The Argentina 1935-51 Definitives The 10c MG Departmental Official

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© Antonio Rubiera, 2011

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Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................5 About the Series ..........................................................................................................................................................6 Digital Presence ...........................................................................................................................................................9 How this series came about .................................................................................................................................... 13 MG overprint comparisons using the 10c value...................................................................................................... 17 10c MG type I overprint examples .......................................................................................................................... 20 10c MG type II/III overprint examples..................................................................................................................... 27 10c MG overprint varieties with breaks to the M ................................................................................................... 33 A selection of 10c MG type I stamps ....................................................................................................................... 36 10cMG Type I selection ........................................................................................................................................... 50 10cMG Type I ink blots and "eye" varieties ............................................................................................................ 60 10c MG type I major plate varieties ........................................................................................................................ 67 10c MG type I with excess ink on the left edge of the stamp ................................................................................. 70 10c MG Type I lower right nick plate variety........................................................................................................... 75 10c MG type I other plate varieties part 1 .............................................................................................................. 78 10c MG type I other plate varieties part 2 .............................................................................................................. 84 10c MG Type I overprint variety .............................................................................................................................. 93 A selection of 10c MG type IIf (flat plate) ............................................................................................................... 94 A selection of 10c MG type III (flat plate) .............................................................................................................. 101 A selection of 10c MG type IIr (rotary plate) ......................................................................................................... 104 10cMG type II flat postmarks ................................................................................................................................ 110 10cMG type II flat overinking ................................................................................................................................ 116 10cMG type II flat overprint varieties ................................................................................................................... 118 10cMG type II and III upper left corner plate variety ............................................................................................ 124 10c MG type II broken L plate variety ................................................................................................................... 128 10cMG type II broken L of REPUBLICA plate variety ............................................................................................. 134 10c MG type II top line deformations ................................................................................................................... 136 10cMG type II top edge plate varieties ................................................................................................................. 141 10cMG type II various plate varieties .................................................................................................................... 145 10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 1 ........................................................................................ 151 10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 2 ........................................................................................ 157 10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 3 ........................................................................................ 160 3

10cMG type II rotary printing ................................................................................................................................ 165 10cMG Type II flat selection of plate varieties ...................................................................................................... 175 10cMG Type II flat additional plate varieties ........................................................................................................ 183 10cMG Type II postmarks ...................................................................................................................................... 187 10c MG Buenos Aires 3 examples ......................................................................................................................... 191 10c MG Buenos Aires 10 examples ....................................................................................................................... 194 10c MG Buenos Aires 12 examples ....................................................................................................................... 199 10c MG Buenos Aires 29 examples ....................................................................................................................... 202 10c MG Campo de Mayo postmark ....................................................................................................................... 206 10c MG postmarked Ajo ........................................................................................................................................ 217 10c MG postmarks beginning with M ................................................................................................................... 221 10c MG various postmarks part 1 ......................................................................................................................... 225 10c MG various postmarks part 2 ......................................................................................................................... 231 10c MG various postmarks part 3 ......................................................................................................................... 238 10cMG Type III ....................................................................................................................................................... 244 10cMG Type II rotary selection ............................................................................................................................. 245

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Introduction In these notes I collect posts to a blog related to one of the many issues of the Argentina 1935-51 Definitives: the 10c M.G. (War Ministry) Departmental Official. Although this stamp was issued in relatively small run when compared to the other issues of the series, I have been lucky to come across a selection of several thousand examples that is the basis of this study. In 1993 I received from Estudio20 two boxes crammed full of Argentinean definitives. In one of the boxes I found approximately 10,000 10c Rivadavia Reds. I have since embarked on an in-depth study of the series these stamps are part of, the Argentina 1935-51 Definitives. Because this series title is long, and because I have given the study a digital presence, I instead refer to the series by the hash tag #arg3551. #arg3551 is one of the most beautiful and complex definitives series to study. It is also missing the large body of research it deserves. I routinely come across people wanting to understand the series and getting lost easily. I hope this small contribution is followed by the body of research that this great series deserves. I have benefited from the work of Jose Ramon Merlo. Merlo's early work on the papers of #arg3551 established the foundation that we all use to study this series. I must give credit to Rein Bakhuizen Vd Brink. Rein has made many of the seminal discoveries that I use in these publications to analyze the series. Rein, please write a book! Formatting of e-books with many images such as this one is an exercise in "close enough." I have strived to balance my exacting need for a perfectly formatted book with my equally exacting need to provide you, the reader, with the largest high quality images possible for, as the services folks say, "all of your #arg3551 needs."

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About the Series #arg3551 was issued in 22 denominations and was printed in at least 20 papers. #arg3551 was designed at a level of quality far above that of the previous series, the 1923-35 San Martin issue, to prevent the recurrence of costly postal forgeries that cost the government considerable losses of revenue. The stamps were issued on watermarked paper beginning in October 1, 1935 for the small format low values, and January 1, 1936 for the large format high values. The lowest value is the 1/2 centavo Belgrano.

The highest value is the 20 pesos Cotton.

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The shift to un-watermarked paper in 1945 triggered the postal forgery of the 20 pesos value. Soon thereafter production returned to the use of watermarked paper. 1951 is the year the last design was issued. These stamps were in continuous production until 1952, when the Evita series was issued. Some values remained in print until as late as 1961. The stamps were over-printed for official use in two formats. In 1935 the stamps were over-printed for each of eight ministries. These issues are the Departmental Officials, to which I refer to using the abbreviation DEPOF.

The DEPOF issues are complex to study and difficult to complete. I recommend their inclusion in an #arg3551 collection not just for the sake of completion, but because of how challenging they are to understand and complete. Beginning in 1938 the eight official over-prints were abandoned in favor of a single over-print of 'Servicio Oficial,' to which I refer to using the abbreviation SO.

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The SO issues were in print for as long as regular issues of this series were in print, and in a few cases, were issued on value/paper combinations not found in the regular issues.

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Digital Presence In English, I keep web content I have generated for this issue at:

http://www.somestamps.com/issues/issues-argentina-1935-51.htm I have all of the content I generated between 2004 and 2008 off this page. I also have additional material off undocumented pages that I use as a crude image repository at: http://www.somestamps.com/publications/publications-content-finder.html and with thumbnail images and by year at: http://www.somestamps.com/publications/publications-forums-2008.html and at similarly labeled files for 2009, 2010, and 2010.

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Once I have loaded images to the publications pages of somestamps, I author briefly-described content to a Google Blogger blog at:

http://arg3551.blogspot.com/ I post content from this blog in English in the United States to: http://www.bidstart.com/external.php?unread=&url=phpBB3/index.php and in Australia to: http://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=6550 I also post in Spanish to: http://foro.filateliaargentina.com.ar/viewforum.php?f=43 This latter forum, from hereafter referred to as the "Foro," is a great place to collaborate in Spanish. It is frequented by most of the well-known Argentinean authorities on this issue.

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Once a year I aggregate contributions to the #arg3551 Google Blogger blog and publish them in PDF to somestamps at: http://www.somestamps.com/publications/publications.htm and to Scribd at:

http://www.scribd.com/ I have struggled with time limitations and the large and poorly organized body of work that I have generated in somestamps and in the #arg3551 Google Blogger blog. I am re-organizing all of this content into a site aimed at e-publishing, and especially e-publishing to mobile platforms.

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Lately I have launched a web presence that should be more amenable to epublishing for mobile platforms by re-formatting the somestamps template to be touch-screen friendly and adding a new domain specifically for this issue at:

http://www.arg3551.com/ with a blog that I intend to use only for e-publishing at: http://www.arg3551.com/blog The #arg3551 Google Blogger blog continues to be the new research blog. In the new dedicated site I am adding text in the format English {Spanish}. I have always wanted to have bilingual editions of everything I write and publish, but my time for this hobby is limited and the scope and depth of this study is too large.
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How this series came about

Thanks to a reference provided by one of the „Foreros,‟ or members of the Argentinean Philately Forum, I learned about the existence of the book published by the Argentinean Post Office, Volume I, in 1939, by Antonio Deluca, and titled “Stamps and other postal and telegraph issues.” This book contains key information about Arg3551, about which Deluca mentions the following: The decision to replace the San Martin issue by a new series came from 1931, but was abandoned due to the Argentinean Post Office „s economic hardship. Its director, Mr. Carlos Risso Dominguez, sent a memorandum to the Ministry of the Interior, dated November 28, 1932, in which he outlines basic facts about this series that I did not know before I obtained this book. The basic facts contained in this memorandum are: 1. There were several postal forgery incidents that cost the Argentinean Post Office a large loss of revenue. “In 1921 a postal forgery of the 5c stamp was found, and it incurred a loss of approximately 1 million pesos of national currency in a few months. There seems to be an additional forgery of higher quality and affecting the 2c and 5c values. It is then without doubt that the prolonged use of the same stamp type conspires against its legitimacy and affects adversely our collection of revenue.” 2. Four categories were proposed for the new issue: “a) Publish the likenesses of those signing the Declaration of Independence...” “b) Publish the likenesses of those signing the 1853 Constitution...” “c) Publish a selection of the likenesses of important military and civilian figures...and in addition add symbolic figures representing the Republic as shown on our currency, and mainly the Argentinean shield in its authentic model.”

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“d) Finally...use the stamps for an increased awareness of our products and therefore put in effect a news-worthy promotion in its favor, just as other countries do...” There then take place several bureaucratic steps typically required for a new stamp series: authorization by the Ministry of the Interior, design contest, and authorization by the President of the Republic. The second memorandum containing facts about this series was sent by the commission making recommendations on this new issue to the Argentinean Post Office on July 4 1933: 1. “ The commission proposes the portraits for the following important figures to be featured in as many issues: San Martin, Rivadavia, Moreno, Belgrano, Sarmiento, Mitre, Urquiza, Rodriguez, Guemes, Velez Sarsfield. Within the context of promoting, the commission indicates, of course, the map of the Argentinean Republic, and the following industries: Cattle, Agriculture, Oil, Wine-making, and Sugar Cane.” 2. This memorandum recommends the use of paper without watermark, somewhat thicker than the one being used at the time for typographed printing, and with white gum. It is interesting that the characteristics in this recommendation correspond to only one of the 18 papers for Arg3551: the NOP, or opaque paper not in the catalogs from aproximately 1948. 3. The recommended dimensions are: 19 by 24 mm, and 21 by 28 mm. 4. The designs and initial printing quantities recommended are: 1/2c Urquiza (50 million); 1c Guemes (30 million); 3c Rodriguez (120 million); 5c Agricultura (60 million); 6c Sarmiento (40 million); 10c Belgrano (300 million); 15c Mapa (20 million); 20c Mitre (10 million); 30c Sugar (12 million); 35c Cattle (6 million); 40c Wine-making (10 million); 50c Velez Sarsfield (6 million); 1p Oil
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Industry (2.5 million); 5p Rivadavia (50000), 10p Moreno (20000), 20p San Martin (10000). 5. Only one design is recommended for the official issues, with each denomination having its own color: “The current system, is unappealing and very costly, because it forces specialized printings of the overprints. In addition, the wide range of papers and printings of the stamps and of the very same overprints, cause that collectors seek them, causing a dysfunctional inventory, given that they cannot be acquired at post offices...” This memorandum includes other details about the official issues, including proposed values and printing quantities. The Casa de Moneda (the Argentinean Treasury, in charge of printing stamps) makes the following design and respective denomination recommendations to the Argentinean Post Office on May 23, 1934: Mitre 1/2c y 1c; Sarmiento 2c; Moreno 10c; Belgrano 5c y 20c; Southern National Park 12c; Sugar 10c; Argentinean Republic, wheat 15c; America and the Argentinean Republic, fruits of the country 5c; Oil 2c; Agriculture 10c; Republic and the farmer 5c; Christ of the Andes 2c; Republic and Shield 12c; Wheat Stalks 5c y 10c; Allegorical figure and wheat 10c; Iguazu Falls 50c. The most interesting fact in this memorandum is mention of Iguazu Falls. This memorandum mentions many designs that were not adopted. Deluca mentions documents that relate to collaboration between the Argentinean Treasury and the Argentinean Post Office, it which the adopted characteristics are outlined: the use of a small format for the values up to 20c, and of the large format for values 25c and up. On July 16 of 1934 the Patriot values as we know them from 1/2c to 20c were finalized. Durante the period spanning October 25, 1934 and February 13, 1935 the Resources values as we know them from 25c to 20 pesos were finalized. On September 14, 1935, the Argentinean Post Office took the following actions:
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1. Decides to issue on October 1, 1935 the 1/2c, 1c, 2c, 3c, 4c, 5c, 6c, 10c, 12c, y 20c (full name version: JMG) values. 2. Demonetizes from January 1, 1936 onwards the previous (San Martin) issue. 3. Allows the exchange of San Martin stamps for the new stamps during the first 90 days of 1936. On November 22, 1935, the Argentinean Post Office decides to issue the 15c, 25c, 30c, 40c, 50c, 1p with map boundaries, 2p, 5p, 10p, and 20p values January 1, 1936. According to Deluca, public notice of the new issue “was made by special announcements, and the printing of 5000 stamps for each value.” I speculate that these stamps are the stamps we come across with specimen (“MUESTRA”) overprint.

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MG overprint comparisons using the 10c value

The images here show side-by-side comparisons of the type I overprint, and the type II/III overprint. I find that most type I stamps have an easy to type overprint and this can aid in finding them and separating them from the much more (my estimate is 10 times more common) types II and III. There is a very small difference in the height of the G, with the type II G being slightly taller.

The type II G (lower one in the figure below) has a slightly wider rim.

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The M and the G are about the same distance apart for both types.

The dot after the M is noticeably smaller on most type I stamps when compared to the type II/III stamps.

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When looking at both overprints, we can small differences in the style of the font: the bars of the M are slightly thicker for the type I stamps, and the G hooks differently.

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The M for the type II/III stamps is slightly taller.

Both Ms are about the same width.

10c MG type I overprint examples

The type I overprint shows more over-inking than the type II/III overprint .
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10c MG type II/III overprint examples

The first three items show a repeatable nick to the upper right corner of the M.

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Here are additional examples.

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10c MG overprint varieties with breaks to the M

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A selection of 10c MG type I stamps

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Here is a selection of this rare stamp. As is the case for all departmentals, usage for each ministry is bound by where the ministry operated. Buenos Aires 10 and 12, and especially Campo de Mayo, are shown here.

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10cMG Type I selection

Here are additional stamps of what I have always considered to be a rare printing. Notice that most of these stamps have a blurred overprint, and such is not the case for the other 10c MG types.

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Here is the repetitive plate variety that is found on 1 in 10 stamps of this plate.

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With small nick upper left to the M of the overprint.

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Postmarked November 11, 1936

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10cMG Type I ink blots and "eye" varieties

These two stamps has multiple ink blots.

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These two stamps have deformations to the left eye of Rivadavia.

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10c MG type I major plate varieties

These two plate varieties are repetitive thoughout the plate. This plate was manufactured using a five horizontal by two vertical master die, and that means that each of these varieties was printed on one out of every ten type I stamps. One variety has a nick to the lower right edge, and the other has a scratch in the field to the right of Rivadavia.

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The second stamp's scratch.

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Here is an additional example of the first plate variety.

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10c MG type I with excess ink on the left edge of the stamp

These stamps are likely from the leftmost edge of the plate.

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10c MG Type I lower right nick plate variety

This plate variety is found in one of the master dies, and because the plate was populated in blocks of 2 rows of 5 columns in sheets of 200, there are 20 of this variety on the plate.

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10c MG type I other plate varieties part 1

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10c MG type I other plate varieties part 2

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10c MG Type I overprint variety

Over-inking is common on the type I 10c departmentals.

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A selection of 10c MG type IIf (flat plate)

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A selection of 10c MG type III (flat plate)

Type III stamps are co-mingled with type II stamps on the flat plate. The type III stamps have a very small dot midway along the edge of Rivadavia's lapel.

The second stamp is type III

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I also find that the last A of REPUBLICA in many type III stamps has a small dot at the upper tip of the inside triangle.

Here are additional examples.

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The first stamp is type III

... and so is the second one.

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A selection of 10c MG type IIr (rotary plate)

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10cMG type II flat postmarks
Concordia

Buenos Aires 110

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Campo de Mayo

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El Palomar 77

Las Palomitas

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Slogans

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10cMG type II flat overinking

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Postmarked Campo de Mayo 77

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10cMG type II flat overprint varieties

I find several with the same nick to the top right edge of the M.

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Here is one with a different nick to the top right edge of the M.

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This stamp has a prominent break to the left leg of the M.

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10cMG type II and III upper left corner plate variety

I find this plate variety to be relatively common for such a small selection. It seems likely that it is on the master dies. Some of these stamps are type III, which has a small dash in Rivadavia's lapel nearest to the right side denomination.

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10c MG type II broken L plate variety

The first stamp from left to right in this strip is the 'broken L" plate variety. It is a repeatable variety from the master pattern used to make the plate.

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Here are alignment lines added to show that the five by five matrix has missalignments on the plate.

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The first stamp is the 'broken L" plate variety.

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The second stamp is the 'broken L" plate variety

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The first stamp is the 'broken L" plate variety.

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The first stamp from top to bottom is the 'broken L" plate variety.

10cMG type II broken L of REPUBLICA plate variety

Interestingly, this master die variety is very common for the 10cMM, yet I only found this one example in this rather large selection of these stamps (200 or so).

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10c MG type II top line deformations

Detail of the first stamp.

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Details of the second stamp.

Detail of the third stamp.

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Detail of the first stamp.

Detail of the second stamp.

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Detail of the first stamp.

Detail of the second stamp.

Detail of the third stamp.

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10cMG type II top edge plate varieties

These varieties are repeatable, and likely in the master dies.

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10cMG type II various plate varieties

First stamp from left to right

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Top stamp

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Stamp on the right

The left stamp has an overprint variety as well as a recognizable plate variety.

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10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 1

Detail of the first stamp.

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Detail of the first stamp.

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Detail of the second stamp.

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10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 2

Detail of the first stamp.

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Detail of the second stamp.

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Detail of the second stamp.

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10c MG type IIf (flat plate) other plate varieties part 3

Detail of the second stamp.

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Detail of the second stamp.

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Detail of the first stamp.

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Detail of the first stamp.

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10cMG type II rotary printing

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10cMG Type II flat selection of plate varieties

Here is a small selection of Type II flat plate varieties.

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10cMG Type II flat additional plate varieties

Broken L of REPUBLICA, shown before on the 10cMM Type II flat.

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10cMG Type II postmarks

Rosario

Rio Cuarto

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Mendoza

Buenos Aires 3

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Buenos Aires 8

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10c MG Buenos Aires 3 examples

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10c MG Buenos Aires 10 examples

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10c MG Buenos Aires 12 examples

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10c MG Buenos Aires 29 examples

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10c MG Campo de Mayo postmark

By how frequently I find this postmark, I am guessing this was the location of a major War Ministry facility.

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10c MG postmarked Ajo

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10c MG postmarks beginning with M

Magdalena

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Mercedes

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Mendoza

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El Marquesado

10c MG various postmarks part 1

Blue marker

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Oficina Postal Ambulante

Abra Pampa

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Concordia

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Cordoba

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Cruce del Uruguay

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Estacion Chepes

10c MG various postmarks part 2

General Guido

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Holmberg

Jose F. Uriburu

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Jujuy

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Las Lomitas

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10c MG various postmarks part 3

El Palomar

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Rosario

Rio Cuarto

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Resistencia

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San Martin

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Santa Fe

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Yacimientos Petroliferos

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10cMG Type III

This type is uncommon on the 10c MG, perhaps even less common than the Type I.

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The Type III has a small dash left middle of the white area on Rivadavia's chest.

The right stamp on the second row is a common plate variety.

10cMG Type II rotary selection

This small selection shows some of the typical postmarks for MG and a few overprint varieties.

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