International Competition (continued

)
team. The pace was a hot one all the way, too fast for our young athletes, unseasoned as they were by Eu­ ropean standards. Beating Italy and Austria was not enough to earn a first round place in the finals; the crew had to face the repechage round against other losers. The draw for second round, however, was just as im­ pressive as the first: Russia, Great Britain, Norway and the UAR. Again, and for the last time, the American effort was not enough against crews whose average age was 26 to 28 and whose racing experience for any one man was greater than that of all four of the young Princetonians combined. The USA beat Norway and the UAR, but unfortunately only two crews advanced to the final round. Third place in rowing, unlike other sports, is not enough. The trip and the racing was not without its lighter moments, and humor and tension often came simultane­ ously during thc racing week in Austria. On their way to the start of the repechage race against Russia, Charlie Hamlin of Harvard broke a piece of equipment. With only five minutes until starting time in a regatta, the international rules of which expressly forbid delays of any kind, the USA shell was incapacitated. There was nothing to do except to row before the judging platform and request the referees to delay the race, a plea that most probably would go unheeded. After some dis­ cussion, a decision did come. Switzerland’s President Keller of the international rowing federation agreed to delay the heat for 24 hours provided all long haired U.S. oarsmen had haircuts. Fortunately, the necessary repairs were made before the dictum could be carried out and the regatta continued. The long season for these four had not ended before a new one began. They were now back again on Carnegie, exactly where they were a year ago: practic­ ing, training, waiting. Next August there will be another set of Nationals followed by another European Cham­ pionship. Princeton Rowing Notes 1969

PHILLIP L. PLATT ’60 TROPHY Cornell, Princeton, Rutgers 1st Varsity Lightweights
1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 Cornell Cornell Cornell Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Cornell Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Cornell Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Rutgers

ROWING AT PRINCETON

277

History of Princeton Women’s Crew
Like men’s competitive rowing, women’s rowing began in England. Thomas E. Weil, Jr’s A Brief TimeLine of Rowing History indicates that a regatta was held for women in Chester in 1814, and that the first eightoared race among English women college students was held in 1919. Wellesley College is generally credited with having started the first women’s crew program in the United States in 1875, although they did not begin intercollegiate competition until 1970. Princeton University, understandably, did not have a women’s rowing program until it had women students. The first four-year undergraduate women were admitted in the fall of 1969, and a women’s rowing pro­ gram had begun by spring of the following year. Amy Richlin ’73, a transfer student who had rowed at Smith College, was instrumental in getting this program started over the objections of some of the men. They were afraid that the women would develop big muscles if they trained hard, or worse, that they would just play around in the boats and not take the sport seriously. Nevertheless, twelve undergraduate women—who were called “girls” or “coeds” in articles about them at the time—came out to practice at dawn every morn­ ing in the spring of 1971 with freshman men’s coach Jim Rathschmidt. Amy’s recruiting poster, with its tag line “The way we see it, you wouldn’t be at Princ­ eton if you liked to do things the easy way,” attracted another few dozen the following fall. The next spring, women’s crew became a varsity sport and won its first race, which was held on April 8, 1972, against MIT. The first eight won the New England Intercollegiate Regatta (the forerunner of the EAWRC sprints) that spring in record time. Amy Richlin became one of the first women to wear the white P-sweater, traditionally awarded captains of championship teams. and one for the heavyweight men—and women had to return to their dorms to shower. Before the fall of 1972, women practiced only in the morning when the men were not there, and even through 1975, women were not allowed upstairs at the boathouse when men were present. The university funded travel for only one women’s boat, but, because two eights and a four usu­ ally went to away races, women slept on the floors of their opponents’ dorm rooms to stretch the travel mon­ ey. (Their opponents often slept on their floors when they visited as well). Men were provided with racing shirts, training clothes, towels, and laundry service. Women were given one racing shirt. Women rowed in old men’s boats and used old men’s pencil­bladed oars, borrowing boats when they traveled because they had no trailer for their shells. During spring break, the men all went to Florida to train; the women trained on Lake Carnegie (but at least they got to shower with all the men gone!). Title IX changed all that. Three tiny shower stalls were built in the back of the tank building so some women, at least, could shower after their work­ outs. Some women were given sweat suits, and the team started sleeping in motels when it was on the road. With help from an oarswoman’s family, Princ­ eton purchased its first shell specifically for women, a wooden Pocock christened the Josephine W. Simpson. (This boat could be split in half between the four and five seats and carried atop a vehicle to races.) They got their own set of oars with modern (at the time) spoon blades.

GROWING ACCEPTANCE
Although most of the male coaches were ini­ tially neutral to hostile and accepted the presence of the women only reluctantly, legendary rigger Nelson Cox was always supportive. He went out of his way to repair and modify the women’s boats, even forming an emergency bow for one after a passing vehicle nicked off the foremost eight inches. He also put up a set of semaphore signal flags on the walls of the old rowing tank that spelled out “Beat Yale and Top Radcliffe,” a clear, if subtle, encouragement to the women. Following the passage and implementation of Title IX, several other developments helped to bring women’s crew to a status equal to that of men’s crew. After several successful seasons coaching the women, Kris Korzeniowski became Director of the Boathouse,

TITLE IX
In 1972, passage of Title IX of the Omnibus Education Act of 1972 provided for a huge increase in athletic opportunities for women throughout the country. Title IX required that all institutions receiving federal funds provide equal opportunities for athletic participation to men and women. To women who were rowing at Princeton in the early 1970s, it seemed that support and encouragement changed exponentially almost overnight. Before Title IX, no athletic facilities for women had been built at the Princeton boathouse. There were two locker rooms—one for the lightweight men

(continued)

278

ROWING AT PRINCETON

History of Princeton Women’s Crew (continued)
and he coached many successful U.S. teams, both women’s and men’s. Men’s and women’s coaches be­ gan to work together and support each other, and all the crews—men’s and women’s—went to Florida to train during winter break. A very generous gift from Mary and Lon Israel ’45 provided for the first “real” women’s locker room in the Class of 1887 Boathouse. Through their generosity, the women’s locker room was expand­ ed twice until the Shea Rowing Center was completed in 2000. Broader alumni support was also beginning to grow. Although there were still few women graduates, important support came from men who had rowed years before. The Princeton University Rowing Association, developing active participation by lightweight and heavyweight alumni in the early 1970s, did not focus on the beginnings of women rowing until a contingent of women attended a board meeting with a proposal to establish a friends group for women. The trustees under president Percy Preston ’36 unanimously rejected the idea in favor of a unified association for all Princ­ eton rowing alums, male and female, lightweight and heavyweight. By 1976, there were also alumnae to join the board; the early women members included Cate Huisman ’75, Cathy Brown Peinhardt ’76, and Mimi Kellogg Lyman ’76. Under Preston and his successor, Grant Sanger ’31, the PURA sent a clear message that there would be a unified association of rowing alums, and that women were to be welcomed at the boathouse as well as in the PURA and treated fairly. The PURA actively committed to equitable funding of women’s rowing at Princeton. first one was awarded in 1976. Seniors from the class of 1984 donated a trophy to be awarded annually to the winner of a race between Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Dartmouth. In 1987, women’s coaches of Brown and Princeton—John Murphy and Curtis Jordan at the time—created the Brown-Princeton trophy out of two oars. The Eisenberg Cup was named for the athletic director at MIT and was donated by MIT to be awarded annually to the winner of a race between Princeton, MIT, and Yale (although MIT does not currently row in this race). Since it first won the EAWRC varsity eights competition in 1972, Princeton women have captured that title seven more times. They have won the Willing trophy eight times since it was first awarded in 1985 to teams with the best overall performance among var­ sity, JV, and novice eights. During the early1990s, the women’s open crew was particularly dominant: it had four consecutive undefeated seasons, went six years un­ defeated in head­to­head races, and won four national championships. In 1993 and again in 1995 it won the “Great Eight Award” at the national championships, given for courage, dedication, and selfless team spirit.

RACING DISTANCES
Women’s race distances in the early years fluctu­ ated considerably. In the early 1970s—when there was still concern that too much of a workout might be bad for women, races were never over 1000 meters. Women often raced on standard 2000-meter courses, but started at the 1000-meter mark, without the benefit of stake boats. Coaches or officials called to coxswains to move boats up or back a stroke or two, until all the boats seemed roughly lined up. Then they tried to call the start quickly, before any of the boats drifted off the starting mark. By 1975, some of the races were at 1000 meters and some at 1500 meters. The EAWRC decided to go to the longer races, but some courses could only handle 1000­meter races, so some races stayed at the shorter length. This created an interesting and varying tactical challenge for the crew, always wondering what distance they were going to be racing in any given week. Race results from the mid­1970s indicate that all races but one were at 1500 meters by 1976 (times around

COMPETITIVE RECORD
In 1975, Princeton received its first trophy for women’s races. It was a gift from five women in the class of 1975 who had rowed in the first women’s race and every race since. The trophy was to be awarded annually to the winner of a race between Princeton and Radcliffe (as it was then known), reflecting the competitive priorities of the women who donated it. In the intervening years, however, Cornell has tradition­ ally joined the Princeton-Radcliffe race, and the trophy has gone to Princeton sixteen times, to Radcliffe nine times, and to Cornell once. In the 1980s, the Black and Brown trophy was added to this race; it is awarded to the winner of the race among the first novice boats. It was named for two of Princeton’s assistant coaches. Several other trophies have been donated since the

(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

279

History of Princeton Women’s Crew (continued)
five-and-a-half-minutes). Princeton’s races stayed at 1500 meters until the mid­1980s, although schools on the West Coast continued to row 1000 meters. Princ­ eton’s race times jump up to seven minutes or so in 1985, suggesting that by then the race distance was 2000 meters. Changing distances also posed unique challenges and opportunities for Princeton’s elite rowers who competed internationally. Barb Trafton ’82 remembers having to race in the 1984 national championships (for Boston Rowing Club) at 1000 meters one week and then switch to racing in the trials for the US lightweight team at 2000 meters the next. In that year the Olym­ pics and the national championships for open crews were still held at 1000 meters, but lightweights—who did not compete in the Olympics—were competing at 2000 meters. FISA made 2000 meters its official race distance for women in 1985. One of Princeton’s most successful elite rowers—Anne Marden ‘81— began competing internationally at 1000 meters. Once the race distance moved to 2000 meters, she dominated US competition for more than a decade. no longer competitive. In 1988, a group of Princeton varsity rowers who were relatively light put together an eight to compete in the collegiate lightweight nationals, and they took first place. But it was not until ten years later that the Princeton women’s program had the depth to field competitive varsity crews in both open and lightweight classifications. Finally, in 1998, Director of Athletics Gary Wal­ ters ’67, with a pledge from the PURA to fund equip­ ment needed for a varsity women’s lightweight pro­ gram and lead gifts from several PURA trustees, rec­ ommended to President Harold Shapiro that women’s lightweights should be instituted at Princeton. Shapiro strongly supported Princeton’s leadership in expand­ ing women’s lightweight competition. The program’s debut at the EAWRC sprints was a success—it won by edging out an experienced crew from Radcliffe. In the same year it placed third in the IRA national champion­ ships. The next two years were similarly stellar, with the lights winning both the sprints and the IRA national championship in 1999 and repeating as national cham­ pions in 2000 and 2001.

LIGHTWEIGHT WOMEN
While Princeton women have been racing in the “open” classification for more than a quarter century, it was only in the 1997­1998 academic year that light­ weight women’s rowing became a varsity sport. But agitation for a lightweight women’s team began shortly after the women’s crew was born; in fact, there was a lightweight women’s crew in the spring of 1974. They went 5-3 and took fourth in a lightweight women’s finals at the Eastern Sprints. Al Piranian felt that he could not continue to coach the numbers of people involved in both a light and a heavy squad, so in the fall of 1974, the lights started rowing in the early morning as the original crew had. Janet Youngholm ‘75 (who was then a senior rowing on the open crew) coached them on a volunteer basis. The Athletic Department would not support the program, and there was a flurry of petitions, letters to the Athletic Department, letters and editorials in the Princetonian, and support from the PURA, but the program did not continue. For nearly a quarter century after that, women’s lightweight rowing was not supported by the Uni­ versity. Many colleges started women’s lightweight programs in the late 1970s and early 1980s, but found that the lightweight programs diluted the open pro­ grams to such an extent that the open programs were

COACHES
Jim Rathschmidt turned the coaching duties over to Pete Raymond ’68 in the fall of 1971, and Pete coached the crew (with the help of his dog Hector) until he left to train for the Olympics in the spring of 1972. After that, Al Piranian ’69 coached the fledgling wom­ en’s crew with sensitivity and good humor through its first four varsity seasons, accumulating a 24-7 record. He dedicated an immense amount of time to the crew while working full time as an engineer and becoming the father of two. His successor, Kit Raymond ’74, was equally successful, coaching the crew to a 21-4 record in the 1976 and 1977 seasons. When Kit was ready to move on, Princeton mounted a major search for a full­time women’s coach. This search led to Kris Korzeniowski, who had rowed on the Polish national team, graduated from a Polish coaching college, and coached a Canadian national women’s team. Kris’s success with the women led to his becoming an Olympic coach. When he left Princeton to coach the Italian national team, Fred Schoch, son of legendary Princeton coach Dutch Schoch, took over. Fred and his successor, Ernie Arlett, each had a successful season with the crew (7-1 and
(continued)

280

ROWING AT PRINCETON

History of Princeton Women’s Crew (continued)
6-3, respectively). Arlett came out of retirement to coach for one year—he had coached Larry Gluckman at Northeastern, and Larry as Princeton head coach talked him into helping out until the university could hire a more permanent replacement. When Curtis Jordan took over for the 1984 season, Princeton began its long reign at the top of US women’s rowing. Over seven seasons, Jordan accumu­ lated a 55-14 record, in addition to EAWRC champion­ ships in 1985 and 1990 and a national championship in 1990. Dan Roock ’80 then coached from 1991 to 1996 and compiled and even more impressive record: 54-2, three EAWRC championships and three national cham­ pionships. PUWC’s current coach, Lori Dauphiny, took over in 1997, and she, too, has led Princeton to consis­ tently strong performances, racking up a 44-4 record in her first three seasons. en’s crew at Princeton until 1998, the list shows that several Princeton women have competed internation­ ally in lightweight events. Some of these women rowed in the second or third boat on the Princeton open crew, but were competitive internationally with women of their own size. Only one Princeton rower has gone on to be a coach at the international level: Ashlee Patton ’88 coached US teams in international competitions every year from 1995 through 2000.

WOMEN AT HENLEY
In 1980, Carol Brown ’75 raced in the US four that won the gold medal in the first women’s races at Henley. Women’s national team boats raced in invi­ tational races for coxed fours, doubles, and singles at Henley in that year and the next. In 1982 the format changed, and trials were held at Lake Waramaug to determine which US crews would race against British national team rowers at Henley. These resulted in the selection of a Boston University crew and a Princeton varsity four (coxswain Andrea LaBaw ’82, Barb Traf­ ton ’82, Deneen Maloney ’82, Allison Calzetti ’82 and Betsy Mayer ’83). The Princeton crew placed second in the 1000-meter exhibition final, the only event at the traditional Henley Royal Regatta in which US collegiate women’s entries ever raced. Although rowers from that four report that every­ one seemed to be titillated by the sight of women row­ ing down the course (though strange for the time, men’s crews would stop and stare as the Princeton women rowed by), the Henley organizing committee couldn’t seem to figure out how (or why?) to fit several more races into a jammed schedule. The women’s events were dropped after 1982, and a women’s Henley was held two weeks earlier than the men’s competition. The PURA has pressed for women’s participation at Hen­ ley. Recently, an elite women’s eight event has been added to the Henley Royal Regatta. Although given the opportunity, Princeton’s championship women’s crews have chosen not to send a boat to the women’s Henley, but given its history of championship women’s crews, it seems likely that Princeton will send a women’s crew to Henley in the future.
By Cate Huisman ’75, with extensive input from Carol Brown ’75 and Barb Trafton ’82, as well as assistance from Amy Richlin ’73, Princeton coaches Curtis Jordan, Lori Dauphiny, and Dan Roock, and Mary Kramer at US Rowing.

ELITE ROWERS
Princeton oarswomen have a long tradition of rep­ resenting the United States in international competition, starting with two members of the first women’s crew, Carol Brown ’75 and Janet Youngholm ’75, who com­ peted in the straight pair at the world championships in Lucerne, Switzerland, in 1974. They finished a length ahead of a strong Soviet pair on their way to the finals, where they ranked as fifth best in the world. Compet­ ing in the eight, Carol went on to win a silver medal at the world championships in 1975 and a bronze medal at the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. These games were the first Olympics that included rowing competition for women; another Princeton competitor was Mimi Kel­ logg ’76, who coxed the US women’s four. Anne Marden ’81, who had begun competing internationally in sweeps, switched to sculling and dominated the competition, bringing home numerous international medals in fourteen years on the US team. Teammate Ann Strayer ’82 was in the quad for five of the years and a spare for a sixth. More recently, Lianne Bennion Nelson ’95 has been on US teams throughout the 1990s and stroked the US eight that competed in the Sydney Olympics in 2000. The impressive complete list (at least as complete a list as the author could make it) of Princeton women who have competed on US teams is appended at the end of this chapter. Christine Clark ’83 also competed internationally for the Cana­ dian national team in the mid­1980s. Although there was no varsity lightweight wom­

ROWING AT PRINCETON

281

What Rowing Means
“Rowing in those days (1840s) was only secondarily a sport. Its main purpose was to provide transportation to friendly resorts in Boston. The austere Charles William Eliot, class of 1855, has written that he would never have belonged to a crew in his undergraduate years even if he had been physically developed enough. ‘It was not a reputable thing to belong to a crew,’ he confessed years later when president of the university. ‘The boats of those days were strong lapstreak boats with a real floor on the inside, which could be used, and were used, both spring and fall as means of bringing home members of the crew who did not propose to return sober from an evening in Boston.’ “ Boston Herald, May 26, 1941 Quoted in REDTOP: Reminiscences of Harvard Rowing “My senior year I got thrown in a lot.” —Women’s Coxswain Sandy Chu ’91 “My father was there that (race) day, a very staid man — but at the end of that race he picked up my girlfriend, Phyllis, and gave her a great big kiss. And she said that was the day she felt we were going to get married. And now, 54 years later, she’s sure of it… “When we had our 50th reunion, we went out on the water and got going a little bit, and then got together and the boat started to swing and you had that old feeling again. That’s why people go out for crew.” —Cleveland E. Dodge, Jr. ’43 “I remember my first race ever, going out as a novice, I was wearing my uniform and it had the ‘P’ on the back. I remember thinking, I’ll never forget this. I’m representing Princeton University and I can’t lose; I have to do my best. I remember sort of being in awe of the whole idea.” —Barbara Byrne ’89 (On Princeton Reunions) “I see all these rowers from all these classes who come back and the first place they come to is the boathouse. There’s something that has to be said for that…I get letters from kids who say, ‘Rowing at Princeton was the greatest experience in my life.’ And I think, ‘This guy’s a CEO of a company and this is the greatest thing in his life?’ But it touches people in a lot of different ways.” —Freshman Heavyweight Coach Mike Teti “My best friends now, 20 years later, are the people I rowed with at Princeton.” —Gary Brewster ’79 “Princeton is held up in the rowing world as the model of the cohesive boathouse.” —Columbia Women’s Coach Mike Zimmer ’88

“For me the attractive force behind crew lies in the heated competition of an agonizingly close race. In no other area can an athlete so boldly challenge her limits, exceeding them with grace and authority. Added to the thrill of the challenge is the essence of teamwork. Sitting on the starting line, all individual efforts melt into one common goal. Few things can compare to the stretch of a Princeton racing jersey across your back and the comfortable weight of a gold medal hanging about your neck.” Wendy Levach ’98 Women’s Open Captain “The atmosphere of camaraderie at the boathouse both within and between the crews, is to me an essential element of the Princeton rowing experience. Both on and off the water, the athletes push one another to their physical limits and beyond, yet the union of each person’s strength and dedication in the eight is truly exhilarating. Nothing is more exciting to me than sitting on the starting line and glancing across at my competition in anticipation of the battle that will ensue.” Sara Gaughan ’98 Women’s Open Captain

282

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Princeton Women Rowers in International Competition
Carol Brown ’75 1974 21975 8 1976 8 1978 4+/8 1979 8 1980 8 1981 8 1983 4+ 1984 spare Janet Youngholm ’75 1974 2fifth, world championships silver, world championships bronze, Olympics silver/fourth, world championships bronze, world championships did not compete; Olympic boycott silver, world championships fifth, world championships Olympics fifth, world championships 1986 lightweight 4­ gold, world championships bronze, world championships gold, Pan Am Games gold, world championships silver, world championships silver, world championships silver, World University Games silver, World University Games gold, Nation’s Cup bronze, world championships gold, world championships gold, Nation’s Cup sixth, world championships gold, world championships silver, world championships seventh, world championships sixth, Olympics world championships world championships Barbara Byrne ’89 1993 lightweight 4­ 1995 lightweight 41995 lightweight 4­ Katie Young ’91 1990 8, stroke 1991 4-, stroke Katherine Healey ’93 1993 8 Ashley Maddox ’94 1993 8 Reuwai Mount ’94 1994 4Danika Harris ’95 1993 lightweight 4­ 1994 lightweight 4­ Lianne Bennion Nelson ’95 1994 41994 2­ 1995 4­ 1998 8 1999 2­ 2000 8, stroke Stephanie Gregg ’96 1998 4­ 1999 spare

Mimi Kellogg Lyman ’76 1976 4+, cox sixth, Olympics Cos Crawford ’78 1978 4+ 1979 4+ Anne Marden ’81 1978 8 1979 4X 1980 4X 1981 1X 1982 4X 1983 2X 1984 4X 1985 1X 1986 1X 1987 2X 1988 1X 1990 1X 1991 1X 1992 1X Ann Strayer ’82 1981 4X 1982 4X 1983 4X 1986 4X 1987 4X 1988 sculling spare silver, world championships sixth, world championships fourth, world championships sixth, world championships did not compete; Olympic boycott eighth, world championships bronze, world championships gold, Pan Am Games silver, Olympics bronze, world championships fifth, world championships bronze, world championships silver, Olympics seventh, world championships fourth, world championships fourth, Olympics eighth, world championships bronze, world championships fifth, world championships eighth, world championships ninth, world championships

Abigail Cromwell ’99 1999 lightweight 1X eighth, Nation’s Cup 2000 lightweight spare 2001 lightweight 4X silver, world championships Record assembled by Cate Huisman ’75

Barb Trafton ’82 1984 lightweight 1X silver, world championships 1985 lightweight 2X fourth, world championships Betsy Mayer ’83 1981 8, spare Jennifer Marron ’85 1985 lightweight 4­ Carolyn Mehaffey ’86 world championships silver, world championships

ROWING AT PRINCETON

283

1970 CREWS
‘V’ FOR VICTORY
Freshman crew (1970) at Eastern Sprints. Symbol is protest against the invasion of Cambodia during the Vietnam War.

VARSITY
Logg Cup Carnegie Cup Navy Trophy
K.S.Klarquist ’70 (Stroke), A.Roberts ’70, J.Dayton ’70, M.Watkins ’71, K.Hofamann ’71, M.Ladra ’71, J.Paulson ’72, L.Colman ’70, B.Millman ’70 (Cox)

HEAVYWEIGHT FOUR WITH COX
K.S.Klarquist ’70, O.R.Bengur ’71, J.A.Gwynne ’71 (Cox), W.C.Lucas ’71, ?

284

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1970 Crew Year
The meat of a successful rowing program is the strength and endurance training that is done between September and March. The gravy is the speed that is developed during Spring Vacation. During this week, which culminates in the Season’s first race, the varsity and second varsity boats are finalized, and intensive speed work begins. Last spring it seemed for a while as if Princ­ eton’s varsity was simply not going to develop speed. The squad included a solid nucleus from the previous year’s boat, but two returning oarsmen, Bob Wetmore and Sandy Dayton, were unavailable to row due to illness. It had been tacitly assumed that Dayton would stroke the Varsity and, without him, Coach Peter Sparhawk had one week to find an oarsman to fill the vital stroke seat. Sparhawk tried several people, among them Captain Lauren Colman, but it wasn’t until Wednesday, with the Georgetown race three days away, that he experimented with senior Skip Klar­ quist. In three years of rowing at Princeton, Klarquist had competed in just one race, but, behind him, the varsity for the first time began to swing together. That Wednesday, the boat began to post consistently fast times. The season arrived with the race that Saturday morn­ ing, and the burgeoning promise of the crew was ful­ filled as they overwhelmed Georgetown by a four-length margin. The following Saturday, the Tigers participated in what has become the ritual defeat of Rutgers, and the next week, both heavyweight and lightweight crews traveled to Annapolis for their races with Navy. The Severn River, when it reaches Annapolis, is more a bay than a river. A breeze will cause a chop on the water, and when the Princeton crews arrived Friday after­ noon, a stiff wind was creating breakers on the race curse. Rowing on the river was impossible, and Friday’s practice consisted of rowing back and forth in the small inlet in front of Navy’s boathouse. Saturday was much the same, with the river resembling a beach in a hurricane; it was decided that the river would be almost calm the following morning at dawn. For the middies, rising at 5:30 is part of a daily routine, but the Princeton day begins rather later. This fact was reflected in the varsity heavyweight contest, as it seemed to take Princeton half of the race to wake up. Down at the point by one and half lengths, the crew came alive and ground past Navy in a rugged finish to win by two seconds. The freshman and second varsities both fell to good Navy crews. Unfortunately, it seemed that beating Navy, an aver­ age crew, from behind was not enough to qualify Princ­ eton to truly race Pennsylvania or Harvard. The Tigers lost the Childs Cup to Penn as the Quakers simply rowed away from start to finish. On the rough Charles River, Harvard rather easily rowed to an eleven­second victory. Though Princeton finished well ahead of Columbia and M.I.T. in their respective races, the crew was never a serious threat to win. The Carnegie Cup was the occasion of the best race of Princeton’s rowing season. Cambodia was invaded on Thursday of that week, and there was doubt on Friday as to whether there was going to be a race. All crews, however, decided to race, although it was obvious for sev­ eral oarsmen that this would be their last row that spring. It seemed Saturday as if the knowledge that this was to be the boat’s last effort together produced the season’s climax. Lake Carnegie sparkled with the tail-wind condi­ tions in which Princeton rows best. Cornell was virtually left behind, as a surprisingly game Yale dogged Princeton down to the 1,500 meter mark. With only a quarter of the race then remaining, the Yalies faded and barely hung on to defeat Cornell, as the Tigers were home, ahead by five seconds. Every climax has its dénouement, and the remainder of the season witnessed no outstanding races. The eight seats in the second varsity could not be filled after the Carnegie Cup, as half of the crew joined the strike. The Tiger varsity finished third on the Eastern Sprints for the second consecutive year, but failed to make the finals at the Intercollegiate Regatta at Syracuse in June. In the 1960 Olympics, the winner of the eight-oared event was for the first time in decades not an American college crew. Coaches in this country have spent the last ten years trying to keep pace with the international insurgence of interest in the sport. A reaction has set in, however, as college oarsmen—at Princeton, as else­ where—cannot meet the often brutal demands of time and effort necessary to sustain a high degree of competence. The oarsmen who graduated from Princeton in 1970, the finest to row here in years, were perhaps the last to be willing to meet these demands. Their efforts will certainly be missed. Princeton had lightweight crews of championship quality in the 1950’s, and the sport here now is enjoying a renaissance. The present success is due to the overhaul begun by Findley Meislahn, lightweight coach until 1969, and continued last year by Woody Fischer. Fischer’s at­ titude and rugged training program insure that Princeton boats crews are among the best in the country. Only Harvard and Yale last year stood in the way of a view from the top, as both Varsity and second Varsity crews finished third among the lightweights. The fresh­ men scored a magnificent end of season victory at the Eastern Sprints, defeating the Harvard boat to which they had lost in a race the week before. 1971 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

285

1970-71 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
1970 VARSITY
J.R.Crowley ’70, C.E.Walter ’70, R.P.Wright ’72, J.S.Slete ’70 (Capt.), E.C.Yeary ’71, D.B.Stone ’70, D.V.Hicks ’70, J.P.Gaynor ’70, Not pictured: J.A.Gwynne ’71 (Cox)

1970 SECOND VARSITY
T.H.Jones ’72 (Stroke), J.T.Davidson ’72, J.J.Griffin ’72, W.H.Brockman ’72, K.P.Giesecke ’72, B.K.Farwell ’72, D.B.Drysdale ’70, G.W.Shepherd ’70, K.N.Burns ’72 (Cox)

1971 VARSITY
R.P.Wright ’72, P.A.Maxson ’73, M.W.Stukenberg ’73, C.Kocher ’73, J.J.Griffin ’72, J.T.Davidson ’72, T.H.Jones ’72, A.G.Oller ’73, C.P.Whitin ’73 (Cox)

286

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1970s FOUR WITH COX
1971 FRESHMEN
—Class of 1974
P.Senghaas, W.R.Urban, T.L.Stein (Cox), W.S.Sargent, R.Workman

1972 HEAVIES
J.C.Baumann ’73, W.S.Sargent ’74, R.N.Kelly ’74 (Cox), R.J.Ressler ’74, D.J.Tweardy ’74

1973 FRESHMEN
— Class of 1976
T.Craig, R.V.Jensen, R.Batten, T.J.Mitchell, H.Brickman (Cox)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

287

1971 HEAVYWEIGHT CREW
HEAVYWEIGHT VARSITY
Navy Trophy Logg Cup
J.R.Paulson ’72 (Stroke), D.J.Harrison ’72, D.A.Hudacek ’73, M.A.Watkins ’71, R.J.Brachman ’71 (Cox & Capt.), M.Ladra ’71, P.J.Wettstein ’72, C.P.Reeve ’72, R.S.Carter ’73

HEAVYWEIGHT SECOND VARSITY
C.W.Raymond ’74 (Stroke), M.N.Szydlowski ’73, S.D.McKee ’73, A.R.Bengur ’73, J.W.Peters ’72, C.L.Fisher ’72, R.S.Friedman ’72, A.M.Miller ’73

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1974
J.P.Meade (Mgr.), P.Senghaas, J.Flynn, W.R.Urban, R.Dahlberg, P.D.Lyman, R.M.Schmon, T.Burns, L.Rinaldini, S.F.Deutsch (Cox)

288

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1971 WOMEN’S CREW
THE LAUNCH OF WOMEN’S CREW
Photo taken in ’71-’72 year.

WOMEN’S CREW
J.Hamilton ’74, C.Hamm ’73, M.Meenan ’74, H.Zia ’74, C.Grayson ’74, B.Dash ’73, A.Richlin ’73, J.Schafer ’74, Jim Rathschmidt (Coach)

time to race we grimace, bitch will we drop it? walking clumsily under the boat’s weight aching tiredness comes so quickly at least not this time . . . hands numb, thumbs frozen The race may be six minutes for the spectator, but its twelve months long for the There is one thing that impresses every­ rower. It starts with the first awkward tuning one about Princeton women’s crew. For the up in the fall, and progresses through the sake of crew, two dozen of us and one coach daily races into the cold of winter, through (Pete Raymond ’68) and a dog named Hector countless stadium stairs and strained­at got up every morning at six. The dog gave up weights, and ends in the spring and summer but we didn’t, still rowing, still going strong with eight men fused into perfect unity. and going to go stronger. Christopher Reeve Amy Richlin

Review of the 1971Crew Year

ROWING AT PRINCETON

289

1972 HEAVYWEIGHT CREW
VARSITY
Logg Cup
C.P.Reeve ’72, D.A.Hudacek ’73, D.J.Harrison ’72, R.M.Schmon ’74, P.J.Wettstein ’72, C.W.Raymond ’74, K.L.Smith ’74, P.D.Lyman ’74, S.F.Deutsch’74 (Cox)

JUNIOR VARSITY
A.R.Bengur ’73, R.S.Carter ’73, D.M.Prowler ’72, R.S.Friedman ’72, W.L.Whittaker ’73, J.R.Paulson ’72, W.R.Urban ’74, L.E.Rinaldini ’74 (Stroke), R.N.Kelly ’74 (Cox)

FRESHMAN LIGHTWEIGHT FOUR WITH COX
—Class of 1975 Stork Sanford Trophy IRA National Champions over 12 Heavyweight Entries
R.E.Redfern (Stroke), T.C.Daley, W.A.Hayne, P.B.Kelsey, G.R.Hamilton (Cox) Howard Shattuck, Deputy Commissioner of Onon­ daga County Parks presents trophy to Coach Gary Kilpatrick

290

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1972 Crew Year
This year’s crew team was invigorated by the appointment of a new, aggressive young frosh coach. Yet, it had its fair share of difficulties, beginning with the return of only three from last year’s varsity boat. The problem was compounded by the small turnout which resulted in the team’s ability to boat only three four-oared shells. Despite a lack of manpower, training began early in September to prepare for the three mile Head of the Schuylkill where Princeton’s best finish was a fairly encouraging third place. As the fall wore on, members experienced problems in their training regime because of the election break, Thanksgiving vacation, and Christmas. On their return in January, however, intensive off­the­water training, comprised of stadium steps, weight lifting, long distance running and ergometer workouts, began with the goal of putting the team in shape for the long spring. Racing began again in late March with the sched­ ule including competition against Navy, Penn, Harvard, and Cornell, some of the best crews in the East. The outlook for the season was uncertain, but the long, arduous hours of training and the determination of the oarsmen and coaches were bound to aid Princeton in looking towards victory.

Women’s crew
For two summers a flyer has gone out to all Fresh­ man women coming here. It ends by saying, “The way I see it, if you liked to do things the easy way, you wouldn’t be at Princeton.” In the last two years we ac­ cumulated three shells, a launch, and a red megaphone. Twenty of us rowed at 6:30 A.M for a year, and thirty of us are rowing now at 6 in the afternoon. Last year we won the first women’s collegiate Easterns, in a time 4 seconds faster than the national record time. This year we go to the nationals as well, and we will probably win. We will win because we don’t do things the easy way, and we never have. Three coaches have worked with us. Al Piranian has been with us for a year now, since our first rowing season. He is an engineer, and he believes in us—he and his stopwatch are with us on the stadium steps and in the ergometer room, and he and his stopwatch were thrown into Rogers Lake together when we won the Easterns. With all of us joined by a year of sunrises and now a year of sunsets, with another year behind us of riding in the big green limousine and singing “Going Back” on a dozen different rivers. This June, Al and his stopwatch are going into the Schuykill! 1973 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

291

1972 CREWS
FIRST WOMEN’S VARSITY CREW AT PRINCETON
Wins First Eastern Sprints

WOMEN’S VARSITY
Margit Roos ’75, Amy Richlin ’73, Carol Brown ’75, Janet Youngholm ’75, Cate Huisman ’75, Maurya Meenan ’74, Lindsay Poole ’75, Kathy Bradley ’75, Mary Wadsworth ’72 (Cox)

LIGHTWEIGHT FRESHMEN
—Class of 1975
S.F.Kineke, R.S.Parker, G.Stewart, T.B.Roberts, Gary Kilpatrick (Coach), W.A.Hayne, P.B.Kelsey, T.C.Daley, R.E.Redfern, G.R.Hamilton (Cox)

292

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Women’s crew breaks records in first Easterns competition
By Chris Halter
The women’s crew team, in its first year as a varsity sport, swept the Women’s Eastern Intercollegiate Regatta Sunday at Roger’s Lake, Connecticut – shaving nine seconds off the national record. The crew’s time of 3:34.9 is the “fastest time women have ever rowed 1000 me­ ters,” according to co­captain Carolyn Hamm ’73. “We just put the power and the timing together,” said sophomore Maurya Meenan who with co­captain Amy Richlin ’73 were the only women in the boat who had ever rowed before this year. The women started out with a 38-stroke pace, settled around 32­34, and at 20 strokes past the half way point, sprinted back to 38 again, to slide over the finish three seats ahead of Radcliffe and six seconds before M.I.T. in a final heat that also in­ cluded Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Middle Town H.S. and Blood Street School. “As soon as the race started, it started to rain so we all felt better; we felt more at home,” said Meenan of the team which has rowed most of its races this year in down­ pours. Radcliffe was favored to win, having been defeated this year only by the Vesper Row­ ing Club and the “Olympic caliber” Philadelphia women’s crew team who in national competition in Seattle last year set the official record which the Princeton women smashed Sunday. “Everyone expected to see crimson as the boats came out from behind a bend in the lake,” Hamm explained. “Instead they saw white shirts ahead by a length and every­ one shouted, “It’s Princeton!” Princeton had lost to Rad­ cliffe by four seconds earlier this spring at Boston, but in Sunday’s race it pulled out at the start and held the lead the whole way. The victory was par­ ticularly sweet for Princeton since on May 5 the Radcliffe team broke a contractual commitment to race on Lake Carnegie because “they didn’t consider us competition,” Hamm explained. In comparison to Rad­ cliffe’s upperclass boat, the Princeton crew of Meenan, Richlin, freshmen Kathy Bradley, Lindsay Poole, Cate Huisman, Janet Youngholm, Carol Brown, Margit Roos and senior coxswain Mary Wadsworth, was young and inexperienced. “All those sunrise prac­ tices really paid off,” said Meenan. Meenan noted that the women were not aware during the race that they were rowing a record-breaking pace. “We were so exhausted at the end, we couldn’t even comprehend the fact that we had won right away,” she said. Unfortunately, the wom­ en’s time will not be recorded “officially,” since the official time for women’s crew can only be set in national com­ petition. “I’m very proud of them,” said coach Al Piranian ‘69. “Every time they raced this year they knocked a few seconds off.” The Easterns were the women’s last competition this year, and they finished the intercollegiate season with eight wins, and losses only to Penn and Radcliffe, both of whom they subsequently defeated. The Daily Princetonian May 17, 1972

ROWING AT PRINCETON

293

1973 HEAVYWEIGHT CREW
VARSITY
D.A.Hudacek ’73, S.D.McKee ’73, R.S.Carter ’73, P.D.Lyman ’74, R.J.Ressler ’74, R.A.Dahlberg ’75, D.J.Tweardy ’74, C.G.Dietemann ’75, S.F.Deutsch’74 (Cox)

294

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1973 WOMEN’S CREW
VARSITY
3rd in Nationals
Janet Youngholm ’75, Joanne Casper ’76, Cathy Brown ’76, Margaret Sieck ’76, Carol Brown ’75, Cate Huisman ’75, Laura Drummond ’76, Ann Marie Elefthery ’76, Mary Levkoff ’75 (Cox)

VARSITY
Mary Levkoff ’75 (Cox), Cate Huisman ’75 (Stroke), Margaret Sieck ’76, Carol Brown ’75, Janet Youngholm ’75, Joanne Casper ’76, Laura Drummond ’76, Cathy Brown ’76, Ann Marie Elefthery ’76 Not in picture: Amy Richlin ’73 (Captain)

COACH ALFRED G. PIRANIAN ’69
Women’s Crews 1972-75

ROWING AT PRINCETON

295

1973 LIGHTWEIGHT CREW
UNDEFEATED VARSITY
Goldthwait Cup Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup Joseph Wright Cup Thames Challenge Cup
E.G.Bohlen ’75 (Cox) (kneeling on left), S.F. Kineke ’75, A.G. Oller ’73, P.B.Kelsey ’75, C.Kocher ’73, W.H.Walton ’74, W.A.Hayne ’75, P.A.Maxson ’73, T.C. Daley ’75, R.E. Redfern ’75, P.B.McCagg ’75, G.R.Hamilton ’75 (Cox) (kneeling on right)

PRINCETON AT HENLEY
vs. Christiania Rowing Club of Norway in 2d Race

PRINCETON WINS THAMES CHALLENGE CUP vs. THAMES TRADESMEN

AT PRACTICE on the River Thames
G.R.Hamilton ’75 (Cox), R.E.Redfern ’75, T.C.Daley ’75, P.A.Maxson ’73, C.Kocher ’73, W.H.Walton ’74, W.A.Hayne ’75, P.B.Kelsey ’75, S.F.Kineke ’75

296

ROWING AT PRINCETON

The Henley Royal Regatta, 1973
The portly and dignified gentleman rose in the bow of the Judges’ launch to address us. “Princeton and Thames Tradesmen,” he announced, “when you are pointed and ready I shall start you like this: Are you ready? Go! Point your bows, please.” The judge emphasized the command “Go!” by dropping a red flag, and we were off. We “settled” from our racing start with a third of a length lead and began pounding our way to the distant finish line. It might seem superfluous to recount here an event which occurred in July of 1973 and whose results everyone knows. However, seven members of the 1973 lightweight crew are still around Princeton. Also, the experience of the Henley Royal Regatta is one that everyone should enjoy at least once in his life, and I would like to share our experience with you. Henley is a tradition in itself. The pomp and pageantry of the elite English affair are almost not be believed. The four­day regatta attracts crews from all over. Some are world class; some would be better off quaffing a few in the nearest pub. There is no “lightweight” division; we entered the Thames Challenge Cup for Eights, one of many events in the regatta. Our start had been good, but we had to maintain the precious lead. In a crew race you are supposed to think of nothing except your drive and the coxswain’s commands. I think if I did that I would have gone crazy long ago. In this Thames Cup final I thought about where we were in the race, about how far back the judges’ launch was, about the “Tradesmen’s” crew with whom we were practically neck and neck, and about the idiotic bicycle riders who were trying to keep up with us. I was also pushing myself, of course. Throughout the body of the race the two crews’ relative positions did not change much. We hit the mile mark with the same lead, one-third length. “Fifty strokes, only fifty strokes to go,” I thought to myself, trying to ignore the fatigue that was engulfing me. The last part of the race was important, for a lot of work had been put into getting us here. We had rowed all fall. The dreary, painful winter workouts had seemed so useless at the time. Coach Gary Kilpatrick’s spring practices had often seemed unnecessarily brutal. But the Eastern Sprints victory had been great, and here we were in a Henley final as a reward. Our four previ­ ous elimination races had gone well, the one possible exception being a record­setting performance against a big Norwegian crew that had almost caught us after we squandered a big lead. As we approached the main grandstand I was aware of a roar-20,000 people screaming and yelling. Of these, perhaps 150 were cheering for us. The Tradesmen were still with us, but we knew we had it. We could not hear Gregg Hamilton, our coxswain, for all the noise, so he signaled the last ten strokes with his hands. We crossed the finish line with that same one-third length lead-not much, but enough to bring the Thames Cup back to Princeton. Auty Hayne 1974 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

297

1974 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
FRESHMEN
—Class of 1977
J.M.F.Kruse (Spare), L.A.Smith (Stroke), R.E.Willoughby, C.S.Osborn, T.D.Jacobson, J.T.Coffee, G.N.Stratton, C.B.Lesesne, D.S.Keller (Bow), B.D.M.Meyer (Spare), M.J.Cunningham (Cox)

FRESHMEN FOUR WITH COX
—Class of 1977

I.R.A. Champions – New Course Record
Stork Sanford Trophy
C.S.Osborn (Bow), D.S.Keller, J.T.Coffee, L.A.Smith (Stroke), M.J.Cunningham (Cox), Coach M. McLaughlin

298

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1974 Crew Year
1973-74 marked a year of revitalization for the heavyweight crew program. With an 85% turnout of last year’s freshman and the reappearance of former varsity standouts, heavyweight crew has turned from a laughable endeavor to a serious business. The incom­ ing sophomores are the first group from frosh coach Mike McLaughlin’s new school of training which ad­ vocates mental and physical toughness. The initiation of an intensive recruiting program last year yielded an exceptional group of freshmen, and the Princeton crew should soon be on top. This upward trend was first reflected at the Head of the Charles Regatta where Princeton Heavyweights took eighth in a field of sixty, beating powerhouses such as Northeastern, Penn, Coast Guard, and M.I.T. Despite a plague of injury and sickness, the squad approached the dull months of winter training with a vigor unseen in recent years. This new attitude doesn’t guarantee a given number of wins, but heavyweight crew in 1974 should see many bare-backed opponents. The future of the rowing program is excellent. With the completion of the new buoy system last spring, Princeton has the only FISA approved interna­ tional race course in the country. It is by far the fairest course to race on straight for 2000 meters with excel­ lent water conditions. Princeton should soon be the center of rowing in America. Already, the University hosts the youth tryouts and the Eastern Sprints for 1975. As a result of this exposure, hundreds of high school oarsmen are becoming interested in rowing at Princeton, which will insure a strong program in the future. If the Tiger lightweight varsity crew wins the Eastern Sprints, they will go to Henley again this summer. Coach Gary Kilpatrick would like the team to duplicate last year’s efforts. Chris Kocher and Peter Maxson, two super oarsmen, were lost to graduation. But the rest of the undefeated varsity is back, including six juniors who have never lost a race for Princeton. An auspicious beginning was made at the Head of the Charles Regatta in October, where the light­ weights led the way to Princeton’s third place team total. Highlighting the afternoon was a tenth of second victory over M.I.T. in an event for eights. Henley oars­ men juniors Tom Daley, Pete McCagg, Bob Redfern, and senior captain Bill Walton were among the win­ ning crew, as well as junior Al Bankhart and sopho­ mores Terry Cooke, Paul Dengle, and John Hayes. The coxswain was unbeatable Gregg Hamilton. In the fours race, Henley juniors Auty Hayne and Pete Kelsey and sophomores Wendell Colson and Jeff Holsapple, took second place. Due to the staggered start, they never saw the crew that took first place by a small margin. Other Tiger lightweights finished ninth in both the eights and fours in addition to taking sixth place in intermediate fours races. In a remarkable display of depth, only one Princeton boat finished behind a Har­ vard lightweight boat. The depth should be evident in greatly improved junior varsity as well as in a third boat for some races. In addition to captain Walton, only Will Swigart, who gave up a letter in squash to row, will be leaving this year. It is the challenge of abundant talent within the team that motivates the crew during the winter months of no outside competition. Coach Kilpatrick has said, “I want to see the sophomores put pressure on those who have proven themselves before.” They did that in the sophomores vs. juniors race at Florida winter practice. After the sophomores had won the first five short pieces, Henley bow oarsman Steve Kineke was heard to ask, “Haven’t they heard we’re not supposed to lose?”

Women’s Crew
Once on a dim and dream-like shore, Half seen, half recollected; I thought I met a human oar Ideally perfected. The Perfect Oar, dinner at Friendly’s, big grey sweat suits, Jenny, Little Eddy, dinner at 7:30 . . . .all part of the unfolding tradition of PUWC. You cannot isolate the experiences and get a true picture of wom­ en’s crew. It isn’t only stadium seats, calloused hands, aching tiredness, seat races, and double practices. Nor is it just ice cream parties, humor, winning races, and sunsets on the lake. Crew is both brutal and lovely; it is this double nature that is its essence. Each girl who tries crew reacts differently to her experiences. Some become addicted or “hard core” and come back year after year. Others give up along the way—after a day, a week, a year. The problem of keeping people out for the team is one that Princeton must still learn to solve. A number of experienced oarswomen failed to return this year, causing an annoying lack of depth. By spring the team was just big enough for two boats,
(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

299

1974 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup
G.R.Hamilton ’75 (Cox), P.B.McCagg ’75 (Stroke), T.C.Daley ’75, W.H.Walton ’74 (Capt.), W.A.Hayne ’75, R.E.Redfern ’75, S.F.Kineke ’75, M.T.Cooke ’76, W.B.Colson ’76

THIRD VARSITY
R.M.Smith ’75, W.L.Hudson ’74, J.M.Black ’76, B.T.Henry ’76, G.E.Combs ’75, ?, J.D.Ahstrom ’76, N.T.Hauck ’76, E.E.Colby ’76 (Cox)

300

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1974 Crew Year (continued)
so each illness and injury was crucial. The mem­ bers of UPO (Union of Port Oarswomen) generally outnumbered those of BOSO (Beneficent Order of Starboard Oarswomen) during the fall, but a balance was achieved by spring through some maneuvering of personnel. In spite of the minor difficulties, team spirits were buoyant throughout the year. The women rowed in good form at the Head of the Charles, adding points in their event to the total Princeton University team score, thus helping the Tigers to a third place finish over all. They remained on the water for practice until the lake froze during Christmas break. After returning from the extended vacation, captain Cate Huisman led the crew in an accelerated winter training period­­including combinations of flat running, stadium seats, ergom­ eter pieces, weight training, and practice in the row­ ing tanks. Highlighting 1974 was the arrival of a new “super cedar” shell, the Josephine Woodward Simpson, which had been purchased by a team member’s family. The new shell can be split into two sections for easier transportation to away races. It’s difficult to say what the future holds for PUWC. Women’s rowing is a rapidly expanding sport. As new teams are formed each year, Princeton must try to maintain her excellent record against the added competition. One thing is certain: no matter what the outcome of the race, the women’s crew team remains a group of vital, enthusiastic people—a source of plea­ sure that makes the little bit of pain worthwhile. 1974 BRIC-A-BRAC

Lightweight Varsity Crews

COACH GARY KILPATRICK
1973-88 1989-90

Heavyweight Varsity Crews

Garyana – A Collection of Killerisms
Members of his lightweight crews collected volumes of Killerisms with respect, and no small amount of amusement. “Gary always had something to say. Sometimes it made sense, sometimes it didn’t. But whatever he said, it did make us row faster. Sometimes because we liked what he said, sometimes because we didn’t. We rowed hard because of him and in spite of him. But no matter what the case, he was there, and we usu­ ally still had our shirts after 2000 m.”

A Toast to Killer
At a Class Day Banquet held on November 19, 1988, Gary Kilpatrick’s as­ sumption of heavyweight coaching responsibilities was marked by a review of his remarkable record. Beginning with his “Most Valuable Oarsman” award at North­ eastern and his establishment of rowing at Ithaca College the citation covered his 16­year Princeton Lightweight 63­26 won­lost record, which included a capture of the Thames Challenge Cup at Henley (1973); and in the past ten years, the WoodHammond 7 times (against Penn), the Platt 7 times (against Cornell and Rutgers), the Goldthwait 5 times (against Harvard and Yale), the Joseph Wright 7 times (against Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Navy, Yale), the Kennedy Challenge Cup for Heavy JV’s at the IRA Regatta in 1985, and also in 1985 the Class of 1921 Trophy for the most outstanding Princeton crew of the season.

ROWING AT PRINCETON

301

1974 WOMEN’S CREWS
VARSITY
3rd at Eastern Sprints
M.Kellogg ’76 (Cox), J.Casper ’76, M.Meenan ’75, C.Brown ’76, J.Youngholm ’75, C.Huisman ’75 (Captain), A.Birmingham ’74, C.Brown ’75, E.Eifrig ’76

JUNIOR VARSITY
Eastern Sprint Champions
S.Roth ’77, M.E.McShane ’77, A.Rubenfeld ’75, C.Calvert ’76, S.Burgess ’77 (Cox), L.Francis ’77, L.Fredrickson ’76, S.Spicer ’77, J.Heskel ’77

NATIONAL CHAMPION PAIR
Carol Brown ’75 Janet Youngholm ’75

302

ROWING AT PRINCETON

What Crew Means
“I got into rowing my junior year in high school, and just loved it. I decided I wanted to row all four years in college. This is the place to do it. Just the history of Princeton’s successes, especially the lightweight crew, was awesome. Back in the ‘80s they were the team to beat. No one could beat them. Just hearing about that made me want to come here. I got here and I had really high goals. I wanted to win a medal at the Head of the Charles and then go to the Henley Regatta in England. Last year we did both. The varsity lightweight boat took third, a bronze medal at the Head of the Charles and we went on to Henley. We won Sprints and Nationals, so I guess it couldn’t get any better. Princeton is always the team to beat at regattas. I hope it stays that way. Princeton has established a reputation for itself. Not only in academics, but also in rowing. That means we will always be attracting the best rowers. People hear about our record and they want to come here. I hope this carries on.” Tom Fernandez ’97 — Lightweight Crew Captain “My Princeton rowing experience is best reflected in the one rowing photograph that I keep in my room. The picture doesn’t capture the graceful rhythm or the effortless glide that are so often associated with rowing. Instead, it shows the team seconds after having crossed the finish line. We’re either slumped over the oars or collapsed into the bottom of the boat. For me, this picture captures the commitment and sacrifice which are essential to row successfully. The Princeton rowing program, with its superior coaches, excellent facilities and legacy of success, helps us make the sacrifice necessary to ensure that when we do cross the finish line, we will be collapsing in victorious exhaustion.” Ted Carson ’97 Captain, Heavyweight Crew

“I think the best part is just being out on the water every dat with your friends, doing something you love to do. It’s almost a religious experience sometimes when it gets so perfect and the water’s beautiful and the sunlight’s hitting the skin of the person in front of you. On a good day there’s nothing better when you leave practice so excited, and on a bad day it’s the dumps. I think every person here has a dream of going on to the National Team. How realistic that is, I don’t know, but rowing will always be a part of my life, whether I’m competing or coaching. We’ll see. Rowing has defined my Princeton experience like nothing else at this school. I have gained so much out of crew; I hope to give something back by helping other people to row. A lot of it is just the pictures on the wall. Sometimes when you are bone tired from practice, you walk down the stairs of the Boathouse and actually read a lot of the history of rowing at Princeton. It’s inspiring.” Sarah Ryerson 97 — Co-Captain Women’s Crew

“In our freshman squad only three people had ever rowed before. Yet, Lori Dauphiny, who was the freshman coach at the time, somehow managed to take a group of girls who had never rowed before for the most part and turn them into Eastern Sprints Champions. We are really lucky that we have such talented coaches. It is really exciting to see them get enthusiastic about rowing. It is contagious and I believe that has a lot to do with our success. Leslie Gewin ’97

ROWING AT PRINCETON

303

1975 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
L.A.Smith ’77 (Stroke), T.C.Daley ’75, R.E.Willoughby ’77, C.S.Osborn ’77, D.S.Keller ’77, R.J.Kelly ’77, T.Craig ’76, G.N.Stratton ’77, M.J.Cunningham ’77 (Cox)

304

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1975 Crew Year
Heavyweight Crew
Crew is an immensely demanding sport, both physically and in the two hours of practice time it requires every school day from September to June. Other athletes deride oarsmen as fanatics with streaks of masochism; they do have their point. After all, what possesses a person to spend nine months of the year in training for seven six­minute races which few will watch and even fewer will appreciate? Perhaps the reason lies in the paradoxical nature of rowing, an intense and violently contradictory sport. It is the ultimate of team sports and yet also the most personal of sports. It offers intense satisfaction and in­ tense pain, fierce exhilaration and equally fierce frustra­ tion, extremely close friendships and strong rivalries. Crew permits the individual to examine himself for weaknesses as well as for strengths and provides, to a certain extent, a working philosophy of life. Vague con­ cepts such as dedication, perseverance, and teamwork are more than just words to an oarsman; they are the trademarks of his sport. For the heavyweights, the past few years have been characterized by small turnouts, high attrition rates, little recruiting, and consequently poor records. Crew demands numbers for success, yet numbers are hard to come by in a sport whose unpleasant aspects are so strongly emphasized. The deleterious effects of a small squad are particularly evident when the com­ petition has strong programs. Unlike most Ivy League sports, Ivy League crew is the best in the nation. Peren­ nial national powerhouses Harvard, Penn, and Cornell are all on the Princeton schedule and among the tough­ est opponents anywhere. In contrast to the past, this year’s heavyweights have the numbers and the size to be competitive with anyone, especially due to a large and talented sopho­ more class. In addition, the freshmen expect to have another fine crew, which bodes well for the varsity program in the years to come. For those who have never seen a crew race, we encourage you to pack a picnic and enjoy a warm spring weekend watching a sport which combines pow­ er, endurance, finesse and timing. For those who have done so, no encouragement is necessary. Indeed, crew is one of the oldest and most tradition­bound of sports, one which, despite its “unreasonable” nature, contin­ ues to thrive and even to expand. Over my four row­ ing years, I have watched as the number of Princeton oarsmen has grown and have often thought to myself that there is a great deal to tradition. The old­fashioned notions of dedication, perseverance, and teamwork are not, despite frequent rumors to the contrary, obsolete.
Chris Dietemann ’75

Lightweight Crew
In the fall of 1973 the lightweight crew returned to Princeton basking in the glory of a victory at Henley, England, and anticipating with confidence an equally successful spring. This past fall the crew came back with pride hurt and confidence shaken by the varsity’s sixth place showing in May’s Eastern Sprints, a perfor­ mance only partially alleviated by the junior varsity’s second place finish. How does one explain what hap­ pened that day? “Surely that race was a fluke.” To lose by ten seconds to a crew that had been victorious by only three seconds the week before requires more than a “bad race,” does it not? These questions may never be answered, but this year should bring an answer to one question: can the lightweights bounce back with an effort they and Coach Gary Kilpatrick will be proud of? It will be a difficult task. A large number of experienced oarsmen have chosen not to row this year. The master coxswain, Gregg Hamilton, has left the coxswain’s seat to assume freshman lightweight coaching duties. These person­ nel problems have been complicated by the athletic department’s perilous financial situation, which has put a severe strain on the entire rowing program. There are encouraging signs, however. The squad is almost as large as last year’s; the “mediocre” performance at the Head of the Charles was really a balanced effort (following the Head loss to Rutgers, we beat them convincingly in an even-boat practice); good weather and a normal calendar have permitted slightly tougher workouts. By the time you read this, the success of the lightweight effort will be known. The most notable aspect of lightweight rowing this year is that certain worthwhile traditions have been initiated or continued. Soccer continues to be the dominant pre-practice sport. To be a part of the flashy dribbling, pinpoint passing, and booming shots of the lightweight soccer team is well worth the occasional broken window, broken toe, or sprained ankle incurred in competition. Saturday morning practices, at least in the fall, are still flavored by the moans of those who could not resist the call of Bacchus the night before. The Friday night bloat, limited to the spring racing season, continues to delight lightweight oarsmen, to
(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

305

1975 WOMEN’S CREWS
CLASS OF 1975 CUP
Presented to the University by the first oarswomen to row for all four years at Princeton: Maurya Meenan ’74, Cate Huisman ’75, Abby Rubenfeld ’75, Janet Youngholm ’75 and Carol Brown ’75 The cup is awarded to the winner of the Princeton-Radcliffe race.

Open Women’s Varsity Eight Race
1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 Radcliffe Radcliffe Princeton Radcliffe Radcliffe Princeton Radcliffe Cornell Radcliffe Princeton Radcliffe Radcliffe Radcliffe Radcliffe 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton

VARSITY
Mimi Kellogg ’76 (Cox), Janet Youngholm ’75, Stacey Roth ’77, Ellen DeSanctis ’78, Carol Brown ’75, Cate Huisman ’75, Carolyn Penfield ’78, Cathy Brown ’76 (Captain), Maurya Meenan ’74

306

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1975 Crew Year (continued)
annoy lightweight coaches, and to befuddle heavy­ weights. The coach’s daughter remains young enough that oarsmen need not feel modest when walking about the locker room area. “The No-Name,” a practice shell once deemed pathetic because of its lack of – you guessed it – a name has thrived ever since it was named after John B. Hayes ’76, a junior who possesses the most overrated body in the boathouse. Finally, in an atmosphere of sporty nostalgia not seen since the likes of Frederic Fox ’39, Will Swigart ’74 has established himself as the Old Man of the Lake, a role we trust he will not soon relinquish. Auty Hayne ‘75 good showings prompted Coach Al Piranian to remark that this team had perhaps more potential than any he had previously coached. The hardworking and enthusiastic crew remained hardworking, if not enthusiastic, throughout a long season of winter practices. Again this year the level of expected activity grew tougher; and the number of stadium steps, laps around the track, minutes on the ergometer, weights on the universal, and ice cream parties all increased. The increase was due in part to continuous re­evaluations of the women’s ability and in part to the pressure of improved competition. That competition made itself felt in the 1975 spring schedule, perhaps the toughest that the Tiger oarswomen have faced. It was complicated by the decision of the EAWRC to allow both 1000 meter and 1500 meter races, which necessitated different strate­ gies from week to week. Particularly strong challenges came from Yale, Boston University, and perennial rival Radcliffe. Yet the final test of the Princeton women is yet to come, as they will host the 1975 National Cham­ pionships on Lake Carnegie in June. Throughout the year, oarswomen continued to debate “the meaning of life according to crew,” won­ dering if what was gained was worth that which was being given up. The sacrifices were mostly matters of time and comfort; other activities that had to be missed, late dinners, extra loads of laundry, and a constant ach­ ing tiredness. The rewards were often far less tangible. It’s hard to attach numbers to a feeling of achievement, a sense of unity with the Princeton tradition, a realiza­ tion of the self­discipline attained, or the supreme sense of camaraderie. But each time a resounding “ooh­aah” rings out across the campus, faces light up spontane­ ously in recognition and pride: “Here is someone with whom I have shared my best and worst moments, who truly knows an intensity of life.” Cathy J. Brown ‘76 1975 BRIC-A-BRAC

Women’s Crew
For the Tiger oarswomen, 1974­75 has been a year of both culmination and renewal. It is a culmina­ tion of the Princeton rowing experience for five gradu­ ating seniors – Carol Brown, Cate Huisman, Maurya Meenan, Abby Rubenfeld and Janet Youngholm—the “hard core” who were with the team at its beginning and are the first to survive four seasons. Last August, Janet and Carol achieved particular distinction as members of the US National Team. Their fifth place finish in the open pair event at the World Championships in Lucerne, Switzerland, was the best showing of a US women’s crew to date. While the powerful pair was returning from Europe, other PUWC veterans were hard at work on the Princeton campus, hoping to attract large numbers of freshmen to crew through a strong recruiting effort. Blue posters went up all over campus, flyers appeared mysteriously in doorways at night, and dozens of discussions on “the rowing experience” took place. By the end of Freshman Week, over a fifth of the fresh­ man women had indicated an interest in trying crew. A month of split session practices had gone by before the group was down to a more manageable three boats. It was this large and effervescent batch of newcom­ ers who provided the spirit of renewal and a healthy optimism. In October the veterans entered two eights in the Head of the Charles Regatta, finishing fifth and thirteenth in a field of 41. A month later, the fresh­ men journeyed to Philadelphia, where they defeated freshmen from George Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania, and gained preliminary exposure to racing, road trips, and “Rich-n-Chips.” The

ROWING AT PRINCETON

307

1976 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Carnegie Cup Childs Cup Navy Trophy Logg Cup 2d at IRA
M.Steinhardt ’78, S.Dawson ’78, S.Fisher ’78, D.Keller ’77, D.Kinzer ’78, M.Holsten ’78, R.Willoughby ’77, L.Smith ’77 (Capt.), M.Cunningham ’77 (Cox)

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1979
M.R.Murray, T.A.Bickford, J.P.Crutcher, D.C.Urguia, C.T.Dembergh, C.F.Lowrey, J.Clarke, A.T.Horvat, E.C.Chow (Cox)

IRON MEN AND WOODEN OARS
D. Kinzer ’78

308

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Last year began the renovation of Princeton crew. With a number of promising sophomores, a junior, and a senior, Coach Pete Sparhawk turned out the best crew that Princeton had seen in years. In contrast to more recent history, the 1975 varsity heavyweights remained contenders in every race that they entered. During the regular season, they won half of their races and finished eighth in the Sprints. Although a disappointment at the time, the season showed an upward swing from the records of past years’ crews. The 1975 J. V. team encountered tougher blows. Nonetheless, in the boat rowed a multitude of young oarsmen who gained valuable experience for the com­ ing season. To bolster that already young squad, Coach Mike McLaughlin produced one of the finest freshman crews in the country. A credit to Princetonian athletic history, this crew lost only to Yale in the regular season and finished second to a strong Penn boat at the Sprints. The great depth in the heavyweight program promises fine results for 1975-1976. Already, Princ­ eton’s second-place finish in the Elite 8 at the Head of the Charles race held in the fall augurs success for the season. In the Boston meet, Princeton beat all college entries and, in fact, lost only to Vesper Boat Club from Philadelphia. The Tigers also finished fourth in the Intermediate 4 and made strong showings in the Inter­ mediate 8. A competitive spirit, an aggressive attitude, and an abundance of underclass talent assures continuing ex­ pansion of the program in the spring and in the future. Lawrence A. Smith ’77

Review of the 1976 Crew Year Lightly Cruising
One can never imagine what it is like to row on the crew team without having actually experienced it. Crew to me will always be that feeling of despair when, thirty strokes into the first freshman-year threemile race, at about the point where you realize that you are winded and are getting tired, Matty, our coxswain, yells: “1/8 mile down – 2 and 7/8 to go!!” Or perhaps it will be watching Bob Baldwin catch a fluke crab and be thrown up into the air and land in the water with perfect grace. It will be the trip to Florida over intersession, in search of warmer waters and women; driving down twenty hours straight in a packed station wagon with a set of oars strapped to the roof; Statesboro, Georgia, and the local sheriff who had never seen long hair and knew those things on the roof were some kind of secret weapon; staying at Rollins College with the pool, ben­ nies, and babes; and the ‘John Hayes memorial 49 cents all-you-can-eat pancake eating contest.’ It will be the rigorous winter training program; that horrible feeling in the pit of your stomach when you realize that you have six more stadiums to run at a minute-thirty. Or the way you always hated people like Terry Cooke who could master the rowing ergometer and beat your best scores without even looking tired. Or it will be rowing in the dark and running into the women’s boat; Jeff Holsapple’s patented rowing mit­ tens for the colder days on the water; Tom Daley being taken ashore to relieve himself on the banks of Lake Carnegie; or Wendell Colson’s cold water diet and other patent-pending ways of making the 150 pound average. Breaking down the door of Jadwin Gym at four in the morning just to get to the sauna to “sweat down” before an early morning weigh-in – “But proctor sir, we just had to get to that sauna in order to lose weight before the race.” And finally we musn’t leave out that fantastic feeling when you realize that you have just won a hard­ fought­out race. The outcomes of six races in the spring – they’re all important, but they are nowhere near the whole of what crew is all about. Wendell B. Colson ’76

The Unsinkable Rowing Spirit
Women’s Crew
(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

309

1976 WOMEN’S CREWS
VARSITY
M.Kellogg ’76 (Cox, Co-Captain), S.Roth ’77, S.Desan ’79, N.Ughetta ’78, B.Francks ’76, A.Roos ’76, E.DeSanctis ’78, M. Kent ’79, C.Brown ’76 (Co-Captain)

JUNIOR VARSITY
J.Abernethy ’79, J.Altreuter ’79, K.Blackburn ’79, S.Burgess ’77, B.Buyers ’79, C.Cadle ’79, J.Casper ’76, C.Crawford ’78, L.Fan ’78, B.Ferguson ’77, L.Fredrickson ’76, M.Gallagher ’78, K.Goetting ’79, B.Green ’78, D.Hayes ’79, J.Kingan ’79, L.MacFarlane ’79, A.Misback ’79, J.Paradise ’79, D.Singerman ’79, A.Wilson ’79

COACH KIT RAYMOND ’74
Women’s Crews 1976-77

“The Gathering” by Kit Raymond ’74

310

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1976 Crew Year (continued)
A fast women’s crew from P.U. Took a look at their freshmen and knew They needed to split,

Kit Raymond ’74 on Coaching
“I rowed for four years at Princeton and then coached here for two years and one more at Rutgers. After a hiatus of about fifteen years I came back to rowing as the coach of the Carnegie Lake Rowing Association. Rowing is intense and competitive in school. That is good at the time. But. in the long term I think many rowers go back to rowing simply because there’s a peace about it that you can’t get from other sports. A major factor is just being out-of-doors, on your own, testing yourself to your limits. Another factor is the experience of working with other congenial people for a common goal. For me coaching women was a riot because women were very different from men. They tended to be a little more relaxed, but at the same time they were very competitive. I remember that at first we were very short of equipment and the funds to buy it. One year the women rowers went around at Reunions and got pledges from grads to donate money for oars. They were very persuasive; we soon had our own new set of oars. I knew a fair amount about rowing from having rowed sweep and coached sweep. But, I really learned far more when I bought my own single and started sculling. The thing that is enjoyable about it is that you learn about rhythm and what actually moves the boat in terms of how the oars are applied to the water. .I became a much more effective coach. If you’re sitting in an 8 or 4, and something goes wrong, you almost always have someone else to blame. In a scull you have no recourse; you are on your own. What a way to learn.”

But Flip threw a fit, So they stuck with Coach Kit and they grew
This fall, the women’s crew team returned to Princeton to find themselves minus their four-year veteran coach, Al Piranian ’69. Due to graduation or near graduation, they were also without over half of the 1975 varsity boat that had rowed to a fifth place finish in the National Championship Regatta held on Lake Carnegie in June. However, these losses paled in sig­ nificance beside three important gains: the appointment of Kit Raymond ’74 as coach, the existence of a junior varsity with good potential, and another overwhelming turnout from the freshman class. This turnout swelled the ranks of the crew team and raised the question of maintaining a separate lightweight team in a division similar to that made in men’s crew. The subject aroused much controversy and publicity during the fall months as oarswomen, alum­ nae and administrators tried to find a solution to the dilemma of increased interest and decreased funds. Such difficulties could not permanently dim the valiancy of the Tiger rowers. Veterans and novices combined for the Head of the Charles and displayed surprising strength in both the women’s fours and the women’s eights events. Clearly, whatever structural change might take place, the essence of spirit and tradi­ tion in the Princeton women’s crew would never ebb. Cathy J. Brown ’76 Mimi Kellogg ’76 1976 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

311

WOMEN’S AWARDS

CAROLA B. EISENBERG CUP
Donated by M.I.T. to Honor their Athletic Director

Women’s Open Crew
1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 Yale Yale Yale Yale Yale Yale Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Yale Yale 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton

THE CAROL P. BROWN ’75 AWARD
Awarded to the senior on the Women’s Open Crew who, in the eyes of her teammates, is a source of inspiration and an example of dedication and perseverance in pursuit of excellence.
1991 Melissa L. Holcombe ’91 1992 Sophie H. Glenn ’92 1993 Aubrey H. Borland ’93 1994 Ashley R. Maddox ’94 1995 Lianne M. Bennion ’95 1996 Cherylyn H. Brandt ’96 1997 Sarah E. Ryerson ’97 1998 Ashley McCowan ’98 1999 Emily M. Jones ’99 Elizabeth J. Spigel ’99 2000 Kristin M. Bartges ’00

1981 Anne R. Marden ’81 1982 Alison Calzetti ’82 Ann L. Strayer ’82 1983 A. Christine Clarke ’83 1984 Maureen J. Fair ’84 1985 Jennifer A. Marron ’85 1986 Carolyn J. Mahaffey ’86 1987 Sarah H. Morrison ’87 1988 Sarah C. Horn ’88 1989 Nancy H. Puttkammer ’89 1990 Sheila K. Dopplehammer ’90

312

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Nelson Cox Retires After Twenty-Seven Years
By Kit Raymond ’74

When he works you watch his hands. They are big hands, broad palms, with gnarled, thick, long fingers. Some freshman coxswain in an eight had steered over a log in the waning hours of the autumn afternoon and the cedar had split down the long hull. The boat was still wet when his fingers ran down the groove. They danced there, measuring, feeling, looking for the way to perfect the flaw. And as the hand and the fingers sensed the dimension of the break, the hull, the man standing over it and the hand entered a life force of their own. The oarsman watched. “Heahya Nels, you think you can fix that?” He leaned over the hull examining and quietly he said, “I think so.” One week later the repaired eight was back on the water. There are many who have repaired racing shells to one degree or another. A few are hacks who keep the boat in working condition for at least the next practice, others are more gifted and repair for the year, but in Nelly’s case the repairs last for the life of the boat. But a rigger, like a carpenter or a businessman, has a life beyond his work; a life which has nothing to do with clamps, epoxy, oar pitch, paint or slides. The Princeton crew has the best rigger in the business, but, more sig­ nificantly, it has Nelson Cox. In the evening when the crews come off the water and the world of the rigger is sealed for the day. Nelly will drive out to Washington Road and cross the bridge over the lake. He lives beyond Route 1 now, but before he comes to the stop light his head will glance off to the left. A force will tug at him and he will remember. The stone house, the field, were once his home. Nelly is linked to the land above the lake. And perhaps that is what sets him apart from the majority of us who are displaced inhabitants from another area, another world. He has a strong definition of self, of justice and a sense of the past. The boathouse is richer in character for his being there. It is also richer for the oarsmen. They hang about him joking, inquiring, and cracking some of that wisdom that lies beneath the surface: “ Penny-wise, dollar foolish,” he might say. Nelson

is also medicine. As he repairs the shells, so he repairs the spirits. Cheerful, although complaining of his back now and then, he is there for anyone to talk to, to share with or to ask questions of. He demands nothing and gives everything. His character is, in many ways, the character of the boathouse. He worked for Dutch Schoch and now Peter Sparhawk, and to imagine the boathouse is to imagine opening the front door and always finding Nelly tinkering with some gadget or repairing some chipped oar blade. Those who have rowed at Princeton have learned that Nelly is more than a repairer of crew equipment. On race days, he would often stand by as the boats were hoisted to the shoulders and carried from the boathouse. Sometimes as the crews marched out, his hand would reach out and grasp someone by the arm; some small word of encouragement had been spoken. Or when the race was finished and the oar blades searched for a hand to pull them in at docking, it was usually Nelly that was there, reaching out, taking a blade, and asking how it went. But he was always there. One of the more interesting phenomena to befall Nelly’s career was the introduction of women’s crew. Once during the first year of women’s crew, Nelly said he had been inside working on his boats, when all of a sudden more four­letter words than he had ever heard before came filtering through the spring air from the lawn in front of the boat house. Most of the crews had walked back up the hill and he couldn’t understand what all the commotion was about. So he poked his head outside and there was one of the oarswomen cleaning her dog with a hose and calling it every name in the book because it wouldn’t sit still. Nelly was amazed. He had never heard a woman talk that way before. But the times had changed and Nelly smiled. It amused him. He has maintained his youth and spirit. As he says, “Amongst young people, you’re inclined to stay young.” Nelly’s realms of involvement move far beyond the Princeton boathouse in the rowing world. In 1964 he was rigger for the gold medal crew in Tokyo. He was asked again to be rigger for the 1974 crews which traveled to Switzerland, but an injury prevented him from following up on the invitation. But the message is clear; he is considered to be the finest in the business. It is said one can learn a great deal about a man if you watch how he keeps the area in which he works.
(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

313

1976 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Platt Trophy
J.J.Schreppler ’78. J.G.Moffat ’78, T.D.Wells ’76, A.H.Pytte ’78, W.B.Colson ’76, D.K.Fryer ’78, W.C.Mathews ’78, T.Craig ’76, D.P.King ’77 (Cox)

JUNIOR VARSITY
R.D.Wilson ’78, G.C.Sniders ’78, S.E.McKenzie ’78, ?, D.K.Hauslohner ’78, C.Rulon-Miller ’78, W.R.Turecamo ’78, J.B.Stewart ’78, K.A.Levinson ’78 (Cox)

FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1979
P.T.Biggs ’79, M.A.T.Godly ’79, M.W.Mealy ’79, V.Chatikavanij ’79, S.B.Davis ’79, G.L.Brewster ’79, R.M.Bliss ’79, J.H.Gregory ’79 (Stroke), W.C.Vickery ’79 (Cox)

—Class of 1979 Undefeated Winner of the “Unofficial” Eastern Sprints Second Freshman Race
D.Graff (Stroke), S.R.McIntosh, M.R.Pinkerton, W.H.Helm, E.J.Ocampo, M.D.Mummert, J.D.Garmon, B.C.Miller, S.A.Turpin (Cox)

SECOND FRESHMEN

314

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Nelson Cox (continued)
The craftsmanship of the rigger is a melding of skill and tool. Not only is Nelly organized to the teeth, but he takes immense pride in the state of his tools. In 1974 the “white phantom” fiberglass Schoenbrod came to Princeton, and Nelson went to work making up some special oarlocks for Pete Sparhawk. He devised a tool to hold the oarlock in place while he drilled out some infinitesimal fraction of plastic from the pin hole. The only trouble was that Nelly could not drill too much for fear of weakening the whole lock. But still the bolt was just a touch too big to fit the oarlock. I asked him how he proposed to resolve the problem. “Come back later,” he told me. After practice he took me over to his refrigerator and pulled out of the freezer compartment a cake tin filled with bolts. He set up his barlock holder, picked up one of the bolts and a light hammer, and with one tap the bolt fell into place. The cold had contracted the bolts. I just looked at him in amazement and walked away shaking my head. If ever a man loves his tools it has to be Nelly. And it must be said of such a man that he who would let others use them must either be a fool or command enough respect so that no one would betray his work­ shop. Nelson is the latter. Upon occasion, one could venture to the boathouse and there would be Nelly showing an oarsman how to use his collection of tools. Many oarsmen walked away having learned the rudi­ ments of woodworking without even realizing it, until one day... “Heah, where did I learn that?” A little think­ ing into the past and there would be Nelly, guiding and helping with the intricacies and tricks of his work. He has given others a touch of the life he has lived, freely and with tacit invitation. Such is the life of a man who loves his work. And such is the extent to which he touched many who rowed out of the boathouse. When Nelson retires, an era will pass. We will remember him for all that he has given us. The beauti­ fully repaired shells, the newly painted oarblades that reflect the sun like a mirror, the hand on our arm and the look in his eye as we headed out for the stake-boat, and finally, the hands that pulled our eights back to the dock and the boathouse...and home. And much more about him that lies in the recesses of our minds. The old-time racing shells were made of wood, sheets of cedar mostly. Then a form of plywood became popular. These were harder to break open in an accident, but they were harder to repair with the wood grain going two ways. Now we have fiberglass covered boats with a honeycomb core. Newer shells are made of carbon fiber; they’re lightweight, strong and rigid. Eight-oared racing boats cost around $18,000, and a set of oars to go with it are about $2,500. A four-oared shell might cost in the range from $9,000 to $10,000. Oars have followed a similar progression — from wood to fiberglass to today’s carbon fiber oars that weigh about 3 to 4 pounds and come in different degrees of stiffness. Boats last, but I think when you’re at a competitive level like Princeton, the coaches feel that boats soften up. They’re not as rigid, so you can’t get all the power to the water to move the boat as fast. We keep our race boats between two and five years, and then sell them to smaller colleges and schools. All of our boats and oars get a double check-up before and after each race. There is a lot to keep up with upwards of 60 boats in the Boathouse . . . . and I used to think that rowing was just another form of transportation!
Brad Woodrick — Boatman

Princeton Rowing Notes Spring 1976

ROWING AT PRINCETON

315

1977 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Childs Cup Logg Cup
L.Smith ’77 (Capt.), R.Willoughby ’77, M.Holsten ’78, C.Dembergh ’79, D.Kinzer ’78, S.Fisher ’78, D.Keller ’77, C.Lowrey ’79, M.Cunningham ’77 (Cox)

I.R.A.FOUR WITH COX CHAMPIONS
Eric Will Trophy
L.Smith ’77 (Stroke), D.Kinzer ’78, D.Keller ’77, S.Fisher ’78 (Bow), M.Cunningham ’77 (Cox), Coach Pete Sparhawk

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1980
G.A.Love, J.M.Evans, R.C.Johnson, D.J.McCaig, S.P.Whalen, R.B.Buchanan, ?, ?, ?

HEAVYWEIGHTS at San Diego Crew Classic
M.L.Holsten ’78 (Stroke), S.P.Dawson ’78, L.A.Smith ’77, R.E.Willoughby ’77, C.T.Dembergh ’79, S.A.Fisher ’78, D.S.Keller ’77, M.Steinhardt ’78

316

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1977 Crew Year
Men’s Lightweight Crew
Almost all of last year’s lightweight crew returned for this fall. The varsity oarsmen were joined by many members of the two successful ’76 freshmen boats. The fall was a time for working on and improving our technique, as we row only two regattas, the “Head of the Charles” and the “Frostbite,” before winter sets in. As Lake Carnegie froze over the emphasis changed from technique to conditioning and the long ordeal of winter training began. The annual winter trip to Florida raised both the team’s spirits and our expec­ tations of a fine season. Competition for the first boat was very intense, as many of last year’s first boat mem­ bers were fighting hard to make the boat this spring. Back at Princeton, ergometers and stadiums were again the rule until the ice finally melted in March, leaving us just over a month of water time before the racing season. The season started out well, with all boats beating Columbia, Mariest, Navy, Rutgers, and Cornell in the first three weeks of racing. The boats were never the same two weeks in a row, however, as coach Gary Kil­ patrick used Monday morning seat races to determine the next week’s boatings. Unfortunately, our hopes for an undefeated season were dashed on the Saturday of the Penn race by nar­ row losses in both the first and second boat races. The next week both boats lost by about a length to Harvard, while beating Yale decisively in our last race before the Sprints. Our third boat started us off right by winning their race in the Sprints. However, the second boat lost to Penn and Harvard, and the first boat fell also to a much improved Navy crew, finishing a close fourth. Graduating this year are oarsmen Ron Cohen and co-captain Jon Jaffin as well as the experienced Cox and almost second coach Dave King. Co-captain Gary Moffat will be back, along with next year’s captains Bob Werner and Jake Gregory. If experience means anything it should help us to make up that length we lost, and more, on Harvard next year. Martin Godley ’79 “The square-tipped oars sounded against the iron oar-locks; in the stillness, they seemed to mark time like the beat of a metronome . . .” Madame Bovary, Flaubert “Let’s all stroke together, like the Princeton crew!” from “Chicago” “. . . the oars were silver, which to the tune of flutes kept stroke and made the water which they beat to follow faster, as amorous of their strokes.” “Antony and Cleopatra,” II “ . . .if you want to get there, you’ll have to learn to pull hard at the oars – get calluses on your hands, as the saying goes.” Madame Bovary, Flaubert There is an unbelievable satisfaction in this sport as well. You have to push yourself to the limit. It’s the ultimate of individual endurance and at the same time the ultimate of the team concept as well. There is not time for communication during a race. All you are really doing is looking at someone’s back. But sometimes, suddenly, you feel the team melt­ ing into one and when the boat is really moving along, there is no other feeling in the world quite like it. Coz Crawford

1977 BRIC-A-BRAC

Women’s crew

ROWING AT PRINCETON

317

1977 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Platt Trophy
J.H.Gregory ’79, A.M.Pytte ’80, M.R.Murray ’79, S.B.Davis ’79, J.B.Stewart ’78, R.D.Wilson ’78, W.C.Matthews ’78, R.F.Werner ’78 (Stroke), S.A.Turpin ’79 (Cox)

JUNIOR VARSITY
M.A.T.Godly ’79, D.A.DeNunzio ’78, J.H.Gregory ’79, E.J.Ocampo ’79, J.H.Jaffin ’77, D.K.Hauslohner ’78, J.G.Moffat ’78, G.L.Brewster ’79 (Stroke), D.P.King ’77 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
E.A.R.C. SPRINTS CHAMPIONS
J.Dean ’78, W.Helm ’79, V.Chatakavanij ’79, S.McKenzie ’78, R.Cohen ’77 (Stroke), M.Mummert ’79, M.Morgan ’79, D.Gorman ’79, P.Allen ’79 (Cox)

318

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1977 LIGHTWEIGHT FRESHMEN CREWS
FRESHMEN
—Class of 1980

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1980

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1980

ROWING AT PRINCETON

319

1977 WOMEN’S CREWS
CREW ASSEMBLED
Back Row: C.Crawford ’78, M.Kent ’79, E.DeSanetis ’78, A. Marden ’81, S.Roth ’77 (Capt.), D.Danielson ’80, N.Ughetta ’78, L.Nyhart ’79, N.West ’79, A.M.Slaughter ’80, L.Rajacich ’79 Front Row: A.Misback ’79, V.Jacobs ’80, S.Roadcap ’79, S.Desan ’79, J.Paradise ’78, L.MacFarlane ’79, G.Seymour ’80, D.Singerman ’79, S.Brantley ’80

JUNIOR VARSITY
L.Nyhart ’79, A.Misback ’79, S.Roth ’77, G.Seymour ’80, S.Brantley ’80, L.Rajacich ’79, M.Kent ’79, S.Roadcap ’79, D.Singerman ’79 (Cox), J.Paradise ‘78 (Cox)

Al Piranian ’69 on Coaching
“I rowed in school and as a lightweight at Princeton, graduating in 1969. When I came back to grad school two years later, women’s crew was just starting. I never coached before, but I thought it might be exciting to try. At that time there was a concern that the women might be coming to the boathouse to socialize rather than be serious oarswomen, so they were constrained to row at 6:30 in the morning rather than in the afternoon. We had some very dedicated women and they performed extremely well. Our first spring we won the Intercollegiate Women’s Rowing Championship in Connecticut. For me that was the most exciting athletic event barring none. I have competed in a lot of different sports and I’ve attended a lot of different events, but I’ve never experienced a thrill like that win.” Al Piranian ’69

320

ROWING AT PRINCETON

EASTERN ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN’S ROWING COLLEGES - 1
Varsity Eight Nate Case Trophy 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Novice Eight Third Varsity Four Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Cornell Event not rowed MIT Northeastern Purdue Yale Yale Rutgers Brown Princeton Princeton Cornell Brown Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Rutgers Brown Virginia 3rd Novice Four Boston Boston MIT Radcliffe MIT Pennsylvania Northeastern Northeastern Wellesley Radcliffe Radcliffe Mount Holyoke Princeton Wisconsin Wisconsin Princeton Radcliffe Radcliffe Boston Wisconsin Virginia Northeastern Wisconsin

Wisconsin Wisconsin Yale Wisconsin Races not rowed due to severe weather conditions Yale Wisconsin Pennsylvania Princeton Yale Yale Princeton Wisconsin Boston Princeton Wisconsin Dartmouth Princeton Wisconsin Wisconsin Yale Radcliffe Yale Brown Princeton Radcliffe Radcliffe Princeton Brown Boston Princeton Boston Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Brown Princeton Princeton Radcliffe Brown Princeton Brown Brown Brown Brown Second Varsity Second Novice

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

Radcliffe Radcliffe Races not rowed due to severe weather conditions Wisconsin Wisconsin Princeton Yale Boston Yale Princeton Dartmouth Dartmouth Yale Radcilffe Wisconsin Yale Brown Radcliffe Yale Princeton Brown Cornell Brown Radcliffe Northeastern Radcliffe Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Radcliffe Princeton Radcliffe Princeton Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Princeton Radcliffe Princeton Brown Virginia Brown Brown Princeton

ROWING AT PRINCETON

321

1978 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
LIGHTWEIGHT TEAM
Platt Trophy
P.Allen, V.Chatikavanij, S.Davis, D.Denunzio, G.Faris, D.Fryer, J.Gregory, M.Godly, D.Hauslohner, E.Ianni, M.Johnston, G.Kilpatrick (Coach), W.Mathews, S.McKenzie, E.O’Campo, T.Platt, A.Papchristen A.Pytte, D.Steinberg, J.Stewart, R.Turecamo, S.Turpin, R.Werner, R.C.Wilson, R.D.Wilson

VARSITY AT PRACTICE
D.K.Fryer ’78 (Bow), A.H.Pytte ’78, R.F.Werner ’78, S.B.Davis ’79, J.B.Stewart ’78, J.H.Gregory ’79, W.C.Mathews ’78, R.D.Wilson ’78 (Stroke), S.A.Turpin ’79 (Cox)

CELEBRATION
Coxswain Scott Turpin ’79 is dunked after winning Coast Guard Race
Heaving: R.D.Wilson ’78, J.B.Stewart ’78, R.F.Werner ’78, W.C.Mathews ’78, J.H.Gregory ’79, D.K.Fryer ’78

Varsity Lightweights won the Lightweight Eight event at the Head of the Charles on Oc­ tober 23, over the 3­mile, winding, upstream pull into a stiff head wind.

322

ROWING AT PRINCETON

EASTERN ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN’S ROWING COLLEGES - 2
Varsity Lightweight Eight 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Boston Event not rowed Event not rowed Boston Radcliffe MIT Radcliffe Smith Radcliffe Radcliffe Event not rowed Radcliffe Event not rowed Rochester Event not rowed Event not rowed Event not rowed Event not rowed Event not rowed Event not rowed Massachusetts Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Princeton Novice Lightweight Eight Lightweight Four

Bates Rhode Island Radcliffe Radcliffe Radcliffe Radcliffe Princeton Princeton Wisconsin Radcliffe Georgetown Princeton

All Time EAWRC Records at Lake Waramaug
1999 1995 1999 1990 1993 1999 1997 1999 Varsity Eight Brown Princeton Virginia Princeton Second Varsity Virginia Brown Brown Princeton 6.02.1 6.04.2 6.05.2 6.10.1 6.14.0 6.14.1 6.27.0 6.27.3 1999 Lightweight Four Georgetown Wisconsin Novice Eight Brown Virginia Yale Princeton Second Novice Brown Princeton 7.26.6 7.32.6 6.16.0 6.20.5 6.24.7 6.31.1 6.34.4 6.38.9

1999 1992 1999

Varsity Lightweight Eight Princeton 6.31.2 Virginia 6.36.3 Radcliffe 6.37.5 Radcliffe 6.41.8 3rd Novice Four Northeastern 7.26.7 U.S.Naval Academy 7.33.9

1999

Novice Lightweight Eight Princeton 6.33.0 Wisconsin 6.42.5

ROWING AT PRINCETON

323

Review of the 1978 Crew Year
Heavyweight Crew
The April 8th race on Lake Carnegie, against Rut­ gers for the Logg Cup with Marist as an added competitor was rowed in one of the strongest headwinds we have ever had on the course. Unlike the usual winds which come off the University shore and generally favor lane I this was straight down the course. The smart way to row this race was to compete with the conditions. Our First Varsity boat did just that, rowing strongly and as smoothly as the water would permit, at 30 and 32. The gained a 2½ length margin over Rutgers, winning in 7:28.6 to Rutgers 7:39.0 with Marist well back in 8:17.1. Our 2nd Varsity boat saw Rutgers moving out on them in mid­course and the results were almost the reverse of the 1st Varsity race with Rutgers in 7:24.1 and Princeton in 7:39.4. Marist, again, was well back. On April 15th against Navy at Annapolis our 1st Varsity boat had one of its best performances beating a solid Navy crew in 6:15.1 to Navy’s 6:18.4 for the Smith Trophy. The 2nd Varsity simply met a stronger crew trail­ ing Navy by 8.9 seconds: 6:36.0 to 6:44.9. The Childs Cup regatta–America’s oldest rowing cup race–on Lake Carnegie on April 22nd put our crews against a very strong Penn squad. Penn’s 1st Varsity, won by 2.5 seconds in 6:43.0 to our crew’s 6:45.5. Our 2nd Varsity were lead by Penn’s: 6:38.2 to 6:51.8. The Compton Cup against Harvard, again the crew to beat and M.I.T. stayed in Cambridge for the 15th year in a row as Harvard rowed the 2000 meters in 6:42.7 to our 6:49.1, with M.I.T. trailing in 7:09.6. Our 2nd Varsity met a particularly strong Harvard boat, an illustration of Harvard’s extraordinary depth of talent, finishing in 6:50.8 to Harvard’s 6:27.9. M.I.T. completed the procession in 7:01.1. The Harvard Varsity had to have been worried when our boat lead them after the start and built the lead to 8 seats – 3/4 length by 1200 meters. It was in the next 400 meters that Harvard pulled back and went on to outsprint the Tiger crew. The last race before the Sprints was against Cornell, defending I.R.A. champions, at Ithaca on May 7th. The Carnegie Cup returned to Princeton as our 1st Varsity took the start, kept the pressure on all the way to win in 6:10.0 to Cornell’s 6:17.5; Cornell’s sprint was useless as we continued to open the distance to the finish line. The Sprints, at Worcester, Mass. on May 14th, found our 1st Varsity matched in its heat with Brown, Harvard and Wisconsin and was lead home by all three. This put them in the Petite Finals where they rowed a fine race to beat all but Penn. Penn’s time was 6:04.8 to our 6:06.2. Our 2nd Varsity boat was third in the J.V. Petite Finals. The last event was the IRA in Syracuse. Our 1st boat rowed well in the heat which found all 4 crews –Penn, Northeastern, Wisconsin and Princeton, within 2 seconds. The repechage race went poorly but we came back to win the Petite Final – in a time that would have placed us 3rd or 4th in the finals. A four with cox’n showed well, taking 2nd in the Varsity Fours event. Pete Sparhawk summed up the season as one in which the crew showed speed at times but was not consis­ tent. The first 1500 meters against Penn and 1000 against Harvard were good but just not sustained. The race against Cornell was our best and most “heads up.” The men on the squad all worked hard and well together. Coach Spar­ hawk particularly singled out Captain Scot Fisher who has been a leader all four of his years at Princeton. In looking forward to next year Pete notes that only two men from this year’s first boat are graduating.

Freshman Heavies
This was a disappointing season to Coach Mike McLaughlin and his squad. After a 10.2 second losing margin against Rutgers on April 8th on Lake Carnegie, competing almost as much with a stiff headwind as with the Rutgers crew, the Frosh traveled to Annapolis and took the Plebes’ wake by 6.3 seconds about 1-1/3 lengths. The Navy race was a case of stroking too high for the water conditions. The race against Penn on April 22nd was a good one, though Penn got an early lead which our boys nar­ rowed but could not quite close, hitting the finish line .8 seconds behind Penn. The Cornell race was a high point. Down by 1 ¼ length, the boat used a series of power 10s and a strong sprint to lead Cornell to the finish in 6:15.0 to 6:16.6. The following weekend, against Harvard and M.I.T. we were just not able to build on the previous week and were second in 6:47.3 to Harvard’s 6:29.9 with M.I.T. trailing in 7:21.9. We fared poorly in the Eastern Sprints with the final result there, a fifth place in the Petite Finals. For the IRA Regatta Mike McLaughlin took a Four with Cox’n consisting of Jon Wonnel at bow, Dan Roock – Captain – at 2, John Seabrook at 3, Paul Horvat at Stroke and Mike Rosenbaum, a third generation Princ­ eton cox’n as Cox. This boat had good speed and won the Freshman Four event and probably could have beaten any Varsity Four there. With an overall record of 3 wins to 4 losses plus the fine showing at the IRAs, the season was about even. Mike McLaughlin feels better tactics could have produced a better season but feels disappointment at what has been his least productive season. Some consolation should be taken in that Mike is sending some fine oarsmen on to the Varsity squad.

Lightweights
(continued)

324

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1978 CREWS
FRESHMAN FOUR WITH COX
—Class of 1981 I.R.A. Champions Stork Sanford Trophy
J.K.Wonnell, D.J.Roock, Mike McLaughlin (Coach), J.M.Seabrook, V.P.Horvat, M.F.Rosenbaum (Cox)

Review of the 1978 Crew Year (continued)
A really fine lightweight varsity boat will probably look back over this past season and ask itself, “What if,” for many years. Losing only to Penn and Harvard in the regular season and by a combined total of only 3.8 seconds they knew they should be the crew to beat at the Sprints. We had a look at these oarsmen on the ergome­ ters, in the tanks and weight room and on the water before the races, and felt a sense of excitement and confidence about them. They moved beautifully together. The swing and bladework marked them as one of the finest. La Salle and a good Navy crew went down fairly easily in the first two races. Cornell was tough but was put away by a margin of 1.1 seconds on April 22nd by just plain hard pulling. Rutgers trailed in that same race. The following weekend our crew found Penn just a little tougher. Rowing a fine race but a bit less aggressive than Penn, we were timed in 6:32.8 to Penn’s 6:31.0. Against perennial favorite Harvard, we showed the aggressiveness but couldn’t quite find the swing as we fol­ lowed Harvard to the finish in 6:18.6 to their 6:16.6. Yale, at least, took our wake by l0.2 seconds. Some speed work and a lot more miles and we were ready for the Sprints at Worcester. The morning heats went well and all three Lightweight boats – Varsity, J.V. and Freshman – qualified for their finals. While off the water the shells were stored – with all the other crew’s boats – on racks under a large tent – for protection. At about noon a strong gust of wind lifted one side of the tent and sent the outside three boats into the air and crashing to the ground. Our boats. The Freshmen’s “Nelson Cox ” suffered two holes about 10”-12” in diameter. The J.V.’s Staempfli received 3 broken knees and a split gunnewale. The Varsity’s Schoenbrod’s hull came through intact but all four port riggers were smashed. What had been a strong feeling of optimism turned in a second to disaster. But there was a little time and in spite of the officials asking coach Gary Kilpatrick, “Are you ready yet?” and then “Aren’t you ready yet?” Gary sent the oarsmen off to get them away from the sight of the wreckage and quickly put 3 “sister” knees into the J.V. boat and, without being able to adjust or check the spread and pitch, put four other riggers on the varsity’s “Gordon Sikes.” With time only to hurry to the starting line, the Varsity boat found them­ selves 3/4 length back of Harvard at the 1000 meter mark.

Building on power tens and keeping the stroke up the Ti­ gers clawed their way seat by seat to within 3 or 4 feet of Harvard’s bow. With about 100 meters to go and moving, it looked like our race. But a partial crab upset the pace and the momentum just enough to let Harvard cross a half second ahead. Rutgers, Penn, Cornell and M.I.T. followed in that order. Our 2nd Varsity Lightweights were not as strong a crew, beating only LaSalle and Yale during the regular season and losing to Navy by so small a margin that both crews were caught in the same time. Qualifying for the finals of the Sprints was a big boost and a well­earned one. After seeing their boat al­ most destroyed they finished 5th in the finals. With a mixture of raw and school rowing talent, this year’s Freshman squad had a record of 3 wins and 4 losses. Marist, Rutgers and Penn all went down convinc­ ingly. Navy lead us by 3.1 seconds, Cornell by 1/10th second, Harvard by 9.1 and Yale by .8 seconds. As the crew developed under coach Chuck Nagle they looked forward to the Sprints as the second half of the season. With a borrowed Schoenbrod – the first time they had ever rowed in a plastic skinned boat – they put down Cornell by 1.5 seconds, satisfying the previous weekend’s 3’ loss. Without time for even a practice start, however, they were not with the leaders. Satisfaction is measured in many ways and our crew felt good in reducing the margin behind Harvard from 9.1 seconds in the regular season to 6 seconds–3/4 length–in their morning heat in the Sprints. With 2 deep crabs near the finish of the finals we finished 6th. Chuck Nagle is pleased that all of his squad is head­ ing for the Varsity squad this Fall. While only a few of his men came to Princeton with rowing skill, the spirit is there. Chuck’s third boat beat Navy by 1.5 lengths –with our No.2 man sliding back and forth on the seat of his pants for 600 meters, having jumped his slide, but deter­ mined not to let that cost the race! Princeton Rowing Notes July 1978

Freshmen Lightweights

ROWING AT PRINCETON

325

1978 WOMEN’S CREWS
VARSITY
A.R.Marden ’81, S.M.Desan ’79, C.E.Crawford ’78, V.Jacobs ’80, N.Ughetta ’78 (Co-Captain), S.M.Brantley ’80, M.Kent ’79, E.R.DeSanctis ’78 (Co-Captain), D.Singerman ’79

VARSITY & JUNIOR VARSITY
Celebrate Win Over Radcliffe in Cambridge

326

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1978 Crew Year
(continued)

Women’s Crew
Playing rugby in a foot of snow, rowing through ice on the canal, Kris telling about the crossing of the Rubicon, singing “The Cat Came Back” in a kickline on Route 95, staging a wet T-shirt contest in Pitts­ field, eating delicious meals at Lili, Nancy and El­ len’s homes, swigging champagne on Memorial Drive outside of Radcliffe boathouse – these are a few of the things the women’s crew of 1977­78 will never forget. It was a year of great changes as they adjusted to a new coach, to a different rowing style, and to the original “Kris Korzeniowski Natural Selection” winter training program. It was also a year of great disappointments; in the fall, the team’s application was too late for the “Head of the Charles” and in the spring, the Easterns were cancelled because of high winds. But it was a year of great triumph as well, cul­ minating in a sweeping victory over Radcliffe, whom Princeton had not beaten in six years. The novice boat remained undefeated through the entire season, while the varsity and junior varsity posted 8­1 records, each boat losing only to Yale. Whatever the record and whatever the memo­ ries, at the close of the season, the team can only look back on 1977-78 with great gratitude and respect for coach Kris Korzeniowski and for the three seniors, Coz Crawford, Ellen DeSanctis and Nancy Ughetta, without whom the boathouse will never be the same. 1978 BRIC-A-BRAC

Early in June four of the women from Kris Korzeniowski’s fine 1978 squad put in two workouts a day in preparation for the National Womens Row­ ing Association championships in Seattle. They were joined by Barbara Johnson ’77 who made it into the finals of the Open Singles and who teamed with Cos Crawford ’78 to make it into the semi-finals of the Pair without. Anne Marden ’81, a first-year sculler, won the Intermediate Singles and our Four with was powered by Anne Marden, Rhoda Jaffin ’80, Valarie Jacob ’80 and Sue Brantley ’80 — with a cox’n pro­ vided by friends in Seattle, to 5th place in the Open Four with event. While many of these women went on to national rowing camps, Cos was in the Four that won the silver medal in the European Women’s Championships at Lucerne. Three of the four port oars on the U.S. National Women’s Eight that will compete in New Zealand in October are present or former Princeton oarswomen; Anne Marden at stroke, Carol Brown ’75 and Cos Crawford.

Princeton Rowing Notes October 1978

“I was the varsity lightweight stroke for the 1979 Princeton crew. The sport has meant more to me probably than any other single factor in my life, and I’ve done a lot of really interesting things. After leaving the rowing world, which I was in for about 15 years, I became a steeplechase jockey, racing in the Maryland Hunt Cup, the Grand National, and other very competitive events. After that I went into politics and became a member of the Maryland legislature. It was the lessons I learned in crew on how to compete, how to be a good winner, and a good loser, that really carried me well into these other activities. Baltimore has not had crew racing in fifty years, until a group of us got together and organized a fund-raiser to build a new boathouse. Now we have a first-class facility. And, the first shell we got came from Princeton — the Nelson Cox, an old wooded Pocock. Twenty years later we are still using it. The Living Classroom Foundation is using it in a program that helps inner-city kids learn about rowing and other water sports. It is great to see the Nelson Cox still in use after all these years.” Gerry Brewster ’79

ROWING AT PRINCETON

327

1979 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 1
VARSITY
J.M.Seabrook ’81, S.P.Whalen ’80, D.M.Mastrianni ’81, D.J.McCaig ’80, R.C.Johnson ’80, C.T.Dembergh ’79, G.A.Love ’80, J.M.Evans ’80 (Stroke), E.C.Chow ’79 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
N.D.Pearson ’81 (Stroke), A.M.Horvat ’80, T.S.Nadbielny ’81, D.J.Roock ’81, J.E.Graham ’80, N.J.Kelly ’81, C.K.Wilson ’81, C.C.Campbell ’79, T.C.Blum ’80 (Cox)

Extra season rowing deserves some recognition. Scot Fisher ’78, Captain of our Varsity Heavies and a member of last year’s IRA Varsity Championship Four, was one of 6 oarsmen who represented the U.S.A. last summer in the Maccabiah Games in Israel. The six men and one cox entered 6 events. Scot rowed in the pair without, the quadruple sculls and the four with. Rowing in borrowed equipment that was described as looking like casualties of the Six Day War, the U.S. team won every race until the race for Fours. That race was postponed for 2 broken riggers to be repaired. After building a good lead with 400 meters to go, Scot’s oar lock fell off and the Argen­ tinian entry caught our boys by 1/2 length. In addition to their fine performance, Scot values the experience of having represented the U.S. and being a part of this international meet.

Princeton Rowing Notes Winter 1978

328

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1979 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 2
I.R.A.VARSITY PAIR WITH COXWAIN CHAMPIONS
Crandell Melvin Trophy
Dan Roock ’81, Tom Blum ’80 (Cox), Tom Nadbielny ’81, Coach Peter Sparhawk

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1982
J.A.Kostal, ?, ?, D.A. Batt, D.L.Smith (Cox), P.M.Facobs, W.W. Somers, F.R.R.Prioleau (Capt.), ? (Cox)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

329

1979 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Wood-Hammond Cup 2d at Sprints Won 1978 Head of the Charles
M.A.T.Godly ’79, C.R.Gaylord ’81, M.H.Johnston ’80, G.W.Faris ’80, S.W.Morss ’81, J.H.Gregory ’79, E.J.Ocampo ’79, G.L.Brewster ’79 (Stroke), S.A.Turpin ’79 (Cox)

JUNIOR VARSITY
J.B.Miller ’81, J.G.Strickler ’81, H.D.Axilrod ’81, M.W.Mealy ’79, J.B.Neuenschwander ’81, H.C.Kelley ’82, R.J.Sommer ’81, W.B.Doyle ’81 (Stroke), L.F.Anderson 81 (Cox)

FRESHMEN
—Class of 1982

330

ROWING AT PRINCETON

It’s Not Always Easy
Bruce Kelley ’79
Although the pain of com­ petitive rowing is legendary — and vividly obvious to even the most casual spectator — few non­participants can appreciate its reward: the pleasure felt by the oarsman as his shell surges forward in perfect rhythm, eight individuals straining together as one machine, racing at maximum speed. A veteran crew coach once observed, “The individual oarsman never forgets such an experience, and in the great common effort lies the real secret of the almost ‘religious’ feeling oarsmen have for their sport, and the affinity they feel for one another.” Princeton’s varsity light­ weight crew experienced that feel­ ing at last month’s Eastern Sprints, in which the Tigers finished a very creditable second to Yale, capping an 8­3 season. But it almost didn’t happen. Two weeks earlier, the machine’s most important part, senior stroke Gerry Brewster, had hurt his shoulder during the crew’s victory over Penn. Without him, the lightweights had lost decisively the following week, to Yale by 11 seconds and to Harvard by five. Intensive treatment, how­ ever, had readied him for the Sprints, the finale of the Eastern rowing season, held this year on Lake Quinsigamond in Worcester, Massachusetts. With Brewster back providing what Coach Gary Kilpatrick terms “the acute sense of rhythm and timing which a good stroke must have,” the boat was once again a unit with all parts in synch. The only question was whether he could last the 2,000 meters. “He really shouldn’t have been racing with that injury,” says Kilpatrick, “but he’s a super guy who overcame incredible prob­ lems. He demanded to race. In the morning trials, Princ­ eton came in second behind Harvard, which had edged out the Tigers by 1.3 seconds in last year’s Sprints. In the finals, Princeton moved off the line slowly, falling to fifth place. “We knew that would happen, because we couldn’t get off as well due to Gerry’s injury,” notes Kilpatrick. By the 1,000-meter mark, Harvard had been passed and only Yale remained ahead. The Tigers challenged the Elis toward the finish, but fell short by three-quarters of a length, 6:28.5 to 6:31.6. Harvard trailed another four seconds behind. It was a moral victory for Princeton’s lightweights, who had started the season with only one returning member from last year’s crew. “The boat rowed extremely well and the bladework was good throughout,” says Kil­ patrick. “It was undoubtedly a winning effort. Afterwards, some Harvard people said it was their best effort of the year. That is quite a tribute.”

Gerry Brewster ’79 with a shoulder injury one week before SPRINTS.

Reprinted from Princeton Alumni Weekly June 11, 1979

Trying to get back in condition. ROWING AT PRINCETON 331

1980 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Carnegie Cup Childs Cup Logg Cup
S.Whalen ’80, G.Love ’80, D.McCaig ’80, R.Johnson ’80, T.Nadbielny ’81, D.Roock ’81, B.Somers ’82, T.Horvat ’80, T.Blum ’80 (Cox)

First Place Finish at the Head of the Charles Regatta.

JUNIOR VARSITY
P.Jacobs ’82, N.Pearson ’81, N.Kelly ’81, P.Horvat ’82, S.Weinstein ’82 (Cox), F.Prioleau ’82, P.Meade ’81, D.Mastrianni ’81, B.Smith ’84

332

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1980 HEAVYWEIGHT FRESHMEN
FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1983
M. Smith (Stroke), J.P.Soons, E.L.Horschman, A.J.Isbester, J.Nunes, P.M.K.Murray, G.F.Koehler, D.H.Jones, S.R.Lesser (Cox)

FRESHMEN SQUAD
—Class of 1983
Back Row: R.W.Antonisse, Coach Larry Gluck­ man, A.J.Isbester, G.Brooke, S.H.Perlmutter, S.F.Redding, D.Jones, E.L.Horschman, P.M.K.Murray, S.R.Nickle, J.M.Allison Front Row: J.P.Hawkins, G.Koehler, D.Bouldon, J.Nunes, M.Smith, R.J.Zielinski, J.P.Soons. Reclin­ ing: S.R.Lesser

SECOND FRESHMEN
—Class of 1983
S.F.Redding, P.M.K.Murray, R.J.Zielinski, S.R.Nickle, R.S.Boulden, S.H.Perlmutter, J.P.Hawkins, J.M.Allison, R.W.Antonnise (Cox)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

333

1980 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup
W.B.Doyle ’81, C.R.Gaylord ’81, P.G.Koontz ’82 D.W.Ervin ’82, L.F.Anderson ’81 (Cox), S.H.Speers ’82, S.W.Morss ’81, T.M. Pounds ’82, R.B.VanCleve ’82

JUNIOR VARSITY
M.H.Johnston ’80, G.W.Faris ’80, B.Semple ’81, R.J.Sommer ’81, J.B.Neuenschwander ’81, L.A.Moffett ’82, B.Rayne ’82, L.S.Frantz ’82, M.F.Carolan ’82 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
W.F.Flynn ’82, C.A.Cole ’81, M.Shoemaker ’82, J.C.MacKenzie ’82, J.B.Miller ’81, P.C.Silver ’82, C.C.L.Palmer ’82, D.C.Williams ’82, S.C.Schwartz ’81 (Cox)

334

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1980 WOMEN’S CREW
NOVICES
—Class of 1983 Eastern Sprint Champs
Top Row: S.Wamsler ’83, A.Moore ’82, N.Villars ’83, S.Faulkner ’81, B.Hoza ’81, S.Alden ’81, ?, L.Pope ’82 Bottom Row: M.Wood ’82, M.Burns ’82, T.Doggett ’83, M.Cancian ’83, A.Bracken ’83, H.Troutman ’83, L.Jones ’83, B.Mayer ’83

COACH KRIS KORZENIOWSKI
Women’s Crews 1978-81
Kris grew up and learned to row in Poland. After rowing and coaching on the National Team he studied coaching under the East German training system and coached a club team in Rome, Italy. After the 1972 Olympics in Munich, Kris moved to Canada where, most recently he was the coach of Canada’s National team. Kris took over the work started so well by Kit Raymond.

The New Women’s Locker Room
Through the generosity of Lon F. Israel, ’45, the women now enjoy an excel­ lent locker room and space in which to do their weight training during the winter. No longer will they have to choose between the small and unattractive facility at the rear of the tank and their dormitory bathrooms; no longer will they have to exercise in one of the boathouse bays, between the racks of shalls. This has been accomplished by combining the storage room at the right of the stairwell (as you ascend) with enough of the spacious upper hall to provide commodious changing space and attractive ancillary facilities.

ROWING AT PRINCETON

335

1981 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS – 1
VARSITY
Childs Cup Logg Cup
P. Jacobs ’82, P. Mead ’81, F. Prioleau ’82, T. Nadbielny ’81, D. Mastrianni ’81 (Capt.), B. Somers ’82, N. Kelly ’81, M. Evans ’81, M. Rosenbaum ’81 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
S. Redding ’83, J. Kostal ’82, G. Koehler ’83, D. Kuhl ’82, E. Horschman ’83, P. Horvat ’82, D. Keyser ’81, N. Pearson ’81, B. Summerskill ’81 (Cox)

FRESHMEN
— Class of 1984
C. Hunt, M. Michalowski, C. Wallace, L. Jones, C. Penny, S. Sagarin, S. VanFossen, H. Backer, S. Scharer (Cox)

SECOND FRESHMEN
— Class of 1984
J.F.Leathrum, M.S.Gates, C.L.Clark, W.B.Haynes, J.F.Pauly, G.Caflisch, R.J.Bischoff, J.M.Baden, J.Bloom (Cox)

336

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1981 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS – 2
FRESHMAN
—Class of 1984 I.R.A. SILVER MEDALISTS
C.Hunt, C.Wallace, S.Sagarin, C.Penny, S.VanFossen, S.Scharer (Cox), H.Backer, L.Jones, Coach Larry Gluckman, M.Michalowski

THIRD VARSITY
J.Allison ’83, J.Hawkins ’83, S.Redding ’83, J.Soons ’83, C.Carpenter ’82, D.Boulder ’83, S.Perlmutter ’83 Not pictured: S.R.Lesser ’83 (Cox)

FRESHMEN SQUAD
—Class of 1984
Front Row: W.Haines, C.Wallace, S.Scharer, S.VanFossen, F.C.Hunt, R.Bischoff, H.Backer, J.Baden, S.Sagarin, J.Bloom Back Row: F.McNally, J.S.Stein ?, J.Pauly, G. Caflish, C.Penny, M.Michalowski, E.L.Jones, Coach Larry Gluckman, F.Derby, R.Lohrer Far Back: C.Clark, M.Gates Photo taken in Fall of 1980

ROWING AT PRINCETON

337

1981 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
VARSITY
UNDEFEATED AT SPRINTS Goldthwait Cup Jope Cup Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup Joseph Wright Cup
W.B.Doyle ’81 (Co-Capt.), B.Sullivan ’83, J.C.Chamberlain ’81, S.W.Morss ’81 (Co-Capt.), S.Weinstein ’82, J.S.Andrews ’83, E.B.Groos ’83, B.B.Bell ’83, R.B.Van Cleve ’82

JUNIOR VARSITY
M.H.Sher ’83, C.R.Gaylord ’81, P.G.Koontz ’82, C.L.Andrews ’83, J.B.Neuenschwander ’81, W.K.Grousbeck ’83, D.W.Ervin ’82, L.S.Frantz ’82. Seated: M.F.Carolan ’82

THIRD VARSITY
J.L.Ross ’83, J.B.Miller ’81, D.C.Williams ’82, C.C.L.Palmer ’82, R.L.Grubman ’84 (Cox), C.A.Cole ’81, J.P.Woll ’83, R.J.Sommer ’81, W.E.Brown ’83

1982 THIRD VARSITY
J.B.Dineen ’84, S.F.Redding ’83, T.A.Fredrickson ’83, J.P.Woll ’83, R.L.Grubman ’84 (Cox), ?, ?, J.A.D’Arcangelo ’84, W.E.Brown ’83 (Stroke)

338

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1981 CREWS
LIGHTWEIGHTS CELEBRATE
S.Morss ’81 (Co-Captain holding the Eastern Sprints 8+ Championship Cup), coach Gary Kilpatrick, W.Doyle ’81 (Co-Captain holding the three-handled Jope Cup for Men’s Lightweight Total Team Points)

FRESHMEN CLASS DAY — FALL 1980
—Class of 1984
M.Michalowski, C.Wallace, J.Baden, S.Sagarin, L.Jones, R.Bischoff, S.VanFossen, H.Backer, S.Sharer (Cox)

New Frosh Uniform

LIGHTWEIGHTS
EARC Sprint Champions
S.W.Morss’81, B.J.Sullivan ’83, W.B.Doyle ’81, E.B.Groos ’83, B.Bell ’83, J.S.Andrews ’83, J.C.Chamberlain ’81, R.B.VanCleve ’82, S.Weinstein ’82 (Cox...suspended)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

339

1981 WOMEN’S CREWS
VARSITY
Undefeated at 2nd Eastern Sprints 1975 Cup Eisenberg Cup
Maureen Fair ’84, Ann Strayer ’82, A.Christine Clark ’83, Ann Marden ’81, Alison Calzetti ’82, Elizabeth Mayer ’83, Eileen Griepsma ’84, Barbara Trafton ’82, Andrea LaBaw ’82

US TEAM — WORLD ROWING

JUNIOR VARSITY
1st Place Eastern Sprints
C.Doggett ’83, S.Alden ’81, E.Hoza ’81, S.Wamsler ’83, A.Bracken ’83, M.Cancian ’83, D.Maloney ’82, N.Tracy ’82, E.Jones ’83 (Cox)

340

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1981 LIGHTWEIGHTS
FRESHMEN
—Class of 1984 EARC Sprints Champions
T.S.Harrison, C.F.Allen, J.S.Sugarman, W.S.Thaler, E.P.Anderson, J.D.Peterson, J.A.D’Arcangelo, S.S.Ross, A.J.Simboli (Cox)

Florida Trip 1981 (Tampa Revisited) by Larry Gluckman
The Florida Trip of 1981 went off without a hitch. The entire boathouse moved itself from the frozen Carnegie to sunny Tampa. One hundred and fifty-two athletes, six coach­ es, two managers, a total of twelve vans and cars, eight Eight oar sweepers, three four oared shells, two launches and a host of rowing equipment made its way down Route 95 south on an all day — all night trek to dockside at the University of Tampa Boathouse. Through the hospitality of Dave Thomas, the crew coach at Tampa, we were given total access to the miles of waterway that make up the Hillsborough RiverTampa Bay Harbor area. The number of practices varied from ten to twelve depending on a student’s arrival in Tampa. The traditional Wednesday afternoon off was strictly adhered to this year and many of the athletes visited Busch Gardens or Disney World to unwind from the voluminous amount of rowing that was taking place each morning and afternoon. Most of the varsity crews exceeded ninety miles and the freshman tallied around seventy-five. There were several intersquad brushes and all the crews appeared to be able to race consistently hard throughout the practice. This attests to the dedicated training these men and women have put themselves through since we left the water prior to Thanksgiving. The area alumni, as usual, provided immeasurable help in securing additional launches and hosting a social on Thursday evening for the crews and prospective Princeton students. Princeton Rowing Notes Spring 1981

Review of the 1981 Crew Year
man shell in half and severely damaging the varsity’s carbon-fiber boat. With their shell hastily repaired, the Tigers sur­ prised everyone at the Easterns by finishing second in their heat, just two-tenths of a second behind Yale. Said Sparhawk, “We knocked out Cornell and Wisconsin in our heat and gained what I think was our maximum speed with the group we had.” In the finals Princeton placed sixth in 5:53.1, nine seconds behind victorious Yale. The heavyweights’ third place in the Rowe Cup overall standings, behind Northeastern and Syracuse, was Princeton’s best since 1969, and with the addition of this year’s freshmen, who went 8-1 and finished second at the Sprints, Princeton heavyweight crew may be on the upswing. 1981 BRIC-A-BRAC

Men’s Crew
The Princeton heavyweight crew team got off to a good start this year, beating Rutgers by five seconds in their first race, then finishing only a length and a half behind Navy the following week. After a five-second win over Penn and Columbia in Philadelphia, the varsity eight was preparing for Har­ vard when Dan Roock ‘81 sustained a back injury that kept him on the shore for the rest of the regular season. Coach Peter Sparhawk, in his 16th year with the var­ sity, juggled his oarsmen, and the Tigers were able to trounce M.I.T. while finishing two lengths back of the Crimson in a respectable time of 5:55. Roock’s absence was perhaps more evident when Boston University and Cornell both pulled away from the Tigers in the last 750 meters. On May 12, just five days before the Sprints, the varsity and freshman boats, both in the midst of power segments, collided head­on, splitting the wooden fresh­

ROWING AT PRINCETON

341

1982 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS
FIRST VARSITY
Victories: Logg Cup, Carnegie Cup 3rd Eastern Sprints, 2nd I.R.A.
M.Wilson ’84, G.Koehler ’83, J.Soons ’83, P.Jacobs ’82 (Co-Capt.), C.Penny ’85, H.Backer ’85, S.VanFossen ’84, B.Somers ’82, S.Lesser ’83 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
E.Horschman ’83, M.Michalowski ’84, L.Jones ’84, D.Kuhl ’82 (Co-Capt.), J.Pauly ’84, J.Kostal ’82, C.Hunt ’84, J.Baden ’84, S.Scharer ’84 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
M.Gates ’84, S.Perlmutter ’83, J.Allison ’83, J.Hawkins ’83, F.Derby ’84, D.Boulden ’83, J.Bloom ’84 (Cox) Absent: B.Bischoff ’84, B.Lohrer ’84, P.Horvat ’82

342

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1982 Crew Year
Men’s Crew
The Class of 1884 Boathouse was an exciting place to be for the varsity heavyweight crew in 1982. Over the summer, freshman coach Larry Gluckman stepped up to replace Pete Sparhawk as the head of the program. Gluckman’s success with his freshman crews and the extremely talented group of sophomore oars­ men that followed him to the varsity level were reasons to believe that 1982 would be a potential turn­around year for heavyweight rowing at Princeton. Coach Gluckman’s infectious confidence caught on with his oarsmen who set beating Harvard and ending a 26 year streak as their single goal. The season opened at Annapolis against Navy, whose first eight had proven their speed by winning at the Head of the Charles. Showing some strong form, Navy churned through the Tigers to win in both var­ sity and junior varsity events. The following weekend on the Harlem River, the University of Pennsylvania surprised the varsity, rowing a 5:46 to Princeton’s 5:52 over the 2000 meter course. The Tiger junior varsity rowed to an easy victory over the Quakers and Co­ lumbia. The following day, in a new race added to the schedule, the varsity and junior varsity both lost to Yale in very close races on a windy Housatonic River. The heavyweights traveled to Cambridge on April th 25 for their meeting with Harvard that they had been training for since September. Despite being winless, the Princeton oarsmen came into the race with a determi­ nation that few of the upper class veterans had expe­ rienced before. But, the Tigers failed to put together a good race, and a motivated Harvard crew powered past them to win by a discouraging 12 seconds. This failure at their first opportunity of the season to end Har­ vard’s generation of domination was only a temporary setback, for the next weekend the varsity and junior varsity came home from Ithaca with Cornell and Bos­ ton University shirts won in some impressively rowed races. Later both crews easily beat Rutgers in their only race on Lake Carnegie. The Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges Sprint Championship in Worchester would be the final chance against Harvard. In the morning heats, the Tiger varsity qualified for the finals, but the junior varsity failed to qualify and later rowed and won in the petit finals. The varsity finals were won by a fast Yale crew in a record time of 5:40. The excitement was supplied by Princeton, however, when they started an all­out drive for the finish line after dropping to dead last in the first third of the race. The varsity eight rowed through Cornell, Brown, and Harvard, edging them by twotenths of a second and narrowly losing to second place Navy by one second. Larry Gluckman and the Princ­ eton varsity heavyweight crew lived up to their boasts and put the burden on Harvard to end Princeton’s string of victories. The freshman heavyweights, coached by Curtis Jordan, had an extremely successful season and earned the number one ranking in the East. The 1985 Tigers won every regular season race with the exception of a dead heat at Navy. After winning four of five events at the Easterns last year, this year’s lightweight crew set out to repeat its domination of eastern lightweight rowing. Bolstered by a large turnout from last year’s freshmen boats, the varsity began the year with five full boats of oarsmen, providing promising depth and ensuring strong com­ petition within the program for seats in the top boats. The crews produced strong showings at the Head of the Charles and the Head of the Schuylkill, including an impressive second-place finish in the Boston race behind the Canadian lightweight national team. The annual intersession trip to Florida provided a welcome break from the drudgery of winter train­ ing. Taking buses for the trip down left the team with limited travel capabilities around Tampa. Unfortunately, though, the Tampa Hilton was unsympathetic and not at all pleased when their station wagon disappeared shortly. The team’s efforts in the water, though, were a bit more productive, as the three boats struggled through the morning forays into Tampa Bay and the afternoon rows up the Hillsborough River in pursuit of Colonel Kurtz. The spring racing season was highlighted by the varsity race against Harvard and Yale, which the Bos­ ton Globe called “perhaps the finest lightweight race ever contested.” All three boats were undefeated going into the race, although Harvard and Yale were favored by virtue of greater margins over common opponents during the year. Yale jumped out to a substantial lead in the early going, but Princeton slowly moved back during the middle thousand meters to gain a slight advantage. Harvard, which had fallen back early, also made a move to come even, and the lead changed hands several times in the last five hundred meters, with each boat holding the advantage for at least a few strokes. Princeton ended up third, with only two­tenths of a sec­ ond between each boat, and Yale taking the race. At the (continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

343

1982 HEAVYWEIGHT FRESHMEN
FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1985
G.A.Watt, T.W.Perlmutter, M.Armstrong, G.L.Guyett, A.W.Young, C.U.Hammarskjold, D.vonMuller, W.S.Nagle, B.A.Zelermyer (Cox)

SECOND FRESHMEN
—Class of 1985
P.R.Geyer, H.L.Hamilton, D.R.Ramsay, H.H.Doddy, E.M.Rasiel, J.C.Feudtner, D.S.Park, P.D.Carmona, J.K.Coulter (Cox)

COACH ERNIE ARLETT
Women’s Varsity 1983 Longtime Northeastern University Men’s Heavyweight Coach Founder of the Head of the Charles Regatta

344

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1982 Crew Year (continued)
sprints, the race became a battle between Princeton and Harvard, with Yale and the rest of the field trailing, but Harvard took and held a slight lead to win. Princeton, meanwhile, captured first in both freshmen races and a third in the JV race to tie Harvard for overall points, capping a strong season. crew headed for Lake Waramaug, Connecticut for the Eastern Sprint Championships. They were seeded second to Boston University. The Tigers easily won the morning heat. The final, however, was not to be so easy. Yale led off the start with Princeton and Boston University a close second and third. Comfortable in the knowledge they could come from behind, the Tigers rowed their own race. With a little more than 400 me­ ters to go in the race, the Tigers made a strategic move and passed the tiring Yale Crew. It was victory that had long been waited for and was much deserved. With only one loss during the normal racing season, the Princeton J.V. boat finished a strong second at the Eastern Sprints. Seeing that only one senior is graduating from the J.V. boat, it is likely that they will meet with additional success next year. Their future success is further assured by the fact that this year’s novice boat had an extremely strong season. They were undefeated until the Sprints where they placed behind Wisconsin and Boston University. The Varsity women’s boat included: Maureen Fair, Tina Clarke, Maria Cancian, Denny Maloney, cocaptain Alison Calzetti, Betsy Mayer, co-captain Ann Strayer, Barb Trafton, and Andrea LaBaw. Alison Cal­ zetti and Ann Strayer received the Carol Brown Award. Betsy Mayer and Ann Bracken were elected co-captains for next year. Although six seniors are graduating from the squad, Princeton women’s crew looks forward to another successful season. 1982 BRIC-A-BRAC

Women’s Crew
Under the direction of new coach Fred Schoch, the women’s crew team had a great year. With an October transition between coaches and a relaxed fall atmosphere the women’s crew failed to reveal their full potential at the fall Head regattas, finishing a disap­ pointing fifth (out of 40) in the Head of the Charles. The tiger crew had been seeded second on the basis of last year’s performance. In the subsequent fall races from which the Tigers’ traditionally strongest foes were absent, the team met with easy success. In November the team left the wintry chill of Lake Carnegie to begin an intense cycle of winter training. The women’s efforts were somewhat rewarded with the traditional January trip to Florida, where a week of double sessions left the team tired but tan. Late winter saw the Tigers itching to be on the water and away from the monotony of weights, tanks, ergometer pieces and timed runs. The spring racing season opened with three consecutive weekends of poor weather, challenging the rowers with high winds and rough water. The Tigers easily beat Connecticut College in their first race, then traveled to Annapolis, MD., where they finished 35 sec­ onds ahead of the Navy women. This success, however, was not to be the case when the Princeton women met Radcliffe and Cornell the following weekend. A jumped seat left Princeton dead in the water with their oppo­ nents rapidly gaining open water. By the time the unfor­ tunate rower had fixed the broken seat the Tigers were three lengths down. In a valiant effort to regain the lost ground, the Princeton women powered past Cornell and finished only 1 ½ seconds behind Radcliffe. The next weekend saw the Tigers facing a Yale squad, eager to revenge the Eisenberg Cup. However, this was not to be; the Princeton women’s superb racing carried their boat across the finish line a full four seconds ahead of Yale. In the Tigers’ final match race they prevailed once again and defeated Pennsylvania and Dartmouth. With a 7 and 1 season behind them, the women’s

ROWING AT PRINCETON

345

1982 WOMEN’S CREWS - 1
VARSITY WINNING EASTERN SPRINTS
M.Fair ’84, A.C.Clarke ’83, M.Cancian ’83, D.Maloney ’82, A.Calzetti ’82, E.Mayer ’83, A.Strayer ’82, B.Trafton ’82, A.LaBaw ’82 (Cox)

VARSITY
1921 Crew Trophy Eisenberg Cup
M.Fair ’84, A.C.Clarke ’83, M.Cancian ’83, D.Maloney ’82, A.LaBaw ’82 (Cox), A.Calzetti ’82, E.Mayer ’83, A.Strayer ’82, B.Trafton ’82

SECOND VARSITY
3rd Place Eastern Sprints
H.Bedford ’84, P.Hoblitzell ’84, A.Bracken ’83, E.Bannister ’84, E.Jones ’83 (Cox), S.Wamsler ’83, E.Griepsma ’84, C.Dogget ’83, N.Tracy ’82

346

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1921 CREW TROPHY
THE 1921 CREW TROPHY
Awarded Annually by the Trustees of Princeton University Rowing Association for the Outstanding Performance of a Men’s or Women’s Crew During the Spring Racing Season

Betsy Mayer ’83, Tina Clarke ’83, Ann L. Strayer ’82, Maria Cancian ’83, Maureen J. Fair ’84, Deneen Maloney ’82, Fred Schoch (Coach)
1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Women’s Varsity Crew Lightweight Varsity Crew Heavyweight Freshman Crew Lightweight Varsity Crew Lightweight Freshmen Crew Lightweight Freshmen Crew Class of 1991 Novice Women, Lightweight and Heavyweight Freshmen Heavyweight Freshman Crew Women’s Varsity Crew Women’s Varsity Crew Women’s Novice Crew Women’s Varsity Crew Women’s & Lightweight Varsity Crews The 1995 Eastern Sprints Crews Lightweight & Heavyweight Varsity Crews Heavyweight Varsity Crew Heavyweight Varsity Crew Men’s Heavyweight Varsity & Women’s Lightweight Varsity Women’s Lightweight Varsity

ROWING AT PRINCETON

347

1982 WOMEN’S CREWS - 2
FIRST NOVICES
—Class of 1985
A.M.Wilson, M-M.Smithers, E.Stevenson ’84, A.Paradis, S.Turner (Cox), E.Schenken, E.Stone, J.Budgell, K.Marsh

3rd Place Eastern Sprints

WOMEN’S HENLEY
A.LaBaw ’82 (Cox), B.Trafton ’82 (Stroke), B.Mayer ’83, A.Calzetti ’82, D.Maloney ’82, (Coach Fred Schoch)

SECOND NOVICES
—Class of 1985
M.Ehmann, L.Robinson,S.Brown, R.Kohler, C.Rosborough (Cox), E.Quintrell, E.Pulling, M.Willoughby, J.Marron

348

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Belly of the Carnegie Head Race
by Stuyve Pell ’53
Head of the River regattas, modelled after the bump­ ing races of English colleges at Oxford and Cambridge, have grown in this country and in Canada over the last fifteen years to be enormous events, international in scope. The idea had been brewing of a somewhat less serious invitational event in the Fall on lake Carnegie. For the Freshman squads this could be a real racing experience. Because of an Ivy League rule limiting competition out of the regular season to two events, the Varsity Squads, having rowed at the Head of the Charles and at the Head of the Schuylkill, could not actually race against crews from other institutions. The result was the participation of oarsmen and women from Columbia, Princeton, Rutgers and Yale on November 10th (1979) before the Yale-Princeton Football game in a rowing event billed irreverently as the Belly of the Carnegie. Among the Freshmen, twenty Heavy and Light­ weight eights churned the 2.8 miles from the lake’s usual finish line near the dam to the end of the float in front of the Boathouse. Six Novice or Freshmen Women’s eights — three from Yale and three from Princeton — rounded out the 1st year field. In a Head race the crews start in single file about 10 seconds apart. This puts pressure on a crew to avoid being passed while giving the crew the opportunity to overtake and pass crews ahead of it. Each boat is timed with elapsed time determining the winner. In the Men’s crews, Yale’s Heavyweight Freshmen took the first two places in 17 minutes, 26 and 27 seconds. A Princeton Heavyweight boat and a Princeton Lightweight boat were next in 17:39 and :47 respectively, followed by Columbia in 17:48, :49, 18:02 and Yale, also in 18:02. The first Columbia boat would have been third overall but for a 15­second penalty for a course violation. The remainder of the boats finished in almost random order but there was noth­ ing random about the energy or enthusiasm shown by these oarsmen who were experiencing their first intercollegiate rowing competition. The Women Novice’s races were tightly contested. First was Princeton in 19:50; second, Yale in 20:18, third and fourth, Princeton in 21:24 and :31, and fifth and sixth were Yale in 22:19 and 22:26. Nineteen eight-oared shells with men from Princeton, Rutgers, Columbia and Yale were boated, but because of the rule mentioned above this could not be a race among the various institutions. The solution or recipe was to take two oarsmen from each university, shake well and pour into an eight-oared shell. Sprinkle lightly with cox’ns — one to a boat — and turn ’em loose on the lake. Mustering anything that would float for launches, the coaches proceed to shape this yeasty dough. Not exactly the Miracle of Loaves and Fishes, these crews looked coordinated and strong in the 2.8 mile row back to the Boathouse from the dam. One boat made it in 16:37 with the next six shells timed in 17:04 to 17:40. This was a fine experience for all who participated. It is planned as an annual event. Princeton Rowing Notes Spring 1980

A Doctor’s Perspective by Luther M. Strayer III ’57, M.D.
After graduation in ’57 I had no opportunity to row. Our Daughter Ann (captain ’82 crew) began to row at Andover and was in the Junior National 4x. A doctor was needed to travel abroad with the Junior National Team and I volunteered, beginning a 16­year tour on the U.S. Rowing Association Sports Medicine commit­ tee. I became Chairman of the Committee in 1984 serving until 1994 and now am an Emeritus member. I had the pleasure of attending the National Rowing Team on 12 International or World Cup events and as many or more National Championships plus over 14 Head of the Charles Regattas. Locations of National Champion­ ships attended were: Detroit, Oak Ridge, Cincinnati, and of course, Indianapolis. Locations abroad, World champions and while training for World champions include: Essen, Ratsberg, Villach, Belgrade, Bled x 2 (Yugoslavia, now Slovenia), Lucerne x 3, Nottingham,

Copenhagen, Seoul, Melbourne, Tasmania, Vienna and Indianapolis. During this time, we were able to bring profession­ alism to the medical service of our National Team. With Kris Korzeniowski’s urging, and the pioneering work of Fritz Hagerman PhD, we began the development of physiological testing of our athletes which many didn’t understand. We saw the beginning of service of other physicians who were caring for our athletes across the country, but were not familiar with the sport of rowing. We also investigated the incidence of significant low back pain in our elite athletes. At this time, a member of the Sports medicine committee is available for consulta­ tion by any member of the rowing community. Finally, I have returned to sculling for exercise, assist in coaching a local high school crew, and truly enjoy my time on the water.

ROWING AT PRINCETON

349

1983 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 1
FIRST VARSITY
Winners of Logg Cup, Childs Cup, Compton Cup and Carnegie Cup “ended the Harvard spell over the Compton Cup”
Boatwright Frank Bozarth, H.Backer ’84, S.VanFossen ’84, B.Smith ’84, C.Penny ’84, S.Lesser ’83 (Cox), B. Nagle ’85, J.Soons ’83, C.Hunt ’85, M.Wilson ’84, Coach L.Gluckman

FIRST VARSITY
L.S.Scharer ’84 (Cox), H.M.Backer ’85, D.S.VanFossen ’84, B.Smith ’84, C.G.Penny ’85, J.P.Soons ’83, B.Nagle ’85, M.Wilson ’84, G.F.Koehler ’83

SECOND VARSITY
I.R.A. SILVER MEDALIST
G.Guyett ’85, A.W.Young ’85, G.Koehler ’83, L.Jones ’84, L.S.Scharer ’84 (Cox), D.VonMuller ’84, J.Koch ’84, C.Hammarskjold ’85, J.Baden ’84, Coach L.Gluckman

SECOND VARSITY
“HOTEL HUCKER”
J.Baden ’84, C.Hammarskjold ’85, J.Koch ’84, D.VonMuller ’84, E.L.Jones ’84, G.Guyett ’85, A.W.Young ’85, B.Nagle ’85, L.S.Scharer ’84 (Cox)

350

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Carnegie Lake Rowing Association
The first meeting of “The Committee for Princeton Community-Based Rowing” took place on June 15, 1983. The main topics on the agenda were listed as “organiza­ tion, membership, finances and program.” Three weeks later on July 8,1983, Stuyve Pell PU ’53 wrote a letter to Princeton University Coach Curtis Jordan (Larry Gluck­ man was away with the National Team) to follow up on his discussions with Curtis and Larry after the Commit­ tee’s meeting. The letter was “to let you and through you, Athletic Director Robert Myslik, know of the first organizational meeting of a group of rowing enthusiasts not currently or directly connected with the University, with the objective of forming a club or association for rowing on Lake Carnegie.”
Hosting National Team Rowers

A theme that was important to the founding of Carn­ egie Lake Rowing Association was that a communitybased rowing club would develop rowing-knowledgeable members who would host National Team athletes in their homes and supply volunteers at selection trials and camps. The very first newsletter features several host families describing what a pleasant experience it was to have these athletes in their homes, even for a month at a time. In August, 1987, CLRA sponsored a Princeton Uni­ versity Lightweight Straight Four in the World University Games in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. In 1989, we sponsored a Men’s Four With and a Women’s Straight Four at the World Championships in Bled, Yugoslavia. That sum­ mer we sponsored a Men’s Eight that won a silver medal at the Pan Am Games in Cuba. The high point was our being named the “Local Organizing Committee” for the Olympic Trials on Mercer Lake in 1992. We received an Olympic banner signed by all the athletes and much praise from USRowing for all that we did to make these trials a memorable event.
Lucky With Our Coaches

One of the benefits the University foresaw when it agreed to a community rowing club in its boathouse was that the club would provide additional employment for the University’s junior coaches. It also stipulated that any other coaches we might use be certified by the University. Carnegie Lake Rowing Association has enjoyed excellent coaching over the years while meeting both these policy objectives Andy Card PU ’85 was succeeded in the fall of 1987 by Willie Black, who had joined the University crew program a year earlier as novice women’s coach. It

was Willie who said about ergometers: “They’re good for coaching body movement, but if you put an erg on the water it will sink. You must get in a boat and learn how to row.” Willie is also quoted in a newsletter as saying: “Rowing means working together. There is no ‘i’ in the word ‘team.”’ Willie was assisted from time to time by Jim Moses, who coached the lightweight freshmen, and by Dan Roock PU’81, who coached the freshmen heav­ ies at the time. Mike Zimmer PU ’88, who rowed on championship lightweight crews at Princeton, and Lori Dauphiny, who rowed at the University of Washington, joined the Princ­ eton coaching staff in the fall of 1989, along with Mike Teti, a 13-time National Team oarsman who was a gold medalist at the 1987 Worlds. Mike Zimmer PU ’88 and Lori became our coaches. Mike stayed on in the summer of 1990 and enlivened rowing camp with a Greek theme. The Saturday morning races were a contest between the ‘Fun’-icians, Achaeans, Minoans and Vikings. John Parker, a 1990 Princeton graduate who stroked the U.S. Men’s Eight at Bled in 1989, began coaching us that fall, along with Lori and Scott (“It’s supposed to be fun!”) Roop, the 1981 World Champion singles rower, who was filling in for Curtis. Scott coached us through the summer and then left to become assistant varsity coach at Brown. During the winter of 1994 Rob Shepherd and Jeff Klepacki, two National Team candidates working with Men’s Eight coach Kris Korzeniowski, took over some of the coaching duties, along with Alex Martynenko and Lea Leonard. Like Tim Giordano, Alex and Lea were former rowing members who became coaches and were approved by the University. Stuyve Pell also pitched in during this period, as John Parker was busy training for the Olympics and Lori had other commitments. Kit Raymond, PU ’74, former women’s coach at Princeton and a former Rutgers coach, began coaching us in the summer of 1992. That fall Dan Allen, a prize­ winning coxswain at Orange Coast College and U.-Cal. at Berkeley, joined the University crew program as a coaching intern and began coaching CLRA as well. Kit took on a bigger role with us in 1993, when he formulated the assessment program and the stratification of expe­ rienced rowers into three categories. Dan moved up to coach the lightweight freshmen in the fall of 1993 when Chris Fenyo, a former cox at Boston University who had coached at Community Rowing, became the coaching intern. Kit was named CLRA head coach late in 1993 and began implementing the new program in 1994. This past (continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

351

1983 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 2
THIRD VARSITY
Coach Fred Schoch, H.Hamilton ’85, E.Horschman ’83, S.Perlmutter ’83, J.Pauly ’84, A.Zelermyer ’85 (Cox), M.Armstrong ’85, R.Boulden ’83, H.Doddy ’84, J.Stein ’84, Coach L.Gluckman

FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1986
T.VanLeer, G.Clements, C.Pompa, G.Ritter, J.Dougherty (Cox), E.Corcoran, E.Buchovecky, M.Demko, J.Andrianos

SECOND FRESHMEN
—Class of 1986
M.Rossner, A. Prall, B.Fitzpatrick, H.Gavin, D.J.Wood (Cox), C.Sullivan, S.Spear, R.Fleming, R.Baxter

352

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Carnegie Lake Rowing Association (continued)
year we have had Amanda Cashman, former Dartmouth novice women’s coach who was substituting for Lori during Lori’s leave of absence. Aubrey Borland, a recent PU graduate, and Paul Nelson were helping the Princeton coaches and also coached us. In addition to providing supplemental employment to the junior coaches, CLRA also provided volunteers for the University’s two fall regattas, the Princeton Chase and the Belly of the Carnegie. This evolved into our actively managing the off­the­water aspects of these regattas while continuing to provide assistance to the Princeton coaches on the water. In 1990 the Princeton crew coaches awarded Carnegie Lake Rowing Association its Princeton Prize, given annually to an individual who has made a “signifi­ cant contribution to the sport of rowing.” The prize is a framed print of the lithograph “The Gathering,” by Kit Raymond. The following year we were invited to name one of the workboat Vespoli eights, which our annual financial contribution to the University had helped purchase. Laker One was christened in Class Day ceremonies in November, 1991. CLRA as a Community Rowing Program The CLRA founders knew that rowing was growing in popularity around the country, but they probably never dreamed that the community­based rowing club they had in mind would grow and develop to the extent it has. The number of regular memberships (not including juniors) went from 110 in 1985 to 135 in 1986 and to 161 in 1987. It jumped to 284 in 1989, the peak year, fell back to 253 in 1990, jumped again to 276 in 1991 and 282 in 1992, and receded to 260, 253 and 242 in the years 1993, ’94 and ’95, respectively. The number of new members in any given year has ranged from 85 in 1986 to a high of 170 in 1989, with the second highest being 1992, when 156 new members joined. A Princeton High School crew club was initiated in 1986 and proved so popular that freshmen were not allowed to join. An article in the May, 1988 Carnegie Currents, by Danica Curcic, one of the 30 or 35 members, describes the 1987 group going on the water after two tank sessions, running into the Kingston dock trying to turn around, and being “barked at” by coach Andy Card. The high school students were not integrated into regular CLRA sessions until their second year, but they began entering races right away, just as the senior members did. A highlight was entering a College Cup Regatta in Baltimore in 1988 and coming in fourth against novice crews from five colleges. (continued)

Carnegie Lake Rowing Association
(continued)

ROWING AT PRINCETON

353

1983 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS - 1
FIRST VARSITY
E.A.R.C. Champions — Henley Semi-Finalists
1921 Crew Trophy Goldthwait Cup Jope Cup Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup Joseph Wright Cup
C.Cobbs ’85, B.Bell ’83, E.Groos ’83, W.Grousbeck ’83, B.Sullivan ’83, J.Farley ’85, C.Andrews ’83, R.Charles ’85 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
E.A.R.C. Champions
Cornell Trophy
M.Sher ’83, A.Card ’85, B.Brown ’83, E.Anderson ’84, P.Paine ’85, M.Michalowski ’84, J.Peterson ’84, M.Califano ’84, R.Wages ’85 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
E.A.R.C. Champions
C.Magid ’84, J.Dinneen ’84, H.Johnson ’85, H.Klein ’85, E.Anderson ’84, J.Denham ’85, S.Redding ’83, M.Califano ‘84, J.Smedley ’86 (Cox)

354

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Lakers Get Competitive
The August, 1987 Carnegie Currents reports on the Charm City Sprints at Baltimore Rowing Club’s brand new boathouse, the Crab Feast Regatta, the Chester River Regatta and the Navesink Cup invitational regatta held on Mercer Lake. Our own Carnegie Lake Regatta was held in September in those days and included Baltimore, Lehigh Valley, Navesink, Viking, Wilmington and some Princeton University crews that did not collect medals if they won. The big excitement of the 1987 season was the CLRA Women’s Four winning the Club Four event at the Head of the Charles, a new category that year. A slightly different boating entered the American Rowing Champi­ onships and the Head of the Charles in the Championship category the following year. The history of our regatta experiences is too long to chronicle here. Highlights include our winning the Mayor’s Cup in Wilmington in 1988, ’90, ’92 and ’94; the Women’s Four that placed eleventh out of 34 at the 1990 Head of the Charles; five successive victories by a Women’s Eight in 1991 regattas, culminating in the sixthplace finish of the Women’s Four in the 1991 Head of the Charles; the second-place finish of a Men’s Four at the National Masters Championships in Camden, New Jersey in 1992; and the stellar 1994 season, which culminated in our entering a Men’s and Women’s Eight, a Men’s Masters Four, a double and a single in the Head of the Charles. The first Laker Erg Race was held in March, 1988 and drew 24 competitors. There was only one entrant in the Women’s Open, and Chris Ives established the 7:52.1 record in the Men’s Open that still stands. In March 1995 the Erg Race drew 48 entrants and eight new records were set. We did other things besides race. When the Harri­ son Street Bridge was re-opened on November 2, 1989, after being closed four years for replacement, the CLRA eights rowed through the bridge at the height of the mid­ day, mid-week ribbon-cutting ceremonies. We also had great parties. Early newsletters speak of June barbecues at the boathouse, farewell parties for coaches at members’ homes and Back-on-the-Water parties. The annual meet­ ing held in conjunction with our Holiday Party moved from the boathouse to more upscale surroundings at Colonial Club on campus in December, 1991. Barbara Johnson

By George Ernest Arlett Having decided on my chosen technique, and having over the years eliminated as much of the superfluous as pos­ sible, I will endeavor to outline a few points which I think are necessary to good coaching. I think it is unnecessary to talk incessantly to a crew dur­ ing practice, and it is often annoying and creates irritation in the boat. Once basics have been learned, the crew should think for themselves, with the watchful eye of the coach to provide the odd word of correction without giving a long harangue on the subject. A coach can say practically all he has to say while the boat is moving. Also, the longer the boat is stopped, the less strokes are rowed. It is wise to keep the coaching as uncomplicated as possible, despite the complex nature of the movement and the many variables. The less theory introduced by the coach, the quicker will his charges progress. You must remember that you are dealing with men and not machines. With regard to crew seating, the experienced coach will generally quickly spot his stroke; and whereas each has his own job to do, the stroke is the key man with the ability to row with good rhythm and qualities of leadership to inspire the crew to winning. If he has an aggressive racing attitude, then you are sitting pretty. Seven has the job of transmitting stroke’s thinking to the rest of the crew and must be an excel­ lent oarsman and be quick to follow stroke’s change of tempo. In succeeding order each man has his own special job to do and is seated according to the coach’s estimation of their suit­ ability for the particular seat. If bow’s rowing looks fairly near to stroke’s, you have a good uniform crew. The job now is to produce a smooth­rowing, well­drilled crew. The ninth member of the crew — the all important coxswain — can often he the means of winning a race. His intelligent communications to stroke are invaluable. His personality in and out of the boat can help immeasurably toward the success of the crew. But again, as with a too talkative coach, continual running commentary on the crew’s endeavors pro­ duces lack of concentration on the oarsmen’s part. Their mind settles on the coxswain’s commentary, and often the rhythm of the boat is lost. Personal motivation is generally self­pride in achieve­ ments which inspire one to aim for higher goals. The feeling that one is progressing in rowing efficiency, is in better physical condition, and has the prospect of being in a winning boat, spurs him on to succeed at the highest level. The collective impetus within the crew can roll on to a winning streak that accepts the challenge of each succeeding race in a confident manner. When my wife once asked Ernie Barry (one of the great English professional scullers, for whom I am named) the se­ cret of his success, his reply was, “The main reason was that I absolutely loved the sport and was never happier than when I was in my boat.” Excerpted from “The Oarsman” May/June 1973

Coaching

ROWING AT PRINCETON

355

1983 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS - 2
FOURTH VARSITY
UNDEFEATED
M.Messineo ’85, S.Cahn ’83, H.Klein ’85, G.Kinley ’85, P.Lewis ’85, J.Woll ’83, R.Murphy ’85, P.Carmona ’85, W.Hou ’85 (Cox)

FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1986
L.Lukens, K.Royer, B.Shannon, C.Urheim, D.Wiedner, S.Barr, B.Broder, W.Grant, T.Gorelick (Cox) with ‘Leverage’

SECOND FRESHMEN
—Class of 1986

E.A.R.C. Champions
D.Duquette, D.Harrover, J.Morgan, J.McGill, R.Hedlund, J.Scott, C.Glovier, V.Rizzo, K.Burns (Cox)

356

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1983 Crew Year
When writing notes for any crew season, it isn’t enough to simply give results, mention notable ac­ complishments, and predict what next year will hold. Racing actually takes up very little of the Heavyweight oarsman’s time. Though the racing is the clearest manifestation of his fitness and skills, it is only one part of the oarsman’s experience. Few people see, or know, anything about the months before the spring. There’s rowing in the darkness of fall evenings, and getting up for 7 o’clock practices when the frost is still on the ground. There are miles of running, hours of technique rowing in the tanks, and steady weeks of weights and other forms of land training. The heavy­ weight squad did all of these things this year, and developed into a true team in the process. Working hard together is a part of the experience. The powerful entries to the men’s heavyweight crew team combined to give Princeton one of the most successful racing seasons in its long history. Both Freshmen crews had winning seasons, as did the varsity and 2nd varsity crews. The 3rd varsity and other crews also produced fine efforts. In the boathouse trophy collection now reside the Logg, Carnegie, Childs, and Compton Cups, an assortment that has not been togeth­ er here at Princeton for many years. Heavyweight coach Larry Gluckman adopted a spring season racing strategy that called for even 500­meter split times over the 2000­meter course. It was an approach that demanded discipline from the oarsmen and coxswain as the opponents normally pulled away in the first half of the race and the second 1000-meters was a steady march back by the Princeton eight. The spring season was also marked by intense internal competition for seats in the varsity and sec­ ond varsity boats that had Coach Gluckman running seat races and making lineup changes right to the final regatta. The race strategy and training intensity paid off when Princeton took the Compton Cup away from Harvard for the first time since 1957. Both the varsity and second varsity executed the even split race strat­ egy perfectly, giving the Harvard boats an early lead and then staging a relentless drive to overtake them in the last hundred meters in front of the largest Lake Carnegie crowd anyone had seen. All heavyweight crews made it to the grand finals at the Eastern Sprints. Late­spring training built up high hopes for the heavies going into the IRA Regatta at Syracuse. The 2V boat took the silver medal on Lake Onondaga. The Princeton varsity was considered the favorite and was just begin­ ning its usual move on the field at the midway point of the finals when the boat’s skeg tore lose. It was a heartbreaking finish to the season, but 1983 stands out as a turnaround year for the heavyweight program.

Lightweight Crew
The Lightweight Crew team once again proved that they were the best in the country. This year the team swept all three varsity races at the Eastern Sprints. Coach Gary Kilpatrick guided the Tigers to their sec­ ond championship season in the last two years, earning them a trip to compete in the prestigious Henley Royal Regatta in England this summer. The fall was highlighted by impressive showings at both the Head of the Schuylkill and the Head of the Charles regattas. The winter saw Kilpatrick pushing his crew harder than ever before, always with the H-Y-P race and the Eastern Sprints in mind. The spring began with four varsity crews on the water, making history for Princeton’s Lightweight Crew team. As the season progressed, the four boats domi­ nated the opposition. All four lightweight boats were undefeated going into the long-awaited H-Y-P race on Lake Carnegie. In eleven years, Kilpatrick’s crews had never won this race at home, giving the team even more motivation. A win by the varsity eight earned the team the Goldthwait Cup, the award for the victors of the H-Y-P regatta. The Tigers, therefore, went into the Eastern Sprints two weeks later as the clear favorites. In the varsity race, Princeton started quickly, jumping into the lead. They continued to increase their lead over the next 1000 meters, and then withstood furious challenges from both Harvard and Yale to take the lightweight championship trophy. The squad’s depth and strength was rewarded by winning the Jope Cup for the second time in its exis­ tence. The most prized possession in lightweight crew, the cup represents overall lightweight supremacy. The Tigers proved that they were not doubtful why they had worked so hard. And, with this year’s fine freshman class, next year’s squad will look to repeat this past year’s accomplishments. Lake Carnegie will again be the site of early morning and late afternoon workouts.

(continued) 357

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1983 WOMEN’S CREWS - 1
FIRST VARSITY
Eisenberg Cup 3rd Eastern Sprints
K.Marsh ’85, J.Budgell ’85, A.C.Clarke ’83, E.Mayer ’83 (Co-Capt.), M.Cancian ’83, S.Wamsler ’83, E.Griepsma ’84, M.Fair ’84, E.Jones ’83 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
J.Marron ’85, C.Doggett ’83, E.Bannister ’84, A.Bracken ’83 (Co-Capt.), A.Paradis ’85, E.Nimick ’83, P.Hoblitzell ’84, H.Bedford ’84, H.Rockwell ’85 (Cox)

NOVICES
—Class of 1986 Eastern Sprint & National Champs “on the water”

358

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1983 AWARD
THE CLASS OF 1983 AWARD
To The Woman Rower who measures success not by results but by effort and whose positive attitude contributes to the morale of the team.
1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Priscilla S. Hoblitzell ’84 Karen A. Kuhlthau ’86 Roberta C. Conner ’86 Barbara L. Jones ’87 Elizabeth A. Hoftreuter ’89 Ashlee B. Patton ’90 Melissa L. Holcombe ’91 Jessica E. Bull ’92 Susan R. Cleary ’93 Morgaen L. Donaldson ’94 Wendy S. Holding ’95 Allison C. Schiffman ’96 Leslie S. Gewin ’97 Michelle J. Clarke ’98 Jane Craig Weaver ’99 Mikaela L. Chilstrom ’99 Christina D. Hruska ’00

Review of the 1983 Crew Year (continued)
Women’s Crew
It was August, and in a repeat of the previous year, the Women’s Crew team had no coach. To ev­ eryone’s joy, Ernie Arlett, or Mr. Crew, as the Boston Globe called him, agreed to come out of retirement for one more year. His advice: “Put your hearts into it and don’t go mad.” After many long, swinging rows, two eights and a four traveled up to Boston for the Head of the Charles. In events with forty entrants each, including many national team oarswomen, Princeton rowed to third, fourth, and sixth place finishes. A grueling winter routine of weights, stadium and long distance running, rowing tank workouts, and the dreaded ergometer, was followed by a successful Inter­ session trip to Florida. During the regular season, the first boat, coxed by Liz Jones’83 and stroked by Maria Cancian ’83 and Karen Marsh ’85, was notorious as a health hazard for coronary patients. They specialized in last minute come-from-behind victories over Rutgers, Yale, and Navy. The second boat, coxed by Haley “the Comet” Rockwell ’85 and stroked by Jennifer “J.P.” Marron ’85, was more consistent, handily defeating all of their opponents except a speedy Yale JV. Eastern Sprints were the season finale. None of the Varsity or Novice boats had any trouble in the morning heats. The Novice four captured fifth, and the first and second Novice eights cruised to first place finishes. The Varsity boat took third in a fast, aggressive race. The team total of two firsts, two thirds and a fifth was the best overall team performance for the second year in a row. New coach Curtis Jordan and co-captains Emily Bannister and Poo Hoblitzell hope for another success­ ful season in ‘84. This year’s co-captains Ann Bracken and Betsy Mayer and Tina Clarke, as well as Jones, Cancian, Suzanne Wamsler, Tia Doggett and Eleanor Nimick will all be sorely missed.

1983 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

359

1983 WOMEN’S CREWS - 2
FIRST NOVICES
—Class of 1986 Sprint Champions/National Champions
C.Mehaffey (Stroke), K.Kemp, M.Hoblitzell, M.Croneberg, R.Conner, S.Pelmas, L.Hodder, S.Ryan, M.Kelleher (Cox)

NOVICES CELEBRATE
“on the land”

SECOND NOVICES
—Class of 1986 Sprint Champions
K.Kulthau (Stroke), J.Bohlen, E.Ayres, L.Carr, L.Anson, S.Singer, A.Fitzgerald, M.Laws, S.Weems (Cox)

THIRD NOVICES
—Class of 1986
T.Nixon, M.Marks, J.P.Atwater, J.Brown, A.Carls, M.L.Warner, L.Zalenko (Cox)

360

ROWING AT PRINCETON

ROWING AT PRINCETON

361

1984 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 1
FIRST VARSITY
Childs Cup Logg Cup
Coach L.Gluckman, M.Wilson ’84, G.Clements ’86, J.Koch ’84, B.Nagle ’85, S.VanFossen ’84, G.Ritter ’86, C.Pompa ’86, G.Guyett ’85, Boat­ wright F.Bozarth, J.Dougherty (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
Coach L.Gluckman, M.Demko ‘86, E.Corcoran ’86, D.VanMuller ’84, E.L.Jones ’84, M.Vatis ’85, J.Baden ’84, A.Prall ’86, T.VanLeer ’86, J.Sabater ’87 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
Coach L.Gluckman, S.Spear ’86, F.Derby ’84, R.Fleming ’87, B.Carpenter ’85, J.Pauly ‘84, M.Muendel ’86, J.Stein ’84, C.Feudtner ’85, M.Garrison ’86, C.Lewis ’87 (Cox), Coach F.Schoch, D.J.Wood ’86 (Cox)

“HOTEL HUCKER”
Everyone who ever rowed/raced in the Second Varsity shell named for John S. “Hucker” Williams ’50

362

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Review of the 1984 Crew Year
An autumnal Lake Carnegie, its mist rising into the chilled early morning air, saw the return of the Tiger heavy­ weight crew to Princeton. Complete with the ritualistic “through the stone bridge by 7:00.” Friday three mile “youpick-em” races, the squad churned away the strokes in prepa­ ration for the Head of the Charles and Schuykill regattas. No remarks of the season would be complete without praise for the 1984 winter practices. The intensity of the team’s work was reflected by the physical testing scores turned in by members. The racing season, however, was wrought with frustra­ tion for a varsity boat. Their first victory occurred on a chop­ py Schuykill over the University of Pennsylvania, on a day when all Princeton boats would win, earning the Childs Cup for another year. The only other varsity win was the capping of another sweep, this time of Rutgers for the Logg Cup. The junior varsity was more successful, adding Navy and Cornell to the list of their victories; while the first frosh, after a slow start against Navy, would only suffer a halfsecond loss to Harvard. Coached by Fred Schoch after the Sprints, the second varsity won the Bronze Medal at the IRA Regatta. The Eastern Sprints on Lake Quinsigamond was the final disappointment, with the first and second varsity boats finishing tenth and fifth respectively. The first frosh placed second with a very strong showing. The third varsity and second frosh seasons, filled with various amounts of success, lots of hard effort, and the final “Saturday Night Sprints,” were marked by improvement as crew and individuals. The 1983­1984 crew season, spanning the days, months, practices and races from September to May, defies simple summation. This much is certain: there were good pulls, and all those left to work with the 1984-1985 team will miss the 1984 senior squad. by posting not only a winning season, but by capturing first in their event at the Sprints. All the lightweight crews, especially the three var­ sity boats, owe their success to the brilliant coaching of Gary Kilpatrick and the incredible competitive desire of all lightweight oarsmen and coxswains. The 1984 varsity lightweight crew takes its place as one of the most successful crews in the history of Princeton.

Women’s Crew
The first year women’s coach Curtis Jordan orchestrat­ ed the Carnegie Tour ’83-’84, producing another successful season for the women’s crews. After losing half the team to graduation, excuses about a “building year” were prepared. Fortunately, excuses proved unnecessary. For the first time, three strong varsity eights trained for most of the year. Half of the varsity this year came from last year’s talented novice crew which won the National Championship last June. Carolyn Mehaffey ’86 stroked the first eight, joined by fellow “ex-novices” Sherry Ryan ’86, Mo Hoblitzell ’85, Sarah Pelmas ’86, and coxswain Mittie Kelleher ’86. Others in the boat were Janet Budgell ’85, Karen Marsh ’85, Busy Schenken ’85 and Maureen Fair ’84. (Fair was also the recipient of this year’s Carol Brown award). The boat’s ex­ cellent record (9-2) was marred only by second-place finishes to Radcliffe and Dartmouth, with a fourth place finish in an extremely fast Eastern Sprints Championship. The second varsity boat had similar success. Stroked by Jennifer Marron ’85, the crew was 10-1 in the regular season, falling only to a fast Yale junior varsity. At Sprints, the boat came away with third place. Those receiving bronze medals included Marron, cox Giana Durzo ’87, Margaret Croneberg ’86, Lucy Hodder ’86, Laura Carr ’86, Emily Bannister ’84 and Poo Hoblitzell ’84, Roberta Conner ’86 and Karen Kuhlthau ’86. The novice boats, ably coached by John Groth, had to overcome many obstacles on the way to their solid fourth place finishes at Sprints. Most of the season was spent shift­ ing lineups to compensate for ill or injured rowers. In spite of these difficulties, both first and second boats pulled past all of their opponents except Yale and Dartmouth. This June, a varsity four and a junior varsity eight will represent Princeton at the National Championships. The team will miss seniors Bannister, Hoblitzell, Fair and manager Hilary Bedford, but the 1984-1985 season looks very promising.

Lightweight Crew
With no returning first boat oarsmen, the Princeton var­ sity lightweight team was not expected to retain its position as the dominant lightweight rowing program in the nation. But much to the surprise of everyone but themselves, the lightweights remained the fastest program in the East for the second year in a row. The first varsity boat logged a six and one season, winning the Harvard-Yale-Princeton race and falling only 1.4 seconds short of the Eastern Sprints Cham­ pionship. The second varsity boat remained undefeated and easily captured first place at the Sprints. The third varsity finished a strong third at the championships. The freshman crews, coached by Scott Turpin, main­ tained the impressive reputation of those that preceded them

1984 BRIC-A-BRAC

ROWING AT PRINCETON

363

1984 HEAVYWEIGHT CREWS - 2
FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1987 I.R.A. Champions Stewards Cup 1921 Crew Trophy
J.Finnegan, B.Sheehan, B.Bennington, J.Helmers, S.DePiero, D.Saxen, D.Burden, J.VanFossen, A.Zecha (Cox)

FIRST FRESHMEN
—Class of 1987
T.Finnegan, W.Sheehan, W.Bennington, J.Helmers, S.DePiero, D.Saxen, D.Burden, J.VanFossen, A.Zecha (Cox), E.Kloman (Coach)

First Princeton Frosh Boat to Win at I.R.A.Regatta

SECOND FRESHMEN
—Class of 1987
J.Picoult (Mgr.), G.DiRusso, M.Trautschold, J.Gutstein, T.Werner, G.Barry, D.Morehead, C.Boyd, J.Meier, C.Lewis (Cox), B.Chung (Cox)

364

ROWING AT PRINCETON

PRINCETON’S NOVICE WOMEN’S CREW NATIONAL COLLEGIATE CHAMPIONS
A remarkable achievement was wrought by Princeton’s EARC Champion Women’s Novice crew at the very end of the 1982-83 season. by Sarah H. Pelmas ’85

On June 1, 1983, the women’s novice first boat, fresh from an overwhelming victory of 3.5 seconds at the Eastern Sprints, drove to Philadelphia and boarded the plane for Madison, Wisconsin and the National Col­ legiate Rowing championships. This crew, along with their coach Fred Cressman, and two spares, were the only representatives for Princeton at the Collegiate Nation­ als. They would face formidable teams from Minnesota, Cornell (Dad Vail champions), Yale (third at the Eastern Sprints), and the University of Wisconsin (runners-up at the Eastern Sprints). Sunday morning arrived, not sunny and warm as they had been used to, but cold and rainy. The girls donned their rain jackets, cheerfully recalling that they had won the Eastern Sprints on a cold, rainy Sunday. They went down to the lake and took a short practice row to test the conditions and get used to the buoys which had recently been put in to mark the lanes. The race came, with the Princeton team finding itself in the outside lane, farthest away from its most feared opponent, Wisconsin. All five teams paddled around, warming up, and arrived at the starting line several minutes ahead of schedule.

Princeton led the race from the start, with the real battle being fought for second and third places. Although Princeton was ahead, Wisconsin was only one seat down for most of the race, losing no more than that all the way to the finish line. Princeton crossed the line with Wis­ consin 0.8 seconds behind, and Cornell 1 second behind them. Yale finished fourth, and Minnesota came in fifth. The margin between Princeton and Minnesota was 3.4 seconds, less than that between Princeton and Wisconsin at the Easterns. It was certainly the closest race of the day. The girls came away . . . with a good experience, nine gold medals, and a championship plaque which will hang in the boathouse for at least the remainder of this year, until another novice boat accepts the challenge of the Collegiate Nationals. Princeton Rowing Notes.

I remember every Wednesday we would have a speed order where all the boats — heavies, lights, women, varsities, jayvees, the works — would line up around the 500 meter mark and race for five minutes. We would have two flights. The winner of the second flight would move up to the first flight and the loser of the first flight would move down to second. I think that sort of competition exemplified what Princeton crew was all about when I was here. Now I am the women’s rowing coach at Columbia University, but I continue to stay involved. I race with a group of alumni in an organization called the Fat Cat Rowing Club. We race at the Head of the Charles and we’ve been to Puerto Rico. The group has been to Hawaii and looks forward to a trip to Cuba in the near future. We may not win every race, but we have a lot of fun. Mike Zimmer ’88

The women’s crew used to have a little ceremony. There was a chalice; I believe it was a coffee can. Before every race someone was designated as keeper of the chalice whose duty was to bring it full of Lake Carnegie water for good luck. There was a lot of formality as we poured it onto enemy waters. Maybe this is a mild substitute for the men’s custom of exchanging shirts after a race. We miss the chance to meet and exchange stories with our competitors. Annie Zimmer ’87

ROWING AT PRINCETON

365

1984 LIGHTWEIGHT CREWS
FIRST VARSITY
Winners: 2nd E.A.R.C.Sprints Jope Cup Goldthwait Cup Platt Trophy Wood-Hammond Cup
M.Califano ’84, P.Paine ’85, C.Getch ’84, B.Shannon ’86, M.Michalowski ’84, J.Peterson ’84, J.Denham, A.Card ’85, J.Smedley ’86 (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
Undefeated E.A.R.C. Champions Cornell Trophy
C.Magid ’84, M.Rossner ’86, R.Hedlund ’86, J.Scott ’86, E.Anderson ’84, S.Barr ’86, D.Harrover ‘86, M.Wais ’85, K.Burns ’87 (Cox)

THIRD VARSITY
C.Glovier ’86, W.Hou ’85, K.Grant ’86, J.McGill ’87, R.Benet ’84, P.Carmona ’85, R.Murphy ’85, K.Royer ’86, T.Gorelick ’86 (Cox)

366

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1984 LIGHTWEIGHT FRESHMEN
SPRINTS WINNERS
—Class of 1987
S.Turpin ’79 (Coach), H.Huntington (Stroke), M.Jones, T.Kingston, A.Ballard, S.Furie (Cox), Y.Abosch, D.Stewart, M.Buckley, T.Saarel (No, they did not win all that silver!)

LIGHTWEIGHT VARSITY

The IRA Regatta—1984
June 2nd in Syracuse was a great day for Princ­ eton rowing. It was the strongest performance on all levels that Princeton has shown in recent years. Even without a varsity eight the Tigers fell only 12 points shy of winning the Ten Eyck Trophy for the best overall team record. Princeton entered eight events, of which they won the Stewards’ Trophy (frosh eights) and the Gordon Hoople Trophy (varsity fours-without), two silvers in the J.V. eight and the varsity pair-without, three fourth places in the fours events, and a sixth in the J.V. eight event. The IRA Regatta held on Lake Onondaga is the national collegiate rowing championships and is spread out over three days. All levels of competition and all boat classes (eights, fours, pairs) participate. Both the

by Edward Kloman

coaches and the oarsmen look forward to this early June happening as one free of the competing concerns that exist during the Eastern Sprints. With exams concluded, the two-a-day workouts are more rigorous and the overall improvement of the crews is dramatic. We entered two eights (J.V. heavies and varsity light­ weights) in the J.V. eight event; a frosh eight; three four-withs; one four-without; and a “smoking” pairwithout. Coaches Kloman, Kilpatrick and Schoch, ac­ companied by Rigger Frank Bozarth, were confident of a strong showing in Syracuse. Larry Gluckman would be in attendance for the finals, although he was already working with the U.S. Olympic women’s squad.

Princeton Rowing Notes, December 1984 367

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1984 WOMEN’S CREWS
FIRST VARSITY
Eisenberg Cup
S.Pelmas, M.Hoblitzell, S.Ryan, M.Fair, B.Schenken, K.Marsh, J.Budgell, C.Mehaffey, M.Kelleher (Cox)

SECOND VARSITY
K.Kuhlthau, R.Conner, P.Hoblitzell (Co-Capt.), E.Bannister (Co-Capt.), L.Carr, L.Hodder, M.Croneberg, J.Marron, G.Durso (Cox)

FIRST NOVICES
—Class of 1987
M.Wheeler (Stroke), E.Bowerman, G.Anderson, P.Davis, A.Torney, C.Astrup, A.Reynolds, M.Kingsley, S.Morrison (Cox)

SECOND NOVICES
—Class of 1987
A.Touborg (Stroke), D.Agnew, E.Short, L.Kunkemueller, B.Jones, J.Lane, T.Yanowitz, A.Keller, J.Smith (Cox)

368

ROWING AT PRINCETON

1984 POINT TROPHY
THE CLASS OF 1984 POINT TROPHY
Presented By The

Princeton Class of 1984
To the Overall Point Winner of the Dartmouth, Pennsylvania, Princeton Race (Women’s Open Crew)
1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton Princeton

Point Scoring 1st Varsity Junior Varsity Freshman 9 7 5 2nd 7 5 3 3rd 5 3 1

“CREW WARRIORS”
1984 Women’s Varsity

ROWING AT PRINCETON

369

1984 CREWS
I.R.A.CHAMPIONS — FOUR WITHOUT COXSWAIN
D.S.VanFossen ’84, W.S.Nagle ’85, M.Wilson ’84, G.L.Guyett ’85

1984 READING TOWN REGATTA CHAMPIONS
Oxfordshire, England
Standing: Coach Curtis Jordan, J.Koch ’84, G.Clements ’86, M.Wilson ’84, J.Stein ’84, Boat­ wright Frank Bozarth Seated: S.VanFossen ’84, M.Vatis ’85, J.Baden ’84, G.Guyett ’85, D.J.Wood ’86 (Cox) with trophy

370

ROWING AT PRINCETON

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful