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Western North Carolina Agricultural Options

2012 CALENDAR

WNC AgOptions Throughout the Year
In January 2011, Western North Carolina Agricultural Options awarded its seventh cycle of grants to 47 vegetable farmers, livestock producers, nursery operators, specialty crop growers and beekeepers in 16 mountain counties plus the Cherokee Indian Reservation. For the first time in WNC AgOptions’ history, six community groups also received between $5,000 and $20,000. The steering committee expanded the program to include community groups working together to increase farm profitability by collectively addressing processing, packaging, marketing and other distribution needs. Since community group grants typically have a wide reach, the program can now impact thousands of farmers each year. This calendar displays images from the year and descriptions of each of the projects, which demonstrate creative options to the agricultural community. With these grants, six small poultry producers responded to the high demand for humanely raised chickens. Even with their new equipment, the farmers cannot fill all customers’ orders, so opportunity for expansion remains. In the same year that the N.C. Governor’s office reported the economic impact of wineries as $1.28 billion, five vineyards expanded with the assistance of WNC AgOptions grants. Agricultural leaders hope that hops for beer-making will someday make a similar impact, as they continue to work with diversifying farmers such as Mark Conley of Mitchell County to establish viable systems. The grants also supported unique ventures such as canned bamboo shoots, truffles, fine dining on the farm, and goats leased for grazing invasive plants. Two goat dairies can now sell raw milk certified for pet consumption, and one cattle farmer is adding a dairy to milk Holsteins and Jerseys. The dairy will be one of two in operation in Madison County, which once had more than 30. Meanwhile, 10 vegetable growers purchased new equipment to expand production and, in many cases, sell direct to consumers, increasing the farms’ bottom lines. As farm profitability increases, so does the likelihood that mountain farmland will remain farmland for the next generation. Pictured above: Anderson Creek Apiary, Graham County

2012 At-a-Glance
January 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 S

February 2012
M T W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 S M

March 2012
T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 31

April 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 S M

May 2012
T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 4 11 18 25 S M

June 2012
T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30

July 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 S M

August 2012
T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 31 S 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 S

September 2012
M 3 10 17 24 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29

October 2012
S 7 14 21 28 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 4 11 18 25 S

November 2012
M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 2 9 16 23 30 S

December 2012
M 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29

Thomas Shepherd, Jr. of Headwaters of Poverty Farm in Buncombe County raises poussins (pictured above), three-week-old chickens, for local chefs. Mike (January 3-4) and Joan Glover of Sleepy Hollow Farm in Swain County raise heritage breeds that are on the near extinct list. They are also one of the largest egg producers in the county. Rick (January 13) and Karen Jordan of Deerwood Nursery in Henderson County diversified their nursery operation to include vegetables and poultry. They converted a shed into a walk-in cooler by installing a Coolbot unit for storing processed chickens. With his new poultry processing equipment, Steven Beltram of Balsam Gardens in Jackson County (January 18) can process 50 birds in 2.5 hours, rather than two days. He sells chickens and turkeys at local farmers markets. Randy (January 27-28) and Megan Smith of Smith’s Sweet Grass Farm in Polk County built two mobile pens with a unique and novel design that allows one person to easily move the pens daily. They primarily sell to CooperRiis Healing Community. Amos and Kaci Nidiffer of Trosly Farm in Avery County (January 29-30) produce ducks, geese and other specialty poultry to sell at the farmers market.

December 2011
S 4 M 5 T 6 W 7 T 1 8 F 2 9 S 3 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Notes

January 2012
Sunday
New Years Day

1

Monday

2

Tuesday

3

Wednesday Thursday

4

5

Friday

6

Saturday

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Martin Luther King Day

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

February 2012
S 5 12 19 26 M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

Shannon Roberts (pictured above) of Horse Collar Farm in Madison County built a new corral system to safely and humanely handle cattle (February 4). He preconditions the animals to boost weight before sale at the Southeast Livestock Exchange. Mark Byrd (February 5) of Byrd Charolais in Mitchell County purchased a three-ton Apache creep feeder to reduce labor in refilling equipment and allow for uniform feeding among the herd, reducing stress on calves as they transition from milk. The mobile unit also allows for better management of Mark’s rotational grazing system. David Noland (February 16-17) of Noland Farm Place in Jackson County purchased a purebred Angus bull with enhanced genetics, structures and Expected Progeny Difference so that he can breed genetically enhanced replacement heifers. The Mountain Cattle Alliance (February 26-27), in partnership with WNC Communities, purchased shared equipment and supplies necessary for members to meet national Beef Quality Assurance program standards. The Alliance leaders hope to increase the number of BQA cattle in the region to 7,500 head. Jimmy and Sheila Greene of North Fork Farm in Watauga County started the first meat CSA in the High Country. They added an insulated utility building to store freezers for the meat (February 29).

January 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

Notes

February 2012
Sunday

29

Monday

30

Tuesday

31

Wednesday Thursday

1

Groundhog Day

2

Friday

3

Saturday

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

Valentine’s Day

14

15

16

17

18

19

President’s Day

20

21

22

23

24

25

March 2012
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 31

26

27

28

29

1

2

3

Tim (pictured above) and Annie Burrell of Rabbit Creek Bee Company in Macon County diversified their queen-rearing operation by producing hives for local natural and organic beekeepers. The Burrells produce locally adapted queens (March 25) with Varroa Sensitive Hygienic traits. Joan and Carl Chesick of Green Goddess Farm & Apiary in Buncombe County (March 1) constructed a honey house with areas for extracting and storing honey and preparing value-added bee products. They expect to quadruple the production of honey and starter hives for sale to local beekeepers. Jeff Mansker of Anderson Creek Apiary in Graham County purchased a honey extractor (March 13-14) and built a storage room to support the growth of his business and satisfy the high demand for his honey.

February 2012
S 5 12 19 26 M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25

Notes

March 2012
Sunday

26

Monday

27

Tuesday

28

Wednesday Thursday

29

1

Friday

2

Saturday

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11
Daylight Savings Time Begins

12

13

14

15

16

17
St. Patrick’s Day

18

19
Vernal Equinox

20

21

22

23

24

April 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Bao Yang of Mountain Spring Garden in McDowell County expanded her bamboo (pictured above) operation by canning shoots to meet the high demand for her product. She will be the only canned bamboo shoot producer in the country. Bill Metes (April 10) of B.M.S. Enterprises in Buncombe County built a smokehouse for log-inoculated mushrooms infused with aromatic wood smoke during the fruiting process. He is experimenting with infusion durations and growing times to achieve a quality product. Jodie and Jeff Zahner of Oconee Bell Farms in Macon County constructed additional propagation and growing areas (April 13-14) for Oconee Bells, a rare native evergreen groundcover, sold to plant collectors, landscape designers and second-home owners. Leslie Sigmon (April 25-26) of Emma Farms in Buncombe County added indoor oyster production to her urban farm. She studied the most effective substrate and strains to determine the most simple, minimal investment production methods.

March 2012
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 31

Sunday

Notes

April 2012
1
Monday

2

Tuesday

3

Wednesday Thursday

4

5

Friday

6

Saturday

7

April Fools Day

8
Easter

9

10

11

12

13

14

15
Tax Day

16

17

18

19

20
Tax Day

21

22
Earth Day

23

24

25

26

27

28

May 2012
S 6 13 20 27 M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

29

30

1

2

3

4

5

Jill Warwick Nicklaw of Sunshine Cove Farm in Watauga County constructed a greenhouse to accommodate the high demand for microgreens (pictured above and May 30), which she primarily sells through Eastern Carolina Organics distribution company. Loretta Ball (May 1-2) of Craggy View Farm in Buncombe County built a retail store on the Barnardsville Highway in Weaverville. She sells her greenhouse plants as well as locally grown and organic produce, meats, poultry, eggs and artisan cheese, and value-added products. Grady Bob Johnson, Jr. of Tucker Hollow Farm in Avery County expanded his farm with the addition of blueberries (May 17-18), blackberries, strawberries and 20 stands of honeybees. He plans to farm full time by 2014. With the purchase of a translicer, Timothy Davis of Davis Farms in Cherokee County is diversifying his markets for 75 acres of collards, kale, turnips and mustard greens (May 14-15). The machine enables him to sell his products in a bag directly to individuals and grocery stores.

April 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

Notes

May 2012
Sunday

29

Monday

30

Tuesday

1

Wednesday Thursday

2

3

Friday

4

Saturday

5

Cinco de Mayo

6
Mother’s Day

7

8

9

10

11

12

13
Mother’s Day

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

June 2012
S 3 10 17 24 M 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30

27

28
Memorial Day

29

30

31

1

2

Herman Garrison of Haywood County improved the sanitation standards of his farm (pictured above and June 26) by purchasing portable toilets and handwashing stations for his workers. This equipment helped him receive Good Agricultural Practices certification. Charles Church (June 1) of Watauga River Farms in Watauga County improved his mixed vegetable operation with a new well, drip irrigation system and plastic mulch. He sells through New River Organic Growers and Eastern Carolina Organics. Ray Chambers (June 5-6) of Haywood County purchased a refrigerated box truck to increase the shelf-life of his products. He can now sell to farmers markets within 200 miles from his farm. A new drip irrigation system and plastic laying equipment allowed Billy Bryant of Bryant Farms in Yancey County to diversify his tomato operation. He and his wife Becky (June 16) package with Yancey Grown labels for sale to Ingles, local produce stands, restaurants and the Greensboro Farmers Market.

May 2012
S 6 13 20 27 M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

Notes

June 2012
Sunday

27

Monday

28

Tuesday

29

Wednesday Thursday

30

31

Friday

1

Saturday

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14
Flag Day

15

16

17
Father’s Day

18

19

20
Summer Solstice

21

22

23

July 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W T 4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

The Avery County Farmers Tailgate Marketing Association (President Kyle Kitchin pictured above) initiated an advertising and educational outreach campaign to promote two weekly farmers markets (July 21) and encourage new growers to sell at market. They held special promotional events and created signs, street banners, flyers and T-shirts. The Mill Spring Agricultural Development Center, or “Friends of Ag” group, started the Polk Fresh Trade Post (July 6). The group renovated a room in a former school building to become a retail space and distribution hub, connecting Western North Carolina farmers to consumers in major nearby cities. The Watauga County Farmers Market (July 8) is securing a permanent location for the 37-year old market. They developed a new group to facilitate the process, which they named PHARM-N: Preserve Heritage, Agriculture and Regional Markets – Now. Southern Appalachian Family Farms (July 23-24) is creating a marketing identity, promotional materials, legal structure and membership directory to jointly market farmers’ products of the far western counties.

June 2012
S 3 10 17 24 M 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30

Notes

July2012
Sunday

1

Monday

2

Tuesday

3

Wednesday Thursday

4

5

Friday

6

Saturday

7

Independence Day

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

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18

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21

22

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24

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28

August 2012
S 5 12 19 26 M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 31 S 4 11 18 25

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

Larry Stepp, Sr. and Larry Stepp, Jr. of Stepp’s Plants Etc. in Henderson County expanded a three-acre raspberry (pictured above), blueberry and asparagus operation with the purchase of additional plants and a new drip irrigation system. Steve and Terry King of King Harvest Farm in Haywood County diversified their ornamentals operation to produce raspberries and asparagus. Their unique terraced growing system demonstrates to other mountain growers a way to farm on hillsides (August 6-7). Todd Nolt of Sunny Side Farm in Watauga County (August 10) established a fall bearing raspberry youpick operation. He is focusing on varieties that demonstrate strong performance in taste, appearance and post-harvest integrity. Frank Teneralli (August 21) of Let It Grow Organic Gardens in Madison County added a half-acre of blackberries to his vegetable and landscaping plants operation. Frank plants strips of flowering perennials in between the rows to improve soil health and provide habitat for beneficial insects.

July 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

Notes

August 2012
Sunday

29

Monday

30

Tuesday

31

Wednesday Thursday

1

2

Friday

3

Saturday

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

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20

P

21

22

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25

September 2012
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

Stephen Thompson of Nottely River Valley Vineyards in Cherokee County constructed a tasting room and pavilion (pictured above) for a 10-acre vineyard of Vitis Vinifera and French American Hybrids. The design incorporates energy saving devices. Robert Johnson of Hattie Hill Vineyard in Watauga County purchased harvesting equipment that will be shared with up to 20 farmers in the region. He sells his grapes (September 5) to multiple wineries. Eddie and Jeff Frisbee of Addison Farms Vineyard in Buncombe County are diversifying their family’s fifth generation cattle farm into a vineyard and winery (September 7-8). They added 400 vines to the 3-acre production area and improved the on-site structure that they converted into a winery. Mario (September 17) and Michael DeLuca of DeMariano Vineyard in McDowell County purchased winery equipment and supplies to help them realize the value-added income from production of their own wine. They are also working with area vineyards to develop a “Wine Trail,” a printed itinerary for tourists. Jeannie and Chuck Blethen (September 26-27) of Jewel of the Blue Ridge Consulting & Vineyard in Madison County built a propagation greenhouse, which will be used to grow native muscadine rootstock for sale to prospective viticulturists.

August 2012
S 5 12 19 26 M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 31 S 4 11 18 25

Notes

September 2012
Sunday

26

Monday

27

Tuesday

28

Wednesday Thursday

29

30

Friday

31

Saturday

1

2

3
Labor Day

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

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21

22

October 2012
S 7 14 21 28 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27

23
C

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Ryan Wiebe of Wiebe Farmin’ in Yancey County increased the production of his four-acre organic vegetable operation (winter squash pictured above) with the addition of a drip irrigation and fertigation system. He sells wholesale to Eastern Carolina Organics. Mark Conley of Conley Ranch in Mitchell County diversified his cattle operation with 450 hops plants (October 5) to supply area microbreweries and home brewers. He uses a trellis system that combines both vertical and horizontal growth. Anthony Cole (October 10) of Jasperwood Farm in Buncombe County diversified his farm with the production of full color bell peppers to sell through Madison Farms and the WNC Farmers Market at Asheville. He purchased a drip irrigation and fertigation system for the peppers. Thomas Charles and Margaret McGinnis of Fork Mountain Farm in Madison County (October 26-27) improved the curing and storage capacity of their French and Italian heirloom winter squash to expand their selling season and meet restaurant demand. They built a curing shed and shelving with sufficient air circulation and temperature control.

September 2012
S 2 9 16 23 30 M 3 10 17 24 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29

October 2012
Sunday

30

Monday

1

Tuesday

2

Wednesday Thursday

3

4

Friday

5

Saturday

6

Notes
7 8
Columbus Day

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

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24

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27

November 2012
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 Halloween

28

29

30

31
Halloween

1

2

3

Ryan Norris of Norris Meat Goats in Watauga County leases his meat goats (pictured above) to land owners as a means of clearing invasive plants as an alternative to using pesticides and machinery. The rotation between pastures also helps Ryan produce a higher quality meat goat. Steven Davis (November 1) of Davis Farm in Madison County diversified his meat and vegetable operation by adding a dairy to milk 50 head of Holstein and Jersey cattle. He will sell to Milkco Inc. in Asheville. Cassandra Lewis (November 10) of Hay Pritty Alpines in Madison County equipped her goat farm with a milking parlor so that she can sell certified raw milk wholesale to local dairies. Sue Mickey of Appleberry Cove Farm and School in Madison County (November 14-15) created a small production facility for processing and packaging raw milk for sale for pet consumption under North Carolina guidelines. Ron and Cheryl Searcy of Wells Farm in Transylvania County (Nobember 26-27) improved their contract goat grazing business with the addition of a treatment facility for the animals.

October 2012
S 7 14 21 28 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27

Notes

November 2012
Sunday

28

Monday

29

Tuesday

30

Wednesday Thursday

31

1

Friday

2

Saturday

3

4
Daylight Savings Time

5

6
Election Day

7

8

9

10

11
Veteran’s Day

12

13
Total Solar Eclipse

14

15

16

17

18
December 2012
S 2 9 16 23 30 M 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29

19

20

21

22
Thanksgiving Day

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

1

John (pictured above) and Joni Wavra of Ty-Lyn Plantation in Jackson County diversified their Christmas tree farm with the addition of Black Perigord and Burgundy Truffles. The specialty mushroom spores are implanted in Filbert and Oak trees. Nicole DelCogliano (November 30) of Green Toe Ground in Yancey County purchased a pole tent and other materials so that she can host five formal on-farm dinners a year. The Jackson County Tree Association (December 3-4) initiated a joint marketing campaign by producing a website, marketing materials and booth displays. Mary Ann Thompson (December 15) of Traditional Delicacies in the Cherokee Reservation expanded her crawfish pools and started canning and freezing her wild greens. Katie Erwin and Edward Marx of H20 Farm in Cherokee County (December 19-20) improved their hydroponic greenhouse operation by adding an under-bench heating system, hot water storage tank and propane heater.

November 2012
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24

Notes

December 2012
Sunday

25

Monday

26

Tuesday

27

Wednesday Thursday

28

29

Friday

30

Saturday

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

January 2013
S 6 13 20 27 M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

23
C

24
Christmas Eve

25
Christmas Day

26

27

28

29

30

New Year’s Eve

31

Pictured above: Goat milk processing building at Appleberry Cove Farm and School, Madison County. Front cover photos: Wine-grape fermentation at DeMariano Vineyard, McDowell County; microgreens at Sunshine Cove Farm, Watauga County; winter squash at Wiebe Farmin’, Yancey County; and onions at Watauga River Farms, Watauga County. Western North Carolina Agricultural Options strives to build sustainable farming communities in our mountain region by providing resources directly to farmers who are diversifying and expanding their operations. The program encourages groups of farmers to solve logistical challenges in the local agricultural system. The ultimate goal of WNC AgOptions is to protect mountain farmland through farm profitability. With support from the N.C. Tobacco Trust Fund Commission, the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service partnered with HandMade in America and the N.C. Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services to offer the first round of grants for farmers in 2004. Through a partnership established in the fall of 2008 with RAFI-USA’s Tobacco Communities Reinvestment Fund, WNC AgOptions continues to offer grants to assist farmers in tobacco-dependent communities generate alternative farm income. Between 2004 and 2011, approximately 300 producers in Avery, Buncombe, Clay, Cherokee, the Cherokee Indian Reservation, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga and Yancey counties received mini-grants for a wide range of capital improvements for their farms. The growers also benefited from technical and marketing assistance, business planning training, and increased exposure to their farms. In 2011, six community groups were awarded $5,000 to $20,000 to address processing, packaging, marketing and other distribution needs, collectively improving farm profitability. To learn more about the program, contact the Madison County Cooperative Extension Center at 828.649.2411 x 305 or visit www.wncagoptions.org
Calendar photography by Jennifer Ferre. Calendar text and coordination by Megan E. Riley, M R et cetera, LLC Calendar design by Cindy Wheeler: www.cindywheeler.com