It’s a given: Tracking the importance of private giving and sponsorship to key organisations

November 2011

Contents
1 2 3 4 Background ................................................................................................. 4 Key findings ................................................................................................ 7 Research findings ..................................................................................... 10 Detailed findings........................................................................................ 24 Total private sector income ....................................................................... 24 Total private sector income – all key organisations ......................... 24 Total private sector income – by states and territories .................... 26 Total private sector income – by artform ......................................... 29 Total private sector income – by company size............................... 32 Corporate sponsorship income................................................................... 35 Corporate sponsorship income – all key organisations ................... 35 Corporate sponsorship income – by states and territories............... 36 Corporate sponsorship income – by artform ................................... 38 Corporate sponsorship income – by company size ......................... 40 In-kind corporate sponsorship .................................................................... 42 In-kind corporate sponsorship – all key organisations ..................... 42 In-kind corporate sponsorship – by states and territories ................ 43 In-kind corporate sponsorship – by artform ..................................... 44 In-kind corporate sponsorship – by company size .......................... 45 Number of corporate sponsorships............................................................. 46 Number of corporate sponsorships – all key organisations ............. 46 Number of corporate sponsorships – by states and territories ........ 48 Number of corporate sponsorships – by artform ............................. 50 Number of corporate sponsorships – by company size ................... 52 Private giving ............................................................................................. 54 Private giving – all key organisations .............................................. 54 Private giving – by states and territories ......................................... 55 Private giving – by artform .............................................................. 57 Private giving – by company size .................................................... 59 Foundations and trusts ............................................................................... 61 Foundations and trusts – all key organisations ............................... 61 Foundations and trusts – by states and territories ........................... 62 2

Foundations and trusts – by artform ............................................... 63 Foundations and trusts – by company size ..................................... 64 Number of private givings ........................................................................... 65 Number of private givings – all key organisations ........................... 65 Number of private givings – by states and territories....................... 66 Number of private givings – by artform ........................................... 68 Number of private givings – by company size ................................. 70 Events and other fundraising activities ....................................................... 72 Events and other fundraising activities – all key organisations ........ 72 5 Appendices ................................................................................................ 75 Appendix 1 – Total private sector income – all key organisations (including MCA capital works fundraising campaign) ...................... 75 Appendix 2 – Key organisations (included in the 2010 survey) ....... 77

3

1

Background

Introduction
The Australia Council for the Arts has been monitoring the performance of the arts sector in attracting private sector support in different ways for some time. The purpose of this report is to track and analyse levels of private sector income of Australia Council funded key organisations1 for the years 2008 to 2010. It adapts the survey of major performing arts companies conducted by AMPAG2, hence complementing that survey’s findings as well as the private sector support survey conducted by AbaF3. 132 key organisations that received triennial funding in 2010 have been included in this year’s report. A list of the participating organisations can be found at Appendix 1. Specific areas of research include: How much private sector income has been received by key organisations since 2008? What is the proportion of corporate sponsorship compared to other sources of private sector income? Has the amount of corporate sponsorship received by key organisations changed in comparison to private giving? What proportion of total turnover is made up of private sector support? How much corporate sponsorship has been received by key organisations since 2008? How much corporate sponsorship is received in the form of in-kind support? How much private giving has been received by key organisations since 2008? How much private giving is received from foundations and trusts? Has the number of sponsorships and donations increased or decreased since 2008? How much is generated from fundraising events? For each of the above focus questions, findings are presented initially by total sector, followed by state and territories, artform and by company size. Details of which data group each company belongs to can be found at Appendix 2.

1

A key organisation is an organisation that receives multi-year funding from an artform board. Key organisations exclude companies designated as Major Performing Arts companies. 2 The survey was conducted by Sue Procter for the Australia Council. She has adapted the survey that she conducts on behalf of AMPAG (Australian Major Performing Arts Group www.ampag.com.au) with their support and co-operation. 3 Australia Business Arts Foundation www.abaf.org.au

4

Methodology
The report will be updated annually, applying a consistent approach to data collection and analysis. Over time this will build a picture of the trends in private sector support to these key organisations that can be used by the organisations and the Council for strategic planning and evaluation. A three-phased approach has been developed to meet the requirements of this study: 1. Annual report analysis: The 2008–2010 audited accounts of the 132 reviewed organisations were used to capture key financial information relating to private sector income. The audited accounts were also used to establish each company’s turnover4 and net assets. 2. Company feedback: The financial information from phase one was entered into a template and forwarded to all participating companies with a request to review and confirm. In addition, participating companies were requested to provide information on the costs of raising corporate sponsorship and private giving as well as provide indication of the number of sponsorships and donations they had received since 2008. 3. Data analysis and report preparation: Sixty eight companies (52 percent) provided phase two feedback. This information, along with the information compiled in phase one has been used as the basis for the following report.

Financial information
Each company has provided an explanation for any financial information contained in this report that deviates materially5 from results presented in their annual reports. Three main types of derivation have been noted: 1. The Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) has run a very successful and highly publicised capital works campaign, raising funds for the construction of a new wing to its gallery. The level of success of this campaign is of such magnitude that it has materially affected all results. Consequently, the capital works campaign of the MCA have been excluded from the figures presented in the report. Total sector results including the capital works campaign of the MCA has been presented at Appendix 1. 2. Fourteen companies reported that they do not include in-kind income in their annual report results but have included in-kind data in this report. 3. Ten companies apply different classification criterion in their annual report. For example, fundraising events are reported in gross rather than net terms and donation income is not separately disclosed, but included as part of other revenue.

Key terminology
Private sector income means total corporate sponsorship, private giving and net fundraising income. It does not include income received from ticket/box office sales. Private giving means revenue from a private source and includes donation income as well as donations or grants received from foundations and trusts.

4 5

Total income Materiality has been set at 10 percent

5

Corporate sponsorship relates to both cash and in-kind support paid to an organisation in return for advertising/naming rights. Fundraising events includes fundraising dinners, raffles, auctions etc. Large companies are those with a turnover greater than $2m in 2010. Medium companies reported turnover between $800k and $2m in 2010. Small companies generated less than $800k in turnover in 2010. Literature companies include those funded by the Literature Board and those companies that have a primary publishing function – for example Artlink and Eyeline Publishing Ltd. Cross-artform companies are those who incorporate multiple artforms as part of their primary function. For example, The Performance Space delivers an artistic program that incorporates visual arts, dance and theatre.

6

2

Key findings

The key findings of this report are as follows: The audited financial statements of the 132 key organisations were used as the basis for the financial information. Of these 132 companies, 68 provided additional information relating to the number of sponsorships and donations received. The 132 key organisations received $60.7m in private sector income in 2010 of which $35.8m related to a one-off capital works fundraising campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Total private sector income in 2010 (excluding the MCA capital works campaign) was $24.9m. There has been a modest increase in private sector income as a percentage of turnover. In 2010, private sector income made up 15 percent of total turnover6 of key organisations. In 2009, private sector made up 12 percent of total turnover. The distribution of private sector income was not even across key organisations. The top 10 private sector income generators make up 67 per cent of total revenue earned. Eighteen companies (14 percent) of 132 companies examined reported receiving no private sector at all in 2010. The $13.6m received as corporate sponsorship in 2010 made up 55 percent of total private sector income – almost double 2009 levels. Much of the reported increase in corporate sponsorship was due to a $4.2m increase in in-kind support. In 2010, cash sponsorship increased $2.4m on 2009 levels. Private giving has remained steady, while corporate sponsorship has increased. In 2010, $10.7m was received as donations and/or foundation and trust support – up 2.3 percent on 2009. Only three years of data have been examined in this inaugural report, making long-term trends difficult to accurately determine. Many of the reported fluctuations are due to a spike in earnings of single companies. Whether these spikes are part of the normal cycle of private sector giving/sponsorship for the sector or aberrant cannot be determined at this point. Some of the data spikes include:
6

Total income

7

-

$1.6m increase in private sector support for South Australian companies is due to the inclusion of substantial in-kind support of a single company. The reported $1.7m drop in private sector support for Victorian companies is due to one Victorian company running a substantial fundraising campaign in 2008 to purchase a building. The recent surge in West Australian corporate sponsorship earnings is due to one company gaining very substantial corporate sponsorship support from a major mining company.

-

-

Noting that the underlying data may be affected by aberrant results of single companies, some possible trends that are emerging from the data include: WA companies are reporting the strongest growth in corporate sponsorship. They are however less successful in securing private giving. NSW companies receive the highest level of private giving – at an average of $183k per company – however have not been able to substantially lift earnings from this source since 2008. Private giving has declined for Victorian companies. Corporate sponsorship has remained at a low and static level. Companies from the Northern Territory receive the highest proportion of private giving from foundation and trusts (as opposed to individual donations). Visual arts companies dominate the results – with the 40 participating companies making up $14.9m or 60 percent of the sector earnings. Dance, theatre and literature companies report significantly lower levels of private sector income compared to music, visual arts and, to a lesser extent, cross-artform companies. Music companies reported the lowest proportion of private giving from foundations and trusts. Seventy nine percent of private giving is received from individual donations for this artform.

-

-

-

-

Sixty eight companies provided data on the number of sponsorships/private givings secured: The number of sponsorship secured by the 68 key organisations has steadily increased since 2008. In 2010, these 68 companies reported securing 524 sponsorships. Despite the low level of corporate sponsorship income ($0.8m), Victorian companies reported the highest number of corporate sponsorships (150). Queensland also reported a relatively high number of sponsorships (127) to a low level of income ($0.5m). Their results contrast with NSW companies who reported raising $4.9m with 145 sponsorships. The number of donations/private givings reported by the 68 companies increased by 515 on 2009 level. In 2010, these 68 companies reported securing 2,677 donations/private givings. 8

-

-

-

Music and theatre companies both reported relatively high numbers of donations/private givings (967 and 703 respectively) and relatively low income levels ($1.2m and $1.1m). These results contrast with the visual arts companies who reported raising $4.2m with 658 private givings.

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3

Research findings

Key organisations received $60.7m in private sector income in 2010 – an increase of $42.2m or 228.1 percent on 2009 levels and $41.3m or 212.8 percent on 2008 levels. The very substantial increase in 2010 is due to the capital works fundraising campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. As the intention of this survey is to track long-term trends in private sector earnings, the MCA’s substantial one-off capital works fundraising campaign has been excluded from the research findings presented below. Excluding the capital works fundraising campaign of the MCA, key organisations received $24.9m in private sector income in 2010 – an increase of $6.9m or 38.1 percent on 2009 levels and $5.9m or 31.4 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit A: Total private sector income – key organisations: 2008–2010

30 25 20

$m

15

$24.9
10 5 0 2008 2009 2010

$18.9

$18.0

10

In 2010, private sector income made up 15.4 percent of the total turnover7 of key organisations – the highest ratio over the review period.
Exhibit B: Ratio of private sector income to turnover – key organisations: 2008–2010

2008

13.6%

2009

12.2%

2010

15.4%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

Of the total $24.9m reported in 2010, $13.6m (55 percent) was received in the form of corporate sponsorship, $10.7m (43 percent) was from private giving and a net amount of $0.6m (2 percent) was raised from fundraising events.
Exhibit C: Sources of revenue – key organisations: 2010
2%
43% 55%

Events(net)

Private giving

Sponsorship

Key organisations reported an increase of $6.6m or 94.1 percent in corporate sponsorship earnings in 2010. This increase was not universal across all companies. Forty nine of the 132 examined organisations reported a $7.3m increase in earnings in 2010, 48 reported no change and 35 companies (26.5 percent) collectively reported earning $0.7m less in 2010 compared to 2009.

7

Turnover is total income. An increase in the proportion of private sector income to turnover implies two things: (1) an increased success rate in securing private sector income (2) an increased reliance on private sector income to meet operational needs.

11

Exhibit D: Corporate sponsorship – key organisations: 2008–2010
16 14 12 10

$m

8 6 4 2 0 2008 2009 2010

$13.6

$7.5

$7.0

Private giving has remained steady, while corporate sponsorship has increased. In 2010, key organisations received $10.7m – an increase of $0.2m or 2.3 percent on 2009 levels and a fall of $0.4m or 3.2 percent on 2008 levels. Fifty one of the 132 examined organisations collectively reported a $2.9m increase. Twenty three companies reported no change and 58 companies (43.9 percent) reported a $2.7m decrease in private income in 2010 compared to 2009. Exhibit E: Private giving – key organisations: 2008–2010
15.0 13.0 11.0 9.0

$m

7.0 5.0 3.0 1.0 -1.0 2008 2009 2010 $11.1 $10.5 $10.7

12

Analysis by states and territories
The following table provides a summary of total private sector income in 2010 by states and territories:
Exhibit F: Total private sector income – by states and territories: 2010

$m ACT(6) NSW(34) Corporate sponsorships $0.4 $5.0 Fundraising events Private giving $0.0 $0.1 $0.3 $6.2

NT(9) $0.4 $$0.7

QLD(18) SA(19) $0.6 $0.1 $0.7 $2.4 $0.0 $0.8

TAS(5) $0.1 $0.0 $0.1

VIC(29) $1.0 $0.1 $1.6

WA(12) $3.7 $0.0 $0.5

Australian Capital Territory Total private sector income in 2010 for the six companies from the Australian Capital Territory was $0.5m – an increase of $76k compared to 2009 results and $481k on 2008 results. The reported jump in earnings in 2009 was due to the results of one company. As this company dominates the results of both 2009 and 2010, no additional analysis is provided. New South Wales Total private sector income in 2010 for the 34 New South Wales companies was $11.5m – an increase of $2.7m compared to 2009 results and $1.8m on 2008 results. This reported increase was not universal across all NSW companies. Fifteen companies or 44 percent reported receiving $4.6m more from private sector income in 2010 compared to 2009. Of these 15 companies, two companies made up more than 80 percent of the result. Similarly, of the 17 companies who received less from private sector income in 2010, one company made up more than 65 percent of the decrease. NSW companies received $5m in corporate sponsorship income in 2010 – more than double the 2009 result and up 28.4 percent on 2008 levels. This increase was dominated by the results of three companies. These companies reported a combined increase in corporate sponsorship of $2.7m – with $2.3m relating to an increase in in-kind support. The remaining 31 companies reported a collective decrease of just $8k in 2010 compared to 2009. NSW companies reported the highest level of private giving of the sector – at $6.2m or an average of $183k per company. The distribution of earnings however was not even across these companies. Only five of the 34 companies examined reported 13

earning more than the $183k average. While NSW companies reported only a modest $51k increase on 2009 results, the 2010 result may have been partially affected by regular donors of the MCA diverting support to the capital works fundraising campaign. It is important to note that the result is also partially affected by the two-year cyclical operations of another company that resides in NSW. Northern Territory Total private sector income in 2010 for the nine Northern Territory companies was $1m – an increase of $204k compared to 2009 and $742k on 2008 results. While this result is partially affected by two companies providing no 2008 data (driving the jump in earnings in 2009), five other companies have reported increases in private sector support in 2010 compared to 2008. Five companies reported receiving $362k in corporate sponsorship income in 2010, an increase of $121k on 2009 levels. NT companies reported $673k in private giving in 2010 – or an average of $74.8k per company. This was the second highest reported average for the sector8 (ref exhibit G). NT companies additionally reported that 94.1 percent of private giving was received from foundations and trusts – more than any other group of the sector. Queensland Total private sector income in 2010 for the 18 Queensland companies was $1.4m – an increase of $250k compared to 2009 and $264k on 2008 results. Queensland companies have reported receiving an average of just $77k per company in private sector income – the second lowest result (behind Tasmania) of the other states and territories. Queensland companies have reported securing $641k in corporate sponsorship income in 2010, up $130k on 2009 and $49k on 2008 results. The 2009 result is primarily due to the result of a single organisation attracting significant sponsorship income for the first time. The underlying data shows considerable movement between the other 17 companies, suggesting that a set number of sponsors may migrate from one company to another. More investigation into which corporate sponsors provide support to each of the Queensland companies is required to properly interpret this possible trend.

8

NSW companies reported the highest average

14

Exhibit G: Average private giving – by states and territories: 2008–2010

$200 $180
$160

ACT $140 $120 NSW
NT

$'000

$100 $80 $60 $40 $20 $2008 2009 2010

QLD SA TAS VIC WA

In addition to the amount of total corporate sponsorship income received, the nine Queensland companies that provided data relating to the number of corporate sponsorships also revealed interesting results. These companies reported that 127 corporate sponsorships were secured to raise just $0.5m in income. In contrast, the NSW companies9 reported securing 145 corporate sponsorships to raise $4.9m. The data therefore indicates that Queensland key organisations have to work extremely hard to attract relatively small amounts of corporate sponsorship income. Queensland companies reported receiving $677k in private giving in 2010 – up $57k on 2009 results and $152k on 2008. This reported increase was relatively widespread with only four of the 18 companies reporting receiving less from private giving in 2010 compared to 2008. South Australia Total private sector income in 2010 for the 19 South Australian companies was $3.2m – up a substantial $1.6m on both 2008 and 2009 results. This result was due to an increase in in-kind sponsorship of a single company10. SA companies have reported receiving $825k in private giving in 2010 – up $146k on 2009 and $223k on 2008 results. This increase was not widespread and was driven primarily by the results of a single organisation. Of the remaining 18 companies, nine companies reported a $17k decrease in earnings, seven companies reported a collective $46k increase and two companies reported no change. Tasmania The five Tasmanian companies generated $182k in private sector income in 2010 – the lowest of the sector. This result was $69k up on 2009 results, but $21k less than amounts received in 2008.

9

20 NSW companies provided data on the number of corporate sponsorships secured. The magnitude of this in-kind sponsorship is of such scale that it has impacted on the overall corporate sponsorship amount results of SA. No separate analysis is therefore provided.
10

15

Corporate sponsorship income in 2010 for Tasmanian companies was $102k – up just $8k from 2008. This increase was due to a single company reporting earnings from this source for the first time. Three of the five companies reported earning less from corporate sponsorship in 2010 compared to 2008. Private giving appears to have stagnated in Tasmania. In 2008 three companies reported receiving $109k. In 2010, only two companies received a collective $62k – a fall of 43.1 percent. Victoria Total private sector income in 2010 for the 29 Victorian companies was $2.7m – a decrease of $26k compared to 2009 results and a substantial decline of $1.7m on 2008 results. The reported decrease from 2008 was primarily due to private giving results of a single organisation11. However it is important to note that the relatively modest decrease ($26k) in 2009 masks a more turbulent outcome present in the underlying data. Of the 29 companies, 16 companies collectively reported a decrease of $679k in private sector support in 2010 compared to 2009. Only 11 companies secured more private sector support over the same period. Victorian companies are, in general, struggling to generate significant corporate sponsorship income. Only 17 of the 29 companies received corporate sponsorship income in 2010. Of these 17 companies, 10 reported earning less than $25k. Despite these relatively low numbers, Victorian companies12 reported securing the most number of corporate sponsorships of the sector – at 150. While the number of sponsorships secured was relatively high, this did not translate to high levels of income. These companies reported generating just $821k in 2010 – contrasting sharply with the NSW result13.
Exhibit H: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by states & territories: 2010
6 5 145 127

150

160 140

Total sponsorship $m

4 3 2 1 0 NSW (20) NT (3) QLD (9) SA (12) TAS (3) VIC (17) WA (3)

100
$4.9 60 80 60 40

16

$0.5

$0.6

11 $0.8

15

20 0

11 12

This company ran a substantial one-off fundraising campaign to purchase a building in 2008. 15 of the 17 companies receiving corporate sponsorship income provided information relating to the number of sponsorships. Total corporate sponsorship income for Victorian companies in 2010 was $979k. 13 The 20 NSW companies that provided data on the number of corporate sponsorships reported securing 145 sponsorships and generating $4.9m.

Total # of sponsorships

120

16

A similar, though less pronounced pattern is noted with private giving. In 2010, 19 of the 29 Victorian companies reported receiving $1.6m in private giving – a fall of $241k from 2009. This fall was due to the results of 14 companies (who collectively reported a $541k decrease in income) partially offset by reported increases of $300k of nine companies. Western Australia West Australian companies have reported the highest increase of private sector income over the review period. This result was driven by a significant increase in the amount these 12 companies have secured in corporate sponsorship. It is important to note however that this reported increase in revenue was not universally enjoyed by all examined WA companies. Only eight of the 12 companies received corporate sponsorship in 2010 – with four of these companies reporting a decrease in support compared to 2009. The substantial surge in income was due to the result of a single company receiving significant support from a major mining company.
Exhibit I: Average corporate sponsorship – by states and territories: 2008–2010

$350 $300 $250 $200 $150
$100

ACT
NSW

NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA

$'000

$50 $2008 2009 2010

It is interesting to note that WA companies have reported one of the lowest levels14 of in-kind support – with 99.2 percent of total corporate sponsorship received as cash. Most other states and territories report about half of their total corporate sponsorship being received as in-kind support. More analysis is required to ascertain whether this low level of in-kind support has led to an understatement of corporate sponsorship for the state, or whether WA corporations support key organisations differently to other states. WA companies appear to be less successful in securing private giving compared to corporate sponsorship. In 2010, the 12 examined companies reported securing $520k. Six companies reported receiving less than $5k, with distribution across the remaining six companies relatively even. The reported increase of $205k on 2009 results was reasonably widespread – with only two of the 12 companies receiving less from private giving in 2010 compared to 2009.

14

The lowest level was the ACT who reported 100 percent of corporate sponsorship received as cash.

17

Analysis by artform
The following table provides a summary of total private sector income in 2010 by artform:
Exhibit J: Total private sector income – by artform: 2010

$m Corporate sponsorships Fundraising events Private giving

CrossVisual arts Dance (11) Literature (8) Music (16) Theatre (32) artform (25) (40) $0.5 $0.0 $2.6 $0.4 $0.0 $0.3 $0.1 $0.0 $0.5 $1.7 $0.1 $1.4 $0.9 $0.1 $1.3 $9.9 $0.3 $4.7

Cross-artform Total private sector income in 2010 for the 25 cross-artform companies was $3.1m – an increase of $444k compared to 2009 results and $1m on 2008 results. The reported increase in earnings in 2010 was essentially due to the private giving result of one company. Only 10 of the 25 cross-artform companies secured corporate sponsorship income in 2010 reporting only modest ($88k) increase in revenue from this source compared to 2009. Cross-artform companies received $2.6m in private giving in 2010 – up $344k on 2009 results and $716k on 2008. Sixteen companies reported receiving private giving in 2010 – however 11 reported earning $374k less in 2010 compared to 2009. Only two companies have reported consecutive increases in private giving in both 2008 and 2009. Dance Total private sector income for the 11 dance companies was $677k in 2010. While there was an increase of $159k on 2009 and $217k on 2008 levels, they delivered the lowest average earnings of all artform categories. Corporate sponsorship income in 2010 for dance companies was $381k – up $67k from 2008. This increase was primarily due to one company securing a substantial corporate sponsorship in 2010 and it being partially offset by decreased earnings reported by another company. Dance companies reported securing 85 corporate sponsorships in 2010 – indicating that these companies have had to work extremely hard to secure the very modest level of income. 18

Exhibit K: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by artform: 2010
6 250 200 200

5
Total sponsorship $m

4
3 85 2 1 0

144
150

67

$4.8

100

28
$1.2 $0.3 Cross-artform (8) $0.4 Dance (11) Music (11) $0.8

50

0 Theatre (23) Visual Arts (14)

While dance companies reported receiving less from private giving in 2010 compared to corporate sponsorship ($276k compared to $381k), reported gains are more evenly distributed. Only eight companies received corporate sponsorship income, with two companies making up over 60 percent of the total. In contrast, nine of the 11 companies reported receiving more from private giving in 2010 compared to 2008. Literature Total private sector income for the eight literature companies was $629k – an increase of $157k on 2009 levels. The reported $364k increase on 2008 levels was the largest proportional increase across the sector – at 137.3 percent, however this increase came off a low base. Literature companies – along with dance and theatre companies – report significantly lower levels of average earnings compared to other artforms. Literature companies received significantly more corporate sponsorship in the form of in-kind support compared to all other artforms. In 2010, literature companies reported receiving $116.8k in-kind support or 80.9 percent of their total corporate sponsorship income. Music Total private sector income for the 16 music companies was $3.3m – an increase of just $39k on 2009 levels, but a $1.4m increase in 2008. In 2010, music companies reported that – at 20.2 percent – private sector income made up the highest proportion of total turnover of all artforms. Music companies have reported the lowest level of in-kind support – with 83.6 percent of total corporate sponsorship received as cash. Most other artforms15 reported receiving a greater proportion of their total corporate sponsorship as inkind support. More analysis is required to ascertain whether this low level of in-kind support has led to an understatement of corporate sponsorship for this artform, or
15

Cross-artform companies also reported a high proportion of cash (73 percent).

Total # of sponsorships

19

whether corporations that support music companies do so differently to other artforms. Music companies have also reported the lowest proportion of private giving being received from foundations and trusts. In 2010, these companies reported that foundations and trusts made up 21.5 percent of total private giving – contrasting from the results of dance (70.8 percent), literature (72.4 percent) and cross-artform (84.6 percent) companies. Fewer foundations and trusts supporting music companies may account for the relatively high number of donations/private givings reported by these companies. In 2010, the 11 companies providing data reported securing 967 – the highest of the sector. Despite this, these companies received only $1.2m – contrasting sharply with visual arts companies.
Exhibit L: Number of private givings compared to income received – by artform: 2010
5 4 967 1200

1000
Total private giving $m

3
3 2 2 1 1 0 $0.4 Cross-artform (8) $0.3 Dance (11) Music (11) 148 201 $1.2

703

658 $4.2

800
600 400 200 0

$1.1

Theatre (23) Visual Arts (14)

Theatre Total private sector income for the 32 theatre companies was $2.3m – an increase of $506k on 2009 levels16. Seventeen companies reported earning $733k more in 2010 compared to 2009. Thirteen companies however reported a $227k decrease. Theatre companies, along with dance and literature companies, earn substantially less on average in private sector income when compared to cross-artform, music and particularly visual arts companies (ref exhibit M). Theatre companies reported an increase in corporate sponsorship income of $267k in 2010. This increase was primarily due to one company including in-kind income in their financial data for the first time.

16

The 2008 result for theatre companies was unusually high due to a one-off fundraising campaign to purchase a building. Consequently only analysis against 2009 figures is presented.

Total # of private givings

4

20

Exhibit M: Average private sector income – by artform: 2008–2010
$400 $350 $300 Cross-artform

$'000

$250 $200 $150 $100 $50 $2008 2009 2010

Dance Literature Music Theatre Visual arts

Visual arts Private sector income is dominated by the results of visual arts companies. In 2010, the 40 participating companies received $14.9m17 in private sector income – making up 60 percent of the entire sector. While the amount raised is partially due to the number of companies, average results for visual arts companies are also substantially greater (ref exhibit M). The average results are substantially greater due to three companies achieving significantly higher results in this area than any other key organisation. Analysing the underlying data reveals that five companies drive the overall result for this artform. In 2010, these companies18 made up 86.5 percent of total income for the visual arts. Much of the reported increase in visual arts private sector income stemmed from increases in corporate sponsorship. Visual arts companies have increased revenue from this source by $5.9m in 2009 – however it is important to note that four companies make up 98.3 percent of this increase. Private giving has declined. The 37 visual arts companies reported receiving $302k less in 2010 compared to 2009. This decline was relatively widespread – with 28 of the 37 companies reporting reduced earnings or no change.

17 18

Excluding the $35.8m capital fundraising campaign income generated by the MCA (ref Appendix 1). It is important to note that one of these companies reported a significant increase in their earnings in 2010 due to the inclusion of very substantial in-kind support.

21

Analysis by company size
The following table provides a summary of total private sector income in 2010 by company size:
Exhibit N: Total private sector income – by company size: 2010

$m Corporate sponsorships Fundraising events Private giving

Large (14) $9.8 $0.2 $4.0

Medium (52) $2.4 $0.3 $4.8

Small (66) $1.4 $0.1 $1.9

Large Total private sector income in 2010 for the 14 large companies was $14m – an increase of $5.6m compared to 2009 and $5.2m on 2008 results. This reported increase was primarily due to the results of three companies. These three companies each reported increases in excess of $1.5m. Two companies reported a substantial increase in in-kind support and one company secured significant corporate sponsorship support. In 2010 total corporate sponsorship for large companies was $9.6m – up $5.7m on 2009 results and $4.8m on 2008 levels. The increase was due primarily to the three companies reported above. Of the remaining 11 companies, four companies reported earning less in 2010 compared to 2009, four reported minimal/no change and three companies increased earnings. Large companies received $14k less from private giving in 2010 compared to 2009. The underlying data suggests that this may be due to regular donors of the MCA migrating to their capital fundraising campaign in 2010. Ignoring the impact of the MCA reveals that five large companies reported received $1.1m more in 2010 compared to 2009 and eight companies received $161k less. Large companies received proportionally less from foundations and trusts compared to medium and small companies. Large companies reported that foundation and trust revenue made up 34.6 percent of total private giving – in contrast with medium (60.7 percent) and small (69.5 percent) companies.

22

Medium Total private sector income in 2010 for the 52 medium companies was $7.9m – an increase of $0.9m compared to 2009 but just $167k on 2008 results. This reported decrease in the 2009 result was primarily due to the private giving result of a single company19. Medium companies have increased corporate sponsorship earnings by $566k on 2009 results – with much of this increase due to one company including in-kind sponsorship in 2010 for the first time. The 25 medium companies that provided data reported attracting 223 corporate sponsors in 2010. Despite this relatively high number, only $1.7m in corporate sponsorship income was generated.
Exhibit O: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by company size: 2008–2010
6 5

223.0

250

200 162.0

Total sponsorship $m

4 3

139.1

150

4.8 2 1 0 Large (8) Medium (25) Small (35)

100

50
1.7 1.0 0

Medium companies received $5.1m in private giving in 2010 – up $226k on 2009, but down $983k on 2008 results. It is important to note that the relatively modest increase ($226k) in 2009 masks a more turbulent outcome present in the underlying data. Of the 52 medium companies, 28 companies collectively reported a decrease of $1.1m in private sector support in 2010 compared to 2009. Only 19 companies secured more private sector support over the same period. Small Total private sector income in 2010 for the 66 small companies was $3.1m – an increase of $364k compared to 2009 and $615k on 2008 results. In 2010, of the 66 small companies, only 34 reported securing any corporate sponsorship at all. Of this, only seven companies reported earning more than $50k. From the table above, small companies, like medium companies, are working extremely hard to secure sponsorships for relatively little gain. In 2010, small companies received just $1.6m in private giving. Small companies are marginally more successful in securing private giving compared to corporate sponsorship. In 2010, 44 companies received some form of private giving, with only 13 of these companies reported receiving amounts over $50k.
19

One company ran a substantial one-off fundraising campaign to purchase a building.

Total # of sponsorships

23

4

Detailed findings

Total private sector income
Total private sector income – all key organisations
How much private sector income has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Key organisations received $24.9m20 in private sector income in 2010 – an increase of $6.9m or 38.1 percent on 2009 levels and $5.9m or 31.4 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 1: Total private sector income – key organisations: 2008–2010

30 25 20

$m

15

$24.9
10 5 0 2008 2009 2010

$18.9

$18.0

What is the proportion of corporate sponsorship compared to other sources of private sector income?
In 2010, total private sector income was made up of 55 percent corporate sponsorship, 43 percent private giving and 2 percent was raised from fundraising events.

20

Note this excludes the capital works campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Total corporate sponsorship and private giving for the sector including income generated by the MCA can be found at Appendix 1.

24

Exhibit 2: Sources of revenue – key organisations: 2010
2%
43% 55%

Events(net)

Private giving

Sponsorship

Has the amount of corporate sponsorship received by key organisations changed in comparison to private giving?
Since 2008, the proportion of corporate sponsorship income has increased compared to private giving. In 2008, corporate sponsorship made up 39 percent of total private sector income. In 2010, this had increased to 55 percent.
Exhibit 3: Sources of revenue – key organisations: 2008–2010

2008 2% 2009 3% 2010 2%
43%

58% 58% 55% Private giving

39% 39%

Events(net)

Sponsorship

What proportion of total turnover is made up of private sector support?
Turnover is the total income generated by a company in a given year. An increase in the proportion of private sector income to turnover implies two things: 1. An increased success rate in securing private sector support. 2. An increased reliance on private sector income to meet operational needs. In 2010, private sector income made up 15.4 percent of total turnover for key organisations. In 2009, private sector income made up 12.2 percent, down from the 2008 levels of 13.6 percent.

Exhibit 4: Ratio of private sector income to turnover: 2008–2010

2008

13.6%

2009

12.2%

2010

15.4%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

25

Total private sector income – by states and territories
How much private sector income – analysed by states and territories – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Of the reported $24.9m21 private sector income received by key organisations in 2010 – $11.5m or 46.4 percent was received by companies that reside in NSW. Companies from WA reported 17 percent of total private sector income, SA companies, 13 percent, Victorian companies, 10.9 percent, Queensland companies, 5.6 percent, NT companies, 4.2 percent, companies from the ACT, 2.2 percent and Tasmanian companies, 0.7 percent.
Exhibit 5: Total private sector income – by states and territories: 2010
14 12 10 8

$m

6
4 2

$11.5

$0.5
0 ACT(6) NSW(34)

$3.2 $1.0
NT(9)

$1.4
QLD(18) SA(19)

$0.2
TAS(5)

$2.7
VIC(29)

$4.2

WA(12)

All states and territories – except Tasmania and Victoria – have reported increases in private sector income in 2010 compared to 2008. WA companies have reported the greatest proportional increase – receiving an additional $2.7m in 2010 compared to 2008. NSW companies have increased earnings $1.8m since 2008, SA companies, $1.7m, and NT companies $0.7m.
Exhibit 6: Total private sector income – by states and territories: 2008–2010
State (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

ACT(6) 61 466 542 481

NSW(34) NT(9) 9,783 8,881 11,546 1,763 294 832 1,036 742

QLD(18) 1,120 1,134 1,384 264

SA(19) 1,553 1,585 3,244 1,691

TAS(5) 203 113 182 -21

VIC(29) 4,374 2,725 2,699 -1,674

WA(12) 1,537 2,293 4,236 2,699

21

Note this excludes the capital works campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Total corporate sponsorship and private giving for the sector including income generated by the MCA can be found at Appendix 1.

26

NSW companies have essentially maintained their share of the market since 2008. Both WA and SA companies have increased their share – up 8.9 and 4.8 percent respectively. Victorian companies make up proportionally less of the market in 2010 compared to 2008 (down from 23.1 to 10.9 percent).
Exhibit 7: Sources of revenue – by states and territories: 2008–2010
2008 2009 2010
ACT(6) NSW(34) NT(9) QLD(18) SA(19) TAS(5) VIC(29) WA(12)

What proportion of total turnover – by states and territories – is made up of private sector support?
Turnover is the total income generated by a company in a given year. An increase in the proportion of private sector income to turnover implies two things: 1. An increased success rate in securing private sector support. 2. An increased reliance on private sector income to meet operational needs. In 2010 private sector income made up 15 percent of total turnover for the sector (ref exhibit 4). Analysing this data by states and territories (ref exhibit 8) reveals that NSW and WA companies report a markedly higher proportion of private sector income to turnover.
Exhibit 8: Ratio of private sector income to turnover – by states and territories: 2010
ACT NSW NT QLD
10.7% 9.6% 9.6% 8.0% 14.7%

20.0%

SA
TAS VIC WA 0%

11.5%
25.6%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

27

Analysing by states and territories, how much has each company – on average – raised in private sector income from 2008–2010?
West Australian companies received, on average, the highest level of private sector income in 2010. NSW companies also reported relatively high levels of average earnings, but – for the first time – fell short of the WA result in 2010. SA companies reported a surge in average earnings in 2010 – however this result was due to reported in-kind earnings from a single company. Victorian companies have reported the most significant decline in average earnings – falling from $151k in 2008 to $93k in 2010.
Exhibit 9: Average private sector income – by states and territories: 2008–2010

$400 $350 ACT $300
$'000

NSW NT QLD

$250 $200 $150 $100 $50 $2008 2009 2010

SA TAS VIC WA

28

Total private sector income – by artform
How much private sector income – analysed by artform – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Of the reported $24.9m22 private sector income received by key organisations in 2010 – $14.9 or 59.8 percent was received by the 40 visual arts companies. Music companies reported 13.2 percent of total private sector income, cross-artform companies, 12.5 percent, theatre companies, 9.4 percent, dance companies, 2.7 percent and literature companies, 2.5 percent.
Exhibit 10: Total private sector income – by artform: 2010

16 14 12 10

$m

8 6 4 2 0 Cross-artform (25) Dance (11) Literature (8) Music (16) Theatre (32)

$14.9

$3.1

$0.7

$0.6

$3.3

$2.3
Visual arts (40)

All artforms except theatre have reported an increase in earnings from private sector support in 2010 compared to 2008. Visual arts companies reported the largest overall increase of $5.1m. Literature companies have more than doubled their income – up $364k or 137 percent on 2008 levels. Theatre companies reported earning $2.2m less in 2010 compared to 2008.
Exhibit 11: Total private sector income – by artform: 2008–2010
Art form (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

Crossartform (25) 2,063 2,659 3,103 1,040

Dance (11) 459 518 677 217

Literature (8) 265 472 629 364

Music (16) 1,865 3,233 3,272 1,408

Theatre (32) 4,532 1,843 2,327 -2,205

Visual arts (40) 9,739 9,304 14,861 5,122

22

Note this excludes the capital works campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Total corporate sponsorship and private giving for the sector including income generated by the MCA can be found at Appendix 1.

29

Visual arts companies have reported the largest increase in market share – up 8.3 percent. Music companies have increased 3.3 percent and cross-artform companies are up 1.6 percent. Theatre companies have lost 14.6 percent of their share of the market, falling from 23.9 in 2008 to 9.4 percent in 2010.
Exhibit 12: Sources of revenue – by artform: 2008–2010
2008 2009 2010
Cross-artform (25) Music (16) Dance (11) Theatre (32) Literature (8) Visual arts (40)

What proportion of total turnover – by artform – is made up of private sector support?
Turnover is the total income generated by a company in a given year. A higher proportion of private sector income to turnover implies two things: 1. An increased success rate in securing private sector support. 2. An increased reliance on private sector income to meet operational needs. In 2010 private sector income made up 15 percent of total turnover for the sector (ref exhibit 4). Analysing this data by artform (ref exhibit 13) reveals that music and visual arts companies report a markedly higher proportion of private sector income to turnover than companies from other artforms.
Exhibit 13: Ratio of private sector income to turnover – by artform: 2010

Cross-artform

12.0%

Dance

6.4%

Literature

14.3%

Music

20.2%

Theatre

7.6%

Visual arts 0% 5%

20.0%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30

Analysing by artform, how much has each company – on average – raised in private sector income from 2008–2010?
Visual arts companies receive – on average – significantly more from private sector income compared to all other artforms. This average is substantially greater due to three companies achieving significantly higher results in this area than any other key organization. Theatre companies reported a significant drop in average private sector income in 2009. The very modest increase in 2010 was not sufficient to return these companies back to levels reported in 2008.
Exhibit 14: Average private sector income – by artform: 2008–2010

$400 $350 $300 Cross-artform

$'000

$250 $200 $150 $100 $50 $2008 2009 2010

Dance Literature Music Theatre Visual arts

31

Total private sector income – by company size
How much private sector income – analysed by company size – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Of the reported $24.9m23 private sector income received by key organisations in 2010 – $14m or 56.1 percent was received by the 14 large companies. The 52 medium companies made up 31.6 percent of total private sector income and the 66 small companies received just 12.3 percent.
Exhibit 15: Total private sector income – by company size: 2010

16 14 12 10
$m

8

$14.0
6 4

$7.9

2
0 Large (14) Medium (52)

$3.1
Small (66)

All groups reported earning more from private sector income in 2010 when compared to 2008. Medium companies however reported increasing just 2 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 16: Total private sector income – by company size: 2008–2010
Size (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

Large (14) 8,794 8,405 13,957 5,163

Medium (52) 7,685 6,929 7,852 167

Small (66) 2,445 2,695 3,059 615

23

Note this excludes the capital works campaign of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Total corporate sponsorship and private giving for the sector including income generated by the MCA can be found at Appendix 1.

32

Large companies have increased their market share of private sector earnings – up from 46.5 percent in 2008 to 56.1 percent in 2010. Small companies have lost ground. Medium companies earn proportionally less of total private sector income – down from 40.6 percent in 2008 to 31.6 percent in 2010.
Exhibit 17: Sources of revenue – by company size: 2008–2010
2008 2009 2010
Large (14) Medium (52) Small (66)

What proportion of total turnover – by size – is made up of private sector support?
Turnover is the total income generated by a company in a given year. A higher proportion of private sector income to turnover implies two things: 1. An increased success rate in securing private sector support. 2. An increased reliance on private sector income to meet operational needs. In 2010 private sector income made up 15 percent of total turnover for the sector (ref exhibit 4). Analysing this data by company size (ref exhibit 18) reveals that large companies report a markedly higher proportion of private sector income to turnover than medium and small companies.
Exhibit 18: Ratio of private sector income to turnover – by company size: 2010

Large

22.3%

Medium

11.7%

Small

9.6%

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

33

Analysing by size, how much has each company – on average – raised in private sector income from 2008–2010?
Large companies receive significantly more from private sector income compared to medium and small companies. Large companies have been able to increase the average amount received in 2010, with these companies driving the reported overall increase in private sector income across the sector. Both medium and small companies reported virtually no change in average earnings from this source since 2008.
Exhibit 19: Average private sector income – by company size: 2008–2010

$1,200

$1,000

$800

Large Medium Small

$'000

$600

$400

$200

$2008 2009 2010

34

Corporate sponsorship income
Corporate sponsorship income – all key organisations
How much corporate sponsorship income has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Key organisations received $13.6m from corporate sponsorship in 2010 – an increase of $6.6m or 94.1 percent on 2009 levels and $6.1m or 81.4 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 20: Corporate sponsorship – key organisations: 2008–2010
16 14 12 10

$m

8 6 4 2 0 2008 2009 2010

$13.6

$7.5

$7.0

35

Corporate sponsorship income – by states and territories
How much corporate sponsorship income – analysed by states and territories – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
In 2010, companies residing in NSW received $5m in corporate sponsorship and West Australian companies reported $3.7m. Companies from these two states dominate the corporate sponsorship market – making up 34.8 percent of the number of companies reviewed but receiving 63.9 percent of total corporate sponsorship reported by the sector.
Exhibit 21: Corporate sponsorship – by states and territories: 2010
$6.0
$5.0 $4.0
$m

$3.0

$5.0
$2.0 $1.0 $$0.4 ACT(6) NSW(34) $0.4 NT(9) $3.7

$2.4 $0.6
QLD(18) SA(19) $0.1 TAS(5) $1.0 VIC(29) WA(12)

All states and territories have reported increases in corporate sponsorship in 2010 compared to 2008. Western Australia has reported the greatest proportional increase – at $2.6m or 230 percent on 2008 levels. South Australia has reported a $1.5m increase, however much of this relates to a single company reporting a substantial increase in in-kind support. Companies from NSW have increased corporate sponsorship by 28.4 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 22: Corporate sponsorship – by states and territories: 2008–2010
State (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

ACT(6) 2 329 409 406

NSW(34) 3,876 2,311 4,983 1,107

NT(9) 65 242 363 298

QLD(18) 592 511 641 49

SA(19) 876 895 2,386 1,510

TAS(5) 94 80 102 8

VIC(29) 845 667 979 134

WA(12) 1,122 1,949 3,701 2,579

36

Analysing by state and territories, how much has each company – on average – received as corporate sponsorship from 2008–2010?
West Australian companies receive on average the greatest amount of corporate sponsorship. In 2010, WA companies reported generating an average of $308k in corporate sponsorship per company. NSW companies reported the next highest average at $147k. While SA companies have reported a substantial jump, the result is affected by a jump in in-kind support of a single company. The remaining states and territories report similar levels of average corporate sponsorship, ranging from $68k for companies from the ACT to $20k for Tasmanian companies. Victorian companies reported an average of $34k
Exhibit 23: Average corporate sponsorship – by states and territories: 2008–2010

$350 $300 $250 $200 $150
$100

ACT
NSW

NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA

$'000

$50 $2008 2009 2010

37

Corporate sponsorship income – by artform
How much corporate sponsorship income – analysed by artform – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
In 2010, visual arts companies received $9.9m in corporate sponsorship – significantly more than any other artform.
Exhibit 24: Corporate sponsorship – by artform: 2010
$12.0

$10.0

$8.0

$m

$6.0 $9.9 $4.0

$2.0 $0.5 $Cross-artform(25) Dance(11) Literature(8) Music(16) Theatre(32) Visual arts(40) $0.4 $0.1 $1.7 $0.9

While all artforms reported earning more from corporate sponsorship in 2010 compared to 2008, the increase reported by visual arts companies dominates the results. In 2008 visual arts companies reported the highest level of earnings from corporate sponsorship compared to all other artforms. In 2010, they consolidated their position and reported a total of $9.9m in income from this source – 5.7 times greater than music companies – the next highest earner. Music companies have more than doubled income from this source and in 2010 reported receiving $1.7m – up $899k since 2008.
Exhibit 25: Corporate sponsorship – by artform: 2008–2010
Art form (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

CrossDance artform (25) (11) 210 421 509 299 314 251 381 67

Literature (8) 86 91 144 58

Music (16) 815 1,567 1,714 899

Theatre (32) 721 652 919 198

Visual arts (40) 5,326 4,003 9,894 4,568

38

Analysing by artform, how much has each company – on average – received as corporate sponsorship from 2008–2010?
Visual arts companies receive more corporate sponsorship on average than any other artform. As mentioned already these average results are substantially greater due to three visual arts companies achieving significantly higher results in this area than any other key organization. While visual arts companies and music companies reported comparable levels in 2009, visual arts companies have significantly increased reported earnings in 2010 – reporting any average of $247k per company. All other artforms report similar average earnings. In 2010 dance companies received on average $35k, theatre companies $29k, cross-artform $20k and literature companies $18k.
Exhibit 26: Average corporate sponsorship – by artform: 2008–2010

$300

$250 Crossartform Dance Literature $150 Music $100 Theatre Visual arts

$200

$'000

$50

$2008 2009 2010

39

Corporate sponsorship income – by company size
How much corporate sponsorship income – analysed by company sizehas been received by key organisations since 2008?
In 2010, the 14 large companies received $9.8m in corporate sponsorship. Medium companies collectively reported $2.5m and the 66 small companies received just $1.3m.
Exhibit 27: Corporate sponsorship – by company size: 2010
$12.0

$10.0

$8.0

$m

$6.0 $9.8 $4.0

$2.0 $2.5 $1.3 $Large(14) Medium(52) Small(66)

Large companies have increased corporate sponsorship $4.8m or 98.6 percent on 2008 levels. Medium companies have reported an increase of $1m or 69 percent on 2008 levels, while small companies have increased corporate sponsorship $250k or 22.8 percent.
Exhibit 28: Corporate sponsorship – by company size: 2008–2010
Size (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

Large (14) 4,913 4,043 9,760 4,847

Medium (52) 1,466 1,893 2,459 993

Small (66) 1,093 1,047 1,343 250

40

Analysing by size, how much has each company – on average – received as corporate sponsorship from 2008–2010?
Large companies generate substantially more corporate sponsorship income than small and medium companies. In 2010, large companies received, on average, $697k per company. In contrast, medium companies reported just $47k and small companies, $20k.
Exhibit 29: Average corporate sponsorship – by company size: 2008–2010

$800 $700 $600 $500

$'000

Large $400 $300 $200 $100 $2008 2009 2010

Medium Small

41

In-kind corporate sponsorship
In-kind corporate sponsorship – all key organisations
How much corporate sponsorship is received in the form of in-kind support?
In 2010, $6.4m or 47 percent of the reported $13.6m total corporate sponsorship was received in the form of in-kind support.
Exhibit 30: Corporate sponsorship – cash and in-kind support: 2008–2010 (summary)
$16.0
$14.0 $12.0 $10.0
$m

$6.4 In-Kind

$8.0
$6.0 $4.0 $2.0 $2008 2009 2010 $4.5 $4.8

$3.0

$2.2 $7.2

Cash

The proportion of in-kind to cash sponsorship has increased in 2010 – up from 31.3 percent in 2009 and 39.9 percent in 2008.
Exhibit 31: Corporate sponsorship – cash and in-kind support: 2008–2010 (detail)
Proportion of total private sector income 60.1% 68.7% 53.0% -7.1% In-kind $'000 2,984 2,183 6,380 3,396 Proportion of total private sector income 39.9% 31.3% 47.0% 7.1%

Cash $'000 2008 2009 2010 4,489 4,801 7,183

Var '10 - '08 2,694

42

In-kind corporate sponsorship – by states and territories
Analysing the data by states and territories, how much corporate sponsorship is received in the form of in-kind support?
The overall increase in in-kind support in 2010 is due to the results of SA and NSW companies. The SA result is due to one organisation reporting a very significant increase in in-kind support. NSW results are affected by several companies. While not the only factor, it is however important to note that the NSW result is partially affected by the two-year cyclical operations of the Biennale of Sydney.
Exhibit 32: Corporate sponsorship – cash and in-kind support – by states and territories: 2008–2010
]

State

($'000) Cash

2008 2.4 100.0% 0.0 0.0% 1,741.6 44.9% 2,134.3 55.1% 30.3 46.4% 35.0 53.6% 361.5 61.1% 230.5 38.9% 726.5 82.9% 149.7 17.1% 80.7 85.8% 13.3 14.2% 440.0 52.1% 405.1 47.9% 1,105.9 98.6% 15.8 1.4%

2009 328.8 100.0% 0.0 0.0% 1,275.0 55.2% 1,035.5 44.8% 116.0 47.9% 126.4 52.1% 267.1 52.3% 243.6 47.7% 599.3 67.0% 295.6 33.0% 64.1 80.1% 15.9 19.9% 238.4 35.8% 428.4 64.2% 1,911.9 98.1% 37.4 1.9%

2010 408.7 100.0% 0.0 0.0% 1,546.7 31.0% 3,436.4 69.0% 168.1 46.3% 194.9 53.7% 295.2 46.1% 345.3 53.9% 551.0 23.1% 1,835.0 76.9% 81.7 80.4% 19.9 19.6% 460.6 47.1% 518.2 52.9% 3,670.8 99.2% 30.1 0.8%

ACT In-Kind Cash NSW In-Kind Cash NT In-Kind Cash QLD In-Kind Cash SA In-Kind Cash TAS In-Kind Cash VIC In-Kind Cash WA In-Kind

43

In-kind corporate sponsorship – by artform
Analysing the data by artform, how much corporate sponsorship is received in the form of in-kind support?
The overall increase in in-kind support in 2010 is due to the results of visual arts companies. Of the 10 companies who reported receiving in-kind support, four reported receiving more than double the support in 2010 compared to 2009.
Exhibit 33: Corporate sponsorship – cash and in-kind support – by artform: 2008–2010
Art form Crossartform ($'000) Cash In-Kind Cash Dance In-Kind Cash Literature In-Kind Cash Music In-Kind Cash Theatre In-Kind Cash Visual Arts In-Kind 2008 159.8 75.9% 50.6 24.1% 152.8 48.7% 161.3 51.3% 75.9 88.4% 10.0 11.6% 611.1 75.0% 204.2 25.0% 583.5 80.9% 137.5 19.1% 2,905.8 54.6% 2,420.0 45.4% 2009 335.6 79.7% 85.7 20.3% 93.8 37.4% 156.9 62.6% 18.0 19.8% 72.7 80.2% 1,355.7 86.5% 210.9 13.5% 477.1 73.2% 174.4 26.8% 2,520.6 63.0% 1,482.1 37.0% 2010 371.9 73.0% 137.5 27.0% 154.4 40.5% 227.1 59.5% 27.6 19.1% 116.8 80.9% 1,433.7 83.6% 280.5 16.4% 476.0 51.8% 443.3 48.2% 4,719.3 47.7% 5,174.7 52.3%

44

In-kind corporate sponsorship – by size
Analysing the data by size, how much corporate sponsorship is received in the form of in-kind support?
The overall increase in in-kind support in 2010 is due to the results of large companies. Of the seven companies who reported receiving in-kind support, four reported receiving more than double the support in 2010 compared to 2009.
Exhibit 34: Corporate sponsorship – cash and in-kind support – by size: 2008–2010
Size ($'000) Cash Large In-Kind Cash Medium In-Kind Cash Small In-Kind 2008 2,606.7 53.1% 2,306.4 46.9% 1,177.1 81.2% 272.1 18.8% 705.1 63.5% 405.2 36.5% 2009 2,632.9 65.1% 1,410.0 34.9% 1,454.6 78.0% 411.4 22.0% 713.1 66.4% 361.3 33.6% 2010 4,743.7 48.6% 5,016.3 51.4% 1,527.6 62.4% 922.0 37.6% 911.5 67.4% 441.5 32.6%

45

Number of corporate sponsorships
Number of corporate sponsorships – all key organisations
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of sponsorships received. For the purposes of this section, total corporate sponsorship income relates only to the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey.

Has the number of corporate sponsorships increased or decreased since 2008?
The number of corporate sponsorships reported by the responding 68 key organisations has increased steadily from 2008 to 2010. In 2010, 524.1 corporate sponsorships were reported – up from 452.3 in 2009 and 410.5 in 2008.

Exhibit 35: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received: 2008–2010
8.0 7.0 452.3 410.5 400 524.1

500
Total # of sponsorships

Total sponsorship $m

6.0 5.0
4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 2008 2009 2010 $6.1

300
$7.5 200

$4.4
100 0

46

Analysing the data at a more detailed level (ref exhibit 36) reveals that both the number of cash and in-kind sponsorships have increased since 2008, however income levels for cash sponsorships have fallen. This implies that key organisations are working harder to attract cash corporate sponsorships income.

Exhibit 36: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received (detail): 2008–2010
(TOTAL 68 companies) Total $ ('000) Total # Avg $ ('000) per company Avg # per company Avg $ ('000) cash sponsorship Total $ ('000) Total # Avg $ ('000) per company Avg # per company Avg $('000) in-kind sponsorship Var (08-10) -181.5 36.8 -2.7 0.5 -3.7 1547.4 76.8 22.8 1.1 1.8

2008 3151.8 184.5 46.4 2.7 17.1 2962.0 226.0 43.6 3.3 13.1

2009 2472.6 193.0 36.4 2.8 12.8 1882.4 259.3 27.7 3.8 7.3

2010 2970.3 221.3 43.7 3.3 13.4 4509.4 302.8 66.3 4.5 14.9

Cash sponsorship

In-kind sponsorship

47

Number of corporate sponsorships – by states and territories
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of sponsorships received. For the purposes of this section, only the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey are included in the discussion below. Additionally note that ACT has been excluded from the analysis below as only one company provided data.

Analysing by states and territories, how many corporate sponsorships were secured in 2010?
Victorian companies reported the highest number of corporate sponsorships in 2010 (150), despite the relatively low level of income generated from this source ($0.8m). In contrast, companies from NSW attracted five fewer sponsorships (145) than Victoria, however were able to generated $4.9m in corporate sponsorship income. The data implies a greater focus or effectiveness in securing this type of revenue by companies from NSW compared to Victoria (and Queensland).
Exhibit 37: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by states and territories: 2010
6 5 145 127

150

160 140

Total sponsorship $m

4 3 2 1 0 NSW (20) NT (3) QLD (9) SA (12) TAS (3) VIC (17) WA (3)

100
$4.9 60 80 60 40

16

$0.5

$0.6

11 $0.8

15

20 0

Total # of sponsorships

120

48

What is the average size of a corporate sponsorship by states and territories, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a corporate sponsorship is calculated with reference to the total corporate sponsorship income received and the number of corporate sponsorships attracted from each state and territory. By averaging this across the number of companies in each state/territory, a very general indication the average size of a corporate sponsorship is provided.
Exhibit 38: Average corporate sponsorship – by states and territories: 2008–2010
Average corporate sponsorship ($'000) NSW NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA

2008 82.1 23.9 11.6 34.0 12.6 12.5 18.8

2009 49.6 10.6 7.2 26.1 24.5 7.9 40.6

2010 68.3 26.6 9.5 22.1 18.3 11.5 26.5

NSW companies have reported receiving significantly higher average corporate sponsorship in both 2008 and 2010. These results are partially affected by the twoyear operational cycle of the Biennale of Sydney. Queensland and Victorian companies have consistently reported the lowest average corporate sponsorship amount from 2008–2010. This result is due to the high number of corporate sponsorships attracted by the reporting companies compared to the income attracted.

49

Number of corporate sponsorships – by artform
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of sponsorships received. For the purposes of this section, only the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey are included in the discussion below. . Additionally note that literature has been excluded from the analysis below as only one company provided data.

Analysing by artform, how many corporate sponsorships were secured in 2010?
Visual arts companies reported the highest number of corporate sponsorships – at 200 – and generated $4.8m in corporate sponsorship income. Music reported secured 144 corporate sponsorships, however only raised $1.2m. Dance companies secured 85 corporate sponsorships for $0.4m, theatre companies, 67 for $0.8m and cross-artform, 28 for $0.3m.
Exhibit 39: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by artform: 2010
6 250 200 200

5
Total sponsorship $m

4
3 85 2 1 0

144
150

67

$4.8

100

28
$1.2 $0.3 Cross-artform (8) $0.4 Dance (11) Music (11) $0.8

50

0 Theatre (23) Visual Arts (14)

Total # of sponsorships

50

What is the average size of a corporate sponsorship by artform, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a corporate sponsorship is calculated with reference to the total corporate sponsorship income received and the number of corporate sponsorships attracted for each artform. By averaging this across the number of companies in each artform, a very general indication the average size of a corporate sponsorship is provided.
Exhibit 40: Average corporate sponsorship – by artform: 2008–2010
Average corporate sponsorship ($'000) Cross-artform Dance Music Theatre Visual Arts

2008 29.4 8.6 16.1 22.2 55.9

2009 17.2 6.6 17.3 19.0 30.9

2010 19.0 9.4 15.7 25.7 49.6

Visual arts companies have reported receiving significantly higher average corporate sponsorship throughout the review period. In 2010, these companies averaged $49.6k per sponsorship – markedly more than any other artform. In contrast dance companies appear to be finding it difficult to attract large sponsors. In 2010 these companies reported attracting an average corporate sponsorship of $9.4k, less than one fifth that of the visual arts companies.

51

Number of corporate sponsorships – by company size
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of sponsorships received. For the purposes of this section, only the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey are included in the discussion below.

Analysing by company size, how many corporate sponsorships were secured in 2010?
Medium sized key organisations reported attracting the greatest number of corporate sponsorships in 2010 – at 223. Despite this relatively high number, only $1.7m in corporate sponsorship income was generated. A similar picture emerges for small companies – with 162 corporate sponsorships delivering just $1m in income. In contrast, large companies attracted the smallest number of corporate sponsorships – at 139, but generated $4.8m.
Exhibit 41: Number of corporate sponsorships compared to income received – by company size: 2008–2010
6 5

223.0

250

200 162.0

Total sponsorship $m

4 3

139.1

150

4.8 2 1 0 Large (8) Medium (25) Small (35)

100

50
1.7 1.0 0

Total # of sponsorships

52

What is the average size of a corporate sponsorship by company size, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a corporate sponsorship is calculated with reference to the total corporate sponsorship income received and the number of corporate sponsorships attracted for each size category. By averaging this across the number of companies in each size category, a very general indication the average size of a corporate sponsorship is provided.
Exhibit 42: Average corporate sponsorship – by company size: 2008–2010
Average corporate sponsorship ($'000) Large Medium Small

2008 68.6 23.9 11.6

2009 49.6 10.6 7.2

2010 68.3 26.6 9.5

Large key organisations have reported receiving significantly higher average corporate sponsorship throughout the review period. In 2010, these companies averaged $68.3k per sponsorship – markedly more than medium and small companies.

53

Private giving
Private giving – all key organisations
How much private giving has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Key organisations received $10.7m from private giving in 2010 – an increase of $237k or 2.3 percent on 2009 levels but a decrease of $352k or 3.2 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 43: Private giving – key organisations: 2008–2010

11.4

11.1

10.8

$m
10.5

$11.1 $10.7

10.2

$10.5

9.9 2008 2009 2010

54

Private giving – by states and territories
How much private giving – analysed by states and territories – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
In 2010, companies residing in NSW received $6.2m in private giving – the largest amount of all states and territories. Victorian companies reported receiving $1.6m from this source, SA companies, $0.8m, Queensland and Northern Territory companies, $0.7m each and ACT and Tasmanian companies each reported $0.1m. Companies from Western Australia reported generating $0.5m – contrasting with their corporate sponsorship results.
Exhibit 44: Private giving – by states and territories: 2010
$7.0
$6.0 $5.0 $4.0
$m

$3.0

$6.2

$2.0
$1.0 $0.1 $ACT(6) NSW(34) NT(9) QLD(18) SA(19) TAS(5) VIC(29) $0.7 $0.7 $0.8 $0.1

$1.6 $0.5 WA(12)

Most states and territories have reported an increase in income from private giving when comparing 2010 results to 2008. Victorian companies however have reported a substantial $1.8m or 52.7 percent decline. Analysis of the underlying data reveals that this fall is due to a single organisation24. If the impact of this organisation is removed, Victorian companies’ results fall more in line with the rest of the sector.
Exhibit 45: Private giving – by states and territories: 2008–2010
State (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

ACT(6) 3 110 119 116

NSW(34) NT(9) 5,740 6,271 6,220 480 229 590 673 445

QLD(18) SA(19) 526 620 677 152 602 678 825 223

TAS(5) 109 33 62 -47

VIC(29) 3,447 1,860 1,619 -1,828

WA(12) 413 315 520 107

24

One company ran a substantial one-off fundraising campaign in 2008 to purchase a building.

55

Analysing by state and territories, how much has each company – on average – received as private giving from 2008–2010?
In 2010, companies from NSW reported receiving an average of $183k in private giving – substantially more than all other states. Companies from the Northern Territory reported the next highest level – at an average of $75k per company. While Victorian companies have reported a significant fall in earnings – from $119k in 2008 to $56k in 2010, the 2008 figure is affected by the results of a single company. WA and SA companies raised, on average, $43k per company in 2010, Queensland companies, $38k; ACT companies $20k; and Tasmanian companies reported $12k per company.
Exhibit 46: Average private giving – by states and territories: 2008–2010

$200 $180
$160

ACT $140 $120 NSW
NT

$'000

$100 $80 $60 $40 $20 $2008 2009 2010

QLD SA TAS VIC WA

56

Private giving – by artform
How much private giving – analysed by artform – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Visual arts companies reported receiving $4.7m from private giving in 2010. Crossartform companies raised $2.6m, music companies, $1.4m, theatre, $1.3m, literature $0.5m and dance companies, just $0.3m.
Exhibit 47: Private giving – by artform: 2010
$5.0 $4.5 $4.0 $3.5 $3.0

$m

$2.5 $2.0 $1.5 $2.6 $1.0 $0.5 $Cross-artform (25) Dance (11) Literature (8) Music (16) Theatre (32) $1.4 $0.3 $0.5 $1.3

$4.7

Visual arts (40)

Since 2008, literature and dance companies have increased private giving at the greatest rate (160.9 and 116.23 percent respectively). While these increases reflect strong growth, it is important to note that both these artforms reported relatively low levels of earning in 2008. Cross-artform companies have reported the largest increase in dollar terms – $716k, representing a 38.7 percent increase on 2008. Theatre companies have reported a substantial 65.2 percent or $2.4m fall in income from this source. This result is partially affected by a single company25. If the impact of this organisation is removed, theatre companies still report a decline in earnings from this source – the only artform to do so.
Exhibit 48: Private giving – by artform: 2008–2010
Art form (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

Crossartform (25) 1,853 2,225 2,569 716

Dance (11) 128 262 276 148

Literature (8) Music (16) 179 338 468 289 953 1,552 1,414 460

Theatre (32) 3,751 1,116 1,304 -2,446

Visual arts (40) 4,203 4,985 4,683 480

25

One company ran a substantial one-off fundraising campaign in 2008 to purchase a building.

57

Analysing by artform, how much has each company – on average – received as private giving from 2008–2010?
The data in exhibit 49 differs from other average analysis (eg exhibits 46 & 52) as the differentiation of earnings is less pronounced. While visual arts companies reported receiving the largest average amount from private giving in 2010, they did not earn significantly more than cross-artform and music companies. Dance companies however have reported earning substantially less from this source compared to other artforms.
Exhibit 49: Average private giving – by artform: 2008–2010

$140

$120

$100 Cross-artform $80
Dance

$'000

Literature $60 Music Theatre $40 Visual arts

$20

$2008 2009 2010

58

Private giving – by company size
How much private giving – analysed by company size – has been received by key organisations since 2008?
In 2010, the 52 medium companies received $5.1m in private giving. Large companies reported receiving $4m and small companies, $1.6m.
Exhibit 50: Private giving – by size: 2010
$6.0

$5.0

$4.0

$m

$3.0 $5.1 $2.0 $4.0

$1.0

$1.6

$Large (14) Medium (52) Small (66)

Small companies have reported the largest overall increase in private giving when comparing 2010 levels with 2008 – up $408k or 33.4 percent. Large companies have increased income from this source by 5.8 percent or $222k. Medium companies have reported a significant fall in earnings. Note this result is affected by a single company26. If the impact of this organisation is removed, medium companies’ results have improved 14.9 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 51: Private giving – by company size: 2008–2010
Size (# companies) $'000 2008 2009 2010 Var '10 - '08

Large (14) 3,772 4,189 3,994 222

Medium (52) Small (66) 6,075 4,866 5,092 -983 1,220 1,444 1,629 408

26

One company ran a substantial one-off fundraising campaign in 2008 to purchase a building.

59

Analysing by company size, how much has each company – on average – received as private giving from 2008–2010?
The average large company generates substantially more private giving income compared to the average small and medium company. In 2010, large companies received, on average, $285k per company. In contrast, medium companies reported $98k and small companies, $25k.
Exhibit 52: Average private giving – by company size: 2008–2010

$350

$300

$250

$200

$'000

Large Medium

$150

Small

$100

$50

$2008 2009 2010

60

Foundations and trusts
Foundations and trusts – all key organisations
How much private giving is received from foundations and trusts?
Key organisations received $5.6m from private foundations and trusts in 2010 – an increase of $1m or 22 percent on 2009 levels and $140k or 3.1 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 53: Foundations and trusts – key organisations: 2008–2010
6.0

5.0

4.0

$m

3.0 $4.5 $4.6

$5.6

2.0

1.0

0.0 2008 2009 2010

Foundations and trusts are making up an increasing proportion of total private giving. In 2008, foundations and trusts support made up 40 percent of total private giving. In 2010, this had increased to 52 percent.
Exhibit 54: Foundations & trusts as a proportion of total private giving – key organisations: 2008 – 2010
1.2

1.0 0.8
60% 56%

48%

$m

0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 2008 2009 Trusts & Foundations Other donations 2010 40% 44% 52%

61

Foundations and trusts – by states and territories
Analysing the data by states and territories, how much private giving is received from foundations and trusts?
The reported increase in foundations and trust support is due to the results from NSW companies. It is interesting to note the proportion of private giving received from foundations and trusts compared to all other donations. Most states and territories report that the majority of private giving is received from foundation and trusts. NSW, SA and ACT companies however derive more private giving income from other sources.
Exhibit 55: Private giving – Foundations & trusts compared to all other donations – by states and territories: 2008–2010
State ($'000) Foundations & trusts ACT All other donations Foundations & trusts NSW All other donations Foundations & trusts NT All other donations Foundations & trusts QLD All other donations Foundations & trusts SA All other donations Foundations & trusts TAS All other donations Foundations & trusts VIC All other donations Foundations & trusts WA All other donations 2008 0.0 0.0% 0.0 100.0% 1.7 29.1% 4.1 70.9% 0.2 93.4% 0.0 6.6% 0.3 51.9% 0.3 48.1% 0.2 35.2% 0.4 64.8% 0.1 65.4% 0.0 34.6% 1.8 52.2% 1.6 47.8% 0.2 53.2% 0.2 46.8% 2009 0.0 0.0% 0.1 100.0% 2.1 33.0% 4.2 67.0% 0.5 83.9% 0.1 16.1% 0.5 81.1% 0.1 18.9% 0.3 41.3% 0.4 58.7% 0.0 22.7% 0.0 77.3% 1.0 54.2% 0.9 45.8% 0.2 71.2% 0.1 28.8% 2010 0.0 10.8% 0.1 89.2% 3.0 47.6% 3.3 52.4% 0.6 94.1% 0.0 5.9% 0.6 81.7% 0.1 18.3% 0.2 29.5% 0.6 70.5% 0.0 74.2% 0.0 25.8% 0.8 51.3% 0.8 48.7% 0.3 62.8% 0.2 37.2%

62

Foundations and trusts – by artform
Analysing the data by artform, how much private giving is received from foundations and trusts?
Music companies report receiving proportionally less from foundations and trusts compared to other artforms. These companies reported that foundations and trusts provided 21.5 percent of their total private giving in 2010. This contrasts with the results of cross-artform (84.6 percent), literature (72.4 percent), dance (70.8 percent) and theatre companies (50.2 percent). Visual arts companies also reported a relatively low proportion of income from this source – at 41.4 percent.
Exhibit 56: Private giving –Foundations & trusts compared to all other donations – by artform: 2008–2010
Art form ($'000) Foundations & trusts Cross-artform All other donations Foundations & trusts Dance All other donations Foundations & trusts Literature All other donations Foundations & trusts Music All other donations Foundations & trusts Theatre All other donations Foundations & trusts Visual Arts All other donations 2008 1.6 83.9% 0.3 16.1% 0.1 83.0% 0.0 17.0% 0.2 88.4% 0.0 11.6% 0.2 16.9% 0.8 83.1% 1.6 43.3% 2.1 56.7% 0.9 20.3% 3.3 79.7% 2009 1.9 83.4% 0.4 16.6% 0.2 81.5% 0.0 18.5% 0.3 82.3% 0.1 17.7% 0.4 23.2% 1.2 76.8% 0.5 44.1% 0.6 55.9% 1.4 27.8% 3.6 72.2% 2010 2.2 84.6% 0.4 15.4% 0.2 70.8% 0.1 29.2% 0.3 72.4% 0.1 27.6% 0.3 21.5% 1.1 78.5% 0.7 50.2% 0.6 49.8% 1.9 41.4% 2.7 58.6%

63

Foundations and trusts – by size
Analysing the data by size, how much private giving is received from foundations and trusts?
Large companies drove the overall increase in foundation and trust income in 2010. They reported receiving $0.6m more in 2010 compared to 2009. They also reported earning proportionally less from foundations and trusts compared to the other size categories.
Exhibit 57: Private giving – Foundations & trusts compared to all other donations – by size: 2008–2010
Size ($'000) Foundations & trusts Large All other donations Foundations & trusts Medium All other donations Foundations & trusts Small All other donations 2008 0.6 15.4% 3.2 84.6% 3.1 51.3% 3.0 48.7% 0.8 62.5% 0.5 37.5% 2009 0.8 18.8% 3.4 81.2% 2.9 59.1% 2.0 40.9% 0.9 64.5% 0.5 35.5% 2010 1.4 34.6% 2.6 65.4% 3.1 60.7% 2.0 39.3% 1.1 69.5% 0.5 30.5%

64

Number of private givings27
Number of private givings – all key organisations
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of private givings received. For the purposes of this section, total private giving income relates only to the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey.

Has the number of private givings increased or decreased since 2008?
The responding 68 key organisations have reported an increase in the number of private givings received from 2008 to 2010. In 2010, these companies reported 2,677.3 incidents of private giving, up from 2,162.3 in 2009 and 2,205 in 2008.

Exhibit 58: Number of private givings compared to income received: 2008–2010
10.0 9.0 8.0 2205.0 2162.3 2500.0 2000.0 1500.0 $8.9
Total # of private givings

2677.3

3000.0

Total private giving $m

7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0

$7.6

$7.2

3.0 2.0
1.0 0.0 2008 2009 2010

1000.0 500.0 0.0

Analysing the data at a more detailed level (ref exhibit 54) reveals that while the number of private givings has increased since 2008, income levels have fallen. This implies that key organisations are working harder to attract private giving.

Exhibit 59: Number of private givings compared to income received (detail): 2008–2010
(TOTAL 68 companies) Total $ ('000) Total # Private giving Avg $ ('000) per company Avg # per company Avg $ ('000) private giving Var (08-10) -1726.4 472.3 -25.4 6.9 -1.4

2008 8948.2 2205.0 131.6 32.4 4.1

2009 7603.1 2162.3 111.8 31.8 3.5

2010 7221.9 2677.3 106.2 39.4 2.7

27

Private givings includes both donations and trust/foundation grants.

65

Number of private givings28 – by states and territories
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of private givings received. For the purposes of this section, total private giving income relates only to the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey. Additionally note that ACT has been excluded from the analysis below as only one company provided data.

Analysing by states and territories, how many private givings were secured in 2010?
Unlike the data for corporate sponsorship, each state and territory has generally reported the number of private giving in line with the amount of income raise. NSW companies for example have reported both the highest number of private givings (1,698) and the highest amount of private giving income received ($4.4m).
Exhibit 60: Number of private givings compared to income received – by states and territories: 2010
5 5 1698 1800 1600

4
Total private giving $m
4 3 3 2 $4.4 369 143 46 $0.1 0 NSW NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA $0.4 $0.8 20 $0.1 328 $1.3 73 $0.2

1400
1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

2
1 1

28

Private givings includes both donations and trust/foundation grants.

Total # of private givings

66

What is the average size of a private giving by states and territories, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a private giving is calculated with reference to the total private giving income received and the number of private givings attracted from each state and territory. By averaging this across the number of companies in each state/territory, a very general indication the average size of a private giving is provided.
Exhibit 61: Average private givings compared – by states and territories: 2008–2010
Average private giving 2008 ($'000) NSW NT QLD SA TAS VIC WA 3.5 37.7 3.1 1.6 1.7 7.8 9.4

2009 3.9 28.8 4.1 1.8 2.0 3.6 3.3

2010 2.6 1.9 2.8 2.0 2.9 4.1 2.3

In general all states and territories report comparable amounts in average private giving for 2010. The very sharp decrease in the average amount reported by NT companies is due to a sharp rise in the number of private givings reported by a single organisation.

67

Number of private givings29 – by artform
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of private givings received. For the purposes of this section, total private giving income relates only to the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey. Additionally note that literature has been excluded from the analysis below as only one company provided data.

Analysing by artform, how many private givings were secured in 2010?
Music companies reported the highest number of private givings of the sector – at 967. Despite this number, these companies reported receiving just $1.2m in private giving income. A similar result was reported for theatre companies, with 703 private givings delivering $1.1m in income. In contrast, visual arts companies secured 658 private givings and raised $4.2m.
Exhibit 62: Number of private givings compared to income received – by artform: 2010
5 4 967 1200

1000
Total private giving $m

3
3 2 2 1 1 0 $0.4 Cross-artform (8) $0.3 Dance (11) Music (11) 148 201 $1.2

703

658 $4.2

800
600 400 200 0

$1.1

Theatre (23) Visual Arts (14)

29

Private givings includes both donations and trust/foundation grants.

Total # of private givings

4

68

What is the average size of a private giving by artform, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a private giving is calculated with reference to the total private giving income received and the number of private givings attracted for each artform. By averaging this across the number of companies in each artform, a very general indication the average size of a private giving is provided.
Exhibit 63: Average private givings – by artform: 2008–2010
Average private giving 2008 ($'000) Cross-artform Dance Music Theatre Visual Arts 7.8 1.5 0.8 7.7 7.3

2009 6.6 4.0 1.3 2.1 8.1

2010 3.0 1.4 1.2 1.5 6.4

Visual arts companies have reported receiving significantly higher average private giving throughout the review period. In 2010, these companies averaged $6.4k per sponsorship – more than any other artform. In contrast dance, music and theatre companies appear to be finding it difficult to attract large private givings. In 2010 these companies reported attracting an average private giving of between $1.2k and $1.5k, approximately one fifth of the visual arts companies.

69

Number of private givings30 – by company size
NOTE! Not all participating companies provided data on the number of sponsorships received. For the purposes of this section, only the 68 companies that responded to this part of the survey are included in the discussion below.

Analysing by company size, how many private givings were secured in 2010?
Medium sized key organisations attracted the greatest number of private givings in 2010 – at 1,364. Despite this relatively high number, only $2.3m in private giving income was received. A similar picture emerges for small companies – with 545 private givings delivering just $1m in income. In contrast, large companies attracted the smallest number of private givings – at 768.3, but generated $3.9m.
Exhibit 64: Number of private givings compared to income received – by company size: 2008–2010
5
4 4 1364.0

1600 1400
Total # of private givigns

1200 1000
768.3 800

Total private giving $m

3 3 2 2 1 1 0 $2.3

$3.9

545.0

600 400

$1.0

200 0

Large (8)

Medium (25)

Small (35)

30

Private givings includes both donations and trust/foundation grants.

70

What is the average size of a private giving by company size, and has this changed since 2008?
The average size of a private giving is calculated with reference to the total private giving income received and the number of private givings attracted for each size category. By averaging this across the number of companies in each size category, a very general indication the average size of a corporate sponsorship is provided.
Exhibit 65: Average private givings – by company size: 2008–2010
Average private giving ($'000) Large Medium Small

2008 5.2 3.5 3.6

2009 6.5 2.0 3.8

2010 5.1 1.7 1.8

Large key organisations have reported receiving higher average private giving throughout the review period. In 2010, these companies averaged $5.1k per private giving – slightly down on 2008 and 2009 levels. Medium and small companies receive a similar average amount, with both categories reporting a relatively sharp fall in the average size of each private giving across the 2008 to 2010 period.

71

Events and other fundraising activities
Events and other fundraising activities – all key organisations
Relatively little information was provided by participating companies in relation to events and other fundraising activities. Of the 132 companies examined, only 29 companies reported undertaking this type of fundraising in 2010. Due to the relatively small data pool, only top level analysis is provided in this section.

How much is generated from events and other fundraising activities?
Net income generated from events and other fundraising activities makes up less than 3 percent of total private sector income. Since 2008 it has increased very modestly off a low base.

Exhibit 66: Net events and other fundraising activity income: 2008–2010

0.7 0.6 0.5

0.4
$m

0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 2008

$0.5
$0.4

$0.6

2009

2010

72

Analysing the underlying data reveals that NSW companies raised more from these events than other states and territories ($34k per company on average). Victorian companies netted $18k on average, WA, $13k, Queensland, $9k, SA, $8k and ACT, $3k.
Exhibit 67: Net events & other fundraising activity income – by states & territories: 2008–2010
$400

$300

$'000

$200 $343

$100 $102 $14 $ACT (4) NSW (10) QLD (7) SA (4) VIC (8) WA (4) $66 $33 $15

Visual arts, music and theatre companies reported netting more than cross-artform, dance and literature companies.
Exhibit 68: Net events & other fundraising activity income – by artform: 2008–2010
$300

$200

$'000

$284 $100 $144 $104 $25 $Cross-artform (3) Dance (3) Literature (3) Music (8) Theatre (10) Visual arts (11) $19 $16

73

On average, large companies reported significantly higher levels of earnings from events and other fundraising activity – at $51k per company – compared to medium ($16k) and small ($6k) companies.
Exhibit 69: Net events & other fundraising activity income – by company size: 2008–2010
$350
$300 $250 $200 $150 $301

$'000

$100
$50 $-

$203 $88

Large (4)

Medium (19)

Small (15)

74

5

Appendices

Appendix 1
Total private sector income – all key organisations (including MCA capital works fundraising campaign)
How much private sector income has been received by key organisations since 2008?
Key organisations received $60.7m in private sector income in 2010 – an increase of $42.2m or 228.1 percent on 2009 levels and $41.3m or 212.8 percent on 2008 levels.
Exhibit 1B: Total private sector income – key organisations: 2008–2010
Key organisations - Total sponsorship and private giving: 2008 - 2010 70 60 50 40
$m

30 20 10 0 2008 2009 19.4 18.5

60.7

2010

What is the proportion of corporate sponsorship compared to other sources of private sector income?
In 2010, total private sector income was made up of 22 percent corporate sponsorship, 77 percent private giving and 1 percent was raised from fundraising events.
Exhibit 2B: Sources of revenue – key organisations: 2010
Key organisations - Sources of revenue: 2010

1%

77%

22%

Events(net)

Private Giving

Sponsorship

75

Has the amount of corporate sponsorship received by key organisations changed in comparison to private giving?
Since 2008, the proportion of corporate sponsorship income has significantly decreased compared to private giving. In 2008, corporate sponsorship made up 39 percent of total private sector income. In 2010, this had decreased to 22 percent.
Exhibit 3B: Sources of revenue – key organisations: 2008–2010

2008 2% 2009 3% 2010 1%

59% 59% 77% Events(net) Private giving Sponsorship

39%
38% 22%

76

Appendix 2
Key organisations included in the 2010 survey
Company 24HR Art: Northern Territory Centre for Contemporary Art Ananguku Arts & Cultural Aboriginal Corporation Arena Theatre Company Ltd Art Monthly Australia Art on the Move (t/u National Exhibitions Touring Structure for WA Inc) Artback NT Arts Development and Touring Inc Artlink Australia Arts Access Australia Limited Arts Access Society Inc Arts Law Centre of Australia Artspace Visual Arts Centre Ltd Association of Northern Kimberley & Arnhem Aboriginal Artists Ausdance National Australian Art Orchestra Ltd Australian Book Review Inc Australian Centre for Contemporary Art Australian Children's Performing Arts Company t/a Windmill Australian Copyright Council Ltd Australian Dance Theatre Australian Experimental Art Foundation Incorporated Australian Festival of Chamber Music North Queensland Ltd Australian Music Centre Ltd Australian Music Industry Network Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) Australian Script Centre Australian String Quartet Inc Australian Theatre for Young People Back to Back Theatre Inc Barkly Regional Arts Inc Beyond Empathy Ltd Biennale of Sydney Limited Black Arm Band Brink Productions Limited Canberra Contemporary Art Space Incorporated Canberra Symphony Orchestra Incorporated Centre for Contemporary Photography Chunky Move Ltd Circa Contact Inc Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia Inc Contemporary Art Services Tasmania Craft ACT:Craft and Design Centre Inc Craft Australia Craft Queensland Ltd (trading under 'artisan') Crafts Council of Victoria Ltd Board Visual arts ATSI Theatre Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Art form Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Literature Visual arts Cross-artform Literature State Size NT SA VIC ACT WA NT SA VIC VIC Small Large Small Small Small Medium Small Small Medium

Community Cross-artform Community Cross-artform Council Visual arts ATSI Dance Music Literature Visual arts Theatre Council Dance Visual arts Music Music Music Visual arts Theatre Music Theatre Theatre Cross-artform Visual arts Visual arts Dance Music Literature Visual arts Theatre Cross-artform Dance Visual arts Music Music Music Visual arts Theatre Music Theatre Theatre

NSW Medium NSW Medium NT ACT VIC VIC VIC SA Large Small Small Small Large Large

NSW Small SA SA QLD Medium Small Medium

NSW Medium QLD SA TAS SA Small Large Small Medium

NSW Medium VIC NT Medium Medium

Community Cross-artform Community Cross-artform Visual arts ATSI Theatre Visual arts Music Visual arts Dance Theatre Visual arts Cross-artform Theatre Visual arts Music Visual arts Dance Theatre

NSW Medium NSW Large Vic SA ACT ACT VIC VIC QLD QLD SA TAS ACT ACT QLD VIC Medium Medium Small Medium Small Medium Medium Small Small Small Small Small Medium Medium

Community Cross-artform Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts

77

Company Craftsouth: Centre for Contemporary Craft & Design DADAA (WA) Inc Dancehouse Incorporated Dancenorth Darwin Symphony Orchestra Incorporated deckchair theatre Inc. Desart Inc Design Forum Tasmania Ltd Djilpin Arts Aboriginal Corporation dLux media arts Inc Eleanor Dark Foundation Ltd Experimenta Media Arts Inc Expressions The Queensland Dance Theatre Ltd Eyeline Publishing Ltd Feral Arts Corp Ltd Footscray Community Arts Centre Ltd Force Majeure Form: Contemporary Craft and Design Inc Gadigal Information Service Gertrude Contemporary Gondwana Choirs Griffin Theatre Company Limited HotHouse Theatre Limited Ilbijerri Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Theatre Co-op Information and Cultural Exchange Inc (ICE) Institute of Modern Art Limited International Art Space Pty Ltd JamFactory Contemporary Craft & Design Inc Just Us Theatre Ensemble KickArts Contemporary Arts Limited Kultour La Mama Inc (VIC) Legs On The Wall Inc Lucy Guerin Association Inc Magabala Books Aboriginal Corporation Melbourne Art Foundation Melbourne Chamber Orchestra Monkey Baa Theatre for Young People Ltd Museum and Gallery Services Queensland Ltd. Museum of Contemporary Art Limited Museums & Galleries NSW Music Council of Australia Pty Ltd National Association for the Visual Arts National Exhibitions Touring Support (NETS) Victoria Not Yet It's Difficult Incorporated NT Writers' Centre Inc O L Society Limited

Board Visual arts

Art form Visual arts

State Size SA WA VIC QLD NT WA NT TAS NT Small Large Small Medium Small Medium Medium Small Medium

Community Cross-artform Dance Dance Music Theatre ATSI Visual arts ATSI Visual arts Literature Visual arts Dance Visual arts Dance Dance Music Theatre Visual arts Visual arts Cross-artform Visual arts Literature Visual arts Dance Literature

NSW Small NSW Small VIC QLD QLD QLD VIC Small Medium Small Small Medium

Community Cross-artform Community Cross-artform Dance Visual arts ATSI Visual arts Music Theatre Theatre Theatre Dance Visual arts Cross-artform Visual arts Music Theatre Theatre Theatre

NSW Small WA Large

NSW Medium VIC Small

NSW Large NSW Medium VIC VIC Medium Small

Community Cross-artform Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Visual arts Council Theatre Theatre Dance ATSI Visual arts Music Theatre Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Music Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Literature Literature Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Visual arts Cross-artform Theatre Theatre Dance Cross-artform Visual arts Music Theatre Visual arts Visual arts Visual arts Music Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Literature Literature

NSW Medium QLD WA SA QLD QLD Vic VIC Medium Small Large Small Medium Small Medium

NSW Medium VIC WA VIC VIC Small Small Small Medium

NSW Small QLD Small

NSW Large NSW Medium NSW Medium NSW Small VIC VIC NT VIC Small Small Medium Small

78

Company Object: Australian Centre for Craft and Design Open City Incorporated PACT Centre for Emerging Artists Inc Patch Theatre Company Inc Performing Arts Centre Society Inc Performing Lines Limited Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts Ltd PlayWriting Australia Queensland Writers Centre Association Inc Red Stitch Actors Theatre Ltd Regional Arts Australia Restless Dance Theatre Inc Shopfront Theatre for Young People Co-operative Ltd Slingsby Theatre Company Ltd Snuff Puppets Inc Somebody's Daughter Theatre Company Inc South Australian Country Arts Trust Spare Parts Puppet Theatre Inc Stalker Theatre Inc Sydney Philharmonia Ltd Synergy & TaikOz Ltd Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute Inc. Tasdance Ltd Terrapin Puppet Theatre Ltd The Australian Centre for Photography Ltd The Border Project Pty Ltd The Performance Space Ltd The Song Company Pty Ltd ThinIce Productions Ltd Topology Inc Tracks Inc Tutti Ensemble Inc Umbrella Studio Contemporary Arts (t/u Umbrella Studio Association) Umi Arts Ltd Urban Theatre Projects Ltd Version 1.0 Inc Wangaratta Festival of Jazz Inc West Australian Youth Jazz Orchestra Association Yirra Yaaking Aboriginal Corporation Young People and the Arts Australia (YPAA) - ASSITEJ Australia

Board Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Theatre Theatre Theatre Visual arts Theatre Literature Theatre Council Dance

Art form Visual arts Visual arts Theatre Theatre Theatre Theatre Visual arts Theatre Literature Theatre Cross-artform Dance

State Size NSW Medium NSW Small NSW Small SA WA Medium Small

NSW Large WA Medium

NSW Medium QLD VIC SA SA Medium Small Small Small

Community Cross-artform Theatre Theatre Theatre Theatre

NSW Small SA VIC VIC SA WA Small Small Medium Large Medium

Community Cross-artform Visual arts Theatre Theatre Music Music ATSI Dance Theatre Visual arts Theatre Visual arts Music Theatre Music Dance Visual arts Theatre Theatre Music Music Cross-artform Dance Theatre Visual arts Theatre Cross-artform Music Theatre Music Dance

NSW Medium NSW Medium NSW Medium SA TAS TAS Large Small Small

NSW Medium SA Small

NSW Medium NSW Medium WA QLD NT SA QLD QLD Small Small Medium Small Small Small

Community Cross-artform Visual arts ATSI Theatre Theatre Music Music ATSI Theatre Visual arts Cross-artform Theatre Theatre Music Music Cross-artform Theatre

NSW Small NSW Small VIC WA WA QLD Small Small Medium Small

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