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Heritage and early history of the boundary element method

Alexander H.-D. Cheng
a,
*
, Daisy T. Cheng
b
a
Department of Civil Engineering University of Mississippi, University, MS, 38677, USA
b
John D. Williams Library, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA
Received 10 December 2003; revised 7 December 2004; accepted 8 December 2004
Available online 12 February 2005
Abstract
This article explores the rich heritage of the boundary element method (BEM) by examining its mathematical foundation from the
potential theory, boundary value problems, Green’s functions, Green’s identities, to Fredholm integral equations. The 18th to 20th century
mathematicians, whose contributions were key to the theoretical development, are honored with short biographies. The origin of the
numerical implementation of boundary integral equations can be traced to the 1960s, when the electronic computers had become available.
The full emergence of the numerical technique known as the boundary element method occurred in the late 1970s. This article reviews the
early history of the boundary element method up to the late 1970s.
q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Boundary element method; Green’s functions; Green’s identities; Boundary integral equation method; Integral equation; History
1. Introduction
After three decades of development, the boundary
element method (BEM) has found a firm footing in the
arena of numerical methods for partial differential
equations. Comparing to the more popular numerical
methods, such as the Finite Element Method (FEM) and
the Finite Difference Method (FDM), which can be
classified as the domain methods, the BEM distinguish
itself as a boundary method, meaning that the numerical
discretization is conducted at reduced spatial dimension. For
example, for problems in three spatial dimensions, the
discretization is performed on the bounding surface only;
and in two spatial dimensions, the discretization is on the
boundary contour only. This reduced dimension leads to
smaller linear systems, less computer memory require-
ments, and more efficient computation. This effect is most
pronounced when the domain is unbounded. Unbounded
domain needs to be truncated and approximated in domain
methods. The BEM, on the other hand, automatically
models the behavior at infinity without the need of
deploying a mesh to approximate it. In the modern day
industrial settings, mesh preparation is the most labor
intensive and the most costly portion in numerical
modeling, particularly for the FEM [9] Without the need
of dealing with the interior mesh, the BEM is more cost
effective in mesh preparation. For problems involving
moving boundaries, the adjustment of the mesh is much
easier with the BEM; hence it is again the preferred tool.
With these advantages, the BEM is indeed an essential part
in the repertoire of the modern day computational tools.
In order to gain an objective assessment of the success of
the BEM, as compared to other numerical methods, a search
is conducted using the Web of Science
SM
, an online
bibliographic database. Based on the keyword search, the
total number of journal publications found in the Science
Citation Index Expanded
195
was compiled for several
numerical methods. The detail of the search technique is
described in Appendix. The result, as summarized in
Table 1, clearly indicates that the finite element method
(FEM) is the most popular with more than 66,000 entries.
The finite difference method (FDM) is a distant second with
more than 19,000 entries, less than one third of the FEM.
The BEM ranks third with more than 10,000 entries, more
than one half of the FDM. All other methods, such as the
finite volume method (FVM) and the collocation method
(CM), trail far behind. Based on this bibliographic search,
Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302
www.elsevier.com/locate/enganabound
0955-7997/$ - see front matter q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.enganabound.2004.12.001
* Corresponding author. Tel.: C1 662 915 5362; fax: C1 662 915 5523.
E-mail address: acheng@olemiss.edu (A.H.-D. Cheng).
we can conclude that the popularity and versatility of BEM
falls behind the two major methods, FEM and FDM.
However, BEM’s leading role as a specialized and
alternative method to these two, as compared to all other
numerical methods for partial differential equations, is
unchallenged.
Fig. 1 presents the histogram of the number of journal
papers published annually, containing BEM as a keyword. It
shows that the growth of BEM literature roughly follows the
S-curve pattern predicted by the theory of technology
diffusion [75]. Based on the data, we observe that after the
‘invention of the technology’ in the late 1960s and early
1970s, the number of published literature was very small;
but it was on an exponential growth rate, until it reached an
inflection point around 1991. After that time, the annual
publication continued to grow, but at a decreasing rate. A
sign of a technology reaching its maturity is marked by the
leveling off of its production. Although it might be too early
to tell, there is an indication that the number of annual BEM
publications is reaching a steady state at about 700–800
papers per year. For comparison, this number for the FEM is
about 5000 articles per year, and for the FDM, it is about
1400.
As the BEM is on its way to maturity, it is of interest to
visit its history. Although there exist certain efforts toward
the writing of the history of the FEM [84,127] and the FDM
[131,193], relatively little has been done for the BEM. The
present article is aimed at taking a first step toward the
construction of a history for the BEM.
Before reviewing its modern development, we shall first
explore the rich heritage of the BEM, particularly its
mathematical foundation from the 18th century to the early
20th. The historical development of the potential theory,
Green’s function, and integral equations are reviewed. To
interest the beginners of the field, biographical sketches
celebrating the pioneers, whose contributions were key to
the mathematical foundation of the BEM, are provided. The
coverage continues into the first half of the 20th century,
when early numerical efforts were attempted even before
the electronic computers were invented.
Numerical methods cannot truly prosper until the
invention and then the wide availability of the electronic
computers in the early 1960s. It is of little surprise that both
the FEM and the BEM started around that time. For the
BEM, multiple efforts started around 1962. A turning point
that launched a series of connected efforts, which soon
developed into a movement, can be traced to 1967. In the
1970s, the BEM was still a novice numerical technique, but
saw an exponential growth. By the end of it, textbooks were
Table 1
Bibliographic database search based on the Web of Science
Numerical
method
Search phrase in topic field No. of entries
FEM ‘Finite element’ or ‘finite elements’ 66,237
FDM ‘Finite difference’ or ‘finite differences’ 19,531
BEM ‘Boundary element’ or ‘boundary
elements’ or ‘boundary integral’
10,126
FVM ‘Finite volume method’ or ‘finite volume
methods’
1695
CM ‘Collocation method’ or ‘collocation
methods’
1615
Refer to Appendix A for search criteria. (Search date: May 3, 2004).
Fig. 1. Number of journal articles published by the year on the subject of BEM, based on the Web of Science search. Refer to Appendix for the search criteria.
(Search date: May 3, 2004).
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 269
written and conferences were organized on BEM. This
article reviews the early development up to the late 1970s,
leaving the latter development to future writers.
Before starting, we should clarify the use of the term
‘boundary element method’ in this article. In the narrowest
view, one can argue that BEM refers to the numerical
technique based on the method of weighted residuals,
mirroring the finite element formulation, except that the
weighing function used is the fundamental solution of
governing equation in order to eliminate the need of domain
discretization [19,21]. Or, one can view BEM as the
numerical implementation of boundary integral equations
based on Green’s formula, in which the piecewise element
concept of the FEM is utilized for the discretization [108].
Even more broadly, BEM has been used as a generic term
for a variety of numerical methods that use a boundary or
boundary-like discretization. These can include the general
numerical implementation of boundary integral equations,
known as the boundary integral equation method (BIEM)
[54], whether elements are used in the discretization or not;
or the method known as the indirect method that distributes
singular solutions on the solution boundary; or the method
of fundamental solutions in which the fundamental solutions
are distributed outside the domain in discrete or continuous
fashion with or without integral equation formulation; or
even the Trefftz method which distribute non-singular
solutions. These generic adoptions of the term are evident in
the many articles appearing in the journal of Engineering
Analysis with Boundary Elements and many contributions in
the Boundary Element Method conferences. In fact, the
theoretical developments of these methods are often
intertwined. Hence, for the purpose of the current historical
review, we take the broader view and consider into this
category all numerical methods for partial differential
equations in which a reduction in mesh dimension from a
domain-type to a boundary-type is accomplished. More
properly, these methods can be referred to as ‘boundary
methods’ or ‘mesh reduction methods.’ But we shall yield to
the popular adoption of the term ‘boundary element method’
for its wide recognition. It will be used interchangeably with
the above terms.
2. Potential theory
The Laplace equation is one of the most widely used
partial differential equations for modeling science and
engineering problems. It typically comes from the physical
consequence of combining a phenomenological gradient
law (such as the Fourier law in heat conduction and the
Darcy law in groundwater flow) with a conservation law
(such as the heat energy conservation and the mass
conservation of an incompressible material). For example,
Fourier law was presented by Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier
(1768–1830) in 1822 [66]. It states that the heat flux in a
thermal conducting medium is proportional to the spatial
gradient of temperature distribution
q ZKkVT (1)
where q is the heat flux vector, k is the thermal conductivity,
and T is the temperature. The steady state heat energy
conservation requires that at any point in space the
divergence of the flux equals to zero:
V$q Z0 (2)
Combining (1) and (2) and assuming that k is a constant, we
obtain the Laplace equation
V
2
T Z0 (3)
For groundwater flow, similar procedure produces
V
2
h Z0 (4)
where h is the piezometric head. It is of interest to mention
that the notation V used in the above came form William
Rowan Hamilton (1805–1865). The symbol V, known as
‘nabla’, is a Hebrew stringed instrument that has a triangular
shape [73].
The above theories are based on physical quantities. A
second way that the Laplace equation arises is through the
mathematical concept of finding a ‘potential’ that has no
direct physical meaning. In fluid mechanics, the velocity of
an incompressible fluid flow satisfies the divergence
equation
V$v Z0 (5)
which is again based on the mass conservation principle. For
an inviscid fluid flow that is irrotational, its curl is equal to
zero:
V!v Z0 (6)
It can be shown mathematically that the identity (6)
guarantees the existence of a scalar potential f such that
v ZVf (7)
Combining (5) and (7) we again obtain the Laplace equation.
We notice that f, called the velocity potential, is a mathe-
matical conceptual construction; it is not associated with any
measurable physical quantity. In fact, the phrase ‘potential
function’ was coined by George Green (1793–1841) in his
1828 study [81] of electrostatics and magnetics: electric and
magnetic potentials were used as convenient tools for
manipulating the solution of electric and magnetic forces.
The original derivation of Laplace equation, however,
was based on the study of gravitational attraction, following
the third law of motion of Isaac Newton (1643–1727)
F ZK
Gm
1
m
2
r
}r}
3
(8)
where F is the force field, G is the gravitational constant, m
1
and m
2
are two concentrated masses, and r is the distance
vector between the two masses. Joseph-Louis Lagrange
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 270
(1736–1813) in 1773 was the first to recognize the existence
of a potential function that satisfied the above equation [111]
f Z
1
r
(9)
whose spatial gradient gave the gravity force field
F ZGm
1
m
2
Vf (10)
Subsequently, Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827) in his
study of celestial mechanics demonstrated that the gravity
potential satisfies the Laplace equation. The equation was
first presented in polar coordinates in 1782, and then in the
Cartesian form in 1787 as [109]:
v
2
f
vx
2
C
v
2
f
vy
2
C
v
2
f
vz
2
Z0 (11)
The Laplace equation, however, had been used earlier in the
context of hydrodynamics by Leonhard Euler (1707–1783)
in 1755 [63], and by Lagrange in 1760 [110]. But Laplace
was credited for making it a standard part of mathematical
physics [15,100]. We note that the gravity potential (9)
satisfying (11) represents a concentrated mass. Hence it is a
‘fundamental solution’ of the Laplace equation.
Simeon-Denis Poisson (1781–1840) derived in 1813
[132] the equation of force potential for points interior to a
body with mass density r as
V
2
f ZK4pr (12)
This is known as the Poisson equation.
2.1. Euler
Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) was the son of a Lutheran
pastor who lived near Basel, Switzerland. While studying
theology at the University of Basel, Euler was attracted to
mathematics by the leading mathematician at the time,
Johann Bernoulli (1667–1748), and his two mathematician
sons, Nicolaus (1695–1726) and Daniel (1700–1782). With
no opportunity in finding a position in Switzerland due to his
young age, Euler followed Nicolaus and Daniel to Russia.
Later, at the age of 26, he succeeded Daniel as the chief
mathematician of the Academy of St Petersburg. Euler
surprised the Russian mathematicians by computing in 3
days some astronomical tables whose construction was
expected to take several months.
In 1741 Euler accepted the invitation of Frederick the
Great to direct the mathematical division of the Berlin
Academy, where he stayed for 25 years. The relation with
the King, however, deteriorated toward the end of his stay;
hence Euler returned to St Petersburg in 1766. Euler soon
became totally blind after returning to Russia. By dictation,
he published nearly half of all his papers in the last 17 years
of his life. In his words, ‘Now I will have less distraction’.
Without doubt, Euler was the most prolific and versatile
scientific writer of all times. During his lifetime, he
published more than 700 books and papers, and it took
St Petersburg’s Academy the next 47 years to publish the
manuscripts he left behind [31]. The modern effort of
publishing Euler’s collected works, the Opera Omnia [64]
begun in 1911. However, after 73 volumes and 25,000
pages, the work is unfinished to the present day.
Euler contributed to many branches of mathematics,
mechanics, and physics, including algebra, trigonometry,
analytical geometry, calculus, complex variables, number
theory, combinatorics, hydrodynamics, and elasticity. He
was the one who set mathematics into the modern notations.
We owe Euler the notations of ‘e’ for the base of natural
logs, ‘p’ for pi, ‘i’ for
ffiffiffiffiffiffi
K1
_
, ‘

’ for summation, and the
concept of functions.
Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777–1855) has been called the
greatest mathematician in modern mathematics for his
setting up the rigorous foundation for mathematics. Euler,
on the other hand, was more intuitive and has been criticized
by pure mathematicians as being lacking rigor. However, by
the number indelible marks that Euler left in many science
and engineering fields, he certainly earned the title of the
greatest applied mathematician ever lived [58].
2.2. Lagrange
Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813), Italian by birth,
German by adoption, and French by choice, was next to
Euler the foremost mathematician of the 18th century. At
age 18 he was appointed Professor of Geometry at the Royal
Artillery School in Turin. Euler was impressed by his work,
and arranged a prestigious position for him in Prussia.
Despite the inferior condition in Turin, Lagrange only
wanted to be able to devote his time to mathematics; hence
declined the offer. However, in 1766, when Euler left Berlin
for St Petersburg, Frederick the Great arranged for Lagrange
to fill the vacated post. Accompanying the invitation was a
modest message saying, ‘It is necessary that the greatest
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 271
geometer of Europe should live near the greatest of Kings.’
To D’Alembert, who recommended Lagrange, the king
wrote, ‘To your care and recommendation am I indebted for
having replaced a half-blind mathematician with a
mathematician with both eyes, which will especially please
the anatomical members of my academy.’
After the death of Frederick, the situationinPrussia became
unpleasant for Lagrange. He left Berlin in 1787 to become a
member of the Acade´mie des Sciences in Paris, where he
remained for the rest of his career. Lagrange’s contributions
were mostly in the theoretical branch of mathematics. In 1788
he published the monumental work Me´canique Analytique
that unified the knowledge of mechanics up to that time. He
banished the geometric idea and introduced differential
equations. In the preface, he proudly announced: ‘One will
not find figures in this work. The methods that I expound
require neither constructions, nor geometrical or mechanical
arguments, but only algebraic operations, subject to a regular
and uniform course.’ [31,128].
2.3. Laplace
Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827), born in Normandy,
France, came from relatively humble origins. But with the
help of Jean le Rond D’Alembert (1717–1783), he was
appointed Professor of Mathematics at the Paris Ecole
Militaire when he was only 20-year old. Some years later, as
examiner of the scholars of the royal artillery corps, Laplace
happened to examine a 16-year old sub-lieutenant named
Napoleon Bonaparte. Fortunately for both of their careers, the
examinee passed. When Napoleon came to power, Laplace
was rewarded: he was appointed the Minister of Interior for a
short period of time, and later the President of the Senate.
Among Laplace’s greatest achievement was the five-
volume Traite´ du Me´canique Ce´leste that incorporated all
the important discoveries of planetary system of the
previous century, deduced from Newton’s law of gravita-
tion. Upon presenting the monumental work to Napoleon,
the emperor teasingly chided Laplace for an apparent
oversight: ‘They told me that you have written this huge
book on the system of the universe without once mentioning
its Creator’. Whereupon Laplace drew himself up and
bluntly replied, ‘I have no need for that hypothesis.’ [31].
He was eulogized by his disciple Poisson as ‘the Newton of
France’ [86]. Among the important contributions of Laplace in
mathematics and physics included probability, Laplace
transform, celestial mechanics, the velocity of sound, and
capillary action. He was considered more than anyone else to
have set the foundation of the probability theory [76].
2.4. Fourier
Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768–1830), born in
Auxerre, France, was the ninth of the 12 children of his
father’s second marriage. One of his letters showed that he
really wanted to make a major impact in mathematics:
‘Yesterday was my 21st birthday; at that age Newton and
Pascal had already acquired many claims to immortality’. In
1790 Fourier became a teacher at the Benedictine College,
where he had studied earlier. Soon after, he was entangled in
the French Revolution and joined the local revolutionary
committee. He was arrested in 1794, and almost went to the
guillotine. Only the political changes resulted in his being
released. In 1794 Fourier was admitted to the newly
established Ecole Normale in Paris, where he was taught
by Lagrange, Laplace, and Gaspard Monge (1746–1818). In
1797 he succeeded Lagrange in being appointed to the Chair
of Analysis and Mechanics.
In 1978, Fourier joined Napoleon’s army in its invasion
of Egypt as a scientific advisor. It was there that he recorded
many observations that later led to his work in heat
diffusion. Fourier returned to Paris in 1801. Soon Napoleon
appointed him as the Prefect of Ise´re, headquartered at
Grenoble. Among his achievements in this administrative
position included the draining of swamps of Bourgoin and
the construction of a new highway between Grenoble and
Turin. Some of his most important scientific contributions
came during this period (1802–1814). In 1807 he completed
his memoir On the Propagation of Heat in Solid Bodies in
which he not only expounded his idea about heat diffusion,
but also outlined his new method of mathematical analysis,
which we now call Fourier analysis. This memoir, however,
was never published, because one of its examiner,
Lagrange, objected to his use of trigonometric series to
express initial temperature. Fourier was elected to the
Acade´mie des Sciences in 1817. In 1822 he published The
Analytical Theory of Heat [66], 10 years after its winning
the Institut de France competition of the Grand Prize in
Mathematics in 1812. The judges, however, criticized that
he had not proven the completeness of the trigonometric
(Fourier) series. The proof would come years later by
Johann Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (1805–1859) [80].
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 272
2.5. Poisson
Simeon-Denis Poisson (1781–1840) was born in Pithi-
viers, France. In 1796 Poisson was sent to Fontainebleau to
enroll in the Ecole Centrale. He soon showed great talents
for learning, especially mathematics. His teachers at the
Ecole Centrale were highly impressed and encouraged him
to sit in the entrance examinations for the Ecole Poly-
technique in Paris, the premiere institution at the time.
Although he had far less formal education than most of the
students taking the examinations, he achieved the top place.
His teachers Laplace and Lagrange quickly saw his
mathematical talents and they became friends for life. In
his final year of study he wrote a paper on the theory of
equations and Be´zout’s theorem, and this was of such
quality that he was allowed to graduate in 1800 without
taking the final examination. He proceeded immediately to
the position equivalent to the present-day Assistant
Professor in the Ecole Polytechnique at the age of 19,
mainly on the strong recommendation of Laplace. It was
quite unusual for anyone to gain their first appointment in
Paris, as most of the top mathematicians had to serve in the
provinces before returning to Paris. Poisson was named
Associate Professor in 1802, and Professor in 1806 to fill the
position vacated by Fourier when he was sent by Napoleon
to Grenoble. In 1813 in his effort to answer the challenge
question for the election to the Acade´mie des Sciences, he
developed the Poisson eqaution (12) to solve the electrical
field caused by distributed electrical charges in a body.
Poisson made great contributions in both mathematics
and physics. His name is attached to a wide variety of ideas,
for example, Poisson’s integral, Poisson equation, Poisson
brackets in differential equations, Poisson’s ratio in
elasticity, and Poisson’s constant in electricity [128].
2.6. Hamilton
William Rowan Hamilton (1805–1865) was a precocious
child. At the age of 5, he read Greek, Hebrew, and Latin; at
10, he was acquainted with half a dozen of oriental
languages. He entered Trinity College, Dublin at the age
of 18. His performance was so outstanding that he was
appointed Professor of Astronomy and the Royal Astron-
omer of Ireland when he was still an undergraduate at
Trinity. Hamilton was knighted at the age of 30 for the
scientific work he had already achieved.
Among Hamilton’s most important contributions is the
establishment of an analogy between the optical theory of
systems of rays and the dynamics of moving bodies. With
the further development by Carl Gustav Jacobi (1804–
1851), this theory is generally known as the Hamilton–
Jacobi Principle. By this construction, for example, it was
possible to determine the 10 planetary orbits around the sun,
a feat normally required the solution of 30 ordinary
differential equations, by merely two equations involving
Hamilton’s characteristic functions. However, this method
was more elegant than practical; hence for almost a century,
Hamilton’s great method was more praised than used [129].
This situation, however, changed when Irwin Schro¨din-
ger (1887–1961) introduced the revolutionary wave-func-
tion model for quantum mechanics in 1926. Schro¨dinger
had expressed Hamilton’s significance quite unequivocally:
‘The modern development of physics is constantly enhan-
cing Hamilton’s name. His famous analogy between optics
and mechanics virtually anticipated wave mechanics, which
did not have much to add to his ideas and only had to take
them more seriously .If you wish to apply modern theory
to any particular problem, you must start with putting the
problem in Hamiltonian form’ [15].
3. Existence and uniqueness
The potential problems we solve are normally posed as
boundary value problems For example, given a closed
region U with the boundary G and the boundary condition
f Zf (x); x2G (13)
where f(x) is a continuous function, we are asked to find a
harmonic function (meaning a function satisfying the
Laplace equation) f(x) that fulfills the boundary condition
(13). This is known as the Dirichlet problem, named after
Dirichlet. The corresponding problem of finding a harmonic
function with the normal derivative boundary condition
vf
vn
Zg(x); x2G (14)
where n is the outward normal of G, is called the Neumann
problem, after Carl Gottfried Neumann (1832–1925).
The question of whether a solution of a Dirichlet or a
Neumann problem exists, and when it exists, whether it is
unique or not, is of great importance in mathematics and
physics alike. Obviously, if we cannot guarantee
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 273
the existence of a solution, the effort of finding it can be in
vain. If a solution exists, but may not be unique, then we
cannot tie the solution to the unique physical state that we
are modeling.
The question of uniqueness is easier to answer: for the
Dirichlet problem, if a solution exists, it is unique; and for
the Neumann problem, it is unique to within an arbitrary
constant. The existence theorem, however, is more difficult
to prove (see the classical monograph Foundations of
Potential Theory [100] by Oliver Dimon Kellogg (1878–
1932) for the full exposition.)
To a physicist, the existence question seems to be
moot. We may argue that if the mathematical problem
correctly describes a physical problem, then a mathemat-
ical solution must exist, because the physical state exists.
For example, Green in his 1828 seminal work [81], in
which he developed Green’s identities and Green’s
functions, presented a similar argument. He reasoned
that if for a given closed region U, there exists a harmonic
function U (an assumption that will be justified later) that
satisfies the boundary condition
U ZK
1
r
on G (15)
then one can define the function
G Z
1
r
CU (16)
It is clear that G satisfy the the Laplace equation
everywhere except at the pole, where it is singular.
Furthermore, G takes the null value at the boundary G. G
is known as the Green’s function. Green went on to prove
that for a harmonic function f, whose boundary value is
given by a continuous function f(x), x2G, its solution is
represented by the boundary integral equation [100,166]
f(x) ZK
1
4p
__
G
f
vG
vn
dS; x2U (17)
where dS denotes surface integral. Since (17) gives the
solution of the Dirichlet boundary value problem, hence
the solution exists!
The above proof hinges on the existence of U, which is
taken for granted at this point. How can we be sure that U
exists for an arbitrary closed region U? Green argued that U
is nothing but the electrical potential created by the charge
on a grounded sheet conductor, whose shape takes the form
of G, induced by a single charge located inside U. This
physical state obviously exists; hence U must exist! It seems
that the Dirichlet problem is proven. But is it?
In fact, mathematicians can construct counter examples
for which a solution does not exist. An example was
presented by Henri Le´on Lebesgue (1875–1941)[112],
which can be described as follows. Consider a deformable
body whose surface is pushed inward by a sharp spine. If the
tip of the deformed surface is sharp enough, for example,
given by the revolution of the curve yZexp(K1/x) (see
Fig. 2 for a two-dimensional projection), then the tip is an
exceptional point and the Dirichlet problem is not always
solvable. (See Kellogg [100] for more discussion). Further-
more, if the deformed surface closes onto itself to become a
single line protruding into the body, then a Dirichlet
condition cannot be arbitrarily prescribed on this degener-
ated boundary, as it is equivalent to prescribing a value
inside the domain!
Generally speaking, the existence and uniqueness
theorem for potential problems has been proven for
interior and exterior boundary value problems of the
Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, and mixed type, if the
bounding surface and the boundary condition satisfy
certain smoothness condition [97,100]. (For interior
Neumann problem, the uniqueness is only up to an
arbitrarily additive constant.) For the existing proofs, the
bounding surface G needs to be a ‘Liapunov surface’,
which is a surface in the C
1,a
continuity class, where
0%a!1. Put it simply, the smoothness of the surface is
such that on every point there exists a tangent plane and a
normal, but not necessarily a curvature. Corners and
edges, on which a tangent plane does not exist, are not
allowed in this class. This puts great restrictions on the
type of problems that one can solve. On the other hand, in
numerical solutions such as the finite element method
and the boundary element method, the solution is often
sought in the weak sense by minimizing an energy norm
in some sense, such as the well-known Galerkin scheme.
In this case, the existence theorem has been proven for
surface G in the C
0,1
class [42], known as the Lipschitz
surface, which is a more general class than the Liapunov
surface, such that edges and corners are allowed in the
geometry.
Fig. 2. Side view of a surface deformed by a sharp spine. The curve is given
by yZexp(K1/x).
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 274
3.1. Dirichlet
Johann Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (1805–1859)
was born in Du¨ ren, French Empire (present day
Germany). He attended the Jesuit College in Cologne
at the age of 14. There he had the good fortune to be
taught by Georg Simon Ohm (1789–1854). At the age of
16 Dirichlet entered the Colle`ge de France in Paris,
where he had the leading mathematicians at that time as
teachers. In 1825, he published his first paper proving a
case in Fermat’s Last Theorem, which gained him instant
fame. Encouraged by Alexander von Humboldt (1769–
1859), who made recommendations on his behalf,
Dirichlet returned to Germany the same year seeking a
teaching position. From 1827 Dirichlet taught at the
University of Breslau. Again with von Humboldt’s help,
he moved to Berlin in 1828 where he was appointed in
the Military College. Soon afterward, he was appointed a
Professor at the University of Berlin where he remained
from 1828 to 1855. Dirichlet was elected to the Berlin
Academy of Sciences in 1831. An improved salary from
the university put him in a position to marry, and he
married Rebecca Mendelssohn, one of the composer
Felix Mendelssohn’s sisters. Dirichlet had a lifelong
friendship with Jacobi, who taught at Ko¨nigsberg, and
the two exerted considerable influence on each other in
their researches in number theory. Dirichlet had a high
teaching load and in 1853 he complained in a letter to
his pupil Leopold Kronecker (1823–1891) that he had 13
lectures a week to give, in addition to many other duties.
It was therefore a relief when, on Gauss’s death in 1855,
he was offered his chair at Go¨ttingen. Sadly he was not
to enjoy this new position for long. He died in 1859 after
a heart attack.
Dirichlet made great contributions to the number
theory. The analytic number theory may be said to
begin with him. In mechanics he investigated Laplace’s
problem on the stability of the solar system, which led
him to the Dirichlet problem concerning harmonic
functions with given boundary conditions. Dirichlet is
also well known for his papers on conditions for the
convergence of trigonometric series. Because of this work
Dirichlet is considered the founder of the theory of
Fourier series [128].
3.2. Neumann
Carl Gottfried Neumann (1832–1925) was the son of
Franz Neumann (1798–1895), a famous physicist who made
contributions in thermodynamics. His mother was a sister-
in-law of Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784–1846). Neumann
was born in Ko¨nigsberg where his father was the Professor
of Physics at the university. Neumann entered the
University of Ko¨nigsberg and received his doctorate in
1855. He worked on his habilitation at the University of
Halle in 1858. He taught several universities, including
Halle, Basel, and Tu¨bingen. Finally, he moved to a chair at
the University of Leipzig in 1868, and would stay there until
his retirement in 1911.
He worked on a wide range of topics in applied
mathematics such as mathematical physics, potential
theory, and electrodynamics. He also made important pure
mathematical contributions such as the order of connectivity
of Riemann surfaces. During the 1860s Neumann wrote
papers on the Dirichlet principle, in which he coined the
term ‘logarithmic potential’ [128].
3.3. Kellogg
Oliver Dimon Kellogg (1878–1932) was born at Linn-
wood, Pennsylvania. His interest in mathematics was
aroused as an undergraduate at Princeton University,
where he received his BA in 1899. He was awarded a
fellowship for graduate studies and obtained a Master
degree in 1900 at Princeton. The same fellowship allowed
him to spend the next year at the University of Berlin. He
then moved to Go¨ttingen to pursue his doctorate. He
attended lectures by David Hilbert (1862–1943). At that
time, Erik Ivar Fredholm (1866–1927) had just made
progress in proving the existence of Dirichlet problem using
integral equations. Hilbert was excited about the develop-
ment and suggested Kellogg to undertake research on the
Dirichlet problem for boundary containing corners, where
Fredholm’s solution did not apply. Kellogg, however, failed
to answer the question satisfactorily in his thesis and several
subsequent papers. With the realization of his errors, he
never referred to these papers in his later work. Kellogg was
hard to blame because similar errors were later made by
both Hilbert and Jules Henri Poincare´ (1854–1912), and to
this date the proof of Dirichlet problem for boundary
containing corners has not been accomplished.
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 275
Kellogg received his PhD in 1903 and returned to the
United States to take up a post of instructor in mathematics
at Princeton. Two years later he joined the University of
Missouri as an Assistant Professor. He spent the next 14
fruitful years at Missouri until he was called by Harvard
University in 1919. Kellogg continued to work at Harvard
until his death from a heart attack suffered while climbing
[13,59]. His book ‘Foundations of Potential Theory’ [100],
first published in 1929, remains among the most author-
itative work to this date.
4. Reduction in dimension and Green’s formula
A key to the success of boundary element method is the
reduction of spatial dimension in its integral equation
representation, leading to a more efficient numerical
discretization. One of the most celebrated technique of
this type is the divergence theorem, which transforms a
volume integral into a surface integral
___
U
V$A dV Z
__
G
A$n dS (18)
where A is a vector, n is the unit outward normal of G, and
dV stands for volume integral. Early development of this
type was found in the work of Lagrange [110] and Laplace.
Eq. (18), also called Gauss’s theorem, is commonly
attributed to Gauss [70]. However, Gauss in 1813 only
presented a few special cases in the form [99]
__
G
n
x
dS Z0 (19)
where n
x
is the x-component of outward normal, and
__
G
A$n dS Z0 (20)
where the components of A are given by A
x
ZA
x
(y,z), A
y
Z
A
y
(x,z), and A
z
ZA
z
(x,y). The general theorem should be
credited to Mikhail Vasilevich Ostrogradski (1801–1862),
who in 1826 presented the following result to the Paris
Acade´mie des Sciences [99]
___
U
a$Vf dV Z
__
G
fa$n dS (21)
where a is a constant vector.
Another useful formula is the Stokes’s theorem,
presented by George Gabriel Stokes (1819–1903), which
transforms a surface integral into a contour integral [162]
__
S
(V!A)$n dS Z
_
C
A$ds (22)
where S is an open, two sided curve surface, C is the closed
contour bounding S, and ds denotes line integral.
The most important work related to the boundary integral
equation solving potential problems came from George
Green, whose groundbreaking work remained obscure
during his lifetime, and he earned his fame only post-
humously. Green in 1828 [81] presented the three Green’s
identities. The first identity is
___
U
(fV
2
jCVf$Vj) dV Z
__
G
f
vj
vn
dS (23)
The above equation easily leads to the second identity
___
U
(fV
2
jKjV
2
f) dV Z
__
G
f
vj
vn
Kj
vf
vn
_ _
dS (24)
Using the fundamental solution of Laplace equation 1/r in
(24), the third identity is obtained
f Z
1
4p
__
G
1
r
vf
vn
Kf
v(1=r)
vn
_ _
dS (25)
which is exactly the formulation of the present-day
boundary element method for potential problems.
4.1. Gauss
Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777–1855) was born an infant
prodigy into a poor and unlettered family. According to a
well-authenticated story, he corrected an error in his father’s
payroll calculations as a child of three. He was supported by
the Duke Ferdinand of Braunschweig to receive his
education. Even as a student, he made major discoveries,
including the method of least squares and the discovery of
how to construct the regular 17-gon. However, his early
career was not very successful and had to continue to rely on
the financial support of his benefactor. At the age of 22, he
published as his doctoral thesis the most celebrated work,
the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. In 1807 Gauss was
finally able to secure a position as the Director of the newly
founded observatory at the Go¨ttingen University, a job he
held for the rest of his life.
Gauss devoted more of his time in theoretical astronomy
than in mathematics. This is considered a great loss for
mathematics—just imagine how much more mathematics he
could have accomplished. He devised a procedure for
calculating the orbits planetoids that included the use of
least square that he developed. Using his superior method,
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Gauss redid in an hour’s time the calculation on which Euler
had spent 3 days, and which sometimes was said to have led to
Euler’s loss of sight. Gauss remarked unkindly, ‘I should also
have gone blind if I had calculated in that fashion for 3 days’.
Gauss not only adorned every branches of pure
mathematics and was called the Prince of Mathematicians,
he also pursued work in several related scientific fields,
notably physics, mechanics, and astronomy. Together with
Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804–1891), he studied electro-
magnetism. They were the first to have successfully
transmitted telegraph [30,31].
4.2. Green
George Green (1793–1841) was virtually unknown as a
mathematician during his lifetime. His most important piece
of work was discovered posthumously. As the son of a semi-
literate, but well-to-do Nottingham baker and miller, Green
was sent to a private academy at the age of eight, and left
school at nine. This was the only formal education that he
received until adulthood. For the next 20 years after leaving
primary school, no one knew how, and from whom Green
could have acquainted himself to the advanced mathematics
of his day in a backwater place like Nottingham. Even the
whole country of England in those days was scientifically
depressed as compared to the continental Europe. Hence it
was a mystery how Green could have produced as his first
publication such a masterpiece without any guidance.
The next time there existed a record about Green was in
1823. At the age of 30, he joined the Nottingham
Subscription Library as a subscriber. In the library he had
access to books and journals. Also he had the opportunity to
meet with people from the higher society. The next 5 years
was not easy for Green; he had to work full time in the mill,
had two daughters born (he had seven children with Jane
Smith, but never married her), and his mother died in 1825.
Despite these difficulties in life and his flimsy mathematical
background, in 1828 he self-published one of the most
important mathematical works of all times—An Essay on
the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of
Electricity and Magnetism [81]. The essay had 51
subscribers, each paid 7 shillings 6 pence, a sum equal to
a poor man’s weekly wage, for a work which they could
hardly understood a word. One subscriber, Sir Edward
Bromhead, however, was impressed by Green’s prowess in
mathematics. He encouraged and recommended Green to
attend Cambridge University.
Several years later, Green finally enrolled at Cambridge
University at the age of 40. From 1833 to 1836, Green wrote
three more papers, two on electricity published by the
Cambridge Philosophical Society, and one on hydrodyn-
amics published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh. After
graduating in 1837, he stayed at Cambridge for a few years
to work on his own mathematics and to wait for an
appointment. In 1838–1839 he had two papers in hydro-
dynamics, two papers on reflection and refraction of light,
and two papers on sound [82]. In 1839, he was elected to a
Parse Fellowship at Cambridge, a junior position. Due to
poor health, he had to return to Nottingham in 1840. He died
in 1841 at the age of 47. At the time of his death, his work
was virtually unknown.
At the year of Green’s death, William Thomson (Lord
Kelvin) (1824–1907) was admitted to Cambridge. While
studying the subject of electricity as a part of preparation for
his Senior Wrangler exam, he first noticed the existence of
Green’s paper in a footnote of a paper by Robert Murphy.
He started to look for a copy, but no one knew about it. After
his graduation in 1845, and before his departure to France to
enrich his education, he mentioned it to his teacher William
Hopkins (1793–1866). It happened that Hopkins had three
copies. Thomson was immediately excited about what he
had read in the paper. He brought the article to Paris and
showed it to Jacques Charles Franc¸ois Sturm (1803–1855)
and Joseph Liouville (1809–1882). Later Thomson repub-
lished Green’s essay, rescuing it from sinking into
permanent obscurity [33].
Green’s 1828 essay had profoundly influenced Thomson
and James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) in their study of
electrodynamics and magnetism. The methodology has also
been applied to many classical fields of physics such as
acoustics, elasticity, and hydrodynamics. During the
bicentennial celebration of Green’s birth in 1993, physicists
Julian Seymour Schwinger (1918–1994) and Freeman J.
Dyson (1923-) delivered speeches on the role of Green’s
functions in the development of 20th century quantum
electrodynamics [33].
4.3. Ostrogradski
Mikhail Vasilevich Ostrogradski (1801–1862) was born
in Pashennaya, Ukraine. He entered the University of
Kharkov in 1816 and studied physics and mathematics. In
1822 he left Russia to study in Paris. Between 1822 and 1827
he attended lectures by Laplace, Fourier, Adrien-Marie
Legendre (1752–1833), Poisson, and Augustin-Louis Cau-
chy (1789–1857). He made rapid progress in Paris and soon
began to publish papers in the Paris Academy. His papers at
this time showed the influence of the mathematicians in Paris
and he wrote on physics and the integral calculus. These
papers were later incorporated in a major work on
hydrodynamics, which he published in Paris in 1832.
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 277
Ostrogradski went to St Petersburg in 1828. He presented
three important papers on the theory of heat, double
integrals and potential theory to the Academy of Sciences.
Largely on the strength of these papers he was elected an
academician in the applied mathematics section. In 1840 he
wrote on ballistics and introduced the topic to Russia. He
was considered as the founder of the Russian school of
theoretical mechanics [128].
4.4. Stokes
George Gabriel Stokes (1819–1903) was born in Skreen,
County Sligo, Ireland. In 1837 he entered Pembroke College
of Cambridge University. He was coached by William
Hopkins, who had among his students Thomson, Maxwell,
and Peter Guthrie Tait (1831–1901), and had the reputation
as the ‘senior wrangler maker.’ In 1841 Stokes graduated as
Senior Wrangler (the top First Class degree) and was also
the first Smith’s prizeman. Pembroke College immediately
gave him a fellowship.
Inspired by the recent work of Green, Stokes started to
undertake research in hydrodynamics and published papers
on the motion of incompressible fluids in 1842. After
completing the research Stokes discovered that Jean Marie
Constant Duhamel (1797–1872) had already obtained
similar results for the study of heat in solids. Stokes
continued his investigations, looking into the internal friction
in fluids in motion. After he had deduced the correct
equations of motion, Stokes discovered that again he was not
the first to obtain the equations, since Claude Louis Marie
Henri Navier (1785–1836), Poisson and Adhe´mar Jean
Claude Barre´ de Saint-Venant (1797–1886) had already
considered the problem. Stokes decided that his results were
sufficiently different and published the work in 1845. Today
the fundamental equation of hydrodynamics is called the
Navier–Stokes equations. The viscous flowin slowmotion is
called Stokes flow. The mathematical theoremthat carries his
name, Stokes theorem, first appeared in print in 1854 as an
examination question for the Smith’s Prize. It is not known
whether any student could answer the question at that time.
In 1849 Stokes was appointed the Lucasian Professor of
Mathematics at Cambridge, the chair Newton once held. In
1851 Stokes was elected to the Royal Society, and was
awarded the Rumford Medal in 1852. He was appointed
Secretary of the Society in 1854, which he held until 1885.
He was the President of the Society from 1885 to 1890.
Stokes received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society in
1893, and served as the Master of Pembroke College in
1902–1903 [128].
5. Integral equations
Inspired by the use of influence functions as a method for
solving problems of beam deflection subject to distributed
load, Fredholm started the investigation of integral
equations 73. Fredholm [67] proved in 1903 the existence
and uniqueness of solution of the linear integral equation
m(x) Kl
_
b
a
K(x; x)m(x)dx Zf (x); a%x%b (26)
where l is a constant, f(x) and K(x,x) are given continuous
functions, and m(x) is the solution sought. Eq. (26) is known
as the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind.
By the virtue of the above Fredholm theorem, we can
solve the Dirichlet problems by the following formula [161]
f(x) ZH2pm(x) C
__
G
K(x; x)m(x)dS(x); x2G (27)
In the above the upper sign corresponds to the interior
problem, the lower sign the exterior problem, m is the
distribution density, G is a closed Liapunov surface, f(x) is
the Dirichlet boundary condition, and the kernel K is given
by
K(x; x) Z
v
vn(x)
1
r(x; x)
_ _
(28)
The kernel is known as a dipole, or a ‘double-layer
potential’. The Fredholm theorem guarantees the existence
and uniqueness of m. Once the distribution density m is
solved from (27) by some technique, the full solution of the
boundary value problem is given by
f(x) Z
__
G
v[1=r(x; x)]
vn(x)
m(x)dS(x); x2U (29)
which is a continuous distribution of the double-layer
potential on the boundary.
For the Neumann problem, we can utilize the following
boundary equation:
vf(x)
vn(x)
ZG2ps(x) C
__
G
K(x; x)s(x)dS(x); x2G (30)
Here again the upper and lower sign, respectively,
corresponds to the interior and exterior problems, s is the
distribution density, G is the bounding Liapunov surface,
vf/vn is the Neumann boundary condition, and the kernel is
given by
K(x; x) Z
v
vn(x)
1
r(x; x)
_ _
(31)
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After solving for s, the potential for the whole domain is
given by
f(x) Z
__
G
1
r(x; x)
s(x)dS(x); x2U (32)
which is the distribution of the source, or the ‘single-layer
potential’, on the boundary. Fredholm suggested a dis-
cretization procedure to solve the above equations.
However, without a fast enough computer to solve the
resultant matrix system, the idea was impractical; hence
further development of utilizing these equations was limited
to analytical work.
For mixed boundary value problems, a pair of integral
equations is needed. For the ‘single-layer method’ applied
to interior problems, the following pair
f(x) Z
__
G
1
r(x; x)
s(x)dS(x); x2G
f
(33)
vf(x)
vn(x)
Z
__
CPV
v[1=r(x; x)]
vn(x)
s(x)dS(x); x2G
q
(34)
can be, respectively, applied on the Dirichlet part G
f
and
the Neumann part G
q
of the boundary. We notice that (33)
contains a weak (integrable) singularity as x/x; while
(34) contains a strong (non-integrable) singularity. The
integral in (34) needs to be interpreted in the ‘Cauchy
principal value’ sense, which is denoted as CPV under the
integral sign. On a smooth part of the boundary not
containing edges and corners, the result of the Cauchy
principle value limit is just (30). This idea of interpreting
and handling this type of strong singularity was
introduced by Cauchy in 1814 [34].
A ‘double-layer method’ can also be formulated to solve
mixed boundary value problems using the following pair of
equations
f(x) Z
__
CPV
v[1=r(x; x)]
vn(x)
m(x)dS(x); x2G (35)
vf(x)
vn(x)
Z
__
HFP
v
vn(x)
v1=r(x; x)
vn(x)
_ _
m(x)dS(x); x2G (36)
The integral in (36) contains a ‘hypersingularity’ and is
marked with HFP under the integral sign, standing for
‘Hadamard finite part.’ This concept was introduced by
Jacques Salomon Hadamard (1865–1963) in 1908 [85].
In boundary element terminology, the single- and
double-layer methods are referred to as the ‘indirect
methods,’ because the distribution density m or s, not the
potential f itself, is solved. The numerical method based on
Green’s third identity (25), which solves f or vf/vn on the
boundary, is called the ‘direct method’.
It is of interest to mention that for a Dirichlet problem,
the single-layer method reduces to using (33) only. Eq. (33)
however is a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind,
whose solution is unstable [175]. In that case, the second
kind equation, (27) or (35), should be used.
Similar integral representation exists in the complex
variable domain. Cauchy in 1825 [35] presented one of the
most important theorems in complex variable—the Cauchy
integral theorem, from which came the Cauchy integral
formula, expressed as
f (z) Z
1
2pi
_
C
f (z)
z Kz
dz (37)
where z and z are complex variables, f is an analytic
function, and C is a smooth, closed contour in the complex
plane. When z is located on the contour, z2C, Eq. (37) can
be exploited for the numerical solution of boundary value
problems, a procedure known as the complex variable
boundary element method.
5.1. Cauchy
Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1789–1857) was born in Paris
duringthe difficult time of FrenchRevolution. Cauchy’s father
was active in the education of young Augustin-Louis. Laplace
and Lagrange were frequent visitors at the Cauchy family
home, and Lagrange particularly took interest in Cauchy’s
mathematical ability. In 1805 Cauchy took the entrance
examination of the Ecole Polytechnique and was placed
second. In 1807 he entered Ecole des Ponts et Chausse´es to
study engineering, specializing in highways and bridges, and
finished school in2years. At the age of 20, he was appointed as
a Junior Engineer to work on the construction of Port
Napole´on in Cherbourg. He worked there for 3 years and
performed excellently. In 1812, he became ill and decided to
returned to Paris to seek a teaching position.
Cauchy’s initial attempts in seeking academic appoint-
ment were unsuccessful. Although he continued to publish
important pieces of mathematical work, he lost to Legendre,
to Louis Poinsot (1777–1859), and to Andre´ Marie Ampe`re
(1775–1836) in competition for academic positions. In 1814
he published the memoir on definite integrals that later
became the basis of his theory of complex functions. In
1815 Cauchy lost out to Jacques Philippe Marie Binet
(1786–1856) for a mechanics chair at the Ecole Poly-
technique, but then he was finally appointed Assistant
Professor of Analysis there. In 1816 he won the Grand Prix
of the Acade´mie des Sciences for a work on waves, and was
later admitted to the Acade´mie. In 1817, he was able to
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 279
substitute for Jean-Baptiste Biot (1774–1862), Chair of
Mathematical Physics at the Colle`ge de France, and later for
Poisson. It was not until 1821 that he was able to obtain a
full position replacing Ampe`re.
Cauchy was staunchly Catholic and was politically a
royalist. By 1830 the political events in Paris forced him to
leave Paris for Switzerland. He soon lost all his positions in
Paris. In 1831 Cauchy went to Turin and later accepted an
offer to become a Chair of Theoretical Physics. In 1833
Cauchy went from Turin to Prague, and returned to Paris in
1838. He regained his position at the Acade´mie but not his
teaching positions because he had refused to take an oath of
allegiance to the new regime. Due to his political and
religious views, he continued to have difficulty in getting
appointment.
Cauchy was probably next to Euler the most published
author in mathematics, having produced five textbooks and
over 800 articles. Cauchy and his contemporary Gauss were
credited for introducing rigor into modern mathematics. It
was said that when Cauchy read to the Acade´mie des
Sciences in Paris his first paper on the convergence of series,
Laplace hurried home to verify that he had not made mistake
of using any divergence series in his Me´canique Ce´leste. The
formulation of elementary calculus in modern textbooks is
essentially what Cauchy expounded in his three great
treatises: Cours d’Analyse de l’E
´
cole Royale Polytechnique
(1821), Re´sume´ des Lec¸ons sur le Calcul Infinite´simal
(1823), and Lec¸ons sur le Calcul Diffe´rentiel (1829). Cauchy
was also credited for setting the mathematical foundation for
complex variable and elasticity. The basic equation of
elasticity is called the Navier–Cauchy equation [8,79].
5.2. Hadamard
Jacques Salomon Hadamard (1865–1963) began his
schooling at the Lyce´e Charlemagne in Paris, where his
father taught. In his first few years at school he was not good
at mathematics; he wrote in 1936: ‘.in arithmetic, until the
fifth grade, I was last or nearly last’. It was a good
mathematics teacher turned him around. In 1884 Hadamard
was placed first in the entrance examination for E
´
cole
Normale Supe´rieure, where he obtained his doctorate in
1892. His thesis on functions of a complex variable was one
of the first to examine the general theory of analytic
functions, in particular it contained the first general work on
singularities. In the same year Hadamard received the Grand
Prix des Sciences Mathe´matique for his paper
‘Determination of the number of primes less than a given
number’. The topic proposed for the prize, concerning
filling gaps in work of Bernhard Riemann (1826–1866) on
zeta functions, had been put forward by Charles Hermite
(1822–1901) with his friend Thomas Jan Stieltjes (1856–
1894) in mind to win it. However, Stieltjes discovered a gap
in his proof and never submitted an entry. The next 4 years
Hadamard was first a lecturer at Bordeaux, and then
promoted to Professor of Astronomy and Rational Mech-
anics in 1896. During this time he published his famous
determinant inequality; matrices satisfying this relation are
today called Hadamard matrices, which are important in the
theory of integral equations, coding theory, and other areas.
In 1897 Hadamard resigned his chair in Bordeaux and
moved to Paris to take up posts in Sorbonne and Colle`ge de
France. His research turned more toward mathematical
physics; yet he always argued strongly that he was a
mathematician, not a physicist. His famous 1898 work on
geodesics on surfaces of negative curvature laid the
foundations of symbolic dynamics. Among the other topics
he considered were elasticity, geometrical optics, hydro-
dynamics and boundary value problems. He introduced the
concept of a well-posed initial value and boundary value
problem. Hadamard continued to receive prizes for his
research and was honored in 1906 with the election as the
President of the French Mathematical Society. In 1909 he
was appointed to the Chair of Mechanics at the Colle`ge de
France. In the following year he published Lec¸ons sur le
calcul des variations, which helped lay the foundations of
functional analysis (the word ‘functional’ was introduced by
him). Then in 1912 he was appointed as Professor of
Analysis at the E
´
cole Polytechnique. Near the end of 1912
Hadamard was elected to the Academy of Sciences to
succeed Poincare´. After the start of World War II, when
France fell to Germany in 1940, Hadamard, being a Jew,
escaped to the United States where he was appointed to a
visiting position at Columbia University. He left America in
1944 and spent a year in England before returning to Paris
after the end of the war. He was lauded as one of the last
universal mathematicians whose contributions broadly span
the fields of mathematics. He lived to 98 year old [118,128].
5.3. Fredholm
Erik Ivar Fredholm (1866–1927) was born in Stockholm,
Sweden. After his baccalaureate, Fredholm enrolled in 1886
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at the University of Uppsala, which was the only doctorate
granting university in Sweden at that time. Through an
arrangement he studied under Magnus Go¨sta Mittag-Leffler
(1846–1927) at the newly founded University of Stockholm,
and acquired his PhD from the University of Uppsala in
1893. Fredholm’s first publication ‘On a special class of
functions’ came in 1890. It so impressed Mittag-Leffler that
he sent a copy of the paper to Poincare´. In 1898 he received
the degree of Doctor of Science from the same university.
Fredholm is best remembered for his work on integral
equations and spectral theory. Although Vito Volterra
(1860–1940) before him had studied the integral equation
theory, it was Fredholm who provided a more thorough
treatment. This work was accomplished during the months
of 1899 which Fredholm spent in Paris studying the
Dirichlet problem with Poincare´, Charles Emile Picard
(1856–1941), and Hadamard. In 1900 a preliminary report
was published and the work was completed in 1903 [67].
Fredholm’s contributions quickly became well known.
Hilbert immediately saw the importance and extended
Fredholm’s work to include a complete eigenvalue theory
for the Fredholm integral equation. This work led directly to
the theory of Hilbert spaces.
After receiving his Doctor of Science degree, Fredholm
was appointed as a Lecturer in mathematical physics at the
University of Stockholm. He spent his whole career at the
University of Stockholm being appointed to a chair in
mechanics and mathematical physics in 1906. In 1909–1910
he was Pro-Dean and then Dean in Stockholm University.
Fredholm wrote papers with great care and attention so
he produced work of high quality that quickly gained him a
high reputation throughout Europe. However, his papers
required so much effort that he wrote only a few. In fact, his
Complete Works in mathematics comprises of only 160
pages. After 1910 he wrote little beyond revisiting his
earlier work [128].
6. Extended Green’s formula
Green’s formula (25), originally designed to solve
electrostatic problems, was such a success that the idea
was followed to solve many other physical problems [166].
For example, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz
(1821–1894) in his study of acoustic problems presented the
following equation in 1860 [87], known as the Helmholtz
equation
V
2
fCk
2
f Z0 (38)
where k is a constant known as the wave number. He also
derived the fundamental solution of (38) as
f Z
cos kr
r
(39)
In the same paper he established the equivalent Green’s
formula
f Z
1
4p
__
G
cos kr
r
vf
vn
Kf
v
vn
cos kr
r
_ _ _ _
dS (40)
which can be compared to (25).
For elasticity, an important step toward deriving Green’s
formula was made by Enrico Betti (1823–1892) in 1872,
when he introduced the reciprocity theorem, one of the most
celebrated relation in mechanics [10]. The theory can be
stated as follows: given two independent elastic states in a
static equilibrium, (u, t, F) and (u
/
, t
/
, F
/
), where u and u
/
are displacement vectors, t and t
/
are tractions on a closed
surface G, and F and F
/
are body forces in the enclosed
region U, they satisfy the following reciprocal relation
__
G
(t
/
$u Kt$u
/
)dS Z
___
U
(F$u
/
KF
/
$u)dV (41)
The above theorem, known as the Betti–Maxwell recipro-
city theorem, was a generalization of the reciprocal
principle derived earlier by Maxwell [117] applied to
trusses. John William Strutt (Lord Rayleigh) (1842–1919)
further generalized the above theorem to elastodynamics in
the frequency domain, and also extended the forces and
displacements concept to generalized forces and general-
ized displacements [136,137].
In the same sequence of papers [10,11], Betti presented
the fundamental solution known as the center of dilatation
[114]
u
+
Z
1 K2n
8pG(1 Kn)
V
1
r
_ _
(42)
where G is the shear modulus, and n is the Poisson ratio. The
use of (42) in (41) produced the integral representation for
dilatation
e ZV$u Z
__
G
(t$u
+
Kt
+
$u)dS C
___
U
F$u
+
dV (43)
where t
*
is the boundary traction vector of the fundamental
solution (42).
The more useful formula that gives the integral equation
representation of displacements, rather than dilatation,
requires the fundamental solution of a point force in infinite
space, which was provided by Kelvin in 1848 [101]
u
+
ij
Z
1
16pG(1 Kn)
1
r
x
i
x
j
r
2
C(3 K4n)d
ij
_ _
(44)
where d
ij
is the Kronecker delta. In the above we have
switched to the tensor notation, and the second index in u
*
ij
indicates the direction of the applied point force. Utilizing
(44), Carlo Somigliana (1860–1955) in 1885 [157] devel-
oped the following integral representation for displacements
u
j
Z
__
G
(t
i
u
+
ij
Kt
+
ij
u
i
)dS C
___
U
F
i
u
+
ij
dV (45)
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 281
Eq. (45), called the Somigliana identity, is the elasticity
counterpart of Green’s formula (25).
Volterra [183] in 1907 presented the dislocation solution
of elasticity, as well as other singular solutions such as
the force double and the disclination, generally known as the
nuclei of strain [114]. Further dislocation solutions were
given by Somigliana in 1914 [158] and 1915 [159]. For a
point dislocation in unbounded three-dimensional space, the
resultant displacement field is
u
+
ijk
Z
1
4p(1 Kn)
!
1
r
2
(1 K2n)(d
kj
x
i
Kd
ij
x
k
Kd
ik
x
j
) K
2
r
2
x
i
x
j
x
k
_ _
(46)
This singular solution can be distributed over the boundary
G to give the Volterra integral equation of the first kind
[182]
u
k
Z
__
G
u
+
kji
n
j
m
i
dS C
___
U
u
+
ki
F
i
dV (47)
where m
i
is the component of the distribution density vector
m, also known as the displacement discontinuity. Eq. (47) is
equivalent to (35) of the potential problem, and can be called
the double-layer method. The counterpart of the single-layer
method (33) is given by the Somigliana integral equation
u
j
Z
__
G
u
+
ji
s
i
dS C
___
U
u
+
ji
F
i
dV (48)
where s
i
is the component of the distribution density vector
s, known as the stress discontinuity.
Similar to Cauchy integral (37) for potential problems,
the complex variable potentials and integral equation
representation for elasticity exist, which was formulated
by Gury Vasilievich Kolosov (1867–1936) in 1909 [102].
These were further developed by Nikolai Ivanovich
Muskhelishvili (1891–1976) [125,126].
We can derive the above extended Green’s formulae in a
unified fashion. Consider the generalized Green’s theorem
[123]
_
U
(vL¦u¦ KuL
+
¦v¦)dx Z
_
G
(vB¦u¦ KuB
+
¦v¦)dx (49)
In the above u and v are two independent vector functions, L
is a linear partial differential operator, L
+
is its adjoint
operator, B is the generalized boundary normal derivative,
and B
+
is its adjoint operator. The right hand side of (49) is
the consequence of integration by parts of the left hand side
operators. Eq. (49) may be compared with the Green’s
second identify (24). If we assume that u is the solution of
the homogeneous equations
L(u) Z0 in U (50)
subject to certain boundary conditions, and v is replaced by
the fundamental solution of the adjoint operator satisfying
L
+
¦G¦ Zd (51)
Eq. (49) becomes the boundary integral equation
u Z
_
G
(uB
+
¦G¦ KGB¦u¦)dx (52)
As an example, we consider the general second order linear
partial differential equation is two-dimension
L¦u¦ ZA
v
2
u
vx
2
C2B
v
2
u
vxvy
CC
v
2
u
vy
2
CD
vu
vx
CE
vu
vy
CFu
(53)
where the coefficients A,B,., and F are functions of x and y.
The generalized Green’s second identity in the form of (49)
exists with the definition of the operators [83]
L
+
¦v¦ Z
v
2
Av
vx
2
C2
v
2
Bv
vxvy
C
v
2
Cv
vy
2
K
vDv
vx
K
vEv
vy
CFv
(54)
B¦u¦ Z A
vu
vx
C2B
vu
vy
_ _
n
x
C C
vu
vy
CEu
_ _
n
y
(55)
B
+
¦v¦ Z
vAv
vx
KDv
_ _
n
x
C 2
vBv
vx
C
vCv
vy
_ _
n
y
(56)
If we require u and v to satisfy (50) and (51), respectively,
we then obtain the boundary integral equation formulation
(52).
6.1. Helmholtz
Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821–1894)
was born in Potsdam, Germany. He attended Potsdam
Gymnasium where his father was a teacher. His interests at
school were mainly in physics. However, due to the financial
situation of his family, he accepted a government grant to
study medicine at the Royal Friedrich-Wilhelm Institute of
Medicine and Surgery in Berlin. His research career began in
1841 when he worked on the connection between nerve fibers
and nerve cells for his dissertation. He rejected the dominant
physiology theory at that time, which was based on vital
forces, and strongly argued on the ground of physics and
chemistry principles. He graduated from the Medical
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Institute in 1843 and had to serve as a military doctor for 10
years. He spent all his spare time doing research.
In 1847 he published the important paper ‘Uber die
Erhaltung der Kraft’ that established the lawof conservation
of energy. In the following year, Helmholtz was released
from his obligation as an army doctor and became an
Assistant Professor and Director of the Physiological
Institute at Ko¨nigsberg. In 1855, he was appointed to the
Chair of Anatomy and Physiology in Bonn. Although at this
time Helmholtz had gained a world reputation, complaints
were made to the Ministry of Education from traditionalist
that his lectures on anatomy were incompetent. Helmholtz
reacted strongly to these criticisms and moved to Heidelberg
in 1857 to set up a newPhysiology Institute. Some of his most
important work was carried out during this time.
In 1858 Helmholtz published his important paper on the
motion of a perfect fluid by decomposing it into translation,
rotation and deformation. His study on vortex tube played
an important role in the later study of turbulence in
hydrodynamics, and knot theory in topology. Helmholtz
also studied mathematical physics and acoustics, producing
in 1863 ‘On the Sensation of Tone as a Physiological Basis
for the Theory of Music’ [88]. From around 1866 Helmholtz
began to move away from physiology and toward physics.
When the Chair of Physics in Berlin became vacant in 1871,
he was able to negotiate a new Physics Institute under his
control. In 1883, he was ennobled by William I. In 1888, he
was appointed as the first President of the Physikalisch-
Technische Reichsanstalt at Berlin, a post that he held until
his death in 1894 [32,128,192].
6.2. Betti
Enrico Betti (1823–1892) studied mathematics and
physics at the University of Pisa. He graduated in 1846 and
was appointed as an assistant at the university. In 1849 Betti
returned to his home town of Pistoia where he became a
teacher of mathematics at a secondary school. In 1854 he
moved to Florence where again he taught in a secondary
school. He was appointed as Professor of Higher Algebra at
the University of Pisa in 1857. In the following year Betti
visited the mathematical centres of Europe, including
Go¨ ttingen, Berlin, and Paris, making many important
mathematical contacts. In particular, in Go¨ttingen Betti met
and became friendly with Riemann. Back in Pisa he moved in
1859 to the Chair of Analysis and Higher Geometry.
During those days the political and military events in
Italy were intensifying as the country came nearer to
unification. In 1859 there was a war with Austria and by
1861 the Kingdom of Italy was formally created. Betti
served the government of the new country as a member of
Parliament. In 1863 Riemann left his post as Professor of
Mathematics at Go¨ttingen and move to Pisa, hoping that
warmer weather would cure his tuberculosis. Influenced by
his friend Riemann, Betti started to work on potential theory
and elasticity. His famous theory of reciprocity in elasticity
was published in 1872.
Over quite a number of years Betti mixed political service
with service for his university. He served a term as Rector of
the University of Pisa and in 1846 became the Director of its
teacher’s college, the Scuola Normale Superiore, a position
he held until his death. Under his leadership the Scuola
Normale Superiore in Pisa became the leading Italian centre
for mathematical research and education. He served as an
Undersecretary of State for education for a fewmonths, and a
Senator in the Italian Parliament in 1884 [128].
6.3. Kelvin
William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) (1824–1907) was well
prepared by his father, James Thomson, Professor of
Mathematics at the University of Glasgow, for his career.
He attended Glasgow University at the age of 10, and later
entered Cambridge University at 17. It was expected that he
would won the senior wrangler position at graduation; but to
his and his father’s disappointment, he finished the second
wrangler in 1845. The fierce competition of the ‘tripos’, an
honors examination instituted at Cambridge in 1824,
attracted many best young minds to Cambridge in those
days. Among Thomson’s contemporaries were Stokes, a
senior wrangler in 1841, and Maxwell, a second wrangler in
1854. In 1846 the Chair of Natural Philosophy in Glasgow
became vacant. Thomson’s father ran a successful campaign
to get his son elected to the chair at the age of 22.
Thomson was foremost among the small group of British
scientists who helped to lay the foundations of modern
physics. His contributions to science included a major role
in the development of the second law of thermodynamics,
the absolute temperature scale (measured in ‘kelvins’), the
dynamical theory of heat, the mathematical analysis of
electricity and magnetism, including the basic ideas for the
electromagnetic theory of light, the geophysical
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determination of the age of the Earth, and fundamental work
in hydrodynamics. His theoretical work on submarine
telegraphy and his inventions of mirror-galvanometer for
use on submarine cables aided Britain in laying the
transatlantic cable, thus gaining the lead in world com-
munication. His participation in the telegraph cable project
earned him the knighthood in 1866, and a large personal
fortune [151,167].
6.4. Rayleigh
John William Strutt (Lord Rayleigh) (1842–1919) was
the eldest son of the second Baron Rayleigh. After studying
in a private school without showing extraordinary signs of
scientific capability, he entered Trinity College, Cambridge,
in 1861. As an undergraduate, he was coached by Edward
John Routh (1831–1907), who had the reputation of being
an outstanding teacher in mathematics and mechanics.
Rayleigh (a title he did not inherit until he was thirty years
old) was greatly influence by Routh, as well as by Stokes.
He graduated in 1865 with top honors garnering not only the
Senior Wrangler title, but also the first Smith’s prizeman.
Rayleigh was faced with a difficult decision: knowing that
he would succeed to the title of the third Baron Rayleigh,
taking up a scientific career was not really acceptable to the
members of his family. By this time, however, Rayleigh was
determined to devote his life to science so that his social
obligations would not stand in his way.
In 1866, Rayleigh was elected to a fellowship of Trinity
College. Around that time he read Helmholtz’ book On the
Sensations of Tone [88], and became interested in acoustics.
Rayleigh was married in 1871, and had to give up his
fellowship at Trinity. In 1872, Rayleigh had an attack of
rheumatic fever and was advised to travel to Egypt for his
health. He took his wife and several relatives sailed down
the Nile during the last months of 1872, returning to
England in the spring of 1873. It was during that trip that he
started his work on the famous two volume treatise The
Theory of Sound [137], eventually published in 1877.
Rayleigh’s father died in 1873. He became the third
Baron Rayleigh and had to devote part of his time
supervising the estate. In 1879, Maxwell died, and Rayleigh
was elected to the vacated post of Cavendish Professor of
Experimental Physics at Cambridge. At the end of 1884,
Rayleigh resigned his Cambridge professorship and settled
in his estate. There in his self-funded laboratory he
continued his intensive scientific work to the end of his
life. Rayleigh made many important scientific contributions
including the first correct light scattering theory that
explained why the sky is blue, the theory of soliton, the
surface wave known as Rayleigh wave, the hydrodynamic
similarity theory, and the Rayleigh–Ritz method in
elasticity. In 1904 Rayleigh won a Nobel Prize for his
1895 discovery of argon gas. He also served many public
functions including being the President of the London
Mathematical Society (1876–1878), President of the
Royal Society of London (1905–1908), and Chancellor of
Cambridge University (1908 until his death) [138,168].
6.5. Volterra
Vito Volterra (1860–1940) was born in Ancona, Italy, a
city on the Adriatic Sea. When Volterra was 2-year old, his
father died and he was raised by his uncle. Volterra began
his studies at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of the
University of Florence in 1878. In the following year he
won a competition to become a student at the Scuola
Normale Superiore di Pisa. In 1882, he graduated with a
doctorate in physics at the University of Pisa. Among his
teachers were Betti, who held the Chair of Rational
Mechanics. Betti was impressed by his student that upon
graduation he appointed Volterra his assistant. In 1883
Volterra was given a Professorship in Rational Mechanics at
Pisa. Following Betti’s death in 1892 he was also in charge
of mathematical physics. From 1893 until 1900 he held the
Chair of Rational Mechanics at the University of Torino. In
1900 he moved to the University of Rome, succeeding
Eugenio Beltrami (1835–1900) as Professor of Mathemat-
ical Physics. Volterra’s work encompassed integral
equations, the theory of functions of a line (later called
functionals after Hadamard), the theory of elasticity,
integro-differential equations, the description of hereditary
phenomena in physics, and mathematical biology. Begin-
ning in 1912, Volterra regularly lectured at the Sorbonne in
Paris.
In 1922, when the Fascists seized power in Italy,
Volterra—a Senator of the Kingdom of Italy since 1905—
was one of the few who spoke out against fascism,
especially the proposed changes to the educational system.
At that time (1923–1926) he was President of the
Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, and he was regarded as
the most eminent man of science in Italy. As a direct result
of his unwavering stand, especially his signing of
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the ‘Intellectual’s Declaration’ against fascism in 1926 and,
5 years later, his refusal to swear the oath of allegiance to the
fascist government imposed on all university professors,
Volterra was dismissed from his chair at the University of
Rome in 1931. In the following year he was deprived of all
his memberships in the scientific academies and cultural
institutes in Italy. From that time on he lectured and
lived mostly abroad, in Paris, in Spain, and in other
European countries. Volterra died in isolation on October
11, 1940 [28].
6.6. Somigliana
Carlo Somigliana (1860–1955) began his university
study at Pavia, where he was a student of Beltrami. Later he
transferred to Pisa and had Betti among his teachers, and
Volterra among his contemporaries. He graduated from
Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa in 1881. In 1887
Somigliana began teaching as an assistant at the University
of Pavia. In 1892, as the result of a competition, he was
appointed as University Professor of Mathematical Physics.
Somigliana was called to Turin in 1903 to become the Chair
of Mathematical Physics. He held the post until his
retirement in 1935, and moved to live in Milan. During
the World War II, his apartment in Milan was destroyed.
After the war he retreated to his family villa in Casanova
Lanza and stayed active in research until near his death in
1955.
Somigliana was a classical physicist–mathematician
faithful to the school of Betti and Beltrami. He made
important contributions in elasticity. The Somigliana
integral equation for elasticity is the equivalent of Green’s
formula for potential theory. He is also known for the
Somigliana dislocations. His other contributions included
seismic wave propagation and gravimetry [173].
6.7. Kolosov
Gury Vasilievich Kolosov (1867–1936) was educated at
the University of St Petersburg. After working at Yurev
University from 1902 to 1913, he returned to St Petersburg
where he spent the rest of his career. He studied the
mechanics of solid bodies and the theory of elasticity,
particularly the complex variable theory. In 1907 Kolosov
derived the solution for stresses around an elliptical hole. It
showed that the concentration of stress became far greater as
the radius of curvature at an end becomes small compared
with the overall length of the hole. Engineers needed to
understand the issue of stress concentration in order to keep
their design safe [128].
7. Pre-electronic computer era
Numerical efforts solving boundary value problems
predate the emergence of digital computers. One important
contribution is the Ritz method, proposed by Walter Ritz
(1878–1909) in 1908 [140]. When applied to subdomains,
the Ritz method is considered to be the forerunner of the
Finite Element Method [194]. Ritz’ idea involves the use of
variational method and trial functions to find approximate
solutions of boundary value problems. For example, for the
following functional
PZ
___
U
1
2
(Vf)
2
dV K
__
G
vf
vn
(fKf )dS (57)
finding its stationary value by variational method leads to
dPZK
___
U
dfV
2
f dV K
__
G
d
vf
vn
_ _
(fKf )dS Z0 (58)
Since the variation is arbitrary, the above equation is
equivalent to the statement of Dirichlet problem
V
2
f Z0 in U (59)
and
f Zf (x) on G (60)
Ritz proposed to approximate f using a set of trial functions
j
i
by the finite series
fz

n
iZ1
a
i
j
i
(61)
where a
i
are constant coefficients to be determined. Eq. (61)
is substituted into the functional (57) and the variation is
taken with respect to the n unknown coefficients a
i
. The
domain and boundary integration were performed, often in
the subdomains, to produce numerical values. This leads to
a linear system that can be solved for a
i
. The above
procedure involves the integration over the solution domain;
hence it is considered as a domain method, not a boundary
method.
Based on the same idea, Erich Trefftz (1888–1937) in his
1926 article ‘A counterpart to Ritz method’ [171,172]
devised the boundary method, known as the Trefftz method.
Utilizing Green’s first identity (23), we can write (57) in an
alternate form
PZK
___
U
1
2
fV
2
f dV K
__
G
vf
vn
1
2
fKf
_ _
dS (62)
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 285
In making the approximation (61), Trefftz proposed to use
trial functions j
i
that satisfy the governing differential
equation
V
2
j
i
Z0 (63)
but not necessarily the boundary condition. For Laplace
equation, these could be the harmonic polynomials
j
i
Z¦1; x; y; z; x
2
Ky
2
; y
2
Kz
2
; z
2
Kx
2
; xy; yz; .¦ (64)
With the substitution of (61) into (62), the domain integral
vanishes, and the functional is approximated as
PzK
__
G

n
iZ1
a
i
vj
i
vn
1
2

n
iZ1
a
i
j
i
Kf
_ _
dS (65)
Taking variation of (65) with respect to the undetermined
coefficients a
j
, and setting each part associated with the
variations da
j
to zero, we obtain the linear system

n
iZ1
a
ij
a
i
Zb
j
; j Z1; .; n (66)
where
a
ij
Z
1
2
__
G
vj
i
j
j
vn
dS (67)
b
j
Z
__
G
f
vj
j
vn
dS (68)
Eq. (66) can be solved for a
i
.
The above procedure requires the integration of functions
over the solution boundary. In the present day Trefftz
method, a simpler procedure is often taken. Rather than
minimizing the functional over the whole boundary, one can
enforce the boundary condition on a finite set of boundary
points x
j
such that
f(x
j
) z

n
iZ1
a
i
j
i
(x
j
) Zf (x
j
); j Z1; .; n and x
j
2G
(69)
This is a point collocation method and there is no integration
involved. Eq. (69) can also be derived from a weighted
residual formulation using Dirac delta function as the test
function.
Following the same spirit of the Trefftz method, one can
use the fundamental solution as the trial function. Since
fundamental solution satisfies the governing equation as
L¦G(x; x
/
)¦ Zd(x; x
/
) (70)
where L is a linear partial differential operator, G is the
fundamental solution of that operator, and d is the Dirac
delta function. It is obvious that the approximate solution
f(x) z

n
iZ1
a
i
G(x; x
i
); x2U; x
i
;U (71)
satisfies the governing equation as long as the source points
x
i
are placed outside of the domain. To ensure that the
boundary condition is satisfied, again the point collocation
is applied:
f(x
j
) z

n
iZ1
a
i
G(x
j
; x
i
) Zf (x
j
); j Z1; .; n and x
j
2G
(72)
This is called the method of fundamental solutions.
The superposition of fundamental solutions is a well
known solution technique in fluid mechanics for exterior
domain problems. William John Macquorn Rankine (1820–
1872) in 1864 [135] showed that the superposition of
sources and sinks along an axis, combining with a rectilinear
flow, created the field of uniform flow around closed bodies,
known as Rankine bodies. Various combinations were
experimented to create different body shapes. However,
there was no direct control over the shape. It took Theodore
von Ka´rma´n (1881–1963) in 1927 [184] to propose a
collocation procedure to create the arbitrarily desirable body
shapes. He distributed nC1 sources and sinks of unknown
strengths along the axis of an axisymmetric body, adding to
a rectilinear flow
f(x) zUx C

nC1
iZ1
s
i
4pr(x; x
i
)
(73)
where U is the uniform flow velocity, x
i
are points on x-axis,
and s
i
are source/sink strengths. The strengths can be
determined by forcing the normal flux to vanish at n
specified points on the meridional trace of the axisymmetric
body. An auxiliary condition

nC1
iZ1
s
i
Z0 (74)
is needed to ensure the closure of the body. In fact, other
singularities, such as doublets (dipoles) and vortices, can be
distributed inside a body to create flow around arbitrarily
shaped two- and three-dimensional bodies [174].
In 1930 von Ka´rma´n [185] further proposed the
distribution of singularity along a line inside a two-
dimensional streamlined body to generate the potential
f(x) ZK
_
L
ln r(x; x)s(x)ds(x); x2U
e
(75)
where f is the perturbed potential from the uniform flow
field, s is the distribution density, L is a line inside the body,
and U
e
is the external domain (Fig. 3a). For vanishing
potential at infinity, the following auxiliary condition is
needed
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 286
_
L
s(x)ds(x) Z0 (76)
To find the distribution density, Neumann boundary
condition is enforced on a set of discrete points x
i
, iZ
1,.n, on the surface of the body
vf(x
i
)
vn(x
i
)
ZK
_
L
v ln r(x
i
; x)
vn(x
i
)
s(x)ds(x); x
i
2C (77)
where C is the boundary contour (Fig. 3a).
Prager [134] in 1928 proposed a different idea: vortices
are distributed on the surface of a streamlined body (Fig. 3b)
to generate the desirable potential. When this is written in
terms of stream function j, the integral equation becomes
j(x) ZK
_
C
ln r(x; x)s(x)ds(x); x2U
e
(78)
In this case, Dirichlet condition is enforced on the surface of
the body.
Lotz [113] in 1932 proposed the discretization of
Fredholm integral equation of the second kind on the
surface of an axisymmetric body for solving external flow
problems. The method was further developed by Vandrey
[177,178] in 1951 and 1960. Other early efforts in solving
potential flows around obstacles, prior to the invention of
electronic computers, can be found in a review [90].
In 1937 Muskhelishvili [124] derived the complex
variable equations for elasticity and suggested to solve
them numerically. The actual numerical implementation
was accomplished in 1940 by Gorgidze and Rukhadze [78]
in a procedure that resembled the present-day BEM: it
divided the contour into elements, approximated the
function within the elements, and formed a linear algebraic
system consisting the unknown coefficients.
The above review demonstrates that finding approximate
solutions of boundary value problems using boundary or
boundary-like discretization is not a new idea. These early
attempts of Trefftz, von Ka´rma´n, and Muskhelishvili existed
before the electronic computers. However, despite these
heroic attempts, without the aid of modern computing tools
these calculations had to be performed by human or
mechanical computers. The drudgery of computation was
a hindrance for their further development; hence these
methods remained dormant for a while and had to wait for a
later date to be rediscovered.
7.1. Ritz
Walter Ritz (1878–1909) was born in Sion in the southern
Swiss canton of Valais. As a specially gifted student, the
young Ritz excelled academically at the Lyce`e communal of
Sion. In 1897 he entered the Polytechnic School of Zurich
where he began studies in engineering. He soon found that
he could not live with the approximations and compromises
involved with engineering, so he switched to the more
mathematically exacting studies in physics, where Albert
Einstein (1879–1955) was one of his classmates. In 1901 he
transferred to Go¨ttingen, where his rising aspirations were
strongly influenced by Woldemar Voigt (1850–1919) and
Hilbert. Ritz’s dissertation on spectroscopic theory led to
what is known as the Ritz combination principle. In the next
few years he continued his work on radiation, magnetism,
electrodynamics, and variational method. But in 1904 his
health failed and he returned to Zurich. During the following
3 years, Ritz unsuccessfully tried to regain his health and
was outside the scientific centers. In 1908 he relocated to
Go¨ttingen where he qualified as a Privat Dozent. There he
produced his opus magnum Recherches critiques sur
l’E
´
lectrodynamique Ge´ne´rale. In 1908–1909 Ritz and
Einstein held a war in Physikalische Zeitschrift over the
proper way to mathematically represent black-body radi-
ation and over the theoretical origin of the second law of
thermodynamics. The debated was judged to Ritz’s favor.
Six weeks after the publication of this series, Ritz died at the
age of 31, leaving behind a short but brilliant career in
physics [69].
Fig. 3. Two methods of distributing sigularities: (a) sources, sinks, and
doublets on a line L inside the airfoil; (b) vortices on the surface C of the
airfoil.
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 287
7.2. von Ka´rma´n
Theodore von Ka´ rma´ n (1881–1963) was born in
Budapest, Hungary. He was trained as a mechanical
engineer in Budapest and graduated in 1902. He did further
graduate studies at Go¨ttingen and earned his PhD in 1908
under Ludwig Prandtl (1875–1953). In 1911 he made an
analysis of the alternating double row of vortices behind a
bluff in a fluid stream, known as Ka´rma´n’s vortex street. In
1912, at the age of 31, he became Professor and Director of
Aeronautical Institute at Aachen, where he built the world’s
first wind tunnel. In World War I, he was called into military
service for the Austro-Hungarian Empire and became Head
of Research in the Air Force, where he led the effort to build
the first helicopter.
After the war, he was instrumental in calling an
International Congress on Aerodynamics and Hydrodyn-
amics at Innsbruck, Austria, in 1922. This meeting became
the forerunner of the International Union of Theoretical and
Applied Mechanics (IUTAM) with von Ka´rma´n as its
honorary president. He first visited the United States in
1926. In 1930 he headed the Guggenheim Aeronautical Lab
at the California Institute of Technology. In 1944, he
cofounded of the present NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
and undertook America’s first governmental long-range
missile and space-exploration research program. His
personal scientific work included contributions to fluid
mechanics, turbulence theory, supersonic flight, mathemat-
ics in engineering, and aircraft structures. He is widely
recognized as the father of modern aerospace science [186].
7.3. Trefftz
Erich Trefftz (1888–1937) was born on February 21,
1888 in Leipzig, Germany. In 1890, the family moved to
Aachen. In 1906 he began his studies in mechanical
engineering at the Technical University of Aachen, but
soon changed to mathematics. In 1908 Trefftz transferred to
Go¨ttingen, at that time the Mecca of mathematics and
physics. Here after Gauss, Dirichlet, and Riemann, now
Hilbert, Felix Christian Klein (1849–1925), Carle David
Tolme´ Runge (1856–1927), and Prandtl created a continu-
ous progress of first-class mathematics. Trefftz’s most
important teachers were Runge, Hilbert and also Prandtl,
the genius mechanician in modern fluid- and aero-dynamics.
Trefftz spent 1 year at the Columbia University, New York,
and then left Go¨ttingen for Strassburg to study under the
guidance of the famous Austrian applied mathematician
Richard von Mises (1883–1953), who founded the GAMM
(Gesellschaft fu¨r Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik)
in 1922 together with Prandtl. Mises was also the first editor
of ZAMM (Zeitschrift fu¨r Angewandte Mathematik und
Mechanik).
Trefftz’s academic career began with his doctoral thesis
in Strassburg in 1913, where he solved a mathematical
problem of hydrodynamics. He was a soldier in the first
World War, but already in 1919 he got his habilitation and
became a Full Professor of Mathematics in Aachen. In the
year 1922 he got a call as a Full Professor with a Chair in the
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Technical
University of Dresden. There he became responsible for
teaching and research in strength of materials, theory of
elasticity, hydrodynamics, aerodynamics and aeronautics.
In 1927 he moved from the engineering to the mathematical
and natural science faculty, being appointed there as a Chair
in Technical (Applied) Mechanics.
Trefftz had a lifelong friendship with von Mises, who,
being a Jew, had to leave Germany in 1933. Trefftz felt and
showed outgoing solidarity and friendship to von Mises, and
he clearly was in expressed distance to the Hitler regime
until his early death in 1937. Feeling the responsibility for
science, he took over the Presidentship of GAMM, and
became the Editor of ZAMM in 1933 in full accordance
with von Mises [160].
7.4. Muskhelishvili
Nikolai Ivanovich Muskhelishvili (1891–1976) was a
student at the University of St Petersburg. He was naturally
influenced by the glorious tradition of the St Petersburg
mathematical school, which began with Euler and continued
by the prominent mathematicians such as Ostrogradsky,
Pafnuty Lvovich Chebyshev (1821–1894), and Aleksandr
Mikhailovich Lyapunov (1857–1918). As an undergraduate
student, Muskhelishvili was greatly impressed by the
lectures of Kolosov on the complex variable theory of
elasticity. Muskhelishvili took this topic as his graduation
thesis and performed brilliantly that Kolosov decided to
publish these results as a coauthor with his student in 1915.
In 1922 Muskhelishvili became a Professor at the Tbilisi
State University, where he remained until his death. In 1935
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 288
he published the masterpiece Some Basic Problems of the
Mathematical Theory of Elasticity, which won him the
Stalin Prize of the First Degree. He held many positions
such as Chair, Director, President, at Tbilisi and the
Georgian Branch of USSR Academy of Sciences, and
received many honors [196,197].
8. Electronic computer era
Although electronic computers were invented in the
1940s, they did not become widely available to common
researchers until the early 1960s. It is not surprising that the
development of the finite element method [38], as well as a
number of other numerical methods, started around that
time. A number of independent efforts of experimenting on
boundary methods also emerged in the early 1960s. Some of
the more significant ones are reviewed below.
Friedman and Shaw [68] in 1962 solved the scalar wave
equation
V
2
fK
1
c
2
v
2
f
vt
2
Z0 (79)
in the time domain for the scattered wave field resulting
from a shock wave impinging on a cylindrical obstacle. In
the above f is the velocity potential and c is the wave speed.
The use of the fundamental solution
G ZK
1
r
d
r
c
K(t Kt
0
)
_ _
(80)
where d is the Dirac delta function, in Green’s second
identity (24) produced the boundary integral equation
f
sc
(x; t) Z
1
4p
_
t
C
0
__
G
G
vf
sc
vn
Kf
sc
vG
vn
_ _
dS dt
0
(81)
where f
sc
is the scattered wave field. Eq. (81) was further
differentiated with respect to time to create the equation for
acoustic pressure. For a two-dimensional problem, the
equation was discretized in space (boundary contour) and in
time that resulted into a double summation. Variables were
assumed to be constant over space and time subintervals, so
the integration could be performed exactly. Finite difference
explicit time-stepping scheme was used and the resultant
algebraic system required only successive, not simultaneous
solution. The computation was carried out using a Monroe
desk calculator [154]. The scattering due to a box-shaped
rigid obstacle was solved. The work was extended in 1967
by Shaw [152] to handle different boundary conditions on
the obstacle surface, and by Mitzner [122] using the retarded
potential integral representation.
Banaugh and Goldsmith [5] in 1963 tackled the two-
dimensional wave equation in the frequency domain,
governed by the Helmholtz equation (38). The 2-Dboundary
integral equation counterpart to the 3-D version (40) is
f Z
i
4
_
C
H
(1)
0
(kr)
vf
vn
Kf
vH
(1)
0
(kr)
vn
_ _
ds (82)
where H
(1)
0
is the Hankel function of the first kind of order
zero, k is the wave number, and iZ
ffiffiffiffiffiffi
K1
_
. Eq. (82) is solved in
the complex variable domain. Similar to Friedman and Shaw
[68], the integration over a subinterval was made easy by
assuming constant variation of the potential on the
subinterval. The problem of a steady state wave scattered
from the surface of a circular cylinder was solved as a
demonstration. An IBM 7090 mainframe computer was used
for the numerical solution. It is of interest to observe that the
discretization was restricted to 36 points, corresponding to 72
unknowns (real and imaginary parts), due to the memory
restriction of the computer. A larger linear system would
have required the read/write operation on the tape storage and
special linear system solution algorithm.
In the same year (1963) Chen and Schweikert [36] solved
the three-dimensional sound radiation problem in the
frequency domain using the Fredholm integral equation of
the second kind
vf(x)
vn(x)
ZK2ps(x) C
__
G
s(x)
v
vn(x)
e
ikr
r
_ _
dS(x); x2G
(83)
Problems of vibrating spherical and cylindrical shells in
infinite fluid domain were solved. The surface was divided
into triangular elements. An IBM 704 mainframe was used,
which allowed up to 1000 degrees of freedom to be
modeled.
Subsequent work using integral equation solving acous-
tic scattering problems included Chertock [37] in 1964, and
Copley in 1967 [40] and 1968 [41]. Copley was the first to
report the non-uniqueness of integral equation formulation
due to the existence of eigen frequencies. Schenck [150] in
1968 presented the CHIEF (combined Helmholtz integral
equation formulation). Waterman developed the null-field
and T-matrix method, first in 1965 [188] for solving
electromagnetic scattering problems, and then in 1969
[189] for acoustic problems. In both the CHIEF and the
T-matrix method, the so-called ‘null-field integral equation’
or the ‘interior Helmholtz integral equation’ was utilized:
0 Z
__
G
f(x)
vG(x; x)
vn(x)
KG(x; x)
vf(x)
vn(x)
dS(x); x2U
i
(84)
where U
i
is the interior of the scatterer, and
G ZK
1
4pr
e
Kikr
(85)
is the free-space Green’s function of Helmholtz equation.
The left hand side of (84) is null because the source point x
is placed inside the body, which is outside the wave field.
The above equation was combined with the exterior integral
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 289
equation to eliminate the non-unique solution, or the so-
called ‘spurious frequencies’.
Returning to potential problems, Maurice Aaron Jaswon
(1922-) and Ponter [95] in 1963 employed Green’s third
identity (25) for the numerical solution of prismatic bars
subjected to torsion in two dimensions,
f(x) Z
1
p
_
C
f(x)
v ln r(x; x)
vn(x)
Kln r(x; x)
vf(x)
vn(x)
_ _
ds(x);
x2C (86)
The boundary conditions were Dirichlet type. Ponter [133]
in 1966 extended it to multiple domain problems.
Jaswon [97] and Symm [164] in 1963 used the single-
layer method, i.e. the Fredholm equation of the first kind as
shown in (33), but in two dimensions,
f(x) ZK
_
C
ln r(x; x) s(x)ds(x); x2C (87)
for the solution of Dirichlet problems. The above equation
was supposedly to be unstable. However, apparently good
solutions were obtained. For Neumann problems, the
Fredholm integral equation of the second kind
vf(x)
vn(x)
Zps(x) K
_
C
v ln r(x; x)
vn(x)
s(x)ds(x); x2C (88)
was used. In the same paper [164], a mixed boundary value
problem was solved using Green’s formula (86), rather than
the Fredholm integral equations.
Hess [89] in 1962 and Hess and Smith [91] in 1964
utilized the single-layer method (30) to solve problems of
external potential flow around arbitrary three-dimensional
bodies
vf(x)
vn(x)
ZK2ps(x) C
__
G
v1=r(x; x)
vn(x)
s(x)ds(x); x2G (89)
The formulation was the same as that of Lotz [113] and
Vandrey [177,178]. The surface of the body was
discretized into quadrilateral elements and the source
density was assumed to be constant on the element. This
technique, called the surface source method, has been
developed into a powerful numerical tool for the aircraft
industry [90].
Massonet [115] in 1965 discussed a number of ideas of
using boundary integral equations solving elasticity pro-
blems. Numerical solutions were carried out in two cases. In
the first case, Fredholm integral equation of the second kind
was used to solve torsion problems:
f(x) ZKpm(x) K
_
C
v ln r(x; x)
vn(x)
m(x)ds(x); x2C (90)
In the second case, plane elasticity problems were solved
using the distribution of the radial stress field resulting from
a half-plane point force on the boundary. The following
Fredholm equation of the second kind was used:
t(x) Zm(x) K
2
p
_
C
m(x)
cos 4 cos a
r
e
r
ds(x); x2C
(91)
where t is the boundary traction vector, m is the intensity of
the fictitious stress, m is its magnitude, e
r
is the unit vector in
the r direction, f is the angle between the two vectors m and
e
r
, and a is the angle between e
r
and the boundary normal.
Solution were found using the iterative procedure of
successively approximating the function m. Due to the
half-plane kernel function used, this technique applies only
to simply-connected domains.
During the first decade of the 20th century, the
introduction of the Fredholm integral equation theorem
put the potential theory on a solid foundation. Although
attempted by Fredholm himself, the same level of success
was not found for elasticity problems. In fact, similar
rigorousness was not accomplished for another 40 years
[72]. Started in the 1940s, the Georgian school of
elasticians, led by Muskhelishvili [196,197] and followed
by Ilia Nestorovich Vekua (1907–1977) [179], Nikolai
Petrovich Vekua (1913–1993) [180], and Victor Dmitrievich
Kupradze (1903–1985) [104,106], all associated with the
Tbilisi State University, together with Solomon Grigorevich
Mikhlin (1908–1991) [120] of St Petersburg, made import-
ant progresses in the theory of vector potentials (elasticity)
through the study of singular integral equations. The initial
development, however, was limited to one-dimensional
singular integral equations, which solved only two-dimen-
sional problems. The development of multi-dimensional
integral equations started in the 1960s [72].
Kupradze in 1964 [105] and 1965 [104] discussed a
method for finding approximate solutions of potential and
elasticity static and dynamic problems. He called the
approach ‘method of functional equations’. Numerical
examples were given in two dimensions. For potential
problems with the Dirichlet boundary condition
f Zf (x); x2C (92)
where C is the boundary contour, the solution is represented
by the pair of integral equations
f(x) Z
1
2p
_
C
f (x)
v ln r(x; x)
vn(x)
ds(x) C
1
p
_
C
s(x)ln r(x; x)ds(x);
x2U (93)
0 Z
1
2p
_
C
f (x)
v ln r(x; x)
vn(x)
ds(x) C
1
p
_
C
s(x)ln r(x; x)ds(x);
x2C
/
(94)
In the above C
/
is an arbitrary auxiliary boundary that
encloses C, and s is the distribution density, which needs to
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 290
be solved from (94). We notice that the above equations
involve the distribution of both the single-layer and the
double-layer potential. Another observation is that in (94) the
center of singularity x is located on C
/
, which is outside of the
solution domain U. Since C and C
/
are distinct contours, Eq.
(94) is not an integral equation in the classical sense, in which
the singularities are located on the boundary. This is why the
term‘functional equation’ was used instead. In the numerical
implementation, C
/
was chosen as a circles, upon which n
nodes were selected to place the singularity. Since the
singularities were not located on the boundary C, the
integrals in (94) were regular and could be numerically
evaluated using a simple quadrature rule. Gaussian quad-
rature with n nodes was used for the integration. The resultant
linear systemwas solved for the n discrete s values located at
the quadrature nodes. Eq. (93) was then used to find solution
at any point in the domain.
For elasticity problems, the same technique was
employed. For static, two-dimensional problems with
prescribed boundary displacement
u
i
Zf
i
(x); x2C (95)
the following pair of vector integral equations solve the
boundary value problem:
u
j
(x) Z
1
p
_
C
s
i
(x)u
f
ij
(x; x)ds(x) K
1
2p
_
C
f
i
(x)u
d
ij
(x; x)ds(x);
x2U (96)
0 Z
1
p
_
C
s
i
(x)u
f
ij
(x; x)ds(x) K
1
2p
_
C
f
i
(x)u
d
ij
(x; x)ds(x);
x2C
/
(97)
where s
i
is the distribution density (vector), and the kernel
u
f
ij
Z
1
4G(1 Kn)
(3 K4n)d
ij
ln r K
x
i
x
j
r
2
_ _
(98)
is the fundamental solution due to a point force (single-layer
potential) in the x
j
direction, and
u
d
ij
Z
1
2(1 Kn)
!
1
r
(1 K2n)
n
i
x
j
r
K
n
j
x
i
r
Cd
ij
vr
vn
_ _
C2
x
i
x
j
r
2
vr
vn
_ _
(99)
is the fundamental solution due to a dislocation (double-
layer potential) oriented in the x
j
direction. Kupradze’s
method was closely followed in Russia under the name
‘potential method’, particularly in the solution of shells [71,
176] and plates [103,181].
Kupradze’s technique of distributing fundamental sol-
utions on an exterior, auxiliary boundary has been
considered by some as the origin of the ‘method of
fundamental solutions’ [14]. However, in most applications
[65], the method of fundamental solutions often bypasses
the integral equation formulation. It considers the distri-
bution of admissible solutions of discrete and unknown
density on an external auxiliary boundary, for example, in
the form of (71). The boundary conditions are satisfied by
collocating at a set of boundary nodes. Hence the method of
fundamental solutions, although can be viewed as a special
case of the method of functional equations, was in
fact independently developed. For example, Oliveira [130]
in 1968 proposed the use of fundamental solution of
point forces linearly distributed over linear segments to
solve plane elasticity problems. For potential problems,
the recent origin can be traced to Mathon and Johnston [116]
in 1977.
Another type of problems that has traditionally used
boundary methods involves problems with discontinuities
such as fractures, dislocations resulting from imperfec-
tions of crystalline structures, interface between dissim-
ilar materials, and other discontinuities. In these cases,
certain physical quantities, such as displacements or
stresses, suffer a jump. These discontinuities can be
simulated by the distribution of singular solutions such
as the Volterra [183] and Somigliana dislocations [158,
159] over the physical surface, which often results in
integral equations [12,62]. For example, integral
equation of this type
A(x)j(x) C
1
p
_
b
a
B(x
/
)j(x
/
)
x
/
Kx
dx
/
C
_
b
a
K(x; x
/
)j(x
/
)dx
/
Zf (x);
a!x!b (100)
and other types were numerically investigated by
Erdogan and Gupta [60,61] in 1972 using Chebyshev
and Jacobi polynomials for the approximation. These
type of one-dimensional singular integral equations has
also been solved using piece-wise, low degree poly-
nomials [74].
The review presented so far has focused on the solution
of physical and engineering problems. The formulations
often borrow the physical idea of distributing concentrated
loads; hence the integral equations are typically singular.
Due to the existence of multiple spatial and the time
dimensions in physical problems, the integral equations are
often multi-dimensional.
For the mathematical community, the effort of finding
approximate solutions of integral equations existed since the
major breakthrough of Fredholm in the 1900s. Early efforts
focused on finding successive approximations of linear,
one-dimensional, and non-singular integral equations.
Different kinds of integral equations that may or may not
have physical origin were investigated. One of the first
monographs on numerical solution of integral equations is
by Bu¨ckner [29] in 1952. Another early monograph is by
Mikhlin and Smolitsky [121] in 1967. The field flourished in
the 1970 with the publication of several monographs—
Kagiwada and Kalaba [98] in 1974, Atkinson [2] in 1976,
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 291
Ivanov [92] in 1976, and Baker [4] in 1977. As mentioned
above, mostly one-dimensional integral equations were
investigated. Some integral equations have physical origin
such as flow around hydrofoil, population competition,
and quantum scattering [55], while most others do not. The
methods used included projection method, polynomial
collocation, Galerkin method, least squares, quadrature
method, among others [77]. It is of interest to observe that
the developments in the two communities, the applied
mathematics and the engineering, run parallel to each other,
almost devoid of cross citations, although it is clear that
cross-fertilization will be beneficial.
As seen from the review above, the origins of
boundary numerical methods, as well as many other
numerical methods, can be traced to this period, during
which many ideas sprouted. However, even though
methods like those by Jaswon and Kupradze started to
receive attention, these efforts did not immediately
coalesce into a single ‘movement’ that grows rapidly. In
the following sections we shall review those significant
events that led to the development of the modern-day
boundary integral equation method and the boundary
element method.
8.1. Kupradze
Viktor Dmitrievich Kupradze (1903–1985) was born in
the village of Kela, Russian Georgia. He was enrolled in
the Tbilisi State University in 1922 and was awarded the
diploma in mathematics in 1927. He stayed on as a
Lecturer in mathematical analysis and mechanics until
1930. In that year he entered the Steklov Mathematical
Institute in Leningrad for postgraduate study and obtained
his doctor of mathematics degree in 1935. In 1933
Muskhelishvili founded a research institute of mathemat-
ics, physics and mechanics in Tbilisi. In 1935, Muskhe-
lishvili and his closest associates Kupradze and Vekua
transformed the institute and became affiliated with the
Georgian Academy of Sciences, with Kupradze serving as
its first director from 1935 to 1941. The Institute was later
known as A. Razmadze. From 1937 until his death,
Kupradze served as the Head of the Differential and
Integral Equations Department at Tbilisi. Kupradze’s
research interest covered the theory of partial differential
equations and integral equations, and mathematical theory
of elasticity and thermoelasticity. He received many
honors, including political ones. He was elected as an
Academician of the Georgian Academy in 1946. From
1954 to 1958 he served as the Rector of Tbilisi
University, and from 1954 to 1963 the Chairman of
Supreme Soviet of the Georgian SSR.
8.2. Jaswon
Maurice Aaron Jaswon (1922-) was born in Dublin,
Ireland. He was enrolled in the Trinity College, Dublin, and
obtained his BSc degree in 1944. He entered the University
of Birmingham, UK and was awarded his PhD degree in
1949. In the same year he started his academic career as a
Lecturer in Mathematics at the Imperial College, London.
His early research was focused on the mathematical theory
of crystallography and dislocation, which cumulated into a
book published in 1965 [94], with a updated version in 1983
[96]. In 1957 Jaswon was promoted to the Reader position
and stayed at the Imperial College until 1967. It was during
this period that he started his seminal work on numerical
solution of integral equations with his students George
Thomas Symm [165] and Alan R.S. Ponter. In 1963–1964
Jaswon visited Brown University. In 1965–1966 he was a
visiting Professor at the University of Kentucky. His
presence there was what initially made Frank Rizzo aware
of an opening position at Kentucky [143]. Upon Rizzo’s
arrival in 1966, they had a few months of overlapping before
Jaswon’s returning to England. In 1967 Jaswon left the
Imperial College to take a position as Professor and Head of
Mathematics at the City University of London, where he
stayed for the next 20 years until his retirement in 1987. He
remains active as an Emeritus Professor at City University.
Jaswon was considered by some as the founder of the
boundary integral equation method based on his 1963 work
[95] implementing Green’s formula.
9. Boundary integral equation method
A turning point marking the rapid growth of numerical
solutions of boundary integral equations happened in 1967,
when Frank Joseph Rizzo (1938-) published the article ‘An
integral equation approach to boundary value problems of
classical elastostatics’ [142]. In this paper, a numerical
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 292
procedure was applied for solving the Somigliana identity
(45) for elastostatics problems. The work was an extension
of Rizzo’s doctoral dissertation [141] at the University of
Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, which described the numerical
algorithm, yet without actual implementation.
According to Rizzo’s own recollection [145], he was
deeply influenced by his advisor Marvin Stippes. At that
time, Stippes was studying representation integrals for
elastic field in terms of boundary data. The Somigliana
identity received particular attention. The identity (45)
without the body force can be written as follows:
u
j
Z
__
G
(t
i
u
+
ij
Kt
+
ij
u
i
)dS (101)
Although the above equation appears to give the solution of
the displacement field, it actually does not, as the right hand
side contains unknowns. In a well-posed boundary value
problem, only half of the boundary data pair {t
i
, u
i
} is given.
The question is whether it is possible to exploit the above
equation by using the then-new crop of digital computers to
do arithmetic and to develop a systematic solution process.
While Rizzo was struggling with these ideas, Stippes
called to his attention the recently published papers by
Jaswon [95,97,164] in which numerical solutions of
potential problems were attempted by exploiting Green’s
third identity. By realizing that the Somigliana identity is
just the vector version of the potential theory, in Rizzo’s
own words: [145] ‘a ‘light bulb’ appeared in my
consciousness’. Rizzo further stated: [143] ‘That work on
potential theory was the model, motivation, and springboard
for everything I did that year for elasticity theory.. Indeed,
in retrospect, all three of those papers represent at once the
birth and quintessence of what has become known as the
‘direct’ boundary element or boundary integral equation
method.’
Rizzo’s subsequent implementation of numerical sol-
ution can be viewed from the angle of Thomas Allen Cruse
(1941-): [51] ‘[In 1965] I took a leave of absence from
Boeing and enrolled in the Engineering Mechanics program
at the University of Washington. One of the first faculty
members I met was Frank Rizzo who had just completed his
doctoral studies at the University of Illinois in Urbana and
[in 1964] had come to the University of Washington as an
Assistant Professor in the Civil Engineering Department.
When I met Professor Rizzo he was working with a graduate
student [C.C. Chang] who could program in Fortran.
Frank’s original dissertation was the formulation of the
two-dimensional elasticity problem using Betti’s reciprocal
work theorem. The Quarterly of Applied Mathematics
rejected the manuscript derived from Frank’s dissertation
due to the absence of numerical results!’ Rizzo developed
the algorithm and obtained good numerical results; and the
paper was finally published in that journal in 1967 [142].
Cruse continued to reminisce about his own role in this
early development of BEM: [51] ‘I was enrolled after this
time in an elastic wave propagation course taught by
Professor Rizzo. As one of his graduate students I was
searching for a suitable piece of original research upon
which to base my dissertation. One day, Frank showed us
how the Laplace transform converted the hyperbolic wave
equation into an elliptic equation—I found my research
topic at that point’.
After planting the seed that became Cruse’s doctoral
research [144], Rizzo moved to the University of Kentucky
in 1966. Cruse completed his dissertation independently in
1967 [43]. In Kentucky, Rizzo met David J. Shippy and
started a highly productive collaboration. In Shippy’s
recollection [156]: ‘When Frank became a faculty member
at the University of Kentucky in 1966 he had already written
his seminal paper on the use of integral equations to solve
elasticity problems [142]. Before long, Frank discovered
that I was very much interested in and involved with the use
of computers. He approached me, described his research
interest, and proposed that we collaborate on future research
of this kind.With no computer code in hand, Frank and I
proceeded to develop from scratch some ad hoc (for specific
geometries) direct boundary integral equation code for
solution of plane elastostatics problems.. Having that
small success behind us, we were poised to apply the
boundary integral equation (BIE) method to more difficult
problems’.
Their first try was to solve elasticity problems with
inclusions [146]. Next they tackled plane anisotropic bodies
[147]. Utilizing Laplace transform and the numerical
Laplace inversion, Rizzo and Shippy then solved the
transient heat conduction problems [148] and the quasi-
static viscoelasticity problems [149]. Hence in a quick
succession of work from 1968 to 1971, Rizzo and Shippy
had much broadened the vista of integral equation method
for engineering applications.
Cruse went on to write his thesis on boundary integral
solutions in elastodynamics and in 1968 published two
papers as a result [44,53]. He then left for Carnegie-Mellon
University. At Carnegie-Mellon, Cruse was encouraged by
Swedlow to work on three-dimensional fracture problems
[51]. As a first step, he programmed the integral equation to
solve three-dimensional elastostatics problems [45]. In 1970
and 1971, Cruse published boundary integral solutions of
three-dimensional fracture problems [46,47]. These were
among the first numerical solutions of three-dimensional
fracture problems [50], as the first finite difference 3-D
fracture solution was done by Ayres [3] in 1970, and the first
finite element solution was accomplished by Tracey [170] in
1971.
In 1971 Cruse in his work on elastoplastic flow [163]
referred the methods that distributed single- and double-
layer potential at fictitious densities, such as those based on
the Fredholm integrals and Kupradze’s method, as the
‘indirect potential methods’, and the methods that utilized
Green’s formality, such as Green’s third identity and the
Somigliana integral, as the ‘direct potential methods’.
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 293
However, as Cruse described [51], ‘the editor of the IJSS,
Professor George Hermann, objected to using such a non-
descriptive title as the ‘direct potential method’. So, I coined
the title boundary-integral equation (BIE) method’ [163].
These terms, direct method, indirect method, and boundary
integral equation method (BIEM), have become standard
terminologies in BEM literature.
In 1973, Cruse resigned from Carnegie-Mellon Univer-
sity and joined Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. He continued to
promote the industrial application of the boundary integral
equation method. In 1975, Cruse and Rizzo organized the
first dedicated boundary integral equation method meeting
under the auspices of the Applied Mechanics Division of the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in
Troy, New York. The proceedings of the meeting [54]
reflected the rapid growth of the boundary integral equation
method to cover a broad range of applications that included
water waves [153], transient phenomena in solids (heat
conduction, viscoelasticity, and wave propagation) [155],
fracture mechanics [49], elastoplastic problems [119], and
rock mechanics [1].
The next international meeting on boundary integral
equation method was held in 1977 as the First International
Symposium on Innovative Numerical Analysis in Applied
Engineering Sciences, at Versailles, France, organized by
Cruse and Lachat [52]. This symposium, according to Cruse
[51], ‘deliberately sought non-FEM papers’. In the same
conference, Carlos Alberto Brebbia (1948-) was invited to
give a keynote address on different mixed formulations for
fluid dynamics. Instead, at the last moment, Brebbia decided
to talk about applying similar ideas to solve boundary
integral equations using ‘boundary elements’ [23]. In the
same year, Jaswon and Symm published the first book on
numerical solution of boundary integral equations [97].
9.1. Rizzo
Frank Joseph Rizzo (1938-) was born in Chicago, IL.
After graduating form St Rita High School in 1955, he
attended the University of Illinois at Chicago. Two years
later he transferred to the Urbana campus and received his
BS degree in 1960, MS degree in 1961, and PhD in 1964.
While pursuing the graduate degrees, he was employed as a
half-time teaching staff in the Department of Theoretical
and Applied Mechanics. In 1964, he began his career as an
Assistant Professor at the University of Washington. Two
years later, he left for the University of Kentucky, where he
stayed for the next 20 years. In 1987, Rizzo moved to Iowa
State University and served as the Head of the Department
of Engineering Sciences and Mechanics, which later
became a part of the Aerospace Engineering and Engineer-
ing Mechanics Department. In late 1989, he returned to his
alma mater, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
to become the Head of the Department of Theoretical and
Applied Mechanics. Near the end of 1991, he returned to the
Iowa State University and remained there until his
retirement in 2000. Rizzo’s 1967 article ‘An integral
equation approach to boundary value problems of classical
elastostatics’, which was cited more than 300 times as of
2003 based on the Web of Science search [195], has much
stimulated the modern day development of the boundary
integral equation method.
9.2. Cruse
Thomas Allen Cruse (1941-) was born in Anderson,
Indiana. After graduation from Riverside Polytechnic High
School, Cruse entered Stanford University, where he
obtained a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1963,
and a MS in Engineering Mechanics in 1964. After a year
working with the Boeing Company, he enrolled in 1965 at
the University of Washington to pursue a PhD degree,
which he was awarded in 1967. In the same year, Cruse
joined Carnegie-Mellon University as an Assistant Pro-
fessor. In 1973 Cruse resigned from Carnegie Mellon and
joined Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Group, where he spent the
next 10 years. In 1983, he moved to the Southwest Research
Institute at San Antonio, Texas, where he stayed until 1990.
In that year Cruse returned to the academia by joining the
Vanderbilt University as the holder of the H. Fort Flower
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. He retired in 1999 as
the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Affairs of the
College of Engineering at Vanderbilt University.
10. Boundary element method
While Rizzo in the US was greatly inspired by the work
of Jaswon, Ponter, and Symm [93,95,164] at the Imperial
College, London, in the early 1960s on potential problems,
these efforts went largely unnoticed in the United Kingdom.
In the late 1960s, another group in UK started to investigate
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 294
integral equations. According to Watson [191]: ‘I was
introduced to boundary integral equations in 1966, as a
research student at the University of Southampton under
Hugh Tottenham. Tottenham possessed a remarkable
library of Soviet books, and encouraged research students to
explore possible applications of the work of Muskhelishvili
[126], Kupradze [104] and others. I laboured through
Muskhelishvili’s complex variable theory, and struggled
with Kupradze’s tortuous mathematical notation without the
benefit of being able to read the text.. I pondered among
other things the problems posed by edges and corners and
came to understand that the fictitious force densities would
probably tend to infinity near such features. My attempts to
determine the nature of the supposed singularities, however,
were unsuccessful.’ Doctoral dissertations based on indirect
methods of Kupradze produced around this time included
that by Banerjee [6] in 1970, and Watson [190] and Tomlin
[169] in 1973.
At that time, Brebbia was also a PhD student at the
University of Southampton under Tottenham. His research
was on the numerical solution of complex double curved
shell structures and he investigated a range of techniques
including variational methods, finite elements, and integral
equations [18]. As a part of his dissertation work, Brebbia
spent 18 months at Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
first working with Eric Reissner (1913–1996), and then
Jerry Connor. Reissner’s introduction of the mixed
formulations of variational principles coupled with Breb-
bia’s knowledge of integral equations gave Brebbia a better
understanding of the generalized weak formulations. Jerry
Connor was at that time carrying out research in the solution
of mixed formulations using finite elements. The collabor-
ation between Brebbia and Connor resulted in two finite
element books [24, 39].
With his new knowledge, Brebbia returned to South-
ampton and completed his thesis on shell analysis [18]. He
was appointed a Lecturer at the Civil Engineering Depart-
ment. He continued his effort in producing integral equation
result for complex shell elements, but decided it was
insufficiently versatile to warrant further development. It
was in 1970 that Brebbia gave his PhD student Jean-Claude
Lachat the task of developing boundary integral equation
formulation seeking to obtain the same versatility as curved
finite elements.
Until that time, the US and the UK schools have been
largely working in isolation from each other, except for the
influence of Jaswon’s work on Rizzo’s research, and the
fundamental ideas of mixed formulations migrated from
MIT to Southampton by Brebbia. In 1972, Brebbia was
organizing the First International Conference on Variational
Methods in Engineering at Southampton with Tottenham
[27]. Although both organizers were working on integral
equations at that time, the inclusion of a special session on
this subject was an afterthought on the assumption that it
would be possible to tie the boundary integral equations
with the variational formulation. Brebbia invited Cruse to
deliver an opening lecture on the boundary-integral
equation method in the conference [48]. As recalled by
Brebbia [22]: ‘Since the beginning of the 1960s, a group
existed at Southampton University working on applications
of integral equations in engineering. Our work was up to
then directly related to the European Mathematical Schools
that originated in Russia. The inclusion of Boundary
Integral Equations as one of the topics of the conference
was a last moment decision, as up to then they were not
interpreted in a variational way. Meeting Tom opened to
us the scenario of the research in BIE taking place in
America, most of it related to his work. It was a historical
landmark for our group and from then on, we continued to
collaborate very closely with Tom’.
The above conference was also the occasion for Brebbia,
Cruse, and Lachat to get together to discuss the latest
research. Lachat went on to offer Watson a position in his
laboratory through Brebbia [23]. In Watson’s recollection
[191]: ‘Towards the end of 1971 I was contacted by
Brebbia, who asked that I pay him an overnight visit to
discuss the implementation of boundary element methods
with his external PhD student, Jean-Claude Lachat. .
Lachat discussed with me through Brebbia as interpreter
some aspects of boundary elements, and then produced a job
application form, requesting that I reply to his offer within
four weeks. .I decided to accept. Lachat, .was head of
the De´partement The´orique et Engrenages [at Centre
Technique des Industries Me´caniques] .At the beginning
of 1973 I started work on boundary elements. I was to
develop firstly a program for plane strain, then one for three
dimensional analysis. Lachat knew of the work of Rizzo and
Cruse, and proposed that the direct formulation be used. I
readily agreed, having met Cruse in 1972 and discussed with
him the direct and indirect approaches. The finite element
programming had been most instructive in respect of shape
functions, Gaussian quadrature and out-of-core simul-
taneous equation solution techniques. It seemed clear that
the boundary elements should be isoparametric, with at least
quadratic variation so that curved surfaces could be
modelled accurately. Analytical integration was then out
of the question, and Gaussian quadrature was far superior to
Simpson’s rule. Adaptations of Gaussian quadrature could
integrate weakly singular functions, but Cauchy principal
values could not be computed directly by quadrature. .The
problem of Cauchy principal values was solved by not
calculating them’. Lachat finished his dissertation in 1975
[107], and the paper of Lachat and Watson [108] was
published in 1976, which was considered as the first
published work that incorporates the above-mentioned finite
element ideas into boundary integral method.
Up to 1977 the numerical method for solving integral
equations had been called the ‘boundary integral equation
method’, following Cruse’s naming. However, with the
growing popularity of the finite element method, it became
clear that many of the finite element ideas can be applied to
the numerical technique solving boundary integral
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 295
equations. This is particularly demonstrated in the work of
Lachat and Watson [108]. Furthermore, parallel to the
theoretical development of finite element method, it was
shown that the weighted residual technique can be used to
derive the boundary integral equations [19,25]. The term
‘boundary element method,’ mirroring ‘finite element
method,’ finally emerged in 1977.
The creation of the term ‘boundary element method’ was
a collective effort by the research group at the University of
Southampton. According to Jose´ Dominguez [57]: ‘The
term Boundary Element Method was coined by C.A.
Brebbia, J. Dominguez, P. K. Banerjee and R. Butterfield
at the University of Southampton. It was used for the first
time in three publications of these authors appeared in 1977:
a journal paper by Brebbia and Dominguez [25], a [chapter
in book] by Banerjee and Butterfield [7], and Dominguez’s
PhD Thesis [56] (in Spanish). Those four authors never
wrote a paper on the subject together but they collectively
came to this name at the University of Southampton. At that
time, R. Butterfield was a [Senior Lecturer], C.A. Brebbia
was a Senior Lecturer, J. Dominguez was a Visiting
Research Fellow, and P.K. Banerjee, who had been student
and researcher at Southampton [earlier], was a frequent
visitor. In some occasions, this group or part of it, met for
lunch at the University or even participated at courses
organized by Carlos Brebbia in Southampton or London.
The phrase Boundary Element Method came out as part of
the discussions in one of these meetings and was used by all
of them in their immediate work.’ (text in square brackets is
correction by the authors.) It was also stated in a preface by
Brebbia [19]: ‘The term ‘boundary element’ originated
within the Department of Civil Engineering at Southampton
University. It is used to indicate the method whereby the
external surface of a domain is divided into a series of
elements over which the functions under consideration can
vary in different ways, in much the same manner as in finite
elements.’
Brebbia presented the boundary element method using
the weighted residuals formulation [19,21,25]. The devel-
opment of solving boundary value problems using functions
defined on local domains with low degree of continuity was
strongly influenced by the development of extended
variational principles and weighted residuals in the mid
1960s. Key players included Eric Reissner [139] and
Kyuichiro Washizu [187], who pioneered the use of
mixed variational statements that allowed the flexibility in
choosing localized functions. To deal with non-conservative
and time-dependent problems, the strategy shifted from the
variational approach to the method of weighted residuals
combined with the concept of weak forms. Brebbia [19]
showed that one could generate a spectrum of methods
ranging from finite elements to boundary elements.
Consider a function f satisfying the linear partial
differential operator L in the following fashion
L¦f¦ Zb(x); x2U (102)
and subject to the essential and natural boundary conditions
S¦f¦ Zf (x); x2G
1
N¦f¦ Zg(x); x2G
2
(103)
where S and N are the corresponding differential operators.
Our goal is to find the approximate solution that minimizes
the error with respect to a weighing function w in
the following fashion:
(L¦f¦ Kb; w)
U
Z(N¦f¦ Kg; S
+
¦w¦)
G
2
K(S¦f¦ Kf ; N
+
¦w¦)
G
1
(104)
where S
*
and N
*
are the adjoint operators of S and N, and the
angle brackets denote the inner product,
(a; b)
g
Z
_
g
a(x)b(x)dx (105)
Eq. (104) can be considered as the theoretical basis for a
number of numerical methods [19]. For example, finite
difference can be interpreted as a method using Dirac delta
function as the weighing function and enforcing the boundary
conditions exactly. The well-known Galerkin formulation in
finite element method uses of the basis function for wthe same
as that used for the approximation of f.
For the boundary element formulation, we perform
integration by parts on (104) for as many times as necessary
to obtain
(f; L
+
¦w¦)
U
Z(S¦f¦; N
+
¦w¦)
G
2
K(N¦f¦; S
+
¦w¦)
G
1
C(f ; N
+
¦w¦)
G
1
K(g; S
+
¦w¦)
G
2
C(b; w)
U
(106)
where L
+
is the adjoint operators of L. The idea for the
boundary method is to replace w by the fundamental
solution G*, which satisfies
L
+
¦G
+
¦ Zd (107)
such that (106) reduces to
f Z(S¦f¦; N
+
¦G
+
¦)
G
2
K(N¦f¦; S
+
¦G
+
¦)
G
1
C(f ; N
+
¦G
+
¦)
G
1
K(g; S
+
¦G
+
¦)
G
2
C(b; G
+
)
U
(108)
This is the weighted residual formulation for boundary
element method. For the case of Laplace equation, which is
self-adjoint, with the boundary conditions
f Zf (x); x2G
1
vf
vn
Zg(x); x2G
2
(109)
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 296
Eq. (108) becomes
f ZK
1
4p
__
G
1
1
r
vf
vn
dS C
1
4p
__
G
1
f
v(1=r)
vn
dS
K
1
4p
__
G
2
1
r
g dS C
1
4p
__
G
2
f
v(1=r)
vn
dS (110)
which is just Green’s formula (25) with boundary conditions
substituted in.
In commissioning the term ‘boundary element method’,
Brebbia considered that the method would gain in generality
if it was based on the mixed principles and weighted
residual formulations. Others have used different interpret-
ations. For example, Banerjee and Butterfield [7] in 1977
followed Kupradze’s idea of distributing sources for solving
potential problems and forces for elasticity problems, and
also called it ‘boundary element method.’ Similarly, the
articles by Brady and Bray [16,17] in 1978 used the term
BEM, but were also based on the indirect formulation. Even
in Brebbia’s 1978 book on boundary element method [19],
the indirect formulation was considered, thought not in
details.
In the subsequent years, the term BEM has been broadly
used as a generic term for a number of boundary based
numerical schemes, whether ‘elements’ were used or not.
The present article will not argue whether in certain
instances the term boundary element is a misnomer or not.
As the present review has demonstrated, the theoretical
foundations of these methods are closely related and the
histories of their development intertwined. Hence, as
indicated in Section 1, the present review accommodates
the broadest usage.
In 1978, Brebbia published the first textbook on BEM
‘The Boundary Element Method for Engineers’ [19]. The
book contained a series of computer codes developed by
Dominguez. In the same year, Brebbia organized the first
conference dedicated to the BEM: the First International
Conference on Boundary Element Methods, at the
University of Southampton [20]. This conference series
has become an annual event and is nowadays organized
by the Wessex Institute of Technology. The most recent
in the series as of this writing is the 26th conference in
2004 [26]. In 1984 Brebbia founded the Journal
‘Engineering Analysis—Innovations in Computational
Techniques.’ It initially published papers involving
boundary element as well as other numerical methods.
In 1989, the journal was renamed to ‘Engineering
Analysis with Boundary Elements’ and became a journal
dedicated to the boundary element method. The journal is
at the present published by Elsevier and enjoys a high
impact factor among the engineering science and
numerical method journals.
10.1. Brebbia
Carlos Alberto Brebbia (1938-) was born in Rosario,
Argentina. He received a BS degree in civil engineering
from the University of Litoral, Rosario. He did early
research on the application of Volterra equations to creep
buckling and other problems. His mentor there was Jose´
Nestor Distefano, latterly of the University of California,
Berkeley. Brebbia went to the University of Southampton,
UK to carry out his PhD study under Hugh Tottenham.
During the whole 1966 and first 6 months in 1967, he
visited MIT and conducted research under Eric Reissner
and Jerry Connor. He attributed his success with FEM as
well as BEM to these great teachers. Brebbia was granted
his PhD at Southampton in 1967. After a year’s research
at the UK Electricity Board Laboratories, in 1970 Brebbia
started working as a Lecturer at Southampton. In 1975, he
accepted a position as Associate Professor at Princeton
University, where he stayed for over a year. He then
returned to Southampton where he eventually became a
Reader. In 1979, Brebbia was again in the US holding a
full professor position at the University of California,
Irvine. In 1981, he moved back to the UK and founded
the Wessex Institute of Technology as an international
focus for BEM research. He has been serving as its
Director since.
11. Conclusion
In this article we reviewed the heritage and the early
history of the boundary element method The heritage is
traced to its mathematical foundation developed in the late
eighteenth to early 18th century, in terms of the Laplace
equation, the existence and uniqueness of solution of
boundary value problems, the Gauss and Stokes theorems
that allowed the reduction in spatial dimensions, the Green’s
identities, Green’s function, the Fredholm integral
equations, and the extension of Green’s formula to
acoustics, elasticity, and other physical problems. The
pioneers behind these mathematical developments were
celebrated with short biographies.
We then observe that in the first half of the 20th century
there existed various attempts to find numerical solutions
without the aid of the modern day electronic computers.
Once electronic computers became widely available, 1960s
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 297
marked the period that ‘a hundred flowers bloomed’—all
kinds of different ideas were tried. The major development
of the modern numerical method, known as the boundary
element method, took shape in the 1970s.
With such a rich and complex history, a question like
‘who founded the boundary element method and when’
cannot be properly answered. First, we may need to qualify
the definition of what is the ‘boundary element method.’
However, it is possible to establish a few important events
that provided the critical momentum, which eventually led
to the modern day movement. From these events we identify
the work done by Jaswon and his co-workers [93,95,164] at
the Imperial College in 1963 on the direct and indirect
methods for potential problems, and the work by Kupradze
and his co-workers [104,105] at Tbilisi State University
around 1965 on potential and elasticity problems, as two
very important events that had spawned followers. In
the US, Jaswon’s work inspired Rizzo to develop his 1967
work on the numerical solution of Somigliana integral
equation [142]. With followers like Cruse and others, the
method, known as the boundary integral equation method at
that time, soon prospered. In the UK, a group at the
University of Southampton led by Tottenham spent much
effort in the early 1970s pursuing Kupradze’s methodology.
It took Brebbia, who was cross-educated between UK
(Southampton) and US (MIT), and Cruse getting together in
the mid-1970s to bring cross-fertilization between the two
schools, which eventually led to the international movement
of boundary element method.
The subsequent conferences and journal organized in the
1980s helped to propel the boundary element method to its
mainstream status. By early 1990s, more than 500 journal
articles per year were related to this subject. These and the
later developments, however, are left to future writers of the
BEM history to explore.
Acknowledgements
This paper has benefitted from comments and materials
provided by a number of colleagues. Particularly the authors
would like to thank Prof. George Hsiao for his comment on
the existence theorem, Profs. Jose Dominguez and Carlos
Brebbia for their personal communications, Prof. Andrzej
Zielin˜ski for transcribing Prof. Stein’s article on Erich
Trefftz, Prof. Yijun Liu for reviewing Prof. Rizzo’s
biography and correcting errors, Prof. Yuri Melnikov for
commenting on Kupradze’s contribution, Prof. Alain
Kassab for supplying Prof. Shaw’s article, Profs. Tom
Cruse and Lothar Gaul for reviewing the article, and the
staff at Wessex Institute of Technology for gathering
the images of the pioneers. The authors are indebted to
the library resources of the J.D. Williams Library at the
University of Mississippi, and particularly the interlibrary
loan services for delivering the requested materials. The
outline biographical archive MacTutor [128] for history of
mathematics, which the authors have liberally cited, has
been highly useful.
Appendix A. Bibliographic search method
An online search through the bibliographic database Web
of Science was conducted on May 3, 2004. At the time of the
search, the database referred to as the Science Citation Index
Expanded [195] contained 27 million entries from 5900
major scientific journals covering the period from 1945 to
present. A search in the topic field based on the combination
of key phrases ‘boundary element or boundary elements or
boundary integral’ was conducted. The search matched
these phrases in article titles, keywords, and abstracts. These
criteria yielded 10,126 articles (Table 1). These entries were
further sorted by their publication year and presented as
annual number of publication in Fig. 1.
For comparison purposes, two most widely known
numerical methods, the finite element method and the
finite difference method, were also searched. The
combination of key phrases ‘finite element or finite
elements’ and ‘finite difference or finite differences’,
respectively, yielded 66,237 and 19,531 articles. Two less
known numerical methods, the finite volume method and
the collocation method, were also searched. These results
are summarized in Table 1.
The reader should be cautioned that the search method
is not precise. The key phrase match is conducted only in
the available title, keyword, and abstract fields, and not in
the main text. Not all entries in the Web of Science
database contain an abstract. In fact, most early entries
contain neither abstract nor keyword. In those cases, titles
alone were searched. This search missed most of the early
articles. For example, Rizzo’s 1967 classical work [142]
‘An integral equation approach to boundary value
problems of classical elastostatics’ was missed in the
BEM search because none of the above-mentioned key
phrases was contained in the title. In fact, all the early
boundary integral equation method articles were missed
and the first entry was dated 1974 (see Fig. 1). If the
search phrase ‘integral equation’ were used, the Rizzo
article would have been found. However, the phrase
‘integral equation’ was avoided because it would generate
many mathematical articles that are not of numerical
nature.
While there exist missing articles, we also acknowl-
edge the fact that even if an article was selected based on
the matching key phrase such as ‘boundary element,’ not
necessarily the article utilized BEM for numerical
solution; hence it may not belong to the category.
However, due to the large number of entries involved,
we can only rely on automatic search and no attempt was
made to adjust the data by conducting article-by-article
inspection. Hence the reported result should be regarded
as qualitative.
A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 298
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A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 302

A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 Table 1 Bibliographic database search based on the Web of Science Numerical method FEM FDM BEM FVM CM Search phrase in topic field ‘Finite element’ or ‘finite elements’ ‘Finite difference’ or ‘finite differences’ ‘Boundary element’ or ‘boundary elements’ or ‘boundary integral’ ‘Finite volume method’ or ‘finite volume methods’ ‘Collocation method’ or ‘collocation methods’ No. of entries 66,237 19,531 10,126 1695 1615

269

Refer to Appendix A for search criteria. (Search date: May 3, 2004).

we can conclude that the popularity and versatility of BEM falls behind the two major methods, FEM and FDM. However, BEM’s leading role as a specialized and alternative method to these two, as compared to all other numerical methods for partial differential equations, is unchallenged. Fig. 1 presents the histogram of the number of journal papers published annually, containing BEM as a keyword. It shows that the growth of BEM literature roughly follows the S-curve pattern predicted by the theory of technology diffusion [75]. Based on the data, we observe that after the ‘invention of the technology’ in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the number of published literature was very small; but it was on an exponential growth rate, until it reached an inflection point around 1991. After that time, the annual publication continued to grow, but at a decreasing rate. A sign of a technology reaching its maturity is marked by the leveling off of its production. Although it might be too early

to tell, there is an indication that the number of annual BEM publications is reaching a steady state at about 700–800 papers per year. For comparison, this number for the FEM is about 5000 articles per year, and for the FDM, it is about 1400. As the BEM is on its way to maturity, it is of interest to visit its history. Although there exist certain efforts toward the writing of the history of the FEM [84,127] and the FDM [131,193], relatively little has been done for the BEM. The present article is aimed at taking a first step toward the construction of a history for the BEM. Before reviewing its modern development, we shall first explore the rich heritage of the BEM, particularly its mathematical foundation from the 18th century to the early 20th. The historical development of the potential theory, Green’s function, and integral equations are reviewed. To interest the beginners of the field, biographical sketches celebrating the pioneers, whose contributions were key to the mathematical foundation of the BEM, are provided. The coverage continues into the first half of the 20th century, when early numerical efforts were attempted even before the electronic computers were invented. Numerical methods cannot truly prosper until the invention and then the wide availability of the electronic computers in the early 1960s. It is of little surprise that both the FEM and the BEM started around that time. For the BEM, multiple efforts started around 1962. A turning point that launched a series of connected efforts, which soon developed into a movement, can be traced to 1967. In the 1970s, the BEM was still a novice numerical technique, but saw an exponential growth. By the end of it, textbooks were

Fig. 1. Number of journal articles published by the year on the subject of BEM, based on the Web of Science search. Refer to Appendix for the search criteria. (Search date: May 3, 2004).

270

A.H.-D. Cheng, D.T. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302

written and conferences were organized on BEM. This article reviews the early development up to the late 1970s, leaving the latter development to future writers. Before starting, we should clarify the use of the term ‘boundary element method’ in this article. In the narrowest view, one can argue that BEM refers to the numerical technique based on the method of weighted residuals, mirroring the finite element formulation, except that the weighing function used is the fundamental solution of governing equation in order to eliminate the need of domain discretization [19,21]. Or, one can view BEM as the numerical implementation of boundary integral equations based on Green’s formula, in which the piecewise element concept of the FEM is utilized for the discretization [108]. Even more broadly, BEM has been used as a generic term for a variety of numerical methods that use a boundary or boundary-like discretization. These can include the general numerical implementation of boundary integral equations, known as the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) [54], whether elements are used in the discretization or not; or the method known as the indirect method that distributes singular solutions on the solution boundary; or the method of fundamental solutions in which the fundamental solutions are distributed outside the domain in discrete or continuous fashion with or without integral equation formulation; or even the Trefftz method which distribute non-singular solutions. These generic adoptions of the term are evident in the many articles appearing in the journal of Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements and many contributions in the Boundary Element Method conferences. In fact, the theoretical developments of these methods are often intertwined. Hence, for the purpose of the current historical review, we take the broader view and consider into this category all numerical methods for partial differential equations in which a reduction in mesh dimension from a domain-type to a boundary-type is accomplished. More properly, these methods can be referred to as ‘boundary methods’ or ‘mesh reduction methods.’ But we shall yield to the popular adoption of the term ‘boundary element method’ for its wide recognition. It will be used interchangeably with the above terms.

gradient of temperature distribution q Z KkVT (1)

where q is the heat flux vector, k is the thermal conductivity, and T is the temperature. The steady state heat energy conservation requires that at any point in space the divergence of the flux equals to zero: V$q Z 0 (2)

Combining (1) and (2) and assuming that k is a constant, we obtain the Laplace equation V2 T Z 0 For groundwater flow, similar procedure produces V2 h Z 0 (4) (3)

where h is the piezometric head. It is of interest to mention that the notation V used in the above came form William Rowan Hamilton (1805–1865). The symbol V, known as ‘nabla’, is a Hebrew stringed instrument that has a triangular shape [73]. The above theories are based on physical quantities. A second way that the Laplace equation arises is through the mathematical concept of finding a ‘potential’ that has no direct physical meaning. In fluid mechanics, the velocity of an incompressible fluid flow satisfies the divergence equation V$v Z 0 (5)

which is again based on the mass conservation principle. For an inviscid fluid flow that is irrotational, its curl is equal to zero: V !v Z 0 (6)

It can be shown mathematically that the identity (6) guarantees the existence of a scalar potential f such that v Z Vf (7)

2. Potential theory The Laplace equation is one of the most widely used partial differential equations for modeling science and engineering problems. It typically comes from the physical consequence of combining a phenomenological gradient law (such as the Fourier law in heat conduction and the Darcy law in groundwater flow) with a conservation law (such as the heat energy conservation and the mass conservation of an incompressible material). For example, Fourier law was presented by Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768–1830) in 1822 [66]. It states that the heat flux in a thermal conducting medium is proportional to the spatial

Combining (5) and (7) we again obtain the Laplace equation. We notice that f, called the velocity potential, is a mathematical conceptual construction; it is not associated with any measurable physical quantity. In fact, the phrase ‘potential function’ was coined by George Green (1793–1841) in his 1828 study [81] of electrostatics and magnetics: electric and magnetic potentials were used as convenient tools for manipulating the solution of electric and magnetic forces. The original derivation of Laplace equation, however, was based on the study of gravitational attraction, following the third law of motion of Isaac Newton (1643–1727) F ZK Gm1 m2 r jrj3 (8)

where F is the force field, G is the gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are two concentrated masses, and r is the distance vector between the two masses. Joseph-Louis Lagrange

Nicolaus (1695–1726) and Daniel (1700–1782). he certainly earned the title of the greatest applied mathematician ever lived [58]. ‘p’ for pi. With no opportunity in finding a position in Switzerland due to his young age. 2.1. Euler. Despite the inferior condition in Turin. had been used earlier in the context of hydrodynamics by Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) in 1755 [63]. and by Lagrange in 1760 [110]. hence declined the offer. he succeeded Daniel as the chief mathematician of the Academy of St Petersburg. and it took St Petersburg’s Academy the next 47 years to publish the manuscripts he left behind [31]. combinatorics. Euler was attracted to mathematics by the leading mathematician at the time. however. he published more than 700 books and papers. Lagrange Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) was the son of a Lutheran pastor who lived near Basel. and then in the Cartesian form in 1787 as [109]: v2 f v2 f v2 f C 2 C 2 Z0 vx2 vy vz (11) The Laplace equation. Cheng. Euler soon became totally blind after returning to Russia.A. and French by choice. 2. Hence it is a ‘fundamental solution’ of the Laplace equation. however. and elasticity. In his words. in 1766. However. and arranged a prestigious position for him in Prussia. after 73 volumes and 25. Lagrange only wanted to be able to devote his time to mathematics. ‘i’ for K1. hence Euler returned to St Petersburg in 1766. Later. at the age of 26. Simeon-Denis Poisson (1781–1840) derived in 1813 [132] the equation of force potential for points interior to a body with mass density r as V2 f Z K4pr This is known as the Poisson equation. mechanics. he published nearly half of all his papers in the last 17 years of his life. Accompanying the invitation was a modest message saying. We note that the gravity potential (9) satisfying (11) represents a concentrated mass. We owe Euler the notations of ‘e’ for the base of natural pffiffiffiffiffiffi P logs. Euler followed Nicolaus and Daniel to Russia. was next to Euler the foremost mathematician of the 18th century. and his two mathematician sons. deteriorated toward the end of his stay. However. During his lifetime. the work is unfinished to the present day. The modern effort of publishing Euler’s collected works. ‘ ’ for summation. Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1736–1813).000 pages.-D. Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827) in his study of celestial mechanics demonstrated that the gravity potential satisfies the Laplace equation. Euler was the most prolific and versatile scientific writer of all times. The relation with the King. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777–1855) has been called the greatest mathematician in modern mathematics for his setting up the rigorous foundation for mathematics.T. The equation was first presented in polar coordinates in 1782. hydrodynamics. Frederick the Great arranged for Lagrange to fill the vacated post. trigonometry. and physics. At age 18 he was appointed Professor of Geometry at the Royal Artillery School in Turin. D. However. by the number indelible marks that Euler left in many science and engineering fields. ‘It is necessary that the greatest . and the concept of functions.2. Johann Bernoulli (1667–1748). Euler (12) In 1741 Euler accepted the invitation of Frederick the Great to direct the mathematical division of the Berlin Academy. Euler was impressed by his work. was more intuitive and has been criticized by pure mathematicians as being lacking rigor. when Euler left Berlin for St Petersburg.H. the Opera Omnia [64] begun in 1911. Without doubt. analytical geometry. Euler surprised the Russian mathematicians by computing in 3 days some astronomical tables whose construction was expected to take several months.100]. number theory. complex variables. By dictation. Switzerland. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 271 (1736–1813) in 1773 was the first to recognize the existence of a potential function that satisfied the above equation [111] fZ 1 r (9) whose spatial gradient gave the gravity force field F Z Gm1 m2 Vf (10) Subsequently. calculus. He was the one who set mathematics into the modern notations. But Laplace was credited for making it a standard part of mathematical physics [15. including algebra. German by adoption. ‘Now I will have less distraction’. on the other hand. Italian by birth. While studying theology at the University of Basel. Euler contributed to many branches of mathematics. where he stayed for 25 years.

Some of his most important scientific contributions came during this period (1802–1814). Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 geometer of Europe should live near the greatest of Kings. Among the important contributions of Laplace in mathematics and physics included probability. One of his letters showed that he really wanted to make a major impact in mathematics: ‘Yesterday was my 21st birthday. because one of its examiner. the velocity of sound. Laplace. where he was taught by Lagrange. When Napoleon came to power. came from relatively humble origins. In 1797 he succeeded Lagrange in being appointed to the Chair of Analysis and Mechanics. but only algebraic operations. which we now call Fourier analysis. the situation in Prussia became unpleasant for Lagrange. Fourier Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827).272 A. In 1978. He banished the geometric idea and introduced differential equations.128]. But with the help of Jean le Rond D’Alembert (1717–1783). objected to his use of trigonometric series to express initial temperature.H. Soon Napoleon ´ appointed him as the Prefect of Isere. Fourier joined Napoleon’s army in its invasion of Egypt as a scientific advisor. was never published. was the ninth of the 12 children of his father’s second marriage. Fourier was elected to the ´ Academie des Sciences in 1817. where he remained for the rest of his career. Fortunately for both of their careers. Laplace was rewarded: he was appointed the Minister of Interior for a short period of time. Whereupon Laplace drew himself up and bluntly replied. He left Berlin in 1787 to become a ´ member of the Academie des Sciences in Paris. nor geometrical or mechanical arguments. The methods that I expound require neither constructions.’ [31]. Laplace transform. and almost went to the guillotine.’ After the death of Frederick. subject to a regular and uniform course. ‘To your care and recommendation am I indebted for having replaced a half-blind mathematician with a mathematician with both eyes. Upon presenting the monumental work to Napoleon. He was eulogized by his disciple Poisson as ‘the Newton of France’ [86]. France. 10 years after its winning the Institut de France competition of the Grand Prize in Mathematics in 1812. the emperor teasingly chided Laplace for an apparent oversight: ‘They told me that you have written this huge book on the system of the universe without once mentioning its Creator’. In 1788 ´ he published the monumental work Mecanique Analytique that unified the knowledge of mechanics up to that time. Laplace happened to examine a 16-year old sub-lieutenant named Napoleon Bonaparte. Among Laplace’s greatest achievement was the five´ ´ ´ volume Traite du Mecanique Celeste that incorporated all the important discoveries of planetary system of the previous century.’ [31. This memoir. In 1822 he published The Analytical Theory of Heat [66]. born in Auxerre. Lagrange’s contributions were mostly in the theoretical branch of mathematics. Fourier returned to Paris in 1801. but also outlined his new method of mathematical analysis. he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the Paris Ecole Militaire when he was only 20-year old. It was there that he recorded many observations that later led to his work in heat diffusion. celestial mechanics. The judges. and capillary action. criticized that he had not proven the completeness of the trigonometric (Fourier) series. where he had studied earlier. and later the President of the Senate. He was considered more than anyone else to have set the foundation of the probability theory [76]. France. he proudly announced: ‘One will not find figures in this work.T. Only the political changes resulted in his being released. headquartered at Grenoble. as examiner of the scholars of the royal artillery corps.-D.’ To D’Alembert. Lagrange. Among his achievements in this administrative position included the draining of swamps of Bourgoin and the construction of a new highway between Grenoble and Turin. In 1807 he completed his memoir On the Propagation of Heat in Solid Bodies in which he not only expounded his idea about heat diffusion. Soon after. which will especially please the anatomical members of my academy. In the preface. D. he was entangled in the French Revolution and joined the local revolutionary committee. at that age Newton and Pascal had already acquired many claims to immortality’. The proof would come years later by Johann Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (1805–1859) [80]. In 1794 Fourier was admitted to the newly established Ecole Normale in Paris. born in Normandy. In 1790 Fourier became a teacher at the Benedictine College. however. 2. Cheng. He was arrested in 1794. who recommended Lagrange. the examinee passed. and Gaspard Monge (1746–1818).3. however. . ‘I have no need for that hypothesis. deduced from Newton’s law of gravitation. Some years later.4. Laplace Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768–1830). the king wrote. 2.

Although he had far less formal education than most of the students taking the examinations. hence for almost a century. he read Greek. France. In his final year of study he wrote a paper on the theory of ´ equations and Bezout’s theorem. The corresponding problem of finding a harmonic function with the normal derivative boundary condition vf Z gðxÞ. is called the Neumann problem. Hebrew. If you wish to apply modern theory to any particular problem. His performance was so outstanding that he was appointed Professor of Astronomy and the Royal Astronomer of Ireland when he was still an undergraduate at Trinity. With the further development by Carl Gustav Jacobi (1804– 1851). In 1796 Poisson was sent to Fontainebleau to enroll in the Ecole Centrale. x 2G (13) where f(x) is a continuous function. D. 2. Poisson equation.A. Poisson’s ratio in elasticity. this method was more elegant than practical. by merely two equations involving Hamilton’s characteristic functions. Poisson’s integral. we are asked to find a harmonic function (meaning a function satisfying the Laplace equation) f(x) that fulfills the boundary condition (13). The question of whether a solution of a Dirichlet or a Neumann problem exists. ¨ This situation. Poisson brackets in differential equations.5. His teachers Laplace and Lagrange quickly saw his mathematical talents and they became friends for life. He soon showed great talents for learning. At the age of 5. This is known as the Dirichlet problem. Poisson Simeon-Denis Poisson (1781–1840) was born in Pithiviers. He entered Trinity College. However. he was acquainted with half a dozen of oriental languages. for example. is of great importance in mathematics and physics alike. he achieved the top place.H. and this was of such quality that he was allowed to graduate in 1800 without taking the final examination. which did not have much to add to his ideas and only had to take them more seriously . vn x 2G (14) where n is the outward normal of G. Poisson made great contributions in both mathematics and physics. It was quite unusual for anyone to gain their first appointment in Paris. His teachers at the Ecole Centrale were highly impressed and encouraged him to sit in the entrance examinations for the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. changed when Irwin Schrodinger (1887–1961) introduced the revolutionary wave-func¨ tion model for quantum mechanics in 1926. Existence and uniqueness The potential problems we solve are normally posed as boundary value problems For example. Obviously. however. Schrodinger had expressed Hamilton’s significance quite unequivocally: ‘The modern development of physics is constantly enhancing Hamilton’s name. given a closed region U with the boundary G and the boundary condition f Z f ðxÞ. it was possible to determine the 10 planetary orbits around the sun. this theory is generally known as the Hamilton– Jacobi Principle. a feat normally required the solution of 30 ordinary differential equations. and Poisson’s constant in electricity [128]. Hamilton was knighted at the age of 30 for the scientific work he had already achieved. at 10. Poisson was named Associate Professor in 1802. the premiere institution at the time. By this construction. and when it exists. His name is attached to a wide variety of ideas. after Carl Gottfried Neumann (1832–1925). Dublin at the age of 18. Among Hamilton’s most important contributions is the establishment of an analogy between the optical theory of systems of rays and the dynamics of moving bodies. Hamilton’s great method was more praised than used [129]. Hamilton William Rowan Hamilton (1805–1865) was a precocious child. if we cannot guarantee . you must start with putting the problem in Hamiltonian form’ [15]. mainly on the strong recommendation of Laplace. named after Dirichlet. His famous analogy between optics and mechanics virtually anticipated wave mechanics. 3. as most of the top mathematicians had to serve in the provinces before returning to Paris.-D. and Latin. He proceeded immediately to the position equivalent to the present-day Assistant Professor in the Ecole Polytechnique at the age of 19.6. he developed the Poisson eqaution (12) to solve the electrical field caused by distributed electrical charges in a body. for example. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 273 2. Cheng. and Professor in 1806 to fill the position vacated by Fourier when he was sent by Napoleon to Grenoble. especially mathematics. In 1813 in his effort to answer the challenge ´ question for the election to the Academie des Sciences.T. whether it is unique or not.

which can be described as follows. hence U must exist! It seems that the Dirichlet problem is proven. Corners and edges. This physical state obviously exists. in which he developed Green’s identities and Green’s functions. If the tip of the deformed surface is sharp enough. Consider a deformable body whose surface is pushed inward by a sharp spine. it is unique. there exists a harmonic function U (an assumption that will be justified later) that satisfies the boundary condition U ZK 1 on G r (15) Fig. which is a surface in the C1. We may argue that if the mathematical problem correctly describes a physical problem. G is known as the Green’s function. such as the well-known Galerkin scheme. for example. (For interior Neumann problem. He reasoned that if for a given closed region U. (See Kellogg [100] for more discussion). and mixed type. An example was ´ presented by Henri Leon Lebesgue (1875–1941)[112]. Side view of a surface deformed by a sharp spine. The curve is given by yZexp(K1/x). given by the revolution of the curve yZexp(K1/x) (see Fig. is more difficult to prove (see the classical monograph Foundations of Potential Theory [100] by Oliver Dimon Kellogg (1878– 1932) for the full exposition. 2. then the tip is an exceptional point and the Dirichlet problem is not always solvable.T. whose shape takes the form of G. as it is equivalent to prescribing a value inside the domain! Generally speaking.100]. on which a tangent plane does not exist. . the existence question seems to be moot. the bounding surface G needs to be a ‘Liapunov surface’. but not necessarily a curvature.166] ðð 1 vG fðxÞ Z K dS. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 the existence of a solution. which is a more general class than the Liapunov surface. Furthermore. which is taken for granted at this point. because the physical state exists. then one can define the function 1 G Z CU r (16) It is clear that G satisfy the the Laplace equation everywhere except at the pole. Since (17) gives the solution of the Dirichlet boundary value problem. the uniqueness is only up to an arbitrarily additive constant. but may not be unique. If a solution exists.H. Green in his 1828 seminal work [81]. and for the Neumann problem. On the other hand. known as the Lipschitz surface. Cheng. The existence theorem. the existence and uniqueness theorem for potential problems has been proven for interior and exterior boundary value problems of the Dirichlet. x2G. are not allowed in this class. if the deformed surface closes onto itself to become a single line protruding into the body. Neumann. where it is singular. such that edges and corners are allowed in the geometry. then a mathematical solution must exist. in numerical solutions such as the finite element method and the boundary element method.) To a physicist. mathematicians can construct counter examples for which a solution does not exist. In this case. whose boundary value is given by a continuous function f(x). where 0%a!1. the existence theorem has been proven for surface G in the C0. if a solution exists. the smoothness of the surface is such that on every point there exists a tangent plane and a normal. This puts great restrictions on the type of problems that one can solve. the effort of finding it can be in vain. induced by a single charge located inside U.-D. D.) For the existing proofs. The question of uniqueness is easier to answer: for the Dirichlet problem. G takes the null value at the boundary G. Furthermore.1 class [42]. Put it simply. Green went on to prove that for a harmonic function f. the solution is often sought in the weak sense by minimizing an energy norm in some sense. x 2U (17) f 4p vn G where dS denotes surface integral. it is unique to within an arbitrary constant. however. But is it? In fact. For example. then a Dirichlet condition cannot be arbitrarily prescribed on this degenerated boundary. presented a similar argument. How can we be sure that U exists for an arbitrary closed region U? Green argued that U is nothing but the electrical potential created by the charge on a grounded sheet conductor. 2 for a two-dimensional projection). Robin. hence the solution exists! The above proof hinges on the existence of U. then we cannot tie the solution to the unique physical state that we are modeling.274 A. if the bounding surface and the boundary condition satisfy certain smoothness condition [97.a continuity class. its solution is represented by the boundary integral equation [100.

Kellogg Oliver Dimon Kellogg (1878–1932) was born at Linnwood. Cheng. Dirichlet is also well known for his papers on conditions for the convergence of trigonometric series. Erik Ivar Fredholm (1866–1927) had just made progress in proving the existence of Dirichlet problem using integral equations. where he received his BA in 1899. ¨ he was offered his chair at Gottingen. Dirichlet had a high teaching load and in 1853 he complained in a letter to his pupil Leopold Kronecker (1823–1891) that he had 13 lectures a week to give. in which he coined the term ‘logarithmic potential’ [128]. Encouraged by Alexander von Humboldt (1769– 1859). Dirichlet made great contributions to the number theory. and the two exerted considerable influence on each other in their researches in number theory. At the age of ` 16 Dirichlet entered the College de France in Paris. He attended lectures by David Hilbert (1862–1943). Finally. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 275 3. where Fredholm’s solution did not apply. who made recommendations on his behalf. There he had the good fortune to be taught by Georg Simon Ohm (1789–1854). however. where he had the leading mathematicians at that time as teachers. Carl Gottfried Neumann (1832–1925) was the son of Franz Neumann (1798–1895). From 1827 Dirichlet taught at the University of Breslau. failed to answer the question satisfactorily in his thesis and several subsequent papers.H. His interest in mathematics was aroused as an undergraduate at Princeton University. which gained him instant fame. Because of this work Dirichlet is considered the founder of the theory of Fourier series [128].1. on Gauss’s death in 1855. he moved to Berlin in 1828 where he was appointed in the Military College. and Tubingen. Kellogg was hard to blame because similar errors were later made by ´ both Hilbert and Jules Henri Poincare (1854–1912). He was awarded a fellowship for graduate studies and obtained a Master degree in 1900 at Princeton. he never referred to these papers in his later work. Soon afterward. At that time. . 3. He died in 1859 after a heart attack. The same fellowship allowed him to spend the next year at the University of Berlin. including ¨ Halle. Kellogg. Basel. The analytic number theory may be said to begin with him. which led him to the Dirichlet problem concerning harmonic functions with given boundary conditions. Dirichlet returned to Germany the same year seeking a teaching position. With the realization of his errors.3. Neumann ¨ was born in Konigsberg where his father was the Professor of Physics at the university. Neumann Johann Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (1805–1859) ¨ was born in Duren. He ¨ then moved to Gottingen to pursue his doctorate. Dirichlet 3. He taught several universities. In mechanics he investigated Laplace’s problem on the stability of the solar system. Hilbert was excited about the development and suggested Kellogg to undertake research on the Dirichlet problem for boundary containing corners. he was appointed a Professor at the University of Berlin where he remained from 1828 to 1855. Again with von Humboldt’s help. potential theory. he moved to a chair at the University of Leipzig in 1868. Sadly he was not to enjoy this new position for long. and he married Rebecca Mendelssohn. and electrodynamics. His mother was a sisterin-law of Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784–1846). In 1825.T. He also made important pure mathematical contributions such as the order of connectivity of Riemann surfaces. French Empire (present day Germany).-D. It was therefore a relief when. one of the composer Felix Mendelssohn’s sisters. During the 1860s Neumann wrote papers on the Dirichlet principle. He worked on a wide range of topics in applied mathematics such as mathematical physics. in addition to many other duties. He attended the Jesuit College in Cologne at the age of 14.2. and to this date the proof of Dirichlet problem for boundary containing corners has not been accomplished. who taught at Konigsberg. An improved salary from the university put him in a position to marry.A. D. and would stay there until his retirement in 1911. Dirichlet was elected to the Berlin Academy of Sciences in 1831. a famous physicist who made contributions in thermodynamics. Neumann entered the ¨ University of Konigsberg and received his doctorate in 1855. Dirichlet had a lifelong ¨ friendship with Jacobi. he published his first paper proving a case in Fermat’s Last Theorem. Pennsylvania. He worked on his habilitation at the University of Halle in 1858.

T. first published in 1929. Gauss in 1813 only presented a few special cases in the form [99] ðð nx dS Z 0 (19) G where nx is the x-component of outward normal.z). However. a job he held for the rest of his life. Green in 1828 [81] presented the three Green’s identities. In 1807 Gauss was finally able to secure a position as the Director of the newly ¨ founded observatory at the Gottingen University.276 A. C is the closed contour bounding S. This is considered a great loss for mathematics—just imagine how much more mathematics he could have accomplished. is commonly attributed to Gauss [70]. 4. and ds denotes line integral. also called Gauss’s theorem.1. Even as a student.y). At the age of 22. including the method of least squares and the discovery of how to construct the regular 17-gon. The first identity is ðð ððð vj dS (23) ðfV2 j C Vf$VjÞ dV Z f vn U G 4. Two years later he joined the University of Missouri as an Assistant Professor. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777–1855) was born an infant prodigy into a poor and unlettered family. and he earned his fame only posthumously. which transforms a volume integral into a surface integral ððð ðð V$A dV Z A$n dS (18) U G The above equation easily leads to the second identity  ððð ðð  vj vf 2 2 Kj ðfV j K jV fÞ dV Z f dS (24) vn vn U G Using the fundamental solution of Laplace equation 1/r in (24). He was supported by the Duke Ferdinand of Braunschweig to receive his education.-D. However. n is the unit outward normal of G. The general theorem should be credited to Mikhail Vasilevich Ostrogradski (1801–1862). and AzZAz(x. Cheng. he published as his doctoral thesis the most celebrated work. presented by George Gabriel Stokes (1819–1903). One of the most celebrated technique of this type is the divergence theorem. AyZ Ay(x.H. . two sided curve surface. Gauss where A is a vector. Reduction in dimension and Green’s formula A key to the success of boundary element method is the reduction of spatial dimension in its integral equation representation. leading to a more efficient numerical discretization. Kellogg continued to work at Harvard until his death from a heart attack suffered while climbing [13. The most important work related to the boundary integral equation solving potential problems came from George Green. the third identity is obtained  ðð  1 1 vf vð1=rÞ Kf fZ dS (25) 4p r vn vn G which is exactly the formulation of the present-day boundary element method for potential problems. his early career was not very successful and had to continue to rely on the financial support of his benefactor. Early development of this type was found in the work of Lagrange [110] and Laplace. whose groundbreaking work remained obscure during his lifetime. who in 1826 presented the following result to the Paris ´ Academie des Sciences [99] ððð ðð a$Vf dV Z fa$n dS (21) U G where a is a constant vector. Eq.z). he corrected an error in his father’s payroll calculations as a child of three. which transforms a surface integral into a contour integral [162] ðð ð ðV !AÞ$n dS Z A$ds (22) S C where S is an open. He spent the next 14 fruitful years at Missouri until he was called by Harvard University in 1919. He devised a procedure for calculating the orbits planetoids that included the use of least square that he developed. Using his superior method. and ðð A$n dS Z 0 (20) G where the components of A are given by AxZAx(y. His book ‘Foundations of Potential Theory’ [100]. Another useful formula is the Stokes’s theorem. Gauss devoted more of his time in theoretical astronomy than in mathematics. remains among the most authoritative work to this date. D.59]. According to a well-authenticated story. (18). he made major discoveries. the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. and dV stands for volume integral. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 Kellogg received his PhD in 1903 and returned to the United States to take up a post of instructor in mathematics at Princeton.

Green was sent to a private academy at the age of eight. In 1838–1839 he had two papers in hydrodynamics. The next time there existed a record about Green was in 1823. but never married her). and two papers on sound [82]. In 1822 he left Russia to study in Paris. and from whom Green could have acquainted himself to the advanced mathematics of his day in a backwater place like Nottingham. his work was virtually unknown. ‘I should also have gone blind if I had calculated in that fashion for 3 days’. This was the only formal education that he received until adulthood. was impressed by Green’s prowess in mathematics.T. and left school at nine. and astronomy. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 277 Gauss redid in an hour’s time the calculation on which Euler had spent 3 days. D. he joined the Nottingham Subscription Library as a subscriber. in 1828 he self-published one of the most important mathematical works of all times—An Essay on the Application of Mathematical Analysis to the Theories of Electricity and Magnetism [81]. he also pursued work in several related scientific fields. Despite these difficulties in life and his flimsy mathematical background. 4. each paid 7 shillings 6 pence. In the library he had access to books and journals. At the age of 30.2. His most important piece of work was discovered posthumously. Between 1822 and 1827 he attended lectures by Laplace.3. Gauss not only adorned every branches of pure mathematics and was called the Prince of Mathematicians. Adrien-Marie Legendre (1752–1833). At the year of Green’s death. but no one knew about it. . Green George Green (1793–1841) was virtually unknown as a mathematician during his lifetime. a sum equal to a poor man’s weekly wage. He brought the article to Paris and showed it to Jacques Charles Francois Sturm (1803–1855) ¸ and Joseph Liouville (1809–1882). elasticity. he was elected to a Parse Fellowship at Cambridge. two on electricity published by the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Cheng. and his mother died in 1825. Green’s 1828 essay had profoundly influenced Thomson and James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) in their study of electrodynamics and magnetism.-D. no one knew how. he stayed at Cambridge for a few years to work on his own mathematics and to wait for an appointment. mechanics. he studied electromagnetism. Also he had the opportunity to meet with people from the higher society. he had to work full time in the mill. He started to look for a copy. The methodology has also been applied to many classical fields of physics such as acoustics. One subscriber. and one on hydrodynamics published by the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Several years later. Dyson (1923-) delivered speeches on the role of Green’s functions in the development of 20th century quantum electrodynamics [33]. The essay had 51 subscribers. Green finally enrolled at Cambridge University at the age of 40. It happened that Hopkins had three copies. He encouraged and recommended Green to attend Cambridge University. William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) (1824–1907) was admitted to Cambridge. rescuing it from sinking into permanent obscurity [33]. The next 5 years was not easy for Green. He died in 1841 at the age of 47. Ukraine. For the next 20 years after leaving primary school. Later Thomson republished Green’s essay. He made rapid progress in Paris and soon began to publish papers in the Paris Academy. From 1833 to 1836. two papers on reflection and refraction of light. he first noticed the existence of Green’s paper in a footnote of a paper by Robert Murphy. After his graduation in 1845.H. which he published in Paris in 1832. 4. Fourier. had two daughters born (he had seven children with Jane Smith. Gauss remarked unkindly. Even the whole country of England in those days was scientifically depressed as compared to the continental Europe. he had to return to Nottingham in 1840. During the bicentennial celebration of Green’s birth in 1993. Ostrogradski Mikhail Vasilevich Ostrogradski (1801–1862) was born in Pashennaya.31]. and Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1789–1857). a junior position. As the son of a semiliterate. Green wrote three more papers. They were the first to have successfully transmitted telegraph [30. He entered the University of Kharkov in 1816 and studied physics and mathematics. Due to poor health. and before his departure to France to enrich his education.A. Together with Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804–1891). Poisson. for a work which they could hardly understood a word. however. he mentioned it to his teacher William Hopkins (1793–1866). physicists Julian Seymour Schwinger (1918–1994) and Freeman J. Thomson was immediately excited about what he had read in the paper. and which sometimes was said to have led to Euler’s loss of sight. but well-to-do Nottingham baker and miller. Sir Edward Bromhead. After graduating in 1837. While studying the subject of electricity as a part of preparation for his Senior Wrangler exam. In 1839. and hydrodynamics. Hence it was a mystery how Green could have produced as his first publication such a masterpiece without any guidance. notably physics. His papers at this time showed the influence of the mathematicians in Paris and he wrote on physics and the integral calculus. These papers were later incorporated in a major work on hydrodynamics. At the time of his death.

Poisson and Adhemar Jean ´ Claude Barre de Saint-Venant (1797–1886) had already considered the problem. In 1837 he entered Pembroke College of Cambridge University. Largely on the strength of these papers he was elected an academician in the applied mathematics section. corresponds to the interior and exterior problems. After completing the research Stokes discovered that Jean Marie Constant Duhamel (1797–1872) had already obtained similar results for the study of heat in solids. It is not known whether any student could answer the question at that time. the chair Newton once held. The mathematical theorem that carries his name. Inspired by the recent work of Green. Stokes started to undertake research in hydrodynamics and published papers on the motion of incompressible fluids in 1842. 5. Integral equations Inspired by the use of influence functions as a method for solving problems of beam deflection subject to distributed load. Fredholm started the investigation of integral equations 73. He was appointed Secretary of the Society in 1854.x) are given continuous functions. After he had deduced the correct equations of motion. xÞ Z (28) vnðxÞ rðx. and m(x) is the solution sought. f(x) is the Dirichlet boundary condition. or a ‘double-layer potential’. f(x) and K(x. By the virtue of the above Fredholm theorem. Maxwell. Pembroke College immediately gave him a fellowship. and Peter Guthrie Tait (1831–1901). xÞmðxÞdSðxÞ. and was awarded the Rumford Medal in 1852.T. xÞ Z (31) vnðxÞ rðx. He was the President of the Society from 1885 to 1890. x 2G (30) vnðxÞ G Here again the upper and lower sign. Stokes continued his investigations. In 1849 Stokes was appointed the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge. the lower sign the exterior problem. xފ mðxÞdSðxÞ. the full solution of the boundary value problem is given by ðð v½1=rðx. Ireland. xÞ . since Claude Louis Marie ´ Henri Navier (1785–1836). who had among his students Thomson.-D. In 1840 he wrote on ballistics and introduced the topic to Russia.278 A. and the kernel is given by   v 1 Kðx. Stokes discovered that again he was not the first to obtain the equations. Fredholm [67] proved in 1903 the existence and uniqueness of solution of the linear integral equation ðb mðxÞ K l Kðx. x 2G (27) G In the above the upper sign corresponds to the interior problem. double integrals and potential theory to the Academy of Sciences. The viscous flow in slow motion is called Stokes flow. s is the distribution density.H. first appeared in print in 1854 as an examination question for the Smith’s Prize. For the Neumann problem. He was coached by William Hopkins. Stokes Stokes received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society in 1893. Today the fundamental equation of hydrodynamics is called the Navier–Stokes equations. respectively. and the kernel K is given by   v 1 Kðx. we can utilize the following boundary equation: ðð vfðxÞ ZG2psðxÞ C Kðx. xÞsðxÞdSðxÞ. and had the reputation as the ‘senior wrangler maker. m is the distribution density. 4. D. He was considered as the founder of the Russian school of theoretical mechanics [128]. (26) is known as the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. The Fredholm theorem guarantees the existence and uniqueness of m. Eq. vf/vn is the Neumann boundary condition. and served as the Master of Pembroke College in 1902–1903 [128]. a% x% b (26) a George Gabriel Stokes (1819–1903) was born in Skreen. He presented three important papers on the theory of heat. G is the bounding Liapunov surface. G is a closed Liapunov surface. where l is a constant. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 Ostrogradski went to St Petersburg in 1828.’ In 1841 Stokes graduated as Senior Wrangler (the top First Class degree) and was also the first Smith’s prizeman. we can solve the Dirichlet problems by the following formula [161] ðð fðxÞ ZH 2pmðxÞ C Kðx. Cheng. looking into the internal friction in fluids in motion. Stokes decided that his results were sufficiently different and published the work in 1845.4. Once the distribution density m is solved from (27) by some technique. xÞ The kernel is known as a dipole. County Sligo. which he held until 1885. In 1851 Stokes was elected to the Royal Society. Stokes theorem. xÞmðxÞdx Z f ðxÞ. x 2U (29) fðxÞ Z vnðxÞ G which is a continuous distribution of the double-layer potential on the boundary.

For mixed boundary value problems. is called the ‘direct method’. Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1789–1857) was born in Paris during the difficult time of French Revolution. Laplace and Lagrange were frequent visitors at the Cauchy family home. It is of interest to mention that for a Dirichlet problem. while (34) contains a strong (non-integrable) singularity. ´ ` to Louis Poinsot (1777–1859). Similar integral representation exists in the complex variable domain. from which came the Cauchy integral formula. However. (27) or (35). and C is a smooth.’ because the distribution density m or s. When z is located on the contour. xÞ G which is the distribution of the source. and was ´ later admitted to the Academie. closed contour in the complex plane. Although he continued to publish important pieces of mathematical work. without a fast enough computer to solve the resultant matrix system. on the boundary. which is denoted as CPV under the integral sign. In 1805 Cauchy took the entrance examination of the Ecole Polytechnique and was placed ´ second. expressed as ð 1 f ðzÞ dz (37) f ðzÞ Z 2pi z K z C where z and z are complex variables. he became ill and decided to returned to Paris to seek a teaching position. In 1814 he published the memoir on definite integrals that later became the basis of his theory of complex functions.A. (37) can be exploited for the numerical solution of boundary value problems. This idea of interpreting and handling this type of strong singularity was introduced by Cauchy in 1814 [34]. he lost to Legendre. The integral in (34) needs to be interpreted in the ‘Cauchy principal value’ sense. the following pair ðð 1 fðxÞ Z sðxÞdSðxÞ. We notice that (33) contains a weak (integrable) singularity as x/x. specializing in highways and bridges. x 2G (35) vnðxÞ CPV vfðxÞ Z vnðxÞ ðð   v v1=rðx. but then he was finally appointed Assistant Professor of Analysis there. In 1817.-D. is solved. x 2Gf (33) rðx. (33) however is a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind.H. 5. f is an analytic function. a procedure known as the complex variable boundary element method. xÞ mðxÞdSðxÞ. Cheng. a pair of integral equations is needed. xފ fðxÞ Z mðxÞdSðxÞ. He worked there for 3 years and performed excellently. xÞ G whose solution is unstable [175]. For the ‘single-layer method’ applied to interior problems. x 2U (32) fðxÞ Z rðx. D. vnðxÞ x 2Gq (34) can be. the single-layer method reduces to using (33) only. not the potential f itself. which solves f or vf/vn on the boundary. the idea was impractical. hence further development of utilizing these equations was limited to analytical work. he was appointed as a Junior Engineer to work on the construction of Port ´ Napoleon in Cherbourg.and double-layer methods are referred to as the ‘indirect methods. or the ‘single-layer potential’. xފ sðxÞdSðxÞ. On a smooth part of the boundary not containing edges and corners. and to Andre Marie Ampere (1775–1836) in competition for academic positions. z2C. Eq.’ This concept was introduced by Jacques Salomon Hadamard (1865–1963) in 1908 [85]. Eq. Cauchy’s father was active in the education of young Augustin-Louis. Fredholm suggested a discretization procedure to solve the above equations. In 1807 he entered Ecole des Ponts et Chaussees to study engineering. the potential for the whole domain is given by ðð 1 sðxÞdSðxÞ.T. In that case. Cauchy in 1825 [35] presented one of the most important theorems in complex variable—the Cauchy integral theorem. In 1816 he won the Grand Prix ´ of the Academie des Sciences for a work on waves. he was able to . Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 279 After solving for s. Cauchy vfðxÞ Z vnðxÞ ðð CPV v½1=rðx. vnðxÞ HFP vnðxÞ x 2G (36) The integral in (36) contains a ‘hypersingularity’ and is marked with HFP under the integral sign. In 1812. In boundary element terminology. A ‘double-layer method’ can also be formulated to solve mixed boundary value problems using the following pair of equations ðð v½1=rðx. In 1815 Cauchy lost out to Jacques Philippe Marie Binet (1786–1856) for a mechanics chair at the Ecole Polytechnique. should be used. the second kind equation.1. applied on the Dirichlet part Gf and the Neumann part Gq of the boundary. standing for ‘Hadamard finite part. The numerical method based on Green’s third identity (25). Cauchy’s initial attempts in seeking academic appointment were unsuccessful. respectively. At the age of 20. and Lagrange particularly took interest in Cauchy’s mathematical ability. the result of the Cauchy principle value limit is just (30). and finished school in 2 years. the single.

It ´ was said that when Cauchy read to the Academie des Sciences in Paris his first paper on the convergence of series. In 1909 he ` was appointed to the Chair of Mechanics at the College de France. in particular it contained the first general work on singularities. Among the other topics he considered were elasticity. not a physicist. yet he always argued strongly that he was a mathematician. when France fell to Germany in 1940.79]. In 1831 Cauchy went to Turin and later accepted an offer to become a Chair of Theoretical Physics. The formulation of elementary calculus in modern textbooks is essentially what Cauchy expounded in his three great ´ treatises: Cours d’Analyse de l’Ecole Royale Polytechnique ´ sume des Lecons sur le Calcul Infinitesimal ´ ´ (1821). Sweden. he wrote in 1936: ‘. Due to his political and religious views. Cheng. having produced five textbooks and over 800 articles. where his father taught. During this time he published his famous determinant inequality. Stieltjes discovered a gap in his proof and never submitted an entry. escaped to the United States where he was appointed to a visiting position at Columbia University. D. coding theory. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 substitute for Jean-Baptiste Biot (1774–1862). The next 4 years Hadamard was first a lecturer at Bordeaux. Laplace hurried home to verify that he had not made mistake ´ ´ of using any divergence series in his Mecanique Celeste. His thesis on functions of a complex variable was one of the first to examine the general theory of analytic functions. Cauchy was staunchly Catholic and was politically a royalist. He regained his position at the Academie but not his teaching positions because he had refused to take an oath of allegiance to the new regime. He left America in 1944 and spent a year in England before returning to Paris after the end of the war. In 1897 Hadamard resigned his chair in Bordeaux and ` moved to Paris to take up posts in Sorbonne and College de France. By 1830 the political events in Paris forced him to leave Paris for Switzerland. he continued to have difficulty in getting appointment. Re ¸ ´ (1823). hydrodynamics and boundary value problems. Cauchy was probably next to Euler the most published author in mathematics. It was a good mathematics teacher turned him around. Hadamard. His famous 1898 work on geodesics on surfaces of negative curvature laid the foundations of symbolic dynamics. in arithmetic. In the following year he published Lecons sur le ¸ calcul des variations. where he obtained his doctorate in 1892. Cauchy and his contemporary Gauss were credited for introducing rigor into modern mathematics. He introduced the concept of a well-posed initial value and boundary value problem.T. and then promoted to Professor of Astronomy and Rational Mechanics in 1896. until the fifth grade. Hadamard continued to receive prizes for his research and was honored in 1906 with the election as the President of the French Mathematical Society. and returned to Paris in ´ 1838. In 1884 Hadamard ´ was placed first in the entrance examination for Ecole ´ Normale Superieure.280 A. 5. Near the end of 1912 Hadamard was elected to the Academy of Sciences to ´ succeed Poincare. Fredholm Jacques Salomon Hadamard (1865–1963) began his ´ schooling at the Lycee Charlemagne in Paris. had been put forward by Charles Hermite (1822–1901) with his friend Thomas Jan Stieltjes (1856– 1894) in mind to win it. Cauchy ¸ was also credited for setting the mathematical foundation for complex variable and elasticity.128]. After his baccalaureate. The basic equation of elasticity is called the Navier–Cauchy equation [8.-D. geometrical optics. and other areas.3. He soon lost all his positions in Paris. and later for Poisson. The topic proposed for the prize. 5.2. which are important in the theory of integral equations. It was not until 1821 that he was able to obtain a ` full position replacing Ampere.H. His research turned more toward mathematical physics. Chair of ` Mathematical Physics at the College de France. which helped lay the foundations of functional analysis (the word ‘functional’ was introduced by him). In the same year Hadamard received the Grand ´ Prix des Sciences Mathe matique for his paper Erik Ivar Fredholm (1866–1927) was born in Stockholm. Hadamard ‘Determination of the number of primes less than a given number’. He was lauded as one of the last universal mathematicians whose contributions broadly span the fields of mathematics. I was last or nearly last’. and Lecons sur le Calcul Differentiel (1829). He lived to 98 year old [118. In his first few years at school he was not good at mathematics. After the start of World War II. Then in 1912 he was appointed as Professor of ´ Analysis at the Ecole Polytechnique. In 1833 Cauchy went from Turin to Prague. being a Jew. matrices satisfying this relation are today called Hadamard matrices. concerning filling gaps in work of Bernhard Riemann (1826–1866) on zeta functions. Fredholm enrolled in 1886 . However.

The use of (42) in (41) produced the integral representation for dilatation ððð ðð F$uà dV (43) e Z V$u Z ðt$uà K tà $uÞdS C G U 6. In the same sequence of papers [10. He spent his whole career at the University of Stockholm being appointed to a chair in mechanics and mathematical physics in 1906. Through an ¨ arrangement he studied under Magnus Gosta Mittag-Leffler (1846–1927) at the newly founded University of Stockholm. one of the most celebrated relation in mechanics [10]. when he introduced the reciprocity theorem.11].137]. which was the only doctorate granting university in Sweden at that time. and also extended the forces and displacements concept to generalized forces and generalized displacements [136. requires the fundamental solution of a point force in infinite space. his Complete Works in mathematics comprises of only 160 pages. known as the Betti–Maxwell reciprocity theorem. an important step toward deriving Green’s formula was made by Enrico Betti (1823–1892) in 1872. Charles Emile Picard (1856–1941). In 1909–1910 he was Pro-Dean and then Dean in Stockholm University. John William Strutt (Lord Rayleigh) (1842–1919) further generalized the above theorem to elastodynamics in the frequency domain. (u. For example. was a generalization of the reciprocal principle derived earlier by Maxwell [117] applied to trusses. they satisfy the following reciprocal relation ððð ðð ðt 0 $u K t$u 0 ÞdS Z ðF$u 0 K F 0 $uÞdV (41) G U The above theorem. his papers required so much effort that he wrote only a few. The theory can be stated as follows: given two independent elastic states in a static equilibrium. Fredholm’s contributions quickly became well known. Hilbert immediately saw the importance and extended Fredholm’s work to include a complete eigenvalue theory for the Fredholm integral equation. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 281 at the University of Uppsala. Fredholm was appointed as a Lecturer in mathematical physics at the University of Stockholm. Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821–1894) in his study of acoustic problems presented the following equation in 1860 [87]. In the above we have * switched to the tensor notation. Cheng. and acquired his PhD from the University of Uppsala in 1893. originally designed to solve electrostatic problems. Although Vito Volterra (1860–1940) before him had studied the integral equation theory. The more useful formula that gives the integral equation representation of displacements. t and t 0 are tractions on a closed surface G. This work led directly to the theory of Hilbert spaces. In 1900 a preliminary report was published and the work was completed in 1903 [67]. In 1898 he received the degree of Doctor of Science from the same university. Extended Green’s formula Green’s formula (25). and n is the Poisson ratio.H. and F and F 0 are body forces in the enclosed region U. F) and (u 0 . Utilizing (44). Betti presented the fundamental solution known as the center of dilatation [114]   1 K 2n 1 à u Z V (42) 8pGð1 K nÞ r where G is the shear modulus. 1 fZ 4p ðð  G   cos kr vf v cos kr Kf dS r vn vn r (40) which can be compared to (25). and Hadamard. Carlo Somigliana (1860–1955) in 1885 [157] developed the following integral representation for displacements ðð ððð à uj Z ðti uà K tij ui ÞdS C Fi uà dV (45) ij ij G U * where k is a constant known as the wave number. In fact. He also derived the fundamental solution of (38) as fZ cos kr r (39) In the same paper he established the equivalent Green’s formula . was such a success that the idea was followed to solve many other physical problems [166]. Fredholm wrote papers with great care and attention so he produced work of high quality that quickly gained him a high reputation throughout Europe. F 0 ). Fredholm’s first publication ‘On a special class of functions’ came in 1890. rather than dilatation. and the second index in uij indicates the direction of the applied point force. It so impressed Mittag-Leffler that ´ he sent a copy of the paper to Poincare. where u and u 0 are displacement vectors. Fredholm is best remembered for his work on integral equations and spectral theory. After 1910 he wrote little beyond revisiting his earlier work [128]. t 0 . known as the Helmholtz equation V2 f C k 2 f Z 0 (38) where t is the boundary traction vector of the fundamental solution (42). which was provided by Kelvin in 1848 [101] i 1 1 h xi xj uà Z C ð3 K 4nÞdij (44) ij 16pGð1 K nÞ r r 2 where dij is the Kronecker delta. For elasticity. t.A.T. After receiving his Doctor of Science degree. However. This work was accomplished during the months of 1899 which Fredholm spent in Paris studying the ´ Dirichlet problem with Poincare. D. it was Fredholm who provided a more thorough treatment.-D.

generally known as the nuclei of strain [114]. we then obtain the boundary integral equation formulation (52). (45).. 6. is the elasticity counterpart of Green’s formula (25). He rejected the dominant physiology theory at that time. (49) becomes the boundary integral equation ð u Z ðuBà fGg K GBfugÞdx G (51) (52) As an example. He attended Potsdam Gymnasium where his father was a teacher.-D. and can be called the double-layer method. The generalized Green’s second identity in the form of (49) exists with the definition of the operators [83] Là fvg Z v2 Av v2 Bv v2 Cv vDv vEv C 2 K K C Fv C2 2 vxvy vx vy vx vy (54)     vu vu vu Bfug Z A C 2B nx C C C Eu ny vx vy vy Bà fvg Z     vAv vBv vCv K Dv nx C 2 C ny vx vx vy (55) where mi is the component of the distribution density vector m. known as the stress discontinuity. also known as the displacement discontinuity. and strongly argued on the ground of physics and chemistry principles. the complex variable potentials and integral equation representation for elasticity exist. we consider the general second order linear partial differential equation is two-dimension Lfug Z A v2 u v2 u v2 u vu vu C C 2 C D C E C Fu C 2B 2 vxvy vx vy vx vy (53) where the coefficients A. The counterpart of the single-layer method (33) is given by the Somigliana integral equation ðð ððð uj Z uà si dS C uà Fi dV (48) ji ji G U (56) If we require u and v to satisfy (50) and (51). Cheng. D. If we assume that u is the solution of the homogeneous equations LðuÞ Z 0 in U (50) Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821–1894) was born in Potsdam.. However. His interests at school were mainly in physics. Consider the generalized Green’s theorem [123] ð ð ðvLfug K uLà fvgÞdx Z ðvBfug K uBà fvgÞdx (49) U G In the above u and v are two independent vector functions. Volterra [183] in 1907 presented the dislocation solution of elasticity. called the Somigliana identity. Germany. B is the generalized boundary normal derivative. which was formulated by Gury Vasilievich Kolosov (1867–1936) in 1909 [102].1. Further dislocation solutions were given by Somigliana in 1914 [158] and 1915 [159]. These were further developed by Nikolai Ivanovich Muskhelishvili (1891–1976) [125. For a point dislocation in unbounded three-dimensional space. L is a linear partial differential operator. (47) is equivalent to (35) of the potential problem. as well as other singular solutions such as the force double and the disclination. Eq.H. (49) may be compared with the Green’s second identify (24). Eq. Similar to Cauchy integral (37) for potential problems.282 A. he accepted a government grant to study medicine at the Royal Friedrich-Wilhelm Institute of Medicine and Surgery in Berlin. due to the financial situation of his family. and v is replaced by the fundamental solution of the adjoint operator satisfying Là fGg Z d Eq. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 Eq. which was based on vital forces. Helmholtz where si is the component of the distribution density vector s. We can derive the above extended Green’s formulae in a unified fashion.B. His research career began in 1841 when he worked on the connection between nerve fibers and nerve cells for his dissertation. Là is its adjoint operator. The right hand side of (49) is the consequence of integration by parts of the left hand side operators.T. He graduated from the Medical . and F are functions of x and y. the resultant displacement field is 1 uà Z ijk 4pð1 K nÞ   1 2 ! 2 ð1 K 2nÞðdkj xi K dij xk K dik xj Þ K 2 xi xj xk r r (46) This singular solution can be distributed over the boundary G to give the Volterra integral equation of the first kind [182] ðð ððð uk Z uà nj mi dS C uà Fi dV (47) kji ki G U subject to certain boundary conditions. and Bà is its adjoint operator. respectively.126].

It was expected that he would won the senior wrangler position at graduation. Among Thomson’s contemporaries were Stokes. producing in 1863 ‘On the Sensation of Tone as a Physiological Basis for the Theory of Music’ [88]. a post that he held until his death in 1894 [32.128. rotation and deformation.-D. In the following year Betti visited the mathematical centres of Europe. When the Chair of Physics in Berlin became vacant in 1871.192]. in Gottingen Betti met and became friendly with Riemann. making many important ¨ mathematical contacts. he was appointed to the Chair of Anatomy and Physiology in Bonn. the Scuola Normale Superiore.3. In 1854 he moved to Florence where again he taught in a secondary school.A. a second wrangler in 1854. D. The fierce competition of the ‘tripos’. Thomson’s father ran a successful campaign to get his son elected to the chair at the age of 22. Over quite a number of years Betti mixed political service with service for his university. He spent all his spare time doing research. In 1863 Riemann left his post as Professor of ¨ Mathematics at Gottingen and move to Pisa. In 1849 Betti returned to his home town of Pistoia where he became a teacher of mathematics at a secondary school. 6. In 1846 the Chair of Natural Philosophy in Glasgow became vacant. He graduated in 1846 and was appointed as an assistant at the university. the absolute temperature scale (measured in ‘kelvins’). Betti During those days the political and military events in Italy were intensifying as the country came nearer to unification. James Thomson. In 1883. His study on vortex tube played an important role in the later study of turbulence in hydrodynamics. Helmholtz also studied mathematical physics and acoustics. complaints were made to the Ministry of Education from traditionalist that his lectures on anatomy were incompetent. Betti served the government of the new country as a member of Parliament. he finished the second wrangler in 1845. the mathematical analysis of electricity and magnetism.2. In 1859 there was a war with Austria and by 1861 the Kingdom of Italy was formally created. an honors examination instituted at Cambridge in 1824. In 1858 Helmholtz published his important paper on the motion of a perfect fluid by decomposing it into translation. In 1888.H. Some of his most important work was carried out during this time. he was able to negotiate a new Physics Institute under his control. he was ennobled by William I. William Thomson (Lord Kelvin) (1824–1907) was well prepared by his father. a position he held until his death. including ¨ Gottingen. and Paris. Thomson was foremost among the small group of British scientists who helped to lay the foundations of modern physics. Helmholtz reacted strongly to these criticisms and moved to Heidelberg in 1857 to set up a new Physiology Institute. 6. Back in Pisa he moved in 1859 to the Chair of Analysis and Higher Geometry. He attended Glasgow University at the age of 10.T. Cheng. Although at this time Helmholtz had gained a world reputation. His contributions to science included a major role in the development of the second law of thermodynamics. Helmholtz was released from his obligation as an army doctor and became an Assistant Professor and Director of the Physiological ¨ Institute at Konigsberg. hoping that warmer weather would cure his tuberculosis. and knot theory in topology. and a Senator in the Italian Parliament in 1884 [128]. In particular. but to his and his father’s disappointment. the geophysical . Kelvin Enrico Betti (1823–1892) studied mathematics and physics at the University of Pisa. a senior wrangler in 1841. attracted many best young minds to Cambridge in those days. In 1847 he published the important paper ‘Uber die Erhaltung der Kraft’ that established the law of conservation of energy. He served as an Undersecretary of State for education for a few months. Berlin. From around 1866 Helmholtz began to move away from physiology and toward physics. Under his leadership the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa became the leading Italian centre for mathematical research and education. he was appointed as the first President of the PhysikalischTechnische Reichsanstalt at Berlin. In the following year. the dynamical theory of heat. He was appointed as Professor of Higher Algebra at the University of Pisa in 1857. His famous theory of reciprocity in elasticity was published in 1872. Professor of Mathematics at the University of Glasgow. including the basic ideas for the electromagnetic theory of light. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 283 Institute in 1843 and had to serve as a military doctor for 10 years. Betti started to work on potential theory and elasticity. and later entered Cambridge University at 17. and Maxwell. for his career. Influenced by his friend Riemann. He served a term as Rector of the University of Pisa and in 1846 became the Director of its teacher’s college. In 1855.

In 1883 Volterra was given a Professorship in Rational Mechanics at Pisa. His participation in the telegraph cable project earned him the knighthood in 1866.T. He took his wife and several relatives sailed down the Nile during the last months of 1872. Beginning in 1912. especially his signing of . Following Betti’s death in 1892 he was also in charge of mathematical physics. Volterra began his studies at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of the University of Florence in 1878. Rayleigh had an attack of rheumatic fever and was advised to travel to Egypt for his health. the surface wave known as Rayleigh wave. At the end of 1884. a city on the Adriatic Sea. and mathematical biology. the hydrodynamic similarity theory. he graduated with a doctorate in physics at the University of Pisa. Maxwell died. Betti was impressed by his student that upon graduation he appointed Volterra his assistant. and the Rayleigh–Ritz method in elasticity. succeeding Eugenio Beltrami (1835–1900) as Professor of Mathematical Physics. and had to give up his fellowship at Trinity.4. and fundamental work in hydrodynamics. Rayleigh was married in 1871. integro-differential equations. There in his self-funded laboratory he Vito Volterra (1860–1940) was born in Ancona. who had the reputation of being an outstanding teacher in mathematics and mechanics. eventually published in 1877. It was during that trip that he started his work on the famous two volume treatise The Theory of Sound [137]. as well as by Stokes. Rayleigh continued his intensive scientific work to the end of his life. Rayleigh (a title he did not inherit until he was thirty years old) was greatly influence by Routh. In 1879. but also the first Smith’s prizeman. and became interested in acoustics. Cheng. As a direct result of his unwavering stand. Rayleigh made many important scientific contributions including the first correct light scattering theory that explained why the sky is blue. Rayleigh was faced with a difficult decision: knowing that he would succeed to the title of the third Baron Rayleigh. In 1882. Volterra regularly lectured at the Sorbonne in Paris.-D. Rayleigh resigned his Cambridge professorship and settled in his estate.168]. 6. In 1900 he moved to the University of Rome. By this time. Rayleigh was determined to devote his life to science so that his social obligations would not stand in his way. When Volterra was 2-year old. especially the proposed changes to the educational system. In 1904 Rayleigh won a Nobel Prize for his 1895 discovery of argon gas. the theory of elasticity. Around that time he read Helmholtz’ book On the Sensations of Tone [88]. Italy. President of the Royal Society of London (1905–1908). thus gaining the lead in world communication. In 1866. Cambridge.H. In 1872. He also served many public functions including being the President of the London Mathematical Society (1876–1878). After studying in a private school without showing extraordinary signs of scientific capability.284 A. Rayleigh was elected to a fellowship of Trinity College.167]. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 determination of the age of the Earth. the theory of soliton. As an undergraduate. the description of hereditary phenomena in physics. taking up a scientific career was not really acceptable to the members of his family. 6. and Rayleigh was elected to the vacated post of Cavendish Professor of Experimental Physics at Cambridge. he entered Trinity College. He became the third Baron Rayleigh and had to devote part of his time supervising the estate. Volterra—a Senator of the Kingdom of Italy since 1905— was one of the few who spoke out against fascism. who held the Chair of Rational Mechanics. D. in 1861. the theory of functions of a line (later called functionals after Hadamard). Rayleigh’s father died in 1873. At that time (1923–1926) he was President of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. his father died and he was raised by his uncle. and a large personal fortune [151.5. Volterra’s work encompassed integral equations. he was coached by Edward John Routh (1831–1907). He graduated in 1865 with top honors garnering not only the Senior Wrangler title. however. when the Fascists seized power in Italy. In 1922. Among his teachers were Betti. Volterra John William Strutt (Lord Rayleigh) (1842–1919) was the eldest son of the second Baron Rayleigh. returning to England in the spring of 1873. and Chancellor of Cambridge University (1908 until his death) [138. In the following year he won a competition to become a student at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. From 1893 until 1900 he held the Chair of Rational Mechanics at the University of Torino. and he was regarded as the most eminent man of science in Italy. His theoretical work on submarine telegraphy and his inventions of mirror-galvanometer for use on submarine cables aided Britain in laying the transatlantic cable.

Based on the same idea. Eq. he returned to St Petersburg where he spent the rest of his career. He held the post until his retirement in 1935. In 1907 Kolosov derived the solution for stresses around an elliptical hole. 7.6. During the World War II. and in other European countries. Volterra died in isolation on October 11. Pre-electronic computer era Numerical efforts solving boundary value problems predate the emergence of digital computers. and moved to live in Milan. Later he transferred to Pisa and had Betti among his teachers. for the following functional ððð ðð 1 vf PZ ðVfÞ2 dV K ðf K f ÞdS (57) 2 vn U G Carlo Somigliana (1860–1955) began his university study at Pavia. Somigliana was a classical physicist–mathematician faithful to the school of Betti and Beltrami. After working at Yurev University from 1902 to 1913. often in the subdomains. Ritz’ idea involves the use of variational method and trial functions to find approximate solutions of boundary value problems. known as the Trefftz method. Kolosov Gury Vasilievich Kolosov (1867–1936) was educated at the University of St Petersburg. the above equation is equivalent to the statement of Dirichlet problem V2 f Z 0 in U and f Z f ðxÞ on G (60) (59) Ritz proposed to approximate f using a set of trial functions ji by the finite series fz n X iZ1 a i ji (61) where ai are constant coefficients to be determined. It showed that the concentration of stress became far greater as finding its stationary value by variational method leads to ððð ðð   vf dP Z K dfV2 f dV K d ðf K f ÞdS Z 0 (58) vn U G Since the variation is arbitrary. proposed by Walter Ritz (1878–1909) in 1908 [140]. The Somigliana integral equation for elasticity is the equivalent of Green’s formula for potential theory. his refusal to swear the oath of allegiance to the fascist government imposed on all university professors. He studied the mechanics of solid bodies and the theory of elasticity.A. and Volterra among his contemporaries. in Paris. 6. Volterra was dismissed from his chair at the University of Rome in 1931. Somigliana was called to Turin in 1903 to become the Chair of Mathematical Physics. This leads to a linear system that can be solved for ai.-D. to produce numerical values. hence it is considered as a domain method. He graduated from Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa in 1881. (61) is substituted into the functional (57) and the variation is taken with respect to the n unknown coefficients ai. From that time on he lectured and lived mostly abroad.7. One important contribution is the Ritz method. When applied to subdomains. D.H. in Spain. In 1892.172] devised the boundary method. the Ritz method is considered to be the forerunner of the Finite Element Method [194]. as the result of a competition. Cheng. In the following year he was deprived of all his memberships in the scientific academies and cultural institutes in Italy.T. 1940 [28]. 5 years later. For example. His other contributions included seismic wave propagation and gravimetry [173]. The domain and boundary integration were performed. his apartment in Milan was destroyed. Erich Trefftz (1888–1937) in his 1926 article ‘A counterpart to Ritz method’ [171. where he was a student of Beltrami. Somigliana the radius of curvature at an end becomes small compared with the overall length of the hole. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 285 the ‘Intellectual’s Declaration’ against fascism in 1926 and. The above procedure involves the integration over the solution domain. In 1887 Somigliana began teaching as an assistant at the University of Pavia. we can write (57) in an alternate form   ððð ðð 1 vf 1 P ZK fV2 f dV K f K f dS (62) 2 vn 2 U G . He made important contributions in elasticity. he was appointed as University Professor of Mathematical Physics. particularly the complex variable theory. After the war he retreated to his family villa in Casanova Lanza and stayed active in research until near his death in 1955. Engineers needed to understand the issue of stress concentration in order to keep their design safe [128]. not a boundary method. Utilizing Green’s first identity (23). 6. He is also known for the Somigliana dislocations.

j Z 1. (69) can also be derived from a weighted residual formulation using Dirac delta function as the test function. n and xj 2G (69) This is a point collocation method and there is no integration involved. Rather than minimizing the functional over the whole boundary. xi are points on x-axis. y2 K z2 . y. To ensure that the boundary condition is satisfied. Trefftz proposed to use trial functions ji that satisfy the governing differential equation V 2 ji Z 0 (63) fðxÞ z ai Gðx.H. William John Macquorn Rankine (1820– 1872) in 1864 [135] showed that the superposition of sources and sinks along an axis. D. one can use the fundamental solution as the trial function. 3a). Following the same spirit of the Trefftz method. xy. and the functional is approximated as ! ðð X n n vji 1 X P zK ai a j K f dS (65) vn 2 iZ1 i i iZ1 G Taking variation of (65) with respect to the undetermined coefficients aj. x2 K y2 . yz. x 0 Þ (70) is needed to ensure the closure of the body. For Laplace equation. Various combinations were experimented to create different body shapes. . a simpler procedure is often taken. j Z 1.-D. one can enforce the boundary condition on a finite set of boundary points xj such that fðxj Þ z n X iZ1 where U is the uniform flow velocity. xi Þ. x 2Ue (75) L where L is a linear partial differential operator. j Z 1. we obtain the linear system n X iZ1 aij ai Z bj . For vanishing potential at infinity. In fact. xÞsðxÞdsðxÞ. the domain integral vanishes.U (71) but not necessarily the boundary condition. x 2U. s is the distribution density. Since fundamental solution satisfies the governing equation as LfGðx. and si are source/sink strengths. An auxiliary condition nC1 X iZ1 si Z 0 (74) ai ji ðxj Þ Z f ðxj Þ. there was no direct control over the shape. xi Þ (73) Eq. n (66) where aij Z 1 2 ðð G vji jj dS vn (67) This is called the method of fundamental solutions. It took Theodore ´ ´ von Karman (1881–1963) in 1927 [184] to propose a collocation procedure to create the arbitrarily desirable body shapes.and three-dimensional bodies [174]. xi Þ Z f ðxj Þ. created the field of uniform flow around closed bodies. The strengths can be determined by forcing the normal flux to vanish at n specified points on the meridional trace of the axisymmetric body. However. and d is the Dirac delta function. ´ ´ In 1930 von Karman [185] further proposed the distribution of singularity along a line inside a twodimensional streamlined body to generate the potential ð fðxÞ Z K ln rðx.. The superposition of fundamental solutions is a well known solution technique in fluid mechanics for exterior domain problems. n and xj 2G (72) With the substitution of (61) into (62). combining with a rectilinear flow. The above procedure requires the integration of functions over the solution boundary. L is a line inside the body. z2 K x2 .g (64) satisfies the governing equation as long as the source points xi are placed outside of the domain.. again the point collocation is applied: fðxj Þ z n X iZ1 ai Gðxj . known as Rankine bodies. (66) can be solved for ai.T. In the present day Trefftz method. these could be the harmonic polynomials ji Z f1. x 0 Þg Z dðx. and Ue is the external domain (Fig. . . and setting each part associated with the variations daj to zero. Cheng. the following auxiliary condition is needed . Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 n X iZ1 In making the approximation (61). Eq. G is the fundamental solution of that operator. xi . . He distributed nC1 sources and sinks of unknown strengths along the axis of an axisymmetric body. adding to a rectilinear flow fðxÞ zUx C nC1 X iZ1 ðð bj Z G vjj dS f vn (68) si 4prðx. It is obvious that the approximate solution where f is the perturbed potential from the uniform flow field.286 A. x. such as doublets (dipoles) and vortices. z. other singularities. can be distributed inside a body to create flow around arbitrarily shaped two..

Other early efforts in solving potential flows around obstacles. The method was further developed by Vandrey [177.T. Ritz’s dissertation on spectroscopic theory led to what is known as the Ritz combination principle. Ritz died at the age of 31. 7.H. iZ 1. In 1937 Muskhelishvili [124] derived the complex variable equations for elasticity and suggested to solve them numerically. Walter Ritz (1878–1909) was born in Sion in the southern Swiss canton of Valais. xi 2C (77) vnðxi Þ vnðxi Þ L where C is the boundary contour (Fig. can be found in a review [90]. Two methods of distributing sigularities: (a) sources. Dirichlet condition is enforced on the surface of the body. 3b) to generate the desirable potential. . In the next few years he continued his work on radiation.178] in 1951 and 1960. and doublets on a line L inside the airfoil.1. The debated was judged to Ritz’s favor. The drudgery of computation was a hindrance for their further development.A. These early ´ ´ attempts of Trefftz. where his rising aspirations were strongly influenced by Woldemar Voigt (1850–1919) and Hilbert. sinks. and variational method. As a specially gifted student. leaving behind a short but brilliant career in physics [69]. and formed a linear algebraic system consisting the unknown coefficients. In 1897 he entered the Polytechnic School of Zurich where he began studies in engineering. the ` young Ritz excelled academically at the Lycee communal of Sion.-D. Ritz Fig. electrodynamics. He soon found that he could not live with the approximations and compromises involved with engineering. Six weeks after the publication of this series. But in 1904 his health failed and he returned to Zurich. xÞ ZK sðxÞdsðxÞ. During the following 3 years. There he produced his opus magnum Recherches critiques sur ´ ´ ´ l’Electrodynamique Generale. Ritz unsuccessfully tried to regain his health and was outside the scientific centers. D. 3. However. xÞsðxÞdsðxÞ. hence these methods remained dormant for a while and had to wait for a later date to be rediscovered. Cheng. prior to the invention of electronic computers.n. so he switched to the more mathematically exacting studies in physics. ð sðxÞdsðxÞ Z 0 L (76) To find the distribution density. without the aid of modern computing tools these calculations had to be performed by human or mechanical computers. In 1901 he ¨ transferred to Gottingen.. and Muskhelishvili existed before the electronic computers. (b) vortices on the surface C of the airfoil. Neumann boundary condition is enforced on a set of discrete points xi. on the surface of the body ð vfðxi Þ v ln rðxi . von Karman. In 1908 he relocated to ¨ Gottingen where he qualified as a Privat Dozent. the integral equation becomes ð jðxÞ Z K ln rðx. In 1908–1909 Ritz and Einstein held a war in Physikalische Zeitschrift over the proper way to mathematically represent black-body radiation and over the theoretical origin of the second law of thermodynamics. The actual numerical implementation was accomplished in 1940 by Gorgidze and Rukhadze [78] in a procedure that resembled the present-day BEM: it divided the contour into elements. When this is written in terms of stream function j. magnetism. Prager [134] in 1928 proposed a different idea: vortices are distributed on the surface of a streamlined body (Fig. x 2Ue (78) C In this case. approximated the function within the elements. 3a). Lotz [113] in 1932 proposed the discretization of Fredholm integral equation of the second kind on the surface of an axisymmetric body for solving external flow problems. despite these heroic attempts. where Albert Einstein (1879–1955) was one of his classmates. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 287 The above review demonstrates that finding approximate solutions of boundary value problems using boundary or boundary-like discretization is not a new idea.

Feeling the responsibility for science. mathematics in engineering. being a Jew.-D. Mises was also the first editor ¨ of ZAMM (Zeitschrift fur Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik). Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 ´ ´ 7. There he became responsible for teaching and research in strength of materials. where he remained until his death. Trefftz felt and showed outgoing solidarity and friendship to von Mises. had to leave Germany in 1933. hydrodynamics. Muskhelishvili Nikolai Ivanovich Muskhelishvili (1891–1976) was a student at the University of St Petersburg. von Karman ´ ´ Theodore von Karman (1881–1963) was born in Budapest. Trefftz’s academic career began with his doctoral thesis in Strassburg in 1913. known as Karman’s vortex street.288 A. he was called into military service for the Austro-Hungarian Empire and became Head of Research in the Air Force. the family moved to Aachen. Trefftz had a lifelong friendship with von Mises. He was a soldier in the first World War. but soon changed to mathematics. Pafnuty Lvovich Chebyshev (1821–1894). Muskhelishvili took this topic as his graduation thesis and performed brilliantly that Kolosov decided to publish these results as a coauthor with his student in 1915. He was naturally influenced by the glorious tradition of the St Petersburg mathematical school. In 1944. now Hilbert. who founded the GAMM ¨ (Gesellschaft fur Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik) in 1922 together with Prandtl. He did further ¨ graduate studies at Gottingen and earned his PhD in 1908 under Ludwig Prandtl (1875–1953). in 1922. In 1908 Trefftz transferred to ¨ Gottingen. and Riemann. Carle David ´ Tolme Runge (1856–1927). In the year 1922 he got a call as a Full Professor with a Chair in the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Dresden. In 1927 he moved from the engineering to the mathematical and natural science faculty. Here after Gauss.3. Trefftz’s most important teachers were Runge. and Aleksandr Mikhailovich Lyapunov (1857–1918).4. He first visited the United States in 1926. In 1912. Felix Christian Klein (1849–1925). Austria. In 1911 he made an analysis of the alternating double row of vortices behind a ´ ´ bluff in a fluid stream. and aircraft structures. In 1930 he headed the Guggenheim Aeronautical Lab at the California Institute of Technology. but already in 1919 he got his habilitation and became a Full Professor of Mathematics in Aachen. In 1890. where he solved a mathematical problem of hydrodynamics. he took over the Presidentship of GAMM. 1888 in Leipzig. aerodynamics and aeronautics. Trefftz spent 1 year at the Columbia University.and aero-dynamics. He was trained as a mechanical engineer in Budapest and graduated in 1902. at the age of 31. Hungary. New York.H. being appointed there as a Chair in Technical (Applied) Mechanics. 7. Trefftz Erich Trefftz (1888–1937) was born on February 21. Cheng. he cofounded of the present NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and undertook America’s first governmental long-range missile and space-exploration research program. which began with Euler and continued by the prominent mathematicians such as Ostrogradsky. ¨ and then left Gottingen for Strassburg to study under the guidance of the famous Austrian applied mathematician Richard von Mises (1883–1953). In 1906 he began his studies in mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Aachen. This meeting became the forerunner of the International Union of Theoretical and ´ ´ Applied Mechanics (IUTAM) with von Karman as its honorary president. As an undergraduate student. and he clearly was in expressed distance to the Hitler regime until his early death in 1937. In 1935 . supersonic flight. His personal scientific work included contributions to fluid mechanics. After the war. where he led the effort to build the first helicopter. In World War I. 7. at that time the Mecca of mathematics and physics. In 1922 Muskhelishvili became a Professor at the Tbilisi State University. theory of elasticity. he was instrumental in calling an International Congress on Aerodynamics and Hydrodynamics at Innsbruck. the genius mechanician in modern fluid. where he built the world’s first wind tunnel. Muskhelishvili was greatly impressed by the lectures of Kolosov on the complex variable theory of elasticity.2.T. who. he became Professor and Director of Aeronautical Institute at Aachen. and Prandtl created a continuous progress of first-class mathematics. D. Dirichlet. He is widely recognized as the father of modern aerospace science [186]. and became the Editor of ZAMM in 1933 in full accordance with von Mises [160]. Hilbert and also Prandtl. Germany. turbulence theory.

and by Mitzner [122] using the retarded potential integral representation. For a two-dimensional problem. started around that time. the integration over a subinterval was made easy by assuming constant variation of the potential on the subinterval. The computation was carried out using a Monroe desk calculator [154]. An IBM 7090 mainframe computer was used for the numerical solution. and received many honors [196. The left hand side of (84) is null because the source point x is placed inside the body. the so-called ‘null-field integral equation’ or the ‘interior Helmholtz integral equation’ was utilized: ðð vGðx. corresponding to 72 unknowns (real and imaginary parts).H. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 289 he published the masterpiece Some Basic Problems of the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. Electronic computer era Although electronic computers were invented in the 1940s. at Tbilisi and the Georgian Branch of USSR Academy of Sciences. Some of the more significant ones are reviewed below. The problem of a steady state wave scattered from the surface of a circular cylinder was solved as a demonstration. and Copley in 1967 [40] and 1968 [41]. In the above f is the velocity potential and c is the wave speed. The surface was divided into triangular elements. The work was extended in 1967 by Shaw [152] to handle different boundary conditions on the obstacle surface. and iZ K1. President. k is the wave number. they did not become widely available to common researchers until the early 1960s. The scattering due to a box-shaped rigid obstacle was solved.T. It is of interest to observe that the discretization was restricted to 36 points. first in 1965 [188] for solving electromagnetic scattering problems. in Green’s second identity (24) produced the boundary integral equation  ð C ðð  1 t vf vG G sc K fsc (81) fsc ðx. Director. and then in 1969 [189] for acoustic problems. Friedman and Shaw [68] in 1962 solved the scalar wave equation V2 f K 1 v2 f Z0 c2 vt2 (79) in the time domain for the scattered wave field resulting from a shock wave impinging on a cylindrical obstacle. which is outside the wave field. Subsequent work using integral equation solving acoustic scattering problems included Chertock [37] in 1964. Waterman developed the null-field and T-matrix method. governed by the Helmholtz equation (38).197]. The above equation was combined with the exterior integral . Cheng. Copley was the first to report the non-uniqueness of integral equation formulation due to the existence of eigen frequencies. not simultaneous solution. Finite difference explicit time-stepping scheme was used and the resultant algebraic system required only successive. The 2-D boundary integral equation counterpart to the 3-D version (40) is where Ui is the interior of the scatterer. Similar to Friedman and Shaw [68]. In both the CHIEF and the T-matrix method. He held many positions such as Chair. Schenck [150] in 1968 presented the CHIEF (combined Helmholtz integral equation formulation). and G ZK 1 Kikr e 4pr (85) is the free-space Green’s function of Helmholtz equation. so the integration could be performed exactly. tÞ Z dS dt0 4p 0 vn vn G ð1Þ of the where H0 is the Hankel function pffiffiffiffiffiffi first kind of order zero. Banaugh and Goldsmith [5] in 1963 tackled the twodimensional wave equation in the frequency domain. Eq. A number of independent efforts of experimenting on boundary methods also emerged in the early 1960s. In the same year (1963) Chen and Schweikert [36] solved the three-dimensional sound radiation problem in the frequency domain using the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind  ikr  ðð vfðxÞ v e Z K2psðxÞ C sðxÞ dSðxÞ. i fZ 4 ð" C ð1Þ H0 ðkrÞ # ð1Þ vf vH0 ðkrÞ Kf ds vn vn (82) 8. x 2G vnðxÞ vnðxÞ r G (83) Problems of vibrating spherical and cylindrical shells in infinite fluid domain were solved. An IBM 704 mainframe was used. D. (81) was further differentiated with respect to time to create the equation for acoustic pressure. A larger linear system would have required the read/write operation on the tape storage and special linear system solution algorithm. due to the memory restriction of the computer. It is not surprising that the development of the finite element method [38]. the equation was discretized in space (boundary contour) and in time that resulted into a double summation. xÞ dSðxÞ. which allowed up to 1000 degrees of freedom to be modeled. x 2Ui (84) vnðxÞ vnðxÞ G where fsc is the scattered wave field. which won him the Stalin Prize of the First Degree. as well as a number of other numerical methods.-D. (82) is solved in the complex variable domain. xÞ vfðxÞ 0 Z fðxÞ K Gðx. Eq.A. Variables were assumed to be constant over space and time subintervals. The use of the fundamental solution i 1 hr (80) G Z K d K ðt K t0 Þ r c where d is the Dirac delta function.

e. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 equation to eliminate the non-unique solution. x 2G (89) vnðxÞ vnðxÞ G The formulation was the same as that of Lotz [113] and Vandrey [177. Maurice Aaron Jaswon (1922-) and Ponter [95] in 1963 employed Green’s third identity (25) for the numerical solution of prismatic bars subjected to torsion in two dimensions. xÞ Z psðxÞ K sðxÞdsðxÞ. similar rigorousness was not accomplished for another 40 years [72]. Returning to potential problems. xÞdsðxÞ. x 2C (92) x 2C ð86Þ The boundary conditions were Dirichlet type. Massonet [115] in 1965 discussed a number of ideas of using boundary integral equations solving elasticity problems. The initial development.  ð 1 v ln rðx. however. made important progresses in the theory of vector potentials (elasticity) through the study of singular integral equations. The following Fredholm equation of the second kind was used: ð 2 cos 4 cos a er dsðxÞ. was limited to one-dimensional singular integral equations. the same level of success was not found for elasticity problems. xÞ Z K2psðxÞ C sðxÞdsðxÞ. Nikolai Petrovich Vekua (1913–1993) [180]. f is the angle between the two vectors m and er. ð fðxÞ Z K ln rðx. and a is the angle between er and the boundary normal. er is the unit vector in the r direction. or the socalled ‘spurious frequencies’. x 2C (88) vnðxÞ vnðxÞ C was used. the Fredholm equation of the first kind as shown in (33).106]. this technique applies only to simply-connected domains. Kupradze in 1964 [105] and 1965 [104] discussed a method for finding approximate solutions of potential and elasticity static and dynamic problems. has been developed into a powerful numerical tool for the aircraft industry [90]. apparently good solutions were obtained. Although attempted by Fredholm himself. a mixed boundary value problem was solved using Green’s formula (86).197] and followed by Ilia Nestorovich Vekua (1907–1977) [179]. Solution were found using the iterative procedure of successively approximating the function m. xÞ vfðxÞ fðxÞ Z K ln rðx. plane elasticity problems were solved using the distribution of the radial stress field resulting from In the above C 0 is an arbitrary auxiliary boundary that encloses C. During the first decade of the 20th century. the solution is represented by the pair of integral equations ð ð 1 v ln rðx. xÞdsðxÞ. Numerical examples were given in two dimensions. C x 2C 0 ð94Þ In the second case. The above equation was supposedly to be unstable. led by Muskhelishvili [196. the introduction of the Fredholm integral equation theorem put the potential theory on a solid foundation. However. m is its magnitude. the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind ð vfðxÞ v ln rðx. p vnðxÞ vnðxÞ C a half-plane point force on the boundary. Hess [89] in 1962 and Hess and Smith [91] in 1964 utilized the single-layer method (30) to solve problems of external potential flow around arbitrary three-dimensional bodies ðð vfðxÞ v1=rðx. In the first case. x 2C mðxÞ tðxÞ Z mðxÞ K p r C (91) where t is the boundary traction vector. He called the approach ‘method of functional equations’. xÞ 1 dsðxÞ C vnðxÞ p ð sðxÞln rðx. For potential problems with the Dirichlet boundary condition f Z f ðxÞ. together with Solomon Grigorevich Mikhlin (1908–1991) [120] of St Petersburg.290 A. The development of multi-dimensional integral equations started in the 1960s [72]. Jaswon [97] and Symm [164] in 1963 used the singlelayer method.H. but in two dimensions.-D. In fact. and Victor Dmitrievich Kupradze (1903–1985) [104. m is the intensity of the fictitious stress. all associated with the Tbilisi State University. the Georgian school of elasticians. xÞ fðxÞ dsðxÞ. which solved only two-dimensional problems. Fredholm integral equation of the second kind was used to solve torsion problems: ð v ln rðx. For Neumann problems. Ponter [133] in 1966 extended it to multiple domain problems. x 2C (87) C for the solution of Dirichlet problems.178]. rather than the Fredholm integral equations. xÞ sðxÞdsðxÞ. D. Due to the half-plane kernel function used. 2p vnðxÞ p C C x 2U 0Z 1 2p ð C ð93Þ f ðxÞ v ln rðx. In the same paper [164]. i. This technique. Numerical solutions were carried out in two cases.T. and s is the distribution density. Cheng. x 2C (90) vnðxÞ C where C is the boundary contour. Started in the 1940s. The surface of the body was discretized into quadrilateral elements and the source density was assumed to be constant on the element. xÞ 1 fðxÞ Z dsðxÞ C f ðxÞ sðxÞln rðx. called the surface source method. xÞ fðxÞ Z KpmðxÞ K mðxÞdsðxÞ. which needs to .

low degree polynomials [74]. x 0 Þjðx 0 Þdx 0 Z f ðxÞ.-D. Kupradze’s technique of distributing fundamental solutions on an exterior. in which the singularities are located on the boundary. It considers the distribution of admissible solutions of discrete and unknown density on an external auxiliary boundary. Since C and C 0 are distinct contours. However. one-dimensional. xÞdsðxÞ. particularly in the solution of shells [71. the recent origin can be traced to Mathon and Johnston [116] in 1977. Early efforts focused on finding successive approximations of linear. Since the singularities were not located on the boundary C. Cheng. 176] and plates [103. certain physical quantities. For example. In the numerical implementation. Oliveira [130] in 1968 proposed the use of fundamental solution of point forces linearly distributed over linear segments to solve plane elasticity problems. Due to the existence of multiple spatial and the time dimensions in physical problems. and ud Z ij 1 2ð1 K nÞ     ni x j nj x i xi xj vr 1 vr K C dij ! ð1 K 2nÞ C2 2 r vn r r r vn (99) is the fundamental solution due to a dislocation (doublelayer potential) oriented in the xj direction. For potential problems. dislocations resulting from imperfections of crystalline structures. Different kinds of integral equations that may or may not have physical origin were investigated. two-dimensional problems with prescribed boundary displacement ui Z fi ðxÞ. This is why the term ‘functional equation’ was used instead. The formulations often borrow the physical idea of distributing concentrated loads. the effort of finding approximate solutions of integral equations existed since the major breakthrough of Fredholm in the 1900s. Another type of problems that has traditionally used boundary methods involves problems with discontinuities such as fractures. ð100Þ si ðxÞufij ðx. Another early monograph is by Mikhlin and Smolitsky [121] in 1967. the integral equations are often multi-dimensional. The resultant linear system was solved for the n discrete s values located at the quadrature nodes. in the form of (71). for example. xÞdsðxÞ K 1 2p ð C fi ðxÞud ðx. and the kernel h xi xj i 1 ð3 K 4nÞdij ln r K 2 ufij Z (98) 4Gð1 K nÞ r is the fundamental solution due to a point force (single-layer potential) in the xj direction. Atkinson [2] in 1976. such as displacements or stresses.61] in 1972 using Chebyshev and Jacobi polynomials for the approximation. the integrals in (94) were regular and could be numerically evaluated using a simple quadrature rule. hence the integral equations are typically singular. interface between dissimilar materials. auxiliary boundary has been considered by some as the origin of the ‘method of fundamental solutions’ [14]. These type of one-dimensional singular integral equations has also been solved using piece-wise. although can be viewed as a special case of the method of functional equations. xÞdsðxÞ. suffer a jump.62]. For the mathematical community. (94) is not an integral equation in the classical sense. C 0 was chosen as a circles. For example. We notice that the above equations involve the distribution of both the single-layer and the double-layer potential. Hence the method of fundamental solutions. was in fact independently developed. and other discontinuities.T. For static. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 291 be solved from (94). Eq.181]. . Gaussian quadrature with n nodes was used for the integration. (93) was then used to find solution at any point in the domain. the method of fundamental solutions often bypasses the integral equation formulation. xÞdsðxÞ K f ðxÞud ðx. The review presented so far has focused on the solution of physical and engineering problems. upon which n nodes were selected to place the singularity. uj ðxÞ Z ij p 2p i C C [65]. which is outside of the solution domain U. For elasticity problems. integral equation of this type 1 AðxÞjðxÞ C p a! x! b ðb a x 2U 1 0Z p x 2C 0 ð96Þ ð C Bðx 0 Þjðx 0 Þ 0 dx C x0 K x ðb a Kðx.H. the same technique was employed. The field flourished in the 1970 with the publication of several monographs— Kagiwada and Kalaba [98] in 1974. x 2C (95) the following pair of vector integral equations solve the boundary value problem: ð ð 1 1 si ðxÞufij ðx. Eq. The boundary conditions are satisfied by collocating at a set of boundary nodes. Another observation is that in (94) the center of singularity x is located on C 0 . Kupradze’s method was closely followed in Russia under the name ‘potential method’. ij ð97Þ where si is the distribution density (vector). which often results in integral equations [12. 159] over the physical surface. One of the first monographs on numerical solution of integral equations is ¨ by Buckner [29] in 1952. in most applications and other types were numerically investigated by Erdogan and Gupta [60. These discontinuities can be simulated by the distribution of singular solutions such as the Volterra [183] and Somigliana dislocations [158.A. In these cases. D. and non-singular integral equations.

292 A. The Institute was later known as A. As seen from the review above. From 1937 until his death. 8. He received many honors. From 1954 to 1958 he served as the Rector of Tbilisi University. Galerkin method. even though methods like those by Jaswon and Kupradze started to receive attention. they had a few months of overlapping before Jaswon’s returning to England. the applied mathematics and the engineering. In that year he entered the Steklov Mathematical Institute in Leningrad for postgraduate study and obtained his doctor of mathematics degree in 1935. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 Ivanov [92] in 1976. He was enrolled in the Trinity College. least squares. He remains active as an Emeritus Professor at City University. where he stayed for the next 20 years until his retirement in 1987. and obtained his BSc degree in 1944. Ireland. Jaswon Viktor Dmitrievich Kupradze (1903–1985) was born in the village of Kela. His presence there was what initially made Frank Rizzo aware of an opening position at Kentucky [143]. which cumulated into a book published in 1965 [94]. Dublin. almost devoid of cross citations. He entered the University of Birmingham. In the same year he started his academic career as a Lecturer in Mathematics at the Imperial College. as well as many other numerical methods. a numerical . He was enrolled in the Tbilisi State University in 1922 and was awarded the diploma in mathematics in 1927.-D. D.H. polynomial collocation. In 1967 Jaswon left the Imperial College to take a position as Professor and Head of Mathematics at the City University of London. and Baker [4] in 1977. As mentioned above. In 1963–1964 Jaswon visited Brown University. and quantum scattering [55]. Kupradze of elasticity and thermoelasticity. London.2. In the following sections we shall review those significant events that led to the development of the modern-day boundary integral equation method and the boundary element method. among others [77]. Russian Georgia. quadrature method. His early research was focused on the mathematical theory of crystallography and dislocation. In 1935.1.T. can be traced to this period. with Kupradze serving as its first director from 1935 to 1941. 9. these efforts did not immediately coalesce into a single ‘movement’ that grows rapidly. Some integral equations have physical origin such as flow around hydrofoil.S. However. 8. including political ones. Razmadze. the origins of boundary numerical methods. mostly one-dimensional integral equations were investigated. Jaswon was considered by some as the founder of the boundary integral equation method based on his 1963 work [95] implementing Green’s formula. It was during this period that he started his seminal work on numerical solution of integral equations with his students George Thomas Symm [165] and Alan R. during which many ideas sprouted. In 1965–1966 he was a visiting Professor at the University of Kentucky. The methods used included projection method. UK and was awarded his PhD degree in 1949. In this paper. He stayed on as a Lecturer in mathematical analysis and mechanics until 1930. and from 1954 to 1963 the Chairman of Supreme Soviet of the Georgian SSR. Upon Rizzo’s arrival in 1966. Cheng. population competition. with a updated version in 1983 [96]. It is of interest to observe that the developments in the two communities. while most others do not. Kupradze served as the Head of the Differential and Integral Equations Department at Tbilisi. when Frank Joseph Rizzo (1938-) published the article ‘An integral equation approach to boundary value problems of classical elastostatics’ [142]. Muskhelishvili and his closest associates Kupradze and Vekua transformed the institute and became affiliated with the Georgian Academy of Sciences. He was elected as an Academician of the Georgian Academy in 1946. physics and mechanics in Tbilisi. Kupradze’s research interest covered the theory of partial differential equations and integral equations. although it is clear that cross-fertilization will be beneficial. In 1957 Jaswon was promoted to the Reader position and stayed at the Imperial College until 1967. and mathematical theory Maurice Aaron Jaswon (1922-) was born in Dublin. Ponter. run parallel to each other. Boundary integral equation method A turning point marking the rapid growth of numerical solutions of boundary integral equations happened in 1967. In 1933 Muskhelishvili founded a research institute of mathematics.

Rizzo and Shippy had much broadened the vista of integral equation method for engineering applications. he was deeply influenced by his advisor Marvin Stippes. In a well-posed boundary value problem. In 1970 and 1971. Cruse completed his dissertation independently in 1967 [43]. These were among the first numerical solutions of three-dimensional fracture problems [50]. He approached me. and the methods that utilized Green’s formality. Frank’s original dissertation was the formulation of the two-dimensional elasticity problem using Betti’s reciprocal work theorem. yet without actual implementation. we were poised to apply the boundary integral equation (BIE) method to more difficult problems’. Rizzo further stated: [143] ‘That work on potential theory was the model. Frank discovered that I was very much interested in and involved with the use of computers. Next they tackled plane anisotropic bodies [147]. Cruse went on to write his thesis on boundary integral solutions in elastodynamics and in 1968 published two papers as a result [44. Cruse was encouraged by Swedlow to work on three-dimensional fracture problems [51]. In Shippy’s recollection [156]: ‘When Frank became a faculty member at the University of Kentucky in 1966 he had already written his seminal paper on the use of integral equations to solve elasticity problems [142]. When I met Professor Rizzo he was working with a graduate student [C. Shippy and started a highly productive collaboration.53]. One of the first faculty members I met was Frank Rizzo who had just completed his doctoral studies at the University of Illinois in Urbana and [in 1964] had come to the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in the Civil Engineering Department. The question is whether it is possible to exploit the above equation by using the then-new crop of digital computers to do arithmetic and to develop a systematic solution process. and the first finite element solution was accomplished by Tracey [170] in 1971.-D. all three of those papers represent at once the birth and quintessence of what has become known as the ‘direct’ boundary element or boundary integral equation method. Urbana-Champaign. Indeed. in Rizzo’s own words: [145] ‘a ‘light bulb’ appeared in my consciousness’. . as the first finite difference 3-D fracture solution was done by Ayres [3] in 1970. described his research interest.. He then left for Carnegie-Mellon University. Having that small success behind us.97. Hence in a quick succession of work from 1968 to 1971.and doublelayer potential at fictitious densities. As one of his graduate students I was searching for a suitable piece of original research upon which to base my dissertation.. With no computer code in hand. such as Green’s third identity and the Somigliana integral. and springboard for everything I did that year for elasticity theory. Cheng. only half of the boundary data pair {ti. Utilizing Laplace transform and the numerical Laplace inversion. According to Rizzo’s own recollection [145].164] in which numerical solutions of potential problems were attempted by exploiting Green’s third identity. Rizzo and Shippy then solved the transient heat conduction problems [148] and the quasistatic viscoelasticity problems [149]. The Quarterly of Applied Mathematics rejected the manuscript derived from Frank’s dissertation due to the absence of numerical results!’ Rizzo developed the algorithm and obtained good numerical results.T. In 1971 Cruse in his work on elastoplastic flow [163] referred the methods that distributed single. Cruse published boundary integral solutions of three-dimensional fracture problems [46. it actually does not. One day. Stippes was studying representation integrals for elastic field in terms of boundary data. D. which described the numerical algorithm. motivation. Frank showed us how the Laplace transform converted the hyperbolic wave equation into an elliptic equation—I found my research topic at that point’.C. Rizzo moved to the University of Kentucky in 1966. By realizing that the Somigliana identity is just the vector version of the potential theory. The Somigliana identity received particular attention. he programmed the integral equation to solve three-dimensional elastostatics problems [45]. in retrospect. and the paper was finally published in that journal in 1967 [142]. as the ‘direct potential methods’. Chang] who could program in Fortran. As a first step. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 293 procedure was applied for solving the Somigliana identity (45) for elastostatics problems. At that time.47]. In Kentucky. as the right hand side contains unknowns. While Rizzo was struggling with these ideas. ui} is given. as the ‘indirect potential methods’. At Carnegie-Mellon.H. Rizzo met David J. Stippes called to his attention the recently published papers by Jaswon [95. Before long.’ Rizzo’s subsequent implementation of numerical solution can be viewed from the angle of Thomas Allen Cruse (1941-): [51] ‘[In 1965] I took a leave of absence from Boeing and enrolled in the Engineering Mechanics program at the University of Washington. Cruse continued to reminisce about his own role in this early development of BEM: [51] ‘I was enrolled after this time in an elastic wave propagation course taught by Professor Rizzo.A. Frank and I proceeded to develop from scratch some ad hoc (for specific geometries) direct boundary integral equation code for solution of plane elastostatics problems. The identity (45) without the body force can be written as follows: ðð à uj Z ðti uà K tij ui ÞdS (101) ij G Although the above equation appears to give the solution of the displacement field. and proposed that we collaborate on future research of this kind. After planting the seed that became Cruse’s doctoral research [144]. The work was an extension of Rizzo’s doctoral dissertation [141] at the University of Illinois. Their first try was to solve elasticity problems with inclusions [146]. such as those based on the Fredholm integrals and Kupradze’s method.

the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.1. which he was awarded in 1967. The proceedings of the meeting [54] reflected the rapid growth of the boundary integral equation method to cover a broad range of applications that included water waves [153]. Frank Joseph Rizzo (1938-) was born in Chicago. to become the Head of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. as Cruse described [51]. After graduation from Riverside Polytechnic High School.H. Rizzo moved to Iowa State University and served as the Head of the Department of Engineering Sciences and Mechanics. This symposium. elastoplastic problems [119]. New York. Carlos Alberto Brebbia (1948-) was invited to give a keynote address on different mixed formulations for fluid dynamics. and boundary integral equation method (BIEM). which later became a part of the Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Department. 9. he began his career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington. where he obtained a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1963. In the same year. and rock mechanics [1]. he returned to the Iowa State University and remained there until his retirement in 2000. In the same conference. In the late 1960s. in the early 1960s on potential problems. After a year working with the Boeing Company. In late 1989. Cruse Thomas Allen Cruse (1941-) was born in Anderson. In the same year. Rizzo’s 1967 article ‘An integral equation approach to boundary value problems of classical elastostatics’. ‘the editor of the IJSS. organized by Cruse and Lachat [52]. and wave propagation) [155]. these efforts went largely unnoticed in the United Kingdom. which was cited more than 300 times as of 2003 based on the Web of Science search [195].2. Texas. Indiana. he was employed as a half-time teaching staff in the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. where he stayed for the next 20 years. In 1983. Ponter. at the last moment. indirect method. I coined the title boundary-integral equation (BIE) method’ [163]. In 1964. he moved to the Southwest Research Institute at San Antonio. and PhD in 1964. Rizzo years later. have become standard terminologies in BEM literature. and a MS in Engineering Mechanics in 1964. The next international meeting on boundary integral equation method was held in 1977 as the First International Symposium on Innovative Numerical Analysis in Applied Engineering Sciences. After graduating form St Rita High School in 1955. he enrolled in 1965 at the University of Washington to pursue a PhD degree. He retired in 1999 as the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Affairs of the College of Engineering at Vanderbilt University.164] at the Imperial College. Near the end of 1991. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 However. In 1987. D. where he spent the next 10 years.294 A. While pursuing the graduate degrees. Instead. he left for the University of Kentucky. He continued to promote the industrial application of the boundary integral equation method. ‘deliberately sought non-FEM papers’. he returned to his alma mater. Jaswon and Symm published the first book on numerical solution of boundary integral equations [97]. Cruse resigned from Carnegie-Mellon University and joined Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. transient phenomena in solids (heat conduction. Cruse and Rizzo organized the first dedicated boundary integral equation method meeting under the auspices of the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in Troy. Professor George Hermann. Two years later he transferred to the Urbana campus and received his BS degree in 1960. France. These terms. direct method. viscoelasticity. objected to using such a nondescriptive title as the ‘direct potential method’. at Versailles. So. In that year Cruse returned to the academia by joining the Vanderbilt University as the holder of the H. 9. and Symm [93. In 1975. In 1973. Fort Flower Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Boundary element method While Rizzo in the US was greatly inspired by the work of Jaswon. another group in UK started to investigate . Brebbia decided to talk about applying similar ideas to solve boundary integral equations using ‘boundary elements’ [23]. fracture mechanics [49]. he attended the University of Illinois at Chicago. London. Cheng. Cruse joined Carnegie-Mellon University as an Assistant Professor. In 1973 Cruse resigned from Carnegie Mellon and joined Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Group.T.95. has much stimulated the modern day development of the boundary integral equation method. where he stayed until 1990. according to Cruse [51].-D. MS degree in 1961. Two 10. IL. Cruse entered Stanford University.

however. and Gaussian quadrature was far superior to Simpson’s rule. Lachat discussed with me through Brebbia as interpreter some aspects of boundary elements. In 1972. The collaboration between Brebbia and Connor resulted in two finite element books [24. and Lachat to get together to discuss the latest research.H. who asked that I pay him an overnight visit to discuss the implementation of boundary element methods with his external PhD student. Lachat went on to offer Watson a position in his laboratory through Brebbia [23]. most of it related to his work. which was considered as the first published work that incorporates the above-mentioned finite element ideas into boundary integral method. Jean-Claude Lachat. He was appointed a Lecturer at the Civil Engineering Department. and struggled with Kupradze’s tortuous mathematical notation without the benefit of being able to read the text. At the beginning of 1973 I started work on boundary elements. and encouraged research students to explore possible applications of the work of Muskhelishvili [126]. Up to 1977 the numerical method for solving integral equations had been called the ‘boundary integral equation method’. finite elements. except for the influence of Jaswon’s work on Rizzo’s research. With his new knowledge. we continued to collaborate very closely with Tom’. Our work was up to then directly related to the European Mathematical Schools that originated in Russia. I decided to accept. I was to develop firstly a program for plane strain. I laboured through Muskhelishvili’s complex variable theory. Adaptations of Gaussian quadrature could integrate weakly singular functions. The inclusion of Boundary Integral Equations as one of the topics of the conference was a last moment decision.’ Doctoral dissertations based on indirect methods of Kupradze produced around this time included that by Banerjee [6] in 1970. Lachat. and then produced a job application form. D. It was in 1970 that Brebbia gave his PhD student Jean-Claude Lachat the task of developing boundary integral equation formulation seeking to obtain the same versatility as curved finite elements.A. At that time. Although both organizers were working on integral equations at that time. Kupradze [104] and others. and integral equations [18]. Brebbia was organizing the First International Conference on Variational Methods in Engineering at Southampton with Tottenham [27]. In Watson’s recollection [191]: ‘Towards the end of 1971 I was contacted by Brebbia. but Cauchy principal values could not be computed directly by quadrature. The finite element programming had been most instructive in respect of shape functions. . Cheng. He continued his effort in producing integral equation result for complex shell elements. following Cruse’s naming.. a group existed at Southampton University working on applications of integral equations in engineering. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 295 integral equations. with the growing popularity of the finite element method. first working with Eric Reissner (1913–1996). His research was on the numerical solution of complex double curved shell structures and he investigated a range of techniques including variational methods. However. and proposed that the direct formulation be used. and Watson [190] and Tomlin [169] in 1973. then one for three dimensional analysis. As a part of his dissertation work. As recalled by Brebbia [22]: ‘Since the beginning of the 1960s.T. and the paper of Lachat and Watson [108] was published in 1976. It was a historical landmark for our group and from then on. . having met Cruse in 1972 and discussed with him the direct and indirect approaches. Meeting Tom opened to us the scenario of the research in BIE taking place in America. According to Watson [191]: ‘I was introduced to boundary integral equations in 1966. The problem of Cauchy principal values was solved by not calculating them’. it became clear that many of the finite element ideas can be applied to the numerical technique solving boundary integral . as a research student at the University of Southampton under Hugh Tottenham. was head of ´ ´ the Departement Theorique et Engrenages [at Centre ´ Technique des Industries Mecaniques] . Analytical integration was then out of the question. My attempts to determine the nature of the supposed singularities.-D. Jerry Connor was at that time carrying out research in the solution of mixed formulations using finite elements. requesting that I reply to his offer within four weeks. Brebbia spent 18 months at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. were unsuccessful. and then Jerry Connor. with at least quadratic variation so that curved surfaces could be modelled accurately. Until that time. Tottenham possessed a remarkable library of Soviet books. . I readily agreed. Reissner’s introduction of the mixed formulations of variational principles coupled with Brebbia’s knowledge of integral equations gave Brebbia a better understanding of the generalized weak formulations. Cruse. . Brebbia invited Cruse to deliver an opening lecture on the boundary-integral equation method in the conference [48]. Brebbia returned to Southampton and completed his thesis on shell analysis [18]. the US and the UK schools have been largely working in isolation from each other. but decided it was insufficiently versatile to warrant further development. Brebbia was also a PhD student at the University of Southampton under Tottenham. I pondered among other things the problems posed by edges and corners and came to understand that the fictitious force densities would probably tend to infinity near such features. and the fundamental ideas of mixed formulations migrated from MIT to Southampton by Brebbia. 39]. Lachat finished his dissertation in 1975 [107]. the inclusion of a special session on this subject was an afterthought on the assumption that it would be possible to tie the boundary integral equations with the variational formulation. as up to then they were not interpreted in a variational way. Lachat knew of the work of Rizzo and Cruse. Gaussian quadrature and out-of-core simultaneous equation solution techniques. It seemed clear that the boundary elements should be isoparametric. The above conference was also the occasion for Brebbia.

who had been student and researcher at Southampton [earlier]. At that time. Brebbia. which is self-adjoint.-D. Dominguez. it was shown that the weighted residual technique can be used to derive the boundary integral equations [19.’ mirroring ‘finite element method. big Z aðxÞbðxÞdx g (105) Eq. x 2G1 (109) vf Z gðxÞ. SÃ fGÃ giG2 C hb. Consider a function f satisfying the linear partial differential operator L in the following fashion Lffg Z bðxÞ.’ Brebbia presented the boundary element method using the weighted residuals formulation [19.’ (text in square brackets is correction by the authors. parallel to the theoretical development of finite element method. P. D.296 A. SÃ fwgiG2 C hb. The term ‘boundary element method. For example. who pioneered the use of mixed variational statements that allowed the flexibility in choosing localized functions. which satisfies LÃ fGÃ g Z d such that (106) reduces to f Z hSffg. in much the same manner as in finite elements. N Ã fGÃ giG2 K hNffg. with the boundary conditions f Z f ðxÞ. K. R. It was used for the first time in three publications of these authors appeared in 1977: a journal paper by Brebbia and Dominguez [25].H. x 2G1 (103) Nffg Z gðxÞ. LÃ fwgiU Z hSffg. Butterfield at the University of Southampton.K. Banerjee. (104) can be considered as the theoretical basis for a number of numerical methods [19]. ð ha. According to Jose Dominguez [57]: ‘The term Boundary Element Method was coined by C. For the case of Laplace equation. Brebbia [19] showed that one could generate a spectrum of methods ranging from finite elements to boundary elements.25]. x 2G2 where S and N are the corresponding differential operators. The idea for the boundary method is to replace w by the fundamental solution G*. and P. J. wiU (106) where LÃ is the adjoint operators of L. the strategy shifted from the variational approach to the method of weighted residuals combined with the concept of weak forms. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 equations. Those four authors never wrote a paper on the subject together but they collectively came to this name at the University of Southampton. was a frequent visitor. J. Brebbia was a Senior Lecturer. The phrase Boundary Element Method came out as part of the discussions in one of these meetings and was used by all of them in their immediate work. Our goal is to find the approximate solution that minimizes the error with respect to a weighing function w in the following fashion: hLffg K b. and Dominguez’s PhD Thesis [56] (in Spanish). finite difference can be interpreted as a method using Dirac delta function as the weighing function and enforcing the boundary conditions exactly. The creation of the term ‘boundary element method’ was a collective effort by the research group at the University of ´ Southampton. To deal with non-conservative and time-dependent problems. met for lunch at the University or even participated at courses organized by Carlos Brebbia in Southampton or London. In some occasions. C. Cheng. Banerjee and R. N Ã fwgiG1 K hg. SÃ fwgiG1 C hf . SÃ fwgiG2 K hSffg K f .T.A. x 2U (102) and subject to the essential and natural boundary conditions Sffg Z f ðxÞ. N Ã fGÃ giG1 K hg. Key players included Eric Reissner [139] and Kyuichiro Washizu [187]. SÃ fGÃ giG1 C hf . x 2G2 vn . and the angle brackets denote the inner product. It is used to indicate the method whereby the external surface of a domain is divided into a series of elements over which the functions under consideration can vary in different ways.25]. This is particularly demonstrated in the work of Lachat and Watson [108]. GÃ iU (108) (107) This is the weighted residual formulation for boundary element method. wiU Z hNffg K g. Dominguez was a Visiting Research Fellow.) It was also stated in a preface by Brebbia [19]: ‘The term ‘boundary element’ originated within the Department of Civil Engineering at Southampton University. we perform integration by parts on (104) for as many times as necessary to obtain hf. The well-known Galerkin formulation in finite element method uses of the basis function for w the same as that used for the approximation of f.21. For the boundary element formulation. The development of solving boundary value problems using functions defined on local domains with low degree of continuity was strongly influenced by the development of extended variational principles and weighted residuals in the mid 1960s.’ finally emerged in 1977. N Ã fwgiG2 K hNffg. N Ã fwgiG1 (104) where S* and N* are the adjoint operators of S and N. Furthermore.A. this group or part of it. a [chapter in book] by Banerjee and Butterfield [7]. Butterfield was a [Senior Lecturer].

and also called it ‘boundary element method. 11. Brebbia organized the first conference dedicated to the BEM: the First International Conference on Boundary Element Methods.’ Similarly. in terms of the Laplace equation. The journal is at the present published by Elsevier and enjoys a high impact factor among the engineering science and numerical method journals.A. In 1975. As the present review has demonstrated. the present review accommodates the broadest usage. 1960s . In 1989. His mentor there was Jose Nestor Distefano. Berkeley. We then observe that in the first half of the 20th century there existed various attempts to find numerical solutions without the aid of the modern day electronic computers. Brebbia was granted his PhD at Southampton in 1967. Others have used different interpretations. and other physical problems. but were also based on the indirect formulation. Brebbia was again in the US holding a full professor position at the University of California. D. where he stayed for over a year. Rosario.T. the Fredholm integral equations. he visited MIT and conducted research under Eric Reissner and Jerry Connor. He received a BS degree in civil engineering from the University of Litoral.H. Conclusion In this article we reviewed the heritage and the early history of the boundary element method The heritage is traced to its mathematical foundation developed in the late eighteenth to early 18th century. at the University of Southampton [20]. In 1984 Brebbia founded the Journal ‘Engineering Analysis—Innovations in Computational Techniques. the journal was renamed to ‘Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements’ and became a journal dedicated to the boundary element method. latterly of the University of California. He then returned to Southampton where he eventually became a Reader.17] in 1978 used the term BEM. Even in Brebbia’s 1978 book on boundary element method [19]. He attributed his success with FEM as well as BEM to these great teachers. he accepted a position as Associate Professor at Princeton University. Irvine. elasticity. UK to carry out his PhD study under Hugh Tottenham. In 1981. the articles by Brady and Bray [16. thought not in details. Brebbia ðð f G1 f ZK 1 4p 1 4p 1 vf 1 dS C r vn 4p 1 1 g dS C r 4p vð1=rÞ dS vn ðð G2 ðð f G2 K vð1=rÞ dS vn (110) which is just Green’s formula (25) with boundary conditions substituted in. Once electronic computers became widely available. (108) becomes ðð G1 10.1. the theoretical foundations of these methods are closely related and the histories of their development intertwined. whether ‘elements’ were used or not. Banerjee and Butterfield [7] in 1977 followed Kupradze’s idea of distributing sources for solving potential problems and forces for elasticity problems. In the subsequent years. In commissioning the term ‘boundary element method’. the term BEM has been broadly used as a generic term for a number of boundary based numerical schemes. Hence. Cheng. Brebbia considered that the method would gain in generality if it was based on the mixed principles and weighted residual formulations. In 1979. During the whole 1966 and first 6 months in 1967. he moved back to the UK and founded the Wessex Institute of Technology as an international focus for BEM research. the Green’s identities. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 297 Eq. The pioneers behind these mathematical developments were celebrated with short biographies. The most recent in the series as of this writing is the 26th conference in 2004 [26]. In the same year. Carlos Alberto Brebbia (1938-) was born in Rosario. For example. The book contained a series of computer codes developed by Dominguez. This conference series has become an annual event and is nowadays organized by the Wessex Institute of Technology. the Gauss and Stokes theorems that allowed the reduction in spatial dimensions. After a year’s research at the UK Electricity Board Laboratories. Brebbia published the first textbook on BEM ‘The Boundary Element Method for Engineers’ [19]. The present article will not argue whether in certain instances the term boundary element is a misnomer or not. and the extension of Green’s formula to acoustics. the existence and uniqueness of solution of boundary value problems. Brebbia went to the University of Southampton. Green’s function. Argentina. In 1978. as indicated in Section 1. He did early research on the application of Volterra equations to creep ´ buckling and other problems. in 1970 Brebbia started working as a Lecturer at Southampton.-D. He has been serving as its Director since. the indirect formulation was considered.’ It initially published papers involving boundary element as well as other numerical methods.

and abstracts. the method. and the work by Kupradze and his co-workers [104. Rizzo’s 1967 classical work [142] ‘An integral equation approach to boundary value problems of classical elastostatics’ was missed in the BEM search because none of the above-mentioned key phrases was contained in the title. Stein’s article on Erich Trefftz. Appendix A. it is possible to establish a few important events that provided the critical momentum. In fact. However.T. In those cases. Tom Cruse and Lothar Gaul for reviewing the article. who was cross-educated between UK (Southampton) and US (MIT).D. These entries were further sorted by their publication year and presented as annual number of publication in Fig. 1. however. From these events we identify the work done by Jaswon and his co-workers [93. At the time of the search. By early 1990s. Yuri Melnikov for commenting on Kupradze’s contribution. Prof. two most widely known numerical methods.’ However. mathematics. The major development of the modern numerical method. With followers like Cruse and others. For example. we may need to qualify the definition of what is the ‘boundary element method.H. the finite element method and the finite difference method. Yijun Liu for reviewing Prof. These and the later developments. 2004. hence it may not belong to the category. which eventually led to the modern day movement. Andrzej ˜ Zielinski for transcribing Prof. most early entries contain neither abstract nor keyword. These criteria yielded 10. all the early boundary integral equation method articles were missed and the first entry was dated 1974 (see Fig. which eventually led to the international movement of boundary element method. George Hsiao for his comment on the existence theorem. The outline biographical archive MacTutor [128] for history of .-D. as two very important events that had spawned followers. In fact. The reader should be cautioned that the search method is not precise. and abstract fields. Two less known numerical methods. more than 500 journal articles per year were related to this subject. respectively. and the staff at Wessex Institute of Technology for gathering the images of the pioneers. The subsequent conferences and journal organized in the 1980s helped to propel the boundary element method to its mainstream status. The search matched these phrases in article titles. First. the finite volume method and the collocation method. It took Brebbia. If the search phrase ‘integral equation’ were used. which the authors have liberally cited. The key phrase match is conducted only in the available title. Cheng / Engineering Analysis with Boundary Elements 29 (2005) 268–302 marked the period that ‘a hundred flowers bloomed’—all kinds of different ideas were tried.95. Profs. the database referred to as the Science Citation Index Expanded [195] contained 27 million entries from 5900 major scientific journals covering the period from 1945 to present.126 articles (Table 1). Not all entries in the Web of Science database contain an abstract. Jaswon’s work inspired Rizzo to develop his 1967 work on the numerical solution of Somigliana integral equation [142]. are left to future writers of the BEM history to explore. However. a question like ‘who founded the boundary element method and when’ cannot be properly answered.298 A. Shaw’s article. The authors are indebted to the library resources of the J. The combination of key phrases ‘finite element or finite elements’ and ‘finite difference or finite differences’. we also acknowledge the fact that even if an article was selected based on the matching key phrase such as ‘boundary element. Acknowledgements This paper has benefitted from comments and materials provided by a number of colleagues. Bibliographic search method An online search through the bibliographic database Web of Science was conducted on May 3. the Rizzo article would have been found. Cheng. These results are summarized in Table 1. In the UK. Prof. keywords. In the US. known as the boundary element method. and Cruse getting together in the mid-1970s to bring cross-fertilization between the two schools. Prof. Jose Dominguez and Carlos Brebbia for their personal communications. has been highly useful.105] at Tbilisi State University around 1965 on potential and elasticity problems.531 articles. Hence the reported result should be regarded as qualitative. were also searched.’ not necessarily the article utilized BEM for numerical solution. the phrase ‘integral equation’ was avoided because it would generate many mathematical articles that are not of numerical nature. Williams Library at the University of Mississippi. While there exist missing articles. were also searched. Profs. 1).164] at the Imperial College in 1963 on the direct and indirect methods for potential problems. a group at the University of Southampton led by Tottenham spent much effort in the early 1970s pursuing Kupradze’s methodology. keyword. Rizzo’s biography and correcting errors. and particularly the interlibrary loan services for delivering the requested materials. Prof. Alain Kassab for supplying Prof. With such a rich and complex history.237 and 19. known as the boundary integral equation method at that time. titles alone were searched. For comparison purposes. and not in the main text. Particularly the authors would like to thank Prof. took shape in the 1970s. due to the large number of entries involved. D. yielded 66. soon prospered. This search missed most of the early articles. we can only rely on automatic search and no attempt was made to adjust the data by conducting article-by-article inspection. A search in the topic field based on the combination of key phrases ‘boundary element or boundary elements or boundary integral’ was conducted.

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