Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

OGR-

GREEN-LIGHT REVIEW

Unit 2: Space
“Introduction to my thoughts on The Time Machine” Oliver Gadsby CG Art and Animation (BA Hons)

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Contents Page:
-Page 1: Synopsis of The Time Machine-Page 2: Possible events of influence-Page 3: The visual concept behind the story and film adaptations made of the novel plus artist information-Page 4-6: The three scenes from the allocated excepts-Page 7: The visual influence map stating the production design principles-Page 8-10: The influence maps for each scene-Page 11-13: The key thumbnails of each scene-Page 14: Written task introduction-

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

-Creative Partnership archived(Wip/In a separate Scribd document for easier viewing)

THE TIME MACHINE
Written by H.G Wells in 1895
The Time Machine is a sci-fi story that (As the title may indicate) explores a journey through time. Our main protagonist is a male inventor, formerly referred to throughout the entirety of the story as ‘the time traveller’ but there are accounts and visual reference on the book cover that he was in fact based on H.G Wells himself. The basis of the story is that our protagonist creates and finishes his time machine in search of how the future has progressed and how the human populace has fared; the book seems to indicate his journey into the future as a leap of

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

scientific curiousness. He travels through time and space, watching the spectacular real-time changes occur to the world around him. He halts the machine and finds himself abruptly launched into a strange world of rolling hills, tall cascading buildings and a first confronted with a large and notably predominant statue of some kind of winged Sphinx before finding himself discovered by the peaceful small, child-like humanoids called the Eloi. The plot takes us through this world of decay and interesting architecture before we meet the more menacing side to future earth’s inhabitancy, the Morlocks, ape-like creatures with characteristically big eyes that live underground. The story unfolds to become compelled towards what is now seen as the dying earth genre because what appears to be happening to planet earth as he escapes the clutches of the Morlocks and travels a further 30 million into the future is that the sun grows dimmer and all of what is left of life on earth is dying out in an ice-age. After witnessing the death of planet earth he then returns to his laboratory and few hours within when he left, exclaiming what has happened to his dis-believing peers he makes plans to venture out again and return soon, he does so but three years later it is untold of what happened to him.

1.

Events within 1895 that may have helped with the construction of The Time Machine;

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

 Oscar Wilde had released several plays of his writings, dramatic influence.  The first rolling lift bridge was invented, new inventions to collaborate with the idea of travel.  The start of Sherlock Holmes, the influence of discovery and research. (Science had been making key breakthroughs, one after the other)  A British Inventor, Birt Acres patents the projector, revolutionary devices to forward mankind.
 As a follow on from the last bullet point, the world’s first cinema was opened later in the year, in Paris.
I find these are good reasons for why the novel became what it is, strong, different, thought-provoking and exciting, setting a great stand point for many films aired in this day and age, especially machinery as it was within the flux of the modern industry.

2.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

‘The discovery of decay is the statement I seem to like to latch to for this novel; the visual style is found throughout the excerpts, decay is in flux and so is the sense of newness breaching into having properties of oldness, simply what our protagonist finds as being new is portrayed as old in this timeframe. I am staying away from time travelling scenes because they leave too much room for straying off course in terms of the new world that is discovered’ Adaptations have been
made of the novel including the 1960’s version directed by George Paul of whom also directed Well’s War of the Worlds of which is another example in itself. There was a late 70’s televised version and the 2002 remake, directed by Simon Wells, H.G Wells’s great grandson. All versions were proclaimed to be interesting renditions but they don’t compare to the book. As relatable artist are concerned, there are obviously the concept designers from the films and series but more interestingly, there is one man from the same period as

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

this was wrote that seems to grasp the dying earth genre very well, John Martin. A British engraver and illustrator with painting displaying apocalyptic scenarios, often based on biblical events, here are some examples to why he’s an ideal relation to the dying earth genre and to this novel;

3.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Chosen scene from excerpt one

Chosen scene from excerpt two

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Chosen scene from excerpt three

6.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

‘The visuals are the carrier for the plot and the
setting; What sets this novel into a unique frame of production when it comes to gaining what kind of scale this story truly lies at, it is enormous!.. Yet very consistent and broad in how much the reader is meant to take in. From exploring the inevitability of planet earth dying, the thought of how humanity will reside in the future (De-evolution is just as common and evolution within natural genetics), displaying horror on a different scale to what is used to in his time period and opening and unlocking MANY ideas in today’s world, War of the Worlds being possibly an even better icon of the statement but never-the-less written by H.G Wells. Visually he makes you mix decay and serenity as a bold realisation of life in itself, primarily setting itself as a metaphor for bustling humanitarian culture and it’s divisions but also quite simple visualised as ‘A red hot

7.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

volcano against the cool and calm nature of a quite canyon’, both co-Exide on earth yet contrast so greatly.’

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

8.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

9.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

10.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Very rough thumbnails of the Winged Sphinx from excerpt one and he huge buildings in the distance along with the rolling hills. No.2 has a good field of depth about it and No.1 (Top right) has the good sense of scale when elaborated with the silver birch tree.

11.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Rough sketches of the well and cave inners. The looming and gloomy look of the machinery in No.4 is feeling ideal, I like the irregularity. No.2 gives a good impression of scale and also the possible inclusion of daylight protruding down the well.

12.

Oliver Gadsby OGR: Unit two

Rough sketches of the inners of the derelict museum. Okay, this scene will show the discovery and accomplishment of the story. I like No. 2 and the angle of the stairs and No.4 for its sense of depth. No.5 includes the air-tight chest from of which the matches are found, making it an important item to show or interact with.

13.

Oliver Gadsby

Unit Two: Written Assignment introduction.
This essay aims to explore the visual concepts and idealism behind the film adaption of the game series, Silent Hill. Exploration of this film shall include reference material from relatable sources such as its idealistic competition in the games industry, Resident Evil and F.E.A.R as well as films and stories that also imply similar thought provoking attributes to that of this film. The Silent Hill franchise, established and produced by Konami Computer Entertainment is essentially about a lonely, dark and mysterious town of which has taken on a paranormal form due to some sort of communal calamity, embodying the sorrows and deadly hardship that it has witnessed within its confines, thus giving the entire town itself an evil and archaic ethos. This point is expressed within the film to a notably strong extent and depicts the suffering of Silent Hill’s inhabitancy, whether good or bad in a emotionally unsettling way. The calamity displayed in the film is believed to be of reference from the first game in the franchise, a fire caused by process of coal smouldering within the underground confines of the town’s mining complex.

OGR: Unit two

14.

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