversityInc.com
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Barbara Frankel
For more information on CEO Commitment, visit www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
The CEO listens attentively—no BlackBerrying or running
out of the room—and he asks probing questions.
Clay Jones has been the leader
of this effort. That’s been apparent
every time we’ve presented to their
executive council. He listens atten-
tively—no BlackBerrying or run-
ning out of the room—and he asks
probing questions about what other
companies have done and what his
company needs to do. Because he’s
so focused on this, all of his subordi-
nates are equally focused on it.
Rockwell Collins made it onto
the list this year for the first time,
coming in at No. 42, and their joy
was so genuine it made me proud
of what we do and why we do it.
What’s even more gratifying is that
they didn’t rest on their laurels—
they immediately started looking
at their areas of improvement and
what they need to do to move up
the list.
In the 12 years we’ve been doing
this, we have seen many companies,
and many CEOs, come and go. Some
companies have long-term commit-
ment and see diversity management
as vital to their business strategy.
Others dabble in it and then drop
away when it becomes real work to
implement change.
For me, the real gratification is
in seeing a company improve and
maximize its talent potential and its
corresponding ability to innovate to
create and sustain business oppor-
tunities.
Earning a spot on the
DiversityInc Top 50 is obviously
important, but the real benefit is in
employee engagement, productivity
and innovation.
12 DiversityInc


June_EditorsLetter.indd 12 8/4/11 3:55 PM
travelers.com
A different perspective can make all the difference.
No two people see things the same way, and we believe that’s important to our
business’s future. We have dedicated ourselves to creating an insurance company
full of many perspectives with one like-minded goal—success. A diverse business
needs employees with diverse ways of thinking, and every position at Travelers is
as unique as the person who fills it. Learn more at travelers.com/Diversity.
EOE ©2010 The Travelers Indemnity Company. All rights reserved. The Travelers Indemnity Company and its property casualty affiliates. One Tower Square, Hartford, CT 06183
December ADS.indd 18 12/15/10 8:31:50 PM
14 DiversityInc
Kaiser Permanente celebrates after
the company is announced as No. 1
on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity list.
June_Top50.Opener.indd 14 8/5/11 2:23 PM
DiversityInc 15
SUMMER 2011
COVER STORY
The DiversityInc
Top 50 Companies
for Diversity,
which has been in
existence for 12 years,
surveys companies on
four key areas of
diversity management:
CEO Commitment,
Human Capital, Corporate
and Organizational
Communications, and Supplier
Diversity. The 300-question
survey is free and is based
entirely on empirical data; doing
business with DiversityInc does
not impact ranking in any way.
To participate, a company must
have at least 1,000 U.S.
employees. Participation has
increased every year and this
year was up to 535, a 19 percent
increase from the previous year.
Surveys are due in early March
2012, and results will be
announced April 24, 2012, at our
event in New York City.
CC TOP CC TOP 50 50
June_Top50.Opener.indd 15 8/5/11 2:23 PM
16 DiversityInc
N
ow in its second decade, the DiversityInc Top 50 competition continues to
grow and evolve. We enjoyed a 19 percent increase in participants from last
year, to 535 organizations, and we continued to reinvest in our project, spend-
ing hundreds of thousands of dollars to upgrade our evaluation process.
Our editorial policies remain
consistent: Actual results deter-
mine the ranking, not business
conducted with DiversityInc.
There are three compa-
nies on our list that do no
business with us at all.
The application process
is free, and all applicants
that fill in enough data
will receive a free report
card. Please see www.
DiversityInc.com/top50
for a complete explana-
tion of our methodology,
eligibility requirements and how to
apply.
We spent a full year improving
the SPSS computer programming
that contains our methodology and
produces the list. A four-person
internal team plus a seasoned SPSS
programming consultant worked
full time for most of last year on
this project, the free report cards
and our benchmarking product. My
goal was to increase our accuracy
in measurement between compa-
nies and industries—and to build
stronger correlations between good
results and best practices.
What makes our process suc-
cessful is that the hundreds of
competitors give us a large-enough
database to make a relative assess-
ment of the quality of diversity
management by actual outcome.
In other words, we don’t make the
standards; the field of competitors
determines them. This can be done
with statistical evaluation.
For example, we measure
four levels of manage-
ment. Inside each of those
levels, we measure the
percentage of standard
deviation of all results,
and from that, we deter-
mine what defines best
results for 50 companies
out of the full field of
competitors. We roll up the results
of hundreds of comparisons for a
point score in each of the four areas
we measure (CEO Commitment,
Human Capital, Corporate and
Organizational Communications,
and Supplier Diversity). We also
test for consistency across all four
areas.
We are evolving in two main
directions. First, we want to contin-
ue to improve our accuracy. Second,
we want to increase the number
of competitors. For the 2012 list,
we will simplify our survey where
possible but continue to refine our
measurement. There are areas that
concern me, such as the lack of
improvement for women in the top
ranks, so we’re looking to mea-
sure competitive versus relatively
non-competitive positions and the
diversity difference between the
two. Our second area of focus will
result in a smaller survey for the
thousands of companies that are
critical to their local economy, but
not nationally or internationally.
We’re going to try and develop
several regional lists, cross-tabbed
by geography and industry.
Our list can only be as healthy
as our company, and I want to
give you a brief update. We have
completed the evolution from being
dependent on magazine advertising
revenue to having the majority of
our revenue come from consult-
ing. We continue to increase the
capabilities of our benchmarking
service and now have more than
70 companies, with close to a 90
percent renewal rate. You can read
more about it at www.DiversityInc.
com/benchmarking. We’ve pro-
duced five successful events in the
past three years and are averaging
600 attendees from 200 compa-
nies. Our upcoming November
2011 event has 14 sponsors, and
we expect to sell out, as we did in
March. We focus on high-level,
thought-provoking speakers (six
CEOs will speak in November) and
subject-matter experts—no com-
mercials. Our syllabus is available
at www.DiversityInc.com/events.
METHODOLOGY
Increased participation and a refined
evaluation process build stronger correlations
between good results and best practices.
BY LUKE VISCONTI
June_Top50.Opener.indd 16 8/5/11 2:23 PM
Photo, this page and previous: Jamie Watts
DiversityInc 17
Clockwise, from top:
The DiversityInc Top
50 Companies for
Diversity awards dinner;
Luke Visconti, CEO of
DiversityInc; author
Isabel Wilkerson with
DiversityInc Executive
Vice President of
Product Development
and Operations Carolynn
Johnson, Visconti, and
Senior Vice President
and Executive Editor
Barbara Frankel;
Frankel and Visconti
announce the
DiversityInc Top 50 list
June_Top50.Opener.indd 17 8/5/11 2:24 PM
BY BARBARA FRANKEL
18 DiversityInc
Companies
Why
DiversityInc
Top 50
ON THE
June_Rise&Fall.indd 18 8/5/11 12:24 PM
DiversityInc 2011 19
What causes companies to move up and down so
much on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for
Diversity list? Three factors: our improving ability
to ask probing questions, increased competition and
the commitment of leadership at individual companies.
These case studies are all based on submissions to the 2011
DiversityInc Top 50 survey. They offer valuable lessons, but
it’s important to remember that each company’s business
goals—and, therefore, its related diversity-management
efforts—are unique. The only way to accurately assess a
company’s progress and recommend a course of action is to
analyze its data points in comparison to other companies.
DiversityInc 19
WWWh Wh
mmmu mmu
DDiv
tto as
the commitm
FOUR
CASE
STUDIES
An analysis of four companies in
different industries shows what’s
important to stay competitive.
Why is there so much movement
on the list each year?
June_Rise&Fall.indd 19 8/5/11 12:24 PM
12.3%
5%
33%
17%
100%
67%
100%
50%
Company A has had reasonable and consistent performance on
the list for the past few years but was never a standout.
This company has two related issues it needs to address if
it wants to stem the decline and compete in an industry where
its peers are rapidly accelerating their diversity-management
efforts. The two issues are its CEO’s lack of personal involve-
ment with diversity management and a failure to consistently
communicate, internally and externally, that diversity is essential
to the business.
CEO SUPPORT IS ESSENTIAL
Let’s first examine the CEO commitment issue. In our 12 years of
assessing companies through the DiversityInc Top 50, we have never seen
a company improve its diversity-management efforts and, subsequently,
its human-capital results without visible CEO commitment. The CEO
of this company has made some public statements that indicate a lack
of cultural competence for at least one traditionally underrepresented
group. What would have helped him—and his senior executives—under-
stand the consumer ramifications of his actions would be more diversity
at his top level and more interaction with employee-resource groups.
Unfortunately, both are lacking here.
The top level of this company, CEO and direct reports, is all white, and
the next two levels down are almost all white. The CEO, therefore, is not
being exposed to multicultural viewpoints from his senior managers. The
lack of diversity at the top of the company is likely to have a cascading
impact on recruitment, retention and talent development, DiversityInc Top
50 data analysis shows. That correlation holds true for this company, where
new hires of Blacks and Latinos fell about 7 percent year to year, promotions
into first management jobs for Blacks and Latinos fell 22 percent and for
women fell 16 percent year to year, and management promotions fell about
COMPANIES FELL
Bonus tied
to diversity
CDO reports
to CEO
Have executive
diversity council
Council establishes
or signs off on
diversity goals and
metrics
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5
0
FOUR
CASE
STUDIES
T
H
A
T
CEO COMMITMENT
Companies that rose
on the DiversityInc
Top 50 list show
substantially more
progress in key
diversity-management
areas than companies
that declined.
INCREASE DECREASE vs.
COMPANIES
THAT
INCREASED
COMPANIES
THAT
DECREASED
Consumer-
Facing
Company
FACTORS
CEO NOT PERSONALLY INVOLVED
LACK OF DIVERSITY IN TOP
LEVELS OF MANAGEMENT
CEO DOESN’T MEET WITH ERGs
CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS
IGNORE DIVERSITY
COMPANY A
June_Rise&Fall.indd 20 8/5/11 12:25 PM
In our 12 years
of assessing
companies
through the
DiversityInc Top
50, we have
never seen
a company
improve its
diversity-
management
efforts and,
subsequently,
its human-
capital results,
without
visible CEO
commitment.
14 percent for Blacks and Latinos year to year. What’s particularly signifi-
cant about this company is that 20 percent of their senior managers come
from outside the organization, yet they do not require diversity at all in their
executive-recruitment slates. By comparison, the DiversityInc Top 50 aver-
age 25 percent of senior managers coming from outside the company, but 90
percent require diversity in their executive-recruitment slates.
NO CEO/ERG RELATIONSHIP
While the CEO of Company A does have a leadership position at a
multicultural nonprofit, he has little exposure to employee-resource
groups, which would have been essential in helping him overcome the
misstep he made. He meets with the groups only once a year, while 44
percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs meet with ERG leaders more than
twice a year. Although ERG leaders have rotational spots on the diver-
sity council, this CEO does not chair the council personally, unlike 30
percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs. The council does not set diversity
goals (usually demographic percentage increases) for the company,
unlike 90 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 executive councils.
His lack of visible support for diversity management carries forward
into the company’s communications, both internal and external. The
company’s website does not clearly articulate its diversity commitment
and, while a message from the CEO does appear after clicking on
“diversity,” the information is general and includes almost no detail about
employee-resource groups. Internally, the ERGs are predominantly only
found at corporate headquarters and their presence is not widespread in
remote locations, where hourly workers are predominant. The inclusion
of hourly workers in ERGs is a challenge for many retail/consumer-
packaged-goods companies, especially since their employment may
be more transitional, but innovative solutions are occurring. Some
labor-intensive companies have chosen to only include these workers
by inviting them to attend non-shift events but not allowing them to be
full members of the employee-resource groups. Others have had more
success allowing hourly workers who assume leadership positions at
employee-resource groups to be excused from shift duties and to be
full-fledged group members. There is initial data indicating this also
improves promotion and retention rates of these employees.
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY
Document to the CEO the benefits of personally chairing the diversity council and using
the council to set diversity-management goals (companies that do this increase racial/ethnic/
gender diversity, especially at upper ranks, 10 percent on average).
Increase CEO interaction with ERG leaders to four times a year and ensure these meetings
include discussion of corporate culture and customer insights.
Examine best practices of other organizations to increase ERG membership across
the company and make ERGs more central to both human-capital and corporate-
communications efforts.
DiversityInc 21
June_Rise&Fall.indd 21 8/5/11 12:27 PM
Supplier diversity is
a crucial means of
building community
support, and the
data shows a definite
correlation between
companies with strong
supplier-diversity
best practices and
percentages of
procurement allotted
to MBEs and WBEs
and human-capital
improvements.
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5
0
COMPANIES FELL
T
H
A
T
22 DiversityInc
FOUR
CASE
STUDIES
Skilled
Employee
Base
FACTORS
CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER HAS
LITTLE ACCESS TO CEO
DECLINING PARTICIPATION IN
MENTORING
DIVERSITY COUNCIL INEFFECTIVE,
MEETS INFREQUENTLY
SUPPLIER DIVERSITY IS
LOW PRIORITY
COMPANY B This company, which has a large population of techni-
cally trained employees, fell in ranking this year, largely
because of the survey

s increased requirement that compa-
nies on the list be strong in all four areas measured: CEO
Commitment, Human Capital, Corporate and Organizational
Communications, and Supplier Diversity.
Although the CEO of this company is a long-time diversity
advocate, his message has been diluted because he has not
held senior executives accountable for results and has not put
in place a strong chief diversity officer. This is reflected in
the lack of alignment between internal and external diversity-
management efforts, especially supplier diversity.
REDUCED ACCOUNTABILITY
This company, like many others, has faced business challenges in
recent years because of the sputtering economy and increased
global competition. Yet at a time when some competitors are increasing
the focus on diversity management as a means of increasing long-term
sales, the CEO and senior leadership have diminished their focus.
Specifically, the percentage of executive bonuses tied to diversity
goals was cut in half this year (from 10 percent of bonus compensation to
5 percent), while the number of employees in the diversity department
dropped from three to two. What’s even more telling is the role of the
chief diversity officer. At 28 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 companies,
chief diversity officers now report directly to the CEO. At another 60
percent of the DiversityInc Top 50, the head of diversity is a direct report
to a direct report of the CEO. At this company, the head of diversity is
down yet another level and does not have a visible role at the company or
much access to the CEO and senior leadership.
The results of this can be seen in a decline in human-capital demo-
graphics. In the last year, new hires of Blacks at this company declined by
43 percent, while new hires of Latinos fell 50 percent. Promotions into first
management jobs fell 33 percent for Latinos, 23 percent for Asians, and 11
percent for women. Promotions within management dropped 52 percent
for Latinos and 17 percent for Asians. This drop in diversity-management
focus also was illustrated by the lack of management participation in its
formal, cross-cultural mentoring program, which was down 90 percent
from last year and another 50 percent from the previous year.
FALLING SUPPLIER-DIVERSITY METRICS
The company’s external efforts indicate the overall lack of focus on
diversity efforts. Supplier diversity, one of the four areas measured, has
never been a strong point of this company (or of its industry, for that
matter), but the results this year show a diminishment from the previous
year. Supplier diversity is a crucial means of building community sup-
port, and the data shows a definite correlation between companies with
strong supplier-diversity best practices and percentages of procurement
allotted to minority- and women-owned suppliers (MBEs and WBEs)
and human-capital improvements.
June_Rise&Fall.indd 22 8/5/11 12:27 PM
DiversityInc 23
At this company, the trend is in the
opposite direction. As the human-capital
percentages declined, so did the supplier-
diversity metrics. The company had low
percentage spend with Tier I (direct
contractor) MBEs and WBEs last year, and
the percentages dropped slightly this year.
Last year, the company reported some Tier
II (subcontractor) spend with MBEs and
WBEs, but this year there was none. Last
year, the company answered that it offered
mentoring and financial assistance/educa-
tion to diverse suppliers; this year, it did
not. Enhanced questions added this year
on certification of specific types of sup-
pliers (i.e., those owned by LGBT people
and people/veterans with disabilities) also
negatively impacted this company.
RECOMMENDATIONS
FOR THIS COMPANY
Enhance the position of chief
diversity officer at least one level
and provide more support (even if
it’s dotted-line support) and access to
senior management to enable the chief diversity
officer to bolster metrics/emphasis driving
human-capital results. Consider a person who has
P&L experience as chief diversity officer; several
companies in the DiversityInc Top 50, including
many with educated workforces, have gone this
route.
The CEO chairs the diversity council
but the council meets infrequently and
does not set and measure diversity
goals. Increasing the council’s (and
the CEO’s) ability to hold executives accountable
for diversity goals will communicate the importance
of diversity management to the company.
The company—and the CEO—have
not communicated diversity’s long-
term importance to their business
goals, although they have been
increasingly vocal about global corporate social-
responsibility efforts. Both on their website and in
internal communications, the same coordinated
focus on diversity should improve human-capital
and supplier-diversity demographics, according
to the data trending of other companies that have
been in similar situations.
47%
42%
58%
45%
49%
36%
47%
40%
43%
34%
8%
6% 6%
4%
8%
5%
Promotions
Into
Management
Promotions in
Management
Management New Hires in
Management
INCREASE DECREASE vs.
COMPANIES THAT INCREASED
COMPANIES THAT DECREASED HUMAN CAPITAL
9%
3%
9%
3%
5.5%
1%
Black
Black
Latino
Latino
Asian
Asian
CEO & DIRECT REPORTS
BY RACE/ETHNICITY
26%
21%
37%
24%
Women
Women
BY GENDER
WOMEN
New Hires
ONE LEVEL DOWN
June_Rise&Fall.indd 23 8/8/11 9:41 AM
A long-time participant in the DiversityInc Top 50 survey,
this company has had an internal focus on mentoring and
employee-resource groups, aided by changes to the survey
ranking that gave more credit for companies whose diversity-
management initiatives were consistent across the organization.
This company’s turnaround really started the previous year
when the CEO began to personally sign off on executive
compensation tied to diversity and also decided to personally
appoint the members of the executive diversity council,
who oversee diversity metrics throughout the organization.
The CEO’s increased demand for accountability created
a momentum, which led to significant increases in the
utilization of the formal, cross-cultural mentoring program and
employee-resource groups. This has begun to show results in
human-capital demographics, with even more improvement
anticipated next year.
IMPROVED MENTORING
This company has had strong mentoring programs—individual,
peer, group and virtual—and employee-resource groups in place
for several years, most for more than a decade. While both mentor-
ing and ERGs have been available across the organization and are not
just pocketed in corporate headquarters, utilization of both initiatives
was lower than that of most other companies in the DiversityInc Top 50
last year. Part of that was the dilemma commonly faced by production/
consumer-products companies of ways to include hourly workers, who
may be temporary and/or who often work shifts. But another part of it
was a lack of centralized communication, especially from the top of the
organization, about the value of these groups to recruitment, retention,
talent development and customer relations.
Since the CEO raised the bar on accountability, and the diversity and
communications teams worked together on getting the message out,
mentoring participation has more than doubled and now exceeds the
DiversityInc Top 50 average by more than 45 percent. The CEO and
direct reports, as well as the next two levels down of executives, are all
part of the formal, cross-cultural mentoring program. There is formal
follow-up by a third-party organization that assesses mentoring’s impact
on retention and promotions.
Employee-resource-group participation has more than tripled and
now exceeds the DiversityInc average by 40 percent. This company
is using its employee-resource groups extensively to source potential
leaders and help with their development, as well as to aid in diversity/
cultural-competence training in the entire organization. The deep con-
nection to what ERG members are experiencing and thinking, both in
the workplace and the marketplace, is having results, the company tells
us, with product development aimed at underrepresented groups as well
as talent management.
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COMPANIES ROSE
T
H
A
T
24 DiversityInc
FOUR
CASE
STUDIES
Consumer-
Facing
Company
FACTORS
CEO SIGNS OFF ON BONUSES
TIED TO DIVERSITY GOALS
ERGs, MENTORING USED
THROUGHOUT ALL BUSINESS UNITS
CEO APPOINTS, OVERSEES
DIVERSITY COUNCIL
CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS,
DIVERSITY OFFICE WORKING TOGETHER
COMPANY C
June_Rise&Fall.indd 24 8/5/11 12:27 PM
The CEO’s
increased
demand for
accountability
created a
momentum,
which led to
significant
increases in
the utilization
of the formal,
cross-cultural
mentoring
program and
employee-
resource
groups.
PROMOTIONS INTO MANAGEMENT ARE UP
Most measurable are the changes in talent development. Promotions
into first management jobs were up 79 percent, year to year, for Asians
and 45 percent for Latinos, while promotions within management
were up 18 percent for Latinos and 10 percent for women. There was
increased racial/ethnic/gender diversity in the senior levels of the orga-
nization as well, and the succession-planning pipeline indicates there
will be more improvement in that area.
Although this company has made tremendous progress, there are still
lessons it can learn from companies at the very top of the list as well as
increasing competition for talent and customers both in its industry and
among progressive companies altogether.
The CEO’s increased emphasis on accountability has been
delivering results; now we would recommend the CEO and
senior executives follow the model of the very top companies
and become a more visible proponent of diversity, including
it throughout internal and external messaging and being
more publicly involved by assuming a leadership position at a
multicultural nonprofit. This is both a visible sign of inclusion and
an educational experience for the executive, who will become
more connected with multicultural customers.
Supplier diversity at this company remains less competitive
than other areas. We recommend the company increase its
community visibility by focusing on educating/training/providing
financial assistance for diverse suppliers. A national philanthropic
initiative that helps start-ups, especially from underserved areas,
would enhance relationships in those communities.
55%
25%
29%
14%
16%
11%
3.4%
2.9%
2.2%
1.9%
Mentoring
Participation
Employee-
Resource-Group
Participation
Multicultural
Advertising
WBE Spend
Tier I
INCREASE DECREASE vs.
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY
COMPANIES THAT INCREASED
COMPANIES THAT DECREASED
COMMUNICATIONS
MBE Spend
Tier I
SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
June_Rise&Fall.indd 25 8/5/11 12:27 PM
This company has had a long history of valuing diversity
management, especially in terms of its community outreach
and recruitment. The previous CEO was a public advocate for
diversity, and the current CEO has been as strong an advocate.
However, this company has had difficulty moving up on the
DiversityInc Top 50 list because its demographics, especially
when compared with its own industry, were not exceptional,
particularly at the upper levels. Under the current CEO, the
demographics have been improving but still remain slightly less
competitive than industry leaders.
CONSISTENCY ACROSS ORGANIZATION
This company was helped this year by DiversityInc’s increased
emphasis on consistency of diversity-management efforts
throughout the organization. Some of the other companies in the
DiversityInc Top 50 were negatively impacted because the data showed
their employee-resource groups and mentoring initiatives, for example,
were only available at corporate headquarters or in certain locations—
or were limited to certain groups of employees. At this company,
employee-resource groups are available to all employees, formal cross-
cultural mentoring is available to three-quarters of the employees, and
participation rates for both are increasing.
This company’s strong results in external outreach also helped it rise
on the list this year; multicultural philanthropy, multicultural marketing
and supplier diversity all are real strengths, and it has deep roots within
the Black, Asian and Latino communities. Our increased ability to mea-
sure these factors helped this company rise. The company also increased
its efforts to help minority- and women-owned suppliers this year, add-
ing financial assistance and mentoring.
The challenge this company has is to increase its human-capital
demographics, especially in upper management. While there is racial/
ethnic/gender diversity at the top of the list, they remain low compared
with industry and DiversityInc Top 50 leaders.
This company’s strong
results in external
outreach also helped it
rise on the list this year;
multicultural philanthropy,
multicultural marketing
and supplier diversity all
are real strengths.
W
H
Y

C
O
M
P
A
N
I
E
S

R
I
S
E

A
N
D

F
A
L
L

O
N

T
H
E

D
I
V
E
R
S
I
T
Y
I
N
C

T
O
P

5
0
COMPANIES ROSE
T
H
A
T
26 DiversityInc
The company uses its executive leadership council as a de facto diversity council, but the creation of a
separate diversity council, chaired by the CEO, would allow the company to focus specifically on
succession planning/talent development to move the needle. Ninety-eight percent of DiversityInc Top 50
companies have executive diversity councils, and the CEO chairs them at 58 percent of the companies.
Increased emphasis on the use of employee-resource groups to develop leadership talent will also
benefit this company’s efforts to increase diversity at the top levels. While ERGs are available throughout
the company, participation in ERGs is still relatively low (50 percent lower than the DiversityInc Top 50
average). This company also can gain some best-practice ideas from other companies that have faced this
challenge, such as including ERG leaders in a high-potential training program.
FOUR
CASE
STUDIES
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY
Financial-
Services
Company
FACTORS
ALIGNS PHILANTHROPIC EFFORTS
WITH INTERNAL ENGAGEMENT
CURRENT CEO IMPROVES
PREDECESSOR’S COMMITMENT
INCREASES MENTORING AND ERG
PARTICIPATION
COMPANY D
June_Rise&Fall.indd 26 8/5/11 12:27 PM
CONCLUSION:
WHAT REALLY
PROPELS RANKING
I
t’s important to note that
ranking in the DiversityInc
Top 50 is completely
separated from companies
doing business with DiversityInc,
including our benchmarking
service. Both the DiversityInc
Top 50 competition and the
benchmarking service benefit
from our increased ability to
fine-tune the questions to create
far more separation between
companies that excel and
companies that merely check
off a box. Our investment in
more sophisticated software
enabled these changes to be
implemented. For example, we
have asked in recent years what
percentage of employees are
members of employee-resource
groups. But this year, we were
able to ask and measure the
percentage of employees in
each specific group and, more
importantly, whether the groups
are available consistently through
the organization or just at
headquarters or a few locations.
What really propels ranking is
the decisions at a company that
impact its diversity-management
efforts and, subsequently, its
human-capital results. Those
decisions, whether about
resources, accountability or
visible support, are dependent
on the CEO. As you see from
these examples—and as our
data shows—without the
direct involvement
of the CEO,
sustainable progress
doesn’t happen.
DI
DiversityInc 27
Want to learn how to leverage diversity
awareness and understanding to
increase the contribution to your
company’s bottom line, innovation
and profitability?
launch a
diversityinc
training
course
today
!
VISIT www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/learning
FOR MORE DETAILS.
FREE for DiversityIncBestPractices.com
subscribers and DiversityInc
Benchmarking customers
À Employee-Resource Groups
À Mentoring
À Diversity Councils
À Generational Communications
(Coming Soon)
COURSE OFFERINGS
FEATURES
À
Interactive, online courses deliver
30–60 minutes of instruction
À
Information based on research findings of best
practices revealed from DiversityInc historical data
À
Insightful case studies from The DiversityInc Top
50 Companies for Diversity
y
Content
focused on
key diversity-
management
topics
es.com
Avonia Richardson-Miller, Ed.D.
June_Rise&Fall.indd 27 8/5/11 12:28 PM
F
A
C
T
S

&

F
I
G
U
R
E
S
’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11
31% 20% 51% 14% 26% 24% 11% 14% 12% 19%
75
98
118
178
203
256
317
352
401
449
535
Auto
Insurance (P&C)
Hospital/Health System
Telecom
Retail
Technology
Media
Hospitality
Health Insurance
Pharmaceutical
Professional Services
Consumer Packaged Goods
Financial 18%
12%
12%
10%
8%
8%
8%
6%
6%
4%
4%
2%
2%
YEAR-TO-YEAR INCREASE
28 DiversityInc
1. Kaiser Permanente
2. Sodexo
3. PricewaterhouseCoopers
4. AT&T
5. Ernst & Young
6. Johnson & Johnson
7. IBM Corp.
8. Deloitte
9. Kraft Foods
10. Colgate-Palmolive Co.
11. Bank of America
12. The Coca-Cola Co.
13. American Express Co.
14. Marriott International
15. Merck & Co.
16. Prudential Financial
17. CSX Corp.
18. Cummins
19. Aetna
20. Cox Communications
21. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.
22. Verizon Communications
23. Accenture
24. Abbott
25. Procter & Gamble
PARTICIPATION IN THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50
FACTS &FIGURES
26. Health Care Service Corp.
27. General Mills
28. Time Warner
29. KPMG
30. Dell
31. MasterCard Worldwide
32. Booz Allen Hamilton
33. SC Johnson
34. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide
35. JCPenney
36. WellPoint
37. Northrop Grumman Corp.
38. Automatic Data Processing
39. Eli Lilly and Co.
40. Wells Fargo & Co.
41. Monsanto Co.
42. Rockwell Collins
43. Allstate Insurance Co.
44. Target Corp.
45. Time Warner Cable
46. Toyota Motor North America
47. Ford Motor Co.
48. AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co.
49. Whirlpool Corp.
50. Chrysler Group
The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity list
began in 2001, at the same
time many corporations were
beginning to understand the
business value of
diversity-management
initiatives. Like diversity
management itself, the list
has evolved signifcantly and
continues to be refned and
improved to refect how rapidly
companies are adapting these
strategies.
In 2011, new software was
implemented to allow for more
concise measurements for
consistency across the four
areas measured: CEO
Commitment, Human Capital,
Corporate and Organizational
Communications, and Supplier
Diversity.
Participation in the list has
increased every year.
There is volatility on the list as
new companies gain strength
and others work to keep up with
quickly evolving best practices.
This year, seven companies
made the list for the frst time;
one is a frst-time participant.
Six companies that had never
ranked before made the list
for the frst time.
Four companies that had fallen
off the list came back.
Seven companies moved on to
the list after being on the
25 Noteworthy Companies
list last year.
Twenty-eight companies moved
up on the list; 20 moved down.
BY YEAR • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS INDUSTRIES • PERCENT
June_Top 50 Factoids.indd 28 8/5/11 12:28 PM
ACCOUNTABILITY, RESULTS
PERSONALLY
INVOLVED,
INDIVIDUALLY
PERSONALLY
INVOLVED,
ORGANIZATIONALLY
HOLDS DIRECT
REPORTS ACCOUNTABLE
STRONG SENSE OF
CULTURE, VALUES
HOLDS OTHER
COMPANIES
ACCOUNTABLE
BLAI PROMOTIONS
INTO MANAGEMENT
WOMEN
PROMOTIONS
INTO
MANAGEMENT
BLAI
PROMOTIONS
WITHIN
MANAGEMENT
WOMEN
PROMOTIONS
WITHIN
MANAGEMENT
BLAI CEO
AND
DIRECT
REPORTS
WOMEN CEO
AND DIRECT
REPORTS
BLAI
2ND LEVEL OF
MANAGEMENT
WOMEN
2ND LEVEL OF
MANAGEMENT
DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants)
Supplier
Diversity
Corporate &
Organizational
Communications
Human
Capital
CEO
Commitment
CRITERIA
¼Accountability
¼Personal
Communications
¼Visibility
CRITERIA
¼Five Levels of Management
¼Promotions Into
Management
¼Promotions in Management
CRITERIA
¼M/WBE, LGBT,
People With Disabilities,
Veterans Spend
¼RFPs
¼Accountability
CRITERIA
¼Mentoring
¼ERGs
¼Philanthropy
¼Consistency
¼Effectiveness
DiversityInc 29
4 AREAS OF MEASUREMENT
BEST PRACTICES LEAD TO IMPROVED HUMAN-CAPITAL RESULTS AND BETTER DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE
C
ompanies in the DiversityInc Top 50 are above
average in all four areas measured: CEO
Commitment, Human Capital, Corporate and
Organizational Communications and Supplier Diversity.
Their diversity-management efforts yield results
demonstrated in their human-capital demographics, as the
charts on these pages demonstrate. DiversityInc Top 50
companies are compared here against the bottom quarter of
the 535 participants in this year’s survey and, in some cases,
against national averages.
The DiversityInc Top 50 is an editorial process and is completely independent of business
conducted with DiversityInc. There are companies on our list that do no business with us.
CEO
Commitment
Human
Capital
Corporate
Communications
Supplier
Diversity
BEST PRACTICES
HUMAN-CAPITAL RESULTS
DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE
HOW TO READ THESE SPIDER GRAPHS
The farther from the center of the
circle, the better the results.
TERMINOLOGY
BLAI= Black, Latino, Asian American
and American Indian
June_Top 50 Factoids.indd 29 8/5/11 12:38 PM
F
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S

&

F
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U
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E
S
Board of Directors (BLAI)
Board
of Directors
(Women)
CEO & Direct
Reports
(BLAI)
CEO &
Direct Reports
(Women)
% of Executive
Compensation
Tied to Diversity
Philanthropy
Visibility
Accountability
DiversityInc Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(out of 535 participants)
DiversityInc Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(out of 535 participants)
CEO Signs Off
on Executive
Compensation
Tied to Diversity
CEO Chairs
Diversity Council
CEO Meets
With ERGs
Head of Diversity
Reports to CEO
CEO Has
Diversity
Quote
on Homepage
72%
98%
42%
98%
42%
90%
16%
28%
78%
100%
2005 DiversityInc Top 50 2011 DiversityInc Top 50
30 DiversityInc
CEO COMMITMENT
HUMAN CAPITAL
One Level Below
CEO & Direct
Reports
(BLAI)
One Level
Below
CEO & Direct
Reports
(Women)
Two Levels
Below CEO &
Direct Reports
(BLAI)
Two Levels Below CEO &
Direct Reports (Women)
Ratio of
Management
Vs. Promotions
Into Management
Ratio of
Management
. Promotions in
Management
HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results.
BLAI= Black, Latino, Asian American and American Indian
DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES
WITH DIVERSITY COUNCILS
WHY YOU SHOULD HAVE AN EXECUTIVE DIVERSITY COUNCIL
Companies with executive diversity councils have:
2X
47%
the number of Blacks, Latinos
and Asians in management
more women in senior
management
than companies without
2005
42%
2011
98%
FACTS &FIGURES
BEST PRACTICES
CEO DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP
BEST PRACTICES
June_Top 50 Factoids.indd 30 8/5/11 12:38 PM
DiversityInc Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(out of 535 participants)
CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS
SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
Tier I MBE Spend
Tier I
WBE
Spend
Tier II MBE Spend
Tier II
WBE Spend
2011 DiversityInc Top 50
2005 DiversityInc Top 50
21%
39%
13%
23%
34%
37%
% Managers in Mentoring
% Employees in ERGs
% Philanthropy to Multicultural Nonprofits
HIGHER ERG PARTICIPATION =
MORE PROMOTION
Companies with ERG-participation rates
above 25% have higher promotion rates
vs. companies with rates below 15%
2011 DiversityInc
Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(of 535 Participants in
2011 DiversityInc Top 50)
23%
48%
8%
40%
% of Employees in ERGs
Promotions Into Management (Women)
2011 DiversityInc
Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(of 535 Participants in
2011 DiversityInc Top 50)
% of Managers in Mentoring
Promotions in
Management
(Blacks, Latinos,
Asians)
23%
8%
48%
40%
ENGAGEMENT = VISIBILITY
% of Managers
in Mentoring
% of Employees
in ERGs
ERG Factors
Diversity-Training
Factors
Mentoring
Factors
BEST PRACTICES
BEST PRACTICES
ACCOUNTABILITY
Companies with at least 30% of their
managers in mentoring programs
vs. companies with less than 15%
4X
as many Blacks, Latinos
and Asians in level of
CEO and direct reports
as many Blacks, Latinos and
Asians in level below CEO
and direct reports
HIGHER MENTORING
PARTICIPATION YIELDS RESULTS
KEY TRENDS
2005 DiversityInc Top 50
2011 DiversityInc Top 50
62%
60%
94%
98%
Compensation Tied to Supplier-Diversity Results
Mandates Supplier-Diversity Metrics in RFPs
Supplier
Diversity
Corporate &
Organizational
Communications
Human
Capital
CEO
Commitment
4 AREAS OF
MEASUREMENT
Blacks Latinos
Asians Women
18% 26%
65% 11%
2X
TIER I Direct contractor
TIER II Subcontractor
MBE Minority-Owned
Business Enterprise
WBE Women-Owned
Business Enterprise
DiversityInc 31
DiversityInc Top 50
Bottom Quarter
(out of 535 participants)
June_Top 50 Factoids.indd 31 8/5/11 12:38 PM
INDUSTRY
Healthcare
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Catholic
Healthcare West
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
Oakland, Calif.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
163,986
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People
With Disabilities
GEORGE HALVORSON
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
We consider our diversity to be a core
strength of our organization. We very
much appreciate being recognized for
our commitment to diversity.
DR. RON COPELAND, F.A.C.S.
• PRESIDENT & MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF
OHIO PERMANENTE MEDICAL GROUP
Our physicians and employees demonstrate
Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to
diversity and inclusion every day. Being
ranked in DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies
for Diversity is a distinction that makes
Kaiser Permanente very proud.
LEADERSHIP
KAISER PERMANENTE
COMPANY FACTS
1
ACCEPTING AWARD AT
OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT
BERNARD TYSON,
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF
OPERATING OFFICER
FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION, GO TO
WWW.DIVERSITYINC.
COM/EVENTS
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
P
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F
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1

1
0
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32 DiversityInc
F
ive years ago, Kaiser Permanente was the best-kept secret in diversity manage-
ment. This modest company’s long history of what it calls “diversity, inclusion,
innovation and advocacy” was not well known in corporate America, despite
an extremely diverse workforce and management, an emphasis on culturally
competent patient care, and deep core values on equality.
Those values have been part of Kaiser’s
history and lead directly to the major
diversity-management strides the com-
pany is taking today. Kaiser has always
stood up for equal opportunity.
The company’s founder, Henry
J. Kaiser, recruited more than
20,000 Blacks from the South
for his shipbuilding effort
during World War II, making
sure they had healthcare in a
racially integrated setting, which
was unique at the time. Kaiser
hired its first woman physician,
Chinese immigrant Beatrice Lei,
in 1946, and its first Black physician intern,
Wendell Lipscomb, in 1951, breaking bar-
riers. The company and its leaders have
fought for affirmative action and equality,
including strong opposition to Proposition
209 in California.
Today, Kaiser Permanente has the most
diverse board of directors and manage-
ment, especially the top three levels of
management, that DiversityInc has seen.
The company’s board of directors is half
Black, Latino and Asian and 36 percent
women, and its top level of management is
38 percent Black, Latino and Asian and 25
percent women.
Kaiser has exceptionally strong diver-
sity leadership from its chairman and CEO,
George Halvorson, who leads the
National Diversity Council.
What makes Kaiser remarkable
is the consistency of its diversity-
management efforts, as well as
the alignment between diversity
in the workplace and diversity in
the customer base. For example,
the organization’s Institute for
Culturally Competent Care and
the nine Centers of Excellence
are making significant strides in eradi-
cating healthcare disparities for Blacks,
Latinos, Asians, people with disabilities and
immigrants.
Kaiser first participated in The
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity
in 2005, when it was on the 25 Noteworthy
Companies list. It moved to No. 36 on the list
in 2006, No. 27 in 2007, No. 7 in 2009 and No.
4 last year. Kaiser’s diversity-management
initiatives have jelled in the last five years as a
clear reflection of its values and leadership.
2
0
1
1
• D
IV
ERS
IT
Y
I
N
C
S
P
E
C
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L

AW
A
R
D
TOP COMPANY FOR
Executive
Development
June_1-10.indd 32 8/5/11 12:40 PM
June.2011 Ads.indd 22 6/27/11 11:16 AM
INDUSTRY
Food Services,
Hospitality
MAIN
COMPETITORS
ARAMARK,
Compass
Group USA,
Delaware North
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
Gaithersburg, Md.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
115,369
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
379,140
GLOBAL REVENUE
$19.38 billion
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 9
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
GEORGE CHAVEL • PRESIDENT AND CEO
While we have accomplished much, we know we have a lot more to do, espe-
cially as the competition for talent is getting more intense and the compet-
itive landscape is changing. For us, diversity and inclusion is fundamental
to our business-growth strategy and a key component of our success.
I challenge our teams to be leaders, not just managers, of diversity
and inclusion if we are to maintain our leadership and ensure that
diversity is a competitive advantage for us.
DR. ROHINI ANAND • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND
GLOBAL CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
As organizations look to integrate four generations in the workplace,
address inequities globally and compete for top talent, it becomes even
more critical to continually raise the bar on expectations and perfor-
mance. Diversity and inclusion is a journey—a journey of continuous
learning, experience and growth. Thanks to the benchmarking and
best-practice sharing initiated by DiversityInc, we are able to learn
from and leverage the experiences, opportunities and challenges of
other organizations.
SODEXO
LEADERSHIP
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DIVERSITYINC LISTS
2
COMPANY FACTS
34 DiversityInc
T
his company continues to set the bar on diversity management through its high-
ly developed metrics, insistence on holding executives accountable for diversity
results, and extremely strong diversity leadership.
For George Chavel, president and CEO of
Sodexo North America, diversity is extreme-
ly personal and the essential key to his com-
pany’s business success. In tough economic
times when other companies have scaled
back, Chavel has insisted Sodexo invest in
diversity-management initia-
tives that advance their strat-
egy. Diversity and inclusion is
one of the company’s six strate-
gic imperatives, with 25 percent
of executive bonuses linked to
diversity objectives. Those score-
card bonuses are paid regardless
of the financial performance of
the company.
Dr. Rohini Anand, senior vice
president and global chief diversity offi-
cer, brings a level of perception, intelli-
gence, commitment and competence that
is hard to match anywhere else. Under her
watch, Sodexo has instituted the world-
class Spirit of Mentoring program, includ-
ing the IMPACT program, its formal
cross-divisional and cross-functional men-
toring initiative that has grown from 45
partnerships in 2004 to 125 partnerships
last year. The company has found that for
every dollar spent on this, it gets two dol-
lars back in enhanced employee retention
and productivity. Her team also has over-
seen the expansion of employee-resource
groups and first-rate learning programs
for professional development and diver-
sity awareness, and an emerging-leaders
program emphasizing talent development
to drive a diverse leadership
pipeline.
Sodexo emphasizes diversi-
ty training at every level to create
an inclusive workplace. The com-
pany communicates this commit-
ment consistently to employees,
clients, suppliers and the pub-
lic at large and doesn’t ever lose
sight of the direct connection to
its business goals.
Most importantly, Chavel, Anand and
all of Sodexo’s leadership use diversity as
the vital differentiator, a driving factor in
obtaining contracts for their food/facilities-
management business and retaining and
growing those relationships.
As Sodexo has been recognized as a
national and global diversity leader, it
has also become a teacher and diversity
advocate for its clients. Sodexo exemplifies
the words “diversity-management
progress” and is an inspiration to other
companies.
June_1-10.indd 34 8/5/11 12:40 PM
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At BASF, we create chemistry. www.basf.com/careers
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June.2011 Ads.indd 17 5/24/11 1:59:10 PM

INDUSTRY
Professional
Services
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Deloitte,
Ernst & Young,
KPMG
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
31,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
161,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$26.57 billion
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
BOB MORITZ • CHAIRMAN AND SENIOR PARTNER
Diversity of talent may be the most important asset for businesses
today. In an increasingly connected world, where talent comes from
today may not be where it comes from tomorrow. We believe that
our commitment to diversity, inclusion and flexibility will
create significant value for our clients, our stakehold-
ers, our firm and our people.
NILOUFAR MOLAVI • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
At PwC, we recognize that diversity is a critical driver of innovation and
a competitive advantage. Our people successfully serve our clients in
addressing complex business issues because they bring such diverse
points of view to the table. That is why we continue to look for
creative ways to attract and retain top talent globally.
PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS
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36 DiversityInc
I
n the last decade, no company has worked harder at expanding its diversity-
management initiatives than PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). An early leader in
workplace diversity, PwC in recent years has had fierce competition as a diver-
sity leader from the other Big Four professional-services firms as well as other
companies moving into the consulting space.
But this organization increasingly uses
its well-honed diversity efforts to engage
its employees and enhance retention and
talent development. From its remark-
able program to encourage its
employees to volunteer for non-
profits (which, it demonstrates,
improves employee engagement)
to its trendsetting work/life poli-
cies, including the Mentor Moms
initiative, PwC is constantly con-
necting its inclusive workplace
to its business goals.
The personal and profes-
sional diversity commitment of
Chairman and Senior Partner Bob Moritz
and Chief Diversity Officer Niloufar
Molavi are well executed by the organiza-
tion, including Chris Brassell, director of
the U.S. Office of Diversity, and Joanne
McDonough, director of diversity and
work/life.
Their efforts are often focused on tal-
ent development, especially for women,
Blacks, Latinos, Asians and American
Indians. For example, PwC’s Diamond
Program for high-performing senior man-
agers and directors focuses on sponsor-
ship and advocacy. The program provides
the top talent of Black, Latino, Asian and
American Indian employees with personal
and professional development, with a goal
toward developing them as future leaders.
Project BOLD is a new service program
designed to accelerate the leadership
development of high-potential and high-
performing women partners.
The company also has a
variety of mentoring programs,
among the most effective
and comprehensive in corpo-
rate America. These include
Performance Coaching and
Development, and Asian Cultural
Awareness Training for Coaches,
as well as group mentoring, on-
board mentoring for new hires,
and peer mentoring.
PwC has nine employee groups, which
it calls networking circles, and they have
been extremely effective in identify-
ing talent and improving retention and
performance.
What sets PwC apart from most other
organizations is its concise and consistent
ability to communicate, internally and
externally, the importance of diversity
to the organization. From its thought-
provoking “Who Am I?” series to its
annual Diversity in Business Leadership
Conference for high-potential PwC
employees, the company’s message on
diversity is always business-related, rel-
evant and crystal clear.
June_1-10.indd 36 8/5/11 12:41 PM
Every day, millions of consumers around the world rely
on us to bridge cultures, ethnicities and generations
with an unrivaled portfolio of brands they love. At
Kraft Foods, an open and inclusive culture is a business
necessity and a competitive advantage. Discover a
family of brands that celebrate differences and reflect
the diversity of our consumers.
June.2011 Ads.indd 28 6/30/11 10:13 AM

INDUSTRY
Technology,
Communications
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Verizon
Communications,
Qwest, Sprint
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
Dallas
U.S. EMPLOYEES
258,962
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
294,600
GLOBAL REVENUE
$124.28 billion
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
RANDALL STEPHENSON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO
At AT&T, diversity at every level of our company
is the key to our success. It helps spark innovation,
elevate customer care and strengthen
connections to the communities we serve.
DEBBIE STOREY • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, TALENT DEVELOPMENT
AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
AT&T has long viewed excellence in diversity management as a business
imperative, plain and simple. Our commitment to valuing diversity and
fostering inclusion has enabled us to focus increasing attention on a wider
array of attributes, particularly generational diversity, to attract and
retain talent and serve our growing global customer base.
AT&T
LEADERSHIP
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COMPANY FACTS
4
38 DiversityInc
T
here are good reasons the telecommunications giant has been at the top of
this list for the last three years and a mainstay on the list for most of the last
decade. With its long history as a supplier-diversity leader, its increasingly
inclusive workplace culture and its firm diversity leadership commitment
from the top of the organization, AT&T is a model of consistent and sustain-
able diversity-management progress.
It certainly starts with Chairman and
CEO Randall Stephenson. As the driving
force behind AT&T’s involvement with
Project Aspire—which is having
a dramatic impact on the high-
school-dropout rate, particularly
for Latino and Black students—
Stephenson ensures his organi-
zation stands behind the values it
espouses. His personal involve-
ment in that initiative and others
directly related to long-term
equity, such as his chairing of the
NAACP’s Corporate Campaign,
puts him at the top of the list for CEO
commitment.
Stephenson showed his commitment
to diversity’s impact on his business in his
last two appointments of chief diversity
officers, both women who had signifi-
cant roles in running the business. Cindy
Brinkley, who took over in 2008, previously
headed the state of Missouri region. Her
successor, Debbie Storey, is an operations
leader expected to push AT&T’s impressive
diversity efforts even further.
The company has improved work-
place diversity on several fronts. Strong
mentoring programs involving managers
from the highest level of the organization on
down are aiding with talent development.
The 10 employee-resource groups
are a critical part of the recruitment
process, as well as on-boarding and
talent development.
AT&T University, a remarkable
learning center at the company’s
Dallas headquarters, is used for
leadership development and to
address vital diversity issues, such
as generations in the workplace,
with external and internal stake-
holders. Diversity training is integrated
into the entire workforce, including a new
online training program and such offerings as
“Profitability and Performance Enhancement
Through Diversity and Inclusion.”
Both globally and domestically, AT&T
is a company that stands behind its val-
ues. Its partnership with Peace Through
Business is empowering and saving women
in Afghanistan and Rwanda. In the United
States, 59 percent of its philanthropy is
directed at multicultural organizations and
49 percent of its senior executives sit on
boards of multicultural nonprofits.
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INDUSTRY
Professional
Services
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Deloitte, KPMG,
PwC
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
23,613
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
144,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$21.26 billion
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
STEVE HOWE • AMERICAS AREA MANAGING PARTNER
As a professional-services organization, the quality of our people is the
key to our success, and diversity and inclusiveness are critical enablers
of our global business strategy. Navigating an increasingly complex
global business environment requires that we fully utilize the
rich perspectives and experience of our diverse talent pool.
This doesn’t just happen. We have to be highly focused and
proactive in fostering an inclusive environment to be able to
attract, develop and retain the top professionals.
BILLIE WILLIAMSON • AMERICAS INCLUSIVENESS OFFICER
Research has repeatedly shown that diverse viewpoints lead to better ideas, bet-
ter teams and better decisions. We see this time and time again in serving our
clients. We know that putting diverse teams forward to address our clients’
business needs gives us a competitive edge. People with diverse back-
grounds, capabilities and experiences are able to provide fresh ideas and
unique perspectives on complex business challenges.
ERNST&YOUNG
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COMPANY FACTS
40 DiversityInc
E
rnst & Young (E&Y) continues to be a diversity-management leader in talent
development and the innovative use of its people to connect with clients glob-
ally and domestically.
Under the leadership of Chairman and CEO James Turley and Americas
Area Managing Partner Steve Howe, the firm has put its diversity-management
efforts in the capable hands of Americas Inclusiveness Officer Billie Williamson, a true
business leader.
The firm aligns its executives’ goals
with its own global strategy, with each
executive developing a personal scorecard
that has inclusiveness as one
of two global transformational
priorities. The Americas-level
Balanced Scorecard applies
to each partner, principal and
executive. Compensation is also
affected by the Ethnicity and
Gender Inclusiveness Snapshots,
which track more than 20
metrics on the progress of
women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians
and American Indians. Metrics include
headcount, retention, promotions, partner
pipeline, recruiting, flexible work arrange-
ments, participation in high-potential
development programs, survey scores and
client assignments.
The firm has extraordinary benefits,
including generous domestic-partner
benefits, such as weekend travel expenses
for partners for out-of-town multiweek
assignments, and six weeks of paid
parental leave for primary-care providers,
including men and adoptive parents.
E&Y continues its strong talent
development with excellent and varied
mentoring programs, including NextGen,
Career Watch, Tax Excellence Program,
Diversity Mentoring Program
and Cultural Connections.
Mentoring offerings are
available across the entire
organization and include formal
cultural-awareness training for
participants, which few compa-
nies do yet.
E&Y has extremely strong
employee-resource groups,
with 50 percent of its employ-
ees participating in them and 30 percent
in more than one group. The groups are
used to identify and nurture talent and
are involved in the on-boarding process of
new employees. Employee-resource-group
success is measured in several ways: reten-
tion, promotion, engagement and contri-
bution to the business. Each group has an
executive sponsor, who is responsible for
showing the group’s contribution to the
business.
E&Y continues to demonstrate consis-
tent progress in building diversity into its
global business goals.
June_1-10.indd 40 8/5/11 12:42 PM
DI VERSI TY I NCLUSI ON
June.2011 Ads.indd 10 5/3/11 10:17:36 AM
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INDUSTRY
Pharmaceuticals,
Consumer
Products, Medical
Devices
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Eli Lilly and Co.,
Novartis AG,
Procter & Gamble
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
New Brunswick,
N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
38,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
118,700
GLOBAL REVENUE
$61.59 billion
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
WILLIAM C. WELDON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO
We are very pleased that we continue to be measured as one of the best
companies committed to diversity and inclusion. The principles of diver-
sity and inclusion are rooted in Our Credo and serve as critical business
enablers for the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies. We
understand that winning in diversity and inclusion allows
us to attract superior talent and drive extraordinary
outcomes for our patients and customers.
ANTHONY P. CARTER • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
At Johnson & Johnson, diversity and inclusion are clearly important components of
our overall business strategy. The Global Office of Diversity & Inclusion is a major
catalyst in accelerating business results and sustainable competitive advantage.
Throughout the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies we believe diversity
and inclusion matter.
JOHNSON&JOHNSON
LEADERSHIP
6
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
42 DiversityInc
A
s stated in its credo, Johnson & Johnson believes “that attracting, developing
and retaining a base of employees that reflects the diversity of its customer base
is essential to its success.” That doctrine has long set the tone for diversity and
inclusion efforts within the organization.
Johnson & Johnson, a long-time fixture
on the DiversityInc Top 50 list, has excep-
tional work/life benefits. These include:
seven onsite child-development centers,
childcare resources and referrals; work/
life resources and referrals for
employees and household mem-
bers; monthly work/life webinars
on generational issues and work/
life changes; resources for parent-
ing and grand-parenting; a toolkit
for raising a child with disabili-
ties; scholarships for children of
employees; LGBT resources and
referrals; work/life resources for
military families; onsite fitness
centers at more than 26 locations; and a pro-
gram to assess health risks and needs.
Johnson & Johnson offers a variety of
global mentoring programs, leadership-
development programs and many other
initiatives for personal and professional
growth. All three levels of senior manage-
ment participate in the company’s formal
mentoring program. The company’s acceler-
ated leadership-development programs
have a global mentoring component, and
a variety of global programs have been
launched leveraging diversity and inclusion.
In the corporate-and-organizational-
communications area, Johnson & Johnson
has 10 employee-resource groups that are
used for diversity recruitment, retention,
diversity in management, talent develop-
ment, and to reach customers and clients
in the community, as well as supplier
diversity. Twenty-five percent of employ-
ees participate in at least one of
these employee groups. These
include groups for Blacks, Latinos,
Asians, women, LGBT employees,
generations, and veterans, as well
as AMENAH (Association for
Middle Eastern and North African
Heritage), SAPNA (South Asian
Professional Network Association)
and HONOR (Helping Our
Neighbors With Our Resources),
whose purpose is to “assist the Johnson
& Johnson companies in developing and
executing programs designed to increase
the quality of life within Johnson & Johnson
companies and minority communities.”
Johnson & Johnson has an established
supplier-diversity program, which tracks
spend with minority-owned business enter-
prises, women-owned business enterprises
and vendors owned by LGBT people and
veterans with disabilities. Supplier-diversity
numbers are audited and integrated into
the overall business-plan goals. Supplier-
diversity information is included in RFPs.
Procurement-management compensation is
linked to supplier-diversity results.
June_1-10.indd 42 8/5/11 12:43 PM
My brand:
Full-time mom, full-time
“Audit Rock Star”
Allison Eidinger, Senior Manager. Wlen I lud my ğist buby, my lile clunged diumuticully. And I
wondeied low I could still lundle u demunding woik scledule. But PwC mude it cleui tlut my expeiience wus
vuluuble, und tley wunted me to stuy. Tley olleied lots ol suppoit, tooŌeveiytling liom Ġexible scleduling
und emeigency buckup clildcuie, to u piogium culled Mentoi Moms. Itłs tlese iesouices tlut luve ullowed
me to tuke good cuie ol my clients, us well us my kids. To leuin moie ubout my peisonul biund und low
stiongly we leel ubout diveisity, go to pwc.com/diversity
© 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved. In this document, “PwC” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (a Delaware limited liability partnership), which is a member
firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity. We are proud to be an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer.
June.2011 Ads.indd 21 6/27/11 9:09 AM
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ERS
IT
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INDUSTRY
Information
Technology and
Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Accenture, HP,
Microsoft
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Armonk, N.Y.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
104,168
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
426,751
GLOBAL REVENUE
$99.87 billion
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
NO. 3
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
SAM PALMISANO • CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO
The employees of IBM represent a talented and diverse workforce. Achieving
the full potential of this diversity is a business priority that is fundamental to
our competitive success. Business activities such as hiring, training, promo-
tions and compensation of employees are conducted without regard to race,
color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation,
national origin, disability or age. In respecting and valuing the diver-
sity among our employees, and all those with whom we do business,
managers are expected to ensure a working envi-
ronment that is free of all forms of harass-
ment. This policy is based on sound business
judgment and anchored in the IBM values.
RON GLOVER • VICE PRESIDENT,
DIVERSITY & WORKFORCE PROGRAMS, HUMAN RESOURCES
IBM’s commitment to diversity continues in 2011, which I’m proud to say
is our centennial year. With IBMers across 170 nations and every part of
the human family, there is no typical IBMer but rather a 400,000-person
strong, talented and diverse workforce. In the 21st century, IBM will lever-
age the creativity, capability and diversity of thought in its workforce—for
innovation and solutions that address the world’s toughest challenges.
IBM CORP.
LEADERSHIP
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COMPANY FACTS
7
ACCEPTING AWARD AT
OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT
ROD ADKINS, SENIOR
VICE PRESIDENT,
SYSTEMS &
TECHNOLOGY GROUP
FOR MORE
INFORMATION, GO TO
WWW.DIVERSITYINC.
COM/EVENTS
44 DiversityInc
T
here are companies that were known as early diversity leaders that were content
to rest on their reputations while others surged ahead of them. Not IBM. Under
the leadership of Ron Glover, vice president, Diversity & Workforce Programs, the
company has been at the forefront of diversity-management initiatives, holding execu-
tives accountable for results, significantly improving its human-capital demographics
and creating a globally inclusive workplace that sets a model for other multinationals.
All this has occurred during a peri-
od when IBM has been transforming itself
from a technology company to a consulting
firm, where its human capital—
and the innovation created by
diverse ideas—is its major asset.
This company’s values have
been demonstrated across the
globe, externally and internal-
ly, from its fight against apart-
heid and, more currently, against
genetic testing. Those values are
heavily dependent on an inclu-
sive workplace. The leadership
of IBM is very focused on talent develop-
ment. Once a year, Chairman, President
and CEO Sam Palmisano and his direct
reports examine all people running busi-
nesses and those who could have the
potential at least two levels down. This
applies to approximately 20,000 people
globally. Palmisano personally reviews as
many as 1,500 people’s progress.
IBM has a Business and Technical
Leaders Assessment Process that identifies
and nurtures people with executive poten-
tial. The company has one of the finest and
most varied mentoring programs we’ve seen
anywhere, and all of its managers
participate, including the CEO and
his direct reports. The initiatives
include individual mentoring,
peer mentoring, group mentor-
ing, reverse mentoring, language
mentoring and speed mentoring.
Mentors and mentees have cross-
cultural training.
IBM has been a model for
flexible and innovative benefits
as well—in the United States and global-
ly. Employees work with their managers to
determine work arrangements. The Global
Work/Life Fund develops and supports
dependent-care programs for families.
Globally, IBM has long been a leader in
understanding local cultures and work-
ing to align them with its own values. IBM
has the most developed employee groups
worldwide, as well as cultural-competence
training and cross-cultural mentoring.
June_1-10.indd 44 8/5/11 12:43 PM
WE ARE PROUD TO BE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNI TY/AFFI RMATI VE ACTI ON EMPLOYER.
Kaiser Permanente is the nation’s leading nonprofit integrated health plan and a recognized
health advocate in the communities in which it resides. Here, our every action supports
the well-being of the men, women, and children who turn to us for care. All 8.6 million
of them in California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland,
Ohio, Oregon, Virginia, and Washington. For more information about career
opportunities with Kaiser Permanente, visit our Web site.
kp.org/jobs/diversity
KAISER PERMANENTE SALUTES THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITY®
OUR DIFFERENCES MAKE US STRONGER
I believe
I acknowledge the contributions of others. Stand up for my opinions. And know that behind
every person, there is a unique point of view. As an employee of Kaiser Permanente, I am
valued for my individuality and for what I contribute. We are all different, yet we share a
common goal—to inspire our patients to be the best they can be. We share this commitment
with our patients, ourselves, and each other. This is what brings us together as family. If you
believe that we all offer something unique, this is the place to put your beliefs into practice.
June.2011 Ads.indd 18 5/31/11 9:29:26 AM
LEADERSHIP

INDUSTRY
Professional
Services
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Ernst & Young,
KPMG, PwC
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
40,266
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
170,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$26.60 billion
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
BARRY SALZBERG • CEO
We are committed to making Deloitte a diverse and inclusive workplace,
to value our people for who they are as much as what they
contribute. We strive to promote an environment where all our
talent can have rich and rewarding careers
and where our clients can expect stronger
teams and more innovative services.
JOHN ZAMORA • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
Diversity is a business imperative at Deloitte that paves the way
to achieve our vision of becoming the standard of excellence. Our
unwavering commitment to attracting, retaining and developing
the very best talent in the marketplace responds to our clients’
demands for high-performing teams with diverse perspectives
and experiences that deliver outstanding results.
DELOITTE
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DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
46 DiversityInc
U
nder Chief Diversity Officer John Zamora, Deloitte has taken major steps in
diversity management in what is surely the most competitive industry: profes-
sional services. The firm’s leap into the top 10 of this list is a testament to the
rigorous recent efforts to enhance succession planning, all talent development,
relevance to the business goals, and communications internally and externally.
As always, it starts with the top, and
CEO Barry Salzberg’s commitment to
diversity has never wavered. He gets a per-
fect score for CEO Commitment on the
survey and has always been a vis-
ible diversity-management lead-
er, internally and externally. He
meets monthly with employee-
resource groups and holds the
firm’s senior leaders accountable
for meeting diversity goals.
Much of Zamora’s efforts
have been concentrated
on talent acquisition and
development. Deloitte has a
host of programs, including the Emerging
Leaders Development Program (ELDP),
now in its sixth year, which identifies high-
performing/high-potential Black, Latino,
Asian and American Indian managers and
senior managers to help them get to the
next stage of their careers. Last year, the
program had 120 participants (almost half
were women), and for the first time, they
were given sponsors within the company
as their advocates, as well as external
coaches (the coaching relationships
last eight months to a year). Most of the
sponsors were cross-cultural and most
were white. The Women’s Initiative
(WIN), headed by Barbara Adachi,
Women’s Initiative national managing
partner, has contributed
significantly to the talent-
development efforts.
Deloitte has extraordinary
benefits and has led corporate
America in researching genera-
tional communications, a topic
on the mind of most companies
these days.
The firm has very strong
employee-resource groups, with
34 percent of its employees participating
in them. These groups are used for recruit-
ment, talent development and diversi-
ty training. For example, last year, Deloitte
revamped its mandatory diversity and
inclusion e-learning training for new hires.
As part of the process, members from
each of the ERGs participated as content
reviewers and pilot testers. In addition,
GLOBE (LGBT employee group) mem-
bers were a key part of developing a train-
ing scenario for one of the
learning modules.
June_1-10.indd 46 8/5/11 12:43 PM
Imagine a company whose diversity initiatives
go way beyond the requirements.
There aren’t enough accolades to describe the thousands of people at Novartis who, every day,
work tirelessly to improve, extend and save the lives of millions. Which is why our commitment
to our employees has been and always will be a top priority, with new diversity initiatives that
empower us in even greater ways than before. Initiatives like networking and employee resource
groups, diversity councils, and outreach panels. This, coupled with healthy lifestyle programs,
domestic partner benefits, child/elder care subsidies and more, results in a corporate culture
that’s not only unique, but invigorating. For more information, please visit Novartis.com
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, part of the Novartis Group, is a world leader in the research and development of products that
protect and improve health and well being. As one of the highest-ranking and fastest-growing pharmaceutical companies in the world, we’re
launching new products at an unprecedented rate, having one of the most admired pipelines in the industry. And we are proud to say that
this phenomenal growth translates into outstanding stability for your professional career.
Novartis is committed to embracing and leveraging diverse backgrounds, cultures and talents to achieve competitive
advantage. We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.
Think what’s possible.
May.2011 Ads.indd 22 6/3/11 12:02:40 PM

INDUSTRY
Consumer
Products
MAIN
COMPETITORS
ConAgra Foods,
Sara Lee
American Retail
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
Northfield, Ill.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
41,038
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
127,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$49.21 billion
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
IRENE ROSENFELD • CHAIRMAN AND CEO
Diversity and inclusion are fundamental to our business
success, and our commitment is as strong as ever. I believe
fostering a workplace that welcomes diversity
of all kinds—perspectives, experiences,
backgrounds and cultures—is a proven way
to attract and keep talented people and
inspire them to do great things.
JIM NORMAN • VICE PRESIDENT, DIVERSITY
Our diversity strategies are driven by our culture, our internal
and external partnerships, and are grounded in leader
accountability. Our actions are essential to creating a
performance-driven, values-led organization that consistently
delivers products and innovation that delight our diverse
customers and consumers around the world.
KRAFT FOODS
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LEADERSHIP
9
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
99
48 DiversityInc
K
raft Foods’ stellar rise on the list is a testament to the company’s commitment
to building a diverse and inclusive workplace and the remarkable work it’s
doing with its employee-resource groups.
This year, Kraft is up an impressive 26 spots from the previous year.
This is the first time Kraft has been ranked in the top 10.
Under the direction of Jim Norman,
vice president of diversity, openness and
inclusion is part of the daily workplace—
from training and mentoring to account-
ability in leadership objectives.
What’s most remarkable
about Kraft is its 10 strong
employee-resource groups,
which are used extensive-
ly in recruitment, peer men-
toring and marketing. One of
the key objectives of the com-
pany’s ERGs, which Kraft calls
employee councils, is profes-
sional development, including
career-planning workshops, training, net-
working and mentoring.
ERGs play a vital role in the company,
assisting with recruitment and support-
ing employee development. One program,
Jump Start, helps new hires navigate the
unwritten rules of the organization. The
ERGs are also involved in mentoring and
peer-coaching projects, designed to help
women and employees from traditional-
ly underrepresented groups increase their
effectiveness in their current and future
assignments.
In 2010, Kraft launched an Employee
Council Leadership Academy to develop
the leadership skills of ERG leaders and
enhance team effectiveness. For two days,
ERG leaders received the same type of
business training that other business lead-
ers typically receive, except their
focus was on the alignment of
diversity and inclusion strategies.
A key factor in Kraft’s success
is the commitment of Chairman
and CEO Irene Rosenfeld to
the organization’s diversity-
management agenda. Kraft links
diversity goals of each busi-
ness unit and function directly
to executive compensation to
strengthen accountability. For about 200 of
the company’s most senior leaders, there is
a clear link of executive incentive compen-
sation to diversity performance.
Kraft requires diversity and inclusion
training for every employee at each career
stage. Metrics that assess the value of the
training include course evaluations and
employee-engagement surveys.
The company has dramatically
improved its mentoring program this year,
with 60 percent of its total employee pop-
ulation and 70 percent of managers now
participating.
June_1-10.indd 48 8/5/11 12:44 PM
Talent has no
boundaries
There is a place where ambitions
are limitless. Where every professional
can leverage their unique skills to
realize their goals. It’s KPMG LLP.
Where success can be achieved by all.
Our goal is to continually attract, retain,
and develop high performers from all
backgrounds. We’re proud that our Chairman
and CEO John Veihmeyer is providing the
leadership we need to make that goal a
reality, and that DiversityInc has ranked us
among its Top 50 Companies for Diversity
for the fourth consecutive year.
kpmgcareers.com
© 2011 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of
independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity.
All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered
trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. 24103NSS
June.2011 Ads.indd 7 5/3/11 10:17:16 AM

INDUSTRY
Consumer
Products
MAIN
COMPETITORS
Church & Dwight,
Procter & Gamble
U.S.
HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
5,442
GLOBAL
EMPLOYEES
36,002
GLOBAL REVENUE
$15.56 billion
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global
Diversity
IAN COOK • CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO
The diversity of Colgate people around the world is
vital to finding new solutions to business challenges
and new opportunities from unique insights. The
commitment we share to recognize and value the
differences that make each Colgate person unique
is a critical part of our culture and vital to our
future success.
EUGENE KELLY • WORLDWIDE DIRECTOR,
GLOBAL DIVERSITY & INCLUSION
At Colgate-Palmolive, we strive to create a truly inclusive environ-
ment that allows us to benefit from diverse viewpoints. These
differences are an enormous source of strength and advantage for
our business and are essential to creating a culture of innovation
throughout the company.
COLGATE-PALMOLIVE CO.
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LEADERSHIP
10
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
W
ith at least 75 percent of its employees outside the United States, the
consumer-products company is clearly committed to its global values and
the benefits of diversity management. The company moved up four spots to
No. 10 this year, marking the first time it has appeared in the top 10.
The company has diversity leadership
at the top. Chairman, President and CEO
Ian Cook chairs the diversity council
and appoints its members, signs off on
executive compensation tied to
diversity, has a personal quote
about diversity on the corporate
website, meets regularly with
employee groups, signs off on
supplier-diversity goals, and is
involved with Catalyst and New
Visions for Public Schools.
Colgate-Palmolive has
mandatory diversity training
globally as well as global
employee-resource groups.
The company has a Global Innovation
Fund program, which provides employees
with access to up to $50,000 in seed money
to bring their ideas to fruition. The idea
behind the fund was to engage employees
by giving them a platform to share their
innovative ideas, which has resulted in
the development of such items as a special
toothpaste product that is thriving in Asia.
Another idea sparked by the Global
Innovation Fund and $40,000 in seed
money was the decision to expand the
women’s ERG on a global scale. Today,
the women’s network operates in 36
different countries.
Colgate-Palmolive has 38 employee
networks, which are used for recruitment,
retention, talent development and
multicultural-marketing outreach. They
include groups for parents, women and
multicultural employees. Fifty
percent of Colgate-Palmolive’s
employees are members of these
groups. The groups adhere to the
company’s strategic initiatives
identified in its business mission:
• Focus on Consumers, the
Profession, and Our Customers
• Effectiveness and Efficiency in
Everything
• Innovation Everywhere
• Leadership
The company’s commitment to
serve its community remains strong,
with 80 percent of its philanthropic
endeavors directed toward ethnic, LGBT
or disability nonprofits. Groups benefiting
include the UNCF, the National Hispanic
Corporate Achievers, Minority University
Pledge, the New York City Hispanic
Chamber of Commerce and College for
Every Student.
Additionally, 19 percent of the
company’s advertising dollars was
spent on multicultural advertising,
targeting Blacks, Latinos, Asians,
American Indians, LGBT people and/or
people with disabilities.
50 DiversityInc
June_1-10.indd 50 8/5/11 12:45 PM
2
0
1
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June.2011 Ads.indd 9 5/3/11 1:37:20 PM
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment
& Retention
NO. 9
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies for
Supplier Diversity
NO. 9
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies for
Executive Women
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies for
LGBT Employees
INDUSTRY
Consumer Products
MAIN COMPETITORS
PepsiCo, Cadbury
Schweppes, Nestlé
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Atlanta
U.S. EMPLOYEES
9,190
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
139,600
GLOBAL REVENUE
$35.12 billion
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
BANK OF AMERICA
THE COCA-COLA CO.
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DIVERSITYINC LISTS
A
s Coca-Cola merges with Coca-Cola Enterprises, the
soft-drink giant faces new diversity-management chal-
lenges integrating its mature initiatives with a much
larger and much less diversity-oriented organization.
For Coca-Cola, diversity challenges aren’t anything new.
The company came back from the nation’s largest racial-discrimination
lawsuit, settled more than a decade ago, to emerge as a leader of diversity
management, near the top of this list for most of the last nine years.
Under Steve Bucherati, group director of diversity and fairness,
the company in recent years has ratcheted up its talent-development
initiatives, especially for women, and has used its impressive employee-
resource groups for mentoring and leadership development. These 15
groups participate in activities with business partners, such as rolling
out new products and packages with Market Impact Teams.
With more than 34 percent of its U.S. employees as members
of these groups, Coca-Cola makes sure the groups are available
to everyone in the organization and that they communicate
with each other.
Coca-Cola is also renowned, and rightly so, for its philanthropy, with
43 percent of its donations going to multicultural nonprofits, including
the Martin Luther King Memorial Project, the American Indian College
Fund and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
INDUSTRY
Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Citi, JPMorgan
Chase, Wells
Fargo & Co.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Charlotte, N.C.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
248,074
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
288,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$134.19 billion
COMPANY FACTS
12
To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
T
here’s a reason Bank of America has consistently been the
highest-ranked bank and remains at the top of the list.
The deep CEO commitment to an inclusive workplace
and to talent development has been at the forefront of
diversity-management initiatives in corporate America
and continues to lead the way.
The organization’s emphasis on diversity and inclusion definitely
starts with CEO Brian Moynihan, who actively chairs the executive
diversity council and meets quarterly with employee-resource groups.
He has clearly communicated the personal and business importance of
diversity management to employees and in public statements.
The bank has a long history as a leader in work/life benefits and
supplier diversity. It has a variety of mentoring programs, includ-
ing group mentoring, virtual mentoring and reverse mentoring, some of which involve its 11
employee-resource groups. ERGs (known at the bank as affinity groups and employee net-
works) have tracked results tied to business initiatives.
Bank of America is a well-rounded diversity-management leader, with consistent progress
in all four areas measured. The inclusive efforts continue with its corporate philanthropy,
with 44 percent going to multicultural nonprofits, including the National Urban League, the
National Council of La Raza and the Special Olympics.
BRIAN T. MOYNIHAN
• CEO
MUHTAR KENT
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
GERI THOMAS
• SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND
INCLUSION EXECUTIVE
STEVE BUCHERATI
• GROUP DIRECTOR,
DIVERSITY & FAIRNESS
52 DiversityInc
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
COMPANY FACTS
11
June_11-20.R2.indd 52 8/8/11 9:53 AM
As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.
deloitte.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its
subsidiaries.
Copyright © 2010 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.
Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
Since inception of our Diversity & Inclusion initiative in 1994, Deloitte has recognized that the strength
we gain from the diversity of our talent fuels our growth. Our people are encouraged to bring their
authentic selves to work, which allows for more creativity and better collaboration, enhancing the
success of our teams, our inclusive environment, and the careers of all our professionals.
To see how we help them reach for their own unique stars, visit www.deloitte.com/us/diversity
Reach for the stars
Jan2011 Ads.indd 8 2/18/11 4:23:43 PM
AMERICAN
EXPRESS CO.
MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL
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M
arriott has a long-standing commitment to diversity.
With employees speaking more than 50 languages and
working in more than 70 countries and territories,
the company continues to enhance its focus on cross-
cultural competence throughout the organization.
A commitment to diversity and inclusion is at the heart of Marriott’s
culture, and it starts at the top, with company Chairman and CEO J.W.
(Bill) Marriott Jr.
Marriott International demonstrates strength in all four areas mea-
sured on the DiversityInc survey. Jimmie Paschall, senior vice president
of external affairs and global diversity officer, leads Marriott’s diversity
efforts. Last year, Marriott introduced a new learning curriculum focused
on cultural competence and global leadership effectiveness, targeting top
leadership with the goal of helping them better relate and do business in
the global marketplace. In early 2011, a new program will be introduced for
all employees company-wide.
Marriott has a long history of community building through its opera-
tions in urban areas, where both suppliers and franchisers are often from
the community. More than 16.2 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor)
suppliers are women- or minority-owned businesses.
Almost 40 percent of the company’s philanthropy is directed at multi-
cultural charities, including the National Black MBA Association, National
Minority Supplier Development Council, NextGen Network and the
National Academy Foundation.
J.W. MARRIOTT JR.
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
JIMMIE PASCHALL
• SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
& GLOBAL DIVERSITY
OFFICER
ACCEPTING AWARD FOR TOP COMPANY FOR EMPLOYEE-RESOURCES GROUPS AT
OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT: ED GILLIGAN, VICE CHAIRMAN
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
13
14
A
long-time diversity leader, American
Express is one of the few companies
that has been on the DiversityInc Top 50 list every year
since we started it in 2001. Now under the direction
of Jennifer Christie, chief diversity officer and vice
president, executive recruitment, the company has made significant
strides in increasing workplace diversity on every level and in com-
municating the value of diversity globally.
The company has a strong executive diversity council, which meets
quarterly and includes rotational positions for its employee-resource
groups. Those groups, which American Express calls employee net-
works, are among the strongest anywhere in corporate America and have
been a model for other organizations.
There are 14 networks and more than 70 chapters globally, used for
recruitment, to give new employees “an immediate sense of community,
reflective of our inclusive corporate culture,” the company states. Within
the networks, there are mentoring programs, sponsorship initiatives,
talent-development opportunities, and networking. The groups also
are used for business outreach, such as the Felicidades and Lunar New
Year gift cards that were created in partnership with AHORA (Hispanic
Network) and ANA (Asian Network). American Express also has world-
class work/life benefits, including many flexible workplace options.
KENNETH I. CHENAULT
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
JENNIFER CHRISTIE
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER & VICE
PRESIDENT, EXECUTIVE
RECRUITMENT
INDUSTRY
Hospitality
MAIN COMPETITORS
Hilton Hotels
Corp., Hyatt Corp.,
Starwood Hotels &
Resorts Worldwide
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Bethesda, Md.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
108,771
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
151,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$11.69 billion
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
INDUSTRY
Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Visa, MasterCard
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
26,989
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
61,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$30.24 billion
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian Americans
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Executive
Women
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT Employees
NO. 9
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global Diversity
COMPANY FACTS
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
COMPANY FACTS
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Groups
June_11-20.R2.indd 54 8/8/11 9:54 AM
Southern Company • Alabama Power • Georgia Power • Gulf Power • Mississippi Power • Southern Company Generation
Southern Company Transmission • Southern Nuclear • Southern Power • Southern Telecom • SouthernLINC Wireless
DIVERSITY IS A
GREAT SOURCE OF ENERGY.
We view our employees the same way we view energy: Our strength comes from
our diversity. As one of the largest energy providers in the United States, Southern
Company is committed to growing and sustaining a smart, talented workforce
that is as diverse as the communities we serve. And by supporting suppliers and
partners of all backgrounds, we’re better equipped to provide great service in
addition to diverse energy sources such as solar, wind, clean coal, and nuclear.
For more information on our commitment to diversity, visit southerncompany.com.
June.2011 Ads.indd 20 6/22/11 12:46 PM
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Community
Development
ACCEPTING AWARD AT
OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT
JOHN STRANGFELD,
CHAIRMAN AND CEO
FOR MORE
INFORMATION, GO TO
WWW.DIVERSITYINC.
COM/EVENTS
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
NO. 9
The DiversityInc Top
10 Companies for
LGBT Employees
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 7
The DiversityInc Top
10 Companies for
Global Diversity
INDUSTRY
Pharmaceuticals
MAIN COMPETITORS
Bristol-Myers
Squibb, Pfizer,
Sanofi-Aventis
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Whitehouse
Station, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
34,760
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
94,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$45.98 billion
MERCK & CO.
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M
erck’s commitment to diversity globally and in the
United States remains stronger than ever, even as
it worked to complete its $41-billion merger with
Schering-Plough. Led by Vice President and Chief
Diversity Officer Deborah Dagit, Merck has a long his-
tory as a diversity leader as well as with its commitment and out-
reach to people with disabilities and the LGBT community.
In December 2010, Merck named its first Black CEO: President, CEO
and Director Kenneth Frazier, who took the helm of the company in
January. He is one of just four Black CEOs leading Fortune 500 companies.
Merck’s work/life benefits are strong and include onsite childcare,
flexible hours, onsite religious accommodations, subsidized member-
ship in wellness/fitness facilities, paid paternity leave, dependent-care
benefits, a caregiver website, a credit union, an eldercare program, and
college webinars and counseling.
The company has a long history of philanthropic commitment to multicultural groups; its
current roster includes UNCF, GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network),
The PhD Project, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, and Career Opportunities for
Students with Disabilities (COSD).
KENNETH FRAZIER
• PRESIDENT, CEO AND
DIRECTOR
JOHN STRANGFELD
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
DEBORAH DAGIT
• VICE PRESIDENT &
CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
EMILIO EGEA
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
INDUSTRY
Insurance and
Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
AIG, AXA
Equitable, MetLife
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Newark, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
20,023
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
39,422
GLOBAL REVENUE
$38.41 billion
PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL
A
mainstay on the DiversityInc Top 50 list, Prudential has
vaulted from its middle-of-the-pack position to No. 16
as its deep-rooted external and internal commitment to
inclusiveness accelerates.
Under the efforts of Chief Diversity Officer Emilio Egea
and Vice President of Diversity Ignace Conic, the diversity initiatives and
goals to assess their success have been fully integrated into the manage-
ment of the organization, including the senior-most leadership. There is
a consistent communication to employees of the diversity strategy, and
progress and accountability for diversity results are tied directly to the
performance of the company’s Chairman and CEO John Strangfeld.
Diversity is a specific goal in annual management-performance
reviews, and every manager has to adopt at least one personal or orga-
nizational diversity objective. Managers receive consistent and compre-
hensive training and education about the value of diversity.
The hallmark of this company is its truly amazing philanthropy
to multicultural communities, especially in its home city of Newark,
N.J. (also where DiversityInc’s headquarters is located). Prudential
allocates 68 percent of its philanthropic efforts to charities aimed at
Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American Indians, LGBT people and people
with disabilities, and that includes partnerships with such organizations
as the Boys and Girls Clubs of Newark, Aspira of New Jersey and the
Children’s Defense Fund.
56 DiversityInc
15
16
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
COMPANY FACTS
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
June_11-20.R2.indd 56 8/8/11 9:55 AM
We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.
Work that makes a difference.
Opportunities that expand your horizons.
A culture committed to diversity and respect.
Are you ready for what’s next in your career? AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAArrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaadddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddddyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaattttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeexxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxtttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr???????????????????????????????????????????????
At Booz Allen Hamilton, our
ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical
missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative
ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients.
Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness,
and creating initiatives to improve quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships
with organizations such as Society of Women Engineers and the League of Black Women, to supporting
events such as AIDS Walk and National Coming Out Day, diversity is central to who we are and what we do.
If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your
professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career.
For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.
Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers
June.2011 Ads.indd 26 6/28/11 5:15 PM
INDUSTRY
Freight
Transportation
MAIN COMPETITORS
Burlington
Northern Santa Fe,
Norfolk Southern &
Union Pacific
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Jacksonville, Fla.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
29,691
CSX CORP.
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www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
L
ed by Susan Hamilton, assistant vice president of diversity
and chief diversity officer, CSX has demonstrated strong
commitment to diversity and inclusion. With 1 in 5 employ-
ees at CSX serving or having served in the military, the
freight-transportation company has become an employer of choice
for veterans. By forming relationships with military-installation
liaisons, the company actively recruits at military bases throughout
its geographical footprint.
CSX also has one of the most effective military employee-resource
groups anywhere; its Military Affinity Group (MAG) serves as a
recruiting and mentoring source, helping to transition the military to
civilian life. In 2010, Michael J. Ward, chairman, president and CEO,
donated $1 million to the Wounded Warrior Project, a national non-
profit in Jacksonville, Fla. The group provides programs and services
to severely injured service members. Ward’s support of diversity is
strong and includes regular meetings with ERGs, using the corporate
intranet to communicate his commitment to diversity and linking
executive compensation to diversity goals.
MICHAEL J. WARD
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
TIM SOLSO
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
SUSAN HAMILTON
• ASSISTANT VICE
PRESIDENT OF
DIVERSITY AND CHIEF
DIVERSITY OFFICER
LISA GUTIERREZ
• EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
GLOBAL DIVERSITY
INDUSTRY
Manufacturing
MAIN COMPETITORS
Caterpillar, Detroit
Diesel, Navistar
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Columbus, Ind.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
14,700
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
40,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$13.23 billion
CUMMINS
F
or the fifth consecutive year, Cummins has been named to
the DiversityInc Top 50 list, moving up from No. 26 in 2010 to
No. 18 this year. The company performed well in all four areas
measured on the DiversityInc survey.
Chairman and CEO Tim Solso gets top honors for his diversity com-
mitment, including meeting once a month with employee-resource
groups and chairing the company’s diversity council, which meets regu-
larly to set diversity goals and assess success.
Solso is involved with the Initiative for Global Development, whose
mission is to fight poverty around the world by promoting economic
development. As part of his role, he is active in an effort called Frontier
100, which pairs U.S. CEOs with African CEOs in a mentoring and
information-sharing relationship.
The company has mandatory diversity training for its entire work-
force. Cummins also has a solid supplier-diversity program, with 9.6
percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement going to minority-
owned suppliers. The company offers mentoring, training and financial
assistance to its diverse suppliers.
ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT
MICHAEL J. WARD, CHAIRMAN,
PRESIDENT AND CEO
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO
WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
58 DiversityInc
17
18
COMPANY FACTS
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP COMPANY FACTS
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AW
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COMPANY FOR
Diversity-
Management
Progress
June_11-20.R2.indd 58 8/8/11 9:56 AM
Count me .
in
Diversity at ADP. Inclusion is a core value that’s helped us become a $9 billion global leader in workforce
solutions. It’s a promise that you’ll be encouraged to share your views, build relationships and make a
real impact on our business. It’s a mindset that creates a workplace in which you feel good about yourself
and the people around you. And it’s an invitation to define, and achieve, your own idea of success.
Join us at ADP, and discover how we’re counting on you to come in and make a difference, every day.
We are proud to be recognized as one of DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies for Diversity.
individual impact collaborating being myself
ADP.COM/CAREERS
ADP believes that diversity leads to strength. We are an equal opportunity/affirmative
action employer; M/F/D/V. The ADP logo is registered trademark of ADP, Inc. All other
logos and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © ADP, 2011.
WI T H Y OU ’ R E I N E X C E L L E N T C OMPA N Y.
June.2011 Ads.indd 4 5/3/11 10:15:37 AM
INDUSTRY
Health Insurance
MAIN COMPETITORS
CIGNA,
UnitedHealth
Group, WellPoint
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Hartford, Conn.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
33,748
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
35,258
GLOBAL REVENUE
$34.25 billion
COMPANY FACTS
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
AETNA
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www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
etna’s move up 11 spots on the list is very well deserved.
Former CEO and chairman Ron Williams’ strong com-
mitment to diversity management as a business driver
is being accelerated under new CEO and President
Mark Bertolini, whose belief in diversity is personal
and deep-rooted. The tireless efforts of Vice President and Chief
Diversity Officer Raymond Arroyo have enabled Aetna to emerge as
a true diversity-management leader.
Specifically, Aetna has broken new ground in its use of employee-
resource groups both for workplace-diversity goals, especially employ-
ee engagement, and for outreach to clients. Aetna’s ERGs for younger
workers and teleworkers are a model for other organizations as ways
to increase enthusiasm, innovation and talent development. For these
remarkable ERG achievements, Aetna was named DiversityInc’s Top
Company for ERGs at our November 2010 event.
Aetna is very metrics-driven and assesses its executive compensa-
tion linked to diversity goals through a comprehensive scorecard, used
to assess how goals are met. Its diversity council, led by Bertolini, has
four focus areas: workforce demographics, workplace culture, supplier
diversity and marketplace diversity.
Aetna is also very cognizant of its role in the community and the
need to give back. The company supports many local and multicultural
nonprofits, and the Aetna Foundation has been a strong voice in the
battle to end healthcare disparities.
MARK T. BERTOLINI
• CEO AND PRESIDENT
RAYMOND ARROYO
• VICE PRESIDENT AND
CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER
COX COMMUNICATIONS
U
nder the guidance of President Pat Esser and Executive
Vice President and Chief People Officer Mae Douglas,
Cox Communications continues to show unwavering
commitment to improving diversity and inclusion in its
workplace, its diversity leadership with vendors, and its
dedication to the communities it serves.
Last year, 15 percent of Cox’s gross revenue was spent on philan-
thropy, and 43 percent of that was directed toward ethnic, LGBT or
disability nonprofits, including the Human Rights Campaign, the
National Urban League, National Council of La Raza, Boys & Girls
Clubs of America and National Association of Multi-Ethnicity in
Communications.
Cox recently implemented a new tracking tool that automates phil-
anthropic giving. This new process results in better tracking of dollars
and allocation to ethnic, LGBT and disability nonprofits. The commit-
ment to community is not just in dollars; 30 percent of the company’s
senior executives sit on the boards of multicultural nonprofits.
Esser, who also leads the company’s national executive diversity
council, meets with employee groups every quarter. Management com-
pensation is tied to successful diversity initiatives, and diversity goals
are part of executive performance reviews.
LEADERSHIP
COMPANY FACTS
PAT ESSER
• PRESIDENT
MAE DOUGLAS
• EXECUTIVE VICE
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF
PEOPLE OFFICER
LEADERSHIP
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Supplier
Diversity
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
INDUSTRY
Telecommunications
MAIN COMPETITORS
Verizon
Communications,
AT&T
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Atlanta
U.S. EMPLOYEES
21,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
22,350
GLOBAL REVENUE
$9.10 billion
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
60 DiversityInc
19
20
June_11-20.R2.indd 60 8/8/11 9:57 AM
©

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What makes an inclusive leader?
Today’s business landscape has no borders. That’s why we develop leaders with truly
inclusive teaming skills and a global mindset. By growing our diverse and inclusive culture,
we differentiate ourselves and help our clients reach their full potential.
What’s next for your business?
ey.com
June.2011 Ads.indd 5 8/5/11 4:55 PM
INDUSTRY
Pharmaceuticals
MAIN COMPETITORS
Bristol-Myers
Squibb, Roche,
Sanofi-Aventis
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
East Hanover, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
11,118
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
119,418
GLOBAL REVENUE
$51.56 billion
NO. 8
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment &
Retention
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
NOVARTIS
PHARMACEUTICALS CORP.
VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS
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INDUSTRY
Telecommunications
MAIN COMPETITORS
AT&T, Qwest,
Sprint, Comcast
Corp.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Basking Ridge, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
186,093
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
194,400
GLOBAL REVENUE
$106.57 billion
COMPANY FACTS
D
iversity is an integral part of Verizon’s corporate cul-
ture. A long-time diversity leader, Verizon consistently
communicates the importance of diversity and inclu-
sion in the workplace to long-term business success.
This message has been infused through all business
units and is clear in the company’s consistently strong results in all four
areas measured by the DiversityInc Top 50 survey.
Chairman and CEO Ivan Seidenberg signs off on executive com-
pensation tied to diversity, personally meets with employee-resource
groups and personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics and
progress as well as goals and achievements for supplier diversity.
Management compensation is tied to successful diversity results,
and diversity goals are part of executive performance reviews.
The company’s 13-member board of directors includes three Black
members, one Latino member and two women members.
The company’s commitment to philanthropy and communities is
strong, with 56 percent of philanthropy aimed at multicultural, LGBT
and disability nonprofit groups, including the Hispanic Scholarship Fund,
Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, ASPIRA Association, American Association of
People with Disabilities, and the World Institute on Disability.
Verizon’s 10 employee-resource groups provide networking, mentoring, special initiatives,
seminars and conferences for members. In addition, the ERGs assist the company with strate-
gic business goals such as employee development, diversity awareness and recruitment efforts,
and they also educate the company about issues that concern diverse communities.
62 DiversityInc
N
ovartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.’s commitment to
diversity globally and in the United States remains
steadfast. The company has long-term CEO com-
mitment and good support from Vice President and
Head of Diversity & Inclusion Marilyn Priestley. It
has demonstrated superior global cultural competence. Last year,
Novartis received DiversityInc’s Top Company for Global Cultural
Competence award.
André Wyss, head of Pharma North America and president of
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., personally signs off on executive
compensation tied to diversity, chairs and appoints members to the
diversity council, meets quarterly with the council and with employee-
resource groups, personally signs off on goals and achievements for
supplier diversity, and regularly uses the intranet to communicate his
diversity commitment.
Novartis has 23 ERGs, including LGBT, generational, people with
disabilities and veterans groups, which are used extensively for diver-
sity recruitment, retention and talent development.
Novartis has solid work/life benefits and mandatory diversity
training for its entire workforce, held every month for more than a
day. The company has a strong formal mentoring program with a
cross-cultural component.
Forty percent of its philanthropic endeavors go to multicul-
tural charities, including the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of
Commerce, Employment Horizons, Pathways to Independence, and
Cerebral Palsy of North Jersey.
ANDRÉ WYSS
• HEAD, PHARMA
NORTH AMERICA,
PRESIDENT, NOVARTIS
PHARMACEUTICALS
CORP.
IVAN SEIDENBERG
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
MARILYN PRIESTLEY
• VICE PRESIDENT AND
HEAD OF DIVERSITY &
INCLUSION
MAGDA YRIZARRY
• VICE PRESIDENT,
WORKPLACE CULTURE,
DIVERSITY AND
COMPLIANCE
21
22
June_21-30.R1.indd 62 8/5/11 12:50 PM
The ING Foundation is privileged to support America’s diverse communities.
In a culture of inclusiveness, all people are afforded a chance to fulfill their
potential. At ING, we believe that our society is strengthened when we celebrate
diversity by taking advantage of our unique differences.
For more information on our Partners In Empowerment opportunities,
please visit: www.ing-usafoundation.com.
Your future. Made easier.
®
Products and services are offered through the ING family of companies. Please log on to http://ing.us for information regarding other products and services offered through the ING
family of companies. Not all products available in all locations. ©2011 ING North America Insurance Corporation. Cn65414052011
By joining our different backgrounds,
we create a better future.
June.2011 Ads.indd 20 6/27/11 9:09 AM
INDUSTRY
Professional,
Scientific and
Technical Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
IBM Corp., EDS,
Deloitte
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
30,864
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
225,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$23.09 billion
INDUSTRY
Pharmaceuticals
MAIN COMPETITORS
Merck & Co., Roche,
Sanofi-Aventis
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Abbott Park, Ill.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
34,032
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
90,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$35.17 billion
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
ACCENTURE
ABBOTT
I
n its eighth year on the list, Abbott has a longstanding commit-
ment to diversity and inclusion and continues to demonstrate
a corporate culture that enhances talent development, work/
life benefits and philanthropy.
The company has a strong mentoring program with a cross-
cultural component, and 50 percent of its managers participate, either
as mentors or mentees.
Abbott has a long list of work/life benefits, including onsite child-
care, recreation clubs, legal discounts and referrals, health coaching and
assessments (both including spouses), and a phased retirement pro-
gram called Freedom to Work that allows employees 55 and older with
10 years of service to reduce or change their responsibilities without
impacting benefits.
Abbott also has strong benefits for lesbian and gay partners of
employees, including bereavement leave, adoption assistance, relocation
assistance, health-risk assessment and coaching, and long-term-care
insurance.
MILES D. WHITE
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
WILLIAM LEE
• DIRECTOR, CORPORATE
DIVERSITY, INCLUSION &
COMPLIANCE
COMPANY FACTS
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
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To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
t Accenture, the responsibility for cultivating diversity
and fostering an inclusive environment, both globally and
domestically, begins with its most senior leaders.
Under the guidance of LaMae Allen deJongh, managing
director of U.S. human capital and diversity, Accenture
continues to embed diversity and inclusion into its culture.
Former Chairman and CEO Bill Green, who stepped down Jan. 1,
clearly communicated his deep commitment to diversity and inclusion,
personally signing off on executive compensation tied to diversity, meet-
ing regularly with employee-resource groups, personally reviewing and
signing off on diversity metrics and progress, and regularly using the
company intranet to communicate diversity commitment.
The company leverages targeted company-wide diversity training
that is mandatory for the entire workforce. This year, the company is
introducing new diversity training and development programs, including
an Early Warning Indicator. The objective of the Early Warning Indicator process is to provide
early visibility to Black employees who may be on a downward performance trend or are “at
risk” for a low performance rating. “At risk” individuals are flagged on a monthly basis to ensure
they are getting the mentoring and coaching they need to increase their chances of success.
Accenture has an extremely strong mentoring and coaching program, which involves all of
its managers. The company states that 100 percent of the organization has access to its men-
toring programs and 100 percent of its employee population participates in the program. The
program has a cross-cultural component, offers training for both mentors and mentees, and
includes metrics and formal follow-up to assess results.
PIERRE NANTERME
• CEO
LAMAE ALLEN
DEJONGH
• MANAGING DIRECTOR,
U.S. HUMAN CAPITAL &
DIVERSITY
64 DiversityInc
23
24
June_21-30.R1.indd 64 8/5/11 12:51 PM
Everyone brings something different to Marriott.
®
Marriott International welcomes people from everywhere. All walks of life. We believe
embracing differences makes Marriott a great place to work, conduct business and stay.
© 2011 Marriott International, Inc.
FIND YOUR WORLD
SM
June.2011 Ads.indd 3 5/3/11 10:15:33 AM
INDUSTRY
Consumer Goods
MAIN COMPETITORS
Johnson & Johnson,
Kimberly-Clark,
Unilever
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Cincinnati
U.S. EMPLOYEES
34,339
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
127,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$78.94 billion

PROCTER&GAMBLE
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
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NO. 9
The DiversityInc Top
10 Companies for
Recruitment & Retention
NO. 5
The DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for Latinos
NO. 9
The DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for Asian Americans
NO. 5
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies for
Executive Women
NO. 6
The DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for People With
Disabilities
NO. 8
The DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for Global Diversity
P
rocter & Gamble (P&G) is a long-time leader in diversity,
both globally and domestically. The company was hon-
ored with DiversityInc’s Top Company for Global Cultural
Competence award in 2010.
CEO commitment is frm. Chairman and CEO Bob
McDonald personally signs off on executive compensation tied to
diversity, chairs and appoints members to the diversity council,
meets quarterly with the council and with ERGs, personally signs off
on goals and achievements for supplier diversity and regularly uses
the intranet to communicate diversity commitment. He also holds a
senior advisory position in the U.S.-China Business Council and the
UNCF.
In addition, P&G has a very diverse board of directors. Of its 11
board members, two are Black, one is Asian, one is Latino and four are women.
The company has a strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural component, and 60
percent of its employees and 65 percent of its managers, including the top three levels of senior
management, participate in the program either as mentors or mentees.
Thirty percent of the company’s philanthropy is directed toward multicultural nonproft
groups, including the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Hispanic Scholarship
Fund, National Council of La Raza, UNCF and the Congressional Black Caucus.
LEADERSHIP
BOB MCDONALD
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
PAT HEMINGWAY HALL
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
LINDA
CLEMENT-HOLMES
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
CAROLYN CLIFT
• SENIOR VICE
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF
DIVERSITY OFFICER
INDUSTRY
Health Insurance
MAIN COMPETITORS
Aetna, CIGNA
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Chicago
U.S. EMPLOYEES
16,167
HEALTH CARE
SERVICE CORP.
A
long-time DiversityInc Top 50 company, this is Health
Care Service Corp.’s seventh year on the list. The com-
pany continues to show consistent strength in the four
areas measured by DiversityInc.
Health Care Service Corp. (HCSC) offers its employees
solid benefts, including coverage for children up to age 26, adoption
assistance, job sharing, dependent-care benefts (including childcare and eldercare), lactation
programs, onsite religious accommodations such as prayer rooms, and subsidized membership in
wellness or ftness facilities.
The company, which operates Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans in Illinois, New Mexico,
Oklahoma and Texas, has 16 employee-resource groups that play a key role in educating the
workforce on diversity, inclusion and cross-cultural knowledge.
The company is also committed to supplier diversity, with almost 13 percent of its Tier I
(direct contractor) procurement going to minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs) and
women-owned business enterprises (WBEs). In addition, Health Care Service Corp. spon-
sors supplier-diversity business conferences for WBEs and MBEs and has a minority vendor-
recruitment program that helps local minority-owned businesses.
COMPANY FACTS
66 DiversityInc
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
25
26
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INDUSTRY
Consumer Products
MAIN COMPETITORS
Dannon, Kellogg
Co., Kraft Foods
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Minneapolis
U.S. EMPLOYEES
16,970
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
33,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$14.88 billion
GENERAL MILLS
COMPANY FACTS
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To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
G
eneral Mills moves up two spots on the DiversityInc
Top 50 list this year. Making its seventh appearance on
the list, this company continues to build a diverse and
inclusive workplace through its successful mentoring
program and active employee-resource groups.
The company has 31 ERGs, which include an American Indian
Council, Consumer Insights Diversity Council, Customer Service
Center Diversity Council, Sales Diversity Council, Betty’s Family
(LGBT employees) and Black Senior Leaders in Marketing Diversity
Groups. The company uses its ERGs to encourage, assess and imple-
ment diversity-training initiatives.
General Mills has a long history of mentoring, both informal and
formal. The company has 16 different mentoring programs, some
of which have been in force for more than 10 years. The company
formally evaluates mentoring relationships every six months and
communicates the benefits of mentoring internally.
The company also has a formal succession-planning program for
Blacks, Latinos, Asians and American Indians and formal diversity
metrics to monitor and advance its diversity efforts.
Thirty-four percent of its philanthropic endeavors are directed
toward ethnic, LGBT and/or disability nonprofits.
KEN POWELL
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
JEFF BEWKES
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
KEN CHARLES
• VICE PRESIDENT OF
GLOBAL DIVERSITY
AND INCLUSION
LISA GARCIA-QUIROZ
• SENIOR VICE
PRESIDENT,
CORPORATE
RESPONSIBILITY AND
DIVERSITY
INDUSTRY
Media &
Entertainment
MAIN COMPETITORS
NBC Universal,
The Walt Disney Co.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
21,712
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
31,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$26.89 billion
TIME WARNER
I
n its second year on the list, Time Warner moves up 11
spots for its broad and inclusive approach to creating a
diverse workplace. The company gets high marks for its
leadership commitment, its strong network of employee-
resource groups, and its formal cross-cultural mentoring and
diversity-training programs.
Time Warner Chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes regularly participates
in employee-resource-group events and internship programs, person-
ally signs off on goals and achievements for supplier diversity and regu-
larly uses the company intranet to personally communicate diversity
commitment. The company ties 30 percent of executive bonuses to
diversity goals.
The company has 29 ERGs that are used to identify and nurture
management talent, augment marketing efforts, on-board new employ-
ees and assist in diversity training, talent development and mentoring
initiatives. Time Warner also has an ERG Leadership Council, which
consists of the chairs of each ERG at every division and in every region
in North America who share and communicate best practices.
The company also excels at positioning diversity on its corporate
website, featuring images and/or videos or text to specifically address
Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American Indians, the LGBT community and
people with disabilities.
LEADERSHIP
68 DiversityInc
COMPANY FACTS
27
28
June_21-30.R1.indd 68 8/9/11 5:05 PM
You can expect a lot from a career at
Target. A great culture. Incredible
opportunity. A community-focused
company. And one of the most powerful
brands in the world. Your best is just ahead.
To learn more, visit Target.com/careers.
X
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Target.com/careers
expect
to lead
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registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. 441450
Stacey F.
Corporate
June.2011 Ads.indd 18 8/8/11 10:16 AM
INDUSTRY
Professional
Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Deloitte, Ernst &
Young, PwC
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Montvale, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
20,540
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
138,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$20.63 billion
NO. 1
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
NO. 6
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Global Diversity
KPMG
LEADERSHIP
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T
his professional-services firm has
been making excellent strides in the
most competitive industry for diversity
management under the U.S. efforts of Kathy Hannan, nation-
al managing partner, diversity and corporate social responsibility.
KPMG gives all of its partners annual diversity objectives. In addi-
tion, the performance-management system is set up so that a partner’s
activities in diversity-specific roles (such as being a member of the
Diversity Advisory Board or a Diversity Network leader) are recognized
and accounted for during all performance reviews and compensation
decisions.
The very active Diversity Advisory Board, which includes three
external members from academia, business and diversity advocacy,
is comprised of the partners who serve as co-chairs of the employee-
driven Diversity Networks. The Diversity Advisory Board meets quar-
terly in person and more often virtually. It has a firm-wide scorecard
to set diversity goals, track progress of diversity initiatives, and help
implement and prioritize diversity objectives.
The firm has a very strong cross-cultural mentoring program, avail-
able to all managers. Engagement, retention and promotion for mentees
are compared against that of those who didn’t participate. KPMG has
world-class employee-resource groups, with more than 43 percent of its
U.S. employees participating. The groups, available at all U.S. locations,
are vital to talent development at the firm.
JOHN VEIHMEYER
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
KATHY HANNAN
• NATIONAL MANAGING
PARTNER, DIVERSITY
AND CORPORATE
SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
LISA MINK
• EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
GLOBAL DIVERSITY
AND INCLUSION
INDUSTRY
Electronic
Computer
Manufacturing
MAIN COMPETITORS
HP, IBM Corp.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Round Rock, Texas
U.S. EMPLOYEES
36,161
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
103,300
GLOBAL REVENUE
$61.49 billion
DELL
fter two years on DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies list,
Dell has made it onto the DiversityInc Top 50, in the middle
of a highly competitive pack. The company has been evaluat-
ing and revamping its diversity-management efforts in the
past year, and the results of initiatives put in place earlier
coming to fruition and a key push have been paying off.
Dell’s efforts to dramatically increase participation in its seven
employee-resource groups and to enhance the value of these groups to
its business goals are paying off, as is its emphasis on accountability and
measurable goals linked to diversity-management results. The company
measures the impact of ERGs in several ways, including the number of
members trained through the ERGs, related talent acquisition and on-
boarding of new employees, partnerships with community organizations
and employee engagement of members versus non-members.
Its management demographics, particularly for women, are showing
improvement. As its cross-cultural mentoring program becomes even
more consistent across the organization and diversity in succession plan-
ning is more prominent, the human-capital demographics should show
even more progress.
Supplier diversity continues to be a strength for Dell, with more than
20 percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement spent with minority-
owned business enterprises.
MICHAEL DELL
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
LEADERSHIP
ACCEPTING AWARD FOR TOP COMPANY FOR TALENT PIPELINE AT OUR NOV. 9–10
EVENT: JOHN VEIHMEYER, CHAIRMAN AND CEO
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
70 DiversityInc
30
COMPANY FACTS
COMPANY FACTS 2
0
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• D
IV
ERS
IT
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AW
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TOP
COMPANY FOR
Talent
Pipeline
29
June_21-30.R1.indd 70 8/5/11 12:53 PM
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June.2011 Ads.indd 32 7/6/11 9:33 AM
INDUSTRY
Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
American Express
Co., Visa
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Purchase, N.Y.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
3,400
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
5,600
GLOBAL REVENUE
$5.54 billion
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
MASTERCARD
WORLDWIDE
BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON
P
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INDUSTRY
Management
Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Accenture, Deloitte
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
McLean, Va.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
24,345
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
23,500
GLOBAL REVENUE
$5.59 billion
COMPANY FACTS
I
n its first time participating, Booz Allen Hamilton makes
the list with strong supplier diversity as well as good
diversity-management initiatives, including robust
employee-resource groups.
The company tells us it has ratcheted up its diversity initiatives
in the last two years. Its mentoring program includes a senior mentoring
program, an online program, mentoring circles by region and mentoring
circles by constituency group with its employee-resource groups.
There are 14 employee-resource groups, which Booz Allen Hamilton
calls employee diversity forums, and more than half its employees are
members of these groups. The groups are used for talent development,
on-boarding and to assist in diversity-training efforts. These include
groups for people with disabilities, veterans, a Rising Leaders group, a
Parents Forum and a Middle East North Africa Forum. The success of
these groups is measured in a variety of ways, including talent sourc-
ing, community involvement and results of the company’s employee-
engagement survey.
Booz Allen Hamilton has a strong supplier-diversity program, with
12.3 percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement spent with
minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs) and 11.8 percent spent
with women-owned business enterprises (WBEs). In addition, the com-
pany provides training and financial education for MBEs and WBEs and
ties procurement compensation to diversity goals.
A
much-improved MasterCard comes back to the
DiversityInc Top 50 list. Chief Diversity Officer
Donna Alligood Johnson’s efforts at gaining senior
leadership buy-in and improving the human-capital
demographics are showing results, especially in the
management levels of the organization.
The executive diversity council, chaired by General Counsel Noah
Hanft, signs off on diversity goals and meets monthly, with employee-
resource-group leaders included.
MasterCard is working hard on talent development. The company
has an increasingly strong mentoring program, in which 50 percent of
its managers participate. The mentoring initiative, which has a cross-
cultural component, is consistent across the entire organization and
involves the most senior leadership, the CEO and his direct reports. It
includes mentoring for new hires, peer mentoring and virtual mentor-
ing. The relationships are evaluated annually.
MasterCard has 12 employee-resource groups, which it calls
business-resource groups. More than half the employees are members
of these groups, which are company-funded and are used for recruit-
ment, talent development, on-boarding of new employees and
mentoring.
The company also has a long history of multicultural philanthropy,
with partnerships with several organizations, including the UNCF, the
Hispanic College Fund, and the Boys & Girls Clubs.
AJAY BANGA
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
DR. RALPH W. SHRADER
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
DONNA ALLIGOOD
JOHNSON
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
BETTY THOMPSON
• SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
AND CHIEF HUMAN
RESOURCES OFFICER
72 DiversityInc
31
32
June_31-40.R2.indd 72 8/5/11 1:02 PM
For over 75 years, Health Care Service Corporation has been meeting the needs of diverse families and
communities every day. Each of our employees, members, providers and suppliers is honored to be working
closely with these families, and we appreciate their commitment in making HCSC the name more generations
trust. Together as a team, it is our mission to help every individual live a healthy and inspired life.
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Health Care Service Corporation has a long history of meeting the needs of diverse families and communities. We seek
employees and participating providers who are dedicated to working closely with these families, and also seek diverse suppliers
from these communities. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion makes HCSC a company more people of all generations
trust. We continue to help diverse individuals and families in the communities we serve live healthy and inspired lives.
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E E
Divisions of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
June.2011 Ads.indd 12 5/4/11 11:59:48 AM
INDUSTRY
Consumer Products
MAIN COMPETITORS
Clorox, Procter &
Gamble, Unilever
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Racine, Wis.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
3,135
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
12,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$8.96 billion
INDUSTRY
Hospitality
MAIN COMPETITORS
Hilton Hotels
Corp., Hyatt
Corp., Marriott
International
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
White Plains, N.Y.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
48,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
145,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$5.07 billion
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian Americans
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for People With
Disabilities
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
SC JOHNSON
STARWOOD HOTELS &
RESORTS WORLDWIDE
N
ow in its eighth year on the list, Starwood has been a
mainstay in the DiversityInc Top 50. The hospitality
company has created a diverse and inclusive workplace
culture, offering its employees strong formal mentoring
programs and solid work/life benefits.
Those include onsite childcare, the ability to work from home and/or
telecommute, adoption assistance, flexible hours, job sharing, paternity
leave, sign-language courses, onsite religious accommodations, and
shuttle service from the train station to the office. The company also
offers excellent benefits for same-sex domestic partners of employees.
The company has a strong history of community philanthropy, with
50 percent of philanthropy directed toward ethnic, LGBT and disability
nonprofit groups including the National Business Disability Council,
Hispanic Scholarship Fund, Organization of Chinese Americans and the
National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce.
President and CEO Frits van Paasschen personally signs off on
executive compensation tied to diversity and personally communicates
his enthusiasm for diversity on the company’s intranet. He also chairs
the diversity council, which meets quarterly. The council is made up of
senior leaders, and its role is to partner with other company leaders to
drive the company’s diversity strategy forward.
FRITS VAN PAASSCHEN
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
COMPANY FACTS
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
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To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
S
C Johnson moved up eight spots on the DiversityInc Top 50
list this year. The move reflects the company’s commitment
to recruiting, retaining and promoting talent from tradi-
tionally underrepresented groups, particularly employees
with disabilities, as well as its strong work/life benefits.
Chairman and CEO Fisk Johnson, the fifth generation of his family
to lead the company, appoints members of the diversity council, meets
regularly with employee-resource groups and signs off on diversity met-
rics and progress.
The company has solid work/life benefits including onsite childcare,
alternative career tracks for parents or others with long-term family-
care issues, retirement transition (such as part-time or virtual work),
paternity leave, dependent-care benefits (including eldercare), lactation
programs, and paid time for volunteering, community outreach and
professional-association activities.
The company also has a strong commitment to its LGBT employees, offering a host of same-
sex domestic-partner benefits, including 401(k), bereavement leave, adoption assistance and fam-
ily medical leave.
SC Johnson has 11 employee-resource groups and uses them for recruitment, talent devel-
opment and marketing. Forty-five percent of its employees are members of more than one of
these groups.
FISK JOHNSON
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
MARIA L. CAMPBELL
• DIRECTOR OF
DIVERSITY
74 DiversityInc
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June_31-40.R2.indd 74 8/5/11 1:06 PM
31
5
c
Recognizing and promoting diversity means having an appreciation for diference. At Wells Fargo,
we welcome and value the insights and perspectives drawn from unique life experiences. It is those
distinctive viewpoints that provide us with the fresh thinking we need to help all our customers
reach their financial goals.
When individuals succeed, communities thrive.
wellsfargo.com
© 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N. A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (476001_01431)
With you when you see through the eyes of many
May.2011 Ads.indd 22 3/31/11 2:48:24 PM
INDUSTRY
Retail
MAIN COMPETITORS
Kohl’s, Macy’s
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Plano, Texas
U.S. EMPLOYEES
171,004
NO. 7
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
JCPENNEY
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
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here are good reasons JCPenney was named
DiversityInc’s Top Company for Diversity-Management
Progress at our event in November 2010. The keen
involvement of Chairman and CEO Mike Ullman, who
heads the diversity council, has been instrumental in
JCPenney’s rise as a diversity-management leader in the retail sec-
tor and throughout corporate America.
In its second year on the list, JCPenney jumps 11 spots. The com-
pany’s workforce-diversity gains are reflected in the increased efforts
to reach multicultural customers and in the alignment of diversity-
management efforts with supplier diversity and philanthropy.
JCPenney is using its associate-resource groups in the field, where it
has created regional councils to understand specific customer markets.
Building community is critical to this company, which gives 60 percent
of its philanthropic allocations to multicultural nonprofits, including
the UNCF and several charities in the Dallas area.
JCPenney is a strong believer in diversity training. Its Diversity &
Inclusion Training is both stand-alone and incorporated into
other training for its employees. The training is mandatory for the
entire workforce.
For this company, culturally competent customer service is essen-
tial to business goals. As Ullman said when accepting the Diversity-
Management Progress award: “Our entire focus on customer
satisfaction has been about associate engagement.”
MYRON E. (MIKE)
ULLMAN III
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
ANGELA BRALY
• CHAIR, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
KATHRYN COLLINS
• VICE PRESIDENT,
INCLUSION & DIVERSITY
AND RECRUITING
LINDA JIMENEZ
• VICE PRESIDENT
AND CHIEF
DIVERSITY OFFICER
INDUSTRY
Health Insurance
MAIN COMPETITORS
Aetna, CIGNA,
UnitedHealth
Group
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Indianapolis
U.S. EMPLOYEES
N/A
WELLPOINT
W
ellPoint moves up 14 spots on the list this year.
The huge jump reflects WellPoint’s contin-
ued commitment to diversity, especially talent
development.
Chair, President and CEO Angela Braly is deeply
committed to diversity, and together with Linda Jimenez, vice president
and chief diversity officer, is leading the effort to integrate diversity
management throughout the company.
A strong focus has been to increase the number of people from
traditionally underrepresented groups in its leadership ranks through
talent development and mentoring. In recent years, WellPoint has
introduced a number of diversity initiatives to encourage more diverse
hiring and recruitment strategies, especially with women and people
with disabilities.
WellPoint has seven employee-resource groups that serve as an
important talent-development venue, helping to identify and groom
talent that may not have been identified through the company’s formal
succession planning. In addition, the company’s ERGs work collabora-
tively in the design and implementation of programs that are specifi-
cally geared toward leadership skills and competency.
Seventy percent of the company’s philanthropic endeavors are
directed toward ethnic, LGBT and/or disability nonprofit groups.
76 DiversityInc
COMPANY FACTS
35
36
June_31-40.R2.indd 76 8/5/11 1:09 PM
©2010 Starwood Hotels &Resorts Worldwide, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Starwood Hotels & Resorts’ nine internationally renowned brands can
accommodate you in comfort and style no matter where travel takes you.
From opulence to convenience, approachability to cutting-edge cool, our brands
are designed to enhance the lifestyles of our guests. Discover what awaits you.
Visit starwoodhotels.com and explore our 1000 hotels
and resorts around the globe.
HOTELS FROM LEFT
Sheraton Gambia Hotel Resort & Spa, Gambia
Aloft Philadelphia Airport, USA
Le Méridien Angkor, Cambodia
the world is yours
June.2011 Ads.indd 42 7/11/11 11:15 AM
INDUSTRY
Aerospace
MAIN COMPETITORS
Boeing Co.,
General Dynamics,
Lockheed
Martin Corp.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Los Angeles
U.S. EMPLOYEES
120,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
75,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$34.76 billion
NORTHROP
GRUMMAN CORP.
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Blacks
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
NO. 4
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Latinos
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
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n its second year on the list, Northrop Grumman moves up 10
spots as its clear leadership commitment and improving human-
capital demographics demonstrate the growing importance of
diversity to this organization.
Supported by Sylvester Mendoza, director of diversity and inclu-
sion, Northrop Grumman’s efforts rely heavily on accountability for diver-
sity results. CEO and President Wes Bush takes a visible role, signing off on
executive compensation tied to diversity, regularly communicating its value
internally and externally, and meeting with employee-resource groups.
The company has a strong succession-planning program that includes
women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians and American Indians for positions at the
top two levels of management. In cases where there are no clear candi-
dates from these groups, it is expected that future talent be identified to
move into these groups.
Northrop Grumman has 32 employee-resource groups, some in exis-
tence for more than a decade, including groups for people with disabili-
ties, veterans, women engineers and new hires. The groups are used for
recruitment, talent development, on-boarding of new employees, mentor-
ing and diversity training. Their success is measured through retention,
engagement, promotions and community-outreach efforts.
More than 50 percent of the company’s philanthropy goes to multicul-
tural organizations, including Great Minds in STEM, the Martin Luther
King Memorial, and the Jackie Robinson Scholarship Foundation.
WES BUSH
• CEO AND PRESIDENT
GARY BUTLER
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
SANDRA EVERS-MANLY
• VICE PRESIDENT,
CORPORATE
RESPONSIBILITY
TARA AMARAL
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER AND VICE
PRESIDENT OF TALENT
ACQUISITION
INDUSTRY
Business Software
& Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Administaff,
Paychex
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Roseland, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
30,545
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
47,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$8.93 billion
ADP
( AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING)
N
ow in its second year on the list, the company demon-
strates progressive leadership and a strong commit-
ment to creating a diverse and inclusive workplace.
Under President and CEO Gary Butler and Chief
Diversity Officer and Vice President of Talent Acquisition
Tara Amaral, ADP has emerged as a leader in talent development,
employee-resource groups and creating an inclusive workplace.
Butler chairs the Executive Diversity Council, a group of senior
executives who set ADP’s overall diversity-management direction and
support and promote diversity and inclusion initiatives at every level.
Diversity goals are part of ADP’s executive performance reviews, and
a percentage of their bonuses are tied to diversity results.
In the human-capital sector, ADP offers its employees a solid
work/life-benefits package, including flexible work arrangements,
onsite childcare, tuition assistance, onsite passport renewal, a mobile
beauty salon, shoe shiners, onsite DVD rentals, a mobile vision center,
wellness/quiet rooms or new-mothers rooms, and free video confer-
encing to faraway family members during the holidays.
ADP also operates nine medical clinics that focus on prevention
and cultivating a healthier lifestyle for its employees. Those
clinics employed more than 30 doctors and nurses.
ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT
GARY BUTLER, PRESIDENT AND CEO
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
78 DiversityInc
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June_31-40.R2.indd 78 8/5/11 1:10 PM
At Kellogg, our success comes from people.
Their unique ideas, drawn from diverse perspectives, are what strenghen the character of our company.
We’re always looking for character.
®, TM, © 2011 Kellogg NA Co.
To explore your opportunities, visit www.kelloggcareers.com

June.2011 Ads.indd 36 7/8/11 9:17 AM
LEADERSHIP
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INDUSTRY
Drug
Manufacturing
MAIN COMPETITORS
GlaxoSmithKline,
Pfizer,
Sanofi-Aventis
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Indianapolis
U.S. EMPLOYEES
16,892
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
38,350
GLOBAL REVENUE
$23.08 billion
ELI LILLYAND CO.
NO. 2
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for LGBT
Employees
NO. 10
The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies
for Asian
Americans
To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
I
n its second year competing, Eli Lilly and Co. has moved off
DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies list.
The company demonstrates top-notch work/life benefits
including onsite childcare; telecommuting; flexible hours; job
sharing; dependent-care benefits; paid paternity leave; onsite
medical services at no cost to employees, dependents and domestic
partners; personal ambulatory care through staff physicians, psycholo-
gists and nurses; unpaid dependent-care leave for up to three years;
paid parent leave for new fathers and adoptive and foster parents; and
up to 16 weeks of maternity leave.
At Lilly, diversity goals are part of executive performance reviews.
Raises, bonuses and stock are tied to successful results. Chairman,
President and CEO John Lechleiter personally signs off on compen-
sation tied to diversity metrics and progress goals and achievements
for supplier diversity. He meets regularly with employee-resource
groups, has a personal quote about diversity on the corporate website
and regularly uses the company intranet to communicate diversity
commitment.
Lilly has a solid supplier-diversity infrastructure. The company pro-
vides financial assistance and training to diverse suppliers. Diversity is
included in its RFPs, and procurement-management compensation is
tied to results.
PAT CRAWFORD
• SENIOR VICE
PRESIDENT AND HEAD
OF DIVERSITY AND
INCLUSION
INDUSTRY
Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS
Bank of America,
Citi, U.S. Bancorp
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
San Francisco
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
280,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$93.25 billion
WELLS FARGO & CO.
S
uccessfully merging two corporate cultures is never easy,
but the union of Wells Fargo and Wachovia was definitely
one made in diversity-management heaven. Both compa-
nies had a long history on this list and had different, and
complementary, diversity-management strengths.
The new Wells Fargo is an improving diversity company, led by
Pat Crawford, senior vice president, head of diversity and inclusion.
The rejuvenated executive diversity council, chaired by Chairman,
President and CEO John Stumpf, is improving its methods of holding
people accountable for diversity goals and measuring diversity suc-
cess. The Wells Fargo board is diverse as well. The 15-member board
has four women and one Black, one Latino and one Asian member.
Wells Fargo continues to be a leader in its outreach to multicul-
tural communities, especially the Asian, Latino and LGBT commu-
nity. Using social media and other marketing techniques, the bank has
made strong inroads to these communities, and more than 36 percent
of its advertising budget goes to multicultural media.
Wells Fargo has a long history of philanthropy to multicul-
tural nonprofits, including GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian and Straight
Education Network), the American Foundation for the Blind,
DesertArc, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and the
National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.
JOHN STUMPF
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
COMPANY FACTS
JOHN LECHLEITER
• CHAIRMAN,
PRESIDENT AND CEO
SHAUN HAWKINS
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
LEADERSHIP
80 DiversityInc
DIVERSITYINC LISTS
COMPANY FACTS
39
40
June_31-40.R2.indd 80 8/5/11 1:12 PM
June.2011 Ads.indd 25 6/28/11 10:04 AM
INDUSTRY
Agriculture
MAIN COMPETITORS
BASF, Bayer
CropScience,
Syngenta
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
St. Louis
U.S. EMPLOYEES
10,300
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
21,400
GLOBAL REVENUE
$10.50 billion
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
MONSANTO CO.
ROCKWELL COLLINS
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INDUSTRY
Aerospace/Defense
MAIN COMPETITORS
Honeywell
Aerospace,
Raytheon
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
U.S. EMPLOYEES
16,704
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
20,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$4.67 billion
COMPANY FACTS
L
ast November, while accepting DiversityInc’s special
award as the Top Company for Community Development,
Rockwell Collins’ Chairman, President and CEO Clay
Jones told our audience he was absolutely determined to
have his company earn a spot on the DiversityInc Top 50.
He did it, with the help of the diversity staff and growing
enthusiasm from the managerial ranks. That enthusiasm is spurred by
Jones, who has been the driving force in making this Cedar Rapids,
Iowa–based defense contractor a major player in the diversity-
management world.
Jones meets with employee-resource groups, signs off on executive
compensation tied to diversity, chairs the executive diversity coun-
cil, communicates the business relevance of diversity to internal and
external stakeholders, and spearheaded the creation of Diversity Focus,
a nonprofit in Cedar Rapids.
The results are paying off in improving demographics. Talent development is a major focus,
with a strong mentoring program. The program is consistent across the organization and
includes Jones and his direct reports.
Rockwell Collins received the community-development award because of its history of phi-
lanthropy, especially with a multicultural perspective. Partnerships include The PhD Project,
the Society of Women Engineers, National Society of Black Engineers, Hispanic Engineer
National Achievement Awards Conference and Graduate Engineering and Science Fellowships
for Minorities.
41
42
M
onsanto continues its commitment to diversity
management and to building an increasingly
diverse and inclusive workplace.
With more than 20,000 employees across the
globe, Monsanto clearly states its values on its web-
site, saying it “will listen carefully to diverse points of view and
engage in thoughtful dialogue to broaden our understanding,” and
that it will “respect the religious, cultural and ethical concerns of
people throughout the world.”
The company supports eight employee-resource groups, includ-
ing groups for LGBT employees, veterans and people with disabili-
ties, and uses them extensively for recruitment, talent development
and marketing.
The company has a deep-rooted and consistent commitment
to philanthropy, especially in the St. Louis area where it is head-
quartered, and has initiated a host of programs aimed at external
audiences, such as supplier diversity, scholarships, university
partnerships, and other key relationships with organizations. These
include donations to St. Louis University, the UNCF, the Hispanic
Scholarship Fund, the St. Louis Public Schools Foundation,
the Hispanic Scholarship Fund, Insight St. Louis, and Missouri
Business Leadership Network.
HUGH GRANT
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
CLAY JONES
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
MICHELE HOLTON
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
JACY HAEFKE
• DIRECTOR, DIVERSITY
AND WORKFORCE
EFFECTIVENESS
82 DiversityInc
June_41-50.indd 82 8/5/11 4:03 PM
Merck is an equal opportunity employer —
proudly embracing diversity in all of its manifestations.
At Merck, we embrace the individual differences each of us bring to the world. We believe that with the collective
backgrounds, experiences and talents of our employees, anything can be conquered. It is those unique qualities that give
us perspective to spark innovation and address unmet medical needs of people throughout the world.
Our professional culture is one of diverse, collaborative, and respectful individuals. Together we help deliver Merck
medicines to those who need them, impacting lives all around the globe. If you’re ready to find your place in the world of
Merck, learn more about us and see employee video profiles at merckcareers.jobs/diversityinc.
Many backgrounds. Many cultures. Many perspectives.
One World. One Merck.
June.2011 Ads.indd 48 8/3/11 8:14 PM
INDUSTRY
Property &
Casualty Insurance
MAIN COMPETITORS
Farmers Insurance
Group, Progressive
Casualty Insurance
Co., State Farm
Mutual Automobile
Insurance Co.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Northbrook, Ill.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
33,221
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
35,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$31.40 billion
INDUSTRY
Retail
MAIN COMPETITORS
Costco Wholesale
Corp., Kmart Corp.,
Walmart
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Minneapolis
U.S. EMPLOYEES
350,000
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
355,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$67.39 billion
ALLSTATE
INSURANCE CO.
TARGET CORP.
T
arget remains focused on driving its diversity goals and
building an inclusive culture. The company performed
well in all four areas measured on the DiversityInc Top
50 survey.
It has a strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural
component. Ninety percent of managers and 90 percent of employees
participate in the mentoring program.
Target has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce, held
for half a day every month. The company has employee-resource groups
used for diversity recruitment, retention, talent development, supplier
diversity and to reach customers in the community. While ERGs are
currently available only to HQ employees, plans are in place to extend
the ERGs to field operations in 2011.
In the area of philanthropy, Target has a long-standing and demon-
strated history in the communities it serves. Its current nonprofit rela-
tionships include the UNCF, Hispanic Scholarship Fund, Management
Leadership Tomorrow, the Asian and Pacific Islander American
Scholarship Fund, American Indian Scholarship Fund, the Hispanic
Heritage Foundation Education Scholarship and the National Society of
Hispanic MBAs.
GREGG STEINHAFEL
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
KIM STRONG
• VICE PRESIDENT,
DIVERSITY AND
INCLUSION
COMPANY FACTS
COMPANY FACTS
LEADERSHIP
LEADERSHIP
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44
To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
llstate’s story is one of a great comeback. A long-
time diversity leader, the company had fallen off the
DiversityInc Top 50 and has made it back this year.
The move is a testament to the company’s continued
commitment to creating a diverse and inclusive work-
place, with strong work/life benefits, employee-resource groups and
mandatory diversity-training programs.
Allstate has 21 employee-resource groups, which it says are instru-
mental in the development and enhancement of its diversity training.
Diversity training is mandatory for its entire workforce and is held
every month for one full day. Employee perceptions on diversity and
the work environment are measured through employee surveys.
Allstate’s Chairman, President and CEO Thomas J. Wilson regular-
ly communicates the importance of diversity through Allstate publica-
tions, videos and employee meetings, meets regularly with ERGs and
personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics and programs as
well as goals and achievements for supplier diversity.
The company has solid work/life benefits, including retirement
transition, dependent-care benefits, onsite daycare, flexible hours, the
ability to work from home and/or telecommute, job sharing, sub-
sidized membership in fitness facilities, lactation programs, onsite
religious accommodations and adoption assistance.
THOMAS J. WILSON
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT
AND CEO
MICHAEL ESCOBAR
• ASSISTANT VICE
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF
DIVERSITY OFFICER
84 DiversityInc
June_41-50.indd 84 8/5/11 1:14 PM
drives innovation and success
Kodak’s commitment to diversity and inclusion touches customers,
consumers, employees, suppliers, shareholders, and more. While our
vision is global, we focus upon the distinctive cultures and communities
in which we live and work.
We champion diversity as a business imperative to help drive
innovation. Working together, we create technologies and services
that unleash the power of pictures and printing. Become part of our
picture—and join us on our journey to enrich people’s lives.
www.kodak.com/go/diversity
© Eastman Kodak Company, 2010
Diversity &Inclusion
Jan2011 Ads.indd 14 2/18/11 4:40:32 PM
INDUSTRY
Communications
MAIN COMPETITORS
Comcast Corp.,
DirecTV, DISH
Network Corp.
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
47,445
TIME
WARNER CABLE
COMPANY FACTS
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T
his is Time Warner Cable’s third year on the list, and the
commitment to diversity best practices by the compa-
ny’s senior leaders remains focused and strong.
Time Warner Cable’s Chairman and CEO Glenn Britt
personally signs off on executive compensation tied to
diversity, appoints members of the diversity council, meets regu-
larly with ERGs, has a personal quote about diversity on the corpo-
rate website, personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics
and goals, and has a senior advisory position at the Emma Bowen
Foundation and Walter Kaitz Foundation.
The company has 17 employee-resource groups, which it calls
employee networks, including one for caregivers. The groups have a
senior executive sponsor and are used for recruitment and marketing
purposes. Time Warner Cable also has mandatory diversity training
for its entire workforce, which lasts a full day and is held monthly.
The company website is clear about the multicultural commit-
ment, with images and videos featuring people from traditionally
underrepresented groups.
GLENN BRITT
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
YOSHI INABA
• PRESIDENT AND COO
TERRI MOORE
• DIRECTOR, DIVERSITY
& INCLUSION
DIAN OGILVIE
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
INDUSTRY
Automotive
MAIN COMPETITORS
American Honda,
General Motors,
Nissan North
America
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
27,475
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
317,734
GLOBAL REVENUE
$229.20 billion
TOYOTA MOTOR
NORTH AMERICA
T
oyota makes the list for the fifth time in the last six
years, with strong diversity-management best practices,
especially employee-resource groups, and good supplier
diversity.
Toyota’s flat structure gives it a unique opportunity to
have broad-based leadership participation in diversity initiatives. Its
Diversity Advisory Board, chaired by former U.S. Secretary of Labor
Alexis Herman, meets quarterly and is comprised of internal and exter-
nal leaders.
Toyota has 13 employee-resource groups, which it calls Business
Partnering Groups. These include religious and age-based groups. The
groups have senior executive sponsors, are company funded, and are
used for recruitment and mentoring. Toyota also has mandatory diver-
sity training for its entire workforce, with pre- and post-training surveys
to assess success.
The company has strong roots in its communities, with 43.5 percent
of its philanthropy aimed at multicultural organizations, including
the National Council of La Raza, the Congressional Black Caucus, the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus, the UNCF, the Hispanic Scholarship
Fund and Push for Excellence.
Toyota also has an excellent supplier-diversity program, with more
than 7 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) spend going to minority-
owned businesses. The company provides financial assistance, financial
education and mentoring/training to its diverse suppliers.
COMPANY FACTS
To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
86 DiversityInc
46
June_41-50.indd 86 8/5/11 1:15 PM
®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc.
®Registered Trademark, DiversityInc Media LLC
© 2011 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE
Thanks to You,
Our diversity makes us stronger.
As the nation’s leading health benefits company, WellPoint
serves the health care needs of nearly 34 million members.
At WellPoint, we are proud of our dedication to diversity. One
way is through Associate Resource Groups like ANGLE, where
LGBT employees and allies work to develop and sustain a
culture of inclusion, enhance and maximize customer relations,
and create and leverage leadership opportunities for all of our
employees. Recently ANGLE’s Safe Space and gender transition
programs garnered recognition from the Association of Diversity
Councils as a Top 25 US Diversity Council.
Better health care, thanks to you.
Visit us online at www.wellpoint.com/careers.
“It’s about me, living my life
as the person I really am.”
June.2011 Ads.indd 13 5/4/11 5:14:01 PM
INDUSTRY
Automotive
MAIN COMPETITORS
Chrysler, General
Motors Corp.,
Toyota Motor
North America
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Dearborn, Mich.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
65,095
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
164,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$128.95 billion
FORD MOTOR CO.
COMPANY FACTS
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To read the extended company profles, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/top50 READ MORE
F
ord’s long-time presence on the DiversityInc Top 50 list is
a testament to its commitment to diversity best practices
throughout the entire organization.
Even during tough economic times, the company has
remained focused on driving its diversity and inclusion goals forward
and on reaching out to multicultural communities as customers and
suppliers.
The company has 11 strong employee-resource groups, which it
uses extensively for talent development and marketing. Thirty-eight
percent of Ford’s employees are members of at least one of these
groups. Among its groups is the Ford Interfaith Network, which is
frequently cited as a model for inclusive religious employee groups.
Ford’s commitment to supporting its community has always been
strong, as evidenced by its supplier-diversity initiatives. Ford spends
more than 14 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) spend with
women- or minority-owned businesses. The company also sponsors
formal external training and mentoring for key diverse suppliers.
The company directs 28.8 percent of its philanthropy to charities
aimed at multicultural, LGBT and/or disability nonprofit groups.
ALAN MULALLY
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
DEBBIE WEAKS
• MANAGER, PERSONNEL
& ORGANIZATION
PLANNING
INDUSTRY
Financial, Life
Insurance
MAIN COMPETITORS
Allianz Life,
Genworth
Financial, Hartford
Life
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
New York
U.S. EMPLOYEES
4,985
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
9,508
GLOBAL REVENUE
$11.44 billion
AXA EQUITABLE
LIFE INSURANCE CO.
XA Equitable climbs onto the DiversityInc Top 50 for the
first time after making DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy
Companies list last year. Under the guidance of Chief
Diversity Officer Tracey Gray-Walker, this company has
made tremendous strides.
With the help of its developing executive diversity council, AXA
Equitable has been setting diversity goals and holding executives
accountable for reaching those milestones.
Internally, AXA Equitable has made significant progress in creating
talent-development opportunities and an inclusive culture. Specifically,
43 percent of managers now participate in its mentoring program,
including the CEO and senior levels of the organization. The company
offers first-rate work/life benefits, including paid time off for volun-
teering and community outreach, backup childcare, and individualized
support for family issues, such as eldercare and legal services.
The company has seven employee-resource groups, which have been
increasing in membership and importance to AXA Equitable’s business
goals. The French-based company even has a Francophile Engagement
Challenge group, which raises cross-cultural awareness and helps with
networking, recruiting and international assignments.
Community philanthropy includes partnerships with such multicul-
tural charities as the Organization of Chinese Americans, the Hispanic
Scholarship Fund, Dress for Success and the UNCF.
LEADERSHIP
88 DiversityInc
MARK PEARSON
• PRESIDENT AND CEO
TRACEY GRAY-WALKER
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
COMPANY FACTS
47
48
June_41-50.indd 88 8/5/11 1:17 PM
MANY PATHS,
ONE DIRECTION
Robert Half International (RHI) believes that integrating our diversity program
into all aspects of our organization is a key business strategy for success.
Our founder, Robert Half, was a pioneer against discriminatory practices in
the workplace. And his motto, “Ethics First,” continues to guide our business
practices, making diversity and inclusion a top priority for the organization.
If you are interested in learning more about career opportunities worldwide,
please log in to our corporate website, rhi.com, and visit our Careers section
to submit your resume. If you are a supplier and are interested in doing
business with RHI, register as a potential supplier at rhi.com and select the
Supplier Registration link under About Us.
Founded in 1948, Robert Half International is the world’s leader
in specialized consulting and staffing services. We help our
clients fill their most demanding temporary, full-time and project
positions through more than 350 locations worldwide.
DI VERSI T Y CREAT ES ENDL ESS OPPORT UNI T I ES
© 2011 Robert Half International. An Equal Opportunity Employer. RHI-0311
June.2011 Ads.indd 8 5/3/11 10:17:23 AM
INDUSTRY
Consumer Goods,
Appliances
MAIN COMPETITORS
Lennox
International, GE
Appliances and
Lighting, Electrolux
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Benton Harbor,
Mich.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
N/A
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
71,000
GLOBAL REVENUE
$18.37 billion
WHIRLPOOL
CORP.
LEADERSHIP
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M
oving onto the DiversityInc Top 50 for the first time,
Whirlpool Corp. gets points for its focus on diversity
training and mentoring.
The company demonstrates strong human-capital
demographics, especially for women. Whirlpool has
mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce, held every
month. Metrics that assess the value of the training include course
evaluations and employee-engagement surveys. The company has a
strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural component, and 65
percent of its employees and 60 percent of its managers participate,
either as mentors or mentees.
The company has nine employee-resource groups and it gets high
marks for best practices. That includes having a senior manager as a
member, allowing groups to meet during the workday, and using them
for both recruiting and marketing purposes.
In the human-capital sector, Whirlpool has competitive work/
life benefits including flexible work hours, adoption assistance, paid
paternity leave, dependent-care benefits including childcare and
eldercare, alternative career tracks for parents or others with long-
term family-care issues, and paid time for volunteering. The firm also
offers solid benefits for LGBT employees.
JEFF M. FETTIG
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO
D.V. WILLIAMS
• GLOBAL DIVERSITY
LEAD
LISA WICKER
• CHIEF DIVERSITY
OFFICER
INDUSTRY
Automotive
MAIN COMPETITORS
Ford Motor Co.,
General Motors
Corp., Toyota
Motor North
America
U.S. HEADQUARTERS
Auburn Hills, Mich.
U.S. EMPLOYEES
33,622
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES
51,623
GLOBAL REVENUE
$41.95 billion
CHRYSLER GROUP
D
espite many challenges, Chrysler Group has main-
tained a leadership commitment to promote diversity
throughout the organization.
Employee-resource groups are a key element of
Chrysler’s diversity initiatives. Today, Chrysler has nine
ERGs, and each is sponsored by a senior executive.
Chrysler also has strong mentoring and work/life programs. More than
70 percent of managers and 40 percent of employees participate in the
mentoring program, which has a cross-cultural component. Mentoring
pairs have measurable goals and there is formal follow-up.
Work/life benefits offered include adoption assistance, flexible
hours, job sharing, lactation programs, subsidized membership in fitness
facilities, dependent-care benefits, alternative career tracks for parents
or others with long-term family-care issues, paid time for volunteer-
ing or community work, an onsite medical center, hair salon, ATM, mail
services, and wellness programs (yoga, stress-management clinics and
stop-smoking programs).
Chrysler’s commitment to its community is also strong. The Chrysler
Network Diversity and Dealer Development Program, started in 1983,
creates dealership opportunities for Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American
Indians and Alaskans with a demonstrated entrepreneurial spirit.
SERGIO MARCHIONNE
• CEO
LEADERSHIP
90 DiversityInc
COMPANY FACTS
COMPANY FACTS
49
50
June_41-50.indd 90 8/5/11 1:19 PM
Diversity & Inclusion.
It’s the foundation of who we are.

©2009 Bank of America Corporation
DIV-120B-AD
We all have distinct perspectives and
individual talents that make each of us
unique. Recognizing and celebrating
those differences is integral to
Bank of America’s commitment to
diversity and inclusion. From our
boardrooms to our banking centers
to our offices abroad, we continue to
build powerful alliances throughout our
company and in the communities we
serve. And our commitment to diversity
and inclusion has helped foster a rich,
rewarding environment that offers each
of our associates unlimited opportunity.
To learn more about starting a career
with Bank of America and about
our associate diversity programs,
visit bankofamerica.com/careers.
©2010 Bank of America Corporation
June.2011 Ads.indd 49 8/3/11 8:15 PM
92 DiversityInc
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É Altria Group
É Boehringer Ingelheim
É BASF
É Brown-Forman Corp.
É Capital One
É The Chubb Corp.
É Comcast Corp.
É Comerica
É The Dow Chemical Co.
É Hyatt Corp.
É HSBC – North America
É ING North America
É Kellogg Co.
É KeyCorp
É Macy’s
É MassMutual
É MetLife
É MGM Resorts International
É Pfizer
É Scripps Networks
É Southern Company
É Staples
É Tyco International
É The Walt Disney Co.
É Wyndham Worldwide
The 2011 DiversityInc
25 Noteworthy
Companies
THE DIVERSITYINC 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES’ ACHIEVEMENTS
COMPANIES OUR EDITORS SEE MAKING STRONG PROGRESS
This list is comprised of companies our senior editorial staff determines
have the potential to make The 2012 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for
Diversity list. In the 2011 survey, seven companies moved up from the
25 Noteworthy Companies list to the DiversityInc Top 50.
All of these companies are either above average or significantly
improving in the four areas measured: CEO Commitment, Human
Capital, Corporate and Organizational Communications, and Supplier
Diversity. Each of these companies also has demonstrated, through its
data, notable progress in the last year.
100%
have employee-
resource groups
84%
include diversity
in their RFPs
for suppliers
68%
of their CEOs sign
off on executive
compensation tied to
diversity
64%
of their CEOs
meet with employee-
resource groups
regularly
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER)
JUNE_SPECIALTY.indd 92 8/3/11 8:35 PM
At GE, we believe diversity helps
imagination thrive. Tanya Spencer
is living proof. As a director of our
ecomagination initiative, her unique
perspective supports innovations like
the WattStation, which gives the world
a better way to charge cars. We can’t
wait to see where her imagination
takes us next.
ge.com/diversity
Tanya Spencer is one of
the many different faces
of imagination we celebrate
every day.
June.2011 Ads.indd 1 4/13/11 9:22:40 AM
1. Marriott International
2. AT&T
3. Sodexo
4. KeyCorp
5. HP
6. CSX Corp.
7. Cox Communications
8. PG&E Corp.
9. Bank of America
10. Merck & Co.
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Tier I MBEs
Tier I WBEs
Tier II MBEs
Tier II WBEs
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity
Supplier Diversity
TIER I Direct contractor
TIER II Subcontractor
MBE Minority-Owned Business Enterprise
WBE Women-Owned Business Enterprise
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Recruitment
& Retention
1. PricewaterhouseCoopers
2. Ernst & Young
3. AT&T
4. Kaiser Permanente
5. Sodexo
6. Johnson & Johnson
7. Bank of America
8. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp.
9. Procter & Gamble
10. Marriott International
1. AT&T
2. Cox Communications
3. Kaiser Permanente
4. Northrop Grumman Corp.
5. Marriott International
6. Southern Company
7. Sodexo
8. McDonald’s
9. Altria Group
10. The Coca-Cola Co.
Blacks
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Workforce
New Hires
Promoted Into
Management
Management
Promotions in
Management
CEO & Direct Reports
One Level Below
CEO & Direct Reports
Board of
Directors
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks
HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results. BLA= Black, Latino and Asian American
D
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Percentage of
Managers in
Mentoring
Mentoring
Program Has
Measurable
Goals
Mentoring
Program
Has Formal
Follow-Up
Total
Retention
BLA
Total Retention
Women
Total Management
Employees BLA
Promotions Into
Management BLA
New Hires BLA
New Hires
Women
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies
for Recruitment & Retention
JUNE_SPECIALTY.indd 94 8/5/11 12:10 PM
“We’re better when everyone’s included.”
John Krafcik, President and Chief Executive Officer
Hyundai Motor America
HyundaiUSA.com/diversity
June.2011 Ads.indd 16 5/19/11 2:22:28 PM
Latinos
1. Colgate-Palmolive Co.
2. Kaiser Permanente
3. Sodexo
4. Automatic Data Processing
5. Procter & Gamble
6. AT&T
7. JCPenney
8. Deloitte
9. PG&E Corp.
10. Ernst & Young
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Asian Americans
1. Deloitte
2. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide
3. Johnson & Johnson
4. IBM Corp.
5. PricewaterhouseCoopers
6. Kaiser Permanente
7. Abbott
8. American Express Co.
9. Procter & Gamble
10. Wells Fargo & Co.
HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results. BLA= Black, Latino and Asian American
1. Kraft Foods
2. PricewaterhouseCoopers
3. Sodexo
4. Kaiser Permanente
5. Procter & Gamble
6. Johnson & Johnson
7. Ernst & Young
8. Deloitte
9. Bank of America
10. American Express Co.
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Executive Women

Workforce
New Hires
Promoted
Into
Management
Management
Promotions in
Management
CEO &
Direct
Reports
One Level
Below CEO &
Direct Reports
Board of
Directors
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos
Workforce
New Hires
Promoted Into
Management
Management
Promotions in
Management
CEO & Direct
Reports
One Level Below
CEO & Direct Reports
Board of Directors
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women
D
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96 DiversityInc
New Hires
Promoted Into
Management
Management
Promotions in
Management
CEO & Direct
Reports
One Level Below
CEO & Direct Reports
Board of Directors
Workforce
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans
JUNE_SPECIALTY.indd 96 8/5/11 12:10 PM
Hispanics account for nearly
16% of the U.S. population, yet
represent only 3% of Fortune 500
board seats. Since 1986, the
Hispanic Association on Corporate
Responsibility has been doing its
part to promote Hispanic inclusion
in Corporate America – now it’s
your turn. Become an advocate
today at www.hacr.org
ADVOCATE:
INCLUSION
HISPANIC
ASSOCIATION
ON CORPORATE
RESPONSIBILITY
ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC
June.2011 Ads.indd 31 7/5/11 9:19 AM
1. KPMG
2. Wells Fargo & Co.
3. IBM Corp.
4. Aetna
5. Ernst & Young
6. PricewaterhouseCoopers
7. Sodexo
8. Bank of America
9. Merck & Co.
10. American Express Co.
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
People With
Disabilities
1. IBM Corp.
2. Ernst & Young
3. PricewaterhouseCoopers
4. Sodexo
5. Deloitte
6. KPMG
7. Merck & Co.
8. Procter & Gamble
9. American Express Co.
10. Colgate-Palmolive Co.
1. IBM Corp.
2. KPMG
3. Kaiser Permanente
4. Aetna
5. Ernst & Young
6. Procter & Gamble
7. Merck & Co.
8. Deloitte
9. Sodexo
10. Starwood Hotels &
Resorts Worldwide
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR
Has ERG for LGBTs
Has Active
Program to
Recruit
LGBTs
Nondiscrimination
Policy Includes
Gender Identity
Nondiscrimination
Policy Includes
Sexual Orientation
Has Adoption
Assistance
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees
Has ERGs Globally
Has Specifc
Talent-
Development
Programs for
Women
Has Harassment
Training for Managers
Outside the U.S.
% of Operations
Outside the U.S.
Offers Education/
Training on Religious
Groups Globally
The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity All Companies
HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results. BLA= Black, Latino and Asian American
Offers Dependent-Care Benefts
Has ERG
for Employees
With Disabilities
Has Active Program
to Recruit People With
Disabilities
Corporate Website
Features Images,
Video or Text to
Specifcally Address
People With Disabilities
Offers Ability
to Telecommute
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities
LGBT Employees
Global Diversity
D
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98 DiversityInc
JUNE_SPECIALTY.indd 98 8/5/11 12:10 PM
ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC
ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC
June.2011 Ads.indd 38 8/5/11 3:05 PM

Workforce BLA
New Hires BLA
Workforce
Women
New Hires
Women
Promotions Into
Management BLA
Promotions Into
Management Women
Management BLA
Promotions in
Management BLA
Management
Women
Promotions in
Management Women
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Regional Companies
1. Comerica
2. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida
3. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
4. KeyCorp
5. BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina
6. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island
7. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey
8. AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah
9. Independence Blue Cross
10. Union Bank
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10
Regional
Companies
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 5
Regional
Utilities
1. Southern California Edison
2. PG&E Corp.
3. Consolidated Edison Co. of New York
4. Sempra Energy
5. Ameren
1. Henry Ford Health System
2. Brigham and Women’s Hospital
3. Massachusetts General Hospital
4. Cleveland Clinic
5. University Hospitals
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 5
Hospital Systems
% of Compensation
Tied to Diversity Results
BLA Representation
on Board of Directors
Women Representation
in CEO and Direct Reports
Senior Executives (Levels 1 and 2)
Sit on Boards of Multicultural Nonprofts
Has an Executive
Diversity Council
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 5 Hospital Systems
HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results. BLA= Black, Latino and Asian American
D
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100 DiversityInc
BLA in Levels
CEO and
Direct Reports
BLA Promoted
Into Management
ERGs Are
Company-Wide
BLA Representation
on Board of Directors
Philanthropic Endeavors
Directed Toward
Multicultural
Nonproft Groups
Formal Mentoring
Consistent Across
Company
All Companies The DiversityInc Top 5 Regional Utilities
JUNE_SPECIALTY.indd 100 8/5/11 12:10 PM
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DiversityInc will recognize the unique achievements of eight
companies at our Nov. 9–10 event in Washington, D.C.
CEOs and senior executives of these companies will explain
why developing excellence in these areas is critical to their
business goals and how and why they have personally been
deeply involved in their diversity-management success.
The areas we are honoring—Community Development, Talent Pipeline, Executive
Development, Global Cultural Competence, Working Families, Employee-Resource
Groups and (two winners) Diversity-Management Progress—were chosen because they
have a significant impact on corporate success and sustainability and because excellence
can be demonstrated through measurable results. These companies are overall diversity
leaders, as demonstrated by their positions on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity and 25 Noteworthy Companies lists, but in each of these cases, they have
also shown extraordinary achievements.
DiversityInc
Awards
Special
BY BARBARA FRANKEL
102 DiversityInc
2011
June_SpecialAwards.indd 102 8/8/11 10:25 AM
The awards will be presented at our event in Washington, D.C., both at the
black-tie dinner on Nov. 9 and at the luncheon on Nov. 10.
The DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards Recipients
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FOR WORKING
FAMILIES
ADP
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FOR GLOBAL
CULTURAL
COMPETENCE
IBM
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TOP COMPANY
FOR EXECUTIVE
DEVELOPMENT
Kaiser
Permanente
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FOR COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT
Prudential
Financial
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FOR TALENT
PIPELINE
KPMG
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FOR DIVERSITY-
MANAGEMENT
PROGRESS
CSX Corp.
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FOR EMPLOYEE-
RESOURCE GROUPS
American
Express
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FOR DIVERSITY-
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Southern
Company
DiversityInc 103
TO ATTEND THIS EVENT, VISIT WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
June_SpecialAwards.indd 103 8/8/11 10:24 AM
PRUDENTIAL
FINANCIAL
KAISER
PERMANENTE
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Community
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104 DiversityInc
· Sixty-eight percent of its donations are allocated to multicultural nonprofits,
including Boys and Girls Clubs of Newark, Children Defense Fund, and YouthBuild
Newark. This compares with 37 percent for the DiversityInc Top 50.
· Two-thirds (67 percent) of its senior executives (CEO and direct reports and
one level down) sit on the boards of multicultural nonprofits. The average for the
DiversityInc Top 50 is 23 percent.
· The Prudential Foundation spends more than $25 million annually on public
education, workforce development, business development, community revitalization,
arts and civic infrastructure, and helping neighborhood organizations rebuild.
· The company has invested more than $1 billion in local redevelopment since 1976. Social
Investments, an asset-management group for Prudential and The Prudential Foundation,
manages portfolios of private placement debt, equity and tax credits, including low-
income housing and new-markets tax credits. Current social investments include Newark,
N.J.; Los Angeles; San Francisco; New York City; Hartford, Conn.; Philadelphia; Chicago;
Boston; New Orleans; Dallas; Houston; Phoenix; and Jacksonville, Fla.
Bernard
Tyson,
President
and Chief
Operating
Officer
NO. 16 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
NO. 1 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
Prudential exemplifies corporate citizenship
reflecting its core values. The company’s efforts to
revitalize its home city of Newark, N.J., as well as its
philanthropic, employee-volunteer and educational
initiatives, are changing lives throughout the country.
Specifically:
Kaiser Permanente has the most diverse board
of directors and management, especially the top
three levels of management, that DiversityInc has
seen. The company’s board of directors is half Black,
Latino and Asian and 36 percent women, and its top level
of management is 38 percent Black, Latino and Asian and 25 percent women.
What types of best practices does Kaiser employ to keep its senior levels so diverse?
The company has an exemplary mentoring program and is one of only 26 percent of
the DiversityInc Top 50 that offer cultural-awareness training for mentors and men-
tees before they start their formal relationship. Its employee-resource groups are used
for diversity training, mentoring, leadership opportunities and talent development.
Kaiser has exceptionally strong diversity leadership from its chairman and CEO,
George Halvorson, who leads the National Diversity Council.
What makes Kaiser remarkable is the consistency of its diversity-management
efforts, as well as the alignment between diversity in the workplace and diversity in
the customer base. Kaiser first participated in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity in 2005, when it was on the 25 Noteworthy Companies list. It moved to
No. 36 on the list in 2006, No. 27 in 2007, No. 7 in 2009 and No. 4 last year. Kaiser’s
diversity-management initiatives have jelled in the last five years as a clear reflection
of its values and leadership.
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
John
Strangfeld,
Chairman
and CEO
June_SpecialAwards.indd 104 8/5/11 1:37 PM
DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards
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Talent
Pipeline
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Global Cultural
Competence
DiversityInc 105
KPMG has demonstrated a strong commitment to
building an inclusive future workforce, one that
has racial and gender diversity. Specifically, the firm
has been the co-creator and presenting sponsor of Major
League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) pro-
gram, in which KPMG provides financial support for college-bound student athletes
participating in an RBI league. Scholarships are awarded on the merits of financial
need, academic achievement, leadership skills and community service.
The KPMG Foundation also started The PhD Project in 1994, which has helped
more than 1,000 Blacks, Latinos and American Indians become business-school
professors. The organization is now serving more than 400 doctoral students. Led by
Bernie Milano, former head of recruiting at KPMG, The PhD Project is now a separate
501(c)3 that has more than tripled the number of Black, Latino and American Indian
professors in business schools.
In addition, KPMG is a leading supporter of other youth-based organizations, espe-
cially GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) and INROADS.
KPMG has extremely strong employee-resource groups and was honored previ-
ously for its efforts to increase employee involvement in those groups. The company
has done an excellent job of using them for recruitment, engagement, retention and
talent development.
IBM
KPMG
John
Veihmeyer,
Chairman
and CEO
NO. 29 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
NO. 7 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
IBM has been a global-diversity leader since the
concept first started to gain traction more than a
decade ago. For IBM, what global diversity means,
besides understanding the cultural complexities of
the local population, is maximizing the talent base in
every country. The company has been making groundbreaking strides in doing
just that through its employee groups, talent-development programs and global
mentoring program.
The organization’s cross-geography mentoring program fosters collaboration
between established and growing global markets and creates the ability for both inno-
vation and talent development. It cultivates talent by bridging leadership and knowl-
edge gaps, regardless of geography. It focuses on accelerating global leadership of
critical skills in growth countries, skills identified as sales, client-facing, technical and
project management, for example. It also helps mentors and mentees develop cultural
intelligence and cultural-adaptability skills.
The results of this program: Managers globally increased revenue and the number
of deals. Mentees had a higher rate of closing deals than those not in the program.
Mentees who executed learning plans booked more business than those who did not.
Mentees exceeded required skill levels. A survey of participants showed that almost
all felt they acquired new skills, had growing knowledge and awareness of different
cultures and related mentoring to career development.
Rod Adkins,
Senior Vice
President,
Systems and
Technology Group
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
TO ATTEND THIS EVENT, VISIT WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
June_SpecialAwards.indd 105 8/5/11 1:37 PM
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American Express has been a leader in both the
types of employee-resource groups it has offered
and in the effective ways it uses those groups to find
and build talent, create an inclusive workplace, promote
engagement, retention and productivity, and reach new markets.
American Express has 15 employee-resource groups with more than 70 chapters
globally. The company has had groups for more than a decade.
Groups are funded through a mixture of funding from executive sponsors, diver-
sity councils and the diversity department. Membership in these groups is available
to all permanent AmEx employees. The employee groups provide development
and networking opportunities and support key business imperatives. They play an
important role in diversity recruiting efforts, often attending events and providing
referrals for top talent. They also frequently greet new employees upon hiring and
offer a sense of community. The groups are used for mentoring programs, sponsor-
ship initiatives, development offerings and networking opportunities. They also play
a critical role in creating marketing strategies and business solutions that appeal to a
diverse consumer audience. Examples include the Felicidades and Lunar New Year
gift cards that were created in partnership with the Global Prepaid Business and
AHORA and ANA employee networks.
AMERICAN
EXPRESS
Ed Gilligan,
Vice Chairman
As a company that helps others with their HR,
payrolls and benefits, ADP makes sure the benefits it
offers its more than 30,000 U.S. employees are inclusive
and valuable. The company gets a perfect score on work/life
benefits on our survey, but its efforts go way
beyond a checklist.
ADP was a pioneer in flexible benefits and in allowing employees, especially those
with family commitments, to work from home. The company also was an early leader
in calling its key employees “associates” to emphasize that they are part of the team.
This concept has been picked up by many other companies, especially retailers.
ADP continues its emphasis on employees and families with post-retirement
benefits, including nine outside medical offices and national wellness programs.
ADP offers its employees a solid work/life–benefits package, including flexible work
arrangements, onsite childcare, tuition assistance, onsite passport renewal, a mobile
beauty salon, shoe shiners, onsite DVD rentals, a mobile vision center, wellness/
quiet rooms or new-mothers rooms, and free video conferencing to faraway family
members during the holidays.
The company also operates nine medical clinics that focus on prevention and
cultivating a healthier lifestyle for its employees. Those clinics employed more than
30 doctors and nurses.
NO. 38 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
NO. 13 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 10, 2011
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
Gary Butler,
President and CEO
June_SpecialAwards.indd 106 8/5/11 1:39 PM
CSX CORP.
DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards
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DiversityInc 107
Michael Ward,
Chairman,
President
and CEO
CSX Corp. has remarkable CEO commitment and has
made huge strides in diversifying its workforce and
management ranks by race/ethnicity and gender, which is
particularly tough for a railroad company headquartered in the South. CSX also has
a remarkable record of community philanthropy. Some specific achievements:
· Major efforts to diversify workforce and management. Of managers with less
than five years of employment, 42 percent are women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians and
American Indians. Two of the top six executives now are women, and CSX has
the first woman chief transportation officer in the rail industry.
· Growing emphasis on employees with disabilities, including having a website
designed for people with disabilities and being the first company in Northeast
Florida certified as disability-friendly.
· Close affiliation through Chairman, President and CEO Michael Ward and the
company with the Wounded Warrior Project as its first corporate partner.
· Strong veterans employee-resource group and overall program for veterans,
including support of the National Guard and reserves, recognized recently with
the Freedom Award from the Department of Defense. CSX is the only company to
win this award twice.
In 2010, Southern Company introduced several
changes to its benefits program to align with other
large employers and to better meet the diverse,
multi-generational interests of employees and recruits.
One significant change was the addition of domestic-partner benefits, which
DiversityInc had been urging the company to add, to create more equality for
LGBT employees. Other changes included parental leave, maternity leave and
adoption reimbursement.
The company has increased its relationships with external multicultural organiza-
tions, for example, serving as a sponsor for the 2011 Atlanta Human Rights Campaign
Gala Dinner. Southern Company also has been working hard to increase the diver-
sity of its talent pool. For example, this year, the company hosted two interns with
visual impairments for a three-month rotation as a result of a partnership with the
Center for the Visually Impaired in Atlanta. And recent efforts in military recruiting
led to Southern Company being one of 15 recipients of the 2010 Secretary of Defense
Employer Support Freedom Award.
Southern Company’s leadership clearly understands the importance of diversity
management in terms of talent development, innovative work solutions and the ability
to connect with customers. The company has escalated its efforts in recent years and
shows every indication of doing even more.
SOUTHERN
COMPANY
ONE OF DIVERSITYINC'S 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES
NO. 17 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST
Susan Story,
CEO, Southern
Company Services
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
ACCEPTING AWARD
ON NOV. 9, 2011
TO ATTEND THIS EVENT, VISIT WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
June_SpecialAwards.indd 107 8/5/11 1:39 PM
More than 50 million people in this country have a documented disability. By 2012, the number
of students enrolling in higher education with a disability is expected to be 11% of the total college
population. This diverse group of potential employees is becoming increasingly important to employers.
COSD’s mission is to serve as an intermediary, bringing more than 1,200 colleges, universities and
employers in both private and public sectors together. If you’d like to make disability part of your
diversity plan, contact Alan Muir at amuir@tennessee.edu.
COSDonline.org
ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC
June.2011 Ads.indd 30 7/5/11 9:11 AM
DiversityInc 109
OUR ANALYSTS ANSWER YOUR
DIVERSITY-
MANAGEMENT
QUESTIONS
ASK DIVERSITYINC is a forum
for companies to pose diversity
questions to our expert team of
benchmarking analysts.
Our analysts base their responses
on 12 years of data collected for The
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for
Diversity survey, which this year had
535 corporate participants.
Here’s a sample of recent questions
and responses.
If you would like to send a diversity-management question, please email askDiversityInc@DiversityInc.com
The forum
for diversity-
management
questions
LUKE
VISCONTI
BARBARA
FRANKEL
C. CRAIG
JACKSON
AMBER
ABOSHIHATA
SHANE
NELSON
June_AskDI.indd 109 8/5/11 1:41 PM
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CRITERIA
¼Accountability
¼Personal
Communications
¼Visibility
CRITERIA
¼Five Levels of Management
¼Promotions Into
Management
¼Promotions in Management
CRITERIA
¼M/WBE, LGBT,
People With Disabilities,
Veterans Spend
¼RFPs
¼Accountability
CRITERIA
¼Mentoring
¼ERGs
¼Philanthropy
¼Consistency
¼Effectiveness
Supplier
Diversity
Corporate &
Organizational
Communications
Human
Capital
CEO
Commitment
WHAT WE MEASURE
DO YOU REQUIRE:
A certain percentage of women and
people of color in management?
That the company has a diversity
award program?
That the company has affnity groups?
That the company has mandatory
diversity training for the workforce?
[THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50]
What criteria
do you use to
determine the
“Top 50”
companies?
We analyze the data from the
hundreds of companies
that apply and compare all
companies against the accom-
plishments of the 50 best. It is
the practices of the best companies
that produce the standards, not
something we dream up. The results
are expressed as a percentage of
standard deviation, with cut-offs
at both the low and high levels. For
example, a company that has 80 per-
cent Black people does not receive
more points than the high cut-off
and having that high a percentage of
Black people would certainly make it
practically impossible for them to be
competitive on Latinos, Asians and
American Indians.
We do not require a certain percentage of women and
people of color in management. The percentage of women and
Black, Latino, Asian and American Indian people in management that
is competitive to be on our list is a factor of the results of the compa-
nies that are the most equitable.
We don't require the company to have a diversity
award program. Although that may be a nice thing to do, it’s a
minor factor of overall organizational communications.
Companies that make the DiversityInc Top 50 list are not
required to have affinity groups. While it's not a requirement,
there is no case of a company producing competitive results in human
capital without them. The correlation between employee-resource
groups (ERGs) and talent development is very strong. Again, it’s not
an absolute requirement and some companies in the DiversityInc Top
50 have rather low participation in their ERGs, but the connection
between ERGs and competitive results becomes stronger every year.
Mandatory diversity training is not a requirement, but it’s
increasingly difficult to attain competitive results without mandatory
training.
There’s a very important point to be made here:
I don’t think you can game the survey. Overall results are a
matter of organizational culture, and that extends to many facets
beyond ERGs or mandatory diversity training. For example, there
is an order of magnitude difference in overall philanthropy
spend between companies at the top of our list and companies
that finished in the lowest quartile of all respondents. I think
what we’re measuring is organizational empathy and com-
mitment to equity. This is critical to effectiveness in many
ways, but here’s a simple and profoundly important one:
If all people are created equally, then talent is distrib-
uted equally, and that means quality is directly relative to
diversity.
If you would like to send a diversity-management
question, please email
askDiversityInc@DiversityInc.com
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
1
BY LUKE VISCONTI
June_AskDI.indd 110 8/5/11 1:42 PM
DiversityInc 111
[HEALTHCARE SUPPLIER DIVERSITY]
How do
health-insurance
companies
compare to
other industries
in supplier
diversity?
% OF PROCUREMENT SPENT WITH DIVERSE SUPPLIERS
Based on data we’ve collected over the years, the
health-insurance industry, collectively, is slightly below
average in supplier-diversity efforts.
The industry scored 7 (out of 11) points for supplier diversity, behind
those such as technology, consulting and pharmaceuticals (an industry
that historically has not been strong in supplier diversity but has ramped
up efforts in the past few years). This is not to say that every health-
insurance company is not competitive in supplier diversity. In fact, Aetna,
Health Care Service Corp., and WellPoint, Nos. 19, 26 and 36 in The
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity, respectively, are signifcantly
ahead of their industry peers in procurement spent with minority- and
women-owned business enterprises (MWBEs) and are competitive with the
DiversityInc Top 50.
Consider the additional facts we extrapolated about
these three competitors:
W
e’ve provided a chart (next page)
highlighting key three-year trends
in the factors that are important in
our assessment of The DiversityInc
Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans. Please note
that our list is not simply a list of who has the high-
est number of Asians. This list is a measurement of a
balanced and inclusive work environment for Asians,
as well as EVERYONE else. Key factors include
whether the company has an employee-resource
group for Asians and the levels of participation. We
also look at demographics of the workforce, new
hires, management levels, promotions into and in
management, and board of directors.
The percentage of Asian new hires in The
DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans
In conclusion, while your industry is historically behind in supplier diver-
sity, Aetna, Health Care Service Corp. and WellPoint are ramping up their
efforts. Since 2008, the three have increased their procurement spend
with MWBEs by 25 percent while their industry peers have decreased
spend by 3 percent.
Developing strong relationships with suppliers builds
brand loyalty and leads to increased business opportu-
nities, partnerships and exposure.
BY SHANE NELSON
4.9%
3.6%
3%
4.2%
2%
3%
Minority-Owned Suppliers
Women-Owned Suppliers
DIVERSITYINC
TOP 50
TOP HEALTH
INSURANCE
OTHER HEALTH
INSURANCE
CEO SIGNS
OFF ON
SUPPLIER
DIVERSITY
84%
36%
90%
36%
98%
73%
100% 100% 100% 100%
94%
64%
REQUIRE
SECOND-TIER
SUPPLIER
DIVERSITY
SUPPLIER-DIVERSITY
METRICS INCLUDED IN
RFPS AND/OR VENDOR
CONTRACTS
TIE PROCUREMENT-
MANAGEMENT
COMPENSATION TO
SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
OTHER HEALTH-INSURANCE COMPANIES
DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 HEALTH-INSURANCE LEADERS
DIVERSITYINC TOP 50
[ASIAN-AMERICAN EMPLOYEES]
What are the metrics for
the last three years for
The DiversityInc Top
10 Companies for
Asian Americans?
BY C. CRAIG JACKSON AND LUKE VISCONTI
June_AskDI.indd 111 8/5/11 1:43 PM

A
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is more than double their percentage in the
U.S. workforce. This has not changed in the
past three years, but the workforce percent-
age of Asians in The DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for Asian Americans increased
18 percent, total management increased
25 percent and the promotion rate both
in management and into management has
increased 22 percent in aggregate. Further,
board-of-director and senior management
representation increased 24 and 22 percent,
respectively.
The companies on our list are good for
all people and are also particularly equi-
table for Asians. Again, this list is not simply
a list of the companies with the most Asian
employees. In fact, there are many com-
panies with a higher percentage than the
companies on our list. That doesn't make
them good for Asians; it just makes them
a company that finds it easy to recruit that
workforce. Again, we’re looking for balance
and inclusion as well.
Sources:
1
LEAP;
2
Fortune;
3
Bureau of Labor Statistics
The 2011 DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for
ASIAN AMERICANS
1. Deloitte
2. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide
3. Johnson & Johnson
4. IBM Corp.
5. PricewaterhouseCoopers
6. Kaiser Permanente
7. Abbott
8. American Express Co.
9. Procter & Gamble
10. Wells Fargo & Co.
6.3%
2%
5%
1.8%
13.6%
4.8%
14.8%
6.1%
National
DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for
Asian Americans
Board of
Directors
1
Top Level of
Management
(CEO and Direct Reports)
2
Total
Workforce
3
Total
Management
3
ASIANS IN U.S. WORKFORCE
BY C. CRAIG JACKSON
¸
¸
If you would like to send a diversity-
management question, please email
askDiversityInc@DiversityInc.com
[CEO DIVERSITY]
Where’s the
diversity in
Fortune 500 CEOs?
I was looking for a list of “minority” CEOs.
Who are the Black, Latino, Asian and
women CEOs in The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity?
BLACK CEOS
Fortune 500
0.8%
(4 of 500)
DiversityInc Top 50
4%
(2 of 50)
American Express and
Merck & Co. are
Nos. 13 and 15,
respectively, in
the 2011 DiversityInc
Top 50 Companies
for Diversity
ASIAN CEOS
Fortune 500
1.8%
(9 of 500)
DiversityInc Top 50
4%
(2 of 50)
MasterCard and Toyota
Motor North America,
are Nos. 31 and 46,
respectively in the 2011
DiversityInc Top 50
KENNETH CHENAULT
AMERICAN EXPRESS
AJAY BANGA
MASTERCARD
YOSHI INABA
TOYOTA MOTOR
NORTH AMERICA
URSULA BURNS
XEROX
KENNETH C. FRAZIER
MERCK & CO.
Source: Fortune
Source: Leadership Education for Asian Pacifcs (LEAP)
AJAY BANGA
MASTERCARD
SANJAY K. JHA
MOTOROLA
ANDREA JUNG
AVON
SURYA N. MOHAPATRA
QUEST DIAGNOSTICS
KEVIN M. MURAI
SYNNEX
INDRA K. NOOYI
PEPSICO
VIKRAM S. PANDIT
CITIGROUP
RAVI SALIGRAM
OFFICEMAX
LAURA J. SEN
BJ’S WHOLESALE CLUB
URSULA BURNS
XEROX
KENNETH CHENAULT
AMERICAN EXPRESS
KENNETH C. FRAZIER
MERCK & CO.
CLARENCE OTIS
DARDEN
June_AskDI.indd 112 8/5/11 1:43 PM
DiversityInc 113
BY C. CRAIG JACKSON
¸
¸
[EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE GROUPS]
How do I start ERGs
based on generations
and/or disabilities?
Would you be able to point us to best practices/
research related to disabilities and generational/new
professional/young professional affinity groups?
LATINO CEOS
Fortune 500
1%
(5 of 500)
DiversityInc Top 50
0%
(0 of 50)
WOMEN CEOS
Fortune 500
2.6%
(13 of 500)
DiversityInc Top 50
4%
(2 of 50)
Kraft Foods and
WellPoint are Nos. 9 and
36, respectively, in the
2011 DiversityInc Top 50
ANGELA F. BRALY
WELLPOINT
Source: HACR
Source: Fortune
ANTONIO PEREZ
EASTMAN KODAK CO.
GEORGE PAZ
EXPRESS SCRIPTS
PAUL RAINES
GAMESTOP
ENRIQUE SALEM
SYMANTEC
JOSUE ROBLES
UNITED SERVICES
AUTOMOBILE
ASSOCIATION (USAA)
CAROL A. BARTZ
YAHOO
ANGELA F. BRALY
WELLPOINT
URSULA M. BURNS
XEROX
LYNN L. ELSENHANS
SUNOCO
ANDREA JUNG
AVON
ELLEN J. KULLMAN
DUPONT
CAROL M. MEYROWITZ
TJX
BETH MOONEY
KEYCORP
DENISE MORRISON
CAMPBELL SOUP CO.
INDRA K. NOOYI
PEPSICO
IRENE B. ROSENFELD
KRAFT FOODS
LAURA J. SEN
BJ’S WHOLESALE CLUB
PATRICIA A. WOERTZ
ARCHER DANIELS
MIDLAND
IRENE B.
ROSENFELD
KRAFT FOODS
BETH MOONEY
KEYCORP
One of DiversityInc's
25 Noteworthy Companies
FOR MORE
2011 DiversityInc Top 50 lists
THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES
FOR BLACKS ON PAGE 98
THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES
FOR LATINOS ON PAGE 100
THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES
FOR ASIAN AMERICANS ON PAGE 100
THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES
FOR EXECUTIVE WOMEN ON PAGE 100
You can also access all our lists at
www.DiversityInc.com/top50
48%
of DiversityInc
Top 50
companies
have generational resource
groups. This number is up from 44
percent in 2009. No companies
had generational resource groups
in 2005.
The approaches to generation-
al groups vary, depending on the
specifc needs of your company.
When we say varied, we mean
some companies have one “gen-
erational group” that is focused on
generational communications, tal-
ent development and planning for
Generation Y to step into leader-
ship roles. Some companies have
a specifc need for onboarding
and retention and may focus their
group specifcally on Generation X
or Y. Some companies might have
an aging workforce or concerns
around retirement transition,
eldercare or succession planning
and may focus the group on boom-
ers and beyond. Some companies
have both. The most successful
groups communicate across
generations and don’t restrict
membership to one group. For
example, a Gen X group would be
open to older members who want
to learn more about Gen X.
72%
of DiversityInc
Top 50
companies
have a resource group for people
with disabilities. This number is up
from 70 percent in 2009 and 48
percent in 2005.
Important to the disabilities
groups—we have seen—is
to have it be inclusive of
“friends.” This may increase
membership as employees who
may have invisible disabilities
and/or feel isolated or uncom-
fortable sharing might be more
inclined to join. It is also always
important, for every group,
to have outside advocates.
Advocates help bridge commu-
nication gaps and, to an extent,
provide additional exposure or
credibility.
Also relevant here is a
mention of some of the more
innovative groups found in the
DiversityInc Top 50, includ-
ing groups for telecommuters,
parents, military and caregivers.
Caregiver groups and disability
groups often have overlap and
sharing of information. Veterans
groups and disabilities groups
may also have overlap.
44%
48%
2005 2009 2011
0%
48%
70%
72%
2005 2009 2011
DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES THAT HAVE:
A GENERATIONAL
RESOURCE GROUP
A RESOURCE GROUP FOR
PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
June_AskDI.indd 113 8/5/11 1:44 PM
the

PhD

project
SM
We all know the importance of a diverse workforce. Without it, our ideas become singular
and complacent. The PhD Project looks to put an end to all that. We are an alliance of foun-
dations, corporations, universities, and professional and academic organizations. We are
dedicated to increasing minority representation in the business world by creating oppor-
tunities to get minority professors up in front of the classroom to serve as role models for
the next generation of minority business leaders.
When we started in 1994, there were only 294 minority business professors in the United
States. Today, we are proud to report that number has more than tripled to more than 1,000
and is increasing every day principally through our efforts.
Follow us on facebook at: http://Facebook.PhDProject.org
and on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thephdproject
For more information, visit our website at:
www.phdproject.org
Congratulations to the DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity.
Developing the next generation
of leaders is one of the most
significant investments your
company can make.
June.2011 Ads.indd 14 5/5/11 2:58:34 PM
KPMG Foundation
Graduate Management
Admission Council
Citi Foundation
AACSB International
244 Participating Universities
AICPA Foundation
DiversityInc
JPMorgan Chase Foundation
The Goldman Sachs Group
The Merck Company Foundation
Microsoft Corporation
Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
ACT-1 Group
AT&T
Dow Chemical Company
John Deere Foundation
Rockwell Collins
California State University System
CIGNA
American Express
ADP
American Marketing Association
Motorola Foundation
The Federal Reserve
Bank of Chicago
The Federal Reserve
Bank of New York
Western Union Foundation
Corporate Executive Board
Thank you to DiversityInc, and all of our Funders, for their commitment
to creating a more diverse workforce for all of corporate America.
* Founders
To find out more about supporting The PhD Project, contact Bernard J. Milano at 201.307.7662,
or email bmilano@kpmg.com.
DiversityInc CEO, Luke Visconti with PhD Project faculty and doctoral students who facilitated sessions at a DiversityInc Top 50 for Diversity event in Washington,
DC. Dr. Daniel Selby, University of Richmond, Dr. Yuvay Meyers, Howard University, Dr. Karynne Turner, Georgia State University, Sharon Simmons, Management
Doctoral Student at Syracuse University, Dr. Atira Charles, Florida State University, Luke Visconti, Dr. Denise Lewis Lloyd, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Dr. C. Douglas Johnson, Georgia Gwinnett College, Dr. Shalei Simms, Ramapo College, Nicholas Pearce, Management Doctoral Student at Northwestern University.
June.2011 Ads.indd 15 5/5/11 2:58:38 PM
116 DiversityInc
CORPORATE SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC POLICY
June_Same Sex Marr.indd 116 8/3/11 6:40 PM
LGBT RIGHTS
How do corporations stay
true to their values?
Fighting LGBT discrimination
LGBT
CIVIL
RIGHTS
How Everyone Benefits
P
h
o
t
o
s
:

J
e
s
s
i
c
a

R
i
n
a
l
d
i
/
R
e
u
t
e
r
s
June_Same Sex Marr.indd 117 8/5/11 1:47 PM
118 DiversityInc
ast November at our event, country-music star Chely Wright told our
audience of senior corporate executives what her life was like as a closeted
professional in an industry that was far from inclusive of LGBT people.
She described putting a gun to her head—and then putting the gun
down. Today, a little more than a year after coming out, Wright is happily
anticipating her wedding to a beautiful young woman, Lauren Blitzer.
To read more about LGBT rights, visit www.DiversityInc.com/LGBT
WHAT
IT MEANS
TO YOU
L
BY BARBARA FRANKEL
Same-Sex Marriage in N.Y.
They are getting married this sum-
mer in Connecticut, which up until
June 24 was one of only five states
plus the District of Columbia that
recognized same-sex marriages.
On June 24, the New York State
Legislature approved same-sex
marriage and Gov. Andrew Cuomo
immediately signed it into law.
New York is the largest state to
recognize same-sex marriages, and
the impact of this decision will be
profound.
The fight for LGBT rights has
gained momentum this year, with
the federal government agreeing
to end “don’t ask, don’t tell” for
the military and President Barack
Obama slowly but surely becoming
a more vocal advocate. As has
happened with other human-
rights battles, some progressive
corporations are leading the
way, while others damage
their reputations with
employees and customers.
Corporate support of
LGBT rights has included
the battle against the Defense
of Marriage Act in Indiana,
led by companies such as
Eli Lilly and Co., WellPoint
and Cummins, Nos. 39, 36
and 18, respectively, in The
2011 DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity. It has
included advocacy for ENDA,
the federal Employment
Non-Discrimination Act,
Chely Wright and
Lauren Blitzer will
be married this
summer.
supported by corporations includ-
ing DiversityInc Top 50 companies
Kaiser Permanente (No. 1), Ernst &
Young (No. 5), IBM Corp. (No. 7),
Bank of America (No. 11), The Coca-
Cola Co. (No. 12), Merck & Co. (No.
15), Accenture (No. 23), KPMG (No.
29), Dell (No. 30), Wells Fargo & Co.
(No. 40), Time Warner (No. 28), Eli
Lilly, WellPoint and Whirlpool Corp.
(No. 49), as well as DiversityInc 25
Noteworthy Companies BASF Corp.,
Boehringer Ingelheim, Capital One,
Chubb, KeyCorp and Pfizer, and
also companies such as Eastman
Kodak Co., Ameriprise Financial and
General Motors.
For some companies, the
equality effort still begins at
home. Southern Company, one
of DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy
Companies, last year approved
domestic-partner benefits for both
same-sex and opposite-sex couples.
Other companies are still grappling
with this issue, which DiversityInc
views as a non-negotiable essential
item to earning a spot on our lists.
June_Same Sex Marr.indd 118 8/5/11 1:47 PM
When Should
Your Company
Take a Stand
Against
LGBT Bias?
In the face of a groundswell of proposed state
laws discriminating against LGBT people, what
should inclusive companies do? BY BARBARA FRANKEL
LGBT RIGHTS
When Values & Actions
Are Misaligned
T
here’s a flip side to this, of
course, even in companies
that work to have inclusive
cultures. Last year’s Target dona-
tion to a gubernatorial candidate
who was publicly homophobic is
still having repercussions. More
recently, several companies,
including AT&T (No. 4), KPMG,
Whirlpool, Pfizer and Comcast (one
of the DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy
Companies), were horrified to learn
their local representatives on the
Tennessee Chamber of Commerce
had approved a resolution sup-
porting a state bill prohibiting local
governments from passing antidis-
crimination ordinances. Although
the companies quickly issued
statements deploring the bill, it had
already passed the legislature and
had gone to the governor’s office,
where he signed it into law.
But right now another governor,
Andrew Cuomo, has proven to be a
staunch supporter of LGBT rights,
and the New York victory should
be savored by the 42,000 same-sex
couples in that state (source: U.S.
Census Bureau), their friends and
families.
It’s also a moment of victory for
corporations that understand that
having an inclusive culture isn’t
limited to what’s behind the doors
of their offices. What happens in
government and society deeply
impacts recruitment, engagement,
productivity and innovation.
I’ll be watching Chely Wright
and Lauren Blitzer get married this
summer, as well as reading about the
thousands of gay and lesbian couples
who will marry in New York. The
impact on the individual is immea-
surable. Blitzer posted this on her
Facebook page right after the New
York decision was announced, and
I think it sums up what many LGBT
people feel when their companies
stand up for them: “This has always
been my residence. Now it really is
my home.”

DI

he news that Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam signed into
law a bill prohibiting local governments from passing
anti-discriminatory measures offers a clear lesson to
inclusive corporations about when—and how—they
should get involved.
T
The new law, aimed squarely
at the LGBT community, is an
example of a groundswell in
several states from the religious
right to pass laws that endanger
human rights and discriminate
against this one group in particu-
lar. Several corporations, includ-
ing three on the DiversityInc Top
50 and two on the DiversityInc
25 Noteworthy Companies lists,
got caught in the crossfire in
Tennessee. They were members
of the Tennessee Chamber of
Commerce that supported this
bill. The chamber rescinded that
support after DiversityInc and
the Human Rights Campaign
(HRC) asked the corporations
how they could support this.
Why did the chamber—and
the leading diversity compa-
nies among its corporate mem-
bers, including AT&T, KPMG,
Whirlpool, Pfizer and Comcast—
approve this in the first place?
Some of the companies said their
local members voted against it.
One told DiversityInc that they
“didn’t realize” the anti-LGBT
focus of this legislation because it
was part of a larger document on
standardizing state regulations.
When they became aware of what
the legislation intended, all of
these companies and several others
issued public statements denounc-
ing the legislation, leading to the
chamber reversing its position.
This case raises two critical
points for corporations with very
public values of inclusion. The
first is the need to be extremely
careful—especially at local levels—
that everything that is signed
off on by any representative of
the company coincides with the
organization’s stated values.
The second is publicly taking
the next step: actively fighting
this type of legislation in every
state. Anti-LGBT legislation is
surfacing in several states, and
no organization that calls itself
a diversity leader should allow
these bills to become laws.
DiversityInc 119
June_Same Sex Marr.indd 119 8/3/11 6:41 PM
LGBT RIGHTS
Since the Tennessee battle
appears to be over, DiversityInc
asked the HRC where the next
battlegrounds are. The HRC’s
response:
MINNESOTA The Minnesota House
passed a proposal to place a consti-
tutional ban on same-sex marriage
on the 2012 ballot.
INDIANA Indiana lawmakers
approved a proposed amendment
to the state constitution that would
define marriage as between one
man and one woman and would
prohibit the state from enacting
civil unions or domestic partner-
ships for same-sex couples. The
proposed amendment will be on
2014 ballots if legislators once
again approve the proposal in the
2013–2014 legislative session.
NORTH CAROLINA North Carolina
has an anti-LGBT marriage amend-
ment that has been introduced in
both the state house and senate (SB
106/HB777) that could prohibit all
forms of legal relationship recogni-
tion for gay and lesbian couples.
TEXAS The Texas State Senate
is considering legislation that
would prevent district clerks from
120 DiversityInc
accepting a court order recognizing a sex change as a legal document for a
marriage license. The House passed a budget bill containing a provision requir-
ing public universities with a student center on “alternative sexuality,” i.e.,
an LGBT center, to provide equal funding to create new centers to promote
“traditional values.”
Here are some diversity-management
resources DiversityInc Top 50 companies
have to help them in this battle:
· SUPPORT FROM THE TOP
All of the DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs ensure diversity is included in the
corporate mission statement; 96 percent of them have quotes on the value of
diversity from the CEOs on their homepage.
Look for our webinar on DiversityIncBestPractices.com on CEO commitment
and DiversityInc Top 50 best practices, featuring our No. 1 and No. 2 companies,
Kaiser Permanente and Sodexo.
· CLEAR AND CONSISTENT MESSAGING
All have antidiscrimination policies that include sexual orientation; 96
percent have antidiscrimination policies that include gender identity. All
employees should be informed about these policies and repercussions for
failing to adhere to them.
For information on diversity training, visit www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/training.
· USE OF EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE GROUPS
All of the DiversityInc Top 50 have LGBT (and ally) resource groups, up
from 63 percent five years ago. These groups are valuable conduits to the
community and keep leaders aware of legislative and other external con-
cerns. Ninety percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs meet regularly with ERG
leaders.
For information on employee-resource groups, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/employee-resource-groups and also see our
webinar on DiversityIncBestPractices.com on employee-resource groups,
featuring Aetna and MasterCard.
When Should Your Company Take a Stand Against LGBT Bias? CONTINUED
Protest
against the
passage of
Proposition 8
banning gay
marriage.
Richard Proust
and his partner of
30 years, Donald
Corren, march
during the Gay
Pride Parade.
Read our coverage of the anti-LGBT-rights law promoted by the Tennessee
Chamber of Commerce at www.DiversityInc.com/lgbt-rights
P
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June_Same Sex Marr.indd 120 8/3/11 6:42 PM
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DiversityInc 123
1924 The Society for Human Rights, the frst
gay-rights organization in the United
States, is founded. It is shut down by
police within a few months
1955 The Daughters of Bilitis, the frst
national U.S. lesbian organization, is
formed
1962 Illinois becomes frst state to
decriminalize “homosexual” acts
1969 Stonewall riots in New
York gain national
attention for gay and
lesbian rights
1970 First Gay Liberation
Day March is held in New York
City; similar events are held in
Los Angeles and San Francisco
1973 The American Psychiatric Association
removes “homosexuality” defnition as
mental disorder
1978 Rainbow fag frst used as symbol of
gay and lesbian pride
1979 First national gay-rights march held in
Washington, D.C.
1982 Wisconsin is frst state to outlaw
discrimination on basis of sexual
orientation
1989 Denmark becomes frst country to
legalize same-sex partnerships
1993 “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy allows
gays and lesbians to serve in the U.S.
military as long as they are closeted
1996 Supreme Court says protections for
gays and lesbians are not special
rights but the same civil rights
guaranteed to all U.S. citizens
2000 Vermont becomes frst state to legally
recognize civil unions between gays or
lesbians
2003 Supreme Court rules sodomy laws
unconstitutional in Lawrence v. Texas
2004 Massachusetts legalizes same-
sex marriage
New Jersey’s Gov. James
McGreevey comes out as frst
openly gay U.S. governor before
resigning
2005 Civil unions become legal in
Connecticut
2006 Civil unions become legal in New
Jersey
2007 DiversityInc requires domestic-partner
benefts as prerequisite to make The
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for
Diversity list
2008 California’s State Supreme Court
allows same-sex marriage, but
Proposition 8 then eliminates it
2009 President Barack Obama signs law
extending existing federal hate-crime
laws to include those committed on
the basis of sexual orientation and
gender identity
2010 Federal court declares California’s
Prop. 8 unconstitutional
2010 Obama signs law to end “don’t ask,
don’t tell” policy
2011 Obama administration drops defense
of DOMA in court. New legislation that
would offcially repeal DOMA and end
federal discrimination against legally
married same-sex couples, called
The Respect for Marriage Act, is fled
in the U.S. House of Representatives
and the Senate
New York becomes the largest state
in the nation to recognize same-sex
marriages after Gov. Andrew Cuomo
signs the bill into law
Illinois recognizes civil unions and
same-sex marriages performed in
other states
2011– Hawaii will begin recognizing civil
unions on Jan. 1, 2012
Gay-rights advocates witnessed a string of historic victories in 2010 and 2011. Congress voted
to end the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, defeating a 17-year ban on gays and lesbians
serving openly in the U.S. armed forces. The Obama administration announced it was dropping
its defense of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in court. New legislation that would offcially
repeal DOMA and end federal discrimination against legally married same-sex couples, called The
Respect for Marriage Act, has been fled in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate.
S
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c
2012
TIMELINE
FACTS&FIGURES
LGBT RIGHTS
Photos, top and right: Shutterstock
June_LGBT Factoids.indd 123 8/5/11 1:48 PM
124 DiversityInc
U.S. Gay and Lesbian
Market Buying Power
2006 $660 BILLION
2009 $732 BILLION
2010 $743 BILLION
Source: Witeck-Combs Communications/ Packaged Facts
The adult LGBT
population
is one of the
most wired and
technologically
fluent groups in
the country.
76%
of LGBT adults are
online, comprising
7.9 percent of the
total adult Internet-
user population
LGBT people spend
57%
more time
online than their
heterosexual
counterparts
32%
of LGBT respondents
said they were online
between 24 and
168 hours a week,
compared with only
18% of heterosexual
Internet users
(Excludes email usage)
Source: eMarketer
Out LGBT Population in the United States
DEMOGRAPHICS WIRED
2006
15.3
MILLION
2011
16.3
MILLION
BETWEEN
6% AND 7%
of the U.S. population
identifies as lesbian, gay,
bisexual or transgender,
but many estimate
the real amount is
10%
Source: Human Rights Campaign
The 2011 DiversityInc Top 10
Companies for LGBT Employees
•KPMG
•Wells Fargo & Co.
•IBM Corp.
•Aetna
•Ernst & Young
•PricewaterhouseCoopers
•Sodexo
•Bank of America
•Merck & Co.
•American Express
All of The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity have LGBT employee-resource
groups
BUYING POWER
LGBT Rights
What factors set The DiversityInc Top
10 Companies for LGBT Employees
apart from others?
• All of them have active programs to recruit LGBT people,
compared with 78 percent of the DiversityInc Top 50
• They average 68 percent of their managers participating
in mentoring programs, compared with 39 percent for the
DiversityInc Top 50
• Eighty percent offer adoption-assistance programs and
80 percent offer paid time off for paternity leave
• All of their nondiscrimination policies include gender
identity
• Ninety percent offer bereavement leave and all of them
offer family medical leave for same-sex partners
LGBT RIGHTS AT THE DIVERSITYINC
TOP 50 COMPANIES
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June_LGBT Factoids.indd 124 8/5/11 1:49 PM
December 2010 125 De De De De DDDe De De De De De De De De De De De De De De DDDe De De De De De De De DDDDDe DDDDDe De De De DDe De De De De De De De DDDe DDe ee DDe DDDDDDDDDe DDDDDDDe De DDDDDDDDe De DDDDDDDe DDDDe De DDDDDDDDDDDDeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeece ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce e ce e ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce e ce ce ce ce cce ce e ce ce ce ce ce ce cce eeee ce ce ce ce ee ce ce ce ccce ee ceeee ceee ccce ce cccccee ce cccceee cccce cccccccccc mb mb mb mb mb mb mb mb bb mb b mb mb mb mbbb mb b mb mb mb mb mb mmmb mb mb bbb mb mb bb mb mb mb bb mb mb mb mb mb mb b mb bb mb mb b mb mmb bb mb mb mb b mb b mb mb mb mb b mb mb mb mb mb mb bbbbb mb mb mmmmb mmb mb mb bbbb mb mbbbbb mb bbb mb mmb mmmmmmbb mmmmmb m er er er er er er er er er er er er r er er er er er eeeeeer er er er eer er er er er eeer er er eer eerr eeeeer er rr er er eeer r er er eer eer er er er eer er er eeer r er er er er r 2222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222201 01 01 01 01 01 001 01 01 01 01 01 1 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 11 01 0011 001 01 111 01 001 111 01 0001 01 01 001 01 01 01 001 001 00000111 01 001 01 01 1 01 01 111 00001 00001 00000001 01 01 111 01 00001 111111 00 00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 25 125 25 125 125 25 5 25 125 55 125 125 1225 25 125 125 12 125 5 125 125 25 125 5555 125 25 125 12 125 2 111111225 25 22222255 25 5 11111222222222 125 125 125 55 2 1222255555555555
About
89%
of gay respondents
and 91 percent of
lesbian respondents
to a recent survey
thought a brand’s
sponsorship or
support of LGBT
events favorably
influenced their
buying decisions
Source: eMarketer
BRAND ATTITUDES &
BUYING DECISIONS
T
HOUSEHOLD INCOME
Gay men
Lesbian
women
General
population
Gay couples
living together
Lesbian couples
living together
Married couples
(general population)
$62,000
$52,000
$49,777
$130,000
$96,000
$71,830
MEDIAN ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, eMarketer
About
78%
of LGBT people and
their friends and
relatives would switch
brands to companies
that are known as
being LGBT-friendly
Source: Witeck-Combs/
Harris Interactive
States issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples:
MASSACHUSETTS
CONNECTICUT
IOWA
VERMONT
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW YORK
Source: Human Rights Campaign
Statewide law providing
equivalent of state-level
spousal rights to same-sex
couples:
NEW JERSEY
CIVIL UNIONS, 2007
WASHINGTON STATE
DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2007/2009
DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2008
NEVADA
DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2009
ILLINOIS
CIVIL UNIONS, 2011
HAWAII
CIVIL UNIONS, EFFECTIVE JAN. 1, 2012
Source: Human Rights Campaign
If the federal government
recognizes legal marriages by
same-sex couples, between
50,000 and 80,000
same-sex couples would be recognized
Source: The Williams Institute
MARRIAGE
States that
recognize
marriages by
same-sex couples
from another
state
MARYLAND 2010
ILLINOIS 2011
Source: Human Rights Campaign
2004
2008
2009
2009
2010
2011
2011
CALIFORNIA
Same-sex marriages
that took place between
June 16, 2008, and Nov.
4, 2008, continue to
be defined as mar-
riage while the courts
determine legality.
On Oct. 12, 2009, Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger
signed into law a bill
that recognized out-of-
jurisdiction same-sex
marriages that occurred
between June 2008 and
November 2008 as mar-
riages in California.
Source: Human Rights Campaign
OREGON
LGBT RIGHTS
DiversityInc 125
FACTS&FIGURES
June_LGBT Factoids.indd 125 8/5/11 1:49 PM
126 DiversityInc
VS.
Photos: Shutterstock
June_Donald Fan.indd 126 8/5/11 1:50 PM
Do
diverse
teams
solve more
problems
than
homogenous
teams?
DIVERSITY
The Driving Force of Innovation
BY DONALD FAN
DiversityInc 127
June_Donald Fan.indd 127 8/5/11 1:52 PM
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
LESS MORE
B
E
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T
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R
W
O
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S
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128 DiversityInc
I
n his latest State of the Union address, President Barack Obama mentioned the
word “innovation” nine times, more than any other president ever has, according
to Fareed Zakaria. This highlights a key point that in this new era, rife with
volatility and ambiguity, innovation is critical in sustaining organic growth and
securing success in a globally competitive environment.
We know that there exists a strong connection between innovation
and diversity and inclusion; our challenge is to help our leaders and fellow
professionals understand that connection. By exploring scientific research,
corporate practice and personal observation, this article aims to connect those
dots. While business lore tends to link innovation with a creative drive that is
exclusive to the top and brightest talent, true innovation thrives in an inclusive
culture that values diverse ideas, leverages unique perspectives and invites
everyone to achieve collaborative breakthroughs across the entire organization.
A Diverse Workforce Is a
Valuable Source of Innovation
Diversity Means Quality
DIVERSITY IN AN EMPLOYEE’S RELATIONSHIPS
Q
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L
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T
Y

O
F

I
D
E
A
The vital foundation for innovation derives from a diverse workforce.
Diversity of talent, by definition,
provides more ideas and perspec-
tives into driving for the best busi-
ness solutions. Diversity becomes
a valuable resource for innova-
tion through a diverse workforce
that reflects today’s marketplace
through consumer insights and
“wisdom of the crowd” that can
lead to creative betterment.
People see problems and solu-
tions from different perspectives.
These perspectives are accompa-
nied by the heuristics that define
how individuals search for solu-
tions. When confronted with a
problem, we encode our perspec-
tives and then apply our particular
heuristics to explore new and better
resolutions. Diverse teams often
outperform teams composed of
June_Donald Fan.indd 128 8/5/11 1:53 PM
DiversityInc 129
the very best individuals, because
this diversity of perspective and
problem-solving approach trumps
individual ability.
Research confirms that diver-
sity is a valuable resource for
innovation. Prof. Ron Burt of the
University of Chicago conducted
an empirical study indicating that
people with more diverse sources of
information generate consistently
better ideas, as the graph on the
previous page highlights.
In the graph, the vertical axis
shows management assessments of
a series of employee ideas related
to supply-chain management. The
horizontal axis measures the level
of diversity in an employee’s inter-
nal connections. As you move to the
right, you see employees who are
more insular in their connections.
They lack diversity of input in their
day-to-day world.
The graph indicates that
higher diversity of connections
also translates to the perception
of higher quality ideas, which
is a fundamental component of
innovation.
Many companies today are
becoming more intentional about
leveraging diversity to spur inno-
vation. For example, Walmart
continues to build a diverse global
workforce by recruiting world-class
talent through creative approaches,
such as the Junior Military Officer
recruiting program and the Women
in Retail initiative, and through
increased community and campus-
outreach efforts.
An Inclusive Culture Is an
Incubator for Innovation
In addition to cultivating a diverse workforce, we must also foster an inclusive
work environment where creative ideas can germinate and grow.
Common characteristics of an inclusive work environment include:
BELIEF
Trusting and
empowering
employees to make
a difference in
continuous business
improvements
ATTITUDE
Respecting a
predisposition toward
collaboration and
diversity of thought
KNOWLEDGE
Knowing how to think
creatively to solve
problems and capture
opportunities
BEHAVIOR
Valuing and
leveraging differences
Walmart strives to build
an even more inclusive
culture to connect and
engage the associates by
encouraging them to bring
up more intelligence,
insight, imagination and
intuition to solve complex
business problems and to
serve customers better.
This inclusive culture
serves as an incubator for
creative thinking through the
following efforts:
1
DEVELOPING MAVERICKS (FREEDOM OF THOUGHT)
Constructive mavericks have the vision and passion to pursue an idea
and bring it to fruition. They challenge convention and initiate new
ways to solve problems. At Walmart, leaders are empowered to be
catalysts through mentoring and sponsorship programs and other develop-
mental opportunities that provide avenues for associates to unlock their full
potential.
2
ADVOCATING COLLABORATION (CROSS-POLLINATION)
Break silos by inspiring people with different backgrounds and
experiences to share their unique perspectives and work in different
functional areas. Becoming a matrix organization, Walmart spurs on
the horizontal flow of skills and information transcending functional areas.
Cross-functional projects, enriched career opportunities and global assign-
ments are examples of the company’s commitment to developing associates
through collaborative opportunities and roles that expand their knowledge
and experiences.
Donald Fan is senior director in the Office of Diversity at Walmart.
June_Donald Fan.indd 129 8/5/11 1:53 PM
For more on diversity management, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com READ MORE
3
SWIMMING UPSTREAM (INGENUITY) Challenge conventional
wisdom by going the opposite way. This can elevate the opportunity
for success, simply because little energy is currently invested there. A
freedom from conventional thinking can unleash a pleasant surprise
and unexpected amazement, similar to the Zen principle of “Breaking from
Routine.” For example, when Walmart founder Sam Walton first pitched his
idea to start a chain of discount stores in small rural communities, he was
told the idea would never work. Walton responded by forming a dedicated
team with different backgrounds and capabilities that complemented each
other, who, through collective endeavors, turned the idea into an unprec-
edented business success.
4
STRENGTHENING CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE
(COMPETENCY) In today’s global economy, it is essential to build
cultural intelligence in order to succeed and lead in innovation.
While examining what neuroscience is revealing about the differ-
ence between individuals and businesses that succeed and those that fail,
Prof. Ying Yi Hong and Dr. David Livermore introduced the Four Cultural
Intelligence (CQ) capabilities at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit:
When we seek to strengthen cultural competencies, we advance the effec-
tiveness, creativity and adaptability of today’s culturally diverse workforce.
Efforts such as cultural-heritage celebrations, offering cultural-assessment
tools, cross-country leadership summits and cultural-competency training
all contribute to strengthen cultural intelligence.
130 DiversityInc
CQ DRIVE
(Motivation)
Our level of interest, drive and
motivation to adapt cross-
culturally. Be curious and seek
differences.
CQ STRATEGY
(Meta-Cognition)
Our level of awareness and
ability to plan in light of our
cultural understanding. Draw
a blueprint of how to leverage
differences.
CQ KNOWLEDGE
(Cognition)
Our level of understanding
about cultural issues. Take time
to understand the merits of
differences and shared values.
CQ ACTION
(Behavior)
Our level of adaptability when
leading and relating cross-
culturally. Look for innovative
breakthroughs by embracing
differences.
5
ENABLING NEW IDEAS
(OUTCOME)
Create an environment
where great ideas can
surface and grow. Walmart uses
different channels to solicit ideas,
including a monthly Town Hall
Meeting hosted by the CEO, an
annual Associate Opinion Survey,
an Open Door process and more.
The ability to act on diverse ideas
has shaped the growth of the com-
pany and helped customers save
money and live better. A couple of
game-changing examples include:
Money Center Walmart offers mil-
lions of unbanked and underserved
customers a series of low-cost
financial services through in-store
Money Centers (check cashing,
bill payments, money transfers,
MoneyCard, etc.)
Direct Farm This global program
focuses on driving agricultural sus-
tainability. In 2010, Walmart China
successfully engaged more than
470,000 farmers in the Direct Farm
program. Additionally, the company
endeavors to reduce produce waste
by 15 percent while upgrading 15
percent of Direct Farm program
products from Green to Organic
certified; and to increase partici-
pation rates to 2 million Chinese
farmers by the end of 2015.
Steve Jobs said, “The source of wealth and capital in this new era is not material things … it is the human
mind, the human spirit, the human imagination and our faith in the future.” When we enlighten and
inspire our people to harness their creativity to generate value in an inclusive culture, we nurture fertile
soil where seeds of innovation can blossom into opportunity of sustained future growth.
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learn more
‘Fertile Soil for Seeds of Innovation

June_Donald Fan.indd 130 8/5/11 1:53 PM
June.2011 Ads.indd 23 6/28/11 9:47 AM
W
e recently covered a story regard-
ing an anti-LGBT-rights law pro-
moted by the Tennessee Chamber
of Commerce. The chamber was reacting to the
city of Nashville passing a pro-LGBT-rights law.
Several companies on The 2011 DiversityInc
Top 50 Companies for Diversity list are mem-
bers of that chamber. We confronted them and
asked how they could support a bill that was
in conflict with the values espoused by their
corporate leadership via their diversity depart-
ments. All stated their opposition to the bill, but
the damage was done, and as the heat started
to rise, the governor signed the bill into law,
bringing Tennessee into the circle of states that
affirmatively oppress their LGBT citizens.
A TEACHABLE MOMENT
Decision
Making,
Clarity of
Values &
What to
Do When
It Goes
Horribly
Wrong
132 DiversityInc
BY LUKE VISCONTI
June_Decision_Making.indd 132 8/5/11 1:54 PM
P
h
o
t
o
:

S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
The corporate reaction to our questions was swift
but after the fact. I think most companies’ headquar-
ters were genuinely surprised by the actions of their
colleagues on the chamber’s board. That leads us to a
“teachable moment.” Here are some ground rules I’ve
learned by observing companies closely:
…
Decision making is best by having clarity on
your values. Credibility received for your pro-
fessed values is dependent on your decisive execu-
tion of actions based on your values. This does not
preclude empathy and forgiveness for mistakes,
but values cannot be parsed without exposure to
repercussions.
†
Your best possible business outcome is depen-
dent on your ability to equitably execute on fair
and equitable treatment. People treated fairly
have a better relationship with you; better relation-
ships transcend commodity pricing and increase
the quality of your revenue stream. Better rela-
tionships also increase employee engagement and
productivity and reduce regrettable loss.
‡
In the age of Facebook and
Twitter, you cannot hide. Your
actions will be publicly evalu-
ated and the resulting addition
or subtraction from your brand
image will have an impact on
your business.
Here is some food for thought
regarding human rights, business
and our LGBT neighbors:
Rights afforded to one group that
do not diminish another group’s
rights are what this country is all
about. This was the basis of wom-
en’s suffrage and the Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights
Act and Americans with Disabilities Act—and it is
the basis of the lawsuit that overcame the anti-LGBT
Proposition 8 in California. The anti-LGBT forces
could not produce a single expert who could show that
same-sex marriage in any way diminished heterosexual
marriage. Married couples have certain legal rights,
and extension of those legal rights to same-sex couples
does not hurt heterosexual marriages and does not
force your house of worship to marry same-sex cou-
ples. Freedom from a state-run religion and freedom of
religion from the state are part of our Constitution.
Here’s some personal advice if you think marriage is
for one man and one woman: Don’t marry someone of
your own sex.
Finally, especially for companies that are publicly
traded and/or regulated by the government (which,
in aggregate, includes just about every company),
there are some things to keep in mind regarding
communications, donations and membership:
…
Communications sent in “secrecy” are worse
than no letter at all, as “secret” complaints consti-
tute tacit approval.
†
An organization cannot stink selectively. The
chamber’s actions were anti-LGBT rights, period.
This cannot be parsed, and if your continued mem-
bership in an organization conflicts with your stated
values, then you have a problem across the entire
organization.
‡
Conflict in values produces brand damage and
potential exposure to lawsuits and is detrimental
to shareholder equity. Your personal opinions or
politics do not trump your organization’s need to do
business properly. This is especially true for leaders.
Over the almost 14 years of
publishing DiversityInc, we’ve seen
the practice of managing diversity
become more effective by orders of
magnitude in the most competitive
companies. Questions about
diversity are now on 100 percent
of DiversityInc Top 50 companies’
requests for proposals (RFPs). This
directly communicates a statement of
values. The ripple effect of diversity
values is aggregating into a bow
wave as globalization is enhanced by
web and cell communications. This
gives companies unprecedented
opportunities—and unprecedented
responsibilities—that transcend nations.
This creates seemingly complex challenges, but I
don’t think they’re all that complex. If you have clarity
on your values, then don’t violate them; if you’re doing
business with a company that violates your values, you
are violating your values; and if you support or make a
donation to an organization that has facets that violate
your values, then you are violating your values.
We will all make mistakes. As Dr. Cornel West said
at one of our events, “We are all cracked vessels,” and
the public is very forgiving of a speedy and forthright
apology, particularly if it’s backed by redemptive action.
Such as, for example, resigning from the Tennessee
Chamber of Commerce.
DI
If your continued
membership in
an organization
conflicts with your
stated values,
then you have
a problem
across the entire
organization.
DiversityInc 133
June_Decision_Making.indd 133 8/3/11 6:00 PM
When Didier Demesmin arrived at Rutgers University, he was sure he wanted to be a doctor. ßut,
like too many disadvantaged students, he was unsure how to reach that goal. Fortunately, the Cfhce
for Diversity and Academic Success in the Sciences (CDASIS) at Rutgers offers a rigorous program
of academic support and mentoring that gives aspiring doctors from underrepresented groups the
foundation they need to succeed in top medical schools.
Rutgers paved the way for Dr. Demesmin, now a leader in pain medicine, and for more than 400
other health professionals and researchers who owe their start to the CDASIS program.
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June.2011 Ads.indd 45 7/15/11 1:59 PM
BY LUKE VISCONTI
DiversityInc Interview
Wells Fargo’s northern New Jersey
regional president
Lucia DiNapoli Gibbons
is responsible for retail operations in 11
counties, which includes 157 retail branches
and nearly 1,600 team members.
She spoke to DiversityInc
CEO Luke Visconti about her
experience working in the banking
industry and how diversity-
management initiatives
have made her branches
more competitive.
Regional
Bank
President
Gives
Her
Perspective
ON
Women,
Banking &
Careers
DiversityInc 135
June_Gibbons ALT.indd 135 8/3/11 6:04 PM
AND WOMEN, BANKING CAREERS
LUKE VISCONTI Lucia, you’re a senior
executive woman in a very power-
ful business role. What has made
you successful?
LUCIA DINAPOLI GIBBONS The core of
it is building great relationships
with people … I don’t think you
can accomplish anything
without connecting to
people and understand-
ing them and building
relationships. That’s
something I’ve been
good at from the very
beginning of my career as a
relationship manager—building
relationships with businesses. I’ve
carried that through every aspect of
my career.
VISCONTI Less than 3 percent of
Fortune 500 CEOs are women, yet
if you look at the same age cohort,
more than half the people who have
four-year degrees are women. What
do you attribute the gap to?
GIBBONS In part, Luke, it’s time,
and I think with a little bit more
time—and I even see this in my
own company—the ranks of middle
to senior management are start-
ing to swell. I’m really confident
that over the next five years, we’ll
see some pretty significant change
at the senior-most positions in
organizations.
VISCONTI What career advice can you
share with women who desire a
senior position?
GIBBONS Sometimes, as females, we
can get very focused on the task at
hand, and that’s great because that
helps you drive performance.
You’ve got to demonstrate
performance in order
to move ahead, but we
cannot lose sight of
networking—network-
ing with each other,
networking with people
throughout our organiza-
tion. We have to take care of
ourselves in that way.
So if you have an eye on moving
forward and moving up, you not only
need to be focused on performance,
you need to be focused on network-
ing and building those connections
through the organization—managing
your brand, essentially, very proac-
tively managing your brand.
VISCONTI That’s a great point. I’ve
heard it described this way: If a
man and a woman are sitting in two
different offices and they’re both
equally busy, and the senior vice
president comes down the hall and
says “Hey, would you like to go to
lunch?” the woman will say “No,
I’ve got to get this done,” and the
man will drop what he’s doing and
go to lunch.
136 DiversityInc
NO. 40
IN THE DIVERSITYINC
TOP 50 COMPANIES
FOR DIVERSITY
GIBBONS I’ve been guilty of that so I
completely agree.
Reaching
Multicultural
Customers
VISCONTI You operate 157 retail
stores in [northern New Jersey],
which covers an amazing breadth
of diversity, and you described how
you adapt your store management
and how customers are handled
based on the diversity that you have
in those retail areas. Can you tell us
a little bit about that?
GIBBONS We operate in one of the
most diverse communities in the
United States. So we’re pretty
deliberate about looking store by
store, understanding the diversity
around that store, and then making
sure that we hire people who repre-
sent that community.
We started, with a lot of gusto,
our Hispanic strategy last year. It
is not simply understanding the
communities that have Hispanic
populations; it’s about understand-
ing the breakdown of that Hispanic
population. Are they Puerto Rican?
Are they Portuguese? Are they
Colombian? There are certain
customs within various heritages
that only the people that are part
of that heritage understand. If you
can connect on that level and build
a relationship because you have an
appreciation for who those custom-
ers are, that’s going to help us build
trust, and that’s going to help us
build business.
VISCONTI Can you tell us about
a store where you applied that
strategy?
GIBBONS Yes. We have a store on
Linden Wood Avenue [in Linden,
N.J.], and it’s a Hispanic commu-
nity [and] it’s a Polish community.
So we have Spanish-speaking store
members and we have Polish-
speaking store members. Now if
we weren’t deliberate about “OK,
it’s a white population; what’s the
Lucia DiNapoli
Gibbons
BIRTHPLACE Jersey City, N.J.
TITLE Executive Vice President and the Northern New Jersey
Regional President, Wells Fargo
EDUCATION Bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and
MBA from the Leonard Stern School of Business at New
York University
AFFILIATIONS Serves on the boards of the New Jersey Network
Foundation, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the
Commerce and Industry Association of New Jersey, and the
Wachovia Regional Foundation. Chair of the Corporate Advisory
Board for the Boys and Girls Clubs of New Jersey
WELLS
FARGO
June_Gibbons ALT.indd 136 8/5/11 1:55 PM
DiversityInc Interview
diversity of that white population?”
to really understand that it was
Polish, we might make the mistake
of simply focusing on the Hispanic
piece because that really pops in
the numbers. That’s why it’s so
important to get so granular, down
to the store level, as to what the
diversity of the market looks like.
VISCONTI Do you think you have bet-
ter market share than your com-
petitors because of this?
GIBBONS We’re growing our market
share in diverse segments better
than our competitors are. Ultimately,
it’s going to help us overtake those
who are ahead of us currently as it
relates to total market share in New
Jersey. At the end of the day, this is
what their strategy is all about. It’s
about winning against our competi-
tion and building business.
Tips for
Success
VISCONTI You’ve had a lot of board
experience and done a lot of phil-
anthropic work. I know how per-
sonally engaged you are with this.
Has that helped you with business?
Why are you doing all this?
GIBBONS First, I should share that I
did grow up in a household where
my father modeled that behavior.
He thought it was really important
to give back to others. So I saw him
do that, and I always aspired to do
the same myself.
The second piece of it is: I used
it as a business-development tool.
Early on in my career when I was a
relationship manager, I would ask
certain significant centers of influ-
ence, “How do I get to know the
people in Bergen County?” “How
do I get to know the people here?”
And they advised me of certain
boards that had certain people I
wanted to meet. So I was able to
marry the two: my strong desire to
make a difference coupled with my
desire to make relationships with
people who were going to help me
from a business perspective.
I was able to give back and feel
great about myself; at the same
time, I was able to meet people that
I was able to do business with. And
that still carries through to today.
We were building a store in
Somerset County, and I had an
issue. I was able to pick up the
phone and call [utility company]
PSE&G so we could get our store
opened on time because I had a
relationship at the time with Ralph
LaRossa [president and chief oper-
ating officer of PSE&G]. So that was
a business issue that I was able to
handle because I had a relationship
with the right person.
So I think in my heart of hearts
it’s absolutely the right thing to do,
and the outcome is that you get to
develop wonderful business rela-
tionships that help you grow your
business as well.
VISCONTI You have an MBA. You
went to the Stern School at NYU
and you’re an undergraduate from
Rutgers. Do you have career sug-
gestions for younger women?
GIBBONS It’s important to do your
best every day. I think that you
need to set very high goals, set high
standards, and excel every day,
especially as it relates to people
and caring about people, because I
happen to be one of those individu-
als who thinks you can set the bar
really high. And engage in an envi-
ronment where you have a win-win
scenario.
And that even comes to engag-
ing in conflict. Sometimes you have
to have tough conversations with
people, but if you do it with care
and with a desire to maintain that
person’s integrity, I think you can
do the tough things.
The last piece of advice I would
add is to really continually learn
from those people around you.
Whatever your discipline is, make
sure that you’re up to date on the
most current things that are occur-
ring in your discipline. Never stop
learning.
VISCONTI This clearly can’t be a
part-time job for you. You’ve got
to juggle a lot of things in a family.
What advice can you give to other
women, and other men, in terms
of work/life balance and how you
manage all of that?
GIBBONS It doesn’t happen without
a support system. My husband
doesn’t work. As my career was
taking off, he started to back off
of what he was doing, and Luke, I
don’t have young children at home,
but I am the primary caregiver for
my mom, and we do have other
family members that we support,
so there’s no way that I’m going
to work all the hours that I’m
working and be able to accomplish
everything I wanted to accomplish
if my husband’s schedule was just
like mine.
Now if he did go down that path
and he had a high-powered career
as well, we would have to figure out
support in a different way … It takes
a very proactive thought process
around what does the support
network need to look like, whether
it’s hired help, family members and
friends—you need to have a game
plan. This is my game plan. You need
to have a game plan around that.
DI

Watch the video interview at
www.DiversityInc.com/gibbons
For more on workforce diversity, visit www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/workforce-diversity
READ MORE
DiversityInc 137
June_Gibbons ALT.indd 137 8/3/11 6:05 PM
Successful
Paths for
Corporate
Moving
women
into line-
management
jobs—
and
REALLY
letting them
have
work/life
balance—
doesn’t
happen
that often.
ADVANCING WOMEN
Here’s
how to do
it right
from
seven
companies.
June_WomenInSales.indd 138 8/5/11 1:56 PM
Career
Women in
Sales
ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT
LINDA ALBORNOZ
OF AMERICAN EXPRESS,
ANDREA L. HAZARD
OF AT&T
AND VALERIE OSWALT
OF KRAFT FOODS
BY BARBARA FRANKEL
June_WomenInSales.indd 139 8/5/11 1:57 PM
I
n 1997, when Linda Albornoz was a director
for American Express based in Houston, her
husband received a great job offer requiring them
to move to San Francisco. Eleven years ago, at
most companies that would have meant Albornoz
either quit or asked for a reassignment to a desk
job, effectively committing career suicide.
SUCCESSFUL CAREER PATHS FOR WOMEN
Instead, her boss let her set up a virtual office,
giving her the flexibility that eventually
helped her rise to her current position of vice
president, Business to Business (B2B) Payment
Solutions. In between, Albornoz and her hus-
band had a daughter, now 7, and they contin-
ued to both succeed in their demanding jobs.
Andrea L. Hazard has been with AT&T for
14 years, starting with its predecessor com-
pany SBC right out of college with a marketing
degree. Today, she is premier
client sales director, Global
Enterprise Solutions. Ten years
ago, she moved into enter-
prise sales and has worked in
Washington, D.C., Oklahoma
City, St. Louis (three times),
Dallas (twice), Minneapolis
and Nashville. Along the way,
she got married and, seven
months ago, had her first
child, a son. Her husband, who
works in telecommunications
sales for a different company,
relocated with her when she
was pregnant, but Hazard real-
izes that her days of living in
a different city virtually every
year are going to have to end,
especially when her son reaches school age.
For Valerie Oswalt, a meteoric rise in
sales at Kraft Foods has also meant frequent
relocations. A certified public accountant, she
joined Kraft in 1996 after two years at Deloitte.
She started in sales finance at Kraft Foods
and moved into more senior roles as Kraft
paid for her MBA at Kellogg University at
Northwestern. Today, Oswalt is customer vice
president of business development for Sales
& Customer Logistics and the mother of two
children, Scott William, 6, and Lauren, 4.
“I’ve moved from Chicago to Boston to
southern California to Dallas to Arkansas to
Northern California,” she says, noting that
this included being customer vice president
for Kraft’s relationship with
Walmart (overseeing more
than $2 billion in revenue)
and being area vice presi-
dent, customer logistics, for
the West Coast.
How have these three
women managed what
to many women seems
impossible: combining
active careers in revenue-
generating positions
and young families? The
answer lies not with
these particular women,
impressive as they are, but
with their companies—
The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity that
consciously provide flexibility and options
for women in P&L roles. These companies
understand that these positions are usually
the way into the top level (CEO and direct
reports) and want to make sure women are not
excluded.
BEST COMPANIES
FOR WOMEN IN SALES
(IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER)
American Express Co.
No. 13 in the DiversityInc Top 50
AT&T
No. 4 in the DiversityInc Top 50
Colgate-Palmolive Co.
No. 10 in the DiversityInc Top 50
Ernst & Young
No. 5 in the DiversityInc Top 50
Kraft Foods
No. 9 in the DiversityInc Top 50
PricewaterhouseCoopers
No. 3 in the DiversityInc Top 50
Procter & Gamble
No. 25 in the DiversityInc Top 50
140 DiversityInc
For more on advancing women in corporations, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/training READ MORE
June_WomenInSales.indd 140 8/5/11 1:58 PM
In Proft & Loss
Positions
38%
33%
30%
Reports
2nd Level of
Management
CEO & Direct
27%
22%
23%
33%
28%
31%
3rd Level of
Management
37%
35%35%
10% Highest Paid
34%
28%
31%
Best Companies for Women in Sales
All Companies (535 DiversityInc Top 50 participants)
DiversityInc Top 50
Promotions in
Management
42%
39%
42%
STARTING POINT MOVEMENT MANAGEMENT LEVELS ACHIEVED
WHAT THE DATA SHOWS
T
heir numbers reflect that effort.
DiversityInc studied seven com-
panies in different industries
with strong initiatives to help women
in revenue-generating roles. They (and
their 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 ranks) are:
PricewaterhouseCoopers, No. 3; AT&T, No.
4; Ernst & Young, No. 5; Kraft Foods, No.
9; Colgate-Palmolive Co., No. 10; American
Express Co., No. 13; and Procter & Gamble,
No. 25.
We found a significant difference in
their results. When compared with the 535
companies that participated in the 2011
DiversityInc Top 50 survey, these seven
companies had 15 percent more women in
P&L roles, 23 percent more women in the
top level (CEO and direct reports) and 22
percent more women in the top 10 percent
highest-paid employees in the company.
How do they do it? What best practices
do they use that enable them to hold on and
promote female talent at this level? The key
word is “flexibility.”
BEST PRACTICES
“W
e strive for clarity of busi-
ness objectives and deliv-
erables to allow managers
and employees the flexibility to determine
where, when and how the work gets done
to accomplish these,” says Jim Norman,
Kraft Foods’ vice president of talent
acquisition, diversity and inclusion. “This
is especially key in field positions, where
constant commute and travel is essential to
a successful relationship with customers.”
In other words, if the sales goals are
met, it doesn’t matter where and when the
executive is physically in the office. Oswalt,
“We always
like to say
we can be
flexible for
the right
people.
People want
to deliver and
the company
has shifted
the mindset
to focusing
on what gets
done, not how
you get it
done.”
VALERIE OSWALT
KRAFT FOODS
WOMEN IN SALES COMPANY COMPARISONS
DiversityInc 141
June_WomenInSales.indd 141 8/5/11 1:58 PM
HOW DOES
THAT WORK,
SPECIFICALLY?
142 DiversityInc
who is an adviser to Kraft Foods’ Women
Sales Council, an employee-resource group
just for women in sales positions, put it
this way: “We always like to say we can be
flexible for the right people. People want
to deliver and the company has shifted the
mindset to focusing on what gets done, not
how you get it done.”
“Although AT&T
has a virtual
policy, I need as
a sales leader
to be in front of
customers, as
the interaction is
very important.”
ANDREA HAZARD
AT&T
FLEXIBLE HOURS AND TELECOMMUTING
All of the DiversityInc Top 50 companies now
offer both of these options, with 90 percent
offering job sharing as well, but in many
companies these are only available for certain
positions. What makes these seven companies
stand out, however, is that these options are
available to revenue generators, people who
actively must be out meeting customers.
Hazard explains how it has worked for her
at AT&T: “Although AT&T has a virtual policy, I
need as a sales leader to be in front of custom-
ers, as the interaction is very important. The
company has allowed me to do both by being
accommodating to my personal life and my
leadership goals.” That’s meant for her a will-
ingness to move into more major market cities
for the telecommunications giant.
For more on progressive benefts, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/worklife
RELOCATION AND SPOUSAL SUPPORT
All of these companies help their executives
move by providing assistance on the sales and
purchases of their homes (even in a very down
market), moving services, interim housing,
childcare and job-search assistance for spous-
es. Interestingly, 72 percent of the DiversityInc
Top 50 now offer paternity leave, almost double
the percentage of fve years ago.
Albornoz, who was encouraged to seek a
new role with expanded responsibilities when
she was eight-and-a-half-months pregnant, says
of her company: “American Express really takes
the worry out of executive relocation. They sell
your house, fnd you a new one, and give you
the right support services and paid time off. I
have a grand piano and a wine collection and
they packed it all up for me.”
EMPHASIS ON
CROSS-CULTURAL MENTORING
Studies from Catalyst and other organizations
emphasize the personal importance of mentor-
ing to women, especially when they assume
leadership positions and compete in what
traditionally has been a male role. Our index of
top sales companies for women averages 59.9
percent of managers participating in mentoring
programs, compared with 37 percent for the
DiversityInc Top 50.
For more on mentoring, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/mentoring
USE EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE
GROUPS CREATIVELY
Kraft Foods has a Women’s Sales Council, an
employee group dedicated to attracting, retain-
ing, developing and advancing women at Kraft.
The group has mentors and formal meetings
and relies on advice from Kraft Foods’ female
chairman and CEO, Irene Rosenfeld.
For more on employee-resource groups, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/ergs
FOCUS ON TRAINING AND EDUCATION
Eighty-six percent of the DiversityInc Top 50
companies have mandatory diversity training
for managers, up 19 percent from fve years
ago, and 66 percent have mandatory diversity
training for their entire workforce, up by a third
more than fve years ago. All individuals beneft
from this, certainly women in sales positions
who often need help as they grow into leader-
ship positions. “Quite frankly, as a woman,
I’ve found the company’s strong investment in
individuals in training and education to be very
important to me,” says Hazard.
For more on training, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/training
CONCLUSION
I
n our benchmarking practice, we often see companies that have difficulty holding on to women as they move up
the ranks or getting women out of the more traditional staff/support positions, such as HR and communications.
These companies have made dedicated efforts to nurture and keep women in revenue-generating positions. Their
results are measurable—and they are improving every year.
The results of these best practices also create engaged and loyal employees. As Kraft Foods’ Oswalt put it: “A lot of
women feel they can’t have everything—certainly not at the same time. Women don’t have to give up on their dreams.
They may not get there as fast, but they will deliver the results.”
DI
SUCCESSFUL CAREER PATHS FOR WOMEN
June_WomenInSales.indd 142 8/3/11 6:52 PM


Center for
Accounting
Education

W

Frank Ross
Director
f_ross@howard.edu
202.806.1637

Pat Kellibrew
Coordinator
pkellibrew@howard.edu
Supported by leading accounting firms and organizations, and
recognized nationally as a prominent resource throughout the
accounting profession, the Howard University School of Business
Center for Accounting Education (CAE) addresses the diversity
challenge by attracting more African Americans to the profession
and improves their rates of retention and upward mobility.
Because of the unique challenges young African Americans face
when entering the accounting profession, CAE offers initiatives
and programs that will prepare them to successfully maneuver
the pitfalls they may encounter early in their career. Training is
targeted to every stage of career development: students
considering accounting as a career; young professionals
beginning their career and preparing for the CPA Exam; middle
managers and potential senior leaders.
CAE’s corporate stakeholders are among the professions leading
firms and major organizations who contribute resources and
expertise in the field of accounting. Members of the ever-
increasing group of stakeholders participate in the training
programs, providing participants with real-world scenarios that
mirror their impending work environment.
Our Stakeholders include:
Bert Smith & Company * Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio and Associates
AICPA * BDO Seidman * Becker CPA Review * Deloitte * KPMG
Coleman & Williams * Ernst & Young * Grant Thornton * NABA
McConnell & Jones * NABA Division of Firms * PWC
Walker & Company * Williams, Adley & Company

For more information on CAE programs, please visit:
www.howardcae.org


The Center for Accounting Education
Howard University School of Business
2600 Sixth Street, NW - Rooms 341-342
Washington, DC 20059


Center for
Accounting
Education

W

Frank Ross
Director
f_ross@howard.edu
202.806.1637

Pat Kellibrew
Coordinator
pkellibrew@howard.edu
202.806.1643
Supported by leading accounting firms and organizations, and
recognized nationally as a prominent resource throughout the
accounting profession, the Howard University School of Business
Center for Accounting Education (CAE) addresses the diversity
challenge by attracting more African Americans to the profession
and improves their rates of retention and upward mobility.
Because of the unique challenges young African Americans face
when entering the accounting profession, CAE offers initiatives
and programs that will prepare them to successfully maneuver
the pitfalls they may encounter early in their career. Training is
targeted to every stage of career development: students
considering accounting as a career; young professionals
beginning their career and preparing for the CPA Exam; middle
managers and potential senior leaders.
CAE’s corporate stakeholders are among the professions leading
firms and major organizations who contribute resources and
expertise in the field of accounting. Members of the ever-
increasing group of stakeholders participate in the training
programs, providing participants with real-world scenarios that
mirror their impending work environment.
Our Stakeholders include:
Bert Smith & Company * Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio and Associates
AICPA * BDO Seidman * Becker CPA Review * Deloitte * KPMG
Coleman & Williams * Ernst & Young * Grant Thornton * NABA
McConnell & Jones * NABA Division of Firms * PWC
Walker & Company * Williams, Adley & Company

For more information on CAE programs, please visit:
www.howardcae.org


The Center for Accounting Education
Howard University School of Business
2600 Sixth Street, NW - Rooms 341-342
Washington, DC 20059
ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC
June.2011 Ads.indd 40 7/8/11 3:41 PM
144 DiversityInc 144 144 144 44 44 44 1 Div Div Div Div DDiv v DDDDD ers ers ers ers ers ers rs ers er r ity ity ity iity it ity ityInc Inc Inc Inc Inc cc
June_Walmart.indd 144 8/3/11 6:47 PM
DiversityInc 145
The
Danger
of the
Walmart
Class-
Action
Decision
BY LUKE VISCONTI
POOR
MANAGEMENT
RUINS
EQUITY
I
think Walmart engineered the
greatest diversity-management
turnaround I’ve ever seen
since I started publishing
DiversityInc in 1998. I admire
a lot of the people and their
collective efforts there. I also
find it incomprehensible that
they still don’t offer medical
partner benefits to their employees who are in same-
sex relationships—and you won’t see them on any
DiversityInc Top 50 list until they do.
That said, this Supreme Court decision has
implications far beyond Walmart, and understanding
P
h
o
t
o

I
l
l
u
s
t
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a
t
i
o
n
:

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a
i
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-
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i
f
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,

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June_Walmart.indd 145 8/3/11 6:48 PM
146 DiversityInc
them is very important. There is a
danger lurking in this decision. This is
from The New York Times:
“The court’s decision will not just
make it harder to bring big, ambi-
tious employment class-action cases
asserting discrimination based
on sex, race or other factors, legal
experts said. In the majority opin-
ion, the court set higher barriers for
bringing several types of nationwide
class actions against a large com-
pany with many branches.”
In its majority opinion, the court
essentially said that if lawyers
brought a nationwide class action
against an employer, they would
have to offer strong evidence of a
nationwide practice or policy that
hurt the class. In the Walmart case,
the court wrote that the plaintiffs
had not demonstrated that Walmart
had any nationwide policies or
practices that discriminated against
women. The opinion, written by
Justice Antonin Scalia, noted that
Walmart’s official corporate policy
opposed discrimination, while the
company gave the managers at its
more than 3,400 stores considerable
discretion over pay and promotions.
“In a company of Wal-Mart’s size
and geographical scope, it is quite
unbelievable that all managers
would exercise their discretion
in a common way without some
common direction,” Justice Scalia
wrote (emphasis added).
I think that’s nonsense—is it also
unbelievable that 99.995 percent of store
managers won’t embezzle? Does every-
one stock their shelves as they see fit at
department stores? Or do they do it by
the rulebook? Keep in mind, this isn’t
about just Walmart. There are endless
examples of large organizations that
force their managers to exercise their
discretion in a common way.
Value in
Diversity
T
he absence of direction
doesn’t absolve a company
of guilt—but with this court
decision, it will be far more difficult
for people who are wronged as a group
to fight as a group. I can imagine that
amoral lawyers will advise companies
with poor records and practices that
rules unstated (or never made) are
rules you don’t have to defend—in
other words, this decision can be used
as a way for a company with problems
to not do anything.
Why? If a person is discriminated
against, the individual, fighting alone,
will have no negotiation power
over huge companies—I know from
experience that it costs hundreds of
thousands of dollars to sue someone—
and a malevolent corporation will use
every legal trick in the book to stretch
things out, thereby costing more
money. There will be individual sexist
managers who will use this case—and
their corporation’s lack of internal
controls, regulation, goals, standards
and repercussions for not following
them—to discriminate. The problem is
even worse on a serendipitous level—
people, left to their own devices, are
prone to discriminate. This is normal
human behavior. We’re tribal beings,
and psychological tests show we are
most likely to trust people who are just
like us.
Here’s the problem—for sharehold-
ers, poor management destroys equity
value. Diversity is a core element of
LUKE VISCONTI
This case
makes it
all the
more
important
for every-
one to truly
inspect the
companies
they do
business
with and
work for.
READ MORE ON DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT AT www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
POOR MANAGEMENT RUINS EQUITY
June_Walmart.indd 146 8/8/11 10:34 AM
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managing human capital. By 2016, 70
percent of our nation’s workforce will
be women and/or Black and Latino.
Right now, only 3 percent of Fortune
500 company CEOs are women. Only
14 percent of Fortune 500 company
board seats are held by women. Yet
women have been getting more
bachelor’s degrees than men since
1980, and practically speaking, women
are numerically at parity with men in
the college-educated and non-college-
educated workforce. Misogynistic
results are not limited to corporations;
we are still waiting for the first woman
president, only 12 percent of the
members of Congress are women, etc.
You can see that women have been
systemically denied opportunities to
achieve their potential—and I don’t
think anyone is really pleased with the
direction or performance of either the
stock market or the government.
The
Bottom Line
T
hat discrimination is damag-
ing to business could not
be better documented by
Walmart. This is from their website
regarding the decision:
“Walmart has a long history of pro-
viding advancement opportunities
for our female associates and over
the years we have made tremendous
strides in developing women
throughout the organization.
In fact, we have created specific
training and mentoring programs to
help prepare women for opportuni-
ties at all levels in our company. As
a result of our efforts, Walmart is
often recognized as a great place for
women to work.”
These programs didn’t come about
from nothing; they came about from a
series of shocks about 10 years ago—a
run of very bad press, court cases and
internal arguments. Top management
took control over the situation and
hired dozens of people to staff their
(very diverse) diversity department—
including some people I know. And I
know them to personally be stand-up
and righteous men and women.
Walmart now has things that would
never have happened 10 years ago,
including a robust and cutting-edge
supplier-diversity program. I believe
they’ll eventually get on board with
partner benefits—because it is only
just to treat their employees equitably
and to not deny a benefit that could
make the difference between life and
death by judging people on whom
they love.
What Is the
Individual
to Do?
I
n my opinion, this case makes
it all the more important for
everyone to truly inspect the
companies they do business with and
work for. Make sure they follow your
values—because in the case of diversity
management, it has a direct bottom-
line result, even if you were to limit
your measurement to productivity.
That means that everyone—including
white, heterosexual, Christian men
with no ADA-defined disabilities—has
better prospects at companies that
manage diversity well.
Look at the corporate websites.
Look for the diversity section; check
out the corporate management and
board for diversity; see if the CEO has
a statement that makes sense to you.
Check out lists like the DiversityInc
Top 50; make sure you understand
where companies stand. Because now
that Justice Scalia has written a free
pass to corporate management, you’re
on your own if you don’t.

DI
Everyone—
including
white,
hetero-
sexual,
Christian
men with
no ADA-
defned
disabilities—
has better
prospects
at compa-
nies that
manage
diversity
well.
POOR MANAGEMENT RUINS EQUITY
148 DiversityInc
June_Walmart.indd 148 8/3/11 6:48 PM
Information from the
deepest database of
diversity metrics there
is, with data from more
than 500 companies
Interviews with CEOs of
multinational corporations on
their commitment to diversity
and the best practices that put
their companies on top
Best practices
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officers
If you

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successful companies use to improve retention and drive innovation.
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THE PREM
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DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT TOPICS AND FEATURES INCLUDING
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For more on effective leadership and legal issues in the workplace, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
L
E
G
A
L
U
P
D
A
T
E
Race Discrimination
Preemptive hiring is
discrimination.
A
Black employee alleged that
she was denied a promotion
to a higher IT position and
a less-qualified Asian employee was
selected instead. The employer’s
defense was that she never applied
for the position and, therefore, could
not contest the decision. However,
the evidence showed that the
manager knew there were only two
eligible employees; knew the Black
employee intended to apply; did not
wait for the application deadline to
expire; and directed the selection of
the Asian employee and stopped the
hiring process while the application
period was still open. The evidence
further showed that the plaintiff
rated far higher on performance
factors than the person selected,
and other key managers considered
her “superior by a wide margin.”
The court found that the employer’s
defense seemed to be a pretext for
racial discrimination. Calhoun v.
Johnson (D.C. Cir., 2011).
Race discrimination claim
ruled “nonsense.”
A
white police applicant
filed a race-discrimination
case alleging that he
was bumped from a hiring list,
passed over, so that lower-scoring
“minority” applicants could be
hired. He identified two “minority”
officers who were hired. The
court upheld summary judgment,
dismissing the case as frivolous
and “nonsense.” The plaintiff’s
complaint relied on hearsay and
stray comments he had heard from
people who were not involved
in the hiring (loose rumors,
conjecture and pure speculation).
The actual evidence showed that
the plaintiff was not “passed over,”
he was eliminated due to failing
the background check; the two
identified “minority” officers had
been hired in a process that was
long over before he even applied,
and neither of them had “passed
over” anyone; and finally, the
bottom half of the roster that the
plaintiff was on was all white
(some of whom were hired), so he
could not have been bumped by
a “minority.” His entire case was
based on conjecture, unfounded
rumors and stereotypes about
“affirmative action” hiring instead
of evidence. Thompson v. Lansing
Mich. (6th Cir., 2011).
BY BOB GREGG
CEMPLOYMENT LAWC
152 DiversityInc
How do you know
when claims of racial,
gender or disability
discrimination in
hiring or promotions
are legitimate?
‘I Didn’t Get
the Job Because
I’m Black’
P
h
o
t
o
s
:

S
h
u
t
t
e
r
s
t
o
c
k
n
o
t
h
i
r
e
d
h
i
r
e
d
June_LegalUpdate_2.indd 152 8/5/11 1:58 PM
DiversityInc 153
Sex Discrimination
HR manager files class-action
suit against Toshiba.
A
former HR manager
has filed suit requesting
certification of a class of
“all females who are or have been
employed by Toshiba in the United
States.” The suit alleges systemic
gender discrimination in com-
pensation, promotion and terms
and conditions of employment
under Title VII and the Equal Pay
Act. The suit seeks to cover all
Toshiba subsidiaries. The plaintiff
had been an HR manager for the
Toshiba Nuclear Energy Corp. sub-
To read more legal articles from Bob Gregg, visit www.DiversityInc.com/legal
Disability Discrimination
Is an essential function essential to the job?
A
shoulder injury made a UPS driver unable
to do his job. He applied for several other
positions he believed he could do. The
company rejected him due to essential job functions
in the job descriptions requiring lifting and
mobility beyond his medical limitations. Yet
the employee produced evidence that these
functions were not actually performed
in the real job. The court allowed the
case to go to trial. The courts give great
weight to an employer’s determination
of what duties should make up a job,
and the job description’s list of essential
functions is a powerful defense in an ADA
case. But the court ruled that there must
be more than a hollow defense. “The employer
will have to show that it actually imposes such
requirements on its employees in fact and not simply
on paper.” Supinski v. United Parcel Service, Inc. (3rd
Cir., 2011).
Messing up president’s schedule was valid
reason for discharge.
A communication director had cancer. He
incorrectly scheduled the organization’s
president, resulting in the president missing
a major, important public-relations event.
The communication director was fired.
He sued, claiming that he was replaced
by a person without a medical condition
and therefore the discharge was a prima
facie case of disability discrimination. The
court disagreed. It found no connection
between the cancer and the discharge. A
major job blunder is a valid non-discriminatory
reason for discharge. McCermott v. New York City
Housing Development Corp. (S.D. NY, 2011).
sidiary. Cyphers v. Toshiba American,
Inc. (S.D., NY, 2011).
Trashing harassment complaint
creates case.
A
fter-the-fact action does not
cure the problem. A cleri-
cal employee gave a written
complaint of sexual harassment to
her supervisor after several verbal
complaints received no action. The
supervisor wadded up the complaint,
threw it in the trash, pointed at the
door and said, “This is total [BS]! I
want you out of here and never want
to see you again!” The employee left,
assuming she was fired. Two days
later, the company’s HR director
learned of the incident, called the
employee, informed her she was not
fired and asked her to come back.
She refused, claiming that she could
not reasonably re-enter the environ-
ment after what occurred. She sued
for Title VII retaliation. The court
ruled that there was a valid claim
of retaliation. The supervisor’s act
clearly violated Title VII. The com-
pany’s attempt to cure was too late
to overcome such an overt act by the
supervisor. Young-Lousee v. Graphic
Packaging Int., Inc. (8th Cir., 2011).
Family & Medical Leave Act
Faith-healing pilgrimage was
not covered by FMLA.
A
hospital employee was
denied FMLA to take
a seven-week overseas
trip for “faith healing” of her
husband’s heart and kidney condi-
tions. During the trip, they visited
churches and met with clergy but
saw no medical professionals. The
husband’s doctors provided no
medical verification for the leave,
and the cardiologist’s certification
stated the leave was not medi-
cally necessary for treatment. The
employee was discharged for
taking unauthorized leave, and she
sued for violation of her FMLA
rights. The court dismissed the
case, finding no medical founda-
tion for the leave. The court noted
the special FMLA exception for
Christian Scientists who reject
ordinary medical care and can be
guided in treatment by Christian
Science practitioners. However,
the plaintiff in this case was
not a Christian Scientist. Her
husband did not reject standard
medical treatment and had several
regular doctors. There is no other
religious exception in the
FMLA, so any leave must be for
verified standard medical treat-
ment. Tayag v. Lehey Clinical
Hospital (1st Cir., 2011).
Bob Gregg,
partner in Boardman
Law Firm,
shares his roundup of
diversity-related legal
issues. He can be
reached at rgregg@
boardmanlawfirm.
com
June_LegalUpdate_2.indd 153 8/5/11 2:00 PM
To learn more about effective diversity-management practices, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
T
H
E
I
N
S
I
D
E
V
I
E
W
BY WELDON H. LATHAM
Much has been written about diversity and inclusion (D&I) and affirmative-
action programs (AAP) in the workplace. Some mistakenly use the two terms
interchangeably. More attention needs to be given to how these two critical
corporate functions, each with unique histories, methodologies and objectives, can
harmonize their activities and more effectively support each other’s mission, while
achieving their vastly different objectives.
Affirmative
Action &
Diversity
154 DiversityInc
Coordinate diversity initiatives with affirmative-action compliance to
enhance results and reduce conflicts.
CDIVERSITY MANAGEMENTC
P
h
o
t
o
:

S
h
u
t
t
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s
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June_Weldon Latham.indd 154 8/5/11 2:00 PM
DiversityInc 155
C
ooperation must begin with a clear understanding
of the significantly different objectives of each func-
tion. Corporate D&I, when most effective, is a C-suite
operation directed at identifying and capitalizing on
rapidly changing marketplace and workplace demo-
graphics and the increasing influence and buying power
of Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American Indians, women and other groups.
These factors usually form the basis of a company’s business case for
diversity. While most D&I functions are not limited to employment mat-
ters, they clearly recognize the importance of D&I in the “war for talent.”
D&I may also address board-of-directors issues, procurement and sup-
plier diversity, government relations, philanthropy, communications and
the D&I relationship to other corporate functions. Successful corporate
D&I activities are as strategically important as product and branding
(and can positively benefit both).
Many sophisticated D&I efforts
are led by chief diversity officers or
equivalents, who are often direct
reports to the CEO and some of
whom serve on the CEO’s executive
committees. The D&I “workforce
component” addresses a wide array
of D&I people issues, including
representation (particularly among
Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American
Indians, women and other histori-
cally underrepresented groups),
and this is where some overlap
with the AAP function may exist.
The D&I workforce function cre-
atively advances strategic corporate
objectives by developing measures
to address D&I human-resource
needs, utilizing such tools as
benchmarking, outreach, targeted
recruiting, career development,
mentoring and other efforts to ef-
fectively develop the most diverse
and productive workforce.
Benchmarking Best Practices
Having advised more than 45 of
the nation’s largest companies on a
wide range of diversity matters, in-
cluding devising effective methods
to respond to reality-based analysis
of gaps in workforce representa-
tion, my group has helped create
many legally tested D&I best prac-
tices to address specific problems.
(In our experience, the most com-
mon issues of representation gaps
occur in the senior executive ranks
and the pipeline jobs that lead to
those most important positions.)
In fact, given the ever-improving
state of D&I performance in recent
years, many of our clients have be-
gun their search for the latest best
practices by utilizing DiversityInc’s
benchmarking service. Where our
clients have used DiversityInc
Benchmarking, it has helped us
assist those clients to tailor D&I so-
lutions to meet their specific needs,
e.g., to ameliorate gaps in repre-
sentation or address any number
of other D&I issues unique to their
organization.
The best CDOs creatively use
D&I achievement as a means to
enhance corporate performance
and marketplace success, but
they seldom have any role in
compliance.
A
ffirmative-action obligations, on
the other hand, are mandated for
the thousands of companies that do
business with our nation’s largest
consumer: the federal government.
These federal contractors are subject
to Executive Orders 10925 and 11246 (issued in 1961 and
1965, respectively) and their implementing regulations.
Corporate affirmative-action offices are typically
É
Corporate Diversity/Inclusion Mission
É
Affirmative-Action Compliance Mission
staffed with personnel operating in an “AAP compli-
ance” department, reporting to human resources, legal
and/or corporate compliance. Their focus is solely
compliance, i.e., ensuring that the company is minimiz-
ing legal liability by satisfying applicable AAP regulatory
requirements. They must stay abreast of regulations
issued by the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Federal
Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), which
administers and enforces affirmative-action require-
The best
CDOs
creatively use
D&I achievement
as a means to
enhance corporate
performance and
marketplace success,
but they seldom
have any role in
compliance.
June_Weldon Latham.indd 155 8/3/11 6:50 PM
To learn more about effective diversity-management practices, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
T
H
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I
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W
156 DiversityInc
ments. AAP regulations require federal contractors
to provide all U.S. citizens with a non-discriminatory
equal-employment opportunity, and they do so in
a formalistic, technical and legalistic manner. This
involves well-established procedures that every AAP
compliance office must follow, including developing the
required affirmative-action plans for Blacks, Latinos,
Asians, American Indians, women, individuals with
disabilities and covered veterans; statistically compar-
ing current “utilization” with labor force “availability”;
creating numerical “goals” for improving representation
where there is “statistically significant” underutiliza-
W
ith companies that have both D&I and AAP
compliance functions, an overlap can exist be-
cause both are seeking to improve underutilized
groups’ representation. The AAP compliance
function requires strict procedural adherence to
regulations and 50 years of precedent. The D&I
function is helping to achieve the business case for diversity as a corporate
imperative and must utilize new and creative thinking to address a dynamic
demographic and economic environment to help the company succeed in
the marketplace. The potential for conflict is obvious, given the extremely
different objectives, methods and historical context, as well as the practical
differences of corporate “silos,” where D&I and AAP compliance are usu-
ally managed independently and neither collaborates nor coordinates their
activities. All these circumstances can lead to problematic disconnects—for
example, the D&I and AAP teams having differing workforce representation
objectives (e.g., hiring goals), and remedial versus action plans.
The AAP compliance function requires strict procedural
adherence to regulations and 50 years of precedent.
The D&I function is helping to achieve the business case for diversity
as a corporate imperative and must utilize new and creative thinking
to address a dynamic demographic and economic environment
to help the company succeed in the marketplace.
} {
tion; and conducting “adverse impact analyses” of
various personnel activities, such as hires, promotions
and terminations, to identify and facilitate elimination
of barriers to equal opportunity. Affirmative-action
plans typically include a description of specific reme-
dial measures directed at improving representation of
underrepresented groups. Many companies regard AAP
compliance in minimalist fashion, doing the minimum
required by regulation to minimize corporate legal li-
ability. Their efforts are strictly compliance and are not
intended, as in the case of D&I, to be creative or expan-
sive in maximizing corporate marketplace success.
Consider the following hypo-
thetical situation: The CDO of a
certain company has analyzed the
workforce and has determined
that Latinos are underrepresented
at the senior-manager level. The
reality-based representation-gap
analysis and basis for the CDO’s
determination might include
studies of market-research trends,
customer demands, low current
Latino representation, availability
of Latino senior managers, the
company’s strategic-planning
É
Areas for Collaboration
objectives, relationships with
Latino organizations, and other
real factors—all appropriate, but far
beyond the formalistic “utilization
vs. availability” analysis required
by the AAP regulations. The CDO
appropriately communicates the
goals, objectives and methodologies
to the CEO, HR and senior manage-
ment, and they are included in
the performance objectives of key
leadership. At the same time, AAP
compliance has used the OFCCP
utilization methodology and has
concluded that there is no Latino
underrepresentation (based on
the minimalist methodology and
applicable national, not local,
availability statistics) requiring the
setting of a lower goal, but there is
female underrepresentation using
the same standard. The AAP group
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T
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To learn more about effective diversity-management practices, visit
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
158 DiversityInc
John M. Bryson II and Michael R. Hatcher of Jackson Lewis LLP contributed to this article.
WELDON LATHAM
is a senior partner in the Washington, D.C., regional offce of Jackson Lewis LLP,
chair of the frm’s corporate diversity counseling group, and counsel to the PepsiCo
Global Diversity and Inclusion Governance Council and the Omnicom Group
Diversity Development Advisory Committee. He is also a professor teach-
ing corporate diversity at the Georgetown University Law Center.
sets its goal for improving female
representation, includes that goal
in its AAP, incorporates remedial
measures in the AAP, and notifies
executives and hiring managers.
These differing results could
cause problems: 1. Confusion as
to what the corporate goals and
methods are; 2. Reduced ability to
achieve either goal; 3. Possible legal
complications. In this instance,
D&I’s analysis showed under-
representation of Latinos but not
women, and the AAP compliance
office analysis showed under-
representation of women but not
Latinos. These conflicting signals
may well leave executives and hir-
ing managers confused as to what
are the corporate goals and ratio-
nale. If unresolved, this confusion
will likely depress performance
and results in both areas. With
respect to the legal complication, if
an employee or the EEOC were to
challenge an employment decision
made pursuant to either the CDO
or AAP methodology, the company
would need to explain its basis for
the differing results. While a clear
understanding of the differences
between D&I and AAP compliance
should carry the day, the problem
could unnecessarily give the
employee or EEOC some leverage
in arguing that the company has no
consistent policy or goals, where in
fact, the D&I effort has strong legal
authority (where it is not confused
with the AAP standard) and clearly
has a different legal standard. (See
“Workplace Diversity Programs:
Debunking 3 Myths” at www.
DiversityInc.com/workplace-
diversity.)
R
econciling the differences between D&I functions and
AAP obligations requires corporate-level coordination
and a clear understanding of the different objectives
and legal standards. Companies should first realize that
there must be a clear understanding by the two functions
about the relationship between D&I initiatives and AAP
obligations, which must then be effectively communicated throughout the
company. Without such awareness, there is potential for confusion among
managers and employees as to conflicting expectations, which impedes ef-
fectiveness and increases legal risk.
At a bare minimum, through a combination of C-suite, legal, human
resources, D&I and compliance interaction, and policy statements, the
two functions should be fully coordinated. AAP compliance should work with D&I in its development of AAP
remedial measures to ensure policy understanding. Differing approaches to workforce analysis, management
and enhancement should be reconciled to ensure not only a minimalist approach to compliance with federal
law but optimization of D&I performance. D&I efforts may well create aggressive action plans that are different
and go well beyond the AAP remedial approach; both, done well, can be different and legal.
In short, AAP compliance obligations must, of course, be satisfied by appropriate goal-setting and remedial
plans but should also be intelligently designed and coordinated with the broader, more aggressive strategic
business-success-driven motivations of D&I. Ideally, companies can successfully coordinate their two func-
tions to eliminate apparent inconsistencies and achieve both their quite different objectives.
DI
É
Ensuring Understanding
& Cooperation
Ideally,
companies
can successfully
coordinate their
two functions to
eliminate apparent
inconsistencies
and achieve both
their quite different
objectives.
June_Weldon Latham.indd 158 8/5/11 2:08 PM
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DiversityInc 161
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For more information, visit
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Rutgers Business
School Executive
MBAs in China
T
he Rutgers Business School has conducted executive MBA
programs in China since 1993, longer than any other American
university. Students in the U.S. Rutgers Executive MBA pro-
gram participate in a 10-day summer residency program in Beijing
and Shanghai to get a firsthand experience of the complex Chinese
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with business and government officials, and visits with their Rutgers-
China Executive MBA counterparts.

“Welcome to
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DiversityInc 163
Carolynn Johnson, executive vice
president, product development and
operations for DiversityInc (seated,
front row, seventh from left), traveled to
China as part of the Rutgers University
Executive MBA Class of 2012.
the Powerhouse”
June_Rutgers MBA.indd 163 8/5/11 2:08 PM
L
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Lisa Mink
Dell’s Diversity Leader
on Building Racial and
Gender Diversity in IT
CBRINGING BLACKS, LATINOS & WOMEN INTO ITC
D
ell made its entry onto
The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity list
this year at No. 30, but the
company faces the significant
challenge of promoting and
recruiting Blacks, Latinos and women in an
industry where the pipeline for that talent is
narrow, especially across the globe.
Lisa Mink, executive director, global diversity and
inclusion, brings her understanding of why it’s critical
for IT companies to help build the pipeline as early as
high school and college and to create inclusive envi-
ronments that foster collaboration and innovation.
“The concept of diversity is really about
organizational effectiveness—
how do we bring team
members together who
all have differences,
164 DiversityInc
BY JOY BUCHANAN
LISA MINK
TITLE
Executive Director, Global
Diversity and Inclusion
BIRTHPLACE
Honolulu, Hawaii
EDUCATION
Bachelor’s degree from the
University of Mississippi
June_Leadership.indd 164 8/5/11 3:54 PM
For more on diversity leadership, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/leadership
DiversityInc 165
bring awareness to that and create an
environment where all of them can do
their best work,” she says. “You can’t just
expect people to intuitively understand or
embrace difference. You have to manage it,
explain it, communicate and work through
it and be very intentional about it.”
Champion & Voice
Mink was acutely aware of differences at a young
age. Her sister, older than her by a little more than a
year, was born with severe developmental disabilities.
Children, adults and even family friends seemed to be
afraid of her, so Mink helped people understand those
differences and taught them how to treat her sister with
respect.
“A lot of what I remember was helping people
understand that this was a human being; this is why this
person is different; this is how you talk to
this person; this is how you communicate,”
Mink says. “I was her champion and her
voice, her guardian and protector.”
As an adult, Mink was not afraid to go
where she would be perceived as differ-
ent. At Dell, she took on three assignments
abroad—in the United Kingdom, Slovakia
and Amsterdam—and had to adjust her
own perceptions and understanding of
how people view the world.
On Sept. 11, 2001, she sat in a cafeteria
with some of her British colleagues and
remarked on the tragic events at the
World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in
Somerset County, Pa. She was surprised
by her coworkers’ reactions. “‘Please, the
rest of the world has been dealing with
this for hundreds, if not thousands, of
years, and you had one day? You need
to raise your awareness, you siloed
American,’” Mink recalls them saying. “I
realized this was going to be a learning
experience and a journey for me to
broaden my understanding.”
When she returned to the United States,
her mentor and sponsor encouraged her
to work in diversity, and she made the transition. “We
want people to be able to be who they are and bring that
to work,” she says. “I think that’s why this intentional
practice of managing diversity and bringing this concept
of inclusion into the workplace has really
gotten traction here at Dell.”
Global Diversity in IT
Sixty-five percent of Dell’s workforce
is outside the United States. The meaning
and importance of diversity—especially
around culture and gender—is important.
“The information-technology industry
does have a group of job families that historically, and
still, attracts young, Caucasian males: software, gaming
storage, the cloud,” Mink says. “We do acknowledge
that the available talent on the market of global women
and people of color is less, which is why we have to be
intentional in making sure we’ve got goals and have
specific plans around that.”
Dell also moved its University Relations & Diversity
Recruiting operations into the Global Diversity &
Inclusion function for the first time,
Mink says, a decision that the company’s
diversity council was deeply involved in
to place a focus on building a pipeline of
diverse talent. “It’s not just about grow-
ing high-level professionals into execu-
tive ranks, it’s how we build and attract
that pipeline from the very beginning,”
she says.
The company’s renewed efforts in
university relations led to the highest
number of summer interns it’s ever had:
nearly 170 students from 50 schools.
Dell did a lot of work on its
employee-resource groups, creating two
new global resource groups—there are
now seven—and expanding the women’s
network group to make it truly global.
The ERGs have more specific business
goals and the members function more
as thought leaders. One of Dell’s newest
ERGs, a generational-resource group
called GenNext, is testing products.
GenNext was featured in our ERG
best-practices article “Do You Need
a Generational Employee-Resource
Group?” For more on generational
ERGs, go to www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com/
ergs. “[Expanding the ERGs] has been very powerful,
and it’s really reinvigorated the excitement around the
ERGs,” Mink says.
DI

Dell
No. 30
in The 2011
DiversityInc
Top 50 Companies
for Diversity
I remember
helping people
understand
that this was
a human
being;
this is why
this person is
different;
this is how
you talk to
this person;
this is
how you
communicate.
LISA MINK
June_Leadership.indd 165 8/3/11 6:09 PM
L
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Donnie
Perkins
Chief Diversity
Officer of University
Hospitals, on
Managing Healthcare
Reform and an
Increasingly
Diverse Population
C
leveland’s University Hospitals,
No. 5 in The DiversityInc Top
5 Hospital Systems, has strong
commitment from CEO Thomas
Zenty III, a diversity council in
place to set an agenda for diver-
sity management, and a history of commitment
to providing culturally competent medical
care. But there are significant challenges facing
the system, including nationwide healthcare
reform, recruiting and advancing talent from
traditionally underrepresented groups and,
most importantly, eliminating health dispari-
ties, says Donnie Perkins, vice president for
diversity and inclusion.
Perkins sees those challenges as
opportunities. “We’re trying to identify
best practices around a number of areas
including health disparities, access and
cultural competency to ensure that we
provide the best level of patient care
that we can,” he says. Taking over the
“My life has
been about
helping to make
a difference for
those that are
underrepresented
and underserved
and helping
them to
achieve equal
outcomes.”
DONNIE PERKINS
BY JOY BUCHANAN
CBETTER HEALTHCARE THROUGH DIVERSITYC
166 DiversityInc
June_Leadership.indd 166 8/5/11 2:13 PM
For more on diversity leadership, visit
www.DiversityInc.com/leadership
DiversityInc 167
system’s diversity-management efforts earlier this year,
Perkins draws on his passion for education and his
experience in teaching and diversity management in
academia. He’s charged with identifying and
recruiting more Black, Latino and Asian
doctors out of medical school and creating
more diverse candidate slates for high-
level positions within the hospital system.
Higher Education
P
erkins’ personal definition of
diversity encompasses “our
differences and similarities,
including characteristics that we see and don’t see,
language, life experience, thoughts, ideas that make us
who we are,” he says. “The power is how we leverage
it to meet the goals of our respective organizations and
meet our own aspirations.”
He came to that definition through his
formal and informal education. His family
moved to Connecticut from North Carolina
when he was young. He attended Danbury
High School, where he played basketball
and baseball and did well in his college-
preparatory courses. Perkins wanted to go
to college, but a white guidance counselor
suggested he become a mechanic. His par-
ents rejected the suggestion. “They were
products of a racial society in the South. At
the time we left, there were still signs for
‘colored’ and ‘white,’” Perkins says. “They
encouraged me to continue, to go on to col-
lege. That’s what I wanted to do and that’s
what they were there to help me do.”
He attended Central State University, a
historically Black university in Wilberforce,
Ohio, and earned a bachelor’s degree in
education science. He taught science,
math and physical education and coached
in Connecticut public schools, primarily
to Black and Latino students with back-
grounds similar to his. He watched as some
of his most talented students missed out on
opportunities.
“Students I saw were very talented and
really possessed the abilities to succeed but were not
given equal chances to succeed because of their socio-
economic standing and their race or gender,” he says.
“Diversity came along as a means to not only assist
those students but to assist society in general.”
From Education to Healthcare
M
oving to healthcare from aca-
demia, he says, was a natural
progression. “My life has been
about helping to make a difference for
those that are underrepresented and
underserved and helping them to achieve
equal outcomes,” he says. “So there
is a clear stream—a thread—that runs
through all of this and the work that I do.”
At University Hospitals, Perkins stresses the
importance of observing and measuring outcomes
from diversity-management initiatives. It’s not
enough, he says, to set strategies without following
through and measuring the results. “What I learned
in my experiences in higher ed is that it’s
not enough to recruit and to retain. The
difference comes when you prepare stu-
dents for excellence both in the academic
arena and into their careers,” he says.
That same lesson applies to
healthcare. Perkins is first assessing
the hospital system’s recruitment
strategies and recruitment outcomes,
looking at where Black, Latino and Asian
candidates are succeeding in the process
and where they’re not and discovering
the reasons why.
Another possibility, Perkins says, is
establishing relationships with medi-
cal schools to reach Black, Latino and
Asian medical students very early in
their careers. “We want to provide qual-
ity, culturally competent patient care,”
he says. “A lot of the work we will do is
about building relationships that help us
recruit the talent that we need to provide
the level of excellent patient care that we
want to provide.”
He also encourages others in his
organization to develop ownership and
become champions for diversity and
inclusion. “There are no bystanders in diversity and
inclusion,” he says. “We all own and we all benefit
from this.”
DI

University
Hospitals
No. 5
in The DiversityInc
Top 5 Hospital
Systems
DONNIE J.
PERKINS
TITLE
Vice President for
Diversity and Inclusion
BIRTHPLACE
Bethel, N.C.
EDUCATION
Bachelor’s degree from
Central State University
in Wilberforce, Ohio;
master’s degree from
Rensselaer at Hartford,
a branch of Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute in
Hartford, Conn.
PHILANTHROPY
Serves on the board
of Cleveland School of
Science and Medicine,
a high school that
introduces students to
health and medical-
science professions
June_Leadership.indd 167 8/3/11 6:10 PM
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For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
CINDY BRINKLEY was appoint-
ed vice president, global human
resources at General Motors,
reporting to Chairman and CEO
Dan Akerson and serving on the
company’s executive operations
committee. Previously, Brinkley
was senior vice president, talent
development and chief diversity
officer of AT&T, No. 4 in The 2011
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity. Brinkley joined
AT&T in 1986 as an external-
affairs liaison to the Texas Public
Utility Commission and media
spokesperson for regulatory and
legislative activities relating to
the Texas Legislature. She later
became area vice president for
SBC California and then execu-
tive director of federal relations
for SBC Communications. She
holds a bachelor’s degree from the
University of Missouri-Columbia
and a bachelor’s degree from
Truman State University.
DEBBIE STOREY, formerly
senior vice president, centers
support, AT&T Services, suc-
CINDY BRINKLEY
LINDA JIMENEZ MARK KING
ceeded Brinkley as senior vice
president, talent development
and chief diversity officer, AT&T
Services. Previously, Storey was
vice president of Consumer Sales
SE/W Regions for AT&T and vice
president of merger integration
for BellSouth. Storey has a bach-
elor’s degree from the University
of Georgia. She earned her MBA
from the Terry College of Business
at the University of Georgia. Jamie
Butcher, formerly vice president of
customer sales and service, replac-
es Storey as senior vice president,
centers support, AT&T Services.
MARK KING was named senior
director and global head of diver-
sity and inclusion for Kellogg
Co., one of DiversityInc’s 25
Noteworthy Companies. He suc-
ceeds Nathalie Davis, who is now
the senior director of continuous
improvement and HR business
partner. King joined the Office of
Diversity & Inclusion as a busi-
ness partner in June 2009. Prior
to his new position, he was senior
diversity and inclusion business
partner. He received a bachelor’s
degree from High Point University
in High Point, N.C.
LINDA JIMENEZ of WellPoint,
No. 36 in The DiversityInc Top 50
Companies for Diversity, has been
named a vice president. Jimenez,
who is WellPoint’s chief diver-
sity officer, is responsible for the
company’s diversity-management
strategies and programs nation-
wide, including multicultural
marketing, diversity metrics, com-
munity relations and social respon-
sibility, and external branding.
Prior to joining WellPoint in
2007, Jimenez ran a consulting
firm and worked at Accor North
America and Abbott Labs/Ross
DEBBIE STOREY
168 DiversityInc
June_POTM.indd 168 8/5/11 2:18 PM
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For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
MAE A. DOUGLAS JOELLE HAYES
JACY HAEFKE
Products Division (now Abbott
Nutrition, a division of Abbott, No.
24 in the DiversityInc Top 50).
She also practiced labor and
employment law for 20 years
before becoming a diversity
practitioner. Jimenez earned
a bachelor’s degree from the
University of Texas at Austin and
a Juris Doctor from the University
of Texas School of Law.
Eastman Kodak Co.’s board of
directors elected AUGUSTIN
MELENDEZ as a vice president.
Melendez joined Kodak in 2000
and has been chief diversity and
community affairs officer and the
director of the Human Resources,
Graphic Communications Group
since January. Prior to Kodak,
Melendez held senior human-
resources roles at several com-
panies as well as the Rochester
City school district. He has two
bachelor’s degrees from Wagner
College and a master’s degree from
St. John Fisher College.
The National Association
for Multi-Ethnicity in
Communications (NAMIC) named
MAE A. DOUGLAS, execu-
tive vice president and chief peo-
ple officer, Cox Communications,
as the recipient of the Friend
of NAMIC Award. Douglas has
served as vice chair of the NAMIC
board of directors and as a plan-
ning committee co-chair for the
annual NAMIC conference. Cox
Communications is No. 20 in the
DiversityInc Top 50.
JOELLE HAYES has been
promoted to vice president of
enterprise diversity and inclusion
for The Travelers Companies.
Hayes partners with business
leaders to implement Travelers
Diversity Business Networks,
voluntary employee-led groups
whose goal is to increase retention
and talent development. Hayes
joined Travelers in 2007 to lead
the company’s diversity efforts.
She holds a bachelor’s degree from
Brown University and masters’
degrees from Syracuse University
and Harvard University’s Graduate
School of Education.
JACY HAEFKE has been
appointed director of diversity
and workforce effectiveness for
Rockwell Collins, No. 42 in the
DiversityInc Top 50. Haefke is
overseeing the Office of Diversity,
employee on-boarding, perfor-
mance management, succession
planning, employee engagement
and organizational culture. She
has worked at Rockwell Collins
for four years, serving in a number
of human-resources leadership
positions. Haefke has a bachelor’s
degree from Northeastern Illinois
University and is completing her
executive MBA at the University
of Tennessee.
AUGUSTIN MELENDEZ
170 DiversityInc
June_POTM.indd 170 8/5/11 2:19 PM

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century leaders and global thinkers, is all about beginnings.
Our whole reason for existence is to help young women
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What would you really like to do?
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JUAN CARLOS MORALES
will join State Street Corp. as
senior managing director and CFO
of State Street Global Advisors
(SSGA). He will lead a team with
locations in Boston, London,
Paris, Sydney and Hong Kong.
Prior, Morales served as chair-
man of the board of directors
and president of BNY Mellon
Mexico, NA. He is also a member
of PRIMER, a network of Latino
business and professional leaders
and a DiversityInc partner. Luke
Visconti, CEO of DiversityInc, is
also a member of PRIMER.
TERRI DAVIS has been named
Rutgers Business School’s
Scholars Training and Enrichment
Program (STEP)’s executive direc-
tor. She came to the university
as New Jersey’s first state train-
ing coordinator for AmeriCorps.
Davis has served as the associate
director for the Rutgers MBA
Career Services Office as well as
the career-placement coordina-
tor for the graduate programs at
the School of Communication and
Information. She holds a bache-
lor’s degree from Spelman College
in Georgia and a master’s degree
from Old Dominion University in
Virginia. She is also a candidate
for a doctorate in education from
Nova Southeastern University in
Florida.
SANDRA EVERS-MANLY,
vice president of corporate
responsibility at Northrop
Grumman Corp. and president
of the Northrop Grumman
Foundation, was honored by
the Anti-Defamation League
for her professional and
philanthropic dedication to the
Los Angeles community at its
17th annual Deborah Awards
Women of Achievement Dinner.
The organization’s awards are
presented annually to women
whose leadership in their
professions and civic contributions
exemplifies the qualities and ideals
of the Anti-Defamation League.
Northrop Grumman Corp. is No. 37
in the DiversityInc Top 50.
The Women’s Business Enterprise
National Council (WBENC)
named PAMELA PRINCE-
EASON president and CEO.
Prince-Eason was chair of the
WBENC board of directors and
most recently was vice president
of worldwide procurement for
Pfizer, one of DiversityInc’s 25
Noteworthy Companies. Prince-
Eason has also represented Pfizer
on the WBENC board as treasurer,
chair and vice chair of the finance
committee, as well as chair of the
technology and audit committees.
Prince-Eason holds a bachelor’s
degree from East Tennessee State
University. She graduated magna
cum laude from Johns Hopkins
University in Baltimore with a
master’s degree.

SANDRA EVERS-MANLY JUAN CARLOS MORALES
For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
172 DiversityInc
PAMELA PRINCE-EASON
TERRI DAVIS
June_POTM.indd 172 8/5/11 2:19 PM
August 24-26, 2011
Chicago, IL
Within the current competitive global
business environment, business success
is reached only by those who can plan,
place and manage their talent
and understand their potential all while
aligning them to the organization's goals.
Elisa Bannon
Vice-President Talent Development
Wireless Vision
Warren Lindley
Divisional Vice President, Organization
Design and Effectiveness
Walgreens
Jamillah Green-Davis
Director, Leadership Development
Cardinal Health
Marko Satarain
Director, Performance
and Engagement Recognition
GAP
Jaci Edgeworth
Director, People Potential
Lululemon Athletica
Meg Roman
Organizational Development Specialist
Kohler
Krysten Lytle
Organizational Development Manager
Kohler
Lisa Fitterer
Director, Talent Management,
Diversity & Inclusion
Navistar
Daniel Silberman
Director, Leadership Development
Quest Diagnostics
Dean Carter
Vice President, Talent Management
Sears Holdings Corporation
Bob Morris
Global Organization Development
and Effectiveness Group
Celgene Corporation
Greg Roche
Vice President, Human Resources
AIMCO
TBA
Senior Level Talent Management Leader
MTV
Richard Wacher
Vice President of Leadership Development
Danaher
Alejandro Morales
Talent Assessment Expert
Hewlett-Packard
TJ Hammond
Vice President, Talent Management
United States Strategic Command
Lori Muehling
Director, Organization Effectiveness
and Talent Management
Exelon Corporation
Fabio Sala
Director, Organization Development
EMC
Confirmed Speakers Include:
Successfully Developing and Managing Talent and Leadership
Programs to Enhance Competition While Driving Business Goals
7th Annual
Strategic Talent Management & Leadership
Development Conference
Who Should Attend:
Media Partners:
• Talent Management
• Leadership Development
• Talent Planning
• Talent Development
• Workforce Management
• Succession Planning
• Learning & Development
• Corporate University
• Organizational Development
• Organization Effectiveness
• Talent Acquisition
• Employee Experience
• Talent Lifecycle
• Employment Branding
• Internal Branding
Attending this Premier marcus evans
Conference will Enable:
• Connecting talent management strategies to the business
development strategies
• Creating and Implementing a multifaceted leadership
development strategy that contributes to overcoming
various business challenges
• Strengthening the internal brand while driving
a culture that prioritizes talent performance and
leadership development
• Developing high potential talent management
programs that can grow and overcome future challenges
of the organization
• Redesigning and Transforming current talent management
programs to increase effectiveness
• Positioning the employee value proposition where career
development & planning are key drivers
marcus evans invites SVP’s, VP’s, Directors
and Senior Managers in:
For More Information,
Please Contact: Michele Westergaard
T: 312 540 3000 ext. 6625
E: Michelew@marcusevansch.com
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JORGE BENITEZ has been
named managing director of North
America and chief executive of the
United States at Accenture. He will
succeed Robert Frerichs, who will
work with Accenture CEO Pierre
Nanterme on strategic initiatives.
Benitez has primary responsibility
for Accenture’s business and
operations in North America.
Benitez served as chief operating
officer of Accenture’s products
operating group, the largest of
the company’s five operating
groups. Accenture is No. 23 in the
DiversityInc Top 50.
DEBRA L. REED has been
elected Sempra Energy’s CEO and
a new member of the company’s
board. She has been executive
vice president of Sempra Energy
since April 2010 and previously
was president and CEO of San
Diego Gas & Electric and Southern
California Gas Co., Sempra
Energy’s regulated California
utilities. Reed serves on the
boards of Halliburton Co., Avery
Dennison Corp. and the San Diego
Regional Economic Development
Corp., as well as on the advisory
councils of University of California
San Diego’s Jacobs School of
Engineering and the Precourt
Energy Efficiency Center at
Stanford University. She graduated
summa cum laude from the
University of Southern California
with a bachelor’s degree in civil
engineering.
PricewaterhouseCoopers’ LARRY
PATRICK has been named a
partner in the Advisory Health
Industries practice. He serves
clients locally and nationally,
providing expertise in strategy,
corporate finance and financial
analysis to help clients execute
on large-scale transformation
projects. Patrick earned a
bachelor’s degree from Auburn
University and holds an MBA from
the University of Texas at Austin.
PricewaterhouseCoopers is No. 3
in the DiversityInc Top 50.
NEREIDA “NEDDY” PEREZ
has been named vice president
of diversity and inclusion for
Ingersoll Rand. She joined
Ingersoll Rand from National Grid,
a gas and electric utility company,
where she served as vice president
of inclusion and diversity and
was responsible for developing
and leading the company’s
diversity strategy. Perez received
a master’s degree from Nova
Southeastern University in Florida
and a bachelor’s degree from the
University of Florida.
Sodexo has appointed MOSTAFA
ABDELGUELIL diversity-relations
manager in the Office of Diversity.
He is responsible for advancing
Sodexo’s diversity and inclusion
strategy by providing direction and
strategic support to local, regional
and national community partners.

For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
174 DiversityInc
JORGE BENITEZ
NEREIDA “NEDDY” PEREZ LARRY PATRICK
DEBRA L. REED
June_POTM.indd 174 8/5/11 2:20 PM
EDUCATION IS OUR PITCH
As a Jackie Robinson
Scholar, you never
walk alone.
Since 1973, nearly 1,400 Jackie Robinson Foundation
(JRF) scholars have walked on the shoulders of these
and other great heroes.
Described in The New York Times in 2008 as what “might
be the best educational effort in the country,” JRF is a
national, not–for–profit, organization founded in 1973 as a
vehicle to perpetuate the memory of Jackie Robinson through
the advancement of higher education among underserved
populations. Distinctively, JRF provides generous four–year
college scholarships in conjunction with a comprehensive
set of strategies, skills and opportunities to highly motivated,
disadvantaged students of color to ensure their success in
college and to develop their leadership potential. JRF’s hands–
on, four–year program includes internship placement, peer and
professional mentoring, leadership training, international travel
and community service opportunities, and a myriad of other
networking outlets. JRF’s strategic combination of financial
assistance and support services results consistently in a nearly
100% college graduation rate. In 2007, JRF launched the “Extra
Innings” Fellowship Program, offering graduate school funding
and operating under the same successful program model.
One Hudson Square, 75 Varick Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10013-1917
T 212.290.8600 | F 212.290.8081
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Los Angeles, CA 90071
T 213.330.7848 | F 213.330.7701
www.jackierobinson.org
Stay Connected
Join the Jackie Robinson Foundation on
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June.2011 Ads.indd 35 7/8/11 9:17 AM
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MOSTAFA ABDELGUELIL
Abdelguelil served as corporate rela-
tions and communications manager
with Sodexo’s premier strategic
partner, the Hispanic Association on
Corporate Responsibility (HACR).
Sodexo is No. 2 in the DiversityInc
Top 50.
ALICIA ABELLA has been appoint-
ed to the Presidential Advisory
Commission on Educational
Excellence for Hispanics. She is
executive director of technical
research at AT&T Labs and works to
encourage Blacks, Latinos, American
Indians and women to pursue
careers in science, technology, engi-
neering and math. AT&T is No. 4 in
the DiversityInc Top 50.
ESPN has hired EDWIN GARCIA
as vice president of diversity and
work/life programs. He’s respon-
sible for developing and promoting
a global diversity strategy, part-
nering with ESPN’s employee-
resource groups and corporate
diversity council, and enhancing
the company’s wellness and work/
life programs and services. Garcia
is a member of the senior human-
resources leadership team and will
advise senior management on issues
of workforce diversity and change
management. He is also a member of
PRIMER. Garcia holds a bachelor’s
degree from the University of Puerto
Rico, Rio Piedras, as well as a mas-
ter’s degree, doctorate and an MBA,
all from the University of Texas.
KELLY GRAY has been promoted
to senior vice president of human
resources with FedEx Ground. She is
responsible for executing and over-
seeing compensation and benefits for
a team of more than 70,000 members
nationwide. Gray also oversees HR
administration, employee informa-
tion systems and recruitment for the
company, and she provides leader-
ship for continued execution of the
corporate diversity strategy. She
holds a bachelor’s degree from the
University of Alabama.
GEORGE SCURLOCK has been
named director of diversity of the
Metropolitan District. He is respon-
sible for both internal diversity,
including employee demographics
and corporate culture, and exter-
nal diversity, primarily supplier
diversity. Scurlock was previously a
senior diversity consultant at Aetna,
No. 19 in the DiversityInc Top
50. Scurlock holds an MBA from
Harvard Business School.
DI

For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
176 DiversityInc
GEORGE SCURLOCK EDWIN GARCIA
KELLY GRAY ALICIA ABELLA
June_POTM.indd 176 8/5/11 2:21 PM




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For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
178 DiversityInc
USBLN Corporate Disability
Employment Summit
WASHINGTON, D.C. DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti
delivered the keynote address on “Disability and Inclusion
Across the Enterprise” at the US Business Leadership Network
(USBLN)’s Corporate Disability Employment Summit on
April 12. Visconti also moderated the panel that followed,
which included Frances W. West, worldwide director, Human
Ability & Accessibility Center, IBM Corp., No. 7 on The 2011
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list, and Lori
Golden, AccessAbilities leader, Ernst & Young, No. 5 in the
DiversityInc Top 50.
GLSEN
Respect Awards
NEW YORK The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education
Network (GLSEN) held its New York Respect Awards
on May 23, with significant corporate attendance,
including Sodexo, American Express, KPMG,
Ernst & Young, Merck & Co., AT&T, Time Warner
and JCPenney (Nos. 2, 13, 29, 5, 15, 4, 28 and 35,
respectively, in the DiversityInc Top 50). DiversityInc
Senior Vice President and Executive Editor
Barbara Frankel was the co-chair of the event and
serves on GLSEN’s national board of directors.
JOIN DIVERSITYINC AT OUR NEXT EVENT
Building Value: How to Make Diversity Mission Critical
At DiversityInc’s Nov. 9–10, 2011, event at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., the focus will be on diversity management and what
makes it essential to companies’ successes. You’ll hear from CEOs of leading companies about how they use diversity in the workplace
to drive marketplace goals. They’ll also discuss what they need and want in a chief diversity offcer. Our two-day program, which will
start on the afternoon of Nov. 9, will provide a mix of high-level speakers, interactive panels, and plenty of time for networking with your
peers. No consultants will be allowed during the day-long learning sessions.
Visit www.DiversityInc.com/events for the full agenda and to register.
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Respect Awards in
New York City
Luke Visconti
speaks at the
USBLN Corporate
Disability
Employment
Summit in
Washington, D.C.
COMING UP
NOV. 9–10,
2011
WASHINGTON
D.C.
June_People&Events.indd 178 8/3/11 6:22 PM
DiversityInc 179
American
Association for
Affirmative
Action Summit
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. The
American Association for
Affirmative Action (AAAA)
presented DiversityInc’s Visconti
with the Champion of Diversity
Award on June 30. The AAAA
is a nonprofit association of
professionals working in affirmative
action, equal opportunity and
diversity. The summit focused
on the future of civil-rights
enforcement activities. This year’s
summit was co-sponsored by the
New Jersey Affirmative Action
Officers’ Council.
Hispanic Association on
Corporate Responsibility
Symposium
WASHINGTON, D.C. Visconti was the lunch keynote speaker at
the Annual HACR Symposium: The Power of Hispanic Inclusion on
May 3. He conducted an interactive poll of the symposium audience’s
“Perceptions on Diversity in Corporate America.” The symposium
focused on effective strategies for achieving greater inclusion and
participation of Latinos in the areas of employment, procurement,
philanthropy and governance.
Prudential’s ‘Exploring
the African American
Financial Experience’
NEWARK, N.J. Prudential’s Black Leadership Forum, an employee-
resource group that focuses on the company’s business and
philanthropic outreach to Blacks, hosted an event for the release
of Prudential’s research study “The African American Financial
Experience” on April 27. Prudential is No. 16 in the DiversityInc Top 50.
Joy Buchanan, managing
editor of DiversityInc
(left), with Alicia Rodgers
Alston, director of
global communications,
Prudential Financial
Luke Visconti
at the Annual HACR
Symposium
June_People&Events.indd 179 8/5/11 2:14 PM
For more on diversity management, go to
www.DiversityIncBestPractices.com
180 DiversityInc
ING Corporate
Responsibility and
Multicultural Affairs
Symposium
ATLANTA DiversityInc’s Visconti, on
May 19, spoke about inclusiveness as a
business strategy at the annual Corporate
Responsibility and Multicultural Affairs
Symposium sponsored by ING, one of
DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies.
Visconti also talked about how companies can
make the DiversityInc Top 50. ING executive
leadership, the top 120 senior leaders at
ING and employee-resource-group leaders
attended the event.
Kraft Women’s
Sales Council
CHICAGO DiversityInc’s Frankel addressed
Kraft Foods’ employee group of women in
sales positions on May 17, discussing the best
practices of companies that promote and
retain women, especially women with families,
in revenue-generating positions. Kraft Foods is
No. 9 in the DiversityInc Top 50.
Members of PSEG’s LGBT resource group, GaLA (left to right)
Lori Gray, Jeff Smith, Sally Nadler, Deb Spell, Wendy Kennedy and Karen Noe,
standing with former Army Lt. Dan Choi
Diversity Leadership
Council at Blue Cross and
Blue Shield of Michigan
DETROIT Visconti addressed the Diversity Leadership Council,
diversity champions and human-resource leaders and directors
of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan on April 7. Visconti was
introduced by Joseph H. Hohner, senior vice president, chief
of staff and chief information officer, Blue Cross and Blue
Shield of Michigan. President and CEO Daniel Loepp attended
the event. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan is No. 3 in The
DiversityInc Top 10 Regional Companies.
PSEG
Diversity and
Inclusion
Speaker Series
NEWARK, N.J. LGBT advocate
Lt. Dan Choi was the year’s
first speaker in PSEG’s annual
Diversity and Inclusion Speaker
Series. More than 100 PSEG
employees, including members
from seven of the company’s
nine employee-resource groups,
attended. Formerly in the Army,
Choi was promptly discharged
under “don’t ask, don’t tell” in
2009 after he came out on “The
Rachel Maddow Show.” The
17-year-old law was repealed
late in 2010.
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Luke Visconti with
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workforce diversity
and inclusion, BCBS
of Michigan
June_People&Events.indd 180 8/3/11 6:23 PM
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June.2011 Ads.indd 39 7/11/11 12:21 PM
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182 DiversityInc
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AAA Northern California,
Nevada and Utah ........................................................100
Abbott ...................................... 11, 28, 64, 96, 112, 170
Accenture ............................................... 28, 64, 118, 174
Accor North America .............................................. 168
Aetna .................................................. 28, 60, 98, 111, 124
Allstate Insurance Co. .....................................28, 84
Altria Group ........................................................................... 92
Ameren ......................................................................................100
American Association for
Affirmative Action .....................................................179
American Association of
People with Disabilities ........................................ 62
American Civil Rights Institute ........................5
American
Express Co. .... 28, 54, 96, 103, 112, 124, 178
American Foundation
for the Blind .........................................................................80
American Indian College Fund ...................... 52
American Indian
Scholarship Fund ..........................................................84
Ameriprise Financial ................................................ 118
Archer Daniels Midland ....................................... 113
ASCENT .........................................................................................5
Asian and Pacific Islander American
Scholarship Fund ..........................................................84
ASPIRA Association .......................................... 56, 62
AT&T ......................... 28, 38, 94, 119, 139, 168, 178
Automatic Data
Processing ................................... 28, 59, 78, 96, 103
Avon ............................................................................................... 112
AXA Equitable
Life Insurance Co. ..............................................28, 88
B
Bank of
America .............................. 28, 52, 91, 94, 118, 124
BASF Corp. ........................................................ 35, 92, 118
Bennett College for Women ............................ 171
BJ’s Wholesale Club .................................................. 112
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of Florida ..............................................................................100
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of Michigan ......................................................... 100, 180
BlueCross BlueShield
of North Carolina .......................................................100
Blue Cross Blue Shield
of Rhode Island ............................................................100
Boehringer Ingelheim ................................... 92, 118
Booz Allen Hamilton ............................... 28, 57, 72
Boys & Girls Clubs .....................................56, 60, 72
Brigham and Women’s Hospital ................100
Brown-Forman Corp. ................................................. 92
C
Campbell Soup Co. ...................................................... 113
Capital One.................................................................. 92, 118
Career Opportunities
for Students with Disabilities ...........56, 108
Cerebral Palsy of North Jersey ....................... 62
Children’s Defense Fund........................................ 56
Chrysler Group ....................................................... 28, 90
Citigroup .................................................................................. 112
Cleveland Clinic .............................................................100
CNN ...............................................................................................123
Colgate-Palmolive Co. ............. 28, 50, 96, 140
College for Every Student .....................................50
Comcast Corp. ......................................................... 92, 119
Comerica .................................................................................... 92
Congressional Black Caucus ...................66, 86
Congressional Hispanic Caucus ................... 86
Consolidated Edison Co.
of New York ......................................................................100
Cox Communications .............. 28, 60, 94, 170
CSX Corp........................................ 28, 39, 58, 94, 103
Cummins .............................................................. 28, 58, 118
D
Darden ........................................................................................ 112
Dartmouth College ............................................................5
Dell ..............................................................................28, 70, 118
Deloitte .............................................. 28, 46, 53, 96, 112
DesertArc ..................................................................................80
Dress for Success ............................................................. 88
DuPont ........................................................................................ 113
E
Eastman Kodak Co. ...................85, 113, 118, 170
Eli Lilly and Co. ...........................................28, 80, 118
eMarketer .............................................................................. 124
Emma Bowen Foundation .................................... 86
Employment Horizons ............................................. 62
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission .............................................................................5
Ernst &
Young ..........28, 40, 61, 94, 118, 124, 140, 178
ESPN .............................................................................................176
Express Scripts ................................................................. 113
F
FedEx Ground ...................................................................176
Ford Motor Co. .........................................................28, 88
G
GameStop ................................................................................ 113
Gay and Lesbian Alliance
Against Defamation .........................................62, 80
General Electric ................................................................ 93
General Mills ..............................................................28, 68
General Motors ................................................... 118, 168
Georgetown University
Law Center ........................................................................ 158
GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight
Education Network) .................56, 71, 80, 178
Graduate Engineering and Science
Fellowships for Minorities ................................ 82
Great Minds in STEM ............................................... 78
H
Harris Interactive ........................................................ 125
Health Care Service Corp. ...... 28, 66, 73, 111
Henry Ford Health System ...............................100
Hispanic Association on Corporate
Responsibility ........................................................ 97, 179
Hispanic College Fund ............................................. 72
Hispanic Heritage Foundation
Education Scholarship ...........................................84
Hispanic Scholarship
Fund ........................ 52, 62, 66, 74, 82, 84, 86, 88
Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield
of New Jersey .................................................................100
Houston Chronicle ...................................................... 177
Howard University ......................................................143
HP .......................................................................................................94
HSBC – North America ........................................... 92
Human Rights Campaign ............. 60, 119, 123
Hyatt Corp. .............................................................................. 92
Hyundai Motor America ........................................ 95
I
IBM
Corp. .......... 28, 44, 96, 103, 112, 118, 124, 178
Independence Blue Cross ..................................100
Ingersoll Rand ...................................................................174
ING North America ...............................63, 92, 180
INROADS ............................................................................... 169
Insight St. Louis ................................................................ 82
J
Jackie Robinson Foundation .................78, 175
Jackson Lewis LLP .............................................. 5, 158
JCPenney .................................................. 28, 76, 96, 178
Johnson & Johnson ..................... 28, 42, 94, 112
K
Kaiser Permanente
................................. 14, 28, 32, 45, 94, 103, 112, 118
Kellogg Co. .........................................................79, 92, 168
KeyCorp .............................................................. 92, 113, 118
KPMG ........... 28, 49, 70, 98, 103, 118, 124, 178
Kraft Foods ........... 28, 37, 48, 96, 113, 139, 180
June_Index.indd 182 8/5/11 2:26 PM
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LatPro.com ............................................................................ 181
Leadership Education for
Asian Pacifics .................................................................. 112
League of United Latin
American Citizens ....................................................... 66
M
Macy’s ............................................................................................ 92
Madrinas ................................................................................. 159
Management Leadership
Tomorrow ..............................................................................84
Marcus Evans Group ................................................173
Marriott International ............... 28, 54, 65, 94
Martin Luther King
Memorial Project ................................................ 52, 78
Massachusetts General Hospital ..............100
MassMutual ........................................................................... 92
MasterCard Worldwide .............. 9, 28, 72, 112
McDonald’s .............................................................................94
Merck & Co.
.............................. 28, 56, 83, 94, 112, 118, 124, 178
MetLife ......................................................................................... 92
Metropolitan District ...............................................176
MGM Resorts International .............................. 92
Minority University Pledge ................................50
Missouri Business
Leadership Network ................................................. 82
Monsanto Co...............................................................28, 82
Motorola ................................................................................... 112
N
NAACP.......................................................................................... 38
National Academy Foundation ....................... 54
National Alliance for
Hispanic Health.............................................................. 56
National Association of Multi-Ethnicity
in Communications .......................................60, 170
National Black MBA Association ................ 54
National Business
Disability Council ......................................................... 74
National Council
of La Raza ................................................ 52, 60, 66, 86
National Gay and Lesbian Chamber
of Commerce ............................................................ 62, 74
National Gay and
Lesbian Task Force .....................................................80
National Hispanic
Corporate Achievers .................................................50
National Minority Supplier
Development Council.............................................. 54
National Security Agency ....................................101
National Society of
Black Engineers .............................................................. 82
National Society of
Hispanic MBAs ................................................................84
National Urban League ..................................52, 60
N (continued)
New Jersey City University ..............................157
New York City Hispanic Chamber
of Commerce ......................................................................50
NextGen Network .......................................................... 54
Northrop
Grumman Corp. ............................. 28, 78, 94, 172
Novartis
Pharmaceuticals Corp. ............. 28, 47, 62, 94
O
OfficeMax ............................................................................... 112
Omnicom Group ............................................................ 158
Organization of
Chinese Americans ........................................... 74, 88
P
Packaged Facts ................................................................. 124
Pathways to Independence ................................. 62
PepsiCo ......................................................................... 112, 158
Pfizer ................................................................................... 92, 118
PG&E Corp..............................................................................94
Presidential Advisory Commission
on Educational Excellence
for Hispanics ....................................................................176
PricewaterhouseCoopers
(PwC) ..........28, 36, 43, 94, 112, 124, 140, 174
PRIMER ...................................................................... 172, 176
Procter & Gamble .............. 28, 66, 94, 112, 140
Prudential Financial ................ 28, 56, 103, 179
PSEG ............................................................................................ 180
Push for Excellence ...................................................... 86
Q
Quest Diagnostics ......................................................... 112
R
Robert Half International ..................................... 89
Rockwell Collins...............................12, 28, 82, 170
Rutgers
University ......................... 134, 150–151, 160, 172
S
Salesforce.com.........................................................................5
San-Antonio Express News ..............................147
SC Johnson .................................................................... 28, 74
Scripps Networks ............................................................ 92
Seattle Times ......................................................................123
Sempra Energy ................................................... 100, 174
Society of Women Engineers............................ 82
Sodexo ....................... 28, 34, 51, 94, 124, 174, 178
Southern California Edison .............................100
Southern Company ................................ 55, 92, 103
Special Olympics .............................................................. 52
Staples ........................................................................................... 92
StarTribune ........................................................................... 121
S (continued)
Starwood Hotels &
Resorts Worldwide ............ 28, 74, 77, 96, 112
State Street Corp. ...........................................................172
St. Louis University ...................................................... 82
Sunoco ......................................................................................... 113
Symantec .................................................................................. 113
Synnex ......................................................................................... 112
T
Target Corp. ........................................................28, 69, 84
The Chubb Corp................................................... 92, 118
The Coca-Cola Co. .........................28, 52, 94, 118
The Dow Chemical Co. ............................................ 92
The PhD Project .............................56, 82, 114–115
The Walt Disney Co. .................................................... 92
The Williams Institute .......................................... 125
Thurgood Marshall College Fund ........... 122
Time Warner ...................28, 68, 78, 81, 118, 178
Time Warner Cable ............................................28, 86
TJX .................................................................................................. 113
Toyota Motor North America ...... 28, 41, 86
Travelers ......................................................................... 13, 170
Tyco International ......................................................... 92
U
UNCF.............50, 56, 66, 72, 76, 82, 84, 86, 88
Union Bank ..........................................................................100
United Services
Automobile Association ...................................... 113
University Hospitals ....................................100, 166
US Business Leadership
Network (USBLN) ...........................................99, 178
U.S. Census Bureau .........................................119, 125
V
Verizon Communications ................. 28, 62, 67
Virginian-Pilot Media Companies ........... 131
W
Walmart .............................................................. 33, 129, 145
Walter Kaitz Foundation ....................................... 86
WellPoint ..........8, 28, 76, 87, 111, 113, 118, 168
Wells Fargo
& Co. ....... 8, 28, 75, 80, 96, 112, 118, 124, 135
Whirlpool Corp. ..........................................28, 90, 118
Witeck-Combs Communications ............. 124
Women’s Business Enterprise
National Council ..........................................................172
World Institute on Disability ............................ 62
Wounded Warrior Project .................................... 58
Wyndham Worldwide ............................................... 92
X
Xerox ............................................................................................ 112
Y
Yahoo ............................................................................................ 113
June_Index.indd 183 8/5/11 4:21 PM
Can a White Man Speak With
Authority on Diversity?
Q
Upon returning to my office, re-energized by the DiversityInc event in March, I shared
the information you addressed during your talk [when you] spoke about DiversityInc
and mentioned your Ask the White Guy feature. When mentioning your feature to a
group of white female colleagues, one responded by saying, what does he (a white guy) have to
do with diversity; how does he create something like DiversityInc and how could he possibly
speak with authority about diversity?
A
I created DiversityInc as a conse-
quence of having my consciousness
raised by a friend, Tony Cato—at
the time, a fellow Naval Aviator. He helped
me start the thought process that led me to
where I am today. He didn’t have an agenda;
we were simply swapping stories as we
worked together, a consequence of
his volunteering to help me
when I was assigned to be
the Minority Officer
Recruiter in Naval
Recruiting District
New Jersey. Tony is
not a go-along-to-get-
along guy; he’s tough,
disciplined and very
smart. He told me
stories of being denied
fair treatment because
he’s Black. It took me
awhile to understand how
profound those stories are, but it
did sink in eventually. I learned to share his
indignation at poor treatment meted out as
a result of discrimination—and the damage
it does to our country.
White men are a part of diversity and
there is a great deal of diversity among
white men. I recently spoke to a group of
900 police and fire chiefs in Oregon—97 per-
cent white men. I made the point that they
might not think they have diversity as they
sit around the fire house or police station
and see nothing but white men—but some
of those white men grew up in single-parent
households, some grew up in large fami-
lies, some went to college on athletic
scholarships, some worked
their way through, and some
didn’t go at all. Some have
a gay brother, some are
gay themselves (and
perhaps closeted). I
told the chiefs that
they could utilize the
diversity they already
have to gain new per-
spective on problems
and in doing so would
better fulfill their missions:
to save lives. My point is that it
is not skin color, gender or orien-
tation that makes one “good at” managing
diversity; it is mindset.
This mindset for majority-culture people
requires an epiphany or an evolution in think-
ing that brings one to understand the extent
of the discrimination around all of us that is
perpetrated mostly by the majority culture.
184 DiversityInc
It is not skin
color, gender or
orientation that
makes one “good
at” managing
diversity; it is
mindset.
Guy
Ask the
Luke Visconti is CEO of DiversityInc
group
do wit
speak
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where
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184 DiversityInc
June_ATWG.indd 184 8/5/11 3:00 PM
Historic Perspective
Anyone can become “authoritative” about
diversity. Nobody comes to the table that
way. How you get there, in my opinion, starts
with understanding history. I’ve gained a lot
of perspective by reading books like Beverly
Tatum’s “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting
Together in the Cafeteria?” as well as Iris
Chang’s “The Chinese in America,” Isabel
Wilkerson’s “The Warmth of Other Suns,”
Douglas Blackmon’s “Slavery By Another
Name,” Ira Katznelson’s “When Affirmative
Action Was White” and Taylor Branch’s tril-
ogy on the civil-rights era.
History is important, but what I’ve found
transformative is personal involvement in
organizations that do not serve you directly
(by “you,” I mean loosely you as defined by
gender, race, orientation, etc.). For example,
I’m a trustee of Bennett College for Women,
a historically Black college, and I’m on the
foundation board of NJCU, a Hispanic-
serving institution. At Rutgers University
(where I am also a trustee), I co-chair the
fundraising committee for Rutgers Future
Scholars. We have raised $2 million in the
past three years. I donate all of my speaking
fees through the DiversityInc Foundation,
which has distributed more than $500,000
since 2006. The life experience I’ve gained by
serving these institutions has been invaluable.
Any executive can take the
same steps to broaden their
experience and cultural
competence. We see how people work so
hard to complete advanced degrees—and they
are important—but life experience is how an
executive does not become a Hosni Mubarak
as our country and world change dramatically.
This change is not just visual; it is about the
rising power of liberated people to destroy the
concept of “melting pot” as they gain the eco-
nomic ability to command respect—as they are.
‘Different Like You’
I will note that people who are not in the
majority culture must deal with the major-
ity culture as they try to retain their own
identity, but those in the majority culture do
not really have to deal with anything BUT
the majority culture (doesn’t make it right,
but this is the reality). In this country, the
majority culture is defined as white, male,
heterosexual, Christian and not having an
ADA-defined disability. But just because
a person in the majority culture starts out
with a much wider “blind spot” than people
not in the majority culture doesn’t mean it’s
impossible for white men to become open
advocates for diversity and inclusion. It
also doesn’t mean that a Black woman (for
example) comes with an automatic Ph.D. in
diversity management (it’s just a lot easier for
the Black woman to see the problem in the
first place). We must all come to the realiza-
tion that, as a reader put it nicely, “I am not
different than you, I am different like you.”

DI
What a great way to start
your day! I am just blown
away by this article. I hadn’t read
something so powerful and inspiring
about diversity for a long time. Thank you
so much for writing this. Everything you
said validated my feelings, thoughts and
experiences. I’m also considered a white
woman, but I’m an immigrant from the
Middle East and was a minority there.
I’m a diversity manager and have had to
tolerate many critical looks and attitudes
from Black and other ethnic-looking
coworkers who are wondering how I could
be possibly qualifed to do the work,
even though I have a graduate degree in
intercultural education. Again, thank you for
this thought-provoking and inspiring article.
Luke, you’ve done it again! Thank you. Your
insight is valuable. I agree that a white
person can talk about and teach diversity.
First of all, white is a race. And just because
someone is not a minority doesn’t mean they
can’t understand diversity or have not been
discriminated against. I receive questions,
as a Black woman, about why I hired a white
male as my assistant director. It was the best
thing I could have done. He’s compassionate,
educated about the laws and diversity issues,
and works extremely hard for those he feels
have been treated unfairly. Keep up the good
insights.
I agree. I’ve received this question to me
over the years as a white male conducting
training in EEO and diversity. It’s what each
person brings to the table based on their
life experiences, skills and one’s willingness
to step out of his or her comfort zone to
learn about bias. It all starts with me.
Thanks.
This column
generated
many reader
comments.
Here are a few
examples:
Have a
question
for Luke?
EMAIL HIM AT
askthewhiteguy@
DiversityInc.com
READ MORE
“Ask the White
Guy” articles
at www.DiversityInc.
com/atwg
?
DiversityInc 185
C
O
N
T
R
O
V
E
R
S
I
A
L
Q
&
A
June_ATWG.indd 185 8/3/11 5:56 PM
BUILDING EQUALITY
By What
Measurement
Can We Abolish
the Diversity
Department?
Q
How will we know that “democratizing” efforts have been
successful? Once success has been achieved (that is, when it is
the norm that opportunity is truly equal), does the need for a
“diversity-management department” go away?
A
This is an easy question to answer: If you believe all people
are created equally, then we’ll know we’re done with needing
a diversity department to help with equitable access and
talent development by measuring the results. Just a few examples
regarding gender:
É
Half (50 percent) of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies will
be women. Right now 12 of 500 company CEOs are women—2.4
percent. Practically speaking, half of America’s college-educated
workforce is women, and women have been earning more than half
of all bachelor’s degrees since 1980.
É
Half (50 percent) of board seats in Fortune 500 companies will be
held by women. Right now only 14 percent are.
É
Half of Congress will be women. Currently there are 14 women in
the House of Representatives, less than 3 percent. Interestingly, 17
percent of U.S. senators are women.
Aside from gender, I can give you endless examples of disproportion-
ate representation of white men in positions of power in this country
to the detriment of anyone not Christian, heterosexual, non-white (or
white Hispanic), or people with ADA-defined disabilities, etc.
186 DiversityInc
Corporations will always need diversity
departments. Why? To continually
encourage innovation and growth.
50
%
… of the CEOs
of Fortune 500 companies
will be women.
… of board seats
in Fortune 500 companies
will be held by women.
… of Congress will
be women.
Our society cannot
achieve maximum
innovation if broad
sectors of its population
are sidelined.
C
O
N
T
R
O
V
E
R
S
I
A
L
Q
&
A
CONTINUED
LUKE VISCONTI
June_ATWG.indd 186 8/3/11 5:56 PM
By the way, the United States leads the
world in human and civil rights; we’re the
best when you look at the entire picture.
When you get outside of this country, the
discrimination increases and you can see
this by measuring the representation of
the majority culture in positions of power in
every other region I can think of (for exam-
ple, how many non-Han Chinese people are
in positions of power in China? I’d imagine
there may be a few, but I’ve never seen one).
Even in the distant future when
companies are equitably recruited, talent
development is equally effective and
positions of power are equitably staffed,
there will still be a need for a diversity
department. Managing the relationships
between all the constituent groups is a
profit center; you can reduce workforce
costs by enhancing employee satisfaction
and engagement, increase the quality of
your revenue stream by building better
relationships with your customers, and
increase innovation by being able to utilize/
consider diverse approaches to solving
problems and accessing opportunities.
On a national basis, whether you are a
Keynesian or Supply-Side economist, the one
constant that grows economies is innova-
tion. Our society cannot achieve maximum
innovation if broad sectors of its population
are sidelined. We shortchange our own GDP
by being discriminatory.
Unless you have some secret that I don’t
know about, I am quite sure nobody alive
today will live to see equity, even in work-
force measures—but we can take deep
satisfaction in continuing that work and see-
ing our incremental growth as a society.
DI

I think that until
we in America
resolve our
problems
with race and
gender, there
will always
have to be some
mechanism for ensuring
affrmative employment and
INCLUSION in our society. While
it should be logical that more
women and people of color will
have to be included/“grown”/
recruited into our corporate
and other structures, if we are
to remain or become again
competitive, the legitimacy of
this rationale is continuously
bombarded by ignorance and
stupidity on the parts of those
who do not understand, or care
to understand, the dynamics
of maximizing productivity and
effectiveness.
My agency measurements in our
mission-critical job series meet or
exceed the relevant civilian labor
force for gender. We have pipeline
issues to work on and a cultural
diversity hill to climb. Our focus
is the maintenance of these high
levels of achievement, the security
of a diverse pool of employment
candidates, and the inclusion of
people with disabilities. I for one
would be happy to fnd a new
job if we fulflled our diversity
mission. Our focus on diversity is
to have the access to the unique
perspectives that come with a
diverse workforce to solve our
increasingly complex problems.
Beyond the compliance categories
of diversity, there are many other
diversity dimensions such as
geographic, speech, education,
etc. Even in a room full of white
men, there is great diversity.
There will always be a need for
a diversity department because
there are continuously new
underrepresented groups on the
horizon.
The reality is that we will always
be able to fnd examples of
“disproportionate representation,”
even in the far-off world of equality
that Luke alludes to. This is due
to statistical random fuctuations
that occur in the world. Rarely
in this perfect world would
any given offce, occupational
series, or GS level have exact
proportionate representation.
Having a statistician come in and
talk about statistical signifcance
won’t solve this problem because
there will always be fuke-y data
that produces bizarre outcomes
for no underlying reason other
than rare but existent random
fuctuations. This is a defciency
of the current system; we feel like
we have to explain each and every
deviation from our perfect world.
No Wall Street analyst would try to
explain precisely each and every
bounce the price of a stock took
throughout a trading day, but that
is basically what the premise of
this question assumes.
One of the best explanations I
have ever heard was from one
of our executive team members
when he was welcoming the
newly minted inclusion council
and giving them the reason
the executive team established
their group. He ended with, “And
when we get there, we may fnd
that ‘there’ has moved.” Truth is,
there will always be insiders and
outsiders, and someone will need
to mediate between the two. It’s
human nature.
Have a question
for Luke?
EMAIL HIM AT
askthewhiteguy@DiversityInc.com
READ MORE
“Ask the White Guy” articles at
www.DiversityInc.com/atwg
?
DiversityInc 187
This column
generated
many reader
comments.
Here are a few
examples:
June_ATWG.indd 187 8/3/11 5:56 PM
SEE OUR SPEAKERS & PROGRAM DETAILS AT WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS
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DIVERSITY
MISSION CRITICAL
LEARNING SESSIONS & AWARDS DINNER
NOVEMBER 9–10, 2011
RITZ-CARLTON

WASHINGTON, D.C.
EVENTS
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P
O
N
S
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NETWORK
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Our March event
SOLD OUT!
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NEW YORK CITY
ARN ENJOY &
June_EventAd.indd 61 8/5/11 2:42 PM
Also in this issue
Lisa Mink of Dell
Leverages Life Experience
to Build Racial & Gender
Diversity
LGBT Civil Rights
How Everyone Benefits,
How Same-Sex Marriage &
LGBT-Friendly Workplaces
Help ALL Your Employees
Meet the Rutgers
Future Scholars
Class of 2020
Donnie Perkins of
University Hospitals
on the Challenges for Hospitals
Facing Healthcare Reform and
an Increasingly Diverse
Patient Population
Decision Making,
Clarity of Values &
What to Do When It
Goes Horribly Wrong
Ask DiversityInc
We Answer Questions
About Supplier Diversity,
Reporting Data, How to Start
ERGs Based on Generations,
Disabilities & More
6%
3%
4.2%
2%
3%
New Department!
2
0
1
1
• D
I
V
ERS
IT
Y
I
N
C
S
P
E
C
I
A
L

A
W
A
R
D
Eight
Companies
Receiving
Special
Awards
CEOs & Top Execs
to Accept Awards at
Our Nov. 9–10 Event
How to Get, Keep
and Promote Women
in Sales
Here’s How to Do It Right
From Seven Companies
Banking Superwoman
Business & Career Advice From
Wells Fargo’s Lucia Gibbons
June_Cover5back.indd 60 8/8/11 10:57 AM

DiversityIncBestPractices.com is now a living textbook on diversity management.
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to diversity-management questions and strategies. The “living” part of the textbook means

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Talent Pipeline.CONTENTS SUMMER 2011 COVER STORY The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity 14 The survey. IN EVERY ISSUE | 4 READER COMMENTS | 8 CEO’S LETTER | 12 EDITOR’S LETTER | 182 COMPANY INDEX 2 DiversityInc . Employee-Resource Groups and (two companies) Diversity-Management Progress. There were 535 participants this year (up 19 percent) and there was considerable movement on the list. Corporate and Organizational Communications. Executive Development. 28 DiversityInc Top 50 Facts & Figures 32 DiversityInc Top 50 Company Profiles 102 DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards We honor eight companies for Community Development. now in its 12th year. 16 Improved Methodology 18 4 Case Studies: Why Companies Rise and Fall on the DiversityInc Top 50 Case studies of four companies and the impact of leadership and clear communications. divided into four key areas: CEO Commitment. Human Capital. is the leading assessment of diversity management in corporate America. Global Cultural Competence. Working Families. and Supplier Diversity. The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity survey is an empirically driven ranking.

Disabilities What’s the business case for employee groups based on age or disability? Here’s what the data shows and how other companies document success. Latino. Here’s how to do it right from seven companies.com/magazine DiversityInc 3 . Trends in DiversityInc’s Top Companies for Asian Americans What matters more for Asian-American employees: sheer numbers or the level of inclusion? Find out how DiversityInc rates companies. Clarity of Values and What to Do When It Goes Horribly Wrong Under the spotlight? Be careful how you react.THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITY 116 FEATURES 135 164 138 116 LGBT Civil Rights: How Everyone Benefits Same-Sex Marriage: What It Means to You When Should Your Company Take a Stand Against LGBT Bias? Timeline of Events Facts & Figures 109 Ask DiversityInc How Does DiversityInc Determine the Top 50? Can you game the DiversityInc Top 50? CEO Luke Visconti provides inside info on what you can— and can’t—do. Supplier Diversity in Health-Insurance Industry What lessons can health-insurance companies learn from three companies in the DiversityInc Top 50? 132 Decision Making.DiversityInc. 160 Rutgers Future Scholars Meet the Class of 2020 184 Ask the White Guy Can a White Man Speak With Authority on Diversity? By What Measure Can We Abolish the Diversity Department? ‘I Didn’t Get the Job Because I’m Black’ 162 Rutgers Executive MBA The Class of 2012 in China 154 Inside View Affirmative Action & Diversity 168 People on the Move 178 People & Events DiversityInc Magazine Online Would you like to get access to the latest issue of DiversityInc magazine as soon as it becomes available? Read every issue at www. Donnie Perkins of University Hospitals manages the challenges for a hospital system facing healthcare reform and an increasingly diverse patient population. 144 The Dangers of the Walmart Class-Action Decision The Supreme Court decision makes it all the more important for everyone to truly inspect their employers. Where’s the Diversity in Fortune 500 CEOs? There’s a dearth of Black. their vendors and their customers. Banking and Careers Wells Fargo Regional President Lucia Gibbons shares her experiences and career advice with DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti. 138 Successful Career Paths for Women in Corporate Sales Moving women into line-management jobs and REALLY letting them have work/life success doesn’t happen often. Asian and women CEOs running major companies—but the DiversityInc Top 50 companies have better stats. top left: Shutterstock 164 Diversity Leadership Dell’s Lisa Mink uses her life experience with difference and discrimination to build racial and gender diversity in IT. DEPARTMENTS How to Start ERGs Based on Generations. 135 Women. 152 Legal Update Photo. NEW! OUR ANALYSTS ANSWER YOUR DIVERSITYMANAGEMENT QUESTIONS 126 Diversity: The Driving Force of Innovation Academic research demonstrates how diverse teams solve more problems creatively than homogeneous teams. and use your values as a guide.

We cannot achieve fairness (a level playing field) by treating everybody the same. Here’s what DiversityInc readers had to say about the exchange: ANGER AT CONNERLY I commend you for inviting Ward Connerly and him for accepting the invitation. It is extremely difficult to separate Mr. Connerly from those elements— particularly on the right—who proffer him (and his views) as validation of their own false claims of victimhood and hateful rhetoric.4 DiversityInc Photos: Jamie Watts READERCOMMENTS Affirmative Action: Still Relevant? DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti invited antiaffirmative-action leader Ward Connerly to speak at our spring learning event. but instead of each side engaging in verbal bomb throwing. it appears that the debate over affirmative action will continue . Connerly talked about banning raceand gender-based affirmative action in college admissions and hiring.com comment Original articles and more: www. it is painful to see a Black man with over seven decades’ experience in America continue to espouse views and positions that are at once naive. “You [Connerly] want to fight hard to eliminate the solution before you eliminate the problem.” Since we didn’t hear their righteous indignation when the “unfairness” was on the other foot.com/ affirmative-action-articles . ill-informed and destructive.. it becomes obvious that fairness is not the issue with them at all.DiversityInc. Those who complain about affirmative action being unfair have no credibility because things never were “fair..” I doubt that the panel had any impact on Ward Connerly’s views. but as the positive impact affirmative action has had on business is the prevailing reality. perhaps the debate will be reshaped using the facts that numerous businesses have accrued over the years. I suspect Connerly will fade into what I believe will be a well-earned oblivion if not ignominy. Jonscott Williams To hear people talk about the unfairness of affirmative action is ridiculous. Nonetheless. Visconti led a panel of civil-rights experts and lawyers refuting Connerly. We were once told in a seminar for supervisors that the most unfair thing we could do in supervising a group of people is to treat everybody the same. That said. DiversityInc. This is the nature of affirmative action. I think the most cogent comment came from Weldon Latham of Jackson Lewis when he said.

and we can’t ensure fairness by merely doing nothing. Salesforce. Human beings tend to make subjective decisions. Latham Senior Partner. Weldon H. Dr. and let’s not make any laws so those folks we got so wealthy off of can catch up. uninformed and without compassion for those who are the objects of oppression. generational dynamic that was here before affirmative action and will be here after affirmative programs are gone or changed.READERCOMMENTS FROM LEFT: Ward Connerly President. DiversityInc. American Civil Rights Institute. company affiliation and title. suffering from current acts of discrimination. DiversityInc. Dartmouth College. there will always be a need for affirmative action to level the playing field.com. Ella Bell Professor. Until the above dynamics about race in this country are changed. ASCENT.” But we don’t live in a perfect world where everyone has an equal chance to compete. Gilbert Casellas Former Head of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Racism is a cultural.” Who would possibly be against such a utopic idea? The real world makes this lofty idealistic mantra sound naive. institutional. if applicable.com. Jackson Lewis.com comment I find it interesting that the memory of Connerly is so short. and Founder. Tuck School of Business. DiversityInc 5 . We reserve the right to edit all submissions. Luke Visconti CEO. Connerly also perpetuates “The BIG LIE”—that affirmative action is synonymous with “preferential CONTACT US We welcome your comments. DiversityInc. then diversity will be the outcome. In that case.” What is wrong with that picture? Robert Branscomb Connerly’s words sound like those of a beauty-pageant contestant: “My goal is to end all wars and world hunger. and we can’t rely on all people doing the right thing. yet the government let the people that oppose equal rights thrive for a couple hundred years. Lora Fong Corporate Counsel. So now he says the same government will do what is right without the use of law! Please allow me the opportunity to have free labor for 200 years and deny those workers education and related rights so I can become rich enough to say “I’m sorry. we wouldn’t need any government laws or policies. including affirmative action. Letters must include your name and.com comment NOT A PERFECT WORLD Ward Connerly states that “I’ve always believed that if everyone had an equal chance to compete and if we believe that we’re all created equally by the good Lord. He has forgotten that the Constitution was supposed to afford all Americans equal treatment. Email letters to editor@DiversityInc.

does not exist. As long as we have to ask the question about race. 6 DiversityInc Photos: Jamie Watts READERCOMMENTS . Connerly believes systemic and blatant racism would not find its way back into our culture (indeed. DiversityInc. Connerly of clear sight. offensively blind to the role affirmative action has played in his own rise to success. we have affirmative action to prevent discrimination. his reality? Joyce Pratt Audience members had some heated comments in response to Ward Connerly at our event. where we are all in a level playing field. now you get yours. next. one is compelled to analyze Connerly’s ability to accurately assess the “real world” or question if there is some other motive for his promotion of such absurdity. But I don’t think so. but what are his experiences. but don’t begrudge others who are still struggling to achieve and may and will need government assistance in order to do so. It is difficult for me to believe that Mr. Steven Gutierrez For a man who stands where he stands today—in this country. com comment Experience has proven that a colorblind state has only been achieved through “total blindness. career opportunity and wealth. Perhaps it would’ve been better—prior to making such a grand stand for the exact opposite of the still much-needed observance and adherence to federal diversity laws—that Connerly either tune in to CNN or the New York Post. Therefore. I say that I am happy you were able to achieve your successes. Mr. the United States should never have interfered with slavery. Experience has also proven that laws are often broken and just as we have police. courts and penalties to remedy violations. DiversityInc. ingrained and passed down for generations—it may be possible for today’s society to wipe the slate clean and become colorblind in all its institutions. incapable of the level of intellectual ability of any whites. The curse and blessing of privilege has robbed Mr.” Experience has proven that laws are made when the issues under their protection have been violated. [and third]. To Mr. the world that Connerly describes. By his logic. there will never be equal opportunity to assess the American dream. woman and child to negotiate their personal freedom from Southern masters who would without a doubt first weigh the economic consequences of freeing a slave to the widely held opinions of whites that Blacks were. Connerly’s perspective: I got mine. population who hold those beliefs.S. In a perfect world. Our efforts are not perfect nor totally successful. animals. rightfully owned chattel. discrimination and still widely held belief in white superiority from the minds of 50 percent of the U. false starts and self-entitled over-consumption in America to nurture this kind of idealism. both public and private. persecution. Linda L. Get real. This society is far from poised to apply his beliefs on affirmative action.AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: STILL RELEVANT? treatment. they are all we have. first. Connerly tells us of his beliefs.” Sadly. Connerly. That’s what he’s really saying. at this time in history—Ward Connerly is remarkably. with the same group outperforming in terms of education. Mr. The truth unfolds by following the “money trail. or maybe ask any Black person who crosses his path how that whole “birther” thing worked out for President Obama.com comment Allow me to translate Mr. Connerly. leaving each indentured man. Ridiculous! I suppose were this country somehow able to “forget” its 400+ years of history— wiping the legacy and memory of subjugation.” Review Connerly’s financial support and income growth since he began advocating this concept and the masked man is fully exposed. but until we find a better solution. Too many broken promises. his idealism would be ideal. I would argue that it has never left) full blown.

” I agree with the article. don’t forget there are atheists out there too. I shouldn’t have to worry about breaking some company policy. Barack Obama. hating gays). Just as I should be free to do that. but at work. Karen Sallis I have been against racism and discrimination for over 40 years. Also. living my own faith without cramming it down others’ throats should be allowed. those values aren’t welcome. but so is a female president. they are both long overdue..g.. My questions to Ward Connerly would be. I can’t tell you how often I have heard smart. and what do you do when you find bias and discrimination in hiring?” “Hiring the most qualified person” is a myth. others should be free to set aside time for prayer/fasting as they see fit. It always amazes me the misinformation that is presented as “fact” to keep the status quo in place.” If someone’s religious values are out of line with company values (e.Diversityinc. then tell them clearly that they can have their values. etc.READERCOMMENTS WHO REALLY BENEFITS? Responding to “who benefits. based on gender. everywhere and in every way! It is only then that we will truly be nearly as good as we so often arrogantly say we are! James Moyer Sr. Keep up the good work. Marine Veteran I would agree with Ward Connerly if bias in hiring didn’t exist. long before it was considered “OK” to do so. Jason [no last name given] Y Month/Month 000 . age. “What are you doing to erase bias and discrimination in hiring. I’m not saying that proselytizing should be allowed. and good Lord. a male and female Asian president. Ursula Burns.com/inclusive O ne’s religion usually makes up part of who one is. Surely. I applaud our first female AfricanAmerican CEO. April Klungland ou forgot “call a spade a spade. Let us celebrate our country’s diversity every day. educated people involved in the hiring process tell me why certain people are right for jobs. The efforts to be inclusive and encourage diversity in the workplace are GREAT but I believe in my heart that our society must embrace all people and cultures throughout our society. Second Generation U. but NOT just in the workplace. and our first biracial president.S. Thanks for the update. however. but assuming one can work five days a week without having some part of one’s religion seep through isn’t going to happen. Simma [no last name given] FAITH AT WORK Creating an Inclusive Environment for All Religions ORIGINAL ARTICLE www. I can see when we add the veterans who are given extra points into the equation that white men would outnumber white women. both a male and female Hispanic president. just as much as lifestyle and extracurricular activities. If I want to pray over my food before I eat it. My faith makes me who I am today. race. I had thought previously that it was white women who benefited the most. It’s very easy to forget that there’s a right to be atheist as well and people shouldn’t have to hide for what they don’t believe any more than for what they do believe. Saying that one should leave those at home is unreasonable. a male and female American Indian president.

I’ll bet it will be. by correlation. A senior executive of a firm at the top of our list asked me if I felt that the questions we ask on our survey end up directing the reality we measure. about one-third of the hands went up. Our ability to measure outcome as expressed in human capital (there are other measurements of the outcome of corporate culture.com/top50) has evolved over the past 12 years. of his community’s diversity and the need to focus on it—in the context of service. goalsetting and. but it is an evolution based on cause and effect. Danny Ludeman. Earlier in the year. Their president and CEO. he asked how many of the (mostly white) men had attended an employee-resource-group meeting.” Point made. structured mentoring. After I spoke. Management best practices. if we focus on management techniques like mentoring and employee-resource groups. 36 on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. Mr. employee-resource groups. Recently.. Ludeman said: “The next time we meet. In other words. what works. More than half of Fortune 500 companies had no diversity efforts. isn’t that what we end up seeing in our numbers? No doubt there is a trailing effect of those questions on decisions being made by companies just starting out on the path of managing diversity. I’d estimate that more than half do (even if a significant number of those companies’ diversity efforts are little more than having tacos in the cafeteria on May 5). Speaking to the audience of roughly 200 senior leaders. is No. a division of WellPoint.” There was no mention of “those people” or “them. He also spoke. but there’s a definite path. their President and CEO Mark Wagar talked about his business.” “our” and “we. To read more on diversity-management trends. For articles and information on diversity councils. have statistically valid correlations to equitable outcome in accomplishment. I was invited to speak to the Wells Fargo Advisors (whose parent company. employee- “ It is the personal commitment of those at the top of organizations that makes the success or failure of managing diversity. we’re not making this stuff up—we’re reporting data-driven results. 40 in the DiversityInc Top 50). In other words. accountability.com ” 8 DiversityInc . it had better be all of you. most importantly. and consistently and emotionally used the words “us. Wagar sees people as his brothers and sisters. The DiversityInc Top 50 survey (www. Wells Fargo & Co.DiversityIncBestPractices. Ten years ago.” Mr. Given our enormous base of 535 participants. with deep respect. today. but none as accurately and consistently measured by every company as human capital) has allowed us to ask questions about best practices. No.DiversityInc. go to www.CEO’SLETTER ‘WE’ AND ‘US’ The Power of Language and Accountability I was invited to speak at Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield. closed out the event. it enables us to see. I was asked an interesting question. specifically about the company’s customers and employees. I did not see the consistency of switched-on leadership that I see today. such as diversity councils.

At MasterCard Worldwide. efficient and secure solutions for advancing today’s global commerce.When different people come together. the MasterCard Brand Mark and Priceless are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. experience and thought. ©2010 MasterCard . By supporting a global business. we take a leading role in creating innovative. we find value in diversity of background. it’s not just beautiful.com/diversity. MasterCard. See how diversity drives us at mastercard. it’s priceless.

goal-setting.com Business Office Mubeen Qureshi Business Office Manager Cecilia Fernandez Executive Assistant to Carolynn Johnson Elisa Figueroa Administrative Assistant Alicia Petty Office Administrator Creative Services Michael Moran Senior Interactive Art Director Andy Nguyen Webmaster Craig Lee-Griffin Intern SALES John M. we have no more obligation unless we receive a corrected address within two years. and at additional mailing offices. 15th fl. visit the new www.com Joy Buchanan Managing Editor Robyn Heller Gerbush Copy Chief CONTRIBUTORS Carolynn L. NJ 07102 Phone: (973) 494-0500 Editorial: editor@DiversityInc. Periodical Postage Paid at Newark. the most important best practice we measure is the percentage of CEO direct reports’ bonuses that is tied to diversitymanagement results. CEO CEO@DiversityInc.. mentoring.com/events) and our benchmarking service (www. 570 Broad St.DIVERSITYINCBESTPRACTICES. Newark. DiversityInc Magazine (ISSN 1540-1502) is published five times a year by DiversityInc Media. the percentage of managers in mentoring and people in employee-resource groups has more than doubled in the past five years.J. U.com DiversityInc is a veteran-owned business. there is a connection between the questions we ask and the reality we measure.3 percent in the past five years. Product Development and Operations (973) 494-0539 | cjohnson@DiversityInc. please e-mail customerservice@DiversityInc.com Niraj Kataria Director. they have asked their suppliers for their diversity questions on RFPs and by tracking Tier II (subcontractor) supplier diversity.com. In my opinion. 15th fl. Craig Jackson Associate Vice President Amber Aboshihata Data Analysis Director Shane Nelson Director of Benchmarking EDUCATION AND TRAINING Stuart Arnold Relationship Consultant | (973) 494-0530 | sarnold@DiversityInc. 570 Broad St. N.DiversityInc. Johnson Executive Vice President. Career Center and Newspaper Relationships (973) 494-0503 | nkataria@DiversityInc.. com/magazine). This has gone from 5 percent to 12.99/copy. DiversityInc. but our measurement of those programs wouldn’t continue if there weren’t corresponding benefits. E-mail: customerservice@DiversityInc. we’re measuring both. Yes.J. PO Box 54. Newark. Vice President..com. In Canada: Subscriptions $21.J. Weldon Latham BENCHMARKING SERVICES C.com VOLUME 10 NUMBER 3 | WWW.com Advertising: (973) 494-0506/advertising@DiversityInc.com Reprints: For article reprints.com BUSINESS OFFICE DiversityInc. events (www. LLC. Newark. Bryson III. Education and Training (973) 494-0516 | arichardsonmiller@DiversityInc. Windsor ON N9A 6J5. 15th fl. subscriptions $9. Hatcher. (Publication Agreement No. rates: Single copy $4. DiversityIncBestPractices. It is the personal commitment of those at the top of organizations that makes the success or failure of managing diversity.. but it is one created by the companies themselves.CEO’SLETTER resource groups. e-prints or permissions. please call (973) 494-0500 Subscription Services/Back Issues: To place an order and for subscriber-service questions. Executive Editor (973) 494-0515 | bfrankel@DiversityInc. without prior written permission of the publisher. 570 Broad Street. 07102. Luke Visconti. Printed in the United States of America. LLC. Forward returned copies to: Station A. It’s not logical to think that this level of reward is because of our competition—it has increased because smart CEOs want to make sure they’re putting the spurs to their diversity efforts.COM BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT & OPERATIONS Barbara Frankel Senior Vice President. So yes. Copyright 2011 All rights reserved. In turn..com Desha Peccerelli Sales Coordinator DIVERSITYINC CAREERS Avonia Richardson-Miller. print. N. electronic or any other. Michael R. For example. Bob Gregg. N. DiversityInc..com/benchmarking)— has certainly encouraged a direct path to the most rapid improvement for hundreds of companies. Subscribers: If the postal service alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable.D. No part of this magazine may be reproduced by any means. Donald Fan. 07102. 10 DiversityInc .com Veronica McCoy Relationship Consultant | (973) 494-0506 | vmccoy@DiversityInc. Ed.com Debby Scheinholtz Relationship Consultant | (973) 494-0504 | dscheinholtz@DiversityInc.S.COM Luke Visconti Chief Executive Officer EDITORIAL/DIVERSITYINCBESTPRACTICES. accountability and more.99/year.40842574).99/year POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: DiversityInc Media. Our ability to accumulate the data—and disseminate it through our publication (www.

Are you passionate about helping people live healthier lives? If so. Abbott welcomes enc ges y JoinIn Bring your Passion For Life to Abbott. At Abbott. Abbott welcomes and encourages diversity in our workforce. www. Abbott offers a wide range of products that address health care needs for every stage of life.000 employees around the world.abbott. u opportunity employer. . Join in and see for yourself why Abbott is recognized as a great place to work for nearly 90. then a career at Abbott may be for you.com/careers bbott com/careers www. As a leading health care company.com/careers An equal op unity employer Abbott welcomes and encourages di An equal opportunity employer.abbott. we are committed to developing the diverse talents of all our employees.

and many CEOs.com “ The CEO listens attentively—no BlackBerrying or running out of the room—and he asks probing questions. That’s been apparent every time we’ve presented to their executive council. In the 12 years we’ve been doing this. Rockwell Collins did have two significant advantages: remarkable and focused commitment from Chairman. For more information on CEO Commitment. Because he’s so focused on this. productivity and innovation. What’s even more gratifying is that they didn’t rest on their laurels— they immediately started looking at their areas of improvement and what they need to do to move up the list. For me. all of his subordinates are equally focused on it. which has very little racial diversity and isn’t on anyone’s list of cultural hubs.EDITOR’SLETTER ENHANCING RELATIONSHIPS My Kind of Company R ockwell Collins exemplifies what being on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list is all about. 42. come and go. and a dedicated group of employees who wanted to know what they could do to create a more inclusive culture and change the demographics of their workforce and management. While there still are plenty of opportunities for diversity-management improvement. Others dabble in it and then drop away when it becomes real work to implement change. Iowa. coming in at No. Some companies have long-term commitment and see diversity management as vital to their business strategy. visit www. especially as the competition inside and outside of its industry heats up. we have seen many companies.com ” 12 DiversityInc . and it’s headquartered in Cedar Rapids. Clay Jones has been the leader of this effort. Rockwell Collins made it onto the list this year for the first time. EXECUTIVE EDITOR editor@DiversityInc. To make it even more challenging. it’s now a recognized diversity leader and its human-capital demographics reflect its increasing emphasis on diversity. Both DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti and I have gotten to know this company well through our benchmarking service and have seen an extraordinary transformation. He listens attentively—no BlackBerrying or running out of the room—and he asks probing questions about what other companies have done and what his company needs to do. the real gratification is in seeing a company improve and maximize its talent potential and its corresponding ability to innovate to create and sustain business opportunities.DiversityIncBestPractices. but the real benefit is in employee engagement. President and CEO Clay Jones. in an industry that is historically very male and very white. Earning a spot on the DiversityInc Top 50 is obviously important. the company was just getting started with its diversity-management initiatives and didn’t have a clear focus of what to do. Barbara Frankel SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. and their joy was so genuine it made me proud of what we do and why we do it. This company started participating five years ago and at first glance had a couple of major strikes against it: It’s a defense contractor.

Learn more at travelers. A diverse business needs employees with diverse ways of thinking.com/Diversity. One Tower Square. We have dedicated ourselves to creating an insurance company full of many perspectives with one like-minded goal—success. travelers. CT 06183 .com EOE ©2010 The Travelers Indemnity Company.A different perspective can make all the difference. No two people see things the same way. The Travelers Indemnity Company and its property casualty affiliates. All rights reserved. and every position at Travelers is as unique as the person who fills it. Hartford. and we believe that’s important to our business’s future.

Kaiser Permanente celebrates after the company is announced as No. 1 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. 14 DiversityInc .

The 300-question survey is free and is based entirely on empirical data. which has been in existence for 12 years. and results will be announced April 24. Human Capital. Participation has increased every year and this year was up to 535. doing business with DiversityInc does not impact ranking in any way.000 U. employees. a 19 percent increase from the previous year. surveys companies on four key areas of diversity management: CEO Commitment. C TOP 50 DiversityInc 15 .S. Corporate and Organizational Communications.COVER STORY SUMMER 2011 The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity. To participate. a company must have at least 1. at our event in New York City. 2012. Surveys are due in early March 2012. and Supplier Diversity.

spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to upgrade our evaluation process. and from that.DiversityInc. com/benchmarking. and we expect to sell out. This can be done with statistical evaluation. We roll up the results of hundreds of comparisons for a point score in each of the four areas we measure (CEO Commitment. Our upcoming November 2011 event has 14 sponsors. so we’re looking to measure competitive versus relatively non-competitive positions and the diversity difference between the two.DiversityInc. Our list can only be as healthy as our company. we will simplify our survey where possible but continue to refine our measurement. Please see www. Second. There are areas that concern me. We focus on high-level. we measure the percentage of standard deviation of all results. eligibility requirements and how to apply. we want to continue to improve our accuracy. such as the lack of improvement for women in the top ranks. the DiversityInc Top 50 competition continues to grow and evolve. management by actual outcome. In other words. We also test for consistency across all four areas. not business conducted with DiversityInc. A four-person internal team plus a seasoned SPSS programming consultant worked full time for most of last year on this project. We continue to increase the capabilities of our benchmarking service and now have more than 70 companies. We enjoyed a 19 percent increase in participants from last year. we want to increase the number of competitors. cross-tabbed by geography and industry. DiversityInc. We spent a full year improving the SPSS computer programming that contains our methodology and produces the list. Human Capital. We’ve produced five successful events in the past three years and are averaging 600 attendees from 200 companies. .com/top50 for a complete explanation of our methodology. with close to a 90 percent renewal rate. Inside each of those levels. For the 2012 list. My goal was to increase our accuracy in measurement between companies and industries—and to build stronger correlations between good results and best practices. What makes our process successful is that the hundreds of competitors give us a large-enough database to make a relative assessment of the quality of diversity 16 DiversityInc N ow in its second decade. There are three companies on our list that do no business with us at all.Increased participation and a refined evaluation process build stronger correlations between good results and best practices. the field of competitors determines them. You can read more about it at www. We are evolving in two main directions. Our second area of focus will result in a smaller survey for the thousands of companies that are critical to their local economy. we don’t make the standards. to 535 organizations. we determine what defines best results for 50 companies out of the full field of competitors. but not nationally or internationally. and all applicants that fill in enough data will receive a free report card.com/events. First. The application process is free. the free report cards and our benchmarking product. and I want to give you a brief update. METHODOLOGY BY LUKE VISCONTI Our editorial policies remain consistent: Actual results determine the ranking. We’re going to try and develop several regional lists. and Supplier Diversity). Corporate and Organizational Communications. thought-provoking speakers (six CEOs will speak in November) and subject-matter experts—no commercials. For example. we measure four levels of management. and we continued to reinvest in our project. Our syllabus is available at www. as we did in March. We have completed the evolution from being dependent on magazine advertising revenue to having the majority of our revenue come from consulting.

Visconti.Clockwise. author Isabel Wilkerson with DiversityInc Executive Vice President of Product Development and Operations Carolynn Johnson. and Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Barbara Frankel. Luke Visconti. this page and previous: Jamie Watts DiversityInc 17 . CEO of DiversityInc. Frankel and Visconti announce the DiversityInc Top 50 list Photo. from top: The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity awards dinner.

Why Companies ON THE DiversityInc Top 50 BY BARBARA FRANKEL 18 DiversityInc .

DiversityInc 2011 19 DiversityInc 19 . commitm FOUR These case studies are all based on submissions to the 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 survey.Why is there so much movement on the list each year? An analysis of four companies in different industries shows what’s important to stay competitive. The only way to accurately assess a company’s progress and recommend a course of action is to analyze its data points in comparison to other companies. Wh Wh What causes companies to move up and down so mu CASE much on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for STUDIES Diversity list? Three factors: our improving ability Div to ask probing questions. increased competition and to as the commitment of leadership at individual companies. its related diversity-management efforts—are unique. They offer valuable lessons. therefore. but it’s important to remember that each company’s business goals—and.

where new hires of Blacks and Latinos fell about 7 percent year to year. That correlation holds true for this company. COMPANIES THAT INCREASED COMPANIES THAT DECREASED 12. What would have helped him—and his senior executives—understand the consumer ramifications of his actions would be more diversity at his top level and more interaction with employee-resource groups. and the next two levels down are almost all white. The CEO. therefore. both are lacking here. and management promotions fell about INCREASE vs. internally and externally. In our 12 years of assessing companies through the DiversityInc Top 50. retention and talent development.WHY COMPANIES RISE AND FALL ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FELL CASE STUDIES FOUR COMPANY A ConsumerFacing Company FACTORS CEO NOT PERSONALLY INVOLVED CEO DOESN’T MEET WITH ERGs LACK OF DIVERSITY IN TOP LEVELS OF MANAGEMENT CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS IGNORE DIVERSITY Company A has had reasonable and consistent performance on the list for the past few years but was never a standout. The lack of diversity at the top of the company is likely to have a cascading impact on recruitment. that diversity is essential to the business. CEO SUPPORT IS ESSENTIAL Let’s first examine the CEO commitment issue. Unfortunately. The top level of this company. promotions into first management jobs for Blacks and Latinos fell 22 percent and for women fell 16 percent year to year.DECREASE Bonus tied to diversity CEO COMMITMENT CDO reports to CEO Have executive diversity council Council establishes or signs off on diversity goals and metrics Companies that rose on the DiversityInc Top 50 list show substantially more progress in key diversity-management areas than companies that declined. CEO and direct reports. is all white. its human-capital results without visible CEO commitment. DiversityInc Top 50 data analysis shows. we have never seen a company improve its diversity-management efforts and. is not being exposed to multicultural viewpoints from his senior managers. The CEO of this company has made some public statements that indicate a lack of cultural competence for at least one traditionally underrepresented group. This company has two related issues it needs to address if it wants to stem the decline and compete in an industry where its peers are rapidly accelerating their diversity-management efforts.3% 33% 17% 100% 67% THAT 100% 50% 5% . The two issues are its CEO’s lack of personal involvement with diversity management and a failure to consistently communicate. subsequently.

DiversityInc 21 . subsequently. while 44 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs meet with ERG leaders more than twice a year. What’s particularly significant about this company is that 20 percent of their senior managers come from outside the organization. unlike 90 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 executive councils. The inclusion of hourly workers in ERGs is a challenge for many retail/consumerpackaged-goods companies. which would have been essential in helping him overcome the misstep he made. especially at upper ranks.14 percent for Blacks and Latinos year to year. Some labor-intensive companies have chosen to only include these workers by inviting them to attend non-shift events but not allowing them to be full members of the employee-resource groups. the DiversityInc Top 50 average 25 percent of senior managers coming from outside the company. where hourly workers are predominant. The company’s website does not clearly articulate its diversity commitment and. while a message from the CEO does appear after clicking on “diversity. Examine best practices of other organizations to increase ERG membership across the company and make ERGs more central to both human-capital and corporatecommunications efforts. but innovative solutions are occurring. There is initial data indicating this also improves promotion and retention rates of these employees. 10 percent on average). By comparison. Others have had more success allowing hourly workers who assume leadership positions at employee-resource groups to be excused from shift duties and to be full-fledged group members. Increase CEO interaction with ERG leaders to four times a year and ensure these meetings include discussion of corporate culture and customer insights. both internal and external. especially since their employment may be more transitional. without visible CEO commitment. The council does not set diversity goals (usually demographic percentage increases) for the company. he has little exposure to employee-resource groups. His lack of visible support for diversity management carries forward into the company’s communications. unlike 30 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs. NO CEO/ERG RELATIONSHIP While the CEO of Company A does have a leadership position at a multicultural nonprofit. we have never seen a company improve its diversitymanagement efforts and. Although ERG leaders have rotational spots on the diversity council. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY In our 12 years of assessing companies through the DiversityInc Top 50. the ERGs are predominantly only found at corporate headquarters and their presence is not widespread in remote locations. but 90 percent require diversity in their executive-recruitment slates. its humancapital results. He meets with the groups only once a year. Document to the CEO the benefits of personally chairing the diversity council and using the council to set diversity-management goals (companies that do this increase racial/ethnic/ gender diversity. yet they do not require diversity at all in their executive-recruitment slates.” the information is general and includes almost no detail about employee-resource groups. this CEO does not chair the council personally. Internally.

In the last year.and women-owned suppliers (MBEs and WBEs) and human-capital improvements.WHY COMPANIES RISE AND FALL ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FELL CASE STUDIES FOUR COMPANY B Skilled Employee Base FACTORS CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER HAS LITTLE ACCESS TO CEO DIVERSITY COUNCIL INEFFECTIVE. Although the CEO of this company is a long-time diversity advocate. This drop in diversity-management focus also was illustrated by the lack of management participation in its formal. What’s even more telling is the role of the chief diversity officer. and 11 percent for women. At this company. cross-cultural mentoring program. Supplier diversity is a crucial means of building community support. 22 DiversityInc FALLING SUPPLIER-DIVERSITY METRICS The company’s external efforts indicate the overall lack of focus on diversity efforts. Human Capital. the head of diversity is down yet another level and does not have a visible role at the company or much access to the CEO and senior leadership. which has a large population of technically trained employees. new hires of Blacks at this company declined by 43 percent. but the results this year show a diminishment from the previous year. for that matter). has faced business challenges in recent years because of the sputtering economy and increased global competition. Specifically. Promotions into first management jobs fell 33 percent for Latinos. the CEO and senior leadership have diminished their focus. and Supplier Diversity. Supplier diversity is a crucial means of building community support. his message has been diluted because he has not held senior executives accountable for results and has not put in place a strong chief diversity officer. and the data shows a definite correlation between companies with strong supplier-diversity best practices and percentages of procurement allotted to minority. has never been a strong point of this company (or of its industry. chief diversity officers now report directly to the CEO. THAT . the percentage of executive bonuses tied to diversity goals was cut in half this year (from 10 percent of bonus compensation to 5 percent). while the number of employees in the diversity department dropped from three to two. largely because of the survey ’s increased requirement that companies on the list be strong in all four areas measured: CEO Commitment. Supplier diversity. the head of diversity is a direct report to a direct report of the CEO. At 28 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 companies. Corporate and Organizational Communications. Promotions within management dropped 52 percent for Latinos and 17 percent for Asians. while new hires of Latinos fell 50 percent. Yet at a time when some competitors are increasing the focus on diversity management as a means of increasing long-term sales. The results of this can be seen in a decline in human-capital demographics. At another 60 percent of the DiversityInc Top 50. like many others. 23 percent for Asians. REDUCED ACCOUNTABILITY This company. which was down 90 percent from last year and another 50 percent from the previous year. This is reflected in the lack of alignment between internal and external diversitymanagement efforts. and the data shows a definite correlation between companies with strong supplier-diversity best practices and percentages of procurement allotted to MBEs and WBEs and human-capital improvements. fell in ranking this year. one of the four areas measured. especially supplier diversity. MEETS INFREQUENTLY DECLINING PARTICIPATION IN MENTORING SUPPLIER DIVERSITY IS LOW PRIORITY This company.

but this year there was none. according to the data trending of other companies that have been in similar situations.5% 3% 3% 1% 26% 21% ONE LEVEL DOWN Black Latino Asian Women 37% 8% 6% 6% 4% 8% 5% 24% DiversityInc 23 . The company—and the CEO—have not communicated diversity’s longterm importance to their business goals. the company reported some Tier II (subcontractor) spend with MBEs and WBEs. Enhanced questions added this year on certification of specific types of suppliers (i.e. Last year. those owned by LGBT people and people/veterans with disabilities) also negatively impacted this company. including many with educated workforces. Consider a person who has P&L experience as chief diversity officer. As the human-capital percentages declined. Both on their website and in internal communications. the trend is in the opposite direction.. so did the supplierdiversity metrics. the company answered that it offered mentoring and financial assistance/education to diverse suppliers. several companies in the DiversityInc Top 50. The CEO chairs the diversity council but the council meets infrequently and does not set and measure diversity goals.DECREASE COMPANIES THAT INCREASED COMPANIES THAT DECREASED HUMAN CAPITAL Promotions Into Management Promotions in Management Management New Hires in Management 58% 47% 42% 45% 49% 36% 47% 40% 43% 34% CEO & DIRECT REPORTS BY RACE/ETHNICITY BY GENDER Black Latino Asian Women 9% 9% 5. and the percentages dropped slightly this year. The company had low percentage spend with Tier I (direct contractor) MBEs and WBEs last year.At this company. have gone this route. it did not. INCREASE WOMEN New Hires vs. the same coordinated focus on diversity should improve human-capital and supplier-diversity demographics. Increasing the council’s (and the CEO’s) ability to hold executives accountable for diversity goals will communicate the importance of diversity management to the company. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY Enhance the position of chief diversity officer at least one level and provide more support (even if it’s dotted-line support) and access to senior management to enable the chief diversity officer to bolster metrics/emphasis driving human-capital results. although they have been increasingly vocal about global corporate socialresponsibility efforts. Last year. this year.

cross-cultural mentoring program. about the value of these groups to recruitment. Since the CEO raised the bar on accountability. OVERSEES DIVERSITY COUNCIL ERGs. But another part of it was a lack of centralized communication. This company’s turnaround really started the previous year when the CEO began to personally sign off on executive compensation tied to diversity and also decided to personally appoint the members of the executive diversity council. This has begun to show results in human-capital demographics. who oversee diversity metrics throughout the organization. as well as the next two levels down of executives. peer. especially from the top of the organization.WHY COMPANIES RISE AND FALL ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES ROSE CASE STUDIES FOUR COMPANY C ConsumerFacing Company FACTORS CEO SIGNS OFF ON BONUSES TIED TO DIVERSITY GOALS CEO APPOINTS. While both mentoring and ERGs have been available across the organization and are not just pocketed in corporate headquarters. with product development aimed at underrepresented groups as well as talent management. group and virtual—and employee-resource groups in place for several years. retention. MENTORING USED THROUGHOUT ALL BUSINESS UNITS CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS. talent development and customer relations. the company tells us. The CEO’s increased demand for accountability created a momentum. Part of that was the dilemma commonly faced by production/ consumer-products companies of ways to include hourly workers. mentoring participation has more than doubled and now exceeds the DiversityInc Top 50 average by more than 45 percent. and the diversity and communications teams worked together on getting the message out. are all part of the formal. as well as to aid in diversity/ cultural-competence training in the entire organization. This company is using its employee-resource groups extensively to source potential leaders and help with their development. 24 DiversityInc THAT . who may be temporary and/or who often work shifts. cross-cultural mentoring program and employee-resource groups. The CEO and direct reports. is having results. aided by changes to the survey ranking that gave more credit for companies whose diversitymanagement initiatives were consistent across the organization. which led to significant increases in the utilization of the formal. IMPROVED MENTORING This company has had strong mentoring programs—individual. this company has had an internal focus on mentoring and employee-resource groups. DIVERSITY OFFICE WORKING TOGETHER A long-time participant in the DiversityInc Top 50 survey. The deep connection to what ERG members are experiencing and thinking. with even more improvement anticipated next year. Employee-resource-group participation has more than tripled and now exceeds the DiversityInc average by 40 percent. both in the workplace and the marketplace. most for more than a decade. utilization of both initiatives was lower than that of most other companies in the DiversityInc Top 50 last year. There is formal follow-up by a third-party organization that assesses mentoring’s impact on retention and promotions.

INCREASE Mentoring Participation vs. while promotions within management were up 18 percent for Latinos and 10 percent for women. there are still lessons it can learn from companies at the very top of the list as well as increasing competition for talent and customers both in its industry and among progressive companies altogether. There was increased racial/ethnic/gender diversity in the senior levels of the organization as well.PROMOTIONS INTO MANAGEMENT ARE UP Most measurable are the changes in talent development. Promotions into first management jobs were up 79 percent. year to year. A national philanthropic initiative that helps start-ups. who will become more connected with multicultural customers. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY The CEO’s increased emphasis on accountability has been delivering results. cross-cultural mentoring program and employeeresource groups. This is both a visible sign of inclusion and an educational experience for the executive. We recommend the company increase its community visibility by focusing on educating/training/providing financial assistance for diverse suppliers.2% 1.9% 2. and the succession-planning pipeline indicates there will be more improvement in that area. would enhance relationships in those communities. Although this company has made tremendous progress.DECREASE EmployeeResource-Group Participation COMPANIES THAT INCREASED COMPANIES THAT DECREASED COMMUNICATIONS Multicultural Advertising SUPPLIER DIVERSITY MBE Spend Tier I WBE Spend Tier I 55% 29% 16% 11% 3. which led to significant increases in the utilization of the formal. for Asians and 45 percent for Latinos.4% 2. especially from underserved areas. now we would recommend the CEO and senior executives follow the model of the very top companies and become a more visible proponent of diversity. Supplier diversity at this company remains less competitive than other areas.9% 25% 14% . The CEO’s increased demand for accountability created a momentum. including it throughout internal and external messaging and being more publicly involved by assuming a leadership position at a multicultural nonprofit.

multicultural marketing and supplier diversity all are real strengths. Increased emphasis on the use of employee-resource groups to develop leadership talent will also benefit this company’s efforts to increase diversity at the top levels. This company’s strong results in external outreach also helped it rise on the list this year. Our increased ability to measure these factors helped this company rise. multicultural marketing and supplier diversity all are real strengths. This company also can gain some best-practice ideas from other companies that have faced this challenge. this company has had difficulty moving up on the DiversityInc Top 50 list because its demographics. participation in ERGs is still relatively low (50 percent lower than the DiversityInc Top 50 average). the demographics have been improving but still remain slightly less competitive than industry leaders. Asian and Latino communities. but the creation of a separate diversity council. and the CEO chairs them at 58 percent of the companies. multicultural philanthropy. and participation rates for both are increasing. formal crosscultural mentoring is available to three-quarters of the employees. especially in terms of its community outreach and recruitment. CONSISTENCY ACROSS ORGANIZATION This company was helped this year by DiversityInc’s increased emphasis on consistency of diversity-management efforts throughout the organization. were not exceptional.and women-owned suppliers this year. The challenge this company has is to increase its human-capital demographics. multicultural philanthropy. such as including ERG leaders in a high-potential training program. At this company. Under the current CEO. However. were only available at corporate headquarters or in certain locations— or were limited to certain groups of employees. While ERGs are available throughout the company. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THIS COMPANY The company uses its executive leadership council as a de facto diversity council. This company’s strong results in external outreach also helped it rise on the list this year.WHY COMPANIES RISE AND FALL ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES ROSE CASE STUDIES FOUR COMPANY D FinancialServices Company FACTORS ALIGNS PHILANTHROPIC EFFORTS WITH INTERNAL ENGAGEMENT INCREASES MENTORING AND ERG PARTICIPATION CURRENT CEO IMPROVES PREDECESSOR’S COMMITMENT This company has had a long history of valuing diversity management. While there is racial/ ethnic/gender diversity at the top of the list. The previous CEO was a public advocate for diversity. they remain low compared with industry and DiversityInc Top 50 leaders. would allow the company to focus specifically on succession planning/talent development to move the needle. and the current CEO has been as strong an advocate. for example. Some of the other companies in the DiversityInc Top 50 were negatively impacted because the data showed their employee-resource groups and mentoring initiatives. chaired by the CEO. The company also increased its efforts to help minority. employee-resource groups are available to all employees. Ninety-eight percent of DiversityInc Top 50 companies have executive diversity councils. and it has deep roots within the Black. especially when compared with its own industry. adding financial assistance and mentoring. particularly at the upper levels. especially in upper management. 26 DiversityInc THAT .

whether the groups are available consistently through the organization or just at headquarters or a few locations. Both the DiversityInc Top 50 competition and the benchmarking service benefit from our increased ability to fine-tune the questions to create far more separation between companies that excel and companies that merely check off a box.D. online courses deliver 30–60 minutes of instruction Information based on research findings of best practices revealed from DiversityInc historical data Insightful case studies from The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity direct involvement of the CEO. innovation topics and profitability? I t’s important to note that ranking in the DiversityInc Top 50 is completely separated from companies doing business with DiversityInc.DiversityIncBestPractices. Ed.com subscribers and DiversityInc Benchmarking customers FEATURES Avonia Richardson-Miller. accountability or visible support.com es. we were able to ask and measure the percentage of employees in each specific group and. its human-capital results.com/learning FOR MORE DETAILS. As you see from these examples—and as our data shows—without the launch a diversityinc training course today! COURSE OFFERINGS Employee-Resource Groups Mentoring Diversity Councils Generational Communications (Coming Soon) FREE for DiversityIncBestPractices. subsequently. sustainable progress doesn’t happen. Interactive. more importantly. are dependent on the CEO. we have asked in recent years what percentage of employees are members of employee-resource groups. What really propels ranking is the decisions at a company that impact its diversity-management efforts and. . But this year. Our investment in more sophisticated software enabled these changes to be implemented.CONCLUSION: WHAT REALLY PROPELS RANKING Want to learn how to leverage diversity y Content awareness and understanding to focused on key diversityincrease the contribution to your management company’s bottom line. including our benchmarking service. DI DiversityInc 27 VISIT www. whether about resources. Those decisions. For example.

Deloitte Kraft Foods Colgate-Palmolive Co. 45. AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co. 10. 48. 20 moved down. 15. Time Warner Cable Toyota Motor North America Ford Motor Co. Wells Fargo & Co. There is volatility on the list as new companies gain strength and others work to keep up with quickly evolving best practices. 5. Health Care Service Corp. Chrysler Group PARTICIPATION IN THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 Participation in the list has increased every year. 31. Cummins Aetna Cox Communications Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. Automatic Data Processing Eli Lilly and Co. Human Capital. Whirlpool Corp. Rockwell Collins Allstate Insurance Co. 30. Marriott International Merck & Co. Verizon Communications Accenture Abbott Procter & Gamble 26. 41. 35. Kaiser Permanente Sodexo PricewaterhouseCoopers AT&T Ernst & Young Johnson & Johnson IBM Corp. 7. 11. General Mills Time Warner KPMG Dell MasterCard Worldwide Booz Allen Hamilton SC Johnson Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide JCPenney WellPoint Northrop Grumman Corp. at the same time many corporations were beginning to understand the business value of diversity-management initiatives. Corporate and Organizational Communications. 43. Monsanto Co. Target Corp. 12. Prudential Financial CSX Corp. 9. Twenty-eight companies moved up on the list. 23. This year. 40. Seven companies moved on to the list after being on the 25 Noteworthy Companies list last year. 42. 29. 6. Bank of America The Coca-Cola Co. 13.FACTS & FIGURES FACTS&FIGURES The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list began in 2001. 32. 21. 19. new software was implemented to allow for more concise measurements for consistency across the four areas measured: CEO Commitment. Like diversity management itself. 2. 17. 46. 4. and Supplier Diversity. 44. 36. 47. 38. 50. 49. 20. 27. 39. seven companies made the list for the first time. 24. 25. the list has evolved significantly and continues to be refined and improved to reflect how rapidly companies are adapting these strategies. 33. Four companies that had fallen off the list came back. 14. 8. 18. 1. BY YEAR • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS INDUSTRIES • PERCENT 535 401 449 18% Financial 12% Consumer Packaged Goods 12% Professional Services 10% Pharmaceutical 8% Health Insurance 8% Hospitality 8% Media 6% Auto 6% Technology 4% Retail 4% Telecom 317 178 75 ’01 352 203 256 98 118 31% ’02 20% ’03 51% ’04 YEAR-TO-YEAR INCREASE 14% 26% 24% 11% 14% ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 12% ’10 19% ’11 2% Hospital/Health System 2% Insurance (P&C) 28 DiversityInc . 34. 16. American Express Co. 3. Six companies that had never ranked before made the list for the first time. 37. 22. one is a first-time participant. 28. In 2011.

Asian American and American Indian WOMEN PROMOTIONS WITHIN MANAGEMENT DiversityInc 29 . Human Capital. VALUES PERSONALLY INVOLVED. There are companies on our list that do no business with us. Corporate and Organizational Communications and Supplier Diversity. Their diversity-management efforts yield results demonstrated in their human-capital demographics. RESULTS HOLDS OTHER COMPANIES ACCOUNTABLE PERSONALLY INVOLVED. as the charts on these pages demonstrate. the better the results. LGBT. ORGANIZATIONALLY Supplier Diversity Human Capital HOLDS DIRECT REPORTS ACCOUNTABLE DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE HUMAN-CAPITAL RESULTS BLAI PROMOTIONS INTO MANAGEMENT WOMEN 2ND LEVEL OF MANAGEMENT BLAI 2ND LEVEL OF MANAGEMENT WOMEN CEO AND DIRECT REPORTS BLAI CEO AND DIRECT REPORTS WOMEN PROMOTIONS INTO MANAGEMENT Corporate Communications HOW TO READ THESE SPIDER GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle. ¼Five Levels of Management ¼Promotions Into Management ¼Promotions in Management C Corporate & Organizational Communications ¼Mentoring ¼ERGs ¼Philanthropy ¼Consistency ¼Effectiveness CRITERIA Supplier Diversity CRITERIA ¼M/WBE. INDIVIDUALLY BEST PRACTICES DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants) CEO Commitment STRONG SENSE OF CULTURE. BEST PRACTICES LEAD TO IMPROVED HUMAN-CAPITAL RESULTS AND BETTER DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY. People With Disabilities. against national averages. Veterans Spend ¼RFPs ¼Accountability The DiversityInc Top 50 is an editorial process and is completely independent of business conducted with DiversityInc. in some cases. DiversityInc Top 50 companies are compared here against the bottom quarter of the 535 participants in this year’s survey and.CEO Commitment ¼Accountability ¼Personal Communications ¼Visibility CRITERIA Human Capital CRITERIA 4 AREAS OF MEASUREMENT ompanies in the DiversityInc Top 50 are above average in all four areas measured: CEO Commitment. BLAI PROMOTIONS WITHIN MANAGEMENT TERMINOLOGY BLAI= Black. Latino.

Latinos and Asians in management more women in senior management than companies without DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants) DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES WITH DIVERSITY COUNCILS 2005 2011 42% 98% BLAI= Black.FACTS & FIGURES FACTS&FIGURES CEO COMMITMENT CEO DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP 2005 DiversityInc Top 50 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Board of Directors (BLAI) 98% 72% 42% 98% 90% 100% 78% Accountability Board of Directors (Women) Visibility CEO & Direct Reports (BLAI) Philanthropy BEST PRACTICES 42% 16% 28% CEO & % of Executive Direct Reports Compensation (Women) Tied to Diversity CEO Signs Off CEO Chairs CEO Meets on Executive Diversity Council With ERGs Compensation Tied to Diversity Head of Diversity Reports to CEO CEO Has Diversity Quote on Homepage DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants) HUMAN CAPITAL WHY YOU SHOULD HAVE AN EXECUTIVE DIVERSITY COUNCIL Ratio of Management . the better the results. 30 DiversityInc . Promotions Into Management Two Levels Below CEO & Direct Reports (Women) 2X 47% the number of Blacks. Asian American and American Indian HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle. Latino. Promotions in Management One Level Below CEO & Direct Reports (BLAI) BEST PRACTICES Companies with executive diversity councils have: One Level Below CEO & Direct Reports (Women) Two Levels Below CEO & Direct Reports (BLAI) Ratio of Management Vs.

companies with rates below 15% Companies with at least 30% of their managers in mentoring programs vs. Latinos and Asians in level below CEO and direct reports 18% 26% 4X 65% 11% 2X Blacks Latinos Asians Women % of Managers in Mentoring Promotions in 48% Management (Blacks. Latinos.4 AREAS OF MEASUREMENT CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS KEY TRENDS ENGAGEMENT = VISIBILITY BEST PRACTICES CEO Human Commitment Capital Corporate & Supplier Organizational Diversity Communications % Managers in Mentoring 21% 39% % Employees in ERGs % of Employees in ERGs Promotions Into Management (Women) 48% 40% 23% Mentoring Factors DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants) 13% 23% % Philanthropy to Multicultural Nonprofits % of Managers in Mentoring % of Employees in ERGs 34% 37% 2005 DiversityInc Top 50 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 HIGHER ERG PARTICIPATION = MORE PROMOTION 8% 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (of 535 Participants in 2011 DiversityInc Top 50) Diversity-Training Factors ERG Factors HIGHER MENTORING PARTICIPATION YIELDS RESULTS ACCOUNTABILITY Companies with ERG-participation rates above 25% have higher promotion rates vs. companies with less than 15% as many Blacks. Asians) 40% 23% 8% 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 (of 535 Participants in 2011 DiversityInc Top 50) Bottom Quarter SUPPLIER DIVERSITY 2005 DiversityInc Top 50 Tier I MBE Spend 62% 60% 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 BEST PRACTICES 94% 98% Compensation Tied to Supplier-Diversity Results Mandates Supplier-Diversity Metrics in RFPs Tier II WBE Spend Tier I WBE Spend TIER I Direct contractor TIER II Subcontractor MBE Minority-Owned Business Enterprise WBE Women-Owned Business Enterprise Tier II MBE Spend DiversityInc Top 50 Bottom Quarter (out of 535 participants) DiversityInc 31 . Latinos and Asians in level of CEO and direct reports as many Blacks.

What makes Kaiser remarkable is the consistency of its diversitymanagement efforts. Asians. and its first Black physician intern. This modest company’s long history of what it calls “diversity. Kaiser has exceptionally strong diversity leadership from its chairman and CEO. who leads the National Diversity Council. Kaiser. recruited more than 20. The company’s founder. No.S. Latino and Asian and 25 percent women. 4 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. Henry J. Calif.000 Blacks from the South for his shipbuilding effort during World War II. the organization’s Institute for Culturally Competent Care and the nine Centers of Excellence are making significant strides in eradicating healthcare disparities for Blacks. We very much appreciate being recognized for our commitment to diversity. and deep core values on equality. Being ranked in DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies for Diversity is a distinction that makes Kaiser Permanente very proud. Kaiser hired its first woman physician. U. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. inclusion. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks NO. The company and its leaders have fought for affirmative action and equality. 7 in 2009 and No. Wendell Lipscomb. COM/EVENTS OHIO PERMANENTE MEDICAL GROUP Our physicians and employees demonstrate Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to diversity and inclusion every day. The company’s board of directors is half Black.S. an emphasis on culturally competent patient care. HEADQUARTERS Oakland. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos NO. EMPLOYEES 163. 9–10 EVENT BERNARD TYSON. including strong opposition to Proposition 209 in California.C. PRESIDENT AND CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER FOR MORE INFORMATION. Chinese immigrant Beatrice Lei.S. RON COPELAND. when it was on the 25 Noteworthy Companies list. For example. making sure they had healthcare in a racially integrated setting. • PRESIDENT & MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF C IA R L• AWA ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV. in 1946. GO TO WWW. It moved to No. as well as the alignment between diversity in the workplace and diversity in the customer base. 27 in 2007. Kaiser’s diversity-management initiatives have jelled in the last five years as a clear reflection of its values and leadership. breaking barriers. Kaiser Permanente has the most diverse board of directors and management. No. F. and its top level of management is IVERSITYI N C The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO. DR. Latino and Asian and 36 percent women. Kaiser first participated in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity in 2005. Latinos. •D 11 20 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities We consider our diversity to be a core strength of our organization.KAISER PERMANENTE 1 F ive years ago.986 DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. which was unique at the time. 4 last year. Kaiser has always stood up for equal opportunity. in 1951.A. Today. 32 DiversityInc D PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Healthcare MAIN COMPETITORS Catholic Healthcare West U. that DiversityInc has seen. 38 percent Black. 4 Those values have been part of Kaiser’s history and lead directly to the major diversity-management strides the company is taking today. Kaiser Permanente was the best-kept secret in diversity management. 36 on the list in 2006. despite an extremely diverse workforce and management. innovation and advocacy” was not well known in corporate America. 3 LEADERSHIP GEORGE HALVORSON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO Executive Development PE TOP COMPANY FOR S .DIVERSITYINC. especially the top three levels of management. George Halvorson. people with disabilities and immigrants.

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369 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 379. and an emerging-leaders program emphasizing talent development to drive a diverse leadership pipeline. Md. The company communicates this commitment consistently to employees. clients. Dr. diversity is extremely personal and the essential key to his company’s business success. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. especially as the competition for talent is getting more intense and the competitive landscape is changing. 4 GEORGE CHAVEL • PRESIDENT AND CEO While we have accomplished much. commitment and competence that is hard to match anywhere else. Those scorecard bonuses are paid regardless of the financial performance of the company. a driving factor in obtaining contracts for their food/facilitiesmanagement business and retaining and growing those relationships. with 25 percent of executive bonuses linked to diversity objectives. Diversity and inclusion is one of the company’s six strategic imperatives. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos NO.140 GLOBAL REVENUE $19. For us. suppliers and the public at large and doesn’t ever lose sight of the direct connection to its business goals. Under her watch.S. insistence on holding executives accountable for diversity results. Chavel has insisted Sodexo invest in diversity-management initiatives that advance their strategy. The company has found that for every dollar spent on this. Anand and all of Sodexo’s leadership use diversity as the vital differentiator. Compass Group USA. 34 DiversityInc . Her team also has overseen the expansion of employee-resource groups and first-rate learning programs for professional development and diversity awareness. Delaware North U. Sodexo exemplifies the words “diversity-management progress” and is an inspiration to other companies. Sodexo has instituted the worldclass Spirit of Mentoring program. it becomes even more critical to continually raise the bar on expectations and performance. opportunities and challenges of other organizations. For George Chavel. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity NO. Rohini Anand. it gets two dollars back in enhanced employee retention LEADERSHIP PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 Food Services. Hospitality MAIN COMPETITORS ARAMARK. ROHINI ANAND • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND GLOBAL CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity As organizations look to integrate four generations in the workplace. and extremely strong diversity leadership. we are able to learn from and leverage the experiences. we know we have a lot more to do. not just managers. HEADQUARTERS Gaithersburg. president and CEO of Sodexo North America. Sodexo emphasizes diversity training at every level to create an inclusive workplace. its formal cross-divisional and cross-functional mentoring initiative that has grown from 45 partnerships in 2004 to 125 partnerships last year. including the IMPACT program.S. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO. experience and growth. EMPLOYEES 115. Most importantly. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. As Sodexo has been recognized as a national and global diversity leader. it has also become a teacher and diversity advocate for its clients. Diversity and inclusion is a journey—a journey of continuous learning. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks NO. senior vice president and global chief diversity officer.38 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. U. In tough economic times when other companies have scaled back. diversity and inclusion is fundamental to our business-growth strategy and a key component of our success. Thanks to the benchmarking and best-practice sharing initiated by DiversityInc. intelligence. Chavel. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO.COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY 2 SODEXO T his company continues to set the bar on diversity management through its highly developed metrics. I challenge our teams to be leaders. DR. and productivity. of diversity and inclusion if we are to maintain our leadership and ensure that diversity is a competitive advantage for us. brings a level of perception. address inequities globally and compete for top talent.

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From its thoughtprovoking “Who Am I?” series to its annual Diversity in Business Leadership Conference for high-potential PwC employees. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. director of the U.S. NILOUFAR MOLAVI • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER At PwC. and they have been extremely effective in identifying talent and improving retention and performance. including the Mentor Moms initiative. PwC’s Diamond Program for high-performing senior managers and directors focuses on sponsorship and advocacy. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. relevant and crystal clear.000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 161. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity But this organization increasingly uses its well-honed diversity efforts to engage its employees and enhance retention and talent development. HEADQUARTERS New York U. the importance of diversity to the organization. including Chris Brassell. where talent comes from today may not be where it comes from tomorrow. From its remarkable program to encourage its employees to volunteer for nonprofits (which. That is why we continue to look for creative ways to attract and retain top talent globally. Professional Services MAIN COMPETITORS Deloitte. Our people successfully serve our clients in addressing complex business issues because they bring such diverse points of view to the table. internally and externally. and Asian Cultural Awareness Training for Coaches. inclusion and flexibility will create significant value for our clients. Blacks. KPMG U. improves employee engagement) to its trendsetting work/life policies. it demonstrates. PwC in recent years has had fierce competition as a diversity leader from the other Big Four professional-services firms as well as other companies moving into the consulting space.57 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. Project BOLD is a new service program designed to accelerate the leadership development of high-potential and highperforming women partners. PwC is constantly connecting its inclusive workplace to its business goals. we recognize that diversity is a critical driver of innovation and a competitive advantage. which it calls networking circles. PwC has nine employee groups. Ernst & Young. director of diversity and work/life. These include Performance Coaching and Development.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $26. For example. The personal and professional diversity commitment of Chairman and Senior Partner Bob Moritz and Chief Diversity Officer Niloufar Molavi are well executed by the organization. and peer mentoring. Office of Diversity.S. The program provides the top talent of Black.PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS 3 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY I n the last decade. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. onboard mentoring for new hires. our firm and our people. as well as group mentoring. Latinos.S. our stakeholders. Their efforts are often focused on talent development. 36 DiversityInc . An early leader in workplace diversity. the company’s message on diversity is always business-related. EMPLOYEES 31. no company has worked harder at expanding its diversitymanagement initiatives than PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). especially for women. In an increasingly connected world. Asian and American Indian employees with personal and professional development. with a goal LEADERSHIP BOB MORITZ • CHAIRMAN AND SENIOR PARTNER Diversity of talent may be the most important asset for businesses today. toward developing them as future leaders. We believe that our commitment to diversity. Asians and American Indians. What sets PwC apart from most other organizations is its concise and consistent ability to communicate. Latino. and Joanne McDonough. among the most effective and comprehensive in corporate America. The company also has a variety of mentoring programs. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO.

. At Kraft Foods. ethnicities and generations with an unrivaled portfolio of brands they love. an open and inclusive culture is a business necessity and a competitive advantage.Every day. Discover a family of brands that celebrate differences and reflect the diversity of our consumers. millions of consumers around the world rely on us to bridge cultures.

is an operations leader expected to push AT&T’s impressive diversity efforts even further. Technology. The 10 employee-resource groups are a critical part of the recruitment process. as well as on-boarding and talent development. particularly for Latino and Black students— Stephenson ensures his organization stands behind the values it espouses.28 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. As the driving force behind AT&T’s involvement with Project Aspire—which is having a dramatic impact on the highschool-dropout rate. who took over in 2008. puts him at the top of the list for CEO commitment. Sprint U. With its long history as a supplier-diversity leader. DEBBIE STOREY • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. Our commitment to valuing diversity and fostering inclusion has enabled us to focus increasing attention on a wider array of attributes. is used for leadership development and to address vital diversity issues. Its partnership with Peace Through Business is empowering and saving women in Afghanistan and Rwanda.AT&T 4 T COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 here are good reasons the telecommunications giant has been at the top of this list for the last three years and a mainstay on the list for most of the last decade. TALENT DEVELOPMENT AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER AT&T has long viewed excellence in diversity management as a business imperative. AT&T is a company that stands behind its values. Her successor. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. such as his chairing of the NAACP’s Corporate Campaign. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity NO.600 GLOBAL REVENUE $124. HEADQUARTERS Dallas U. a remarkable learning center at the company’s Dallas headquarters.” Both globally and domestically. Strong LEADERSHIP RANDALL STEPHENSON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO At AT&T. 59 percent of its philanthropy is directed at multicultural organizations and 49 percent of its senior executives sit on boards of multicultural nonprofits. such as generations in the workplace. AT&T is a model of consistent and sustainable diversity-management progress. mentoring programs involving managers from the highest level of the organization on down are aiding with talent development. particularly generational diversity. both women who had significant roles in running the business. diversity at every level of our company is the key to our success. Cindy Brinkley. plain and simple. previously headed the state of Missouri region. with external and internal stakeholders.962 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 294.S. The company has improved workplace diversity on several fronts. It helps spark innovation. Qwest. Communications MAIN COMPETITORS Verizon Communications. including a new online training program and such offerings as “Profitability and Performance Enhancement Through Diversity and Inclusion. Diversity training is integrated into the entire workforce. His personal involvement in that initiative and others directly related to long-term equity. Debbie Storey.S. In the United States. elevate customer care and strengthen connections to the communities we serve. EMPLOYEES 258. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos It certainly starts with Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson. its increasingly inclusive workplace culture and its firm diversity leadership commitment from the top of the organization. 38 DiversityInc . 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks NO. Stephenson showed his commitment to diversity’s impact on his business in his last two appointments of chief diversity officers. AT&T University. to attract and retain talent and serve our growing global customer base.

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Navigating an increasingly complex global business environment requires that we fully utilize the rich perspectives and experience of our diverse talent pool. KPMG. survey scores and client assignments. retention. partner pipeline. with each executive developing a personal scorecard that has inclusiveness as one of two global transformational priorities. promotion. Tax Excellence Program. Metrics include headcount. the firm has put its diversity-management efforts in the capable hands of Americas Inclusiveness Officer Billie Williamson. Career Watch. Professional Services MAIN COMPETITORS Deloitte.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $21. We see this time and time again in serving our clients. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO. Diversity Mentoring Program and Cultural Connections. including men and adoptive parents. E&Y has extremely strong employee-resource groups. Under the leadership of Chairman and CEO James Turley and Americas Area Managing Partner Steve Howe. Latinos. Compensation is also affected by the Ethnicity and Gender Inclusiveness Snapshots. The firm has extraordinary benefits. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. with 50 percent of its employees participating in them and 30 percent in more than one group.S.ERNST&YOUNG 5 E COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 rnst & Young (E&Y) continues to be a diversity-management leader in talent development and the innovative use of its people to connect with clients globally and domestically. which few companies do yet. promotions. We know that putting diverse teams forward to address our clients’ business needs gives us a competitive edge. and diversity and inclusiveness are critical enablers of our global business strategy. better teams and better decisions. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. People with diverse backgrounds. Each group has an executive sponsor.S. Mentoring offerings are available across the entire organization and include formal cultural-awareness training for participants. including NextGen.613 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 144. develop and retain the top professionals. We have to be highly focused and proactive in fostering an inclusive environment to be able to attract. development with excellent and varied mentoring programs. such as weekend travel expenses for partners for out-of-town multiweek assignments. who is responsible for showing the group’s contribution to the business. 40 DiversityInc . Employee-resource-group success is measured in several ways: retention. The Americas-level Balanced Scorecard applies to each partner. a true business leader. PwC U. E&Y continues to demonstrate consistent progress in building diversity into its global business goals. E&Y continues its strong talent LEADERSHIP STEVE HOWE • AMERICAS AREA MANAGING PARTNER As a professional-services organization.26 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. Blacks. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO. Asians and American Indians. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity The firm aligns its executives’ goals with its own global strategy. flexible work arrangements. recruiting. which track more than 20 metrics on the progress of women. capabilities and experiences are able to provide fresh ideas and unique perspectives on complex business challenges. participation in high-potential development programs. This doesn’t just happen. and six weeks of paid parental leave for primary-care providers. EMPLOYEES 23. HEADQUARTERS New York U. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos NO. the quality of our people is the key to our success. BILLIE WILLIAMSON • AMERICAS INCLUSIVENESS OFFICER Research has repeatedly shown that diverse viewpoints lead to better ideas. engagement and contribution to the business. including generous domestic-partner benefits. principal and executive. The groups are used to identify and nurture talent and are involved in the on-boarding process of new employees.

DIVERSITY INCLUSION .

COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 Pharmaceuticals. a toolkit for raising a child with disabilities. These include groups for Blacks.S. has exceptional work/life benefits. LGBT employees. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women Johnson & Johnson. All three levels of senior management participate in the company’s formal mentoring program. The company’s accelerated leadership-development programs have a global mentoring component. diversity and inclusion are clearly important components of our overall business strategy. and veterans. which tracks spend with minority-owned business enterprises. EMPLOYEES 38. and a program to assess health risks and needs. Supplier-diversity numbers are audited and integrated into the overall business-plan goals. Consumer Products. HEADQUARTERS New Brunswick. The principles of diversity and inclusion are rooted in Our Credo and serve as critical business enablers for the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies. women-owned business enterprises and vendors owned by LGBT people and veterans with disabilities. women. diversity in management. work/ life resources and referrals for employees and household members. as well as AMENAH (Association for Middle Eastern and North African Heritage). developing and retaining a base of employees that reflects the diversity of its customer base is essential to its success. and to reach customers and clients in the community. Medical Devices MAIN COMPETITORS Eli Lilly and Co. Latinos. used for diversity recruitment. leadershipdevelopment programs and many other initiatives for personal and professional growth. scholarships for children of employees.700 GLOBAL REVENUE $61. SAPNA (South Asian Professional Network Association) and HONOR (Helping Our Neighbors With Our Resources). a long-time fixture on the DiversityInc Top 50 list. ANTHONY P. whose purpose is to “assist the Johnson & Johnson companies in developing and executing programs designed to increase the quality of life within Johnson & Johnson companies and minority communities. Johnson & Johnson has 10 employee-resource groups that are LEADERSHIP WILLIAM C. Asians. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO.” Johnson & Johnson has an established supplier-diversity program. In the corporate-and-organizationalcommunications area.” That doctrine has long set the tone for diversity and inclusion efforts within the organization. 42 DiversityInc .J. WELDON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO We are very pleased that we continue to be measured as one of the best companies committed to diversity and inclusion. CARTER • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER At Johnson & Johnson. LGBT resources and referrals.JOHNSON&JOHNSON 6 A s stated in its credo. Johnson & Johnson believes “that attracting. resources for parenting and grand-parenting.S. monthly work/life webinars on generational issues and work/ life changes. work/life resources for military families.59 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. N. These include: seven onsite child-development centers.. Throughout the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies we believe diversity and inclusion matter. childcare resources and referrals. and a variety of global programs have been launched leveraging diversity and inclusion. Novartis AG. We understand that winning in diversity and inclusion allows us to attract superior talent and drive extraordinary outcomes for our patients and customers. Procter & Gamble U. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO.000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 118. generations. Supplierdiversity information is included in RFPs. talent development. Procurement-management compensation is linked to supplier-diversity results. U. The Global Office of Diversity & Inclusion is a major catalyst in accelerating business results and sustainable competitive advantage. as well as supplier diversity. retention. Johnson & Johnson offers a variety of global mentoring programs. onsite fitness centers at more than 26 locations. Twenty-five percent of employees participate in at least one of these employee groups.

“PwC” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (a Delaware limited liability partnership). We are proud to be an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer. . pwc. which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited. All rights reserved.My brand: Full-time mom. full-time “Audit Rock Star” Allison Eidinger.com/diversity © 2011 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. In this document. Senior Manager. each member firm of which is a separate legal entity.

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. 4 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. color. promotions and compensation of employees are conducted without regard to race. COM/EVENTS D PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 Information Technology and Services MAIN COMPETITORS Accenture. holding executives accountable for results. which I’m proud to say is our centennial year. peer mentoring. DIVERSITY & WORKFORCE PROGRAMS. IBM has long been a leader in understanding local cultures and working to align them with its own values. IBM has a Business and Technical Leaders Assessment Process that identifies LEADERSHIP 20 C IA R L• AWA ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV.COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY 7 IBM CORP. Those values are heavily dependent on an inclusive workplace. Palmisano personally reviews as many as 1. . In the 21st century. HUMAN RESOURCES C 44 DiversityInc S IBM’s commitment to diversity continues in 2011. group mentoring. With IBMers across 170 nations and every part of the human family.Y. religion. Achieving the full potential of this diversity is a business priority that is fundamental to our competitive success. PRESIDENT AND CEO 1 IVERSITYI N 1• D Global Cultural Competence PE TOP COMPANY FOR The employees of IBM represent a talented and diverse workforce.S. there is no typical IBMer but rather a 400. IBM has been a model for flexible and innovative benefits as well—in the United States and globally. Business activities such as hiring.S. against genetic testing. The initiatives include individual mentoring. Under the leadership of Ron Glover. talented and diverse workforce. Globally.500 people’s progress. In respecting and valuing the diversity among our employees. gender identity or expression. HP. and all those with whom we do business. Diversity & Workforce Programs. significantly improving its human-capital demographics and creating a globally inclusive workplace that sets a model for other multinationals. EMPLOYEES 104. GO TO WWW. IBM has the most developed employee groups worldwide. All this has occurred during a period when IBM has been transforming itself from a technology company to a consulting firm. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO. Employees work with their managers to determine work arrangements. N. Not IBM. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity and nurtures people with executive potential. more currently. Microsoft U. President and CEO Sam Palmisano and his direct reports examine all people running businesses and those who could have the potential at least two levels down. Once a year. This company’s values have been demonstrated across the globe.000-person strong.168 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 426. language mentoring and speed mentoring. sexual orientation. This applies to approximately 20.000 people globally. the company has been at the forefront of diversity-management initiatives. and all of its managers participate. disability or age. U. HEADQUARTERS Armonk. reverse mentoring. Chairman. RON GLOVER • VICE PRESIDENT. T here are companies that were known as early diversity leaders that were content to rest on their reputations while others surged ahead of them. gender. training. including the CEO and his direct reports. managers are expected to ensure a working environment that is free of all forms of harassment. externally and internally. vice president. The Global Work/Life Fund develops and supports dependent-care programs for families. IBM will leverage the creativity. capability and diversity of thought in its workforce—for innovation and solutions that address the world’s toughest challenges.87 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. 9–10 EVENT ROD ADKINS. SAM PALMISANO • CHAIRMAN. 3 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO.751 GLOBAL REVENUE $99. as well as cultural-competence training and cross-cultural mentoring. from its fight against apartheid and.DIVERSITYINC. This policy is based on sound business judgment and anchored in the IBM values. national origin. SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY GROUP FOR MORE INFORMATION. Mentors and mentees have crosscultural training. The company has one of the finest and most varied mentoring programs we’ve seen anywhere. The leadership of IBM is very focused on talent development. where its human capital— and the innovation created by diverse ideas—is its major asset.

.org/jobs/diversity WE ARE PROUD TO BE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. Colorado. there is a unique point of view. If you believe that we all offer something unique. kp. Ohio.6 million of them in California. and each other. this is the place to put your beliefs into practice. We are all different. Oregon. All 8. We share this commitment with our patients. yet we share a common goal—to inspire our patients to be the best they can be. As an employee of Kaiser Permanente. the District of Columbia. Virginia. Maryland. KAISER PERMANENTE SALUTES THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITY® Kaiser Permanente is the nation’s leading nonprofit integrated health plan and a recognized health advocate in the communities in which it resides. visit our Web site. Hawaii. and Washington. And know that behind every person. ourselves. Georgia.I believe OUR DIFFERENCES MAKE US STRONGER I acknowledge the contributions of others. This is what brings us together as family. For more information about career opportunities with Kaiser Permanente. I am valued for my individuality and for what I contribute. and children who turn to us for care. women. our every action supports the well-being of the men. Here. Stand up for my opinions.

EMPLOYEES 40. sponsors were cross-cultural and most were white.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $26. Women’s Initiative national managing partner. 46 DiversityInc . He gets a perfect score for CEO Commitment on the survey and has always been a visible diversity-management leader. and for the first time. headed by Barbara Adachi. Last year. For example. These groups are used for recruitment. last year. KPMG. We strive to promote an environment where all our talent can have rich and rewarding careers and where our clients can expect stronger teams and more innovative services. all talent development. The firm’s leap into the top 10 of this list is a testament to the rigorous recent efforts to enhance succession planning. Our unwavering commitment to attracting. Most of the LEADERSHIP BARRY SALZBERG • CEO We are committed to making Deloitte a diverse and inclusive workplace. to value our people for who they are as much as what they contribute. He meets monthly with employeeresource groups and holds the firm’s senior leaders accountable for meeting diversity goals. it starts with the top. Asian and American Indian managers and senior managers to help them get to the next stage of their careers. internally and externally. The Women’s Initiative (WIN). GLOBE (LGBT employee group) members were a key part of developing a training scenario for one of the learning modules. they were given sponsors within the company as their advocates. In addition. including the Emerging Leaders Development Program (ELDP).S. has contributed significantly to the talentdevelopment efforts. and CEO Barry Salzberg’s commitment to diversity has never wavered. with 34 percent of its employees participating in them. Professional Services MAIN COMPETITORS Ernst & Young. Latino. now in its sixth year. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. The firm has very strong employee-resource groups. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO.DELOITTE 8 U COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 nder Chief Diversity Officer John Zamora. Much of Zamora’s efforts have been concentrated on talent acquisition and development. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity As always. the program had 120 participants (almost half were women). members from each of the ERGs participated as content reviewers and pilot testers. retaining and developing the very best talent in the marketplace responds to our clients’ demands for high-performing teams with diverse perspectives and experiences that deliver outstanding results. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO. HEADQUARTERS New York U. as well as external coaches (the coaching relationships last eight months to a year). talent development and diversity training. a topic on the mind of most companies these days. PwC U. which identifies highperforming/high-potential Black. Deloitte has a host of programs. Deloitte has extraordinary benefits and has led corporate America in researching generational communications.S. JOHN ZAMORA • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER Diversity is a business imperative at Deloitte that paves the way to achieve our vision of becoming the standard of excellence. As part of the process. Deloitte revamped its mandatory diversity and inclusion e-learning training for new hires.60 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. and communications internally and externally. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos NO. Deloitte has taken major steps in diversity management in what is surely the most competitive industry: professional services.266 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 170. relevance to the business goals.

extend and save the lives of millions. Imagine a company whose diversity initiatives go way beyond the requirements. Initiatives like networking and employee resource groups. child/elder care subsidies and more. every day.Think what’s possible. Novartis is committed to embracing and leveraging diverse backgrounds. There aren’t enough accolades to describe the thousands of people at Novartis who. but invigorating. please visit Novartis. We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v. Which is why our commitment to our employees has been and always will be a top priority. domestic partner benefits. This. results in a corporate culture that’s not only unique. and outreach panels. For more information. we’re launching new products at an unprecedented rate. having one of the most admired pipelines in the industry. with new diversity initiatives that empower us in even greater ways than before. work tirelessly to improve. diversity councils.com Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. is a world leader in the research and development of products that protect and improve health and well being. And we are proud to say that this phenomenal growth translates into outstanding stability for your professional career. cultures and talents to achieve competitive advantage. coupled with healthy lifestyle programs. . As one of the highest-ranking and fastest-growing pharmaceutical companies in the world. part of the Novartis Group.

with 60 percent of its total employee population and 70 percent of managers now participating. and our commitment is as strong as ever. helps new hires navigate the unwritten rules of the organization. EMPLOYEES 41. JIM NORMAN • VICE PRESIDENT. I believe fostering a workplace that welcomes diversity of all kinds—perspectives. including career-planning workshops. A key factor in Kraft’s success is the commitment of Chairman and CEO Irene Rosenfeld to the organization’s diversitymanagement agenda. DIVERSITY Our diversity strategies are driven by our culture. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women Under the direction of Jim Norman. and are grounded in leader accountability. values-led organization that consistently delivers products and innovation that delight our diverse customers and consumers around the world. Consumer Products MAIN COMPETITORS ConAgra Foods. Kraft requires diversity and inclusion training for every employee at each career stage. 48 DiversityInc . the leadership skills of ERG leaders and enhance team effectiveness.21 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO.038 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 127. ERG leaders received the same type of business training that other business leaders typically receive. Jump Start. vice president of diversity. our internal and external partnerships. except their focus was on the alignment of diversity and inclusion strategies. backgrounds and cultures—is a proven way to attract and keep talented people and inspire them to do great things. which are used extensively in recruitment. For about 200 of the company’s most senior leaders. assisting with recruitment and supporting employee development. Kraft launched an Employee Council Leadership Academy to develop LEADERSHIP IRENE ROSENFELD • CHAIRMAN AND CEO Diversity and inclusion are fundamental to our business success.S. is professional development.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $49. The company has dramatically improved its mentoring program this year. there is a clear link of executive incentive compensation to diversity performance. What’s most remarkable about Kraft is its 10 strong employee-resource groups. Sara Lee American Retail U. U. In 2010. For two days. training. The ERGs are also involved in mentoring and peer-coaching projects.S. This is the first time Kraft has been ranked in the top 10. openness and inclusion is part of the daily workplace— from training and mentoring to accountability in leadership objectives. ERGs play a vital role in the company. Ill. One of the key objectives of the company’s ERGs. This year. peer mentoring and marketing. One program. HEADQUARTERS Northfield. Kraft links diversity goals of each business unit and function directly to executive compensation to strengthen accountability. which Kraft calls employee councils.KRAFT FOODS 9 K COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 raft Foods’ stellar rise on the list is a testament to the company’s commitment to building a diverse and inclusive workplace and the remarkable work it’s doing with its employee-resource groups. Metrics that assess the value of the training include course evaluations and employee-engagement surveys. networking and mentoring. Our actions are essential to creating a performance-driven. designed to help women and employees from traditionally underrepresented groups increase their effectiveness in their current and future assignments. experiences. Kraft is up an impressive 26 spots from the previous year.

24103NSS . We’re proud that our Chairman and CEO John Veihmeyer is providing the leadership we need to make that goal a reality. and that DiversityInc has ranked us among its Top 50 Companies for Diversity for the fourth consecutive year.S. logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. kpmgcareers. The KPMG name. a Swiss entity. Printed in the U. Where success can be achieved by all. member firm of the KPMG network of . independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”).A. and develop high performers from all backgrounds. Where every professional can leverage their unique skills to realize their goals.com © 2011 KPMG LLP a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U. Our goal is to continually attract. It’s KPMG LLP . retain. All rights reserved.Talent has no boundaries There is a place where ambitions are limitless.S.

Latinos. marking the first time it has appeared in the top 10. which has resulted in the development of such items as a special toothpaste product that is thriving in Asia. meets regularly with employee groups. 19 percent of the company’s advertising dollars was spent on multicultural advertising. Today. talent development and multicultural-marketing outreach.PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 COLGATE-PALMOLIVE CO. has a personal quote about diversity on the corporate website. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity The company has diversity leadership at the top. which provides employees with access to up to $50. we strive to create a truly inclusive environment that allows us to benefit from diverse viewpoints. EUGENE KELLY • WORLDWIDE DIRECTOR. with 80 percent of its philanthropic endeavors directed toward ethnic. The commitment we share to recognize and value the differences that make each Colgate person unique is a critical part of our culture and vital to our future success. the women’s network operates in 36 different countries. GLOBAL DIVERSITY & INCLUSION At Colgate-Palmolive. and Our Customers • Effectiveness and Efficiency in Everything • Innovation Everywhere • Leadership The company’s commitment to serve its community remains strong. Groups benefiting include the UNCF. signs off on supplier-diversity goals.000 in seed money was the decision to expand the women’s ERG on a global scale. PRESIDENT AND CEO The diversity of Colgate people around the world is vital to finding new solutions to business challenges and new opportunities from unique insights. the National Hispanic Corporate Achievers. Colgate-Palmolive has 38 employee LEADERSHIP IAN COOK • CHAIRMAN. Minority University Pledge.000 in seed money to bring their ideas to fruition. women and multicultural employees. The groups adhere to the company’s strategic initiatives identified in its business mission: • Focus on Consumers. Chairman.442 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 36. EMPLOYEES 5. Colgate-Palmolive has mandatory diversity training globally as well as global employee-resource groups. HEADQUARTERS New York U. These differences are an enormous source of strength and advantage for our business and are essential to creating a culture of innovation throughout the company. The company has a Global Innovation Fund program. The company moved up four spots to No. targeting Blacks. retention. President and CEO Ian Cook chairs the diversity council and appoints its members. the Profession. The idea behind the fund was to engage employees by giving them a platform to share their innovative ideas. which are used for recruitment. 10 W INDUSTRY ith at least 75 percent of its employees outside the United States. 50 DiversityInc . 10 this year. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos NO. Fifty percent of Colgate-Palmolive’s employees are members of these groups. Asians. Procter & Gamble U. Additionally. COMPANY FACTS Consumer Products MAIN COMPETITORS Church & Dwight. the consumer-products company is clearly committed to its global values and the benefits of diversity management. American Indians. LGBT or disability nonprofits. Another idea sparked by the Global Innovation Fund and $40. LGBT people and/or people with disabilities.S. and is involved with Catalyst and New Visions for Public Schools. networks. the New York City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and College for Every Student.002 GLOBAL REVENUE $15.S.56 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. signs off on executive compensation tied to diversity. They include groups for parents.

2011 .

the American Indian College Fund and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. who actively chairs the executive GLOBAL EMPLOYEES diversity council and meets quarterly with employee-resource groups. Wells The deep CEO commitment to an inclusive workplace Fargo & Co. These 15 groups participate in activities with business partners. and continues to lead the way. diversity challenges aren’t anything new. Chase. with 44 percent going to multicultural nonprofits. U. including the National Urban League. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO. some of which involve its 11 employee-resource groups. including the Martin Luther King Memorial Project.S.com/top50 . Under Steve Bucherati. group director of diversity and fairness. for its philanthropy. With more than 34 percent of its U.PROFILES 1–10 LEADERSHIP T 11 BANK OF AMERICA COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Financial Services BRIAN T. HEADQUARTERS Atlanta U.C.S. Coca-Cola is also renowned. ERGs (known at the bank as affinity groups and employee networks) have tracked results tied to business initiatives. the company in recent years has ratcheted up its talent-development initiatives. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity NO. virtual mentoring and reverse mentoring. GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION EXECUTIVE NO. EMPLOYEES 9. A MUHTAR KENT • CHAIRMAN AND CEO STEVE BUCHERATI • GROUP DIRECTOR. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees 12 THE COCA-COLA CO. $134.S. Nestlé U. with consistent progress in all four areas measured. and rightly so.19 billion The bank has a long history as a leader in work/life benefits and supplier diversity. including group mentoring. The company came back from the nation’s largest racial-discrimination lawsuit. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks s Coca-Cola merges with Coca-Cola Enterprises. to emerge as a leader of diversity management. Cadbury Schweppes. with 43 percent of its donations going to multicultural nonprofits. EMPLOYEES The organization’s emphasis on diversity and inclusion definitely 248. DIVERSITYINC LISTS PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 GERI THOMAS • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. especially for women. The inclusive efforts continue with its corporate philanthropy. DIVERSITY & FAIRNESS 52 DiversityInc READ MORE To read the extended company profiles. settled more than a decade ago.600 GLOBAL REVENUE $35. Coca-Cola makes sure the groups are available to everyone in the organization and that they communicate with each other. Bank of America is a well-rounded diversity-management leader.DiversityInc. the soft-drink giant faces new diversity-management challenges integrating its mature initiatives with a much larger and much less diversity-oriented organization.S. employees as members of these groups. and to talent development has been at the forefront of U. It has a variety of mentoring programs. 288.074 starts with CEO Brian Moynihan.S. N. visit www.190 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 139. For Coca-Cola.12 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP Consumer Products MAIN COMPETITORS PepsiCo. near the top of this list for most of the last nine years. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO. and has used its impressive employeeresource groups for mentoring and leadership development.000 He has clearly communicated the personal and business importance of GLOBAL REVENUE diversity management to employees and in public statements. such as rolling out new products and packages with Market Impact Teams. the National Council of La Raza and the Special Olympics. JPMorgan highest-ranked bank and remains at the top of the list. MOYNIHAN • CEO MAIN COMPETITORS here’s a reason Bank of America has consistently been the Citi. HEADQUARTERS diversity-management initiatives in corporate America Charlotte.

which allows for more creativity and better collaboration. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited . Copyright © 2010 Deloitte Development LLC.deloitte. Deloitte has recognized that the strength we gain from the diversity of our talent fuels our growth. visit www. “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. To see how we help them reach for their own unique stars. enhancing the success of our teams.Reach for the stars Since inception of our Diversity & Inclusion initiative in 1994. Our people are encouraged to bring their authentic selves to work. Please see www. our inclusive environment. All rights reserved. and the careers of all our professionals.com/us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries.com/us/diversity As used in this document. deloitte.

the company continues to enhance its focus on crosscultural competence throughout the organization. with company Chairman and CEO J.771 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 151. reflective of our inclusive corporate culture. Marriott has a long history of community building through its operations in urban areas. where both suppliers and franchisers are often from the community. Within the networks. Marriott introduced a new learning curriculum focused on cultural competence and global leadership effectiveness.W. U. executive recruitment. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide U. EXECUTIVE RECRUITMENT ACCEPTING AWARD FOR TOP COMPANY FOR EMPLOYEE-RESOURCES GROUPS AT OUR NOV. The groups also are used for business outreach. HEADQUARTERS Bethesda. American Express also has worldclass work/life benefits. Last year. A AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. used for recruitment.” the company states. Marriott International demonstrates strength in all four areas measured on the DiversityInc survey. GO TO WWW. including many flexible workplace options.69 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. EMPLOYEES 108. HEADQUARTERS JENNIFER CHRISTIE • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER & VICE PRESIDENT. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO.13 LEADERSHIP KENNETH I. More than 16. Those groups. leads Marriott’s diversity efforts. MARRIOTT JR..or minority-owned businesses. With employees speaking more than 50 languages and working in more than 70 countries and territories.S. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Hospitality MAIN COMPETITORS M JIMMIE PASCHALL • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women NO.DIVERSITYINC. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. NextGen Network and the National Academy Foundation. the company has made significant strides in increasing workplace diversity on every level and in communicating the value of diversity globally. American C I A • WAR LA Express is one of the few companies that has been on the DiversityInc Top 50 list every year since we started it in 2001. In early 2011. 9–10 EVENT: ED GILLIGAN.2 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) suppliers are women. Jimmie Paschall. 20 EmployeeResource Groups TOP COMPANY FOR •D 11 IVERSITYI N COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 J. National Minority Supplier Development Council. chief diversity officer and vice president. there are mentoring programs. are among the strongest anywhere in corporate America and have been a model for other organizations. MasterCard U.. sponsorship initiatives. senior vice president of external affairs and global diversity officer. EXTERNAL AFFAIRS & GLOBAL DIVERSITY OFFICER arriott has a long-standing commitment to diversity. Hyatt Corp. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity NO. and it starts at the top. • CHAIRMAN AND CEO D C Financial Services MAIN COMPETITORS Visa. which meets quarterly and includes rotational positions for its employee-resource groups. EMPLOYEES 26. such as the Felicidades and Lunar New Year gift cards that were created in partnership with AHORA (Hispanic Network) and ANA (Asian Network). Hilton Hotels Corp. Md.S.989 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 61.COM/EVENTS 14 MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL LEADERSHIP S New York U. 5 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks PROFILES 41–50 . talent-development opportunities. to give new employees “an immediate sense of community. There are 14 networks and more than 70 chapters globally. and networking.24 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $11. Almost 40 percent of the company’s philanthropy is directed at multicultural charities. VICE CHAIRMAN FOR MORE INFORMATION. CHENAULT • CHAIRMAN AND CEO PE long-time diversity leader.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $30. (Bill) Marriott Jr.W. which American Express calls employee networks. The company has a strong executive diversity council. including the National Black MBA Association.S. A commitment to diversity and inclusion is at the heart of Marriott’s culture.S. targeting top leadership with the goal of helping them better relate and do business in the global marketplace. a new program will be introduced for all employees company-wide. Now under the direction of Jennifer Christie.

Southern Company • Alabama Power • Georgia Power • Gulf Power • Mississippi Power • Southern Company Generation Southern Company Transmission • Southern Nuclear • Southern Power • Southern Telecom • SouthernLINC Wireless . wind. As one of the largest energy providers in the United States. And by supporting suppliers and partners of all backgrounds. we’re better equipped to provide great service in addition to diverse energy sources such as solar. We view our employees the same way we view energy: Our strength comes from our diversity. visit southerncompany.DIVERSITY IS A GREAT SOURCE OF ENERGY . For more information on our commitment to diversity.com. and nuclear. Southern Company is committed to growing and sustaining a smart. clean coal. talented workforce that is as diverse as the communities we serve.

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COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY

KENNETH FRAZIER
• PRESIDENT, CEO AND DIRECTOR

erck’s commitment to diversity globally and in the MAIN COMPETITORS United States remains stronger than ever, even as Bristol-Myers it worked to complete its $41-billion merger with Squibb, Pfizer, Sanofi-Aventis Schering-Plough. Led by Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer Deborah Dagit, Merck has a long hisU.S. HEADQUARTERS Whitehouse tory as a diversity leader as well as with its commitment and outStation, N.J. reach to people with disabilities and the LGBT community. In December 2010, Merck named its first Black CEO: President, CEO U.S. EMPLOYEES 34,760 and Director Kenneth Frazier, who took the helm of the company in January. He is one of just four Black CEOs leading Fortune 500 companies. GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 94,000 Merck’s work/life benefits are strong and include onsite childcare, flexible hours, onsite religious accommodations, subsidized memberGLOBAL REVENUE ship in wellness/fitness facilities, paid paternity leave, dependent-care $45.98 billion benefits, a caregiver website, a credit union, an eldercare program, and college webinars and counseling. The company has a long history of philanthropic commitment to multicultural groups; its current roster includes UNCF, GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network), The PhD Project, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, and Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities (COSD).
DIVERSITYINC LISTS

Pharmaceuticals

PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50

DEBORAH DAGIT
• VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER

NO. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity

NO. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees

NO. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities

NO. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity

LEADERSHIP

16 PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL
•D 11

IVERSITYI N

Community Development
PE
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TOP COMPANY FOR

COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY

Insurance and Financial Services
MAIN COMPETITORS

AIG, AXA Equitable, MetLife
U.S. HEADQUARTERS

Newark, N.J.
U.S. EMPLOYEES

20,023
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES

39,422
GLOBAL REVENUE

$38.41 billion
56 DiversityInc

mainstay on the DiversityInc Top 50 list, Prudential has vaulted from its middle-of-the-pack position to No. 16 as its deep-rooted external and internal commitment to inclusiveness accelerates. Under the efforts of Chief Diversity Officer Emilio Egea and Vice President of Diversity Ignace Conic, the diversity initiatives and goals to assess their success have been fully integrated into the management of the organization, including the senior-most leadership. There is a consistent communication to employees of the diversity strategy, and progress and accountability for diversity results are tied directly to the performance of the company’s Chairman and CEO John Strangfeld. Diversity is a specific goal in annual management-performance reviews, and every manager has to adopt at least one personal or organizational diversity objective. Managers receive consistent and comprehensive training and education about the value of diversity. The hallmark of this company is its truly amazing philanthropy to multicultural communities, especially in its home city of Newark, N.J. (also where DiversityInc’s headquarters is located). Prudential allocates 68 percent of its philanthropic efforts to charities aimed at Blacks, Latinos, Asians, American Indians, LGBT people and people with disabilities, and that includes partnerships with such organizations as the Boys and Girls Clubs of Newark, Aspira of New Jersey and the Children’s Defense Fund.

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• CHAIRMAN AND CEO ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT

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JOHN STRANGFELD, CHAIRMAN AND CEO
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.DIVERSITYINC. COM/EVENTS

EMILIO EGEA
• CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER

Work that makes a difference.

Opportunities that expand your horizons.

A culture committed to diversity and respect.

Are you ready for what’s next in your career? Are you ready for what’s next in your career? At Booz Allen Hamilton, our ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients.
Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships with organizations such as Society of Women Engineers and the League of Black Women, to supporting events such as AIDS Walk and National Coming Out Day, diversity is central to who we are and what we do. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career. For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.

Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers
We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.

LEADERSHIP

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Freight Transportation
MAIN COMPETITORS

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MICHAEL J. WARD
• CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO

Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Norfolk Southern & Union Pacific
U.S. HEADQUARTERS

Jacksonville, Fla.
U.S. EMPLOYEES

29,691
DIVERSITYINC LISTS

NO. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity

ed by Susan Hamilton, assistant vice president of diversity and chief diversity officer, CSX has demonstrated strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. With 1 in 5 employees at CSX serving or having served in the military, the freight-transportation company has become an employer of choice for veterans. By forming relationships with military-installation liaisons, the company actively recruits at military bases throughout its geographical footprint. CSX also has one of the most effective military employee-resource groups anywhere; its Military Affinity Group (MAG) serves as a recruiting and mentoring source, helping to transition the military to civilian life. In 2010, Michael J. Ward, chairman, president and CEO, donated $1 million to the Wounded Warrior Project, a national nonprofit in Jacksonville, Fla. The group provides programs and services to severely injured service members. Ward’s support of diversity is strong and includes regular meetings with ERGs, using the corporate intranet to communicate his commitment to diversity and linking executive compensation to diversity goals. VERSITY • DI IN 1

PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50

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DiversityManagement Progress
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TOP COMPANY FOR

SUSAN HAMILTON • ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT OF DIVERSITY AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER

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ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV. 9–10 EVENT

MICHAEL J. WARD, CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.DIVERSITYINC.COM/EVENTS

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TIM SOLSO
• CHAIRMAN AND CEO

LISA GUTIERREZ
• EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, GLOBAL DIVERSITY

or the fifth consecutive year, Cummins has been named to the DiversityInc Top 50 list, moving up from No. 26 in 2010 to No. 18 this year. The company performed well in all four areas measured on the DiversityInc survey. Chairman and CEO Tim Solso gets top honors for his diversity commitment, including meeting once a month with employee-resource groups and chairing the company’s diversity council, which meets regularly to set diversity goals and assess success. Solso is involved with the Initiative for Global Development, whose mission is to fight poverty around the world by promoting economic development. As part of his role, he is active in an effort called Frontier 100, which pairs U.S. CEOs with African CEOs in a mentoring and information-sharing relationship. The company has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce. Cummins also has a solid supplier-diversity program, with 9.6 percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement going to minorityowned suppliers. The company offers mentoring, training and financial assistance to its diverse suppliers.

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58 DiversityInc

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COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY

Manufacturing
MAIN COMPETITORS

Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, Navistar
U.S. HEADQUARTERS

Columbus, Ind.
U.S. EMPLOYEES

14,700
GLOBAL EMPLOYEES

40,000
GLOBAL REVENUE

$13.23 billion

To read the extended company profiles, visit www.DiversityInc.com/top50

It’s a promise that you’ll be encouraged to share your views.COM/CAREERS in.WITH Y O U ’ R E I N E X C E L L E N T C O M P A N Y. © ADP. your own idea of success. The ADP logo is registered trademark of ADP. All other logos and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Inc. and achieve. M/F/D/V. individual impact collaborating being myself Diversity at ADP. . 2011. Count me ADP. Join us at ADP. every day. We are an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. And it’s an invitation to define. and discover how we’re counting on you to come in and make a difference. We are proud to be recognized as one of DiversityInc’s Top 50 Companies for Diversity. build relationships and make a real impact on our business. Inclusion is a core value that’s helped us become a $9 billion global leader in workforce solutions. It’s a mindset that creates a workplace in which you feel good about yourself and the people around you. ADP believes that diversity leads to strength.

EMPLOYEES 21. and the Aetna Foundation has been a strong voice in the battle to end healthcare disparities. 4 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. LGBT or disability nonprofits. the National Urban League. its diversity leadership with vendors. UnitedHealth Group. innovation and talent development. Specifically. WellPoint U.S. has four focus areas: workforce demographics. Its diversity council. Management compensation is tied to successful diversity initiatives.25 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. LGBT and disability nonprofits.PROFILES 1–10 LEADERSHIP 19 AETNA etna’s move up 11 spots on the list is very well deserved. and diversity goals are part of executive performance reviews. National Council of La Raza. Last year. workplace culture. COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Health Insurance MAIN COMPETITORS CIGNA.258 GLOBAL REVENUE MARK T. Cox recently implemented a new tracking tool that automates philanthropic giving. HEADQUARTERS Hartford. Cox Communications continues to show unwavering commitment to improving diversity and inclusion in its workplace. Conn. This new process results in better tracking of dollars and allocation to ethnic. Aetna is also very cognizant of its role in the community and the need to give back. Aetna is very metrics-driven and assesses its executive compensation linked to diversity goals through a comprehensive scorecard. used to assess how goals are met. EMPLOYEES 33. The company supports many local and multicultural nonprofits. AT&T U. BERTOLINI • CEO AND PRESIDENT $34. who also leads the company’s national executive diversity council.S. 30 percent of the company’s senior executives sit on the boards of multicultural nonprofits. To read the extended company profiles. Esser. The tireless efforts of Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer Raymond Arroyo have enabled Aetna to emerge as a true diversity-management leader.DiversityInc.S. and for outreach to clients.com/top50 Telecommunications MAIN COMPETITORS Verizon Communications.000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 22. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity NO. whose belief in diversity is personal and deep-rooted. Boys & Girls Clubs of America and National Association of Multi-Ethnicity in Communications. meets with employee groups every quarter. The commitment to community is not just in dollars. 15 percent of Cox’s gross revenue was spent on philanthropy. especially employee engagement. Aetna’s ERGs for younger workers and teleworkers are a model for other organizations as ways to increase enthusiasm.10 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO.S. 4 RAYMOND ARROYO • VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities 20 COX COMMUNICATIONS LEADERSHIP U COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PAT ESSER • PRESIDENT MAE DOUGLAS • EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF PEOPLE OFFICER nder the guidance of President Pat Esser and Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer Mae Douglas.748 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 35. visit www. U. and 43 percent of that was directed toward ethnic. supplier diversity and marketplace diversity. including the Human Rights Campaign. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks 60 DiversityInc READ MORE . Former CEO and chairman Ron Williams’ strong commitment to diversity management as a business driver is being accelerated under new CEO and President Mark Bertolini. Aetna has broken new ground in its use of employeeresource groups both for workplace-diversity goals. led by Bertolini.350 GLOBAL REVENUE $9. HEADQUARTERS Atlanta U. Aetna was named DiversityInc’s Top Company for ERGs at our November 2010 event. For these remarkable ERG achievements. and its dedication to the communities it serves.

What’s next for your business? ey.com © 2011 Ernst & Young LLP. we differentiate ourselves and help our clients reach their full potential. Ernst & Young Global Limited. . That’s why we develop leaders with truly inclusive teaming skills and a global mindset. each of which is a separate legal entity. By growing our diverse and inclusive culture.What makes an inclusive leader? Today’s business landscape has no borders.

HEADQUARTERS East Hanover. personally signs off on goals and achievements for supplier diversity. Comcast areas measured by the DiversityInc Top 50 survey. head of Pharma North America and president of Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. one Latino member and two women members.21 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Pharmaceuticals MAIN COMPETITORS Bristol-Myers Squibb. Qwest. groups and personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics and U. Sanofi-Aventis U.S. A long-time diversity leader.56 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. Verizon’s 10 employee-resource groups provide networking.118 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 119. personally signs off on executive compensation tied to diversity. American Association of People with Disabilities. PHARMA NORTH AMERICA. N. N NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS CORP. Roche. MAIN COMPETITORS This message has been infused through all business AT&T. which are used extensively for diversity recruitment.. Novartis received DiversityInc’s Top Company for Global Cultural Competence award. U. The company has a strong formal mentoring program with a cross-cultural component. units and is clear in the company’s consistently strong results in all four Sprint.400 The company’s 13-member board of directors includes three Black GLOBAL REVENUE members.S. $106. including the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. 194. LGBT and disability nonprofit groups. André Wyss. Corp.57 billion The company’s commitment to philanthropy and communities is strong. with 56 percent of philanthropy aimed at multicultural. Employment Horizons. PRESIDENT. Forty percent of its philanthropic endeavors go to multicultural charities. It has demonstrated superior global cultural competence. Pathways to Independence. generational. N. LEADERSHIP PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 LEADERSHIP IVAN SEIDENBERG • CHAIRMAN AND CEO ANDRÉ WYSS • HEAD. EMPLOYEES progress as well as goals and achievements for supplier diversity. retention and talent development. chairs and appoints members to the diversity council. Novartis has solid work/life benefits and mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce. 186.’s commitment to diversity globally and in the United States remains steadfast. GLOBAL EMPLOYEES and diversity goals are part of executive performance reviews. held every month for more than a day. Last year.J. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention ovartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. In addition. The company has long-term CEO commitment and good support from Vice President and Head of Diversity & Inclusion Marilyn Priestley.S. diversity awareness and recruitment efforts. Chairman and CEO Ivan Seidenberg signs off on executive comU. and they also educate the company about issues that concern diverse communities. seminars and conferences for members. MARILYN PRIESTLEY • VICE PRESIDENT AND HEAD OF DIVERSITY & INCLUSION 22 VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS D MAGDA YRIZARRY • VICE PRESIDENT. 62 DiversityInc . EMPLOYEES 11. WORKPLACE CULTURE. Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.S. the ERGs assist the company with strategic business goals such as employee development. meets quarterly with the council and with employeeresource groups. and Cerebral Palsy of North Jersey. mentoring. including LGBT. special initiatives. and regularly uses the intranet to communicate his diversity commitment. personally meets with employee-resource Basking Ridge. NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS CORP. people with disabilities and veterans groups. and the World Institute on Disability. HEADQUARTERS pensation tied to diversity.093 Management compensation is tied to successful diversity results. Novartis has 23 ERGs. ASPIRA Association.418 GLOBAL REVENUE $51.J. DIVERSITY AND COMPLIANCE iversity is an integral part of Verizon’s corporate culCOMPANY FACTS ture. including the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. Verizon consistently INDUSTRY communicates the importance of diversity and incluTelecommunications sion in the workplace to long-term business success.

At ING.By joining our different backgrounds. In a culture of inclusiveness. Not all products available in all locations. Your future.us for information regarding other products and services offered through the ING family of companies. The ING Foundation is privileged to support America’s diverse communities.com. all people are afforded a chance to fulfill their potential. we create a better future.® Products and services are offered through the ING family of companies. we believe that our society is strengthened when we celebrate diversity by taking advantage of our unique differences. Please log on to http://ing. ©2011 ING North America Insurance Corporation. For more information on our Partners In Empowerment opportunities. Made easier.ing-usafoundation. please visit: www. Cn65414052011 .

000 signing off on diversity metrics and progress. and includes metrics and formal follow-up to assess results. The company has a strong mentoring program with a crosscultural component. The company states that 100 percent of the organization has access to its mentoring programs and 100 percent of its employee population participates in the program.S. human capital and diversity. recreation clubs. personally reviewing and 225.864 personally signing off on executive compensation tied to diversity. Roche. including bereavement leave. HEADQUARTERS continues to embed diversity and inclusion into its culture. Accenture has an extremely strong mentoring and coaching program. PIERRE NANTERME • CEO LAMAE ALLEN DEJONGH • MANAGING DIRECTOR. The program has a cross-cultural component. the responsibility for cultivating diversity Technical Services and fostering an inclusive environment. The objective of the Early Warning Indicator process is to provide early visibility to Black employees who may be on a downward performance trend or are “at risk” for a low performance rating. This year.DiversityInc. Ill. Pharmaceuticals MAIN COMPETITORS Merck & Co. EDS.032 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 90. IBM Corp. 30. work/ life benefits and philanthropy. which involves all of its managers. Abbott has a longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion and continues to demonstrate a corporate culture that enhances talent development. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans 64 DiversityInc READ MORE To read the extended company profiles. New York Former Chairman and CEO Bill Green.com/top50 . begins with its most senior leaders. EMPLOYEES clearly communicated his deep commitment to diversity and inclusion. the company is introducing new diversity training and development programs. “At risk” individuals are flagged on a monthly basis to ensure they are getting the mentoring and coaching they need to increase their chances of success.. adoption assistance. and regularly using the GLOBAL REVENUE company intranet to communicate diversity commitment. U. EMPLOYEES 34. including onsite childcare.S. HUMAN CAPITAL & DIVERSITY Scientific and t Accenture. HEADQUARTERS Abbott Park.S. health coaching and assessments (both including spouses). managing Deloitte director of U. and 50 percent of its managers participate. legal discounts and referrals. and a phased retirement program called Freedom to Work that allows employees 55 and older with 10 years of service to reduce or change their responsibilities without impacting benefits. both globally and MAIN COMPETITORS domestically. health-risk assessment and coaching.09 billion The company leverages targeted company-wide diversity training that is mandatory for the entire workforce. who stepped down Jan. either as mentors or mentees.S. Abbott has a long list of work/life benefits.S.S. PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 LEADERSHIP 24 ABBOTT I COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY MILES D. offers training for both mentors and mentees. visit www. U. WHITE • CHAIRMAN AND CEO n its eighth year on the list.. U. Sanofi-Aventis U. including an Early Warning Indicator. 1.17 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS WILLIAM LEE • DIRECTOR.PROFILES 1–10 LEADERSHIP 23 ACCENTURE COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Professional. Accenture U. and long-term-care insurance. CORPORATE DIVERSITY. meetGLOBAL EMPLOYEES ing regularly with employee-resource groups. Under the guidance of LaMae Allen deJongh. INCLUSION & COMPLIANCE NO.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $35. $23. Abbott also has strong benefits for lesbian and gay partners of employees. relocation assistance.

Everyone brings something different to Marriott. We believe embracing differences makes Marriott a great place to work. All walks of life. . Inc. FIND YOUR WORLDSM © 2011 Marriott International. conduct business and stay.® Marriott International welcomes people from everywhere.

S. 8 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity LEADERSHIP 26 PAT HEMINGWAY HALL • PRESIDENT AND CEO CAROLYN CLIFT • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER Chicago long-time DiversityInc Top 50 company. rocter & Gamble (P&G) is a long-time leader in diversity. 5 NO. participate in the program either as mentors or mentees. and subsidized membership in wellness or fitness facilities.S. and 60 percent of its employees and 65 percent of its managers. P&G has a very diverse board of directors.000 on goals and achievements for supplier diversity and regularly uses GLOBAL REVENUE the intranet to communicate diversity commitment. Health Care Service Corp.S. Of its 11 board members. UNCF and the Congressional Black Caucus. He also holds a $78.339 diversity. New Mexico. this is Health Care Service Corp. including coverage for children up to age 26. with almost 13 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) procurement going to minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs) and women-owned business enterprises (WBEs). The company.LEADERSHIP P NO. including the League of United Latin American Citizens. 9 25 PROCTER&GAMBLE COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 BOB MCDONALD • CHAIRMAN AND CEO Consumer Goods MAIN COMPETITORS Johnson & Johnson. Thirty percent of the company’s philanthropy is directed toward multicultural nonprofit groups. GLOBAL EMPLOYEES meets quarterly with the council and with ERGs. job sharing. The company was honUnilever ored with DiversityInc’s Top Company for Global Cultural U.167 areas measured by DiversityInc. Oklahoma and Texas. National Council of La Raza. 9 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO. the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. dependent-care benefits (including childcare and eldercare). Chairman and CEO Bob U. including the top three levels of senior management. adoption assistance. EMPLOYEES McDonald personally signs off on executive compensation tied to 34. has 16 employee-resource groups that play a key role in educating the workforce on diversity. sponsors supplier-diversity business conferences for WBEs and MBEs and has a minority vendorrecruitment program that helps local minority-owned businesses. personally signs off 127. CIGNA U. (HCSC) offers its employees solid benefits. HEADQUARTERS 66 DiversityInc . inclusion and cross-cultural knowledge. one is Asian. A HEALTH CARE SERVICE CORP. which operates Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans in Illinois. In addition.-China Business Council and the UNCF. Health Care Service Corp. 5 NO. two are Black.94 billion senior advisory position in the U. The comU. chairs and appoints members to the diversity council. both globally and domestically. In addition. The company has a strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural component. lactation programs. EMPLOYEES pany continues to show consistent strength in the four 16. Kimberly-Clark. COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Health Insurance MAIN COMPETITORS Aetna. HEADQUARTERS Competence award in 2010. DIVERSITYINC LISTS LINDA CLEMENT-HOLMES • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention NO.S. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO.’s seventh year on the list. one is Latino and four are women.S. onsite religious accommodations such as prayer rooms. The company is also committed to supplier diversity. Cincinnati CEO commitment is firm.

com. Inspired by the thrill. BRING ALL OF WHO YOU ARE. Bring it! You’re bristling with ingenuity.BRING YOUR IDEAS AND PASSION. You can also like us on Facebook at facebook. . Crackling with creativity. you’ll find a dynamic environment that thrives on the diverse perspectives and unique contributions of each and every one of its team members — and puts you in a position to effect positive change. the realization of seeing your ideas through.com/verizoncareers for information on career opportunities and upcoming events. BRING YOUR DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES. Take the lead at yourverizoncareer. And with Verizon. locally and globally. Careers For Everything You Are Verizon is an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v. from explosions of brilliance in the mind to powerful instruments of communication and connectivity.

Customer Service Center Diversity Council.88 billion eneral Mills moves up two spots on the DiversityInc Top 50 list this year. General Mills has a long history of mentoring. featuring images and/or videos or text to specifically address Blacks. its strong network of employeeresource groups. The Walt Disney Co. Asians and American Indians and formal diversity metrics to monitor and advance its diversity efforts. The company also has a formal succession-planning program for Blacks. Betty’s Family (LGBT employees) and Black Senior Leaders in Marketing Diversity Groups. and its formal cross-cultural mentoring and diversity-training programs. KEN CHARLES • VICE PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Media & Entertainment MAIN COMPETITORS NBC Universal. Time Warner moves up 11 spots for its broad and inclusive approach to creating a diverse workplace.. The company has 31 ERGs. personally signs off on goals and achievements for supplier diversity and regularly uses the company intranet to personally communicate diversity commitment.S.S.S. The company uses its ERGs to encourage.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $26. American Indians. Latinos. which include an American Indian Council. EMPLOYEES 21. which consists of the chairs of each ERG at every division and in every region in North America who share and communicate best practices. Making its seventh appearance on the list. The company has 29 ERGs that are used to identify and nurture management talent. Time Warner Chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes regularly participates in employee-resource-group events and internship programs.S. Asians. Time Warner also has an ERG Leadership Council. The company gets high marks for its leadership commitment.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $14. Latinos. CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND DIVERSITY READ MORE To read the extended company profiles.712 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES I 28 TIME WARNER LEADERSHIP 31.DiversityInc. Consumer Insights Diversity Council. HEADQUARTERS New York U. The company also excels at positioning diversity on its corporate website. EMPLOYEES 16. Kraft Foods PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 68 DiversityInc U. on-board new employees and assist in diversity training. both informal and formal. JEFF BEWKES • CHAIRMAN AND CEO LISA GARCIA-QUIROZ • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. the LGBT community and people with disabilities.LEADERSHIP PROFILES 1–10 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Consumer Products MAIN COMPETITORS G 27 GENERAL MILLS KEN POWELL • CHAIRMAN AND CEO Dannon. talent development and mentoring initiatives.89 billion n its second year on the list. Sales Diversity Council. Kellogg Co. some of which have been in force for more than 10 years. The company ties 30 percent of executive bonuses to diversity goals. visit www.970 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 33. augment marketing efforts. HEADQUARTERS Minneapolis U.com/top50 . LGBT and/or disability nonprofits. this company continues to build a diverse and inclusive workplace through its successful mentoring program and active employee-resource groups. The company has 16 different mentoring programs. U. assess and implement diversity-training initiatives. Thirty-four percent of its philanthropic endeavors are directed toward ethnic. The company formally evaluates mentoring relationships every six months and communicates the benefits of mentoring internally.

To learn more. Inc. A great culture. Stacey F.Expect the Best Target. visit Target.com/careers.com/careers X expect to lead You can expect a lot from a career at Target. 441450 . Your best is just ahead. Incredible opportunity. Inc. All rights reserved. And one of the most powerful brands in the world. A community-focused company. Corporate ©2011 Target Brands. The Bullseye Design and Target are registered trademarks of Target Brands.

It has a firm-wide scorecard to set diversity goals.300 GLOBAL REVENUE $61. The firm has a very strong cross-cultural mentoring program.S. the human-capital demographics should show even more progress. EMPLOYEES 20. Ernst & Young. particularly for women. in the middle of a highly competitive pack. GO TO WWW. U. KPMG gives all of its partners annual diversity objectives. Its management demographics. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities NO. Texas U.S.161 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES MICHAEL DELL • CHAIRMAN AND CEO 103. The company has been evaluating and revamping its diversity-management efforts in the past year. as is its emphasis on accountability and measurable goals linked to diversity-management results.S.S.63 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. The very active Diversity Advisory Board. with more than 43 percent of its U. Dell has made it onto the DiversityInc Top 50. PwC U. 1 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO.S. with more than 20 percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement spent with minorityowned business enterprises. EMPLOYEES 36. track progress of diversity initiatives. KPMG has world-class employee-resource groups. The Diversity Advisory Board meets quarterly in person and more often virtually. business and diversity advocacy.20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N D PROFILES 1–10 LEADERSHIP C T 29 KPMG TOP COMPANY FOR COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Talent Pipeline Professional Services MAIN COMPETITORS JOHN VEIHMEYER • CHAIRMAN AND CEO KATHY HANNAN • NATIONAL MANAGING PARTNER. efforts of Kathy Hannan.000 GLOBAL REVENUE PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 $20. The groups. DIVERSITY AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PE his professional-services firm has C I A • WAR LA been making excellent strides in the most competitive industry for diversity management under the U.S. partnerships with community organizations and employee engagement of members versus non-members. N. is comprised of the partners who serve as co-chairs of the employeedriven Diversity Networks. HEADQUARTERS Montvale. 6 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity ACCEPTING AWARD FOR TOP COMPANY FOR TALENT PIPELINE AT OUR NOV. which includes three external members from academia. CHAIRMAN AND CEO FOR MORE INFORMATION.J. related talent acquisition and onboarding of new employees. S Deloitte.540 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 138. including the number of members trained through the ERGs. HEADQUARTERS Round Rock. are vital to talent development at the firm. 9–10 EVENT: JOHN VEIHMEYER. national managing partner. are showing improvement. Supplier diversity continues to be a strength for Dell.COM/EVENTS COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Electronic Computer Manufacturing MAIN COMPETITORS 30 DELL fter two years on DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies list. LEADERSHIP HP.S.49 billion LISA MINK • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. and help implement and prioritize diversity objectives. retention and promotion for mentees are compared against that of those who didn’t participate. available at all U. employees participating. Dell’s efforts to dramatically increase participation in its seven employee-resource groups and to enhance the value of these groups to its business goals are paying off. GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION 70 DiversityInc .DIVERSITYINC. As its cross-cultural mentoring program becomes even more consistent across the organization and diversity in succession planning is more prominent. diversity and corporate social responsibility. U. and the results of initiatives put in place earlier coming to fruition and a key push have been paying off. locations. available to all managers. In addition. The company measures the impact of ERGs in several ways. IBM Corp. the performance-management system is set up so that a partner’s activities in diversity-specific roles (such as being a member of the Diversity Advisory Board or a Diversity Network leader) are recognized and accounted for during all performance reviews and compensation decisions. Engagement.

October 21. 2011 FOR MORE INFORMATION | glsen.HONORING 2011 Student Advocate of the Year GALA CO-CHAIRS Friday.com GREAT CORPORATE VISIBILITY – JOIN US ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC .org | glsen@stampeventco.

3 percent of Tier I (direct contractor) procurement spent with minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs) and 11.S. which are company-funded and are used for recruitment. The company has an increasingly strong mentoring program. Its mentoring program includes a senior mentoring program. signs off on diversity goals and meets monthly.59 billion 72 DiversityInc . Management Services MAIN COMPETITORS Accenture. talent development.8 percent spent with women-owned business enterprises (WBEs).S.400 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 5. N. U.500 GLOBAL REVENUE $5. The groups are used for talent development. mentoring circles by region and mentoring circles by constituency group with its employee-resource groups. which has a crosscultural component. peer mentoring and virtual mentoring. Visa U. especially in the management levels of the organization. and more than half its employees are members of these groups. The executive diversity council.Y. SHRADER • CHAIRMAN AND CEO LEADERSHIP AJAY BANGA • PRESIDENT AND CEO DONNA ALLIGOOD JOHNSON • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER 32 BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON I COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY BETTY THOMPSON • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER n its first time participating.S. The company tells us it has ratcheted up its diversity initiatives in the last two years. a Rising Leaders group. Va. HEADQUARTERS Purchase.54 billion much-improved MasterCard comes back to the DiversityInc Top 50 list. EMPLOYEES 24. with partnerships with several organizations.600 GLOBAL REVENUE $5. The mentoring initiative. including robust employee-resource groups. chaired by General Counsel Noah Hanft. A MASTERCARD WORLDWIDE PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 LEADERSHIP DR. The relationships are evaluated annually. It includes mentoring for new hires. the Hispanic College Fund. veterans. community involvement and results of the company’s employeeengagement survey.345 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 23. the CEO and his direct reports. Chief Diversity Officer Donna Alligood Johnson’s efforts at gaining senior leadership buy-in and improving the human-capital demographics are showing results. on-boarding of new employees and mentoring. There are 14 employee-resource groups. Booz Allen Hamilton makes the list with strong supplier diversity as well as good diversity-management initiatives. and the Boys & Girls Clubs. in which 50 percent of its managers participate. is consistent across the entire organization and involves the most senior leadership. MasterCard is working hard on talent development. including the UNCF. the company provides training and financial education for MBEs and WBEs and ties procurement compensation to diversity goals. The company also has a long history of multicultural philanthropy. These include groups for people with disabilities. on-boarding and to assist in diversity-training efforts. which it calls business-resource groups. HEADQUARTERS McLean. In addition. with 12. U. The success of these groups is measured in a variety of ways. EMPLOYEES 3. a Parents Forum and a Middle East North Africa Forum. Booz Allen Hamilton has a strong supplier-diversity program.S. Deloitte U. an online program. including talent sourcing.31 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Financial Services MAIN COMPETITORS American Express Co. with employeeresource-group leaders included. which Booz Allen Hamilton calls employee diversity forums.. RALPH W. MasterCard has 12 employee-resource groups. More than half the employees are members of these groups.

Divisions of Health Care Service Corporation. a Mutual Legal Reserve Company. an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. providers and suppliers is honored to be working closely with these families. Together as a team. Each of our employees. members. and we appreciate their commitment in making HCSC the name more generations E E trust. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion makes HCSC a company more people of all generations trust.Health Care Service Corporation has a long history of meeting the needs of diverse families and communities. Health Care Service Corporation has been meeting the needs of diverse families and communities every day. We seek employees and participating providers who are dedicated to working closely with these families. . For over 75 years. We continue to help diverse individuals and families in the communities we serve live healthy and inspired lives. it is our mission to help every individual live a healthy and inspired life. and also seek diverse suppliers from these communities.

.S. Those include onsite childcare. HEADQUARTERS Chairman and CEO Fisk Johnson. Organization of Chinese Americans and the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. $8. The hospitality company has created a diverse and inclusive workplace culture. flexible hours. adoption assistance. LGBT and disability nonprofit groups including the National Business Disability Council. Procter & tionally underrepresented groups. community outreach and professional-association activities.DiversityInc.Y.96 billion paternity leave. bereavement leave. visit www. U.07 billion 74 DiversityInc READ MORE . The company also has a strong commitment to its LGBT employees. PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 MARIA L. with 50 percent of philanthropy directed toward ethnic. CAMPBELL • DIRECTOR OF DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP 34 FRITS VAN PAASSCHEN • PRESIDENT AND CEO DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. Wis.S. offering a host of samesex domestic-partner benefits. HEADQUARTERS White Plains. the fifth generation of his family Racine. onsite religious accommodations.. meets U. job sharing. 12. Marriott International U. Starwood has been a mainstay in the DiversityInc Top 50. U. N. retirement transition (such as part-time or virtual work). Unilever with disabilities. The company has a strong history of community philanthropy. EMPLOYEES regularly with employee-resource groups and signs off on diversity met3. retaining and promoting talent from tradiClorox. Hispanic Scholarship Fund. and paid time for volunteering. The move reflects the company’s commitment MAIN COMPETITORS to recruiting. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans NO.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $5. appoints members of the diversity council. He also chairs the diversity council.S.000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 145. including 401(k). EMPLOYEES 48. The company also offers excellent benefits for same-sex domestic partners of employees.135 rics and progress. GLOBAL EMPLOYEES The company has solid work/life benefits including onsite childcare. President and CEO Frits van Paasschen personally signs off on executive compensation tied to diversity and personally communicates his enthusiasm for diversity on the company’s intranet. Hyatt Corp. to lead the company. and shuttle service from the train station to the office. particularly employees Gamble. Forty-five percent of its employees are members of more than one of these groups. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities ow in its eighth year on the list. which meets quarterly.com/top50 N STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Hospitality MAIN COMPETITORS Hilton Hotels Corp. sign-language courses. as well as its strong work/life benefits. The council is made up of senior leaders. offering its employees strong formal mentoring programs and solid work/life benefits. SC Johnson has 11 employee-resource groups and uses them for recruitment. the ability to work from home and/or telecommute. paternity leave. adoption assistance and family medical leave.000 alternative career tracks for parents or others with long-term familyGLOBAL REVENUE care issues. and its role is to partner with other company leaders to drive the company’s diversity strategy forward.S. dependent-care benefits (including eldercare). To read the extended company profiles. lactation programs.PROFILES 1–10 LEADERSHIP 33 SC JOHNSON S COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY FISK JOHNSON • CHAIRMAN AND CEO C Johnson moved up eight spots on the DiversityInc Top 50 Consumer Products list this year. talent development and marketing.

A. communities thrive. When individuals succeed. At Wells Fargo. we welcome and value the insights and perspectives drawn from unique life experiences. It is those distinctive viewpoints that provide us with the fresh thinking we need to help all our customers reach their financial goals. wellsfargo.com © 2011 Wells Fargo Bank. N. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (476001_01431) .With you when you see through the eyes of many Recognizing and promoting diversity means having an appreciation for difference.

HEADQUARTERS Indianapolis U. is leading the effort to integrate diversity management throughout the company. where it has created regional councils to understand specific customer markets. LGBT and/or disability nonprofit groups. UnitedHealth Group U. PRESIDENT AND CEO LINDA JIMENEZ • VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER ellPoint moves up 14 spots on the list this year.S. JCPenney is a strong believer in diversity training. WellPoint has introduced a number of diversity initiatives to encourage more diverse hiring and recruitment strategies. The training is mandatory for the entire workforce.” MYRON E.S. including the UNCF and several charities in the Dallas area. JCPenney jumps 11 spots. The keen involvement of Chairman and CEO Mike Ullman. EMPLOYEES 171. The company’s workforce-diversity gains are reflected in the increased efforts to reach multicultural customers and in the alignment of diversitymanagement efforts with supplier diversity and philanthropy. Chair. Texas U. the company’s ERGs work collaboratively in the design and implementation of programs that are specifically geared toward leadership skills and competency. which gives 60 percent of its philanthropic allocations to multicultural nonprofits. and together with Linda Jimenez. Seventy percent of the company’s philanthropic endeavors are directed toward ethnic.PROFILES 1–10 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Retail MAIN COMPETITORS T 35 JCPENNEY LEADERSHIP Kohl’s. For this company. has been instrumental in JCPenney’s rise as a diversity-management leader in the retail sector and throughout corporate America. A strong focus has been to increase the number of people from traditionally underrepresented groups in its leadership ranks through talent development and mentoring. culturally competent customer service is essential to business goals. The huge jump reflects WellPoint’s continued commitment to diversity. In recent years. CIGNA. especially talent development. 7 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos here are good reasons JCPenney was named DiversityInc’s Top Company for Diversity-Management Progress at our event in November 2010. (MIKE) ULLMAN III • CHAIRMAN AND CEO PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 KATHRYN COLLINS • VICE PRESIDENT. In addition. EMPLOYEES N/A 76 DiversityInc . President and CEO Angela Braly is deeply committed to diversity.004 DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. Macy’s U. helping to identify and groom talent that may not have been identified through the company’s formal succession planning. vice president and chief diversity officer. especially with women and people with disabilities. Its Diversity & Inclusion Training is both stand-alone and incorporated into other training for its employees. JCPenney is using its associate-resource groups in the field.S. As Ullman said when accepting the DiversityManagement Progress award: “Our entire focus on customer satisfaction has been about associate engagement. INCLUSION & DIVERSITY AND RECRUITING LEADERSHIP ANGELA BRALY • CHAIR. HEADQUARTERS Plano. In its second year on the list.S. WellPoint has seven employee-resource groups that serve as an important talent-development venue. who heads the diversity council. Building community is critical to this company. W 36 WELLPOINT COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Health Insurance MAIN COMPETITORS Aetna.

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4 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks n its second year on the list. EMPLOYEES 120. Lockheed Martin Corp. GO TO WWW. Diversity goals are part of ADP’s executive performance reviews. director of diversity and inclusion. employee-resource groups and creating an inclusive workplace. $8. signing off on executive compensation tied to diversity. Supported by Sylvester Mendoza. In cases where there are no clear candidates from these groups.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $34. Top 10 Companies wellness/quiet rooms or new-mothers rooms.DIVERSITYINC. tuition assistance. promotions and community-outreach efforts.J. shoe shiners.S. and meeting with employee-resource groups. PRESIDENT AND CEO FOR MORE INFORMATION. the Martin Luther King Memorial.93 billion In the human-capital sector. LEADERSHIP 20 C IA R L• AWA 78 DiversityInc D PROFILES 1–10 Boeing Co.S. HEADQUARTERS Los Angeles U. including groups for people with disabilities. NO. Those • DI IN 11 clinics employed more than 30 doctors and nurses. a group of senior executives who set ADP’s overall diversity-management direction and GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 47.000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 75. EMPLOYEES 30. a mobile vision center. Tara Amaral. onsite passport renewal. The groups are used for recruitment. General Dynamics. including Great Minds in STEM. The company has a strong succession-planning program that includes women.545 Butler chairs the Executive Diversity Council. Asians and American Indians for positions at the top two levels of management.S.COM/EVENTS PE S . Their success is measured through retention. mentoring and diversity training. More than 50 percent of the company’s philanthropy goes to multicultural organizations.000 support and promote diversity and inclusion initiatives at every level. U. Administaff. CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY 38 ADP (AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING) LEADERSHIP ow in its second year on the list. ADP also operates nine medical clinics that focus on prevention VERSITY and cultivating a healthier lifestyle for its employees. onsite DVD rentals. 9–10 EVENT GARY BUTLER. and free video conferfor Latinos encing to faraway family members during the holidays. a mobile The DiversityInc beauty salon. Northrop Grumman has 32 employee-resource groups. ADP offers its employees a solid DIVERSITYINC LISTS work/life-benefits package. HEADQUARTERS Roseland. N. the company demonstrates progressive leadership and a strong commitMAIN COMPETITORS ment to creating a diverse and inclusive workplace. talent development. regularly communicating its value internally and externally. it is expected that future talent be identified to move into these groups. WES BUSH • CEO AND PRESIDENT PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 SANDRA EVERS-MANLY • VICE PRESIDENT.COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Aerospace MAIN COMPETITORS I 37 NORTHROP GRUMMAN CORP. Northrop Grumman moves up 10 spots as its clear leadership commitment and improving humancapital demographics demonstrate the growing importance of diversity to this organization. veterans.. CEO and President Wes Bush takes a visible role.76 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. U. women engineers and new hires. Paychex Under President and CEO Gary Butler and Chief Diversity Officer and Vice President of Talent Acquisition U. on-boarding of new employees. and the Jackie Robinson Scholarship Foundation. and GLOBAL REVENUE a percentage of their bonuses are tied to diversity results. Blacks.S. engagement. ADP has emerged as a leader in talent development. Latinos. some in existence for more than a decade. Northrop Grumman’s efforts rely heavily on accountability for diversity results. 4 onsite childcare. including flexible work arrangements. TOP COMPANY FOR Business Software & Services N C GARY BUTLER • PRESIDENT AND CEO TARA AMARAL • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER AND VICE PRESIDENT OF TALENT ACQUISITION Working Families ACCEPTING AWARD AT OUR NOV.

drawn from diverse perspectives.We’re always looking for character. .kelloggcareers.com ®. TM. ™ At Kellogg. visit www. © 2011 Kellogg NA Co. Their unique ideas. our success comes from people. To explore your opportunities. are what strenghen the character of our company.

President and CEO John Lechleiter personally signs off on compensation tied to diversity metrics and progress goals and achievements for supplier diversity. The 15-member board has four women and one Black.DiversityInc. Diversity is included in its RFPs.S. Wells Fargo continues to be a leader in its outreach to multicultural communities. President and CEO John Stumpf. the American Foundation for the Blind. HEADQUARTERS Indianapolis U. Lilly has a solid supplier-diversity infrastructure. DesertArc. PRESIDENT AND CEO PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 SHAUN HAWKINS • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER 40 WELLS FARGO & CO. job sharing. At Lilly. paid paternity leave. Pfizer. Citi. The Wells Fargo board is diverse as well.S. Lesbian and Straight Education Network). dependent-care benefits. onsite medical services at no cost to employees.350 GLOBAL REVENUE $23. paid parent leave for new fathers and adoptive and foster parents. including GLSEN (the Gay. personal ambulatory care through staff physicians.08 billion n its second year competing. HEADQUARTERS S LEADERSHIP San Francisco GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 280. 10 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans uccessfully merging two corporate cultures is never easy. the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. The rejuvenated executive diversity council. U. JOHN STUMPF • CHAIRMAN. Bancorp U. chaired by Chairman. is improving its methods of holding people accountable for diversity goals and measuring diversity success. unpaid dependent-care leave for up to three years. the bank has made strong inroads to these communities. psychologists and nurses. The new Wells Fargo is an improving diversity company. bonuses and stock are tied to successful results. He meets regularly with employee-resource groups.com/top50 . and procurement-management compensation is tied to results. Raises. visit www. but the union of Wells Fargo and Wachovia was definitely one made in diversity-management heaven. telecommuting. The company demonstrates top-notch work/life benefits including onsite childcare. diversity goals are part of executive performance reviews. Wells Fargo has a long history of philanthropy to multicultural nonprofits. Latino and LGBT community. and more than 36 percent of its advertising budget goes to multicultural media. senior vice president. one Latino and one Asian member. has a personal quote about diversity on the corporate website and regularly uses the company intranet to communicate diversity commitment. flexible hours. JOHN LECHLEITER • CHAIRMAN. Eli Lilly and Co.25 billion DIVERSITYINC LISTS NO. and complementary. and up to 16 weeks of maternity leave. diversity-management strengths.S. Using social media and other marketing techniques.S. PRESIDENT AND CEO PAT CRAWFORD • SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND HEAD OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION READ MORE 80 DiversityInc To read the extended company profiles. dependents and domestic partners. The company provides financial assistance and training to diverse suppliers. Sanofi-Aventis U. COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Financial Services MAIN COMPETITORS Bank of America. has moved off DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies list.892 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 38. head of diversity and inclusion. Chairman. LEADERSHIP GlaxoSmithKline.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $93. especially the Asian. EMPLOYEES 16. 2 The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees NO. led by Pat Crawford.PROFILES 1–10 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Drug Manufacturing MAIN COMPETITORS I 39 ELI LILLYAND CO. Both companies had a long history on this list and had different.

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and uses them extensively for recruitment.PROFILES 1–10 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY M 41 MONSANTO CO. and has initiated a host of programs aimed at external audiences. Rockwell Collins received the community-development award because of its history of philanthropy.S. Bayer CropScience.000 Jones meets with employee-resource groups. Louis area where it is headquartered. With more than 20. Louis. U. the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. 20. LEADERSHIP Agriculture MAIN COMPETITORS BASF. the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. HEADQUARTERS HUGH GRANT • CHAIRMAN. especially in the St. Monsanto clearly states its values on its website. HEADQUARTERS He did it.” The company supports eight employee-resource groups. a nonprofit in Cedar Rapids. EMPLOYEES 10. 16. Louis U. PRESIDENT AND CEO PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 St.400 GLOBAL REVENUE $10. communicates the business relevance of diversity to internal and external stakeholders. saying it “will listen carefully to diverse points of view and engage in thoughtful dialogue to broaden our understanding.S. university partnerships. Insight St. cultural and ethical concerns of people throughout the world. signs off on executive GLOBAL REVENUE compensation tied to diversity. Partnerships include The PhD Project. The results are paying off in improving demographics. and Missouri Business Leadership Network. Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference and Graduate Engineering and Science Fellowships for Minorities. Syngenta U. Talent development is a major focus.50 billion MICHELE HOLTON • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER 42 ROCKWELL COLLINS LEADERSHIP L COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY CLAY JONES • CHAIRMAN. the UNCF. the St. while accepting DiversityInc’s special award as the Top Company for Community Development. President and CEO Clay Aerospace. such as supplier diversity. the Society of Women Engineers. chairs the executive diversity coun$4. National Society of Black Engineers.000 employees across the globe. onsanto continues its commitment to diversity management and to building an increasingly diverse and inclusive workplace.” and that it will “respect the religious. PRESIDENT AND CEO JACY HAEFKE • DIRECTOR.300 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 21. with the help of the diversity staff and growing Cedar Rapids. veterans and people with disabilities. including groups for LGBT employees. Jones told our audience he was absolutely determined to Raytheon have his company earn a spot on the DiversityInc Top 50. especially with a multicultural perspective. MAIN COMPETITORS Honeywell Rockwell Collins’ Chairman. and other key relationships with organizations. Louis Public Schools Foundation. and spearheaded the creation of Diversity Focus. Iowa enthusiasm from the managerial ranks. talent development and marketing.S. These include donations to St. The company has a deep-rooted and consistent commitment to philanthropy.704 Iowa–based defense contractor a major player in the diversityGLOBAL EMPLOYEES management world. That enthusiasm is spurred by U. who has been the driving force in making this Cedar Rapids.67 billion cil.S. The program is consistent across the organization and includes Jones and his direct reports. DIVERSITY AND WORKFORCE EFFECTIVENESS Aerospace/Defense ast November. Louis University. with a strong mentoring program. 82 DiversityInc . scholarships. EMPLOYEES Jones.

learn more about us and see employee video profiles at merckcareers. We believe that with the collective backgrounds. experiences and talents of our employees. impacting lives all around the globe. Many cultures. If you’re ready to find your place in the world of Merck. anything can be conquered. Our professional culture is one of diverse. At Merck. It is those unique qualities that give us perspective to spark innovation and address unmet medical needs of people throughout the world. . Many perspectives. One World. we embrace the individual differences each of us bring to the world. Merck is an equal opportunity employer — proudly embracing diversity in all of its manifestations. and respectful individuals.jobs/diversityinc. collaborative.Many backgrounds. One Merck. Together we help deliver Merck medicines to those who need them.

S.S.S. videos and employee meetings. The company performed well in all four areas measured on the DiversityInc Top 50 survey. Employee perceptions on diversity and the work environment are measured through employee surveys. visit www. Allstate has 21 employee-resource groups. talent development. Target has a long-standing and demonstrated history in the communities it serves.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $67. PRESIDENT AND CEO COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY llstate’s story is one of a great comeback. EMPLOYEES 33. Walmart U. HEADQUARTERS Minneapolis U. Diversity training is mandatory for its entire workforce and is held every month for one full day. the ability to work from home and/or telecommute. Allstate’s Chairman. the company had fallen off the DiversityInc Top 50 and has made it back this year. Its current nonprofit relationships include the UNCF. PRESIDENT AND CEO KIM STRONG • VICE PRESIDENT.DiversityInc. U.S.com/top50 . While ERGs are currently available only to HQ employees. Retail MAIN COMPETITORS Costco Wholesale Corp. The company has solid work/life benefits.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $31. onsite daycare. President and CEO Thomas J.39 billion 84 DiversityInc READ MORE To read the extended company profiles. held for half a day every month. American Indian Scholarship Fund. The company has employee-resource groups used for diversity recruitment. Management Leadership Tomorrow..000 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 355. DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION arget remains focused on driving its diversity goals and building an inclusive culture. A longtime diversity leader. the Hispanic Heritage Foundation Education Scholarship and the National Society of Hispanic MBAs. subsidized membership in fitness facilities. flexible hours. It has a strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural component. which it says are instrumental in the development and enhancement of its diversity training. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. The move is a testament to the company’s continued commitment to creating a diverse and inclusive workplace. lactation programs. job sharing.221 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 35. In the area of philanthropy. PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 THOMAS J. U. EMPLOYEES 350. Wilson regularly communicates the importance of diversity through Allstate publications. Property & Casualty Insurance MAIN COMPETITORS Farmers Insurance Group. onsite religious accommodations and adoption assistance... Kmart Corp. Hispanic Scholarship Fund. employee-resource groups and mandatory diversity-training programs. HEADQUARTERS Northbrook.43 LEADERSHIP ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO. the Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund. dependent-care benefits. with strong work/life benefits. Progressive Casualty Insurance Co.40 billion MICHAEL ESCOBAR • ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER LEADERSHIP 44 TARGET CORP. plans are in place to extend the ERGs to field operations in 2011. including retirement transition. T COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY GREGG STEINHAFEL • CHAIRMAN. Target has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce. Ninety percent of managers and 90 percent of employees participate in the mentoring program. WILSON • CHAIRMAN. meets regularly with ERGs and personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics and programs as well as goals and achievements for supplier diversity. retention. Ill. supplier diversity and to reach customers in the community.

While our vision is global. we focus upon the distinctive cultures and communities in which we live and work. www.com/go/diversity .© Eastman Kodak Company.kodak. suppliers. consumers. We champion diversity as a business imperative to help drive innovation. and more. 2010 Diversity & Inclusion drives innovation and success Kodak’s commitment to diversity and inclusion touches customers. employees. we create technologies and services that unleash the power of pictures and printing. Become part of our picture—and join us on our journey to enrich people’s lives. shareholders. Working together.

20 billion oyota makes the list for the fifth time in the last six years. U. The company has strong roots in its communities. The company has 17 employee-resource groups. including the National Council of La Raza. visit www.DiversityInc. financial education and mentoring/training to its diverse suppliers. meets regularly with ERGs. DIVERSITY & INCLUSION COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Automotive MAIN COMPETITORS American Honda.S. appoints members of the diversity council. The company provides financial assistance. Its Diversity Advisory Board. Toyota’s flat structure gives it a unique opportunity to have broad-based leadership participation in diversity initiatives. These include religious and age-based groups. Nissan North America U. including one for caregivers. the Hispanic Scholarship Fund and Push for Excellence.com/top50 . and good supplier diversity. with strong diversity-management best practices. Time Warner Cable’s Chairman and CEO Glenn Britt personally signs off on executive compensation tied to diversity. with pre. with 43. The groups have a senior executive sponsor and are used for recruitment and marketing purposes.S. The company website is clear about the multicultural commitment. General Motors.5 percent of its philanthropy aimed at multicultural organizations. especially employee-resource groups.S.COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Communications MAIN COMPETITORS T 45 TIME WARNER CABLE LEADERSHIP PROFILES 1–10 Comcast Corp.S.S. DirecTV.734 GLOBAL REVENUE $229. and has a senior advisory position at the Emma Bowen Foundation and Walter Kaitz Foundation. EMPLOYEES 27. chaired by former U.and post-training surveys to assess success. are company funded. with images and videos featuring people from traditionally underrepresented groups. Toyota also has an excellent supplier-diversity program. meets quarterly and is comprised of internal and external leaders. which it calls Business Partnering Groups.445 his is Time Warner Cable’s third year on the list. Toyota also has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce. and the commitment to diversity best practices by the company’s senior leaders remains focused and strong. HEADQUARTERS New York U. EMPLOYEES 47. Time Warner Cable also has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce.. personally reviews and signs off on diversity metrics and goals. which it calls employee networks. Toyota has 13 employee-resource groups. HEADQUARTERS New York U. the Congressional Black Caucus. has a personal quote about diversity on the corporate website. The groups have senior executive sponsors. Secretary of Labor Alexis Herman.475 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES T 46 TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA LEADERSHIP 317. YOSHI INABA • PRESIDENT AND COO DIAN OGILVIE • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER 86 DiversityInc READ MORE To read the extended company profiles. and are used for recruitment and mentoring. GLENN BRITT • CHAIRMAN AND CEO PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 TERRI MOORE • DIRECTOR. DISH Network Corp. which lasts a full day and is held monthly. with more than 7 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) spend going to minorityowned businesses. the UNCF. the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

” As the nation’s leading health benefits company. EOE . we are proud of our dedication to diversity. Better health care. WellPoint. WellPoint serves the health care needs of nearly 34 million members. One way is through Associate Resource Groups like ANGLE. Our diversity makes us stronger. At WellPoint. enhance and maximize customer relations. “It’s about me. Visit us online at www. living my life as the person I really am. Recently ANGLE’s Safe Space and gender transition programs garnered recognition from the Association of Diversity Councils as a Top 25 US Diversity Council.com/careers. and create and leverage leadership opportunities for all of our employees. Inc. ® Registered Trademark. Inc. ® Registered Trademark. thanks to you. All Rights Reserved. where LGBT employees and allies work to develop and sustain a culture of inclusion.Thanks to You. DiversityInc Media LLC © 2011 WellPoint.wellpoint.

the Hispanic Scholarship Fund.LEADERSHIP PROFILES 1–10 COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY F 47 FORD MOTOR CO. Ford spends more than 14 percent of its Tier I (direct contractor) spend with women. The company also sponsors formal external training and mentoring for key diverse suppliers.8 percent of its philanthropy to charities aimed at multicultural. AXA Equitable has been setting diversity goals and holding executives accountable for reaching those milestones. 43 percent of managers now participate in its mentoring program. Ford’s commitment to supporting its community has always been strong. as evidenced by its supplier-diversity initiatives.S.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $128.S. The company has seven employee-resource groups. the company has remained focused on driving its diversity and inclusion goals forward and on reaching out to multicultural communities as customers and suppliers.S. XA Equitable climbs onto the DiversityInc Top 50 for the first time after making DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies list last year. Under the guidance of Chief Diversity Officer Tracey Gray-Walker.S.com/top50 . Thirty-eight percent of Ford’s employees are members of at least one of these groups.985 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 9. The French-based company even has a Francophile Engagement Challenge group. Dress for Success and the UNCF. Mich. backup childcare. PERSONNEL & ORGANIZATION PLANNING COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Financial. Community philanthropy includes partnerships with such multicultural charities as the Organization of Chinese Americans. which raises cross-cultural awareness and helps with networking. U. including the CEO and senior levels of the organization. The company directs 28. Toyota Motor North America U. EMPLOYEES MARK PEARSON • PRESIDENT AND CEO 4.44 billion TRACEY GRAY-WALKER • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER 88 DiversityInc READ MORE To read the extended company profiles. General Motors Corp. recruiting and international assignments. which is frequently cited as a model for inclusive religious employee groups.DiversityInc. such as eldercare and legal services. which it uses extensively for talent development and marketing. Life Insurance MAIN COMPETITORS AXA EQUITABLE 48 LIFE INSURANCE CO. Even during tough economic times. ALAN MULALLY • PRESIDENT AND CEO Automotive MAIN COMPETITORS Chrysler. Hartford Life U. LEADERSHIP Allianz Life. which have been increasing in membership and importance to AXA Equitable’s business goals.95 billion ord’s long-time presence on the DiversityInc Top 50 list is a testament to its commitment to diversity best practices throughout the entire organization.508 GLOBAL REVENUE $11. this company has made tremendous strides. PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 DEBBIE WEAKS • MANAGER. HEADQUARTERS New York U. visit www. Genworth Financial. AXA Equitable has made significant progress in creating talent-development opportunities and an inclusive culture. Internally. LGBT and/or disability nonprofit groups. and individualized support for family issues. EMPLOYEES 65. Among its groups is the Ford Interfaith Network. including paid time off for volunteering and community outreach. Specifically. With the help of its developing executive diversity council. The company has 11 strong employee-resource groups.or minority-owned businesses.095 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 164. The company offers first-rate work/life benefits.. HEADQUARTERS Dearborn.

com. If you are a supplier and are interested in doing business with RHI. © 2011 Robert Half International. “Ethics First. rhi. full-time and project positions through more than 350 locations worldwide. And his motto. register as a potential supplier at rhi. RHI-0311 . ONE DIRECTION Robert Half International (RHI) believes that integrating our diversity program into all aspects of our organization is a key business strategy for success. Our founder.com and select the Supplier Registration link under About Us. and visit our Careers section to submit your resume. If you are interested in learning more about career opportunities worldwide.MANY PATHS. Robert Half. D I V E R S I T Y C R E AT E S E N D L E S S O P P O R T U N I T I E S Founded in 1948.” continues to guide our business practices. Robert Half International is the world’s leader in specialized consulting and staffing services. We help our clients fill their most demanding temporary. was a pioneer against discriminatory practices in the workplace. please log in to our corporate website. An Equal Opportunity Employer. making diversity and inclusion a top priority for the organization.

EMPLOYEES N/A GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 71. Appliances MAIN COMPETITORS Lennox International. In the human-capital sector. stress-management clinics and stop-smoking programs). Whirlpool Corp. The company has nine employee-resource groups and it gets high marks for best practices. Chrysler also has strong mentoring and work/life programs.622 GLOBAL EMPLOYEES 51. Electrolux U. Chrysler’s commitment to its community is also strong.623 GLOBAL REVENUE $41.LEADERSHIP M 49 WHIRLPOOL CORP. held every month. General Motors Corp. Today. and paid time for volunteering. alternative career tracks for parents or others with long-term family-care issues. FETTIG • CHAIRMAN AND CEO COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY oving onto the DiversityInc Top 50 for the first time. dependent-care benefits including childcare and eldercare.37 billion D.. hair salon. Toyota Motor North America U. paid paternity leave.000 GLOBAL REVENUE $18.95 billion espite many challenges. Latinos. an onsite medical center. and 65 percent of its employees and 60 percent of its managers participate. Mich. U. lactation programs. either as mentors or mentees. HEADQUARTERS Benton Harbor. Chrysler Group has maintained a leadership commitment to promote diversity throughout the organization. gets points for its focus on diversity training and mentoring. GE Appliances and Lighting. adoption assistance. alternative career tracks for parents or others with longterm family-care issues. HEADQUARTERS Auburn Hills. The firm also offers solid benefits for LGBT employees.. Mentoring pairs have measurable goals and there is formal follow-up. Employee-resource groups are a key element of Chrysler’s diversity initiatives. Asians. EMPLOYEES D 50 CHRYSLER GROUP LEADERSHIP 33. Consumer Goods. The Chrysler Network Diversity and Dealer Development Program. ATM. and wellness programs (yoga. subsidized membership in fitness facilities. More than 70 percent of managers and 40 percent of employees participate in the mentoring program. Mich. Work/life benefits offered include adoption assistance. and each is sponsored by a senior executive. American Indians and Alaskans with a demonstrated entrepreneurial spirit.S. job sharing. Metrics that assess the value of the training include course evaluations and employee-engagement surveys. WILLIAMS • GLOBAL DIVERSITY LEAD COMPANY FACTS INDUSTRY Automotive MAIN COMPETITORS Ford Motor Co.S.V. SERGIO MARCHIONNE • CEO LISA WICKER • CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER . U.S. especially for women. That includes having a senior manager as a member. flexible hours.S. Whirlpool has mandatory diversity training for its entire workforce. which has a cross-cultural component. started in 1983. dependent-care benefits. mail services. PROFILES 1–10 PROFILES 11–20 PROFILES 21–30 PROFILES 31–40 PROFILES 41–50 90 DiversityInc JEFF M. paid time for volunteering or community work. creates dealership opportunities for Blacks. Whirlpool has competitive work/ life benefits including flexible work hours. allowing groups to meet during the workday. and using them for both recruiting and marketing purposes. The company has a strong mentoring program with a cross-cultural component. Chrysler has nine ERGs. The company demonstrates strong human-capital demographics.

we continue to build powerful alliances throughout our company and in the communities we serve. And our commitment to diversity and inclusion has helped foster a rich. rewarding environment that offers each of our associates unlimited opportunity. We all have distinct perspectives and individual talents that make each of us unique. ™ It’s the foundation of who we are. To learn more about starting a career with Bank of America and about our associate diversity programs. visit bankofamerica. ©2010 Bank of America Corporation ©2009 Bank of America Corporation DIV-120B-AD . From our boardrooms to our banking centers to our offices abroad.Diversity & Inclusion. Recognizing and celebrating those differences is integral to Bank of America’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.com/careers.

Wyndham Worldwide 92 DiversityInc . Each of these companies also has demonstrated. Comcast Corp. seven companies moved up from the 25 Noteworthy Companies list to the DiversityInc Top 50. Corporate and Organizational Communications. In the 2011 survey. through its data. HSBC – North America ING North America Kellogg Co. KeyCorp Macy’s MassMutual MetLife MGM Resorts International Pfizer Scripps Networks Southern Company Staples Tyco International The Walt Disney Co. and Supplier Diversity.DIVERSITYINC LISTS The 2011 DiversityInc 25 Noteworthy Companies COMPANIES OUR EDITORS SEE MAKING STRONG PROGRESS This list is comprised of companies our senior editorial staff determines have the potential to make The 2012 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. notable progress in the last year. Comerica The Dow Chemical Co. Capital One The Chubb Corp. All of these companies are either above average or significantly improving in the four areas measured: CEO Commitment. THE DIVERSITYINC 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES’ ACHIEVEMENTS 100% 84% 68% 64% have employeeresource groups include diversity in their RFPs for suppliers of their CEOs sign off on executive compensation tied to diversity THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER) of their CEOs meet with employeeresource groups regularly Altria Group Boehringer Ingelheim BASF Brown-Forman Corp. Human Capital. Hyatt Corp.

we believe diversity helps imagination thrive. We can’t wait to see where her imagination takes us next.Tanya Spencer is one of the many different faces of imagination we celebrate every day. which gives the world a better way to charge cars. ge. As a director of our ecomagination initiative. At GE.com/diversity . Tanya Spencer is living proof. her unique perspective supports innovations like the WattStation.

6. 10. 5. 4. 4. 9. Marriott International Southern Company Sodexo McDonald’s Altria Group The Coca-Cola Co. 6. PricewaterhouseCoopers Ernst & Young AT&T Kaiser Permanente Sodexo Johnson & Johnson Bank of America Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. 7. BLA= Black. AT&T Cox Communications Kaiser Permanente Northrop Grumman Corp.THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITYINC LISTS Recruitment & Retention 1. 3. 2. 8. 3. 4. Bank of America Merck & Co. 9. Latino and Asian American 94 DiversityInc . Cox Communications PG&E Corp. 8. the better the results. 2. Tier II WBEs Tier I MBEs Tier I WBEs Tier II MBEs TIER I TIER II MBE WBE Direct contractor Subcontractor Minority-Owned Business Enterprise Women-Owned Business Enterprise The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Supplier Diversity All Companies THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Blacks 1. 9. 2. Board of Directors One Level Below CEO & Direct Reports CEO & Direct Reports Workforce New Hires Promoted Into Management Management Promotions in Management The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Blacks All Companies HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle. 7. 6. 3. 10. 10. 8. 7. Procter & Gamble Marriott International New Hires Women Percentage of Managers in Mentoring Mentoring Program Has Measurable Goals New Hires BLA Promotions Into Management BLA Total Management Employees BLA Total Retention Women The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Recruitment & Retention Mentoring Program Has Formal Follow-Up Total Retention BLA All Companies THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Supplier Diversity 1. 5. Marriott International AT&T Sodexo KeyCorp HP CSX Corp. 5.

“We’re better when everyone’s included.” John Krafcik.com/diversity . President and Chief Executive Officer Hyundai Motor America HyundaiUSA.

6. Ernst & Young Board of Directors One Level Below CEO & Direct Reports Promoted Into Management Management Promotions in Management All Companies CEO & Direct Reports The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Latinos THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Asian Americans 1. 3. 2. Workforce New Hires Colgate-Palmolive Co. 6. 4. 6. 9. 5. Kaiser Permanente Sodexo Automatic Data Processing Procter & Gamble AT&T JCPenney Deloitte PG&E Corp. 4.DIVERSITYINC LISTS THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Latinos 1. 7. 9. 3. Latino and Asian American 96 DiversityInc . 8. 7. the better the results. CEO & Direct PricewaterhouseCoopers Reports Kaiser Permanente Management Abbott Promotions in Management American Express Co. 9. 2. 7. BLA= Black. Kraft Foods PricewaterhouseCoopers Sodexo Kaiser Permanente Procter & Gamble Johnson & Johnson Ernst & Young Deloitte Bank of America American Express Co. All Companies THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Executive Women 1. 8. 8. 5. 4. 10. Procter & Gamble The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans Wells Fargo & Co. Board of Directors One Level Below CEO & Direct Reports CEO & Direct Reports Workforce New Hires Promoted Into Management Management Promotions in Management The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Executive Women All Companies HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle. Workforce New Hires Deloitte Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Board of Directors Johnson & Johnson One Level Below Promoted Into CEO & Direct Reports Management IBM Corp. 2. 5. 10. 3. 10.

S.org . population. Since 1986. yet represent only 3% of Fortune 500 board seats. the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility has been doing its part to promote Hispanic inclusion in Corporate America – now it’s your turn.INCLUSION HISPANIC ASSOCIATION ON CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC ADVOCATE: Hispanics account for nearly 16% of the U. Become an advocate today at www.hacr.

4. Aetna Ernst & Young PricewaterhouseCoopers Sodexo Bank of America Merck & Co. 4.DIVERSITYINC LISTS LGBT Employees 1. 10. 6. 3. 5. 10. Procter & Gamble American Express Co. 3. Deloitte Sodexo Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Offers Ability to Telecommute Offers Dependent-Care Benefits Has ERG for Employees With Disabilities Corporate Website Features Images. 4. 2. IBM Corp. 8. American Express Co. 7. 5. 6. 10. 7.S. 2. Ernst & Young PricewaterhouseCoopers Sodexo Deloitte KPMG Merck & Co. the better the results. 2. IBM Corp. 9.S. Video or Text to Specifically Address People With Disabilities Has Active Program to Recruit People With Disabilities All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for People With Disabilities THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Global Diversity 1. Has Harassment Training for Managers Outside the U. Latino and Asian American 98 DiversityInc . BLA= Black. 8. 9. 5. KPMG Kaiser Permanente Aetna Ernst & Young Procter & Gamble Merck & Co. Colgate-Palmolive Co. Offers Education/ Training on Religious Groups Globally Has ERGs Globally Has Specific TalentDevelopment Programs for Women % of Operations Outside the U. All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Global Diversity HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle. 3. KPMG Wells Fargo & Co. 6. 9. Has Adoption Assistance THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR Has ERG for LGBTs Has Active Program to Recruit LGBTs Nondiscrimination Policy Includes Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination Policy Includes Gender Identity All Companies The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR People With Disabilities 1. 7. 8. IBM Corp.

ADVERTISING BY DIVERSITYINC ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC .

DIVERSITYINC LISTS

THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 10

Regional Companies
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Comerica Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida Management Workforce Women Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Women KeyCorp Promotions in New Hires Management BLA BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina Women Management BLA Promotions Into Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island Management BLA Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey Promotions Into AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah Management Women Independence Blue Cross The DiversityInc Top 10 Regional Companies All Companies Union Bank

Promotions in Management Women Workforce BLA New Hires BLA

THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 5

Regional Utilities
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Southern California Edison PG&E Corp. Consolidated Edison Co. of New York Sempra Energy Ameren

BLA in Levels CEO and Direct Reports Formal Mentoring Consistent Across Company BLA Promoted Into Management

Philanthropic Endeavors Directed Toward Multicultural Nonprofit Groups

ERGs Are Company-Wide BLA Representation on Board of Directors

The DiversityInc Top 5 Regional Utilities

All Companies

% of Compensation Tied to Diversity Results Has an Executive Diversity Council
THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 5

Hospital Systems
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Henry Ford Health System Brigham and Women’s Hospital Massachusetts General Hospital Cleveland Clinic University Hospitals
Senior Executives (Levels 1 and 2) Sit on Boards of Multicultural Nonprofits The DiversityInc Top 5 Hospital Systems

BLA Representation on Board of Directors

Women Representation in CEO and Direct Reports

All Companies

HOW TO READ THESE GRAPHS The farther from the center of the circle, the better the results. BLA= Black, Latino and Asian American

100 DiversityInc

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DiversityInc will recognize the unique achievements of eight companies at our Nov. 9–10 event in Washington, D.C. CEOs and senior executives of these companies will explain why developing excellence in these areas is critical to their business goals and how and why they have personally been deeply involved in their diversity-management success.

DiversityInc

Special Awards
BY BARBARA FRANKEL
102 DiversityInc

2011

The areas we are honoring—Community Development, Talent Pipeline, Executive Development, Global Cultural Competence, Working Families, Employee-Resource Groups and (two winners) Diversity-Management Progress—were chosen because they have a significant impact on corporate success and sustainability and because excellence can be demonstrated through measurable results. These companies are overall diversity leaders, as demonstrated by their positions on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity and 25 Noteworthy Companies lists, but in each of these cases, they have also shown extraordinary achievements.

PE C IA PE R L• AWA R L• AWA PE Southern Company C IA TOP COMPANY FOR DIVERSITYMANAGEMENT PROGRESS D D R L• AWA The awards will be presented at our event in Washington. both at the black-tie dinner on Nov. 10.The DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards Recipients 20 20 20 VERSITY IN 11 • DI TOP COMPANY FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT VERSITY IN 11 • DI TOP COMPANY FOR EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT VERSITY IN 11 • DI TOP COMPANY FOR TALENT PIPELINE C C C Prudential Financial C IA Kaiser Permanente PE C IA KPMG PE R L• AWA R L• AWA PE D D C IA R L• AWA 20 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP COMPANY FOR GLOBAL CULTURAL COMPETENCE TOP COMPANY FOR WORKING FAMILIES IBM ADP PE C IA R L• AWA PE C IA R L• AWA D 20 20 20 VERSITY IN 11 • DI VERSITY IN 11 • DI TOP COMPANY FOR DIVERSITYMANAGEMENT PROGRESS D VERSITY IN 11 • DI TOP COMPANY FOR EMPLOYEERESOURCE GROUPS American Express C IA CSX Corp.. D.COM/EVENTS DiversityInc 103 D D S S S S C C S S C C C S S . VISIT WWW.DIVERSITYINC. TO ATTEND THIS EVENT.C. 9 and at the luncheon on Nov.

as well as the alignment between diversity in the workplace and diversity in the customer base.. N. 4 last year. Two-thirds (67 percent) of its senior executives (CEO and direct reports and one level down) sit on the boards of multicultural nonprofits. as well as its LA philanthropic. Community Development D TOP COMPANY FOR C S 104 DiversityInc . Latino and Asian and 36 percent women. The company’s board of directors is half Black.. 2011 Bernard Tyson. equity and tax credits. community revitalization. including Boys and Girls Clubs of Newark. Houston.. What types of best practices does Kaiser employ to keep its senior levels so diverse? The company has an exemplary mentoring program and is one of only 26 percent of the DiversityInc Top 50 that offer cultural-awareness training for mentors and mentees before they start their formal relationship. 9.KAISER PERMANENTE NO.J. No. Children Defense Fund. and helping neighborhood organizations rebuild. New York City. Conn. N. Phoenix. Latino and Asian and 25 percent women. This compares with 37 percent for the DiversityInc Top 50. The average for the DiversityInc Top 50 is 23 percent. who leads the National Diversity Council. an asset-management group for Prudential and The Prudential Foundation. 9.16 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. San Francisco. business development. Current social investments include Newark. Its employee-resource groups are used for diversity training. Dallas. George Halvorson. 36 on the list in 2006. and Jacksonville.J. employee-volunteer and educational initiatives. The company has invested more than $1 billion in local redevelopment since 1976. Specifically: Sixty-eight percent of its donations are allocated to multicultural nonprofits. and its top level of management is 38 percent Black. Social Investments. Kaiser’s diversity-management initiatives have jelled in the last five years as a clear reflection of its values and leadership. President and Chief Operating Officer Kaiser Permanente has the most diverse board PE of directors and management. It moved to No. 27 in 2007. Philadelphia. manages portfolios of private placement debt. What makes Kaiser remarkable is the consistency of its diversity-management efforts. New Orleans. Kaiser has exceptionally strong diversity leadership from its chairman and CEO. The Prudential Foundation spends more than $25 million annually on public education. Chairman and CEO Prudential exemplifies corporate citizenship PE reflecting its core values. 2011 John Strangfeld. Los Angeles. The company’s efforts to C I A • WAR revitalize its home city of Newark. Fla. leadership opportunities and talent development. that DiversityInc has LA seen. Chicago. including lowincome housing and new-markets tax credits. mentoring. and YouthBuild Newark. Kaiser first participated in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity in 2005. Boston. especially the top C I A • WAR three levels of management. Executive Development D TOP COMPANY FOR C S PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL NO.1 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. No. arts and civic infrastructure. are changing lives throughout the country. 7 in 2009 and No. workforce development. Hartford. when it was on the 25 Noteworthy Companies list.

7 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. Global Cultural Competence PE D S S ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. A survey of participants showed that almost all felt they acquired new skills. had growing knowledge and awareness of different cultures and related mentoring to career development. It also helps mentors and mentees develop cultural intelligence and cultural-adaptability skills. what global diversity means. The organization is now serving more than 400 doctoral students. Specifically. especially GLSEN (the Gay. The PhD Project is now a separate 501(c)3 that has more than tripled the number of Black. talent-development programs and global mentoring program. 9. in which KPMG provides financial support for college-bound student athletes participating in an RBI league. The company has been making groundbreaking strides in doing just that through its employee groups. Mentees who executed learning plans booked more business than those who did not.DIVERSITYINC. retention and talent development. 2011 John Veihmeyer. It focuses on accelerating global leadership of critical skills in growth countries. 2011 Rod Adkins. which has helped more than 1. Mentees exceeded required skill levels. skills identified as sales. For IBM. Latino and American Indian professors in business schools. leadership skills and community service. client-facing. Senior Vice President. Lesbian and Straight Education Network) and INROADS. for example. one that C I A • WAR has racial and gender diversity.COM/EVENTS DiversityInc 105 C NO. former head of recruiting at KPMG. The results of this program: Managers globally increased revenue and the number of deals. In addition. Latinos and American Indians become business-school professors. Mentees had a higher rate of closing deals than those not in the program. is maximizing the talent base in every country. KPMG has extremely strong employee-resource groups and was honored previously for its efforts to increase employee involvement in those groups. Led by Bernie Milano. 9.000 Blacks. The organization’s cross-geography mentoring program fosters collaboration between established and growing global markets and creates the ability for both innovation and talent development. the firm LA has been the co-creator and presenting sponsor of Major League Baseball’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program. technical and project management. Scholarships are awarded on the merits of financial need. The KPMG Foundation also started The PhD Project in 1994. KPMG is a leading supporter of other youth-based organizations. VISIT WWW. Chairman and CEO •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP COMPANY FOR IBM TO ATTEND THIS EVENT. LA besides understanding the cultural complexities of the local population. Systems and Technology Group . The company has done an excellent job of using them for recruitment.DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP COMPANY FOR KPMG has demonstrated a strong commitment to building an inclusive future workforce. regardless of geography. Talent Pipeline KPMG C NO. It cultivates talent by bridging leadership and knowledge gaps.29 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST PE D 20 IBM has been a global-diversity leader since the concept first started to gain traction more than a C I A • WAR decade ago. academic achievement. engagement.

2011 Gary Butler. Vice Chairman American Express has been a leader in both the EC R types of employee-resource groups it has offered I AL• AWA and in the effective ways it uses those groups to find and build talent. The company gets a perfect score on work/life benefits on our survey. including flexible work arrangements. onsite DVD rentals. employees are inclusive and valuable. ADP continues its emphasis on employees and families with post-retirement benefits. The company has had groups for more than a decade. wellness/ quiet rooms or new-mothers rooms. President and CEO EC R As a company that helps others with their HR. Examples include the Felicidades and Lunar New Year gift cards that were created in partnership with the Global Prepaid Business and AHORA and ANA employee networks. This concept has been picked up by many other companies.ADP 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP COMPANY FOR C (AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING) NO. but its efforts go way beyond a checklist. promote engagement. P AMERICAN EXPRESS NO. including nine outside medical offices and national wellness programs. to work from home. and reach new markets. The company also was an early leader in calling its key employees “associates” to emphasize that they are part of the team. onsite passport renewal. diversity councils and the diversity department.38 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST Working Families ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. a mobile beauty salon. 9. The groups are used for mentoring programs. 10.S. Membership in these groups is available to all permanent AmEx employees. especially those with family commitments. They also frequently greet new employees upon hiring and offer a sense of community. 2011 Ed Gilligan. retention and productivity. The employee groups provide development and networking opportunities and support key business imperatives. The company also operates nine medical clinics that focus on prevention and cultivating a healthier lifestyle for its employees. Groups are funded through a mixture of funding from executive sponsors.13 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. They also play a critical role in creating marketing strategies and business solutions that appeal to a diverse consumer audience. a mobile vision center. American Express has 15 employee-resource groups with more than 70 chapters globally. create an inclusive workplace. ADP offers its employees a solid work/life–benefits package. tuition assistance. sponsorship initiatives. EmployeeResource Groups P TOP COMPANY FOR 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N 106 DiversityInc D D S S C . onsite childcare.000 U. especially retailers. ADP was a pioneer in flexible benefits and in allowing employees. Those clinics employed more than 30 doctors and nurses. often attending events and providing referrals for top talent. shoe shiners. development offerings and networking opportunities. and free video conferencing to faraway family members during the holidays. I AL• AWA payrolls and benefits. ADP makes sure the benefits it offers its more than 30. They play an important role in diversity recruiting efforts.

which DiversityInc had been urging the company to add.17 ON THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 LIST ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. 2011 Susan Story. Chairman. to create more equality for LGBT employees. Southern Company introduced several changes to its benefits program to align with other large employers and to better meet the diverse. Some specific achievements: Major efforts to diversify workforce and management.DiversityInc 2011 Special Awards 20 •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP In 2010. serving as a sponsor for the 2011 Atlanta Human Rights Campaign Gala Dinner. Other changes included parental leave. Two of the top six executives now are women. Southern Company Services •D 11 IVERSITYI N TOP DiversityManagement Progress PE COMPANY FOR TO ATTEND THIS EVENT. 2011 Michael Ward. Southern Company also has been working hard to increase the diversity of its talent pool. Blacks. For example. NO.DIVERSITYINC. recognized recently with the Freedom Award from the Department of Defense. Strong veterans employee-resource group and overall program for veterans. including support of the National Guard and reserves. the company hosted two interns with visual impairments for a three-month rotation as a result of a partnership with the Center for the Visually Impaired in Atlanta.COM/EVENTS DiversityInc 107 C CSX CORP. The company has escalated its efforts in recent years and shows every indication of doing even more. Close affiliation through Chairman. Growing emphasis on employees with disabilities. Of managers with less than five years of employment. including having a website designed for people with disabilities and being the first company in Northeast Florida certified as disability-friendly. and CSX has the first woman chief transportation officer in the rail industry. CSX also has a remarkable record of community philanthropy. innovative work solutions and the ability to connect with customers. The company has increased its relationships with external multicultural organizations. And recent efforts in military recruiting led to Southern Company being one of 15 recipients of the 2010 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award. C IA R L• AWA D S S ACCEPTING AWARD ON NOV. CSX is the only company to win this award twice. Southern Company’s leadership clearly understands the importance of diversity management in terms of talent development. DiversityManagement Progress PE C IA COMPANY FOR SOUTHERN COMPANY ONE OF DIVERSITYINC'S 25 NOTEWORTHY COMPANIES R L• AWA D C 20 CSX Corp. One significant change was the addition of domestic-partner benefits. President and CEO . VISIT WWW. 9. President and CEO Michael Ward and the company with the Wounded Warrior Project as its first corporate partner. Latinos. for example. has remarkable CEO commitment and has made huge strides in diversifying its workforce and management ranks by race/ethnicity and gender. Asians and American Indians. CEO. multi-generational interests of employees and recruits. maternity leave and adoption reimbursement. 42 percent are women. this year. which is particularly tough for a railroad company headquartered in the South. 9.

This diverse group of potential employees is becoming increasingly important to employers.200 colleges. COSD’s mission is to serve as an intermediary. COSDonline.edu.More than 50 million people in this country have a documented disability. If you’d like to make disability part of your diversity plan. bringing more than 1. By 2012. contact Alan Muir at amuir@tennessee.org ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC . the number of students enrolling in higher education with a disability is expected to be 11% of the total college population. universities and employers in both private and public sectors together.

The forum for diversitymanagement questions

LUKE VISCONTI

BARBARA FRANKEL

C. CRAIG JACKSON

AMBER ABOSHIHATA

SHANE NELSON

OUR ANALYSTS ANSWER YOUR

DIVERSITYMANAGEMENT QUESTIONS

ASK DIVERSITYINC is a forum for companies to pose diversity questions to our expert team of benchmarking analysts.
Our analysts base their responses on 12 years of data collected for The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity survey, which this year had 535 corporate participants. Here’s a sample of recent questions and responses.

If you would like to send a diversity-management question, please email askDiversityInc@DiversityInc.com
DiversityInc 109

ASK DiversityInc

[THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50]

What criteria do you use to determine the “Top 50” companies?
We analyze the data from the hundreds of companies that apply and compare all companies against the accomplishments of the 50 best. It is
the practices of the best companies that produce the standards, not something we dream up. The results are expressed as a percentage of standard deviation, with cut-offs at both the low and high levels. For example, a company that has 80 percent Black people does not receive more points than the high cut-off and having that high a percentage of Black people would certainly make it practically impossible for them to be competitive on Latinos, Asians and American Indians.

DO YOU REQUIRE:
1 2 3 4

A certain percentage of women and people of color in management? That the company has a diversity award program? That the company has affinity groups? That the company has mandatory diversity training for the workforce?

1

We do not require a certain percentage of women and people of color in management. The percentage of women and
Black, Latino, Asian and American Indian people in management that is competitive to be on our list is a factor of the results of the companies that are the most equitable.

2 We don't require the company to have a diversity award program. Although that may be a nice thing to do, it’s a
minor factor of overall organizational communications.

3 Companies that make the DiversityInc Top 50 list are not required to have affinity groups. While it's not a requirement,
there is no case of a company producing competitive results in human capital without them. The correlation between employee-resource groups (ERGs) and talent development is very strong. Again, it’s not an absolute requirement and some companies in the DiversityInc Top 50 have rather low participation in their ERGs, but the connection between ERGs and competitive results becomes stronger every year.

4 Mandatory diversity training is not a requirement, but it’s
increasingly difficult to attain competitive results without mandatory training.

There’s a very important point to be made here: I don’t think you can game the survey. Overall results are a

WHAT WE MEASURE
CEO Commitment
¼Accountability ¼Personal Communications ¼Visibility
CRITERIA

Corporate & Organizational Communications
¼Mentoring ¼ERGs ¼Philanthropy ¼Consistency ¼Effectiveness
CRITERIA

matter of organizational culture, and that extends to many facets beyond ERGs or mandatory diversity training. For example, there is an order of magnitude difference in overall philanthropy Human spend between companies at the top of our list and companies Capital that finished in the lowest quartile of all respondents. I think CRITERIA what we’re measuring is organizational empathy and com¼Five Levels of Management mitment to equity. This is critical to effectiveness in many ¼Promotions Into Management ways, but here’s a simple and profoundly important one: ¼Promotions in Management If all people are created equally, then talent is distributed equally, and that means quality is directly relative to diversity. Supplier

Diversity
CRITERIA

BY LUKE VISCONTI

¼M/WBE, LGBT, People With Disabilities, Veterans Spend ¼RFPs ¼Accountability

If you would like to send a diversity-management question, please email askDiversityInc@DiversityInc.com

110 DiversityInc ersityInc

[HEALTHCARE SUPPLIER DIVERSITY]

How do health-insurance companies compare to other industries in supplier diversity?
% OF PROCUREMENT SPENT WITH DIVERSE SUPPLIERS

Based on data we’ve collected over the years, the health-insurance industry, collectively, is slightly below average in supplier-diversity efforts.
The industry scored 7 (out of 11) points for supplier diversity, behind those such as technology, consulting and pharmaceuticals (an industry that historically has not been strong in supplier diversity but has ramped up efforts in the past few years). This is not to say that every healthinsurance company is not competitive in supplier diversity. In fact, Aetna, Health Care Service Corp., and WellPoint, Nos. 19, 26 and 36 in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity, respectively, are significantly ahead of their industry peers in procurement spent with minority- and women-owned business enterprises (MWBEs) and are competitive with the DiversityInc Top 50.

Consider the additional facts we extrapolated about these three competitors:
CEO SIGNS OFF ON SUPPLIER DIVERSITY REQUIRE SECOND-TIER SUPPLIER DIVERSITY SUPPLIER-DIVERSITY METRICS INCLUDED IN RFPS AND/OR VENDOR CONTRACTS TIE PROCUREMENTMANAGEMENT COMPENSATION TO SUPPLIER DIVERSITY

DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 HEALTH-INSURANCE LEADERS

4.9% 3.6% 3%

Minority-Owned Suppliers Women-Owned Suppliers

100% 84%

100% 90% 36%

100% 98% 73%

100% 94% 64%

DIVERSITYINC TOP 50

4.2% 3% 2%

OTHER HEALTH-INSURANCE COMPANIES

36%

In conclusion, while your industry is historically behind in supplier diversity, Aetna, Health Care Service Corp. and WellPoint are ramping up their efforts. Since 2008, the three have increased their procurement spend with MWBEs by 25 percent while their industry peers have decreased spend by 3 percent.

Developing strong relationships with suppliers builds brand loyalty and leads to increased business opportunities, partnerships and exposure.
DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 TOP HEALTH INSURANCE OTHER HEALTH INSURANCE BY SHANE NELSON

[ASIAN-AMERICAN EMPLOYEES]

What are the metrics for the last three years for

W

The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans?
BY C. CRAIG JACKSON AND LUKE VISCONTI

e’ve provided a chart (next page) highlighting key three-year trends in the factors that are important in our assessment of The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans. Please note that our list is not simply a list of who has the highest number of Asians. This list is a measurement of a balanced and inclusive work environment for Asians, as well as EVERYONE else. Key factors include whether the company has an employee-resource group for Asians and the levels of participation. We also look at demographics of the workforce, new hires, management levels, promotions into and in management, and board of directors. The percentage of Asian new hires in The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans

DiversityInc 111

Latino. FRAZIER MERCK & CO. 6. Who are the Black. Procter & Gamble Wells Fargo & Co.3% 2% Board of Directors1 5% 1. 13 and 15. 1. Again. 9. WORKFORCE DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans National [CEO DIVERSITY] 14. 3Bureau of Labor Statistics is more than double their percentage in the U. respectively. URSULA BURNS XEROX Source: Fortune ASIAN CEOS Fortune 500 AJAY BANGA MASTERCARD SANJAY K.8% (9 of 500) DiversityInc Top 50 4% (2 of 50) If you would like to send a diversitymanagement question. This has not changed in the past three years.S. 5.S.com MasterCard and Toyota Motor North America. CRAIG JACKSON Total Management3 Total Workforce3 Sources: 1LEAP. Deloitte Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Johnson & Johnson IBM Corp. PricewaterhouseCoopers Kaiser Permanente Abbott American Express Co. this list is not simply a list of the companies with the most Asian employees. are Nos. 7. PANDIT CITIGROUP RAVI SALIGRAM OFFICEMAX LAURA J.ASK DiversityInc ASIANS IN U.8% 13. but the workforce percentage of Asians in The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Asian Americans increased 18 percent. That doesn't make them good for Asians.8% Where’s the diversity in Fortune 500 CEOs? I was looking for a list of “minority” CEOs. we’re looking for balance and inclusion as well. MOHAPATRA QUEST DIAGNOSTICS KEVIN M. FRAZIER MERCK & CO. 2. 4. 10.6% 6. Asian and women CEOs in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity? BY C.1% 4. In fact. workforce. please email askDiversityInc@DiversityInc. 8. Further.8% (4 of 500) DiversityInc Top 50 4% (2 of 50) American Express and Merck & Co. The companies on our list are good for all people and are also particularly equitable for Asians. total management increased 25 percent and the promotion rate both in management and into management has increased 22 percent in aggregate. respectively in the 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Source: Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics (LEAP) 112 DiversityInc . SEN BJ’S WHOLESALE CLUB YOSHI INABA TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA AJAY BANGA MASTERCARD ASIAN AMERICANS 1. are Nos. NOOYI PEPSICO VIKRAM S. The 2011 DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for BLACK CEOS Fortune 500 URSULA BURNS XEROX KENNETH CHENAULT AMERICAN EXPRESS KENNETH C.8% Top Level of Management (CEO and Direct Reports)2 6. 31 and 46. there are many companies with a higher percentage than the companies on our list. it just makes them a company that finds it easy to recruit that workforce. 2Fortune. Again. in the 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity KENNETH C. board-of-director and senior management representation increased 24 and 22 percent. respectively. 3. MURAI SYNNEX INDRA K. JHA MOTOROLA ANDREA JUNG AVON SURYA N. CLARENCE OTIS DARDEN KENNETH CHENAULT AMERICAN EXPRESS 0.

Advocates help bridge communication gaps and. Some companies have both. MEYROWITZ TJX BETH MOONEY KEYCORP DENISE MORRISON CAMPBELL SOUP CO. This number is up from 44 percent in 2009. talent development and planning for Generation Y to step into leadership roles. GEORGE PAZ EXPRESS SCRIPTS PAUL RAINES GAMESTOP ENRIQUE SALEM SYMANTEC JOSUE ROBLES UNITED SERVICES AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION (USAA) 1% (5 of 500) DiversityInc Top 50 0% Source: HACR How do I start ERGs based on generations and/or disabilities? Would you be able to point us to best practices/ research related to disabilities and generational/new professional/young professional affinity groups? BY C. depending on the specific needs of your company. Some companies might have an aging workforce or concerns around retirement transition. NOOYI PEPSICO IRENE B. BRALY WELLPOINT URSULA M. 9 and 36. SEN BJ’S WHOLESALE CLUB PATRICIA A. The approaches to generational groups vary. ROSENFELD KRAFT FOODS LAURA J. (0 of 50) WOMEN CEOS Fortune 500 CAROL A.DiversityInc. It is also always important. eldercare or succession planning and may focus the group on boomers and beyond.” This may increase membership as employees who may have invisible disabilities and/or feel isolated or uncomfortable sharing might be more inclined to join. INDRA K. we mean some companies have one “generational group” that is focused on generational communications. including groups for telecommuters. ELSENHANS SUNOCO ANDREA JUNG AVON ELLEN J. KULLMAN DUPONT CAROL M. For example. ROSENFELD KRAFT FOODS of DiversityInc Top 50 companies have a resource group for people with disabilities. for every group. CRAIG JACKSON of DiversityInc Top 50 companies have generational resource groups. BURNS XEROX LYNN L. a Gen X group would be open to older members who want to learn more about Gen X. When we say varied. The most successful groups communicate across generations and don’t restrict membership to one group. Some companies have a specific need for onboarding and retention and may focus their group specifically on Generation X or Y. Also relevant here is a mention of some of the more innovative groups found in the DiversityInc Top 50. No companies had generational resource groups in 2005. to have outside advocates.[EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE GROUPS] LATINO CEOS Fortune 500 ANTONIO PEREZ EASTMAN KODAK CO. This number is up from 70 percent in 2009 and 48 percent in 2005. military and caregivers. WOERTZ ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND 2. respectively. Veterans groups and disabilities groups may also have overlap.6% (13 of 500) 48% 72% DiversityInc Top 50 4% (2 of 50) Kraft Foods and WellPoint are Nos. Caregiver groups and disability groups often have overlap and sharing of information. in the 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 ANGELA F.com/top50 DiversityInc 113 . parents. BRALY WELLPOINT IRENE B. provide additional exposure or credibility. to an extent. BARTZ YAHOO ANGELA F. Important to the disabilities groups—we have seen—is to have it be inclusive of “friends. BETH MOONEY KEYCORP One of DiversityInc's 25 Noteworthy Companies DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES THAT HAVE: A GENERATIONAL RESOURCE GROUP A RESOURCE GROUP FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Source: Fortune 44% 48% 70% 48% 72% FOR MORE 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 lists THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR BLACKS ON PAGE 98 THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR LATINOS ON PAGE 100 THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR ASIAN AMERICANS ON PAGE 100 THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 10 COMPANIES FOR EXECUTIVE WOMEN ON PAGE 100 0% 2005 2009 2011 2005 2009 2011 You can also access all our lists at www.

our ideas become singular and complacent. there were only 294 minority business professors in the United States.org .000 and is increasing every day principally through our efforts. Without it. The PhD Project looks to put an end to all that. Congratulations to the DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity.org and on Twitter: http://twitter.Developing the next generation of leaders is one of the most significant investments your company can make. Today. universities. We are dedicated to increasing minority representation in the business world by creating opportunities to get minority professors up in front of the classroom to serve as role models for the next generation of minority business leaders. Follow us on facebook at: http://Facebook. corporations. When we started in 1994. We are an alliance of foundations.com/thephdproject the PhDproject SM For more information. and professional and academic organizations. we are proud to report that number has more than tripled to more than 1. We all know the importance of a diverse workforce.phdproject. visit our website at: www.PhDProject.

Milano at 201. Dr. for their commitment to creating a more diverse workforce for all of corporate America. Florida State University. Georgia Gwinnett College. C. Luke Visconti.DiversityInc CEO. and all of our Funders.com. Inc. KPMG Foundation Graduate Management Admission Council Citi Foundation AACSB International 244 Participating Universities AICPA Foundation DiversityInc JPMorgan Chase Foundation The Goldman Sachs Group The Merck Company Foundation Microsoft Corporation Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP Wal-Mart Stores. Ramapo College. Dr. or email bmilano@kpmg. Dr. Nicholas Pearce.7662. Douglas Johnson. Luke Visconti with PhD Project faculty and doctoral students who facilitated sessions at a DiversityInc Top 50 for Diversity event in Washington. Thank you to DiversityInc. contact Bernard J. Dr. ACT-1 Group AT&T Dow Chemical Company John Deere Foundation Rockwell Collins California State University System CIGNA American Express ADP American Marketing Association Motorola Foundation The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Western Union Foundation Corporate Executive Board * Founders To find out more about supporting The PhD Project. Sharon Simmons.307. Georgia State University. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Howard University. Daniel Selby. Dr. Shalei Simms. DC. Denise Lewis Lloyd. Dr. Dr. Management Doctoral Student at Northwestern University. Karynne Turner. Atira Charles. . Management Doctoral Student at Syracuse University. Yuvay Meyers. University of Richmond.

CORPORATE SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC POLICY 116 DiversityInc .

LGBT RIGHTS How do corporations stay true to their values? Fighting LGBT discrimination How Everyone Benefits LGBT CIVIL RIGHTS Photos: Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters .

(No. As has happened with other humanrights battles. Dell (No. Andrew Cuomo immediately signed it into law. 49). don’t tell” for the military and President Barack Obama slowly but surely becoming a more vocal advocate. Chubb. which DiversityInc views as a non-negotiable essential item to earning a spot on our lists.Y. 39. The fight for LGBT rights has gained momentum this year. Wright is happily anticipating her wedding to a beautiful young woman. KPMG (No. 40). Boehringer Ingelheim. For some companies. and also companies such as Eastman Kodak Co. visit www.com/LGBT 118 DiversityInc . (No. 29). led by companies such as Eli Lilly and Co.Same-Sex Marriage in N. and Chely Wright and Lauren Blitzer will be married this summer. 7). To read more about LGBT rights. the equality effort still begins at home. WellPoint and Cummins. Wells Fargo & Co. the federal Employment Non-Discrimination Act.DiversityInc. 36 and 18. the New York State Legislature approved same-sex marriage and Gov. 12). a little more than a year after coming out. The CocaCola Co. 30). WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU BY BARBARA FRANKEL L ast November at our event. WellPoint and Whirlpool Corp. (No. 11). last year approved domestic-partner benefits for both same-sex and opposite-sex couples. They are getting married this summer in Connecticut. in The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity. Ameriprise Financial and General Motors. one of DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies. supported by corporations including DiversityInc Top 50 companies Kaiser Permanente (No. Time Warner (No.. Eli Lilly. It has included advocacy for ENDA. 23). 1). 5). (No. which up until June 24 was one of only five states plus the District of Columbia that recognized same-sex marriages. Capital One. Ernst & Young (No. New York is the largest state to recognize same-sex marriages.. 15).. Other companies are still grappling with this issue. On June 24. She described putting a gun to her head—and then putting the gun down. KeyCorp and Pfizer. as well as DiversityInc 25 Noteworthy Companies BASF Corp. Accenture (No. Merck & Co. with the federal government agreeing to end “don’t ask. some progressive corporations are leading the way. 28). Southern Company. (No. Bank of America (No. country-music star Chely Wright told our audience of senior corporate executives what her life was like as a closeted professional in an industry that was far from inclusive of LGBT people. Today. IBM Corp. the impact of this decision will be profound. while others damage their reputations with employees and customers. Lauren Blitzer. Corporate support of LGBT rights has included the battle against the Defense of Marriage Act in Indiana. Nos. respectively.

including AT&T (No. Anti-LGBT legislation is surfacing in several states. I’ll be watching Chely Wright and Lauren Blitzer get married this summer. Although the companies quickly issued statements deploring the bill. their friends and families. Census Bureau). as well as reading about the thousands of gay and lesbian couples who will marry in New York. several companies. KPMG. Last year’s Target donation to a gubernatorial candidate who was publicly homophobic is still having repercussions. Whirlpool. is an example of a groundswell in several states from the religious right to pass laws that endanger human rights and discriminate against this one group in particular. aimed squarely at the LGBT community. Bill Haslam signed into law a bill prohibiting local governments from passing anti-discriminatory measures offers a clear lesson to inclusive corporations about when—and how—they should get involved. The impact on the individual is immeasurable. One told DiversityInc that they “didn’t realize” the anti-LGBT focus of this legislation because it was part of a larger document on standardizing state regulations. it had already passed the legislature and had gone to the governor’s office. has proven to be a staunch supporter of LGBT rights. and no organization that calls itself a diversity leader should allow these bills to become laws. The new law. Andrew Cuomo. KPMG. It’s also a moment of victory for corporations that understand that having an inclusive culture isn’t limited to what’s behind the doors of their offices. Pfizer and Comcast (one of the DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies). What happens in government and society deeply impacts recruitment. When they became aware of what the legislation intended. all of these companies and several others issued public statements denouncing the legislation. what should inclusive companies do? BY BARBARA FRANKEL T he news that Tennessee Gov. More recently.” DI When Should Your Company Take a Stand Against LGBT Bias? In the face of a groundswell of proposed state laws discriminating against LGBT people. leading to the chamber reversing its position. and I think it sums up what many LGBT people feel when their companies stand up for them: “This has always been my residence. including AT&T.LGBT RIGHTS T When Values & Actions Are Misaligned here’s a flip side to this. where he signed it into law. This case raises two critical points for corporations with very public values of inclusion. Now it really is my home. But right now another governor. The first is the need to be extremely careful—especially at local levels— that everything that is signed off on by any representative of the company coincides with the organization’s stated values. even in companies that work to have inclusive cultures. 4). Whirlpool. They were members of the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce that supported this bill. Blitzer posted this on her Facebook page right after the New York decision was announced. got caught in the crossfire in Tennessee. and the New York victory should be savored by the 42. were horrified to learn their local representatives on the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce had approved a resolution supporting a state bill prohibiting local governments from passing antidiscrimination ordinances. of course. engagement. Pfizer and Comcast— approve this in the first place? Some of the companies said their local members voted against it.S. including three on the DiversityInc Top 50 and two on the DiversityInc 25 Noteworthy Companies lists. Why did the chamber—and the leading diversity companies among its corporate members. The second is publicly taking the next step: actively fighting this type of legislation in every state.000 same-sex couples in that state (source: U. DiversityInc 119 . Several corporations. The chamber rescinded that support after DiversityInc and the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) asked the corporations how they could support this. productivity and innovation.

96 percent of them have quotes on the value of diversity from the CEOs on their homepage.com on employee-resource groups. Kaiser Permanente and Sodexo. INDIANA Indiana lawmakers approved a proposed amendment to the state constitution that would define marriage as between one man and one woman and would prohibit the state from enacting civil unions or domestic partnerships for same-sex couples. All employees should be informed about these policies and repercussions for failing to adhere to them. Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters. visit www. Look for our webinar on DiversityIncBestPractices. TEXAS The Texas State Senate Richard Proust and his partner of 30 years. up from 63 percent five years ago. accepting a court order recognizing a sex change as a legal document for a marriage license. 96 percent have antidiscrimination policies that include gender identity. Read our coverage of the anti-LGBT-rights law promoted by the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce at www. The proposed amendment will be on 2014 ballots if legislators once again approve the proposal in the 2013–2014 legislative session.com/employee-resource-groups and also see our webinar on DiversityIncBestPractices. Donald Corren. USE OF EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE GROUPS All of the DiversityInc Top 50 have LGBT (and ally) resource groups. featuring our No. For information on employee-resource groups.LGBT RIGHTS When Should Your Company Take a Stand Against LGBT Bias? CONTINUED Since the Tennessee battle appears to be over. Photos: Top.com/lgbt-rights . 2 companies. Ninety percent of DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs meet regularly with ERG leaders.com/training. march during the Gay Pride Parade. is considering legislation that would prevent district clerks from CLEAR AND CONSISTENT MESSAGING All have antidiscrimination policies that include sexual orientation.DiversityIncBestPractices. These groups are valuable conduits to the community and keep leaders aware of legislative and other external concerns. Shutterstock For information on diversity training. to provide equal funding to create new centers to promote “traditional values.” Here are some diversity-management resources DiversityInc Top 50 companies have to help them in this battle: SUPPORT FROM THE TOP All of the DiversityInc Top 50 CEOs ensure diversity is included in the corporate mission statement. DiversityInc asked the HRC where the next battlegrounds are.com on CEO commitment and DiversityInc Top 50 best practices.DiversityInc.” i. The House passed a budget bill containing a provision requiring public universities with a student center on “alternative sexuality. 1 and No. an LGBT center..e. bottom. NORTH CAROLINA North Carolina has an anti-LGBT marriage amendment that has been introduced in both the state house and senate (SB 106/HB777) that could prohibit all forms of legal relationship recognition for gay and lesbian couples. visit www. The HRC’s response: MINNESOTA The Minnesota House passed a proposal to place a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage on the 2012 ballot.DiversityIncBestPractices. featuring Aetna and MasterCard. Protest against the passage of Proposition 8 banning gay 120 DiversityInc marriage.

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LGBT RIGHTS

FACTS&FIGURES
Gay-rights advocates witnessed a string of historic victories in 2010 and 2011. Congress voted to end the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, defeating a 17-year ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the U.S. armed forces. The Obama administration announced it was dropping its defense of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in court. New legislation that would officially repeal DOMA and end federal discrimination against legally married same-sex couples, called The Respect for Marriage Act, has been filed in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate.

TIMELINE
1924 The Society for Human Rights, the first gay-rights organization in the United States, is founded. It is shut down by police within a few months 1955 The Daughters of Bilitis, the first national U.S. lesbian organization, is formed 1962 Illinois becomes first state to decriminalize “homosexual” acts 1969 Stonewall riots in New York gain national attention for gay and lesbian rights 1970 First Gay Liberation Day March is held in New York City; similar events are held in Los Angeles and San Francisco
Sources: Human Rights Campaign, CNN, Seattle Times, DiversityInc

1996 Supreme Court says protections for gays and lesbians are not special rights but the same civil rights guaranteed to all U.S. citizens 2000 Vermont becomes first state to legally recognize civil unions between gays or lesbians 2003 Supreme Court rules sodomy laws unconstitutional in Lawrence v. Texas 2004 Massachusetts legalizes samesex marriage New Jersey’s Gov. James McGreevey comes out as first openly gay U.S. governor before resigning 2005 Civil unions become legal in Connecticut 2006 Civil unions become legal in New Jersey 2007 DiversityInc requires domestic-partner benefits as prerequisite to make The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list 2008 California’s State Supreme Court allows same-sex marriage, but Proposition 8 then eliminates it 2009 President Barack Obama signs law extending existing federal hate-crime laws to include those committed on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity 2010 Federal court declares California’s Prop. 8 unconstitutional 2010 Obama signs law to end “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy

2011 Obama administration drops defense of DOMA in court. New legislation that would officially repeal DOMA and end federal discrimination against legally married same-sex couples, called The Respect for Marriage Act, is filed in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate

1973 The American Psychiatric Association removes “homosexuality” definition as mental disorder 1978 Rainbow flag first used as symbol of gay and lesbian pride 1979 First national gay-rights march held in Washington, D.C. 1982 Wisconsin is first state to outlaw discrimination on basis of sexual orientation 1989 Denmark becomes first country to legalize same-sex partnerships 1993 “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy allows gays and lesbians to serve in the U.S. military as long as they are closeted

New York becomes the largest state in the nation to recognize same-sex marriages after Gov. Andrew Cuomo signs the bill into law Illinois recognizes civil unions and same-sex marriages performed in other states 2011– Hawaii will begin recognizing civil 2012 unions on Jan. 1, 2012

Photos, top and right: Shutterstock

DiversityInc 123

LGBT Rights
DEMOGRAPHICS Out LGBT Population in the United States 2006 2011 WIRED BUYING POWER

15.3 16.3
MILLION MILLION BETWEEN

6% 7%
AND
of the U.S. population identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, but many estimate the real amount is

10%
Source: Human Rights Campaign

The adult LGBT population is one of the most wired and technologically fluent groups in the country.

LGBT RIGHTS AT THE DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES

76% 57% 32%
Source: eMarketer

The 2011 DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees •KPMG •Wells Fargo & Co. •IBM Corp. •Aetna •Ernst & Young •PricewaterhouseCoopers •Sodexo •Bank of America •Merck & Co. •American Express
All of The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity have LGBT employee-resource groups

of LGBT adults are online, comprising 7.9 percent of the total adult Internetuser population LGBT people spend

U.S. Gay and Lesbian Market Buying Power

2006

more time online than their heterosexual counterparts

2009

2010

$660 $732 $743

BILLION
Photos: Shutterstock

BILLION

BILLION

What factors set The DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for LGBT Employees apart from others?

of LGBT respondents said they were online between 24 and 168 hours a week, compared with only 18% of heterosexual Internet users
(Excludes email usage)

Source: Witeck-Combs Communications/Packaged Facts

•All of them have active programs to recruit LGBT people,
compared with 78 percent of the DiversityInc Top 50 •They average 68 percent of their managers participating in mentoring programs, compared with 39 percent for the DiversityInc Top 50 •Eighty percent offer adoption-assistance programs and 80 percent offer paid time off for paternity leave •All of their nondiscrimination policies include gender identity •Ninety percent offer bereavement leave and all of them offer family medical leave for same-sex partners

124 DiversityInc

LGBT RIGHTS

FACTS&FIGURES
HOUSEHOLD INCOME

MEDIAN ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME Gay men Lesbian women General population

BRAND ATTITUDES & BUYING DECISIONS T About

$62,000 $52,000 $49,777 $130,000 $96,000 $71,830
States that recognize marriages by same-sex couples from another state
MARYLAND 2010 ILLINOIS 2011
Source: Human Rights Campaign

89%
of gay respondents and 91 percent of lesbian respondents to a recent survey thought a brand’s sponsorship or support of LGBT events favorably influenced their buying decisions
Source: eMarketer

Gay couples living together Lesbian couples living together Married couples (general population)
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, eMarketer

MARRIAGE

States issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples:
MASSACHUSETTS CONNECTICUT IOWA VERMONT DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW YORK
Source: Human Rights Campaign

About

2004 2008 2009 2009 2010 2011 2011

78%
of LGBT people and their friends and relatives would switch brands to companies that are known as being LGBT-friendly
Source: Witeck-Combs/ Harris Interactive

Statewide law providing equivalent of state-level spousal rights to same-sex couples:
NEW JERSEY CIVIL UNIONS, 2007 WASHINGTON STATE DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2007/2009 OREGON DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2008 NEVADA DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIPS, 2009 ILLINOIS CIVIL UNIONS, 2011 HAWAII CIVIL UNIONS, EFFECTIVE JAN. 1, 2012
Source: Human Rights Campaign

CALIFORNIA

Same-sex marriages that took place between June 16, 2008, and Nov. 4, 2008, continue to be defined as marriage while the courts determine legality. On Oct. 12, 2009, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed into law a bill that recognized out-ofjurisdiction same-sex marriages that occurred between June 2008 and November 2008 as marriages in California.
Source: Human Rights Campaign

If the federal government recognizes legal marriages by same-sex couples, between

50,000 and 80,000
same-sex couples would be recognized
Source: The Williams Institute

DiversityInc 125

December 01 125 December 2010 125 December 2010 125 2

126 DiversityInc Photos: Shutterstock .VS.

Do diverse teams solve more problems than homogenous teams? DIVERSITY The Driving Force of Innovation BY DONALD FAN DiversityInc 127 .

While business lore tends to link innovation with a creative drive that is exclusive to the top and brightest talent.I BETTER n his latest State of the Union address. President Barack Obama mentioned the word “innovation” nine times. our challenge is to help our leaders and fellow professionals understand that connection. rife with volatility and ambiguity. we encode our perspectives and then apply our particular heuristics to explore new and better resolutions. Diversity becomes a valuable resource for innovation through a diverse workforce that reflects today’s marketplace through consumer insights and “wisdom of the crowd” that can lead to creative betterment. When confronted with a problem. true innovation thrives in an inclusive culture that values diverse ideas. by definition. provides more ideas and perspectives into driving for the best business solutions. according to Fareed Zakaria. Diversity of talent. We know that there exists a strong connection between innovation and diversity and inclusion. this article aims to connect those dots. People see problems and solutions from different perspectives. innovation is critical in sustaining organic growth and securing success in a globally competitive environment. leverages unique perspectives and invites everyone to achieve collaborative breakthroughs across the entire organization. Diverse teams often outperform teams composed of Diversity Means Quality 3.0 QUALITY OF IDEA WORSE 2.0 1. more than any other president ever has.5 3. These perspectives are accompanied by the heuristics that define how individuals search for solutions. corporate practice and personal observation. This highlights a key point that in this new era.5 2. By exploring scientific research. A Diverse Workforce Is a Valuable Source of Innovation The vital foundation for innovation derives from a diverse workforce.5 10 MORE 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 LESS DIVERSITY IN AN EMPLOYEE’S RELATIONSHIPS 128 DiversityInc .

the vertical axis shows management assessments of a series of employee ideas related to supply-chain management. Walmart continues to build a diverse global workforce by recruiting world-class talent through creative approaches. insight. and through increased community and campusoutreach efforts. Becoming a matrix organization. Prof. such as the Junior Military Officer recruiting program and the Women in Retail initiative. because this diversity of perspective and problem-solving approach trumps individual ability. In the graph. This inclusive culture serves as an incubator for creative thinking through the following efforts: 1 DEVELOPING MAVERICKS (FREEDOM OF THOUGHT) Constructive mavericks have the vision and passion to pursue an idea and bring it to fruition. The horizontal axis measures the level of diversity in an employee’s internal connections. ADVOCATING COLLABORATION (CROSS-POLLINATION) Break silos by inspiring people with different backgrounds and experiences to share their unique perspectives and work in different functional areas. imagination and intuition to solve complex business problems and to serve customers better. They lack diversity of input in their day-to-day world. Cross-functional projects. enriched career opportunities and global assignments are examples of the company’s commitment to developing associates through collaborative opportunities and roles that expand their knowledge and experiences. The graph indicates that higher diversity of connections also translates to the perception of higher quality ideas. For example. At Walmart. Ron Burt of the University of Chicago conducted an empirical study indicating that people with more diverse sources of information generate consistently better ideas. as the graph on the previous page highlights. leaders are empowered to be catalysts through mentoring and sponsorship programs and other developmental opportunities that provide avenues for associates to unlock their full potential. An Inclusive Culture Is an Incubator for Innovation In addition to cultivating a diverse workforce. which is a fundamental component of innovation. Walmart spurs on the horizontal flow of skills and information transcending functional areas. They challenge convention and initiate new ways to solve problems.the very best individuals. Research confirms that diversity is a valuable resource for innovation. you see employees who are more insular in their connections. Many companies today are becoming more intentional about leveraging diversity to spur innovation. 2 Donald Fan is senior director in the Office of Diversity at Walmart. DiversityInc 129 . we must also foster an inclusive work environment where creative ideas can germinate and grow. Common characteristics of an inclusive work environment include: BELIEF Trusting and empowering employees to make a difference in continuous business improvements ATTITUDE Respecting a predisposition toward collaboration and diversity of thought KNOWLEDGE Knowing how to think creatively to solve problems and capture opportunities BEHAVIOR Valuing and leveraging differences Walmart strives to build an even more inclusive culture to connect and engage the associates by encouraging them to bring up more intelligence. As you move to the right.

bill payments. when Walmart founder Sam Walton first pitched his idea to start a chain of discount stores in small rural communities. Walmart uses different channels to solicit ideas. “The source of wealth and capital in this new era is not material things … it is the human mind. through collective endeavors. it is essential to build cultural intelligence in order to succeed and lead in innovation. ‘Fertile Soil for Seeds of Innovation’ Steve Jobs said. the company endeavors to reduce produce waste by 15 percent while upgrading 15 percent of Direct Farm program products from Green to Organic certified. cross-country leadership summits and cultural-competency training all contribute to strengthen cultural intelligence. While examining what neuroscience is revealing about the difference between individuals and businesses that succeed and those that fail. A couple of game-changing examples include: Money Center Walmart offers millions of unbanked and underserved customers a series of low-cost financial services through in-store Money Centers (check cashing. CQ STRATEGY (Meta-Cognition) Our level of awareness and ability to plan in light of our cultural understanding. turned the idea into an unprecedented business success. CQ ACTION (Behavior) Our level of adaptability when leading and relating crossculturally. who. money transfers. including a monthly Town Hall Meeting hosted by the CEO. and to increase participation rates to 2 million Chinese farmers by the end of 2015. creativity and adaptability of today’s culturally diverse workforce. Take time to understand the merits of differences and shared values.com . STRENGTHENING CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE (COMPETENCY) In today’s global economy. an annual Associate Opinion Survey. The ability to act on diverse ideas has shaped the growth of the company and helped customers save money and live better. Walton responded by forming a dedicated team with different backgrounds and capabilities that complemented each other. we advance the effectiveness. Look for innovative breakthroughs by embracing differences. we nurture fertile soil where seeds of innovation can blossom into opportunity of sustained future growth. simply because little energy is currently invested there.3 SWIMMING UPSTREAM (INGENUITY) Challenge conventional wisdom by going the opposite way. Use your mobile phone’s QR reader to scan the code and learn more CQ KNOWLEDGE (Cognition) Our level of understanding about cultural issues. This can elevate the opportunity for success. Be curious and seek differences.) Direct Farm This global program focuses on driving agricultural sustainability. an Open Door process and more.DiversityIncBestPractices. Draw a blueprint of how to leverage differences. In 2010. MoneyCard. drive and motivation to adapt crossculturally.” For example.000 farmers in the Direct Farm program. David Livermore introduced the Four Cultural Intelligence (CQ) capabilities at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit: CQ DRIVE (Motivation) Our level of interest. READ MORE 130 DiversityInc For more on diversity management. Ying Yi Hong and Dr. When we seek to strengthen cultural competencies. etc. he was told the idea would never work. Walmart China successfully engaged more than 470. similar to the Zen principle of “Breaking from Routine. Prof. Additionally.” When we enlighten and inspire our people to harness their creativity to generate value in an inclusive culture. offering cultural-assessment tools. the human spirit. the human imagination and our faith in the future. Efforts such as cultural-heritage celebrations. visit www. 5 4 ENABLING NEW IDEAS (OUTCOME) Create an environment where great ideas can surface and grow. A freedom from conventional thinking can unleash a pleasant surprise and unexpected amazement.

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and as the heat started to rise. 132 DiversityInc . We confronted them and asked how they could support a bill that was in conflict with the values espoused by their corporate leadership via their diversity departments. bringing Tennessee into the circle of states that affirmatively oppress their LGBT citizens.A TEACHABLE MOMENT Decision Making. Several companies on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list are members of that chamber. All stated their opposition to the bill. The chamber was reacting to the city of Nashville passing a pro-LGBT-rights law. but the damage was done. Clarity of Values & What to Do When It Goes Horribly Wrong BY LUKE VISCONTI W e recently covered a story regarding an anti-LGBT-rights law promoted by the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce. the governor signed the bill into law.

This do not diminish another group’s gives companies unprecedented rights are what this country is all opportunities—and unprecedented about. we’ve seen If your continued the practice of managing diversity become more effective by orders of membership in magnitude in the most competitive an organization companies. DI your own sex. then you are violating your values. in aggregate. This does not preclude empathy and forgiveness for mistakes. requests for proposals (RFPs). I think most companies’ headquarters were genuinely surprised by the actions of their colleagues on the chamber’s board. web and cell communications. and if you support or make a marriage. Your personal opinions or politics do not trump your organization’s need to do business properly. Here’s some personal advice if you think marriage is Such as. en’s suffrage and the Civil Rights Act. This then you have directly communicates a statement of Here is some food for thought a problem values. Better relationships also increase employee engagement and productivity and reduce regrettable loss. business values is aggregating into a bow and our LGBT neighbors: across the entire wave as globalization is enhanced by Rights afforded to one group that organization. Questions about conflicts with your diversity are now on 100 percent of DiversityInc Top 50 companies’ stated values. does not hurt heterosexual marriages and does not force your house of worship to marry same-sex couWe will all make mistakes. People treated fairly have a better relationship with you. the public is very forgiving of a speedy and forthright apology. Married couples have certain legal rights.” Here are some ground rules I’ve learned by observing companies closely: Decision making is best by having clarity on your values. but I the basis of the lawsuit that overcame the anti-LGBT don’t think they’re all that complex. then you have a problem across the entire organization. and if your continued membership in an organization conflicts with your stated values. if you’re doing could not produce a single expert who could show that business with a company that violates your values. This is especially true for leaders. particularly if it’s backed by redemptive action. donation to an organization that has facets that violate and extension of those legal rights to same-sex couples your values. “We are all cracked vessels. This cannot be parsed. As Dr. In the age of Facebook and Twitter. resigning from the Tennessee for one man and one woman: Don’t marry someone of Chamber of Commerce. An organization cannot stink selectively. The chamber’s actions were anti-LGBT rights. you same-sex marriage in any way diminished heterosexual are violating your values. That leads us to a “teachable moment. Freedom from a state-run religion and freedom of at one of our events. there are some things to keep in mind regarding communications. period. Conflict in values produces brand damage and potential exposure to lawsuits and is detrimental to shareholder equity. includes just about every company). for example. Over the almost 14 years of publishing DiversityInc. donations and membership: Communications sent in “secrecy” are worse than no letter at all. Finally. better relationships transcend commodity pricing and increase the quality of your revenue stream. especially for companies that are publicly traded and/or regulated by the government (which. but values cannot be parsed without exposure to repercussions. The anti-LGBT forces on your values. Cornel West said ples. Photo: Shutterstock DiversityInc 133 . then don’t violate them. Voting Rights Act and Americans with Disabilities Act—and it is This creates seemingly complex challenges. you cannot hide. The ripple effect of diversity regarding human rights.” and religion from the state are part of our Constitution. as “secret” complaints constitute tacit approval. If you have clarity Proposition 8 in California. Your best possible business outcome is dependent on your ability to equitably execute on fair and equitable treatment.The corporate reaction to our questions was swift but after the fact. Your actions will be publicly evaluated and the resulting addition or subtraction from your brand image will have an impact on your business. This was the basis of womresponsibilities—that transcend nations. Credibility received for your professed values is dependent on your decisive execution of actions based on your values.

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Regional Bank President Gives Her Perspective ON Women. which includes 157 retail branches and nearly 1. Banking & Careers BY LUKE VISCONTI DiversityInc 135 .600 team members.Wells Fargo’s northern New Jersey regional president DiversityInc Interview Lucia DiNapoli Gibbons is responsible for retail operations in 11 counties. She spoke to DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti about her experience working in the banking industry and how diversitymanagement initiatives have made her branches more competitive.

would you like to go to ing to swell. We started. which covers an amazing breadth of diversity. I’ve So if you have an eye on moving carried that through every aspect of forward and moving up. and that’s going to help us build business. relationships with businesses. and then making sure that we hire people who represent that community. we GIBBONS I’ve been guilty of that so I completely agree. and you described how you adapt your store management and how customers are handled based on the diversity that you have in those retail areas. as females. you not only my career. it’s time. our Hispanic strategy last year. I’m really confident lunch?” the woman will say “No. can get very focused on the task at LUCIA DINAPOLI GIBBONS The core of hand.]. Wells Fargo EDUCATION Bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and MBA from the Leonard Stern School of Business at New York University AFFILIATIONS Serves on the boards of the New Jersey Network Foundation. it’s a white population. VISCONTI Can you tell us about a store where you applied that strategy? GIBBONS Yes. So we have Spanish-speaking store members and we have Polishspeaking store members. that over the next five years. N. man and a woman are sitting in two and I think with a little bit more different offices and they’re both time—and I even see this in my equally busy. I’ve heard it described this way: If a GIBBONS In part. That’s IN THE DIVERSITYINC ing with each other. yet through the organization—managing if you look at the same age cohort. Are they Puerto Rican? Are they Portuguese? Are they Colombian? There are certain customs within various heritages that only the people that are part of that heritage understand. and it’s a Hispanic community [and] it’s a Polish community. Luke.WOMEN.J. We have to take care of relationship manager—building ourselves in that way. It is not simply understanding the communities that have Hispanic populations. What do you attribute the gap to? VISCONTI That’s a great point. BANKING AND CAREERS LUKE VISCONTI Lucia. So we’re pretty deliberate about looking store by store. that’s going to help us build trust. If you can connect on that level and build a relationship because you have an appreciation for who those customers are. with people … I don’t think you You’ve got to demonstrate can accomplish anything WELLS performance in order without connecting to FARGO to move ahead. understanding the diversity around that store. 40 Lucia DiNapoli Gibbons most diverse communities in the United States. very proacmore than half the people who have tively managing your brand. Chair of the Corporate Advisory Board for the Boys and Girls Clubs of New Jersey 136 DiversityInc Linden Wood Avenue [in Linden. organizations. need to be focused on performance. something I’ve been TOP 50 COMPANIES networking with people good at from the very FOR DIVERSITY throughout our organizabeginning of my career as a tion.J. but we people and understandcannot lose sight of ing them and building networking—networkrelationships. Now if we weren’t deliberate about “OK. TITLE Executive Vice President and the Northern New Jersey Regional President. Reaching Multicultural Customers VISCONTI You operate 157 retail stores in [northern New Jersey]. the Commerce and Industry Association of New Jersey. What has made you successful? VISCONTI What career advice can you share with women who desire a senior position? GIBBONS Sometimes. New Jersey Performing Arts Center.” and the see some pretty significant change man will drop what he’s doing and at the senior-most positions in go to lunch. we’ll I’ve got to get this done. and that’s great because that it is building great relationships helps you drive performance. essentially. your brand. you need to be focused on networkVISCONTI Less than 3 percent of ing and building those connections Fortune 500 CEOs are women. it’s about understanding the breakdown of that Hispanic population. Can you tell us a little bit about that? GIBBONS We operate in one of the NO. four-year degrees are women. with a lot of gusto. and the Wachovia Regional Foundation. you’re a senior executive woman in a very powerful business role. N. and the senior vice own company—the ranks of middle president comes down the hall and to senior management are startsays “Hey. what’s the . We have a store on BIRTHPLACE Jersey City.

Tips for Success VISCONTI You’ve had a lot of board experience and done a lot of philanthropic work. It’s about winning against our competition and building business. I think that you need to set very high goals. and I had an issue. down to the store level. VISCONTI This clearly can’t be a part-time job for you. at the same time. My husband doesn’t work. but if you do it with care and with a desire to maintain that person’s integrity. Ultimately. VISCONTI Do you think you have bet- ter market share than your competitors because of this? GIBBONS We’re growing our market share in diverse segments better than our competitors are. make sure that you’re up to date on the most current things that are occurring in your discipline. You’ve got to juggle a lot of things in a family. I was able to meet people that I was able to do business with. So I was able to marry the two: my strong desire to best every day. because I happen to be one of those individuals who thinks you can set the bar really high. Has that helped you with business? Why are you doing all this? GIBBONS First. That’s why it’s so important to get so granular. we would have to figure out support in a different way … It takes a very proactive thought process around what does the support network need to look like. and excel every day. he started to back off of what he was doing. You went to the Stern School at NYU and you’re an undergraduate from Rutgers. What advice can you give to other women. The second piece of it is: I used it as a business-development tool. so there’s no way that I’m going to work all the hours that I’m working and be able to accomplish everything I wanted to accomplish if my husband’s schedule was just like mine. we might make the mistake of simply focusing on the Hispanic piece because that really pops in the numbers. I think you can do the tough things. The last piece of advice I would add is to really continually learn a support system. and we do have other family members that we support. We were building a store in Somerset County. visit www. And engage in an environment where you have a win-win scenario. “How do I get to know the people in Bergen County?” “How do I get to know the people here?” And they advised me of certain boards that had certain people I wanted to meet. This is my game plan. Whatever your discipline is. I don’t have young children at home. set high standards. I know how personally engaged you are with this. You need to have a game plan around that. Do you have career suggestions for younger women? GIBBONS It’s important to do your Watch the video interview at www. it’s going to help us overtake those who are ahead of us currently as it relates to total market share in New Jersey. So I think in my heart of hearts it’s absolutely the right thing to do. as to what the diversity of the market looks like.DiversityInc Interview diversity of that white population?” to really understand that it was Polish. whether it’s hired help. And that even comes to engaging in conflict. VISCONTI You have an MBA.com/gibbons from those people around you. I should share that I make a difference coupled with my desire to make relationships with people who were going to help me from a business perspective. I was able to pick up the phone and call [utility company] PSE&G so we could get our store opened on time because I had a relationship at the time with Ralph LaRossa [president and chief operating officer of PSE&G]. in terms of work/life balance and how you manage all of that? GIBBONS It doesn’t happen without did grow up in a household where my father modeled that behavior. Early on in my career when I was a relationship manager. and Luke. As my career was taking off.DiversityIncBestPractices. but I am the primary caregiver for my mom. Now if he did go down that path and he had a high-powered career as well. He thought it was really important to give back to others.DiversityInc. Sometimes you have to have tough conversations with people. family members and friends—you need to have a game plan. and other men. So I saw him do that. At the end of the day. and I always aspired to do the same myself. DI READ MORE For more on workforce diversity. So that was a business issue that I was able to handle because I had a relationship with the right person. I was able to give back and feel great about myself. and the outcome is that you get to develop wonderful business relationships that help you grow your business as well. Never stop learning. this is what their strategy is all about. I would ask certain significant centers of influence. And that still carries through to today.com/workforce-diversity DiversityInc 137 . especially as it relates to people and caring about people.

Successful Paths for Corporate .ADVANCING WOMEN Moving women into linemanagement jobs— and REALLY letting them have work/life balance— doesn’t happen that often. Here’s how to do it right from seven companies.

HAZARD OF AT&T AND VALERIE OSWALT OF KRAFT FOODS . ANDREA L. LEFT TO RIGHT LINDA ALBORNOZ OF AMERICAN EXPRESS.Career Women in Sales BY BARBARA FRANKEL ABOVE.

starting with its predecessor comthis included being customer vice president pany SBC right out of college with a marketing for Kraft’s relationship with degree. paid for her MBA at Kellogg University at giving her the flexibility that eventually Northwestern.. when Linda Albornoz was a director for American Express based in Houston. seven Ernst & Young active careers in revenuemonths ago. to many women seems and Nashville. In between. at most companies that would have meant Albornoz either quit or asked for a reassignment to a desk job. 4. she moved into enterAmerican Express Co.C. PricewaterhouseCoopers these particular women. and moved into more senior roles as Kraft Instead. she reports) and want to make sure women are not joined Kraft in 1996 after two years at Deloitte. Today. visit www. A certified public accountant. dent. but Hazard realProcter & Gamble No. and they contin“I’ve moved from Chicago to Boston to ued to both succeed in their demanding jobs. for women in P&L roles. a son. her boss let her set up a virtual office. had her first No. Along the way. 10 in the DiversityInc Top 50 impossible: combining she got married and. for prise sales and has worked in No. No. Eleven years ago. she is premier Walmart (overseeing more client sales director.com/training . Ten years FOR WOMEN IN SALES (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER) and being area vice presiago. Hazard has been with AT&T for Northern California. excluded. consciously provide flexibility and options especially when her son reaches school age. a meteoric rise in understand that these positions are usually sales at Kraft Foods has also meant frequent the way into the top level (CEO and direct relocations. 25 in the DiversityInc Top 50 with their companies— izes that her days of living in The DiversityInc Top 50 a different city virtually every Companies for Diversity that year are going to have to end. southern California to Dallas to Arkansas to Andrea L. Business to Business (B2B) Payment & Customer Logistics and the mother of two Solutions. 9 in the DiversityInc Top 50 answer lies not with sales for a different company. Global BEST COMPANIES than $2 billion in revenue) Enterprise Solutions. 3 in the DiversityInc Top 50 impressive as they are. Albornoz and her huschildren. Louis (three times). Scott William.SUCCESSFUL CAREER PATHS FOR WOMEN I n 1997. now 7. D. noting that 14 years. 13 in the DiversityInc Top 50 the West Coast. Her husband. 5 in the DiversityInc Top 50 generating positions child. her husband received a great job offer requiring them to move to San Francisco. St. She started in sales finance at Kraft Foods READ MORE 140 DiversityInc For more on advancing women in corporations. 4 in the DiversityInc Top 50 women managed what Dallas (twice). who Kraft Foods and young families? The works in telecommunications No. Oswalt is customer vice helped her rise to her current position of vice president of business development for Sales president. These companies For Valerie Oswalt. but was pregnant. 6.” she says. Today. Minneapolis Colgate-Palmolive Co. Oklahoma AT&T How have these three City. Washington. customer logistics.DiversityIncBestPractices. and Lauren. No. band had a daughter. effectively committing career suicide. relocated with her when she No.

3. Kraft Foods’ vice president of talent acquisition.” In other words.” says Jim Norman. People want to deliver and the company has shifted the mindset to focusing on what gets done. if the sales goals are met. No. “This is especially key in field positions. 13. these seven companies had 15 percent more women in P&L roles. No. No.” VALERIE OSWALT KRAFT FOODS DiversityInc 141 . when and how the work gets done to accomplish these. where constant commute and travel is essential to a successful relationship with customers. 25. 5.. No. American Express Co. Colgate-Palmolive Co. When compared with the 535 companies that participated in the 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 survey. No. DiversityInc studied seven companies in different industries with strong initiatives to help women in revenue-generating roles. 4. AT&T. and Procter & Gamble. 23 percent more women in the top level (CEO and direct reports) and 22 percent more women in the top 10 percent highest-paid employees in the company.. How do they do it? What best practices do they use that enable them to hold on and promote female talent at this level? The key word is “flexibility. Kraft Foods. We found a significant difference in their results. They (and their 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 ranks) are: PricewaterhouseCoopers. 9. No.Best Companies for Women in Sales All Companies (535 DiversityInc Top 50 participants) DiversityInc Top 50 WOMEN IN SALES COMPANY COMPARISONS 42% 38% 33% 30% 39% 42% 37% 33% 27% 22%23% 28% 31% 35%35% 34% 28% 31% In Profit & Loss Positions Promotions in Management CEO & Direct Reports 2nd Level of Management 3rd Level of Management 10% Highest Paid STARTING POINT MOVEMENT MANAGEMENT LEVELS ACHIEVED T WHAT THE DATA SHOWS heir numbers reflect that effort. Ernst & Young. No. it doesn’t matter where and when the executive is physically in the office. “We always like to say we can be flexible for the right people.” “W BEST PRACTICES e strive for clarity of business objectives and deliverables to allow managers and employees the flexibility to determine where. diversity and inclusion. 10. not how you get it done. Oswalt.

and 66 percent have mandatory diversity training for their entire workforce. says of her company: “American Express really takes the worry out of executive relocation. but they will deliver the results.” FOCUS ON TRAINING AND EDUCATION Eighty-six percent of the DiversityInc Top 50 companies have mandatory diversity training for managers. with 90 percent offering job sharing as well. who was encouraged to seek a new role with expanded responsibilities when she was eight-and-a-half-months pregnant. I have a grand piano and a wine collection and they packed it all up for me. They may not get there as fast. What makes these seven companies stand out.” says Hazard. I’ve found the company’s strong investment in individuals in training and education to be very important to me. People want to deliver and the company has shifted the mindset to focusing on what gets done. is that these options are available to revenue generators. The group has mentors and formal meetings and relies on advice from Kraft Foods’ female chairman and CEO. but in many companies these are only available for certain positions. almost double the percentage of five years ago. Their results are measurable—and they are improving every year. developing and advancing women at Kraft. The company has allowed me to do both by being accommodating to my personal life and my leadership goals. go to www. not how you get it done.com/worklife EMPHASIS ON CROSS-CULTURAL MENTORING Studies from Catalyst and other organizations emphasize the personal importance of mentoring to women.DiversityIncBestPractices. Our index of top sales companies for women averages 59. go to www. put it this way: “We always like to say we can be flexible for the right people.com/ergs RELOCATION AND SPOUSAL SUPPORT All of these companies help their executives move by providing assistance on the sales and purchases of their homes (even in a very down market). as a woman. we often see companies that have difficulty holding on to women as they move up the ranks or getting women out of the more traditional staff/support positions. “Quite frankly.” That’s meant for her a willingness to move into more major market cities for the telecommunications giant.9 percent of managers participating in mentoring programs. I need as a sales leader to be in front of customers. As Kraft Foods’ Oswalt put it: “A lot of women feel they can’t have everything—certainly not at the same time. up 19 percent from five years ago. retaining. especially when they assume leadership positions and compete in what traditionally has been a male role. go to www. All individuals benefit from this. as the interaction is very important.DiversityIncBestPractices. 72 percent of the DiversityInc Top 50 now offer paternity leave.” ANDREA HAZARD AT&T All of the DiversityInc Top 50 companies now offer both of these options. SPECIFICALLY? “Although AT&T has a virtual policy.DiversityIncBestPractices. certainly women in sales positions who often need help as they grow into leadership positions. For more on progressive benefits. an employee group dedicated to attracting. For more on employee-resource groups. Albornoz.com/mentoring USE EMPLOYEE-RESOURCE GROUPS CREATIVELY Kraft Foods has a Women’s Sales Council. compared with 37 percent for the DiversityInc Top 50. Hazard explains how it has worked for her at AT&T: “Although AT&T has a virtual policy. I need as a sales leader to be in front of customers. up by a third more than five years ago. interim housing.” FLEXIBLE HOURS AND TELECOMMUTING HOW DOES THAT WORK. go to www. For more on mentoring. an employee-resource group just for women in sales positions. These companies have made dedicated efforts to nurture and keep women in revenue-generating positions. They sell your house.” DI 142 DiversityInc . For more on training.com/training I CONCLUSION n our benchmarking practice. find you a new one. Interestingly. Women don’t have to give up on their dreams. The results of these best practices also create engaged and loyal employees. moving services. such as HR and communications. as the interaction is very important. and give you the right support services and paid time off. Irene Rosenfeld.SUCCESSFUL CAREER PATHS FOR WOMEN who is an adviser to Kraft Foods’ Women Sales Council. people who actively must be out meeting customers.DiversityIncBestPractices. however. childcare and job-search assistance for spouses.

middle managers and potential senior leaders. please visit: www. middle beginning their career and preparing for for the CPA Exam.Supported by leading accounting firms and organizations. and recognized by leading accounting firms and organizations.Rooms 341-342DIVERSITYINC ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY Washington.1637 Director For more information on CAE programs. Because of the unique challenges young African Americans face when entering the accounting profession.edu Pat Kellibrew 202. Bazilio and Associates Coleman BDO Seidman * & Young * Review * Deloitte * AICPA * & Williams * Ernst Becker CPAGrant Thornton * NABA KPMG McConnell & Jones * NABA Division of Firms * PWC Walker & Company * Williams. Members training increasing group increasing providing of stakeholders real-world scenarios that programs.806. DC 20059 Howard University School of Business 2600 Sixth Street. Members of the everexpertise in the of stakeholders participate in the of the everfield of accounting. CAE’s corporate stakeholders are among the professions leading firms and major organizations who contribute resources and firms and major organizations who contribute resources and expertise in the field of accounting. providing participants with real-world scenarios that mirror their impending work environment.edu Frank Ross 202. theEducation (CAE) addressesBusiness Center for Accounting Education (CAE) addresses to diversity challenge by attracting more African Americans the the profession challenge by attracting more retention and upward profession and improves their rates of African Americans to the mobility. group participants with participate in the training programs. DC 20059 pkellibrew@howard. Bazilio and Associates AICPA * & Company Becker CPA Review * Deloitte * KPMG Bert SmithBDO Seidman * * Thompson. Cobb. Training is targeted to every stage of of career development: students targeted to every stage career development: students considering accounting as asa a career. CAE offers initiatives and programsthat will prepare them to successfully maneuver and programs that will prepare them to successfully maneuver the pitfalls they may encounter early in their career.1643 Kellibrew Coordinator pkellibrew@howard.806. young professionals considering accounting career. and improves their rates challenges young African Americans face Because of the uniqueof retention and upward mobility.edu .howardcae.org f_ross@howard. NW .edu The Center for Accounting Education Washington. please visit: www. young professionals beginning their career and preparing the CPA Exam.org f_ross@howard.806. Our Stakeholders include: CAE’s corporate stakeholders are among the professions leading S Center for Center for Accounting Accounting Education Education We’re We’re About About Success! Our Stakeholders include: Bert Smith & Company * Thompson. CAE offers initiatives when entering the accounting profession. NW .howardcae.1637 The Center for Accounting Education Howard University School of Business 2600 Sixth Street. Training is the pitfalls they may encounter early in their career. and the upported nationally as a prominent resource throughout accounting nationally as the Howard University School of the recognized profession. mirror their impending work environment. Cobb. Adley & Company Success! Frank Ross Director Coleman & Williams * Ernst & Young * Grant Thornton * NABA McConnell & Jones * NABA Division of Firms * PWC Walker & Company Williams.Rooms 341-342 Coordinator Pat202. managers and potential senior leaders. a prominent resource throughout Business accounting Accounting Howard University School of the diversity Center for profession. Adley & Company For more information on*CAE programs.

144 Diver ity c 144 DiversityInc DiversityInc v rsit r ityInc .

That said. Shutterstock I think Walmart engineered the greatest diversity-management turnaround I’ve ever seen since I started publishing DiversityInc in 1998. and understanding Photo Illustration: Craig Lee-Griffin.Danger of the POOR MANAGEMENT RUINS EQUITY The Walmart ClassAction Decision BY LUKE VISCONTI partner benefits to their employees who are in samesex relationships—and you won’t see them on any DiversityInc Top 50 list until they do. this Supreme Court decision has implications far beyond Walmart. I admire a lot of the people and their collective efforts there. I also find it incomprehensible that they still don’t offer medical DiversityInc 145 .

goals. are prone to discriminate.” Justice Scalia wrote (emphasis added). they would have to offer strong evidence of a nationwide practice or policy that hurt the class. The problem is even worse on a serendipitous level— people. regulation. In the Walmart case. and psychological tests show we are most likely to trust people who are just like us. noted that Walmart’s official corporate policy opposed discrimination. while the company gave the managers at its more than 3. There will be individual sexist managers who will use this case—and their corporation’s lack of internal controls. this decision can be used as a way for a company with problems to not do anything. I can imagine that amoral lawyers will advise companies with poor records and practices that rules unstated (or never made) are rules you don’t have to defend—in other words. the court essentially said that if lawyers brought a nationwide class action against an employer.POOR MANAGEMENT RUINS EQUITY them is very important. it will be far more difficult for people who are wronged as a group to fight as a group. Diversity is a core element of READ MORE ON DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT AT www. written by Justice Antonin Scalia. race or other factors. left to their own devices.” about just Walmart. will have no negotiation power over huge companies—I know from experience that it costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to sue someone— and a malevolent corporation will use every legal trick in the book to stretch things out. I think that’s nonsense—is it also unbelievable that 99. This is from The New York Times: “The court’s decision will not just make it harder to bring big. “In a company of Wal-Mart’s size and geographical scope. In the majority opinion.DiversityIncBestPractices. There are endless examples of large organizations that force their managers to exercise their discretion in a common way. it is quite unbelievable that all managers would exercise their discretion in a common way without some common direction. the court set higher barriers for bringing several types of nationwide class actions against a large company with many branches. There is a danger lurking in this decision. fighting alone.com 146 DiversityInc . the court wrote that the plaintiffs had not demonstrated that Walmart had any nationwide policies or practices that discriminated against women. The opinion. Value in Diversity T LUKE VISCONTI In its majority opinion. We’re tribal beings. standards and repercussions for not following them—to discriminate. Here’s the problem—for shareholders. This is normal human behavior. he absence of direction doesn’t absolve a company of guilt—but with this court decision. ambitious employment class-action cases asserting discrimination based on sex. the individual. thereby costing more money. poor management destroys equity value. legal experts said.995 percent of store managers won’t embezzle? Does everyone stock their shelves as they see fit at department stores? Or do they do it by the rulebook? Keep in mind. this isn’t This case makes it all the more important for everyone to truly inspect the companies they do business with and work for. Why? If a person is discriminated against.400 stores considerable discretion over pay and promotions.

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Because now that Justice Scalia has written a free pass to corporate management. court cases and internal arguments. only 12 percent of the members of Congress are women. only 3 percent of Fortune 500 company CEOs are women. This is from their website regarding the decision: “Walmart has a long history of providing advancement opportunities for our female associates and over the years we have made tremendous strides in developing women throughout the organization. Christian men with no ADAdefined disabilities— has better prospects at companies that manage diversity well. they came about from a series of shocks about 10 years ago—a T Everyone— including white. As a result of our efforts. we have created specific training and mentoring programs to help prepare women for opportunities at all levels in our company. Walmart now has things that would never have happened 10 years ago. 70 percent of our nation’s workforce will be women and/or Black and Latino. it has a direct bottomline result. In fact. Walmart is often recognized as a great place for women to work. Right now. Only 14 percent of Fortune 500 company board seats are held by women. DI 148 DiversityInc . and practically speaking. we are still waiting for the first woman president. heterosexual. including a robust and cutting-edge supplier-diversity program. Look at the corporate websites. run of very bad press. And I know them to personally be stand-up and righteous men and women. Check out lists like the DiversityInc Top 50. What Is the Individual to Do? I n my opinion. Look for the diversity section. Make sure they follow your values—because in the case of diversity management.POOR MANAGEMENT RUINS EQUITY managing human capital. even if you were to limit your measurement to productivity. you’re on your own if you don’t. Top management took control over the situation and hired dozens of people to staff their (very diverse) diversity department— including some people I know. check out the corporate management and board for diversity. You can see that women have been systemically denied opportunities to achieve their potential—and I don’t think anyone is really pleased with the direction or performance of either the stock market or the government. see if the CEO has a statement that makes sense to you. That means that everyone—including white. Yet women have been getting more bachelor’s degrees than men since 1980. this case makes it all the more important for everyone to truly inspect the companies they do business with and work for. heterosexual.” These programs didn’t come about from nothing. The Bottom Line hat discrimination is damaging to business could not be better documented by Walmart. By 2016. I believe they’ll eventually get on board with partner benefits—because it is only just to treat their employees equitably and to not deny a benefit that could make the difference between life and death by judging people on whom they love. Christian men with no ADA-defined disabilities—has better prospects at companies that manage diversity well. Misogynistic results are not limited to corporations. women are numerically at parity with men in the college-educated and non-collegeeducated workforce. make sure you understand where companies stand. etc.

SUBSCRIBE NOW AT WWW.COM/SUBSCRIBE . you’re missing out on what the most successful companies use to improve retention and drive innovation.DIVERSITYINC.99 NT MANAGEME DIVERSITY N ON UBLICATIO E PREMIER P TH DIVERSITY-MANAGEMENT TOPICS AND FEATURES INCLUDING Interviews with CEOs of multinational corporations on their commitment to diversity and the best practices that put their companies on top Best practices from the most influential chief diversity officers Includes full access to the digital and iPad versions of the magazine If you’re not a subscriber to DiversityInc magazine.SUBSCRIBE NOW! AND RECEIVE 1 YEAR (5 ISSUES) FOR JUST Information from the deepest database of diversity metrics there is. with data from more than 500 companies $9.

it offers the possibility of a tuitionfree college education. and financial support—for promising eighth graders to pursue through their high school and college years. it offers a concrete path—paved with academic. social. . For increasing numbers. An ambitious program at Rutgers University holds out new hope of reversing this alarming trend. First. this leads to a life without hope.Rutgers Future Scholars Too many young people from our inner cities give up on learning because they can’t see college in their future. personal. perhaps more important.

and mentoring.. now numbering 800. Appropriate to Rutgers’ status as a premier public research university. academically talented middle schoolers who may become the first in their families to earn a four-year college degree. communication. The students. . however. Those who complete the program successfully and are admitted to Rutgers are guaranteed free tuition. Too often. critical thinking.rutgers. receive ongoing academic support. a time for bold action. offering a college opportunity to high school seniors is already too late. including self-assessment and the collection of national data. Facing tough challenges. the Rutgers Future Scholars Program each year accepts 200 low-income. These are just some of the real-world skills Rutgers Future Scholars gain on the way to becoming leaders in the 21st-century workplace. Support Future Scholars .edu. .. enrichment.edu or contact us at 732-932-6712 or info@futurescholars. Let their success be yours. Rutgers Future Scholars has a significant research component. Develop Future Leaders To learn more about the program and how you might help support it. JERSE Y ROOTS. GLOBAL RE ACH ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC . with the intention of developing a prototype program with national implications. Rutgers has a long-standing commitment to accessibility and diversity. a large proportion of our undergraduates are first-generation college students. Collaboration. guidance. an opportunity to help. Launched in 2008 in four New Jersey cities.An untapped pool of talent.rutgers. go to futurescholars. enriching environment to younger students is crucial to their success. the Rutgers Future Scholars learn what it takes to succeed. That’s why Rutgers Future Scholars is based on the concept that providing a supportive.

passed over. Race discrimination claim ruled “nonsense.. The evidence further showed that the plaintiff rated far higher on performance factors than the person selected. 2011). knew the Black employee intended to apply. did not wait for the application deadline to expire. (6th Cir. The court upheld summary judgment. Cir. 2011). The employer’s defense was that she never applied for the position and. therefore.com 152 DiversityInc Photos: Shutterstock LEGALUPDATE not h ired Preemptive hiring is discrimination. unfounded rumors and stereotypes about “affirmative action” hiring instead of evidence.” white police applicant filed a race-discrimination case alleging that he was bumped from a hiring list. Black employee alleged that she was denied a promotion to a higher IT position and a less-qualified Asian employee was selected instead. go to www.C. However. . so that lower-scoring “minority” applicants could be hired. dismissing the case as frivolous and “nonsense. and directed the selection of the Asian employee and stopped the hiring process while the application period was still open.EMPLOYMENT LAW For more on effective leadership and legal issues in the workplace. the evidence showed that the manager knew there were only two eligible employees. The actual evidence showed that the plaintiff was not “passed over. gender or disability discrimination in hiring or promotions are legitimate? ‘I Didn’t Get the Job Because I’m Black’ BY BOB GREGG hired Race Discrimination A and other key managers considered her “superior by a wide margin. the bottom half of the roster that the plaintiff was on was all white (some of whom were hired). and neither of them had “passed over” anyone.. He identified two “minority” officers who were hired. Johnson (D. Thompson v.” The court found that the employer’s defense seemed to be a pretext for racial discrimination.” he was eliminated due to failing the background check. could not contest the decision.” His entire case was based on conjecture. conjecture and pure speculation). so he could not have been bumped by a “minority. Calhoun v.” The plaintiff’s complaint relied on hearsay and stray comments he had heard from A people who were not involved in the hiring (loose rumors. the two identified “minority” officers had been hired in a process that was long over before he even applied. Lansing Mich. and finally.DiversityIncBestPractices. How do you know when claims of racial.

. Tayag v. A assuming she was fired. called the employee. 2011). important public-relations event. sub- A sidiary.com/legal DiversityInc 153 . Disability Discrimination on paper.. McCermott v. 2011). The supervisor’s act clearly violated Title VII. NY. threw it in the trash. (3rd Is an essential function essential to the job? Cir. The suit seeks to cover all Toshiba subsidiaries.. “The employer major job blunder is a valid non-discriminatory will have to show that it actually imposes such reason for discharge. Inc. New York City requirements on its employees in fact and not simply Housing Development Corp. partner in Boardman Law Firm. they visited churches and met with clergy but saw no medical professionals. and therefore the discharge was a prima boardmanlawfirm. A be more than a hollow defense. A clerical employee gave a written complaint of sexual harassment to her supervisor after several verbal complaints received no action. He can be reached at rgregg@ of what duties should make up a job. promotion and terms and conditions of employment under Title VII and the Equal Pay Act. The reason for discharge. To read more legal articles from Bob Gregg. 2011). “This is total [BS]! I want you out of here and never want to see you again!” The employee left. 2011). and she sued for violation of her FMLA rights. shoulder injury made a UPS driver unable to do his job. Graphic Packaging Int. Cyphers v. Young-Lousee v. the plaintiff in this case was not a Christian Scientist. He applied for several other Messing up president’s schedule was valid positions he believed he could do. (8th Cir. Trashing harassment complaint creates case. NY. so any leave must be for verified standard medical treatment. finding no medical foundation for the leave. The court noted the special FMLA exception for Christian Scientists who reject ordinary medical care and can be guided in treatment by Christian Science practitioners. (S. functions were not actually performed a major. claiming that she could not reasonably re-enter the environment after what occurred. The court dismissed the case.” The suit alleges systemic gender discrimination in compensation. It found no connection case. The court ruled that there was a valid claim of retaliation. The court allowed the The communication director was fired. Inc. She sued for Title VII retaliation. Yet incorrectly scheduled the organization’s the employee produced evidence that these president. She refused.D. claiming that he was replaced diversity-related legal weight to an employer’s determination by a person without a medical condition issues. The com functions is a powerful defense in an ADA court disagreed. resulting in the president missing Bob Gregg. There is no other religious exception in the FMLA. During the trip. and the job description’s list of essential facie case of disability discrimination. hospital employee was denied FMLA to take a seven-week overseas trip for “faith healing” of her husband’s heart and kidney conditions. However. The courts give great He sued. Toshiba American. 2011). visit www.D.DiversityInc. Lehey Clinical Hospital (1st Cir. shares his roundup of case to go to trial. Her husband did not reject standard medical treatment and had several regular doctors. The plaintiff had been an HR manager for the Toshiba Nuclear Energy Corp.Sex Discrimination HR manager files class-action suit against Toshiba. former HR manager has filed suit requesting certification of a class of “all females who are or have been employed by Toshiba in the United States. The supervisor wadded up the complaint. informed her she was not fired and asked her to come back. The husband’s doctors provided no medical verification for the leave.. But the court ruled that there must between the cancer and the discharge. (S. United Parcel Service. A and the cardiologist’s certification stated the leave was not medically necessary for treatment. Inc. A Family & Medical Leave Act Faith-healing pilgrimage was not covered by FMLA.” Supinski v. He mobility beyond his medical limitations. company rejected him due to essential job functions in the job descriptions requiring lifting and A communication director had cancer. the company’s HR director learned of the incident. pointed at the door and said. fter-the-fact action does not cure the problem. Two days later. in the real job. The employee was discharged for taking unauthorized leave.. The company’s attempt to cure was too late to overcome such an overt act by the supervisor.

Some mistakenly use the two terms interchangeably. methodologies and objectives. . can harmonize their activities and more effectively support each other’s mission.DiversityIncBestPractices. LATHAM Much has been written about diversity and inclusion (D&I) and affirmativeaction programs (AAP) in the workplace. while achieving their vastly different objectives. each with unique histories. BY WELDON H. More attention needs to be given to how these two critical corporate functions.com 154 DiversityInc Photo: Shutterstock THEINSIDEVIEW DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT Affirmative Action & Diversity Coordinate diversity initiatives with affirmative-action compliance to enhance results and reduce conflicts.To learn more about effective diversity-management practices. visit www.

Corporate Diversity/Inclusion Mission C ooperation must begin with a clear understanding of the significantly different objectives of each function. In fact. i. These federal contractors are subject to Executive Orders 10925 and 11246 (issued in 1961 and 1965. government relations. given the ever-improving state of D&I performance in recent years. to ameliorate gaps in representation or address any number of other D&I issues unique to their organization. Corporate D&I. While most D&I functions are not limited to employment matters.. many of our clients have begun their search for the latest best practices by utilizing DiversityInc’s benchmarking service.S. targeted Benchmarking Best Practices Having advised more than 45 of the nation’s largest companies on a wide range of diversity matters. which administers and enforces affirmative-action require- DiversityInc 155 . but they seldom have any role in compliance. utilizing such tools as benchmarking. but they seldom have any role in compliance. Corporate affirmative-action offices are typically staffed with personnel operating in an “AAP compliance” department. Department of Labor. respectively) and their implementing regulations. career development. Their focus is solely compliance. ensuring that the company is minimizing legal liability by satisfying applicable AAP regulatory requirements. women and other historically underrepresented groups). Asians. is a C-suite operation directed at identifying and capitalizing on rapidly changing marketplace and workplace demographics and the increasing influence and buying power of Blacks. are mandated for the thousands of companies that do business with our nation’s largest consumer: the federal government.” D&I may also address board-of-directors issues. The best CDOs creatively use D&I achievement as a means to enhance corporate performance and marketplace success. Successful corporate D&I activities are as strategically important as product and branding (and can positively benefit both). procurement and supplier diversity. The best CDOs Many sophisticated D&I efforts are led by chief diversity officers or equivalents. including representation (particularly among Blacks. e.) Affirmative-Action Compliance Mission A ffirmative-action obligations. The D&I workforce function creatively advances strategic corporate objectives by developing measures to address D&I human-resource needs. outreach.g. who are often direct reports to the CEO and some of whom serve on the CEO’s executive committees. communications and the D&I relationship to other corporate functions. These factors usually form the basis of a company’s business case for diversity. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). including devising effective methods to respond to reality-based analysis of gaps in workforce representation. American Indians. Latinos. and this is where some overlap with the AAP function may exist. mentoring and other efforts to effectively develop the most diverse and productive workforce. Asians. on the other hand. (In our experience.. the most common issues of representation gaps occur in the senior executive ranks and the pipeline jobs that lead to those most important positions.e. Where our clients have used DiversityInc Benchmarking. it has helped us assist those clients to tailor D&I solutions to meet their specific needs. The D&I “workforce component” addresses a wide array of D&I people issues. reporting to human resources. recruiting. They must stay abreast of regulations issued by the U. creatively use D&I achievement as a means to enhance corporate performance and marketplace success. women and other groups. my group has helped create many legally tested D&I best practices to address specific problems. philanthropy. when most effective. American Indians. Latinos. they clearly recognize the importance of D&I in the “war for talent. legal and/or corporate compliance.

women. and other real factors—all appropriate.DiversityIncBestPractices. and they are included in the performance objectives of key leadership.THEINSIDEVIEW { ments. to identify and facilitate elimination of barriers to equal opportunity. AAP regulations require federal contractors to provide all U. The CDO appropriately communicates the goals.com 156 DiversityInc . individuals with disabilities and covered veterans.S. All these circumstances can lead to problematic disconnects—for example. but there is female underrepresentation using the same standard. ith companies that have both D&I and AAP compliance functions. as well as the practical differences of corporate “silos.. Affirmative-action plans typically include a description of specific remedial measures directed at improving representation of underrepresented groups.g. At the same time. but far beyond the formalistic “utilization vs. objectives and methodologies to the CEO. as in the case of D&I. American Indians. and they do so in a formalistic. promotions and terminations. availability statistics) requiring the setting of a lower goal. given the extremely different objectives. the D&I and AAP teams having differing workforce representation objectives (e. citizens with a non-discriminatory equal-employment opportunity. hiring goals). availability of Latino senior managers. low current Latino representation. AAP compliance has used the OFCCP utilization methodology and has concluded that there is no Latino underrepresentation (based on the minimalist methodology and applicable national. creating numerical “goals” for improving representation where there is “statistically significant” underutiliza- tion. The AAP compliance function requires strict procedural adherence to regulations and 50 years of precedent. The AAP group To learn more about effective diversity-management practices. visit www. not local.” where D&I and AAP compliance are usually managed independently and neither collaborates nor coordinates their activities. availability” analysis required by the AAP regulations. statistically comparing current “utilization” with labor force “availability”. HR and senior management. relationships with Latino organizations. The potential for conflict is obvious. This involves well-established procedures that every AAP compliance office must follow. Latinos. and conducting “adverse impact analyses” of various personnel activities. The D&I function is helping to achieve the business case for diversity as a corporate imperative and must utilize new and creative thinking to address a dynamic demographic and economic environment to help the company succeed in the marketplace. to be creative or expansive in maximizing corporate marketplace success. technical and legalistic manner. Many companies regard AAP compliance in minimalist fashion. and remedial versus action plans. Asians. The D&I function is helping to achieve the business case for diversity as a corporate imperative and must utilize new and creative thinking to address a dynamic demographic and economic environment to help the company succeed in the marketplace. customer demands. The AAP compliance function requires strict procedural adherence to regulations and 50 years of precedent. Consider the following hypothetical situation: The CDO of a certain company has analyzed the workforce and has determined that Latinos are underrepresented at the senior-manager level. Their efforts are strictly compliance and are not intended. an overlap can exist because both are seeking to improve underutilized groups’ representation. doing the minimum required by regulation to minimize corporate legal liability. the company’s strategic-planning W Areas for Collaboration } objectives. including developing the required affirmative-action plans for Blacks. methods and historical context. The reality-based representation-gap analysis and basis for the CDO’s determination might include studies of market-research trends. such as hires.

personally and professionally. WWW.NJCU.EDU 1-888-441-NJCU 2039 KENNEDY BOULEVARD. NEW JERSEY 07305 ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC . in the global economy. JERSEY CITY.NEW JERSEY CITY UNIVERSITY NJCU has everything you need to succeed.

2. He is also a professor teaching corporate diversity at the Georgetown University Law Center.DiversityIncBestPractices.. this confusion will likely depress performance and results in both areas. the D&I effort has strong legal authority (where it is not confused with the AAP standard) and clearly has a different legal standard. be satisfied by appropriate goal-setting and remedial plans but should also be intelligently designed and coordinated with the broader. legal. regional office of Jackson Lewis LLP . more aggressive strategic business-success-driven motivations of D&I. D. With respect to the legal complication. human resources. While a clear understanding of the differences between D&I and AAP compliance should carry the day. which impedes efobjectives. if an employee or the EEOC were to challenge an employment decision made pursuant to either the CDO or AAP methodology. AAP compliance should work with D&I in its development of AAP remedial measures to ensure policy understanding. These conflicting signals may well leave executives and hiring managers confused as to what are the corporate goals and rationale. where in fact. visit www. (See “Workplace Diversity Programs: Debunking 3 Myths” at www. both. the two functions should be fully coordinated. can be different and legal. Possible legal complications. D&I and compliance interaction. DiversityInc. the company would need to explain its basis for the differing results.com 158 DiversityInc . and policy statements. done well. the problem could unnecessarily give the employee or EEOC some leverage in arguing that the company has no consistent policy or goals. D&I efforts may well create aggressive action plans that are different and go well beyond the AAP remedial approach. of course. In short. If unresolved. To learn more about effective diversity-management practices. Reduced ability to achieve either goal.C. AAP compliance obligations must. These differing results could cause problems: 1.com/workplacediversity. which must then be effectively communicated throughout the and achieve both company. and counsel to the PepsiCo Global Diversity and Inclusion Governance Council and the Omnicom Group Diversity Development Advisory Committee.) econciling the differences between D&I functions and can successfully AAP obligations requires corporate-level coordination and a clear understanding of the different objectives coordinate their and legal standards. Companies should first realize that two functions to there must be a clear understanding by the two functions eliminate apparent about the relationship between D&I initiatives and AAP inconsistencies obligations. and the AAP compliance office analysis showed under- representation of women but not Latinos. there is potential for confusion among their quite different managers and employees as to conflicting expectations. D&I’s analysis showed underrepresentation of Latinos but not women. Bryson II and Michael R. through a combination of C-suite. Hatcher of Jackson Lewis LLP contributed to this article. Ideally. DI R Ensuring Understanding & Cooperation Ideally. companies WELDON LATHAM is a senior partner in the Washington. incorporates remedial measures in the AAP. and notifies executives and hiring managers. Without such awareness. Differing approaches to workforce analysis. Confusion as to what the corporate goals and methods are. management and enhancement should be reconciled to ensure not only a minimalist approach to compliance with federal law but optimization of D&I performance. In this instance. At a bare minimum. chair of the firm’s corporate diversity counseling group. fectiveness and increases legal risk. 3. companies can successfully coordinate their two functions to eliminate apparent inconsistencies and achieve both their quite different objectives. John M. includes that goal in its AAP.THEINSIDEVIEW sets its goal for improving female representation.

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gutierrez@rutgers. contact aramis.edu 160 DiversityInc .RUTGERSFUTURESCHOLARS Rutgers Future Scholars Class of 2020 Alejandro Aguilar Tiffany Aguirre Giancarlo Almanzar Mirse Amaya Emiliana Arocha Piney Arp Pamela Arvelo Christofer Ayres Dominique Bennet Victor Bonilla Moet Brady Aldin Cameron Daniel Castro Martin Chukwu Jr Kelsey Clarke Gabriel Colley Vania Conseco Mamadi Conteh Abelardo Cruz Carlos Cruz Edwin Cruz Jonathon Cruz Induwara Dalawella Avrie Davis Tyrell Dempsey Mariana Diaz Damien Dillard Seth Duodu-Baah Elisa Duran Amy Espana Alexander Estrada-Pineda Maurice Ffrench Anita Fleming Nicole Flores Cindy Garcia Emili Garcia Ivan Garcia Nichole Glenn Jesenia Gonzalez Cristian Gonzalez Stephany Gonzalez Ivan Gonzalez Monica Goombas Brandon Gracia Ny’Ala Harris Zeyad Hegab Carlos Hernandez Paula Hobbins Bethany Holder Alexander Iovine Estarlin Jaquez Lucas Jimenez Jorge Jimenez Zyrie Lawrence Maria Lopez-Brena Andrew Luna Quiasia Martin Leyvi Martinez Alex Martinez Bryan Matthew Mariana Mayo Cheyan McDonald Ezekiel Medina Karen Mejia Tah-Jeir Montgomery Meggan Montouri Dja’Nasia Motley Cameron Murray Precious Njokubi Cheimika Njokubi Michelle Nwafulume Yvette Ortiz Katana Overby Krupa Parekh Krishna Patel Kevin Patel Yesha Patel Jacob Radecki Alanis Ramirez Michelle Ramirez-Cruz Anali Reyes Denilsa Reyes Elena Reyes Johan Reyes Tamara Rivera Siara Rosa David Rosario Jorge Salazar Nelsy Santos Hinata Sarwar Kim Sarza Nina Smith Alexis Smith Curtiss Stacey Katherine Suarez Briana Sweeny Alpha Tarawally Elisa Taveras Diana Taveras Jaryneth Torres Wesley Urbina Leslie Valdez Yamir Venable Arkin Villacis Jessica Vizcarra Isaiah Winn Epiphani Woodward Sharon Zalaya Jason Zarate For more information on the Rutgers Future Scholars.

.GUTIERREZ@ RUTGERS.THE RUTGERS FUTURE SCHOLARS PROGRAM selects bright seventh-graders from Newark. N.J. Camden. New Brunswick and Piscataway. there are almost 800 scholars in grades 8–11.EDU DiversityInc 161 . mentoring and scholarships if admitted to Rutgers. providing college preparation. Individual and corporate contributions provide vital support for these worthwhile young scholars. CONTACT ARAMIS. FOR MORE INFORMATION. Currently.

businesses in China. “Welcome to For more information.edu/emba 162 DiversityInc .rutgers.Rutgers Business School Executive MBAs in China RUTGERSEMBAPROGRAM T he Rutgers Business School has conducted executive MBA programs in China since 1993. Rutgers Executive MBA program participate in a 10-day summer residency program in Beijing and Shanghai to get a firsthand experience of the complex Chinese economy and to get an idea of the challenges and opportunities for U. longer than any other American university. seminars with business and government officials. and visits with their RutgersChina Executive MBA counterparts.S. The trip includes business visits. visit http://business. Students in the U.S.

Carolynn Johnson. the Powerhouse” DiversityInc 163 . seventh from left). front row. traveled to China as part of the Rutgers University Executive MBA Class of 2012. product development and operations for DiversityInc (seated. executive vice president.

global diversity and inclusion. Hawaii EDUCATION Bachelor’s degree from the University of Mississippi . but the company faces the significant challenge of promoting and recruiting Blacks. Latinos and women in an industry where the pipeline for that talent is narrow. executive director. Lisa Mink. Global Diversity and Inclusion BIRTHPLACE Honolulu. brings her understanding of why it’s critical for IT companies to help build the pipeline as early as high school and college and to create inclusive environments that foster collaboration and innovation. LATINOS & WOMEN INTO IT Lisa Mink Dell’s Diversity Leader on Building Racial and Gender Diversity in IT BY JOY BUCHANAN D ell made its entry onto The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list this year at No. LISA MINK TITLE Executive Director.LEADERSHIP 164 DiversityInc BRINGING BLACKS. especially across the globe. 30. “The concept of diversity is really about organizational effectiveness— how do we bring team members together who all have differences.

of this is goals and the members function more years. you siloed how you ERGs. “I was her champion and her I remember to place a focus on building a pipeline of voice. and she made the transition. a generational-resource group American.” No. the Pentagon and in this is how new global resource groups—there are Somerset County. “‘Please. she sat in a cafeteria this person is nearly 170 students from 50 schools.com/ to work in diversity.’” Mink recalls them saying. her guardian and protector. university relations led to the highest how people view the world. realized this was going to be a learning GenNext was featured in our ERG experience and a journey for me to LISA MINK best-practices article “Do You Need broaden my understanding. At Dell. 11. it’s how we build and attract ent. Mink was not afraid to go understand ing high-level professionals into execuwhere she would be perceived as differtive ranks. The meaning and importance of diversity—especially around culture and gender—is important. creating two World Trade Center. “We ergs. employee-resource groups. DI practice of managing diversity and bringing this concept For more on diversity leadership.” a Generational Employee-Resource When she returned to the United States. called GenNext.” Mink says. “We do acknowledge year. One of Dell’s newest to raise your awareness.” diversity council was deeply involved in Mink says. and you had one day? You need as thought leaders. with some of her British colleagues and Dell did a lot of work on its remarked on the tragic events at the different. the network group to make it truly global.com/leadership DiversityInc 165 . 2001.” she says. “The information-technology industry Champion & Voice does have a group of job families that historically. this is why this Inclusion function for the first time. The ERGs have more specific business this for hundreds. “You can’t just expect people to intuitively understand or embrace difference.DiversityInc. which is why we have to be afraid of her. is testing products. want people to be able to be who they are and bring that and it’s really reinvigorated the excitement around the to work. and Amsterdam—and had to adjust her The company’s renewed efforts in own perceptions and understanding of being.” helping people diverse talent. Caucasian males: software. explain it. and Mink was acutely aware of differences at a young still. communicate and work through it and be very intentional about it. “I think that’s why this intentional ERGs. go to www. She was surprised you talk to now seven—and expanding the women’s by her coworkers’ reactions. person is different. rest of the world has been dealing with this person. she took on three assignments that this was that pipeline from the very beginning. that the available talent on the market of global women Children. a decision that the company’s this person. if not thousands. Pa. Dell also moved its University Relations & Diversity “A lot of what I remember was helping people Recruiting operations into the Global Diversity & understand that this was a human being. attracts young. older than her by a little more than a storage. Slovakia a human she says. “It’s not just about growAs an adult. so Mink helped people understand those intentional in making sure we’ve got goals and have differences and taught them how to treat her sister with specific plans around that. this is how you talk to Mink says. You have to manage it.DiversityIncBestPractices.” abroad—in the United Kingdom. this is why number of summer interns it’s ever had: On Sept. Group?” For more on generational her mentor and sponsor encouraged her ERGs.” respect. “I communicate. “[Expanding the ERGs] has been very powerful.” she says. this is how you communicate. was born with severe developmental disabilities.” Global Diversity in IT Sixty-five percent of Dell’s workforce is outside the United States. adults and even family friends seemed to be and people of color is less. Her sister. gaming age. 30 in The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity Dell of inclusion into the workplace has really gotten traction here at Dell. the cloud.” Mink says.bring awareness to that and create an environment where all of them can do their best work. visit www.

No.LEADERSHIP “My life has been about helping to make a difference for those that are underrepresented and underserved and helping them to achieve equal outcomes. access and cultural competency to ensure that we provide the best level of patient care that we can. “We’re trying to identify best practices around a number of areas including health disparities.” DONNIE PERKINS 166 DiversityInc BETTER HEALTHCARE THROUGH DIVERSITY Chief Diversity Officer of University Hospitals. Taking over the . a diversity council in place to set an agenda for diversity management. vice president for diversity and inclusion. and a history of commitment to providing culturally competent medical care. including nationwide healthcare reform. says Donnie Perkins. recruiting and advancing talent from traditionally underrepresented groups and. 5 in The DiversityInc Top 5 Hospital Systems. has strong commitment from CEO Thomas Zenty III. eliminating health disparities. most importantly.” he says. on Managing Healthcare Reform and an Increasingly Diverse Population BY JOY BUCHANAN Donnie Perkins C leveland’s University Hospitals. Perkins sees those challenges as opportunities. But there are significant challenges facing the system.

Latino and what they were there to help me do. he says. Perkins wanted to go the hospital system’s recruitment to college. “So there erkins’ personal definition of Systems is a clear stream—a thread—that runs diversity encompasses “our through all of this and the work that I do. is encouraged me to continue. Asian medical students very early in He attended Central State University.P “Diversity came along as a means to not only assist system’s diversity-management efforts earlier this year.’” Perkins says. PHILANTHROPY ity.” he says. about building relationships that help us math and physical education and coached a high school that recruit the talent that we need to provide in Connecticut public schools. That’s what I wanted to do and that’s a branch of Rensselaer cal schools to reach Black. ‘colored’ and ‘white. difference comes when you prepare stumoved to Connecticut from North Carolina PERKINS dents for excellence both in the academic when he was young. His parlooking at where Black. ideas that make us from diversity-management initiatives. “They were EDUCATION candidates are succeeding in the process products of a racial society in the South. progression. importance of observing and measuring outcomes language. thoughts.” he says. “We want to provide qualhistorically Black university in Wilberforce. The formal and informal education. Perkins says. suggested he become a mechanic.C.” he says. High School. “My life has been about helping to make a difference for those that are underrepresented and in The DiversityInc underserved and helping them to achieve Higher Education Top 5 Hospital equal outcomes. Perkins stresses the including characteristics that we see and don’t see.” Perkins draws on his passion for education and his experience in teaching and diversity management in academia. Conn. At Bachelor’s degree from and where they’re not and discovering the time we left. Science and Medicine. “They master’s degree from Another possibility. those students but to assist society in general. Latino and Asian From Education to Healthcare doctors out of medical school and creating oving to healthcare from acaUniversity more diverse candidate slates for highdemia. “There are no bystanders in diversity and really possessed the abilities to succeed but were not inclusion. to set strategies without following it to meet the goals of our respective organizations and through and measuring the results. “What I learned meet our own aspirations. “We all own and we all benefit given equal chances to succeed because of their sociofrom this.DiversityInc.” grounds similar to his. the reasons why. He’s charged with identifying and recruiting more Black. He attended Danbury arena and into their careers. was a natural Hospitals level positions within the hospital system. “A lot of the work we will do is education science. Latino and Asian ents rejected the suggestion. He taught science. become champions for diversity and “Students I saw were very talented and inclusion.” differences and similarities. “The power is how we leverage enough. there were still signs for Central State University in Wilberforce. he says.” he says. He watched as some He also encourages others in his of his most talented students missed out on organization to develop ownership and opportunities.” DI economic standing and their race or gender. strategies and recruitment outcomes. culturally competent patient care.” Polytechnic Institute in Hartford. a their careers.” he says. At University Hospitals. visit www. 5 M For more on diversity leadership. N. but a white guidance counselor BIRTHPLACE Bethel. where he played basketball TITLE That same lesson applies to and baseball and did well in his collegeVice President for Diversity and Inclusion healthcare.” Ohio. establishing relationships with medilege.” in my experiences in higher ed is that it’s He came to that definition through his not enough to recruit and to retain. Ohio. life experience. It’s not who we are. His family DONNIE J. primarily introduces students to the level of excellent patient care that we to Black and Latino students with backhealth and medicalscience professions want to provide. Perkins is first assessing preparatory courses. No. and earned a bachelor’s degree in Serves on the board of Cleveland School of he says. to go on to colRensselaer at Hartford.com/leadership DiversityInc 167 .

He succeeds Nathalie Davis. AT&T Services. N. who is now the senior director of continuous improvement and HR business partner. formerly senior vice president. Previously. Brinkley joined AT&T in 1986 as an externalaffairs liaison to the Texas Public Utility Commission and media spokesperson for regulatory and legislative activities relating to the Texas Legislature.DiversityIncBestPractices. Jimenez. has been named a vice president. MARK KING LINDA JIMENEZ LINDA JIMENEZ of WellPoint. Jimenez ran a consulting firm and worked at Accor North America and Abbott Labs/Ross For more on diversity management. is responsible for the company’s diversity-management strategies and programs nationwide. who is WellPoint’s chief diversity officer. reporting to Chairman and CEO Dan Akerson and serving on the company’s executive operations committee. talent development and chief diversity officer. Jamie Butcher. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a bachelor’s degree from Truman State University. 36 in The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity. No. Storey was vice president of Consumer Sales SE/W Regions for AT&T and vice president of merger integration for BellSouth. replaces Storey as senior vice president. Prior to his new position.. She later became area vice president for SBC California and then executive director of federal relations for SBC Communications. 4 in The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity. global human resources at General Motors. community relations and social responsibility. suc- ceeded Brinkley as senior vice president. formerly vice president of customer sales and service. No. diversity metrics. AT&T Services.C. Brinkley was senior vice president. King joined the Office of Diversity & Inclusion as a business partner in June 2009.com 168 DiversityInc . AT&T Services. he was senior diversity and inclusion business partner. Prior to joining WellPoint in 2007. including multicultural marketing.PEOPLEONTHEMOVE CINDY BRINKLEY was appointed vice president. centers support. MARK KING was named senior director and global head of diversity and inclusion for Kellogg Co. She earned her MBA from the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. Storey has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia. and external branding. CINDY BRINKLEY DEBBIE STOREY DEBBIE STOREY. He received a bachelor’s degree from High Point University in High Point. go to www. talent development and chief diversity officer of AT&T. centers support. Previously. one of DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies.

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No. Graphic Communications Group since January. Eastman Kodak Co. He has two bachelor’s degrees from Wagner College and a master’s degree from St. John Fisher College. go to www. JOELLE HAYES has been promoted to vice president of enterprise diversity and inclusion for The Travelers Companies. DOUGLAS JOELLE HAYES Products Division (now Abbott Nutrition.PEOPLEONTHEMOVE AUGUSTIN MELENDEZ MAE A. executive vice president and chief people officer. MAE A. The National Association for Multi-Ethnicity in Communications (NAMIC) named JACY HAEFKE has been appointed director of diversity JACY HAEFKE For more on diversity management. DOUGLAS. Cox Communications. Melendez held senior humanresources roles at several companies as well as the Rochester City school district.’s board of directors elected AUGUSTIN MELENDEZ as a vice president. 20 in the DiversityInc Top 50. 42 in the DiversityInc Top 50. Douglas has served as vice chair of the NAMIC board of directors and as a planning committee co-chair for the annual NAMIC conference. performance management. No. and workforce effectiveness for Rockwell Collins. employee on-boarding. She has worked at Rockwell Collins for four years. 24 in the DiversityInc Top 50).DiversityIncBestPractices. employee engagement and organizational culture. Hayes partners with business leaders to implement Travelers Diversity Business Networks. She also practiced labor and employment law for 20 years before becoming a diversity practitioner. Melendez joined Kodak in 2000 and has been chief diversity and community affairs officer and the director of the Human Resources. a division of Abbott. as the recipient of the Friend of NAMIC Award. serving in a number of human-resources leadership positions. Haefke is overseeing the Office of Diversity. Hayes joined Travelers in 2007 to lead the company’s diversity efforts. Haefke has a bachelor’s degree from Northeastern Illinois University and is completing her executive MBA at the University of Tennessee. succession planning. Cox Communications is No. Prior to Kodak.com 170 DiversityInc . She holds a bachelor’s degree from Brown University and masters’ degrees from Syracuse University and Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education. voluntary employee-led groups whose goal is to increase retention and talent development. Jimenez earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin and a Juris Doctor from the University of Texas School of Law.

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She is also a candidate for a doctorate in education from Nova Southeastern University in Florida. was honored by the Anti-Defamation League for her professional and philanthropic dedication to the Los Angeles community at its PAMELA PRINCE-EASON The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) named PAMELA PRINCEEASON president and CEO.PEOPLEONTHEMOVE JUAN CARLOS MORALES TERRI DAVIS SANDRA EVERS-MANLY JUAN CARLOS MORALES will join State Street Corp. 17th annual Deborah Awards Women of Achievement Dinner. He is also a member of PRIMER. NA. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Spelman College in Georgia and a master’s degree from Old Dominion University in Virginia. Luke Visconti. Paris. vice president of corporate responsibility at Northrop Grumman Corp. He will lead a team with locations in Boston.com 172 DiversityInc . CEO of DiversityInc. 37 in the DiversityInc Top 50. She graduated magna cum laude from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore with a master’s degree. The organization’s awards are presented annually to women whose leadership in their professions and civic contributions exemplifies the qualities and ideals of the Anti-Defamation League. She came to the university as New Jersey’s first state training coordinator for AmeriCorps. as senior managing director and CFO of State Street Global Advisors (SSGA). London. Sydney and Hong Kong. PrinceEason has also represented Pfizer on the WBENC board as treasurer. is No. TERRI DAVIS has been named Rutgers Business School’s Scholars Training and Enrichment Program (STEP)’s executive director. SANDRA EVERS-MANLY. For more on diversity management.DiversityIncBestPractices. Morales served as chairman of the board of directors and president of BNY Mellon Mexico. is also a member of PRIMER. go to www. Northrop Grumman Corp. Prince-Eason holds a bachelor’s degree from East Tennessee State University. as well as chair of the technology and audit committees. one of DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies. Davis has served as the associate director for the Rutgers MBA Career Services Office as well as the career-placement coordinator for the graduate programs at the School of Communication and Information. a network of Latino business and professional leaders and a DiversityInc partner. Prince-Eason was chair of the WBENC board of directors and most recently was vice president of worldwide procurement for Pfizer. Prior. and president of the Northrop Grumman Foundation. chair and vice chair of the finance committee.

6625 E: Michelew@marcusevansch.7th Annual Strategic Talent Management & Leadership Development Conference Successfully Developing and Managing Talent and Leadership Programs to Enhance Competition While Driving Business Goals August 24-26. Please Contact: Michele Westergaard T: 312 540 3000 ext. VP’s. Organization Effectiveness and Talent Management Exelon Corporation Fabio Sala Director. Organization Development EMC Who Should Attend: marcus evans invites SVP’s. Talent Management United States Strategic Command Lori Muehling Director. People Potential Lululemon Athletica Meg Roman Organizational Development Specialist Kohler Krysten Lytle Organizational Development Manager Kohler Lisa Fitterer Director. Human Resources AIMCO TBA Senior Level Talent Management Leader MTV Richard Wacher Vice President of Leadership Development Danaher Alejandro Morales Talent Assessment Expert Hewlett-Packard TJ Hammond Vice President. Talent Management. Leadership Development Cardinal Health Marko Satarain Director. Diversity & Inclusion Navistar Daniel Silberman Director. business success is reached only by those who can plan. IL Within the current competitive global business environment. Leadership Development Quest Diagnostics Dean Carter Vice President. Directors and Senior Managers in: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Talent Management Leadership Development Talent Planning Talent Development Workforce Management Succession Planning Learning & Development Corporate University Organizational Development Organization Effectiveness Talent Acquisition Employee Experience Talent Lifecycle Employment Branding Internal Branding Media Partners: For More Information. Performance and Engagement Recognition GAP Jaci Edgeworth Director. place and manage their talent and understand their potential all while aligning them to the organization's goals. Organization Design and Effectiveness Walgreens Jamillah Green-Davis Director. Attending this Premier marcus evans Conference will Enable: • Connecting talent management strategies to the business development strategies • Creating and Implementing a multifaceted leadership development strategy that contributes to overcoming various business challenges • Strengthening the internal brand while driving a culture that prioritizes talent performance and leadership development • Developing high potential talent management programs that can grow and overcome future challenges of the organization • Redesigning and Transforming current talent management programs to increase effectiveness • Positioning the employee value proposition where career development & planning are key drivers Confirmed Speakers Include: Elisa Bannon Vice-President Talent Development Wireless Vision Warren Lindley Divisional Vice President. 2011 Chicago. Talent Management Sears Holdings Corporation Bob Morris Global Organization Development and Effectiveness Group Celgene Corporation Greg Roche Vice President.com ADVERTISING SPACE DONATED BY DIVERSITYINC .

Reed serves on the boards of Halliburton Co. as well as on the advisory councils of University of California San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering and the Precourt LARRY PATRICK NEREIDA “NEDDY” PEREZ For more on diversity management. Benitez has primary responsibility for Accenture’s business and operations in North America. 23 in the DiversityInc Top 50. She joined Ingersoll Rand from National Grid. Perez received a master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University in Florida and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida. REED JORGE BENITEZ has been named managing director of North America and chief executive of the United States at Accenture.. NEREIDA “NEDDY” PEREZ has been named vice president of diversity and inclusion for Ingersoll Rand. Energy Efficiency Center at Stanford University. PricewaterhouseCoopers is No. where she served as vice president of inclusion and diversity and was responsible for developing and leading the company’s diversity strategy. Avery Dennison Corp.. He is responsible for advancing Sodexo’s diversity and inclusion strategy by providing direction and strategic support to local.PEOPLEONTHEMOVE bachelor’s degree from Auburn University and holds an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin. regional and national community partners. He will succeed Robert Frerichs. and the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corp. Patrick earned a Sodexo has appointed MOSTAFA ABDELGUELIL diversity-relations manager in the Office of Diversity. corporate finance and financial analysis to help clients execute on large-scale transformation projects.DiversityIncBestPractices. 3 in the DiversityInc Top 50. JORGE BENITEZ DEBRA L. DEBRA L. the largest of the company’s five operating groups. providing expertise in strategy. Accenture is No. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. He serves clients locally and nationally.com 174 DiversityInc .. REED has been elected Sempra Energy’s CEO and a new member of the company’s board. Benitez served as chief operating officer of Accenture’s products operating group. She has been executive vice president of Sempra Energy since April 2010 and previously was president and CEO of San Diego Gas & Electric and Southern California Gas Co. who will work with Accenture CEO Pierre Nanterme on strategic initiatives. PricewaterhouseCoopers’ LARRY PATRICK has been named a partner in the Advisory Health Industries practice. go to www. a gas and electric utility company. Sempra Energy’s regulated California utilities.

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Scurlock was previously a senior diversity consultant at Aetna. including employee demographics and corporate culture. Latinos.000 members nationwide. as well as a master’s degree. technology. American Indians and women to pursue careers in science. GEORGE SCURLOCK has been named director of diversity of the Metropolitan District. He’s responsible for developing and promoting a global diversity strategy. the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR). partnering with ESPN’s employeeresource groups and corporate diversity council. neering and math.PEOPLEONTHEMOVE MOSTAFA ABDELGUELIL ALICIA ABELLA KELLY GRAY Abdelguelil served as corporate relations and communications manager with Sodexo’s premier strategic partner. Garcia is a member of the senior humanresources leadership team and will advise senior management on issues of workforce diversity and change management.com 176 DiversityInc . ALICIA ABELLA has been appointed to the Presidential Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. all from the University of Texas. He is responsible for both internal diversity. and she provides leader- GEORGE SCURLOCK For more on diversity management. She is responsible for executing and overseeing compensation and benefits for a team of more than 70. 19 in the DiversityInc Top 50. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Alabama. Sodexo is No. and enhancing the company’s wellness and work/ life programs and services. primarily supplier diversity. She is executive director of technical research at AT&T Labs and works to encourage Blacks. DI EDWIN GARCIA KELLY GRAY has been promoted to senior vice president of human resources with FedEx Ground. No. Garcia holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Puerto Rico. ship for continued execution of the corporate diversity strategy. doctorate and an MBA. engi- ESPN has hired EDWIN GARCIA as vice president of diversity and work/life programs. go to www.DiversityIncBestPractices. Rio Piedras. 2 in the DiversityInc Top 50. Scurlock holds an MBA from Harvard Business School. employee information systems and recruitment for the company. AT&T is No. 4 in the DiversityInc Top 50. and external diversity. Gray also oversees HR administration. He is also a member of PRIMER.

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. KPMG. They’ll also discuss what they need and want in a chief diversity officer. D. go to www. and plenty of time for networking with your peers. Human Ability & Accessibility Center. West. JOIN DIVERSITYINC AT OUR NEXT EVENT NEW YORK The Gay. Ernst & Young. 7 on The 2011 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list. 5. interactive panels. the focus will be on diversity management and what makes it essential to companies’ successes. 29. For more on diversity management. respectively. No consultants will be allowed during the day-long learning sessions. which included Frances W. will provide a mix of high-level speakers.C. Building Value: How to Make Diversity Mission Critical At DiversityInc’s Nov. 9–10.C. American Express.DiversityIncBestPractices. 15. No.com . event at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington. You’ll hear from CEOs of leading companies about how they use diversity in the workplace to drive marketplace goals. Visconti also moderated the panel that followed.. 2011 WASHINGTON D. IBM Corp.Luke Visconti speaks at the USBLN Corporate Disability Employment Summit in Washington.DiversityInc. AT&T.C. including Sodexo. 9. 178 DiversityInc Wilson Cruz and Barbara Frankel co-chaired the GLSEN Respect Awards in New York City USBLN Corporate Disability GLSEN Employment Summit Respect Awards WASHINGTON. Ernst & Young. and Lori Golden. Merck & Co. 2011. 13. with significant corporate attendance. PEOPLEANDEVENTS COMING UP NOV. D.com/events for the full agenda and to register. 9–10. Our two-day program. 2. worldwide director.C. Time Warner and JCPenney (Nos. Visit www. in the DiversityInc Top 50).. Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) held its New York Respect Awards on May 23. 5 in the DiversityInc Top 50. No. D. DiversityInc CEO Luke Visconti delivered the keynote address on “Disability and Inclusion Across the Enterprise” at the US Business Leadership Network (USBLN)’s Corporate Disability Employment Summit on April 12. 4. 28 and 35. DiversityInc Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Barbara Frankel was the co-chair of the event and serves on GLSEN’s national board of directors. AccessAbilities leader. which will start on the afternoon of Nov.

equal opportunity and diversity. with Alicia Rodgers Alston. Prudential is No. N. director of global communications. He conducted an interactive poll of the symposium audience’s “Perceptions on Diversity in Corporate America.J. philanthropy and governance. Prudential’s Black Leadership Forum.J. an employeeresource group that focuses on the company’s business and philanthropic outreach to Blacks. hosted an event for the release of Prudential’s research study “The African American Financial Experience” on April 27.Luke Visconti at the Annual HACR Symposium Joy Buchanan. Prudential Financial American Association for Affirmative Action Summit ATLANTIC CITY. The AAAA is a nonprofit association of professionals working in affirmative action. Prudential’s ‘Exploring the African American Financial Experience’ NEWARK. D. The American Association for Affirmative Action (AAAA) presented DiversityInc’s Visconti with the Champion of Diversity Award on June 30. procurement. The summit focused on the future of civil-rights enforcement activities. managing editor of DiversityInc (left).” The symposium focused on effective strategies for achieving greater inclusion and participation of Latinos in the areas of employment. This year’s summit was co-sponsored by the New Jersey Affirmative Action Officers’ Council. 16 in the DiversityInc Top 50. Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility Symposium WASHINGTON. Visconti was the lunch keynote speaker at the Annual HACR Symposium: The Power of Hispanic Inclusion on May 3. N. DiversityInc 179 .C.

DI For more on diversity management.J. including members from seven of the company’s nine employee-resource groups. 3 in The DiversityInc Top 10 Regional Companies. Dan Choi PSEG Diversity and Inclusion Speaker Series NEWARK. N. PEOPLEANDEVENTS Kraft Women’s Sales Council CHICAGO DiversityInc’s Frankel addressed Kraft Foods’ employee group of women in sales positions on May 17. Jeff Smith. spoke about inclusiveness as a business strategy at the annual Corporate Responsibility and Multicultural Affairs Symposium sponsored by ING. ING executive leadership. senior vice president. Kraft Foods is No. Hohner. More than 100 PSEG employees. in revenue-generating positions. Sally Nadler. standing with former Army Lt. Deb Spell. Dan Choi was the year’s first speaker in PSEG’s annual Diversity and Inclusion Speaker Series. one of DiversityInc’s 25 Noteworthy Companies. LGBT advocate Lt. Visconti also talked about how companies can make the DiversityInc Top 50. GaLA (left to right) Lori Gray. the top 120 senior leaders at ING and employee-resource-group leaders attended the event.” The 17-year-old law was repealed late in 2010. attended.DiversityIncBestPractices. Wendy Kennedy and Karen Noe. especially women with families.com 180 DiversityInc . Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan. go to www. Formerly in the Army. Visconti was introduced by Joseph H. Choi was promptly discharged under “don’t ask. BCBS of Michigan Members of PSEG’s LGBT resource group.ING Corporate Responsibility and Multicultural Affairs Symposium ATLANTA DiversityInc’s Visconti. Luke Visconti with Equilla Wainwright. discussing the best practices of companies that promote and retain women. diversity champions and human-resource leaders and directors of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan on April 7. Diversity Leadership Council at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan DETROIT Visconti addressed the Diversity Leadership Council. President and CEO Daniel Loepp attended the event. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan is No. on May 19. 9 in the DiversityInc Top 50. don’t tell” in 2009 after he came out on “The Rachel Maddow Show. vice president of workforce diversity and inclusion. chief of staff and chief information officer.

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.................................. 103.........................100 Brown-Forman Corp............................. 92.................... 57................ Lesbian and Straight Education Network) ............. 180 BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina .. 112 Dartmouth College.................................. 80........... 28... 90 Citigroup ....... 103 Cummins........................... 66..... 28......... 113 F FedEx Ground ............................................ 112..................... 45........... 28.100 American Association for Affirmative Action .............................................. 175 Jackson Lewis LLP ................................143 HP ........... 88 Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey .... 92 Hyundai Motor America ....5 American Express Co............. 54.. 92 Ameren ............28............................. 94..................... 92 Human Rights Campaign ....................84 Ameriprise Financial ........................................... 78............ 66..................... 28......... 28.................................100 Abbott ..... 118....... 82 J Jackie Robinson Foundation ..........................................................................................100 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan .... 80........................... 28..... 124 Emma Bowen Foundation................................ 112 Cleveland Clinic................................100 Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility .....179 American Association of People with Disabilities ... 28.............................................. 64................ 88 B Bank of America ........................... 38............ 56............. 92. 119... 103 Avon ..................174 ING North America ... 100. 82 Great Minds in STEM .... 28.. 28............... 14.......................................................... 118 eMarketer ................................................. 96.......................... 78. 118 Booz Allen Hamilton ............. 113 E Eastman Kodak Co... 28................................. 112 K Kaiser Permanente .. 94.................. 118........ 177 Howard University .......................28.. 92 Congressional Black Caucus ... 49........79....... 96..... 97........................................................... ........................ 61............................................................. 118 Bennett College for Women .................................................................................................................. 124...................... 37........... 53......................................... 171 BJ’s Wholesale Club ...................................... ................... 86 Consolidated Edison Co.... ................... 124................ 11...... 118 Kellogg Co.....80 Dress for Success ....................... 118........................ 64.. ..... 96......... 59.......... 74.. 72 Brigham and Women’s Hospital ........................................................ 28. 118..... 32...................................................................... 92.................................. ................................................ 52...... 124 BASF Corp................COMPANYINDEX Companies are indexed to the page where they are first mentioned in an article or ad in this issue. .................... 113..84 Hispanic Scholarship Fund.... 170 Accenture ........... 96............. 118............................................ 113 ASCENT ..... 88 G GameStop . 28.................. 28..... of New York ...................... ....... 103..... 86 Employment Horizons ...................... 140 College for Every Student......................................... 60...... 92................................................ ...... 124 Allstate Insurance Co............................100 Boehringer Ingelheim ...............................80 American Indian College Fund. 118 Archer Daniels Midland .............................................................123 Colgate-Palmolive Co................................................... 84................................................................................... 103................................. 112....................... 88 DuPont ..................................... 178 Graduate Engineering and Science Fellowships for Minorities.......................... 48.... 94 HSBC – North America ........ 113....... 174 Accor North America ............. 86........ 168 Aetna ................................. 68 General Motors ...... 71......................................... 93 General Mills ............... 56. 28..... 46................. 72 Hispanic Heritage Foundation Education Scholarship ................ 60.....................100 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island ......................... 180 182 DiversityInc ........ 80 General Electric ............................ 58.............100 Cox Communications ...... 39....... 98............. 118...... 62 AT&T............................. ......... 178 American Foundation for the Blind.......................................85...........................176 Ford Motor Co...... 40. 158 JCPenney.................................. 158 GLSEN (Gay.......................................... 112...... 113 Capital One.........................................5 Dell .......... 124.................................................... 123 Hyatt Corp............................. 70........ 92 C Campbell Soup Co......... 170 Eli Lilly and Co.................................. 108 Cerebral Palsy of North Jersey.......... 91................ 96.... 70.................................................. 118 KPMG ............................... 92................ 92.... 94.......... 72 Boys & Girls Clubs ............................ ........ 111....... Nevada and Utah ................................... 92....... 82.................................... 178 Kraft Foods ............................. 169 Insight St.................................. 111 Henry Ford Health System.. A AAA Northern California...................................... 84 Altria Group .... 178 Automatic Data Processing ..........................................................66............... 60... 62 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ........................... 62 Children’s Defense Fund.... 28..................................................................................................................................... 168 Georgetown University Law Center .................. 50 Comcast Corp.................. 63.......... 178 Independence Blue Cross... .. Advertisers are highlighted in red type...100 CNN ..........................28......... 95 I IBM Corp............................................................................................................. 96............... 119.................................. 42............5 Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund ... 58... 178 Johnson & Johnson . 56 Chrysler Group ....... 56..........................................5 Ernst & Young ............ 103............................... 118 D Darden ............................................... 94..................... 118...................................... 73..................................... 118 Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities .. 28. 76.100 Ingersoll Rand ................. Louis ...... 125 Health Care Service Corp.............. 28.... 139................................................... 140............................... 60.... 113 Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation ................. ...... 62.......... 35............... 52 American Indian Scholarship Fund ......................56................................................................................................. 44.....176 Express Scripts........................ 28.. 94.................... 98.............. 28........................................................... 124............................. 62 American Civil Rights Institute ....... 112 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida ................................................. 28............................................ 139............ 180 INROADS........................................ 170 CSX Corp............ 28..... 118 Deloitte.............. 178 ESPN ............... 113.................................................. 94... 5............... 112.................................................. 94.............. 119 Comerica ...................................... 96.......... 52. 168.............62..84 ASPIRA Association ............................................................. 86 Congressional Hispanic Caucus .................................... 28............ 168 KeyCorp ...... 78 H Harris Interactive ............ 112 AXA Equitable Life Insurance Co............................ 50............. 179 Hispanic College Fund ........... ............... 96..........................................100 Houston Chronicle ......................... 28.. 112 DesertArc ... 28.................... 28................................................................................................ ......................

...... 124........................ 80...................... 124 Women’s Business Enterprise National Council ... 134........................... 50 NextGen Network .157 New York City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce ..... 119........ 89 Rockwell Collins.... 28....................................................... 94.............. 28..................................... 33........... 66 M Macy’s ............................................................................... 92 MasterCard Worldwide ........................ 170 Tyco International ............................. 74........................................................................................................... 82...... 135 Whirlpool Corp.................................................. 118....................... 113 Symantec.. 96... 112 Y Yahoo ............................ 66...............176 MGM Resorts International ................. 83................................. 112..... 113 Toyota Motor North America . 78..................................... 86 Travelers.... 94.................................... 158 Pfizer ............. 124..... 54............................... 174 Society of Women Engineers..... 28................... 54 National Security Agency................................. 94............ 86 National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce .................................. 60.......................... 50 National Minority Supplier Development Council.................................................... 94 O OfficeMax ................................................................................ 121 S (continued) Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide ............................................................................................ 88 Union Bank .................................. 179 PSEG ....................................................................84 Marcus Evans Group ........ 66........................ 52...................... 66. 81.... 92......... 113 University Hospitals .................. Census Bureau .........99...................... 114–115 The Walt Disney Co... 131 W Walmart............................ 28................... 47.................................................... 77........................ 28................... ........................................ 74 National Council of La Raza ........ 56.......................................... ...................................... 92 U UNCF.......................... 82 Monsanto Co...... 28... 94................. 28................................172 World Institute on Disability............................ 125 V Verizon Communications .................. 78...................8................84 National Urban League ....................................................................... 51...12.......................................................................................................................5 San-Antonio Express News .... 38 National Academy Foundation................... 103..... 13.......................50..................................... 65.com ... 28............. 113 Synnex ...... 52 Staples ............................................................................. 160...... 84 The Chubb Corp. 125 Thurgood Marshall College Fund .................................... 94 Merck & Co....... 28....... 74 Scripps Networks .....28............... 94 Martin Luther King Memorial Project ...... 112..... 170 Rutgers University ....................... 112 R Robert Half International ..... 62 Wounded Warrior Project...... 118 Witeck-Combs Communications ................... 54 Northrop Grumman Corp....... 129.............................................................................. 43.... 82 Sunoco...................................................... 140 Prudential Financial . 74. 92 Metropolitan District . 34........com........ 50 Missouri Business Leadership Network ......................... 54 National Business Disability Council ......................................................................................52... 178 Time Warner Cable . 113 DiversityInc 183 ... 84..... 124............ 28.........................100 Southern Company .... 67 Virginian-Pilot Media Companies ............... 92 The PhD Project ............................................................................................. 87................ 74 National Gay and Lesbian Task Force .............. 8............................................. 78 Massachusetts General Hospital . 124......COMPANYINDEX L LatPro. 82........ 112 Omnicom Group ...... 90............................................... 28...... 96.......................... 56 National Association of Multi-Ethnicity in Communications ......................................... 41............. Louis University .100 MassMutual .............. 118........................................... 174 PRIMER ................... 166 US Business Leadership Network (USBLN) ...................... 174..........56......................................................... 92 Seattle Times ..................... 118....................... 118......................... 86 WellPoint ............147 SC Johnson............. 72..... 112 T Target Corp.................................. 28.......... 52....................................................... 36................. 92 Madrinas .................................................... 178 MetLife............. 92................................ 82 National Society of Hispanic MBAs.......................... 100..... 86 TJX................ 62..............172 St... 159 Management Leadership Tomorrow ................. 172....... 112 N NAACP................................................................................... 82 Motorola ......................................................... .......................................................................... 168 Wells Fargo & Co...176 PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) .......... 92. 176 Procter & Gamble.................. 55...... 112......... ....... 112.................................................. 92 X Xerox ..................................... 92 StarTribune........... 88 P Packaged Facts ......................... 111...... .. 118 The Coca-Cola Co.................................... 52.... 180 Push for Excellence..................... 101 National Society of Black Engineers .......... 82......................................... 118 The Dow Chemical Co................................123 Sempra Energy ... 94....... 69...... 94.............. 60 N (continued) New Jersey City University ........... 28.. 62 PepsiCo ................................ 9........ 124 Pathways to Independence ... 62........... 86........................................................................ 92 The Williams Institute ................................ 62.................................... 112. .............................................................. 72........... 178 U................................................................. 28........................... 28...................................................28...........................S........................................ 28................................... 86 Q Quest Diagnostics ............ 103 Special Olympics ........................100 United Services Automobile Association............................................... 60.............. 76.......................... 82 Sodexo ............................................................. 94 Presidential Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics ................................................................. 68................ 181 Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics ............................................ 178 Southern California Edison....................... 140. 170 National Black MBA Association ......................... 58 Wyndham Worldwide .......................................................................................80 National Hispanic Corporate Achievers .............................. 54 National Alliance for Hispanic Health................. ... 112 State Street Corp........ 28......... 28.. 56................ ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 150–151..... 56. 145 Walter Kaitz Foundation ........................................... 158 Organization of Chinese Americans ..... 122 Time Warner ...28........... 173 Marriott International .............. 118 PG&E Corp....................... 75. 112 League of United Latin American Citizens .................................................................. 100.. 113........ 76...................................... 172 S Salesforce......................... 28................................................ 112 McDonald’s .................................... 172 Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp............................. 92 Minority University Pledge .

This mindset for majority-culture people requires an epiphany or an evolution in thinking that brings one to understand the extent of the discrimination around all of us that is perpetrated mostly by the majority culture. Some have a gay brother. some grew up in large families. 184 DiversityInc . It took me B awhile to understand how awhil profound those stories are. a fellow Naval Aviator. Tony Cato—at the time. doe White men are a part of diversity and Wh there is a great deal of diversity among white men. gender or orientation that makes one “good at” managing diversity. He told me smart stories of being denied storie fair treatment because tr he’s Black. When mentioning your feature to a group of white female colleagues. I created DiversityInc as a consequence of having my consciousness raised by a friend. He didn’t have an agenda. disciplined and very discip smart. but it profou did sink in eventually. I made the point that they might not think they have diversity as they sit around the fire house or police station and see nothing but white men—but some of those white men grew up in single-parent households. one responded by saying. a consequence of worke his volunteering to help me vo when I was assigned to be the Minority Officer M Recruiter in Naval Recru Recruiting District Recru New Jersey. what does he (a white guy) have to with do wit diversity. and some didn’t go at all. some are gay themselves (and perhaps closeted). we were simply swapping stories as we we worked together. I told the chiefs that they could utilize the diversity they already have to gain new perspective on problems and in doing so would better fulfill their missions: to save lives. He helped tim me sta the thought process that led me to start where I am today. how does he create something like DiversityInc and how could he possibly speak with authority about diversity? 900 police and fire chiefs in Oregon—97 percent white men. gender or orientation that makes one “good at” managing diversity. he’s tough. some worked their way through. I recently spoke to a group of It is not skin color. I learned to share his sin indignation at poor treatment meted out as indign a result of discrimination—and the damage resu it does to our country. some went to college on athletic scholarships. I shared the information you addressed during your talk [when you] spoke about DiversityInc and mentioned your Ask the White Guy feature.Guy Ask the Luke Visconti is CEO of DiversityInc Can a White Man Speak With Authority on Diversity? Q A Upon returning to my office. it is mindset. re-energized by the DiversityInc event in March. it is mindset. Tony is J not a go-along-to-getg along guy. My point is that it is not skin color.

I’m also considered a white woman. which has distributed more than $500. com/atwg This column generated many reader comments. I co-chair the fundraising committee for Rutgers Future Scholars. I’ve gained a lot of perspective by reading books like Beverly Tatum’s “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” as well as Iris Chang’s “The Chinese in America. educated about the laws and diversity issues. heterosexual. it is about the rising power of liberated people to destroy the concept of “melting pot” as they gain the economic ability to command respect—as they are. I receive questions. in my opinion. First of all. as a reader put it nicely. the majority culture is defined as white.000 since 2006.” I mean loosely you as defined by gender. I’m a trustee of Bennett College for Women.com READ MORE “Ask the White Guy” articles at www. It all starts with me.CONTROVERSIAL Q&A Historic Perspective Anyone can become “authoritative” about diversity. In this country. but those in the majority culture do not really have to deal with anything BUT the majority culture (doesn’t make it right. skills and one’s willingness to step out of his or her comfort zone to learn about bias. about why I hired a white male as my assistant director. For example. I am different like you. The life experience I’ve gained by serving these institutions has been invaluable. thoughts and experiences. in diversity management (it’s just a lot easier for the Black woman to see the problem in the first place). I’m a diversity manager and have had to tolerate many critical looks and attitudes from Black and other ethnic-looking coworkers who are wondering how I could be possibly qualified to do the work. starts with understanding history. We have raised $2 million in the past three years. Christian and not having an ADA-defined disability. I agree.). It also doesn’t mean that a Black woman (for example) comes with an automatic Ph. Keep up the good insights. a historically Black college. And just because someone is not a minority doesn’t mean they can’t understand diversity or have not been discriminated against.D. but I’m an immigrant from the Middle East and was a minority there. History is important. It’s what each person brings to the table based on their life experiences. Here are a few examples: What a great way to start your day! I am just blown away by this article. How you get there. I donate all of my speaking fees through the DiversityInc Foundation. Luke. Any executive can take the same steps to broaden their experience and cultural competence. a Hispanicserving institution. Nobody comes to the table that way. Thank you so much for writing this. I hadn’t read something so powerful and inspiring about diversity for a long time. Everything you said validated my feelings. “I am not different than you. Thanks. male. But just because a person in the majority culture starts out with a much wider “blind spot” than people not in the majority culture doesn’t mean it’s impossible for white men to become open advocates for diversity and inclusion.” DI ? Have a question for Luke? EMAIL HIM AT askthewhiteguy@ DiversityInc. you’ve done it again! Thank you. Again.DiversityInc. We see how people work so hard to complete advanced degrees—and they are important—but life experience is how an executive does not become a Hosni Mubarak as our country and world change dramatically. DiversityInc 185 .” Isabel Wilkerson’s “The Warmth of Other Suns. We must all come to the realization that. and I’m on the foundation board of NJCU. thank you for this thought-provoking and inspiring article. race. etc. I agree that a white person can talk about and teach diversity. orientation. white is a race. At Rutgers University (where I am also a trustee). Your insight is valuable. It was the best thing I could have done. even though I have a graduate degree in intercultural education. but what I’ve found transformative is personal involvement in organizations that do not serve you directly (by “you. ‘Different Like You’ I will note that people who are not in the majority culture must deal with the majority culture as they try to retain their own identity. but this is the reality).” Douglas Blackmon’s “Slavery By Another Name. and works extremely hard for those he feels have been treated unfairly. I’ve received this question to me over the years as a white male conducting training in EEO and diversity. as a Black woman.” Ira Katznelson’s “When Affirmative Action Was White” and Taylor Branch’s trilogy on the civil-rights era. He’s compassionate. This change is not just visual.

17 percent of U. Practically speaking. Q A How will we know that “democratizing” efforts have been successful? Once success has been achieved (that is. Interestingly. Why? To continually encourage innovation and growth. Half (50 percent) of board seats in Fortune 500 companies will be held by women. I can give you endless examples of disproportionate representation of white men in positions of power in this country to the detriment of anyone not Christian.S. non-white (or white Hispanic). does the need for a “diversity-management department” go away? This is an easy question to answer: If you believe all people are created equally. Our society cannot achieve maximum innovation if broad sectors of its population are sidelined. 186 DiversityInc . less than 3 percent.CONTROVERSIAL Q&A CONTINUED BUILDING EQUALITY LUKE VISCONTI By What Measurement Can We Abolish the Diversity Department? Corporations will always need diversity departments. … of Congress will be women. 50% … of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies will be women. or people with ADA-defined disabilities. Just a few examples regarding gender: Half (50 percent) of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies will be women. … of board seats in Fortune 500 companies will be held by women. Currently there are 14 women in the House of Representatives. etc. Right now 12 of 500 company CEOs are women—2. and women have been earning more than half of all bachelor’s degrees since 1980. senators are women. half of America’s college-educated workforce is women. Aside from gender. heterosexual.4 percent. then we’ll know we’re done with needing a diversity department to help with equitable access and talent development by measuring the results. when it is the norm that opportunity is truly equal). Half of Congress will be women. Right now only 14 percent are.

and the inclusion of people with disabilities. Even in a room full of white One of the best explanations I have ever heard was from one of our executive team members when he was welcoming the newly minted inclusion council and giving them the reason the executive team established their group. Unless you have some secret that I don’t know about. DiversityInc 187 . there will always have to be some mechanism for ensuring affirmative employment and INCLUSION in our society.com READ MORE “Ask the White Guy” articles at www. even in workforce measures—but we can take deep satisfaction in continuing that work and seeing our incremental growth as a society. we may find that ‘there’ has moved. This is due to statistical random fluctuations that occur in the world. and increase innovation by being able to utilize/ consider diverse approaches to solving problems and accessing opportunities. there are many other diversity dimensions such as geographic.DiversityInc. We have pipeline issues to work on and a cultural diversity hill to climb. Our focus on diversity is to have the access to the unique perspectives that come with a diverse workforce to solve our increasingly complex problems. or GS level have exact proportionate representation. education. there will always be insiders and outsiders. increase the quality of your revenue stream by building better relationships with your customers. there is great diversity.com/atwg My agency measurements in our mission-critical job series meet or exceed the relevant civilian labor force for gender. Here are a few examples: I think that until we in America resolve our problems with race and gender. It’s human nature.” even in the far-off world of equality that Luke alludes to. and someone will need to mediate between the two. The reality is that we will always be able to find examples of “disproportionate representation. I am quite sure nobody alive today will live to see equity. Even in the distant future when companies are equitably recruited. We shortchange our own GDP by being discriminatory. “And when we get there. you can reduce workforce costs by enhancing employee satisfaction and engagement. whether you are a Keynesian or Supply-Side economist. Beyond the compliance categories of diversity. there will still be a need for a diversity department. DI This column generated many reader comments. the United States leads the world in human and civil rights. While it should be logical that more women and people of color will have to be included/“grown”/ recruited into our corporate and other structures. There will always be a need for a diversity department because there are continuously new underrepresented groups on the horizon. the legitimacy of this rationale is continuously bombarded by ignorance and stupidity on the parts of those who do not understand. but I’ve never seen one). Our focus is the maintenance of these high levels of achievement. we’re the best when you look at the entire picture. Rarely in this perfect world would any given office. we feel like we have to explain each and every deviation from our perfect world. speech. etc. the dynamics of maximizing productivity and effectiveness. ? Have a question for Luke? EMAIL HIM AT askthewhiteguy@DiversityInc. the security of a diverse pool of employment candidates. how many non-Han Chinese people are in positions of power in China? I’d imagine there may be a few. talent development is equally effective and positions of power are equitably staffed. occupational series.By the way. men. This is a deficiency of the current system. if we are to remain or become again competitive. He ended with.” Truth is. On a national basis. Having a statistician come in and talk about statistical significance won’t solve this problem because there will always be fluke-y data that produces bizarre outcomes for no underlying reason other than rare but existent random fluctuations. When you get outside of this country. I for one would be happy to find a new job if we fulfilled our diversity mission. or care to understand. Managing the relationships between all the constituent groups is a profit center. Our society cannot achieve maximum innovation if broad sectors of its population are sidelined. No Wall Street analyst would try to explain precisely each and every bounce the price of a stock took throughout a trading day. but that is basically what the premise of this question assumes. the one constant that grows economies is innovation. the discrimination increases and you can see this by measuring the representation of the majority culture in positions of power in every other region I can think of (for example.

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Clarity of Values & What to Do When It Goes Horribly Wrong Meet the Rutgers Future Scholars Class of 2020 . How to Start ERGs Based on Generations. Disabilities & More Donnie Perkins of University Hospitals on the Challenges for Hospitals Facing Healthcare Reform and an Increasingly Diverse Patient Population LGBT Civil Rights How Everyone Benefits. Keep and Promote Women in Sales Here’s How to Do It Right From Seven Companies 3% 2% Ask DiversityInc We Answer Questions About Supplier Diversity.2% 6% 3% Banking Superwoman Business & Career Advice From Wells Fargo’s Lucia Gibbons How to Get.Also in this issue •D 11 20 IVERSITYI N Eight Companies Receiving Special Awards PE C I A • WAR LA CEOs & Top Execs to Accept Awards at Our Nov. Reporting Data. How Same-Sex Marriage & LGBT-Friendly Workplaces Help ALL Your Employees Lisa Mink of Dell Leverages Life Experience to Build Racial & Gender Diversity Decision Making. 9–10 Event D C New Department! S 4.