Safety Meeting

Given By_____________________

Topic #15

Date_________________

EMERGENCY! WHAT WOULD YOU DO? What would you do? That question should make you think. Your answer could mean the difference between life and death for a co-worker. Emergency, Rescue 911, Code Red, Squad 51, and for the old timers Rescue 8 are all TV shows that deal with real life emergencies. Are you prepared for the unexpected? Do you know what to do? Do you know who to call for help? Are you qualified to help? If you answered "yes' to these questions - great! However, if you answered "no' then you need to pay special attention to today's safety meeting. No matter what your position at the construction project, you need to know what to do in the event of an emergency. Your life and the lives of your co-workers could depend on your training and knowledge. If you are the first one on the scene, you need to protect yourself from any hazards. For example, precautions may need to be taken to deal with blood or other body fluids, gas leaks, and power lines. You don't want to become another victim. Stay cool, don't panic, and call for help. Contact 911, local emergency officials or a jobsite emergency response team. You are the main link between the emergency and the outside world. Secure the area and keep co-workers and others out of the area unless they are trained to provide assistance. If you are qualified to give emergency care, protect yourself first. Make sure you wear your universal PPE (Personal Protective Equipment - gloves, goggles, and a one way mask.) Talk to the victim. Check your ABC'S: Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. If the victim is not breathing start CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation). If the person is bleeding apply direct pressure to the wound. Emergencies are unplanned events. They come unexpectedly and may involve you. What will you do if an emergency occurs? Find out who to call and know where a telephone is. Learn the locations of fire extinguishers and first aid kits, and make sure you know how to use them. Learn and understand emergency procedures and evacuation routes for the jobsite. Be prepared for the unexpected. Do it now. Don't wait until after the emergency to learn what to do. Ask your supervisor if you have any questions. You may need to help save a life tomorrow! Is your first aid training up to date? Check for classes in your area today!

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________
HAND TOOLS 3

Topic #40

Date_________________

Do you use any hand tools on the job? Sure you do, there isn't a day that goes by that you don't pick one up to help you with your work. There are numerous hand tools used in construction work; hammers, screw drivers, wrenches, side cutters, tape measures, sledge hammers, hand saws, cat's paws, chisels, punches, and pipe wrenches, just to name a few. Each tool is designed to do a specific job. It's up to you to know how to use each tool property. Short cuts and using the wrong tool for the job will more than likely cause an accident. One of the most frequent abuses of a hand tool is the misuse of the screw driver. This hand tool is often used as a mini pry bar, a wood chisel, etc. - any number of small tasks for which it simply was not designed to be used. A puncture wound can easily occur when misusing any pointed hand tool. Always use the right tool for the job at hand. Keep tools in good condition. Injuries occur when a tool slips or breaks, often because the tool is dull. A sharp, well- maintained tool will help you perform your job more effectively and in a shorter time. Keep all tools sharp, chisel points dressed, etc. Replace broken tools and broken or cracked handles immediately. As the worker who uses the hand tool, you should think of safety first. Check to be sure that the tool is in good shape before you use it. If you have any question about the condition of the tool, or how to use it properly, check with your supervisor. Personal protective equipment is required if there's any danger of flying objects. Wear your safety goggles. If there is the potential of a hand injury, be sure to wear gloves. Injuries also can occur when you're carrying the tool. Never run, with any tool in your hands. Carry tools with pointed or sharp edges so that those edges are away from your body. An intelligent and safe way to transport hand tools is to wear a tool belt or carry them in a toolbox. If you need to carry tools up a ladder, place them in a bucket and haul them up - and use the same method when going down the ladder. Construction workers are often thought to be hand tool experts, yet we continue to have accidents on the job. Concentrate on safety - work to improve your skills daily - share your knowledge with co-workers and remember, a good sharp tool in the hands of a good sharp worker will do an outstanding job! CHOOSE THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE RIGHT JOB AND THEN BE SURE YOU KNOW HOW TO USE IT CORRECTLY.

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________
HARD HATS 2

Topic #42

Date_________________

The first hard hat was invented by a California manufacturer of safety equipment in 1919. E. D. Bullard still makes hard hats today. Head protection is worn by all types of professionals. NASCAR drivers, National Football League players, National Hockey League players, jockeys, soldiers, and deep sea divers just to name a few. As construction workers we are required to wear head protection too. Ours is called a hard hat. Why require a hard hat? It protects you from the danger of head injury caused by the impact from falling or flying objects and from electrical shock. All hard hats must meet requirements for impact resistance and/or electrical resistance as set by the American National Standards Institute. Hard hats are tested to withstand the impact of an eight-pound weight dropped five feet. That's about the same as a two-pound wrench or hammer falling twenty feet and landing on your head. There are three classes of hard hats: 'Class A' hard hats are made from insulating material to protect you from falling objects and electric shock up to 2,200 volts. 'Class B' hard hats meet the same requirements as Class A hard hats but they are rated for shock protection up to 20,000 volts. 'Class C' hard hats are designed to protect you from falling objects, but are not rated for electrical shock protection. Make sure that your hard hat is the right one for your job, and WEAR IT! Never drill holes in your hard hat and check your hat daily for cracks, dents or deep scratches. This kind of change or , damage could severely reduce its ability to protect you. The suspension system should not be removed except for cleaning. Don't wear your hard hat backwards (except while welding). Bump caps are not appropriate for construction projects; they are not built to provide the protection that a hard hat does. Don't take chances - wear your hard hat at all times, it protects your head which in turn protects your brain. Keep your hat clean and replace it immediately if it is damaged. If a head injury should occur, report it to your supervisor. Make sure your hard hat fits properly. It is the symbol of a construction worker. 'Wear it proudly!

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________

Topic #57

Date_________________

HOUSEKEEPING & TRIPPING HAZARDS As each of us works throughout the jobsite, our daily needs require extension cords, air compressor hoses, cutting torch hoses and welding leads. Each of these cords or hoses acts as an umbilical cord providing us with the necessary electricity, compressed air, acetylene, oxygen, grounds for welding, and power for the welding stinger. The danger here is that any of these leads can become tangled and create tripping hazards if they are not placed properly before you start work. We must take the time to run them underneath walkways, overhead if needed, away from access doors and ramps, and away from pinch points. Leads and hoses are subject to cuts, abrasions, puncture and plain old normal wear and tear. Remember to run leads, cords and hoses out of the way, cover them properly and most of all, do not let them become tripping hazards. There are many other objects around the work area that are just as dangerous. Have you ever stepped on a screwdriver or a short piece of pipe and felt your feet about to slip out from under you? Did you ever trip over a shovel carelessly left on the ground? Have you ever thought of how well a wire snare works in catching small or large animals? How about your foot! We must take time to pick up long pieces of tie wire, if not, you may be the next one that is snared. All of the above can be solved if we do a little housekeeping while we work. Cleaning up at the end of the job is fine, in fact it is essential, but job cleanup is not a one shot proposition, it is a continuous operation. It is an important factor in construction efficiency and in the prevention of work injuries. Remember these tips -- store material and tools neatly, cleanup scrap as work progresses, keep walkways clear at all times, and take care of your tools. Do not leave them where they will cause you or others to fall. GOOD JOBSITE HOUSEKEEPING PROMOTES EFFICIENCY AND MORALE, AND HELPS TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS. 'THE INJURY YOU PREVENT MAY BE YOUR OWN!'

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________
MOTOR VEHICLES

Topic #63

Date_________________

Ensure safe driving by including an inspection of any motor vehicle you drive, on or off the job. Check all lights, brake lights and turn signals; be sure that windshield wipers, the horn, and if applicable, the backup warning device are in working order. Check the brakes, both the foot pedal as well as the hand brake. Check the status of the inspection sticker. Check the oil and make sure you have enough fuel. Report any defective or broken parts on company vehicles to your supervisor. As the driver or operator you are responsible to make sure that all bins are closed, the load is secure, and the area is CLEAR before moving the vehicle. Extreme caution must be used when backing vehicles. Turn around instead of backing up whenever possible. If you must back-up and you have someone riding with you, have your passenger get out and direct you so you can back-up safely. When backing a vehicle in the vicinity of other workers or in a congested area, a signal person should always be used. The operator must observe posted speed limits. Many accidents are caused by driving too slowly as well as too fast. Use turn signals when turning and when pulling out onto the road or highway. It is the responsibility of every employee who drives a company motor vehicle to be licensed, and to know and obey all state and local regulations pertaining to its operation. Always carry your driver's license with you. Many states also require that the vehicle registration be carried in your car, van or truck. Every person who operates a motor vehicle has an obligation to themselves, their family, their employer, other drivers and pedestrians to operate their vehicle in a safe and courteous manner. Be a defensive driver! Make allowances for mistakes, lack of skill and lack of knowledge on the part of the other driver. Control your temper and be alert at all times, looking far enough ahead to recognize and avoid impending situations. You're in the driver's seat -- a lot rests on your shoulders. DRIVE DEFENSIVELY! SEAT BELTS SAVE LIVES! BUCKLE UP - THE LIFE YOU SAVE MAY BE YOUR OWN!

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

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