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ROWING AT PRINCETON

COVER

The cover of ROWING AT PRINCETON is adapted from Late Fall


Practice by the late James M. Anderegg 51. Here is his promotion
for the print which he sold in the 1950s for $5.00 postpaid.

Late Fall Practice

Anderegg

Colonial Club
40 Prospect St.
Princeton, N.J.
$5.00 Postpaid, check or money order. Will be mailed
immediately.

ROWING AT PRINCETON

ROWING
AT
PRINCETON
18722000

celebrating . . .
4500 Princetonians who have strained
and gained from their rowing
experience for 130 years

Compiled by Willis M. Rivinus 50


Princeton University Rowing Association
Princeton, New Jersey
2002
ROWING AT PRINCETON

Copyright 2002
Princeton University Rowing Association
Princeton, New Jersey
First Printing September 2002
Second Printing December 2002
4

ROWING AT PRINCETON

FOREWORD

his first comprehensive history of Princeton rowing is a direct result and logical extension of the Celebration
of Princeton Rowing, the renovation of the Class of 1887 Boathouse and its expansion into the C. Bernard
Shea 16 Rowing Center. Attended by hundreds of rowing alumni and friends in 1997, the Celebration commemorated 125 years of Princeton rowing, 75 years of lightweight rowing, 25 years of womens rowing and the institution of womens lightweight rowing at Princeton. At the Celebration, the Princeton University Rowing Association
(PURA) announced the boathouse renewal effort. Another crowd of hundreds of rowing alumni helped dedicate the
Shea Rowing Center in October 2000.
The story of this book really begins with the search by Bob Faron 68 and Stuyve Pell 53 for material to use
in the fantastic video tape shown at the Celebration, Princeton RowingThe First 125 Years. The tip of the historical
iceberg was discovered, and we realized we had an obligation to preserve Princetons dusty rowing archives in anticipation of the complete demolition of the boathouse interior. In addition to memorabilia of assorted value, hundreds
of original photographs were found. It became immediately clear that this historical treasure trove had to be assembled, conserved and cataloged. The man who rose to this challenge was our colleague Will Rivinus 50, to whom the
PURA dedicates this book.
While ROWING AT PRINCETON reflects the efforts of countless people, friends of Princeton rowing owe a
debt of gratitude to Will. Through his stewardship of the Princeton rowing archives, and in response to the strongly articulated desire of the PURA trustees and other Princeton rowing alumni to organize a comprehensive display of team
photographs, Will generated the idea of digitally copying the original photos, typesetting the captions, and displaying
them in framed panels in the new boathouse. Among other things, this would permit a draft set for the boathouse
dedication that could be re-done as the inevitable additions and corrections poured in. Moreover, the originals could
be preserved in the Universitys archives at Seeley Mudd Library.
Wills efforts were substantial. Notwithstanding the hundreds of photographs found in the boathouse, many
teams were unidentified or missing. Will relentlessly tracked them down. A surprising lack of recent team pictures
was solved with the cooperation (and agreeable fees) of Sportgraphics, who can supply you with copies of their
identified pictures at www.sportgraphics.com. Photos of nearly all teams were eventually rooted out from numerous
sources.
Will quickly realized that the resultant work product could be shared beyond the walls of the boathouse if it
were assembled into a book. He agreed to be editor-in-chief. A book, however, would require text. Will assembled
histories from his own pencil as well as a number of other sources, the most important of which was the annual BricA-Brac, which could theoretically provide a narrative of each season. The reality, however, was that the yearbooks
reporting was uneven and sometimes inaccurate or non-existent. Will therefore called upon each years captains to
review, edit and supplement their respective years text. Most did, and we thank them.
Will Rivinus is responsible for everything that is good about this book; we thank him for his efforts, skills,
perseverance and patience. Capturing the essence of more than a century of rowing at Princeton is a daunting task.
Inevitably, despite our checking, cross-checking, and solicitations, there are errors and omissionsfor which we
sincerely apologize. Lets consider this the first edition and look forward to the PURAs accepting the challenge of a
Version 2 in the future.
The PURA hopes that this book captures some of the spirit and experience of Princeton rowing. On behalf
of the PURA trustees and my worthy successor, Bill Walton 74, thanks for your continued support. We especially
want to thank the Patrons and Sponsors listed herein, many of whom have been frequent, dependable and appreciated
participants in the tradition of generous support for Princeton rowing; their contributions made this volume fiscally
possible.

Seattle, WA
February 2002

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Richard Ottesen Prentke 67


Past President
Princeton University Rowing Association
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PATRONS
James D.Ahstrom 76
Gerry L. Brewster 79
Richard T. Califano 93
Robert M. Chilstrom 67
Roberta B. Connolly s73 &

Arthur M. Miller 73
Thomas Craig 76
Stephen F. Deutsch 74
James K. Donnell 53
John Michael Evans 80

Scot Fisher 78
Neil T. Hauck 76
G. Blair Macdonald 50
Richard O. Prentke 67
Willis M. Rivinus 50
Juan A. Sabater 87
Bruce G. Soden 60
Luther M. Strayer, III 57
William H. Walton, III 74

SPONSORS
Thomas W. Bakewell 43
Sarah Morrison Barpoulis 87
C. Minor Barringer 42
Frederic T. Billings, III 68
Craig H. Boyce 94
Robert H. Braunohler 68
Thomas W. Brennan 93
Willis V. Carpenter 51
Joanne R. Casper 76 &
Wendell B. Colson 76
Neil D. Chrisman 58
Michelle J. Clarke 98
Mary & Hal Cranston P03
Michael J.Cunningham 77
Ellen R. DeSantis 78
Christine Dias P02
Herbert L. Dillon, Jr. 47
Stephen & Joy Dittmann P05
L. Scott Frantz 82
Simon Furie 87
Robert R. Gambee 64
Erich B. Groos, Jr. 83
Wycliffe K. Grousbeck 83
George R. Hansen, Jr. 66
Ashton Harvey 51
Donald H. Hofreuter 54

Charles T. Hopkins 89
Richard A. Hord 43
David & Anne Howerton P03/06
Peter E. Hubbard 64
William L. Hudson 74
Lon F. Israel 45
Thomas R. Johnson 68
Thomas H. Jones 72
Peter R. Kaplan 60
Arthur H. Keyes, Jr. 39
D.Nicbolas Komorous 04
Laura D. Kunkemueller 87
Michael A. Ladra 71
W. Wallace Lanahan, Jr. 40
Edward A. Lasater 59
Donald L. Marsh, Jr. 68
Robert E. Mast 76
David M. Mastrianni 81
Gerald M. Mayer, Jr. 51
Mark W. Mealy 79
Charles A. Moran 64
Thomas & Margaret Nowak P04
Kevin W. OConnell 97
Robert S. OHara, Jr. 60
John B. OSullivan 65 &
Sarah S. OSullivan 00

Jonathan F. Swain 57
Stuyvesant B. Pell 53
David G. Powell 54
Susanne Wamsler Redetski 83
John G. Reeve 70
Donald R. Reeves 86
Robert H. Richards 59
Stephen D. Robinson 94
Francis F. Rosenbaum, Jr. 48
Michael F. Rosenbaum 83
P. Steven Sangren 68
Peter S. Schroeder 62
John S. Scott 86
Brendan L. Shannon 86
J. McWilliams Stone, Jr. 50
Robert D. Stuart, Jr. 37
A.Jordan Sykes 03
Carl E. Walter 70
Walter H. Wells 45
Robert F. Werner 78
Sankey Williams 66
John P. Woll 83
Helen I. Youngman 93
Alden D. Zecha 87

ROWING AT PRINCETON

The New Princeton Crew Boathouse


Dedicated October 7, 2000

The C. Bernard Shea 16 Rowing Center


The new C. Bernard Shea 16 Rowing Center unifies the historic Class of 1887 Boathouse with a spacious modern
addition, creating a striking presence on the north shore of Carnegie Lake. The remodeled boathouse tower, with stairs
sweeping up to a lofty skylit anteroom on the second floor, is not only the dominant visual element of the complex,
but also its primary entryway.
From the tower, a long gallery extends westward above the boat bays, offering views of the lake interspersed with evocative photographs of Princeton crews. The gallery leads to an airy refurbished club
room, with trophy cases, video equipment and lounge furnishings. An adjacent corridor connects to
the mens and womens changing rooms.
Upstairs in the attached new building, state-of-the-art training rooms are accented with tall windows
and traditional exposed timber trusses. Extending from the south wall, an elevated porch overlooks a
wide landscaped lawn, expanded dockage areas and a rebuilt launch house. The ground floor encompasses two new boat bays and an indoor tank for 16 rowers, framed by a sweeping low arch of
windows that emulates in form the graceful stone spans of the Washington Street bridge.
The Shea Rowing Center brings to Princeton not only much-needed space and improved training
facilities, but a beautiful and versatile athletic headquarters, reflecting the long history, generations of
effort and legacy of success that define Tiger crew.

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Entrance Tower with


Donor Recognition

Rowing Tanks &


Workout Room
Two New Boat Bays

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Workout
Room

Rowing
Tanks

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Shea Color Photos (c)2000 Nick Wheeler/Wheeler Photographics for


Architectural Resources Cambridge

DEDICATED FACILITIES
C. Bernard Shea 16
Rowing Center
Irene C. Shea W16
Richard Ottesen Prentke 67
Training Center
PrincetonUniversity Rowing Association, in honor of
Richard Ottesen Prentke 67
Ohrstrom/Firestone Tank
George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. 50
The Roger S. Firestone
Foundation and the
Firestone family

Boat Bays
C.Minor Barringer 42
Oarsmen of the Classes of
1938-1944
Anonymous, in honor of
Michael C. McLaughlin,
Freshman Crew coach,
1972-1979
Alexander W. Keer 34
Garland M. Lasater, Jr. 60, in
honor of Edward A. Lasater 59

Israel Womens Locker Room


Mary and Lon F. Israel 45

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Klein 67,


in honor of Jennifer E. Klein 01
and Thomas E. Klein 04

The Oakmead Foundation

Oscar B. Marx III 60

Mr. and Mrs. L. Scott Frantz 82


Class of 1968 Shop
Oarsmen of the Class of 1968,
in memory of Nelson Cox, boatman
Coaches Apartments
Buena and Robert M. Chilstrom
67, in honor of Mikaela Lynn
Chilstrom 99
Coaches Offices
James K. Donnell 53
Roberta B. Connolly and
Arthur M. Miller 73

Frantz Training Room

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ROWING AT PRINCETON

Contents
Pictures with names of every crew
that we could locate, and reviews of
every year, plus
Page
Foreword by Dick Prentke......................................................5
Patrons and Sponsors..............................................................6
C. Bernard Shea16 Rowing Center in color..........................7
Contents................................................................................11
Introduction to U.S.Rowing..................................................14
1872 Crews Start of Annual Reviews................................16
Ready All, Row Our Origins..............................................17
The College Regatta 1874..................................................21
Shell Race on Delaware River 1877..................................29
Creating Loch Carnegie......................................................43
Class of 1887 Boathouse.......................................................64
Lightweight Rowing Begins.................................................80
Varsity B Becomes 1921 Varsity.......................................87
150-Pound Crew Visits Henley in 1930..............................117
Starboard Stroke Heritage...................................................150
90,000 Fans at Poughkeepsie..............................................157
Finest Materials for Shells..................................................181
Palm Beach Regattas...........................................................183
Goodbye Poughkeepsie.......................................................187
Henley Royal Regatta.........................................................213
Mowing Lake Carnegie.......................................................225
Environs of Princeton and Lake Carnegie..........................250
Coed Crew at Princeton......................................................273
Princeton Oarsmen in International Competition...............275
History of Womens Crew...................................................278
What Rowing Means to Many Rowers...............................282
Princeton Women in International Competition.................283
Womens Crew Breaks Records at Easterns.......................293
Henley Royal Regatta, 1973...............................................297
Nelson Cox Retires.............................................................313
Brad Woodrick on Shells....................................................315
Eastern Association of Womens Rowing Colleges............321
Its Not Always Easy by Bruce Kelley 79.........................331
New Womens Locker Room..............................................335

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Page
Belly of the Carnegie Head Race........................................349
Doctors Perspective by Luther M. Strayer 57..................349
Carnegie Lake Rowing Association....................................351
Shells with Aerospace Technology.....................................361
Novice Women National Champions...............................365
Other Rowers on the Lake..................................................380
Surprise Finish in Lucerne..................................................381
After the Championships by Andrew Ballard 87...............389
Princeton in Henley Competition........................................391
1987 All Squads Banquet....................................................399
Princeton Wins NCAA Title................................................403
Rowing Reflections by Peter Schroeder 62.......................441
Princeton Rowing by Dan Allen (Berkeley 91).................454
25th Reunion Row by Bruce Millman 70...........................463
Royal Treatment in England by Joe Murtaugh...................469
Princeton Chase..................................................................471
Theres Money in Womens Crew......................................487
Womens Lightweight Crew...............................................489
Letter about Henley by David Bordeau 00........................495
CRASH Ps..........................................................................503
Shea Rowing Center...........................................................510
Princeton University Rowing Association..........................514
William Allen Butler 76 Path............................................514
Acknowledgments...............................................................518
Appendices..........................................................................519
Crew Captains Mens Heavyweight.................................520
Crew Captains Mens Lightweight..................................521
Crew Captains Womens Open and Light........................522
Annual Race Results...........................................................544
Princeton at Olympics + + .................................................573
Listing of Rowers................................................................582
Bibliography.......................................................................600
(continued)

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Contents
Sampling of Coaches

Shell Christenings

Page
Constance S. Titus................................................................44
Matthew Baird 24...............................................................94
J. Duncan Spaeth..................................................................97
Charles P. Logg..................................................................100
Clement B Newbold 28....................................................112
Busy Fall on Lake........................................................113
Gordon G. Sikes 16..........................................................127
Nine Men in a Boat......................................................128
John Schultz.......................................................................138
Centipede......................................................................139
Wilhelmus B. Byran 20....................................................139
Walter H. Pflaumer 34......................................................142
Fred W. Spuhn....................................................................156
Dutch Schoch...................................................................168
Jim Rathschmidt................................................................193
Peter Sparhawk..................................................................224
Fin Meislahn 64................................................................276
Al Piranian 69...................................................................295
On Coaching...................................................................320
Gary Kilpatrick..................................................................301
Kit Raymond 74................................................................310
On Coaching...................................................................311
Kris Korzeniowski.............................................................335
Ernie Arlett.........................................................................344
On Coaching...................................................................355
Coaches and Captains with Ten Eyck Trophy...................371
Dan Roock 81...................................................................387
Larry Gluckman.................................................................393
Joe Murtaugh.....................................................................406
On Coaching...................................................................407
Curtis Jordan......................................................................426
On Coaching...................................................................427
Lori Dauphiny....................................................................479
On Coaching...................................................................427
Heather Smith....................................................................479
Mike Teti............................................................................525
On Coaching...................................................................525

Page
1 - The Early Days.............................................................173
2 - Dutch Schoch Era.........................................................177
3 - Rosenbaum Legacy.......................................................229
4 - Recent Dedications.......................................................231
5 - The Nineties..................................................................439
6 - Boathouse Dedications (1)............................................511
7 - Boathouse Dedications (2)............................................513

Coaches Womens Crew.................................................523


Coaches Mens Crew......................................................524

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ROWING AT PRINCETON

Contents
Cups, Trophies, Awards
With Record of Winners
Intercollegiate

Page
Childs Cup............................................................................. 30
Carnegie Cup......................................................................... 88
Goldthwait Cup...................................................................... 93
Princeton-Navy(Smith) Trophy............................................. 96
Compton Cup....................................................................... 129
Wood-Hammond Trophy..................................................... 165
Logg Cup............................................................................. 235
Phillip L. Platt 60 Trophy................................................... 277
Class of 1975 Cup................................................................ 306
Carola B. Eisenberg Cup...................................................... 312
Class of 1984 Point Trophy................................................. 369
Dolly Callow Cup................................................................ 449
Content Cup......................................................................... 451
Belly Bowl........................................................................... 451
Bergschneider Trophy.......................................................... 483
Class of 1999 Cup................................................................ 496

Intercollegiate Rowing Association................... 526

Varsity Challenge Cup......................................................... 527


Kennedy Challenge Trophy................................................. 528
Stewards Cup....................................................................... 529
Norstar Cup.......................................................................... 529
Open Fours Trophy.............................................................. 530
Gordon Hoople Trophy........................................................ 530
Eric Will Trophy.................................................................. 531
Stork Sanford Trophy........................................................... 531
Varsity Pairs Trophy............................................................. 531
Ten Eyck Trophy.................................................................. 532
Robert Mulcahy Trophy....................................................... 533

Princeton

Page
W.Lyman Biddle Medal......................................................107
Coaches Cup (Schultz Trophy)..........................................136
Gordon Sikes Medal...........................................................219
Carol P. Brown 75 Award..................................................312
1921 Crew Trophy..............................................................347
Class of 1983 Award...........................................................359
Heavyweight Triathalon Trophy.........................................371
Bayard W. Read 26 Lightweight Award............................409
Pell Sculling Trophy...........................................................418
The Freshman Award..........................................................449
Butler Award.......................................................................483
David R. Covin 91 Award..................................................496

(Eastern Sprints)................................................ 534


Worcester Bowl................................................................... 535
E.C.A.C. Trophy................................................................. 536
Kenneth Burns Trophy........................................................ 537
Joseph Wright Trophy......................................................... 538
Cornell Trophy.................................................................... 539
Charles Willing Trophy....................................................... 539
Rowe Cup........................................................................... 540
Jope Cup............................................................................. 541
EAWRC Trohpies............................................................... 542

Princeton Athletic Awards

William Roper Trophy........................................................543

Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges

C. Otto von Kienbusch 06 Award......................................543


Class of 1916 Cup...............................................................543

ROWING AT PRINCETON

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Introduction
Rowing races undoubtedly began soon after the
second pre-historic human figured out how to paddle
while lying on a floating tree trunk. Human nature is
such that competition was surely a by-product of the ancient development of boats. Paddles seem to have been
replaced by the mechanical advantage of an oar against a
fulcrum by about 1000 B.C., and there are many recorded
examples of early rowing races, one of the oldest of which
is Virgils Aeneid V.
The waiting crews are crowned with popular wreaths;
Their naked shoulders glisten, moist with oil.
Ranged in a row, their arms stretched to the oars.
All tense the starting gun they await.
Together at the trumpets thrilling blast
Their bent arms churn the water into foam;
The sea grapes open by the oars up-torn;
With shouts and cheers of eager partisans
The woodlands ring, the sheltered beach rolls up
The sound, the hills re-echo with the din.

American collegiate rowing can be traced back to


rowing in England, and rowing in England was derived
from thousands of London watermen, who were essentially nautical taxi drivers across the Thames in the early
eighteenth century. A combination of their own competitive instincts, market forces and the wagering habits of
London gentry led eventually to organized racing between
watermen, which became extremely popular as a spectator
sport. The race in singles for Doggetts Coat and Badge
began in 1716 and continues to this day.* The first regatta
took place on the Thames in 1775, and rowing became a
spectacle open to any member of the society.
Undergraduates soon emulated the professional racing, and intramural rowing was occurring at the colleges
of Oxford and Cambridge by the late 1700s. It was also
occurring within English public schools by that time
* Doggetts Coat and Badge was a prize given to the winner of an
annual sculling race. The race for it is the oldest recorded rowing
competition. Thomas Doggett was a successful London actor
in the early 1700s. Like most Londoners, he traveled between
various points in the city in the Thames River taxi boats, and
favored the small, fast wherries operated by an individual boatman. He habitually tipped his boatman well if he outran nearby
boats. He eventually established a trust with the Company of
Fishmongers to pay for a prize of a distinctive coat and badge,
and ten pounds, to the winner of a five-mile race from London
Bridge to Chelsea. The first notice was posted on August 1,
1715. Believe it or not, I actually lay my eyes on an example
of this prize monthly at the Pocock Rowing CenterGeorge
Pococks brother won it one year. (R.O.Prentke)

14

and has been documented at Eton as far back as 1793.


The first known extramural schoolboy contest was a race
between Eton and Westminster in 1829. The first college
boat club was organized at Oxford in 1815; Cambridge
began its first boat club in 1827.
Cambridge and Oxford contested the first intercollegiate boat race in June 1829 before a crowd of 20,000
at Henley-upon-Thames. It was the second intercollegiate
sport, after cricket. In fact, it is said that this boat race was
the result of a challenge between cricket rivals of the two
colleges. In that first match, the crews collided and had to
be restarted before the Oxford eight could win. Their boats
were clinker-built (long overlapping pieces of wood),
weighed 600 pounds, and were 45 feet long and four
feet wide. The oarlocks were nothing more than wooden
pins protruding from the gunwales, and the seats did not
move. Seven years, a cholera epidemic, and disputes over
the course passed before the two universities met again.
There was another two-year respite about a decade later
when Oxford refused to row against a professionally
coached Cambridge crew. The well-known boat race
on the Thames was instituted in 1856. The Henley Royal
Regatta began in 1839 because it was not only scenic but
also one of the straightest stretches of the river.
Meanwhile in the United States, races occurred as
early as 1762 on the Schuylkill, club rowing existed by
1823, a rowing association was formed in 1834, and
professional rowing became popular in numerous races
in the East from 1810 to 1850, with crowds in the tens of
thousands. The first collegiate boat club was organized
at Yale in 1843, and Harvard defeated Yale in their first
rowing race, for two miles in large, heavy keeled, slideless eights, on August 3, 1852. The race occurred at the
suggestion of the Boston, Concord and Montreal Railroad
Company, which agreed to pay all the bills. Charles
William Eliot, Harvard class of 1855, confessed after
he became Harvard president that, in the 1850s, it was
not a reputable thing to belong to a crew. The boats of
those days, he noted, were used, both spring and fall, as
means of bringing home members of the crew who did
not propose to return sober from an evening in Boston.
In 1858, Harvard, Trinity, Brown and Yale planned
the first intercollegiate regatta, but it was cancelled when
the Yale stroke drowned. In 1871, the captains of the Amherst, Brown, Bowdoin and Harvard crews met to form the
Rowing Association of American Colleges, the first collegiate athletic organization in the country. Yale declined
to attend but later joined. The association set race dates
and devised a rule that only undergraduate students would

ROWING AT PRINCETON