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GIZ

Support for Preparation of

State Action Plan on Climate Change to the State of Punjab

INCEPTION REPORT
August 2011

CONSULTING ENGINEERING SERVICES (INDIA) PRIVATE LIMITED 57, Nehru Place (5th Floor), New Delhi - 110019

Project: Preparation of State Action Plan for Climate Change Document: 2011074/EC/Inception Report

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INCEPTION REPORT Recognizing that climate change is a global challenge, India is engaged actively in multinational negotiation sin the UN framework convention on climate change in a positive constructive and forward looking manner. On June 30, 2008, the Prime Minister of India released Indias National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC), which intends to provide a concrete road map detailing Introduction how India plans to me forward in combating climate change. Its a careful long term strategy, which will help to attain the goals by minimizing the adverse consequences of development on peoples livelihood without undermining the developmental efforts. The approach that NAPCC has undertaken is a directional shift in the development pathway that promotes development objectives while also yielding co-benefits (emphasis added) for addressing climate change effectively. The NAPCC has set out eight national missions as the way forward in implementing the govNational Missions ernments strategy and achieving the National Action plans objec& Punjab tive. The focus of these missions is on promoting understanding of climate change, adaptation and mitigation, energy efficiency and natural resource conservation. Alike other State Governments, the Government of Punjab has embarked upon formulating its climate change action plan for addressing the climate change concerns that it envisages for the future. In this respected it has aligned some of its programs in line with the national missions articulated in the national action plan on climate change which are: National Water Mission National Mission on Sustainable Agriculture National Mission for a Green India National Mission for sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem National Solar Mission National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency National Mission on Sustainable Habitats National Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation to climate change required integrated solutions that simultaneously address livelihood improvements and environmental sustainability. Proactive measures for adaptation to climate variability and change can substantially reduce many adverse impacts, and thus contribute to livelihood security of the vulProject Backnerable rural population. While climate change will affect the Nations economy as a whole, its impact will be more severely felt by ground the poor, who have the least adaptive capacity. Recognizing this, NAPCC outlines its first principle a protecting the poor and vulnerable sections of the society through inclusive and sustainable development strategy, sensitive to climate change.

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GIZ project Climate Change Adaptation in Rural Areas of India with the aim to contribute the livelihoods and adaptive capacities of vulnerable rural communities aligns itself with NAPCC. The project focuses on integrating the issue of climate change adaptation in various sector policy decisions that reduce risk and enhance the adaptive capacity of the most vulnerable sectors and groups. The key components of the project include vulnerability and risk assessment, development of technical Climate Change Initiadaptation options, climate proofing of rural development proative of GIZ grams, development of adaptation oriented financial instruments and information & knowledge management to support mainstreaming national discussions on climate change adaptation. In addition to the above project components, the project is supporting selected states in preparation of State Action Plan on Climate Change (SAPCC) including adaptation and mitigation. In order to realize the implementation of National Action Plan on Climate Change, the support for the preparation of State Action Plan on Climate Change (SAPCC) has given the highest priority by Government of India. GIZ will be supporting the Government of Punjab for the preparation of the SAPCC and has enScope of the Astrusted Consulting Engineering Services (India) Private Limited (CES), signment New Delhi to undertake to study. CES will synthesize all the sectoral reports and prepare the first SAPCC draft for the comments of various stakeholders of the State Government. The task to be undertaken by CES is broadly outlined in Box 1.

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Task 1
This includes preparation of an outline for the state action plan on climate change. The sectors/missions to be included will be discussed with the State Government. The framework prepared by GIZ for MOEF may be used for orientation for the structure of SAPCC. The collection of information will be facilitated by the State Government. The task includes series of meeting with respective state department, stakeholder and the nodal department responsible for preparation of SAPCC.

Box 1

Outline for the SAPCC in consultation with the State Government & GIZ Outline for the identified sectors/missions in consultation with the state government and GIZ Organize the inception workshop for the preparation of SAPCC Support the identified working groups by the state governments for the preparation of detailed sectoral papers

Task 2
This task will include synthesizing the various sectoral papers prepared by the working groups and the consultants to prepare the draft state action plan on climate change. This task will require intense interaction with the state government & other relevant stakeholders at the state level. The comments received by the stakeholders need to be integrated for the finalization of the SAPCC. Synthesize various sectoral papers and prepare draft SAPCC in collaboration with the various identified team members from the state Government Organize a state level consultation for presenting the draft SAPCC Finalize the SAPCC based on the comments received from various stakeholders

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The Steering Committee has been formed by Government of Punjab to expedite preparation of the State Action Plan. The Steering Committee is headed by Chief Secretary, Government of Punjab. Executive Director of Punjab State Council for Science & Technology (PSCST) cum Member Secretary of Punjab Biodiversity Board, Chandigarh is acting as a nodal officer to facilitate the study. The Inception Meeting befirst meeting between CES and PSCST took place on 4th Aug tween PSCST & CES 2011 at PSCSTs office in Chandigarh. The meeting was chaired by Dr. Neelima Jairath, Executive Director. PSCST and was attended by Dr. Satnam Singh Ladhar, Joint Director (PSCST), Dr. Gurcharan Singh, Team Leader cum Water Resources and Agriculture Expert (CES), Mr. R P Kapoor, Forestry Expert (CES), Mr. D Das Gupta, Head of Environment & Ecology Department (CES) and Mr. Tirthankar Banerjee, Environmental Assessment Expert (CES). The detailed minutes of the meeting is enclosed in Annex 1. The key outcome of the meeting is as follows: Identification of the nodal officers in different departments, who will provide the relevant data that need to be analyzed for arriving at the relevant strategies required to address climate change concerns. The key focus areas for Punjab for the National Action Plan would be (a) Solar/Renewable energy and energy efficiency (b) Agriculture (c) Water resources (d) Transportation and urban planning. The other areas of concern for the Government of Punjab include health, the Himalayan ecosystem, development of a strategic knowledge database to address cc concerns.
Key Issues & Data Collected

CES will organize workshop with the help of GIZ and PSCST to familiarize different departments about the issue of climate change, mitigation and adaptation needs and the process of preparation of the action plan such as elaboration on the guidelines of MOEF, for preparation of the same and the sectoral details required. The Status of secondary data and reports collected till date is as follows: Particulars Status
State of Environment, Punjab 2005 State of Environment, Punjab 2007 State action of Orissa State action of Meghalaya Basis statistics of Punjab 2010-2011* Statistical abstract of Punjab, 2011* Municipal Year book, Punjab* District Statistical Handbooks, Punjab* Collected Collected Collected Collected Collected Collected Collected Collected

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Particulars
Met data from all sources (IMD and State Government Departments)* National Action plan on Climate Change Report on Insects (Department of Entomology) State Action Plan for Climate Change - Punjab (draft) Plan Documents-2011-2012(for Funding /Expenditure)

Status
Ongoing Collected Ongoing Collected Collected

* Socioeconomic Statistical data collected from pbplanning.gov.in/reports.htm

The Punjab Government has also provided Draft SAPCC of Punjab. The experts at CES have gone through the entire document and comments have been provided to align the SAPPC with the requirements of the framework provided by the MOEF for formulation of the same. The comments on draft SAPCC has been provided in Annex 2. This also contains outlines of the SAPCC and the outline of each of the chapters of the SAPCC. The chapter outline basically indicates the information required for completing the SAPCC. It is proposed to have a workshop with the concerned departments in the third week of September. The outline of the draft program is enclosed in Annex 3. Further, to augment the information provided in the draft SAPCC of the Punjab Government, a matrix has been created to access information on some of the activities undertaken by the government under each mission of NAPCC, which is provided in Annex 4. The information requested includes information on current key concerns, actions to be taken to achieve the targets, actions to be completed by 12th plan, costs of each action at todays price, further actions to be completed by the 13th plan for achieving these targets and cost of the same at todays price. Further to this, the draft outline of the SAPCC as per the guidelines of the MOEF (please refer Annex 5). This also indicates the nature of data requirement for drafting the SAPCC according the MOEF guidelines.

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Annex 1
Minutes of the Meeting between CES & PSCST
A meeting was held on 4th August, 2011 in the office of Punjab State Council for Science and Technology (PSCST), MGSIPA Complex, Chandigarh for initial briefing related to Preparation of state Action Plan on Climate Change for Punjab.

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Minute of the meeting held in Chandigarh on 4th August2011 A meeting was held on 4th August, 2011 in the office of Punjab State Council for Science and Technology (PSCST), MGSIPA Complex, Chandigarh for initial briefing related to Preparation of state Action Plan on Climate Change for Punjab. The following persons attended the meeting: Dr. Neelima Jairath Executive Director, PSCST Dr. Satnam Singh Ladhar Joint Director (Environment), PSCST Dr. Gurcharan Singh Team Leader-Cum- Water Resources and Agriculture Expert, CES Mr. R. P. Kapoor Forestry Expert, CES Mr. D.Das Gupta Head, Environment & Ecology Department, CES Mr. Tirthankar Banerjee Environmental Impact Assessment Expert, CES

The key issues discussed in the meeting are as under: A steering committee has already been formed with the Chief Secretary, Government of Punjab, as its Chairman. The Committee met on 12th July 2011 where all the concerned Departments/ Agencies were asked to nominate a Nodal Officer who would be responsible for providing the requisite information and data to the consultants for preparation of the State Action Plan. In order to facilitate the study, each Department/Agency is required to give the name of the Nodal Officer and Co-Nodal Officer who will be responsible for providing authentic data. Two departments had already provided the names of their Nodal Officers, while other departments are expected to name them by 12th August 2011. CES requests PSCST to provide contacts no. of Nodal Officers and members of steering committee, which was agreed by PSCST. The members of PSCST informed that they have already collected the readily available information from various departments related to activities under the eight National Missions and compiled the collected information in the Draft SAPCC, which will be provided to CES for review and preparation of the State Action Plan. Mr. R.P. Kapoor, Forestry Expert, suggested one to one meeting with the nodal officers so as to cover the grey areas because the subject of climate change is vast and unstructured. Others
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agreed with him. Dr. Jairath opined that the Knowledge Mission and health sectors are grey area and sought help from the consultants to identify more grey areas. It was also discussed that the timely completion of the project depends on availability of data from respective departments and for this the project may require some more time to complete. Dr. Jairath stated that the focal areas in Punjab are: a) Solar/ Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency b) Agriculture c) Water Resources d) Transportation, Urban Planning, etc. Dr. Jairath informed that PEDA would provide details on energy efficiency and renewable energy planned for Punjab. As regards water resources, ADB is already conducting a study and a draft report is available and it will be provided to CES. She also informed that on the agricultural aspects, Punjab Agriculture University has lot of information. They have also done detailed work related to meteorology. She mentioned that crop diversity is an important issue in the context of Punjab. Punjab has very few forest lands except for the fragile Shivalik Eco System. In this context, she advised that consultants should interact with Himalayan Glacial institute in Chandigarh. She also advised the consultant to consult a book on Plant Species by Ms. Kanchan Chopra. It was discussed in the meeting that Inception Report is under preparation and will be submitted soon. Dr. Satnam Singh Ladhar suggested that Inception report should cover comprehensive questionnaire. He also advised to submit the Inception Report to the respective departments and after the submission of report workshop should be organized. Dr Singh suggested that the final SAPCC should reflect all data/information by respective departments. CES will organize the workshop with help of (GIZ) and PSCST. Dr. Singh suggested that two persons from each stakeholder department, namely the Nodal Officer and the Head of the Department or his representative should attend the workshop. Therefore, the number of participants in the workshop will be around 25. It was agreed by both PSCST & CES that the Nodal officer would be responsible for reliability of data. Data of the respective department after compilation should be sent to secretary of the respective departments for verification and authentication.

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Annex 2
Revised Draft SAPCC with Comments & Chapter Outlines
Section 1: Comments on the existing SAPCCC- Punjab Section 2: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Energy and Industry Sector Section 3: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Agriculture Sector Section 4: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Biodiversity, Forests, Wild Life and Eco Tourism Sector Section 5: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Sustainable Habitats Section 6: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Human Health Sector Section 7: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Water Sector

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Section 1: Comments on the existing SAPCCC- Punjab


The aim of the State Action plan on Climate change is to achieve a certain level of climate proofing of the ongoing and future planning vis a vis the current variability in climate and projected climate change. Though, logistically speaking, it is easier to achieve the short term targets as set out for 2020 in this document, but given that climate change is a long term phenomenon due to long lives of the drivers of climate change (GHGs) in the atmosphere, their impacts on various sectors, and the ensuing vulnerabilities may also need to be analyzed at such time lines (say at least up to 2050s), to have an idea as to what the scenario is likely to be in the future, within the context of which all development has to take place. The draft document has indicated the targets it wants to achieve by 2020 which are in line with the NAPCC. Also the document identifies the activities that are being undertaken by the various implementing agencies and the future action plans. The following issues need to be integrated in the document so as to make it a climate change Action Plan guide for the state: 1. A description of the natural resources of the state (water, agriculture, forests and biodiversity along with the descriptions of sectors of energy, industry, transport, and other habitat constituents) 2. A description of ongoing developmental policies/program/projects for the various sectors 3. The institutional mechanism which governs and implements above 4. An analysis of the current climate trends and their impact on various sectors (possibly by agro-climatic region the seasonal mean temperature, maximum temperature, mean surface temperature, and rain fall) Water Agriculture Biodiversity and forests Energy Industry Habitats including building and transport Human health 5. Projections of future climate 6. An analysis of vulnerability of various sectors to climate change 7. The strategies to achieve climate proofing. The activities given in the document have to be aligned under a few core strategies for each sector. Some of these have been set out to be achieved by 2020 (e.g. energy efficiency) and some do not have any definite time lines (e.g. agriculture). Time line with targets quantified have to be set for
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the 12th plan (next 5 years) and 13th plan (next 10 years, which makes it up to 2022 at least) and may be beyond (next 15 years starting from 2012). 8. Some of the activities given in various sectors may have to be shifted to the other, for e.g., in agriculture mission activities related to rainwater harvesting may have to be taken under the chapter on water, as they are towards increase the water as a resource. 9. Additional strategies and actions there in may have to be identified that can be in the nature of formulation of policy, implementation of technology, institution of research activities and augmentation of current institutional mechanism for effective service delivery amongst others. 10. Tentative costs of each action and hence that of the strategy has to be quantified for the 12th and the 13th plan.

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Section 2: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Energy and Industry Sector
Electricity and Power I. Overview of Electricity Sector in Punjab a. Installed generation capacity details from 2000 to 2011 b. Quantum and trends of purchase of electricity from Central Grid and other sources from 2000 to 2011 c. Price at which electricity was and is purchased from the Grid from 2000 to 2011 d. Sale of electricity by class of consumers from 2000 to 2011 (Domestic, industry, traction, agriculture, public works etc) e. Urban and rural domestic electricity consumption pattern from 2000 to 2011 f. Domestic sector energy consumption by use if data available and at least under broad heads such as Power and Lighting. (Single phase, three phase) g. Commercial sector energy consumption by category i. Office ii. Commercial establishments iii. Hotels and resorts iv. Hospitals v. Educational institutions h. Commercial Sector energy consumption by use i. Lighting ii. Power iii. Etc i. Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure i. Details of current infrastructure and additions, strengthening program etc ii. If APDRP Programme was implemented details primarily year and for what purpose j. Tariff and Pricing Policy i. Current tariff rates domestic, commercial, industrial etc (If data from 2005 is available that would be great) ii. Who determines tariffs and when was the last revision of tariff k. Transmission and Distribution Losses i. Trends of Technical losses 2000 to 2011 ii. Trends of ATC Losses 2000 to 2011 iii. If there is a falling trend why, what programmes were implemented iv. Metering system 100% metered connection? If No, what is the ratio between metered and non-metered connection v. What is the billing system computerised?? Bar coded?? Etc l. Data on renewable energy installations i. Grid based systems ii. Non-grid based systems iii. Is there an authority or cell for renewable energy m. Information on energy efficiency measures implemented i. On-going programmes sector wise if any ii. Where the funding coming from are these BEE programmes.

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II.

Strategies, priorities and actions for the next 5, 10 and 15 years


Issues ATC Loss reduction 5 years Targets in %age reduction Programmes planned to achieve this How much What source Targets Say Government building lighting efficiency Street lighting programme 10 Years Targets in %age reduction Programmes planned to achieve this How much What source Targets Say Government building lighting efficiency Street lighting programme 15 years Targets in %age reduction Programmes planned to achieve this How much What source Targets Say Government building lighting efficiency Street lighting programme

Generation capacity addition Energy Conservation

Other programmes with Other programmes with Other programmes with targets if any targets if any targets if any Also any new policy/s being planned Renewable Energy Targets Policies Regulations Also any new policy/s being planned Targets Policies Regulations Also any new policy/s being planned Targets Policies Regulations

Industrial Sector 1. Consumption Pattern: a. Category of industries with numbers i. Chemicals ii. Pharma iii. Cement iv. ..... v. ...... vi. ....... b. Electricity and energy consumption pattern of each of the category of industries c. Source of electricity for the industries d. Demand trends for industrial energy consumption from 2000 to 2011 e. Break up of number of industries organised and un-organised; large and Medium Scale and SMEs. f. Efficiency practices in industries if any. 2. Future Demand Projections a. If this is not done, we can do it based on trends and other information 3. Strategies, Actions, Timelines and Budgets

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Section 3: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Agriculture Sector


(One paper each on agriculture crops, horticulture, livestock and its productivity and fisheries need to be developed)

1. An introduction to the status of agriculture in Punjab Trends of contribution of agriculture to the state GDP Trends of production of important agriculture crops Trends of production of horticulture crops Trends of livestock population and productivity Trends of production of fish (riverine/ estuaries/ marine) 2. Distinctive nature of the - heavy rainfall agro climatic zones 3. Policy drivers of agriculture productivity, production and hence maintaining food security National Policies (link developmental policies with NAPCC and its missions on water, agriculture and greening India, solar for renewable energy in agriculture) Policies Specific to the Union territory Programs Projects Others 4. Observed climate change (trends of temperature and precipitation from all stations where weather data is recorded) for at least last 30 years Min temperature (Pre- monsoon, Monsoon, Post Monsoon, Winter) Max temperature (Pre- monsoon, Monsoon, Post Monsoon, Winter) Average temperature (Pre- monsoon, Monsoon, Post Monsoon, Winter) Seasonal rain fall (Pre- monsoon, Monsoon, Post Monsoon, Winter) 5. Concerns anticipated due to climate change
(this section will elaborate the concerns vis-a-vis the changes in climate parameters in the regions mentioned in section 3 of agriculture productivity and production and hence food security (based on literature survey and strong expert judgment / perception)

5a. Agriculture crops Rising Minimum temperatures during sowing/ growing season Changes in Maximum temperature if any during sowing/growing season Total rainfall increasing and decreasing Rainfall intensity increasing Onset and withdrawal of monsoon Rabi season is getting shorter Emerging pests mainly foliar type more abundant Thermal humidity index rising Rising CO2 concentrations 5b. Horticulture Same as above 5c. Livestock and livestock productivity Increase in temperatures (livestock stress, decrease in availability of feed stock) Increase in water stress (decrease in feed availability) Increase in CO2 concentration (impact on feed) increase in frequency and intensity of cyclones

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5d. Fisheries (inland (ponds and riverine), estuaries, marine) Increase in temperature (at lower and upper latitudes, changes in surface temperature in the inland waters) Changes in water flow in rain fed rivers due to changing precipitation pattern or increase in intensity of rain fall Changes in mean, maximum and minimum temperature of river water/ ponds Submergence of catchment areas due to rise in water level (e.g., all the major estuaries) Change in biodiversity profile of estuaries Increase in sea surface temperature -planktons/fish relationship (along with examples of how shift is taking place) Increase in sea level rise 6. Strategies for adapting to CC (for each of the six regions) 6a. Agriculture Crops - current best practices and future requirements for maintaining yields and bridging the yield gaps
Strategy Current program/ projects Funds available Implemente Actions in the d through 12th Plan (next 5 (institution/ years) program/pr oject) Approx. Cost in todays price Actions in the 13th Plan (nest 10 years) Approxima Action in te Cost in 14th plan today's price

6b. Horticulture - current best practices and future requirements for maintaining yields and bridging the yield gaps (Similar table as agriculture crops) 6c. Livestock - current best practices and future requirements for maintaining yields and bridging the yield gaps (Similar table as agriculture crops) 6d.Fisheries - current best practices and future requirements for maintaining yields bridging the yield gaps and catering to the demand (Similar table as agriculture crops)

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Section 4: Proposed outline for the Chapter on Biodiversity, Forests, Wild Life and Eco Tourism Sector
1. . 3. A description of Biodiversity and Ecosystem services 4. Concerns of Biodiversity, Forests, Wild Life and Eco-tourism due to climate Change 5. The Institutions involved in management of Forests, Biodiversity, Wildlife and ecotourism 6. Current policies and programmes and projects 7. Protection of Wild Life and Biodiversity Protection of Forests and Afforestation programmes Protecting water sources within forests Disaster Management Developing renewable energy technologies Curtailing man-animal conflict Sericulture Any other Concerns due to climate change Increase in temperature leading to Change in vegetation type Increase in temperature leading to more frequent droughts and forest fires Increase in intensity of precipitation leading to more land slides Any other.. A description of Biodiversity

2. Current distribution of Forests (State of Forest, 2009)

8. Strategies and Actions to Address the Concerns of Climate Change


Table : Strategies and actions for the forestry sector Actions Agencies Short Medium (2nd responsible (1st plan) plan period) Action 1 Actions to be Actions to be Action 2 carried out carried out Action 3 Action 4 Cost: Cost: --------

Strategies Strategy 1

Long (3rd plan period) Action to be carried out Cost:

Total (Cost)

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Section 5: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Sustainable Habitats


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Introduction Demography and Settlements Trends in Urbanization Urban Projections and Structure of Urban Punjab Life-line Infrastructure in Rural and Urban Environs 5.1 Water Supply including sectoral demand 5.2 Sanitation and Wastewater 5.3 Household Sanitation: 5.4 Solid Waste Management: 6.0 Transport 6.1 Overview of the Transport Sector 6.1.1 The Growth of on road vehicle numbers (2000-2010) 6.1.2 Current distribution of vehicle mix by type 6.1.3 Trends of total demand of commercial energy in the transport sector 6.2 Policies in the Road transport sector 6.2.1 National policies and programs that are being implemented (JnNURM) 6.2.2 Any specific policy/s governing the transport sector exclusive to the state 6.2.3 Policy requirements towards a better transport planning that addresses. - increased use of renewable mix in fuel - tax on fuel - better, wider, and additional roads to reduce congestion - The concept of one way traffic - Feasibility of introducing mass rapid transport system - Encouraging pooling of cars 6.3 Traffic composition in Punjab 6.3.1 Passenger Vehicles Vs. Public Transport Vehicles 6.3.2 Truck and heavy vehicle population (If we can give some numbers such as x y z number of trucks ply on the xyz roads every day that will be great Toll Gate information would suffice) 6.3.3 Traffic congestion points if any 6.3.4 Mobility reform plans if any such as parking regulations, higher tax on vehicles, etc 6.4 Profile of Public transportation and Government Vehicles in the state 6.5 Actions Plan for implementation of policies/strategies 6.6 Any transport related infrastructure plans for the next 5, 10 and 15 years such as Airport Railways Truck terminals 7.0 Housing and Construction 8.0 Hazards and Vulnerability 8.1 Floods and Vulnerability 8.2 Any Other Hazard

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9.0 Governance and the Public Policy Framework 10.0 Impacts of Climate Change 11.0 Strategies, Actions, Timelines and Budgets
Table (8): Action Plan for Habitat Mitigation Current Fund Implemented Actions Approx. Actions Approx. program/projects available through in 12th cost in Plan in 13th cost in (institution/program pla todays plan todays /project) price price

Strategies

Strategies

Table: Action Plan for Habitat - Adaptation Current Fund Implemented Actions in Approx. Actions Approx. program/projects available through years 0-5 cost in Plan in cost in (institution/program todays years 6- todays /project) price 10 price

Strategies

Table : Action Plan for Habitat - Risk Mitigation Current Fund Implemented Actions in Approx. Actions Approx. program/projects available through years 0-5 cost in Plan in cost in (institution/program todays years 6- todays /project) price 10 price

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Section 6: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Human Health Sector


1. Status of Disease profile related to climate Water Borne Disease Cholera Vector Borne Disease Malaria: Kala Azar: Dengue: Chikungunya: Japanese Encephalitis (JE)/AES: Heat Stress Increase in respiratory diseases due to increase in pollution load (domestic and outdoor) Malnutrition Any other 2. Policies and Programs to Manage Morbidity and Mortality 3. Institutions managing disease 4. Concerns related to Climate Change and Human Health Due to increase in temperature, Increase in frequency floods and Increase in frequency and intensity of rain fall the following concerns may arise Impacts on identified vulnerable population Newer areas of infiltration for vectors Increase in incidences of morbidities due to increase in extreme heat events Higher damages, morbidity and mortality due to increase in intensity of cyclones Increase in water borne diseases Increase in respiratory diseases due to increase in pollution loads as temperatures rises Increase in morbidity/mortality due to increase in landslides New and emerging diseases 5. Strategies and Actions Table : Strategies, Actions, time lines and budgets
Institutions involved A. Vector borne diseases including managing out breaks Actions in the 12th Plan Action 1: Action 2: Action 3: -----Approximate Cost at todays price Actions in 13th plan Action 1 Action 2 Action 3 ............... Approximate Actions in 14th Cost at Cost at plan todays Price todays price Action 1 ........

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Section 7: Proposed outline of the Chapter on Water Sector


1. A description of Water resources River (river basin map to be provided) Springs Rainfall intensity (map to be provided) Lakes (a map may also be provided giving location of the same) 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Sources and modes of water supply in rural and urban areas Current Challenges towards ensuring Water security in Punjab Identification of special regions vulnerable to water availability Institution managing water Demand and Projection of water required for various sectors Agriculture Industry Domestic use Rural and Urban Any other 7. Ensuring water availability Current policies, programmes and projects 8. Concerns due to climate change Decrease in Projected rainfall Decrease in projected ground water recharge Decrease in projected river runoff 9. Strategies and actions
Current Funds programs/ available projects Strategy 1: Implemented Actions in the Approximate through 12th Plan Cost in todays (institution/pro (next 5 years) price gram/project) Action 1 Action 2 Action 3 Action 4.... Action 1 Action 2 Action 3 Action 4.... Actions in the Approx. 13th Plan (nest Cost in 10 years) today's price Action 1 Action 2 Action 3.... Action 1 Action 2 Action 3 Action 4....

Strategy 2:

Strategy 3:.....

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Annex 3
Draft Program Schedule of Inception Workshop
Objectives Participants Resource Teams Workshop Program Schedule

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Inception Workshop for Preparation of Punjab State Action Plan Climate Change Objective of Workshop: To discuss the guidelines for formulating the State Action Plan on Climate Change for the state of Punjab and setting up of working groups/ drafting committees for different sectors. Participants: Officials from following Departments of Government of Punjab: Sector- Agriculture: Agriculture, Soil Conservation, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, Fisheries, Panchayati Raj & Rural Development and Forests. Sector- Water: PWD, Irrigation & Urban and Rural Water Supply departments. Sector- Energy: Power, PEDA (Non-Conventional Energy Sources). Sector- Health: Health. Sector- Industry: Industry. Sector -Urban Habitat & Transport: Urban Development, Transport, Tourism, Planning & Statistics, Town & Country Planning and Local department. Punjab Pollution Control Board Punjab Agriculture University Punjab Remote Sensing Center IMD,Chandigarh CGWB,Chandigarh Climate Change Division, MOEF Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment Chandigarh Planning department CRRID

Resource Team for the Workshop: Dr. Sanjay Tomar, Dr. Sumana Bhattacharya, Dr. Gurcharan Singh, Mr. Debashish Dasgupta, Tirthankar Banerjee Proposed Workshop Program Schedule Date: September 2011 Time 9.00 am 10.00 am 10.30 am 11.00 am 11.30 am Program Details Registration Welcome/Opening Remarks: Focal Point Climate Change Thematic Presentation on Climate Change and Adaptation: Dr. Sumana Bhattacharya MoEF Framework for preparing SAPCC : GIZ/ CES Proposed outline of sectoral background papers and data gaps: Dr. Sumana Bhattacharya Address : Chair, steering committee of SAPCC 1.00 pm LUNCH

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Time 2.00 pm 4.00 pm

Program Details Sector wise setting up of working groups /drafting Committees with relevant experts and nodal officers identified for each focus area (Themes: Agriculture, Water, Health, Energy, Industry, urban habitat and transport, Forests) TEA Recommendations

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Annex 4
Matrix
Activities undertaken by Punjab Government under each mission of NAPCC

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1. National Solar Mission


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments involved Current Actions to key con- be taken cerns to achieve the targets Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Solar Water heating

15 lac LPD commissioned Punjab Energy 2 lac LPD under construction Development 4500 LPD sanctioned Agency

Solar lighting 4700 Nos. commissioned Punjab Energy 600 Nos. under construction Development Agency Solar power generation 1.325 MW commissioned Punjab Energy 16.960 MW under construc- Development tion Agency Punjab Energy Development Agency

Assessment 2600 MW of Total Solar energy potential of state

% Solar ener- 1.325 MW commissioned Punjab Energy gy potential 16.960 MW under construc- Development of state so far tion Agency tapped

Green/Solar 1 Solar Passive Complex passive build- established at Chandigarh ings by PEDA

Punjab Energy Development Agency

Solar Pump Sets

Dept. of Soil & Water Con- Soil & Water servation propose to install Conservation 100 solar pumps under GOI sponsored Rashtriya Kirishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY) for which it has proposed additional subsidy of Rs. 2.00 lakhs per solar pump under RKVY in addition to PEDA assistance, for Micro Irrigation on Farm Tanks for conservation of irrigation water through assured power supply.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements* Departments involved

Current Actions to key con- be taken cerns to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Any other program

MC, Ludhiana has intimated Dept. of Local that case is under consider- Govt. ation for adopting the solar system. Solar cooking Punjab Energy PEDA Development Agency Conventional energy saved in the state by using solar energy system Punjab Energy PEDA Development Agency

10 Development of Solar Cities

Punjab Energy PEDA Development Agency

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2. National Mission on Enhanced Energy Efficiency


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current Actions to involved key con- be taken to cerns achieve the targets Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action Cost at to be todays taken by price 13th plan

Saving of fuels Dept. of Transport purDept. of chased 1037 new buses and Transport grounded old buses to increase the KMPL and to save the fuel. Dept. of Transport to purchase 150 new buses every year and to replace old buses of Punjab Roadways. The Dept. is presently buying EURO-2 (BS-II) buses. Under Incentive Scheme implemented, awards are given to the drivers who achieve high KMPL than the fixed target. The Dept. has installed Fuel Injection Pump Test Bench in Saheed Bhagat Singh Nagar. It is used for testing pumps of buses for ensuring saving of fuel and check on pollution. The Dept. has also installed pollution checking machines in its depots to check smoke level. Further, the Dept. buys High Speed Diesel from the renowned public sector companies like M/s Indian Oil Corporation Ltd. and Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd. to get quality diesel supply. Potential: 2550 mKW/h Pilot study on 2081Agri. pump sets by BEE in two circles (30-40% saving potential) Energy audit of 24 Govt. buildings and 2 big institutions i.e. NIPER, Mohali and

Improving efficiency in water pumps in agriculture Energy audit of buildings

Punjab Energy Development Agency

Punjab Energy Development Agency

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements* Departments Current Actions to involved key con- be taken to cerns achieve the targets Punjabi University, Patiala.

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken by price 13th plan

MC, Ludhiana has informed that energy audit for the MC building has been conducted. Audit of rest of the buildings of MC is to be done. MC, Bathinda has intimated that audit of energy conducted by Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE), New Delhi 4 Developing microhydel projects Potential: 140 MW Achievement: 35 MW Under implementation: 40 MW Replacement of Targets to provide 28 lac ordinary bulbs CFLs during 2010-11 and 20 with CFLs lac during 2011-12. 7.5 lakh replaced Bachat Lamp Yozana under CDM scheme is in progress with PSPCL. MC, Ludhiana has intimated that ordinary incandescent bulbs are not being used in the office of Nagar Nigam, Ludhiana.

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Ludhiana)

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Bathinda)

Punjab Energy Development Agency Punjab Energy Development Agency

Dept. of Local Bodies (MC, Ludhiana)

MC, Bathinda has completed Dept. of Local replacement of ordinary Bodies (MC, lights with CFL 2400 nos. i.e. Bathinda) 17% on trial basis. If it succeeds, 75% lights will be replaced with CFL. 6 Improved con- MC, Bathinda has provided trol systems for timers on main roads. For street lights energy saving MC would also provide timers in remaining part of city. MC, Ludhiana has informed that case is under consideration to adopt solar system. Dept. of Local Bodies (MC, Bathinda)

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Ludhiana)

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements* Departments Current Actions to involved key con- be taken to cerns achieve the targets - Biomass/Bagasse Cogeneration power project : 250.35 MW - Biomass Power Projects: 28.5 MW - Waste to energy: 1 No. Punjab Energy Development Agency

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken by price 13th plan

Use of renewable sources of energy (other than solar)

Formulation of Formed Energy Conservation Soil & Water Energy Conser- Cell (ECC) to cover all offices Conservation vation Cell of department. (ECC) LED 2 demo projects, 1 for street Punjab Energy lighting and other for home Development lighting are under execution. Agency

10 Energy Efficien- RFT prepared and submitted Punjab Energy cy in Municipal to Local Govt. Dept. of im- Development street lighting plementation Agency, Dept. of Local Govt. MC, Ludhiana floated tenders for replacement of 80000 street lights through ESCO mode. 11 Energy Efficien- Potential: 795 mKHW, Concerned cy in Industry Achievement: 22 mKHW in departments large industry Energy audit in 24 SMEs 10% energy saving in brick, cupola and rolling mills through improved technology. 12 Energy Efficien- Potential: 80 mKHW, Concerned cy in commer- achievement of 29 mKHW departments cial buildings through CFL and Star labelled appliances.GOP notification for compulsory SWHS, CFL, ISI marked pumps and EE building design.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements* Departments Current Actions to involved key con- be taken to cerns achieve the targets Punjab State PSTCL Transmission Corporation Limited

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken by price 13th plan

13 Efficiency in Power generation (Modernization of power plants)

14 Saving of power

Punjab State PSTCL Transmission Corporation Limited Punjab State PSTCL Transmission Corporation Limited Punjab State PSTCL Transmission Corporation Limited

15 Prevention in pilferage and other losses

16 Reduce transmission/ distribution losses

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3. Mission on Sustainable Habitats


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets Punjab Energy Development Agency Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

Solar pas- Punjab Energy Developsive build- ment Agency has conings structed a Solar Passive Complex at Chandigarh which houses this agency. It is an energy efficient building. Dept. of Forests, Punjab has set up green building in Mohali. This is also an energy efficient complex. Promotion Dept. of Soil & Water Conof use of servation has set up Energy clean fuels Conservation Cell (ECC) in which will take necessary transport steps for use of clean fuels sector under the technical assistance from PEDA. Vehicular pollution control

Dept. of Forests, Punjab

Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation, Punjab

Dept. of Transport is issuing State instructions to all the De- Transport pots from time to time to Dept. check the pollution of the buses before sending on routes.

Punjab Roadways have its own Drivers Training School, where training is imparted to the drivers. Water pol- As per MC, Ludhiana public MC, Ludhialution con- is requested from time to na trol from time to change their MCs old/damaged pipes to prevent supply of polluted water. At the same time the Sewerage Board is requested to change the damaged pipes in the cities.

Other departments also need to take similar action and intimate achievements. State Pollution Control Board need to give action taken with regard to vehicular pollution control in the state. State Pollution Control Board need to give action taken with regard to water pollution control from MCs in the state.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

As per SOE 2007, 3035 tons Local Bodies of municipal solid waste is Dept. (MC, being generated per day in Bathinda) the state. Of which 71% is contributed by 5 Municipal Corporations namely Ludhiana, Amritsar, Jalandhar, Patiala and Bathinda. 38 municipal authorities have adequate land for disposal of municipal solid waste for more than 20 years. Action taken by departments for management of solid waste include :- Constitution of District Level Committees to identify landfill sites for all urban bodies.- Dept. of L:ocal Bodies has taken an initiative under Public Private Partnership format for which the state has been divided into 9 clusters namely Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Ferozepur, Bathinda, Pathankot, Patiala, Sangur, Amritsar and GMADA. Each cluster comprises a major town and other peripheral towns. The management of solid waste would include doorto-door collection, transportation, Central Integrated Processing Plant, scientific landfill site and transfer stations. - SWM project for Ludhiana cluster has been planned under JNNURM. - Preparation of DPR by Punjab Pollution Control Board for the towns of Mandi Gobindgarh and Kartarpur. - State Govt. has enacted Punjab Plastics Carry Bags (Manufacture, Usage and Disposal) Act. Landfill site for municipal solid waste is being Department Environment & Ecologymaintained.

Municipal Solid waste management

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Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

Management of hazardous waste

As per SOE, 2007 there are 2628 hazardous waste generating units in the State which are generating approximately 124674 tons of waste per annum (TPA). Of this, 96992 TPA is recyclable, 15108 TPA is incinerable and 12573 TPA is storable. A Common Treatment Storage & Disposable Facility (TSDF) has been developed in the state at village Numbian, Teh. Derabassi, Dist. Mohali on 20.64 acres area by M/s Nimbuan Greenfield Punjab Ltd. through M/s Ramky Enviro Engineers Ltd., Hyderabad. The Facility has an expected life of 15 years. Manage- MC, Ludhiana has intimated ment of that a cow dung based bioAnimal gas plant to generate elecwaste and tricity has already been Dead ani- installed by PEDA at Dairy mals Complex, Humbran Road, Ludhiana. Another project for Tajpur Road Dairy Complex is under consideration.

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Ludhiana)

Dept. of Animal Husbandry, other MCs and other depts. to give the action taken by the respective department.

Control of Dept. of Transport has isNoise pol- sued instructions to all the lution depots to remove the pressure horns and check the buses in this regard before sending on routes. Mass Public Transport System

Transport Dept.

State Transport Dept., MCs

Environment & Ecology Department

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets Industry Dept. Punjab Pollution Control Board Dept. of Industries and State Pollution Control Board need to give action taken with regard to industrial air pollution control in the state. -do-

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

Industrial Air Pollution Control

10 Water pollution control from industries

Industries Dept. & Punjab Pollution Control Board All concerned Depts., Punjab Pollution Control Board

11 Management of Electronic waste

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4. Water Mission
Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current involved key concerns Actions to be taken to achieve the targets Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

State of drinking water supply in urban areas

For providing water supply and sewerage facilities to 100% urban population or Punjab State, a sum of Rs. 2815.82 cr. is required (Annexure 'I'). The Dept. is maintaining water supply schemes in 16 towns of Bathinda, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Dasuya, Mukerian, Tanda, Phillaur, Goraya, Nawanshahr (Shaheed Bhagat Singh Nagar), Banga, Dhilwan, Kapurthala, Sultanpur Lodhi, Phillaur and Phagwara. 86% urban population of 135 towns of Punjab State has access to drinking water supply. The Board is making efforts to achieve 100% urban population coverage with drinking water supply. MC, Bathinda has formulated project for 100% W/s in the town at a cost Rs.29.40 crores for which works is in progress. The Dept. is providing water supply to the historic towns of Muktsar, Anandpur Sahib and Fatehgarh Sahib.(a) Muktsar: Augmentation of water supply scheme at a cost of Rs.431.88 lacs under PIDB and Rs. 1541.08 lacs under JNNURM in progress.(b) Anandpur Sahib: Augmentation of water supply scheme under Gurta Gaddi Diwas Program at a cost of Rs. 306.19 lacs.(c) Talwandi Sabo: Augmentation of water supply scheme under Gurta Gadi Diwas Programme at a cost of Rs. 168.48 lacs.Further, the Dept. is implementing the project for augmentation of water supply scheme in Jalalabad town, Dist. Ferozepur at a cost of Rs. 256.00 lacs.

Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage Board

-do-

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Bathinda) Water Supply & Sanitation Dept.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Increase in water use efficiency in urban areas (by preventing leakages etc.)

MC, Ludhiana has informed that to Dept. of Local prevent leakage, they have reGovt. (MC, quested PWSSB to take necessary Ludhiana) action and educate public to maintain their water supply lines.

Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage Board has formed Patrolling Parties for different areas and they have been ordered for surprise checking of leakage and wastage of water. Flow meters have been installed on tube well for checking the discharge of water. Consumers have been educated through advertisements. State of water - The department is implementing supply in rural rural water supply program under areas SWAP mode under which rural water supply schemes are being executed with contribution from beneficiaries as well as Operation and Maintenance of schemes is being done through Gram Panchayat Water Supply and Sanitation Committees (GPWSC). This will ensure better sustainability of rural water supply schemes.- Govt. of India has made it compulsory for each state to utilize 20% funds for sustainability activities. Punjab Govt. has accorded formal approval for implementation for sustainability program in the department. Sustainability of water means to ensure availability of adequate quantity of potable water to rural population throughout the year.

Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage Board

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Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

There are 11780 main habitations Water Supply and 2331 other habitations out of & Sanitation which department has covered Dept. 12516 (10764 main habitation and 1752 other habitations = 11623 habitations) with safe drinking water supply up to 31.03.2009. Details are given below : Status as on 01.04.2010 HabitationsSchemes Schemes MH OH Totalbased uponi Canal : 671 1084 199 1283 waterii Tube well : 4501 9112 946 10058iii Percolation : 33 82 86 168 Welliv India Mark- : 820 187 1007 II Hand Pumps Total 5205 11098 1418 12516 During the year 2010-11, the Dept. has covered 373 habitations up to 31.08.2010.

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Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Rural Habitations yet to be covered as on 01.04.2010: MH OH TotalNon covered : 1628 579 1595 Habitations(NC)Partially : 2665 -2665CoveredHabitations(PC)Total : 3681 579 4260Habitations- It is proposed to cover 2023 NC/PC habitations with potable water supply during 201011.- All the balance NC/PC habitations will be covered by the end of financial year 2011-12. Further, the Dept. targeted to cover 2228 habitations (NCs 935, PC 1216 and OH 77) during 2009-10 of which following have already been covered : NC habitations 339 PC habitations 661 Other habitations 229 Total 1229 Remaining habitations will be covered by March, 2012.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Increase in water use efficiency in rural areas

State of treatment of waste water in urban areas

The following activities are being carried out by the Department of Water Supply & Sanitation.- The department is carrying out intensive IEC activities to sensitize the rural population regarding efficient use of drinking water.- The Dept. has set up a Shikayat Nivaran Kendra (SNK) at Mohali with a toll free number 1800-180-2468 where all rural water supply consumers can lodge their complaints as well as retrieve the latest information about the status of the complaints lodged by them. This will help in achieving higher O&M standards thereby increasing the water use efficiency.- The leakage, if any, is being promptly repaired by the department officials. PWSSB is maintaining sewerage schemes in the towns of Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Kartarpur (Annexure-I)

Water Supply & Sanitation Dept.

Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage Board

Environment & Ecology Department

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

The Dept. of Water Supply & Sani- Water Supply tation is providing sanitation facility & Sanitation in 3 No. historical towns namely Dept. Anandpur Sahib, Kiratpur Sahib and Muktsar.Status of installation of sewerage treatment plants in different towns is as under:i) Anandpur Sahib: A sewerage treatment plant (STP) of 8 mld capacity is under construction and the same is likely to be commissioned by January/February, 2010.ii) Muktsar: Two No. STP is to be constructed for the city. 12.2 MLD capacity STP has been approved under JNNURM out of which 3.5 MLD capacity STP at Ballamgarh Road is already operational. 1st installment under JNNURM has already been received and the work is likely to be taken in hand shortly.The case for acquisition of land for construction of 5.7 MLD STP at Jalalabad Road is under process. The construction of STP will be taken in hand after the acquisition of land.iii) Kiratpur Sahib: Detailed survey report has been framed and is pending with World Bank for NOC. The augmentation of water supply is likely to be completed by March, 2011. 6 Reuse of treated municipal waste water (i) 45 Mld treated domestic waste water from STP, Bhattian at Ludhiana to be reused for irrigation. Laying pipe network to utilize 45 Mld of treated Municipal Waste Water. Work started. This work is financed by "Sh. P.Ram Committee for Budha Nallah" Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage Board (PWSSB)

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

(ii) Treated domestic waste water -dofrom STP, Balloke at Ludhiana to be reused for irrigation. A sum of Rs. 304.62 crore is required for this purpose. Proposal for laying pipe network to utilize treated Municipal Waste Water is being prepared by Dept. of Soil Conservation, Punjab. Funding source is yet to be tied up. Soil & Water Conservation propos- Dept. of Soil es to use of treated waste water for & Water Conirrigation in 225 ha area through servation Underground Pipeline System (UGPS) at an estimated cost of Rs.175.00 lac. Baba Balbir Singh Seechewal, a renowned environmentalist and religious preacher has started mobilizing public for reuse of treated waste water in agriculture. State of Sew- Govt. of India has awarded Nirmal erage/ Sanita- Gram Puraskar to 96 villages for tion facilities achieving the target of open defein Rural areas cation free villages. The Punjab Govt. has recommended 152 no. villages for award of Nirmal Gram Puraskar during the year 2010-2011. 3487 villages in Punjab shall be made open defecation free with construction of 1.05 Lakh Individuals Household toilets up to June 2011 with financial assistance from NABARD. All remaining villages of Punjab are proposed to be open defecation free within next five years. 40% of villages in Punjab are also likely to be covered with sewerage facility in next 10 years.

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

Cleaning of polluted rivers, streams, etc.

i) Under Satluj Action Plan 8 num- Punjab Water ber STPs commissioned to treat 462 Supply & Mld of domestic waste water. Sewerage Board ii) Installation of 155 Mld capacity -doSTPs at Bhattian & Balloke in Ludhiana approved under JNNURM to treat domestic waste water before disposal on to land and river Satluj. iii) Installation of 237 Mld capacity 18 no. STPs in 12 towns approved under UIDSSMT. -do-

iv) Proposal to set up STPs at Ropar -do(10,2 & 2.5 Mld) & Nangal (5 Mld) approved by GOP to treat 19.5 Mld domestic waste water before disposal on to land or river. v) Proposal to set up 14 STPs (95.68 -doMld) in towns of district Bathinda & Mansa approved by GOP. Baba Balbir Singh Seechewal, a renowned environmentalist and religious preacher has taken lead for initiating environment protection programs particularly for cleaning and rehabilitation of Kali Bein. Govt. of Punjab has been facilitating this program. Restoration of Punjab Water Supply & Sewerage -dodegraded wa- Board proposes to ensure 100% ter bodies treatment of waste water before its release in rivers.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

10 Water bodies in rural areas (Rehabilitation of village ponds)

Dept. of Rural Development has Rural Devellaunched scheme for rehabilitation opment Dept. of village ponds in the state. . 512 ponds in 500 villages of the state ( average 25 from each district) are proposed to be rehabilitated as pilot project at an estimated cost of 33.66 crores within next one year. . The ponds of all the remaining villages are likely to be renovated within next ten years. With the efforts of the PSCST, Harike, Kanjli and Ropar wetlands have been included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance. These wetlands were earlier designated as wetlands of national importance by MEF, GOI. Conservation measures at these wetlands are being taken by involving various state government departments. Steps being taken include soil conservation, wildlife conservation, plantation, weed removal, water quality assessment, livelihood development issues for using water hyacinth, public awareness, etc. In order to ensure availability of quality water throughout the year for drinking and cooking purposes, RO Plants stand installed and commissioned in 367 villages of 8 districts, where ground water is not potable due to high concentration of chemicals in water or where sufficient quantity of raw water is not available from canals due to various reasons.It is proposed to install R.O Plants in 246 villages during the year 2010-11, In future, R.O. plants will be installed keeping in view the quality of ground water and/or availability canal water in the village.

11 Conservation of wetlands

PSCST and other related departments

12 Assured availability of drinking water through Reverse Osmosis (RO) Plants.

Dept. of Water Supply & Sanitation

Environment & Ecology Department

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Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action Cost at to be todays taken price by 13th plan

13 Increase in water use efficiency by industries

Industries Depts., Punjab Pollution Control Board

14 Reuse of treated water by industries

Industries Depts., Punjab Pollution Control Board

15 Water bodies in urban areas

Local Bodies Dept.

Environment & Ecology Department

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5. Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current key Actions involved concerns to be taken to achieve the targets Dept. of Soil & Conservation Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

Conservation efforts for Shivalik hills in Punjabplantation activities

Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation is implementing GOI sponsored National Watershed Development Project for Rain fed Areas (NWDPRA) in kandi area and Treatment of catchment area of flood prone River (FPR) Ghaggar and State Plan scheme for watershed development in nonproject areas in Kandi area. Under the program it has treated approx. 69071 ha area since 8th Plan. Components of the scheme include plantation activities, Soil & Water Erosion Control and Livelihood support through sustainable agriculture & allied activities on watershed basis in middle & lower reaches of Kandi area. Further, it proposes to extend the activity to 24276 ha area. Conservation Dept. of Soil & Water Soil Conservaefforts for Conservation has imtion Dept. Shivalik hills plemented GOI sponin Punjab-soil sored National Waterconservation shed Development Proactivities ject for Rain fed Areas (NWDPRA) in Kandi Area and Treatment of catchment area of flood prone River (FPR) Ghaggar and State Plan scheme for watershed development in nonproject areas in approx. 69071 ha in Kandi Area at a cost of Rs. 4476.61

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current key Actions involved concerns to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

lac. The Dept. would further carry out activities in 24276 ha area at approx. cost of Rs. 2832.20 lac.

Conservation With the efforts of the of wetlands PSCST, MEF has desigin Shivaliks nated Nangal Wetland, Ropar Wetland and Ranjit Sagar Dam Wetland located in the Shivaliks/its foothills as wetlands of national importance. Conservation measures at these wetlands are being taken by involving various state agencies under the coordination of PSCST with financial support from MEF, GOI. Steps being taken include plantation of native species, soil conservation, water quality assessment, wetland education & awareness, etc. State Govt. has also identified Dholbaha Wetland as wetland of state importance. Development As above of watersheds

All departments

Soil Conservation Dept.

Environment & Ecology Department

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6. Mission for a Green India


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments involved Current key Actions concerns to be taken to achieve the targets Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action to Cost at be taken todays by 13th price plan

Parks and gardens

Ludhiana has 758 parks. Dept. of Local 373 parks are being Govt. (MC, Lumaintained by Park dhiana) Management Committees for which Municipal Corporation is providing funds @ Rs.1.00/- per sq.m. per month. During the year 2008-09. MC provided Rs. 65.40 lacs for 368 parks. During 2009-10 it provided Rs. 69.84 lacs for the maintenance of 373 parks. In rest of the parks like Rose Garden, Mini Rose Garden, etc. the MC itself maintains the plantation along 77.5 km center verges, green belts and roads in the city. MC has planted a number of trees during the previous years as per details mentioned below : 2005-06 30050 saplings 2006-07 38039 2007-08 28957 2008-09 34800 2009-10 38511 Further, it proposes to take up plantation during next two years : 2010-11 32000 2011-12 35000 MC has a program to plant 2000 saplings around buildings in four zones and sub-zones.

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MC, Bathinda is developed and is maintaining 70 parks including One Rose garden. 2500 plants planted in parks and on roads sides/streets. Till 2012, 92 parks maintain committees will be formed to enhance public participation. 5000 more plants will be planted in parks and along roads/streets. Plantation in Schools are actively takschools ing up environment conservation programs including plantation of native species of trees, shrubs, herbs and medicinal plants with financial and technical support from Ministry of Environment & Forests, Govt. of India under National Green Corps Programme and National Environment Awareness Campaign. PSCST is coordinating implementation of these schemes in the State.Dept. of Forests is providing saplings to schools for plantation activities. Any other State Govt. is mobilizing program public to plant trees on large scale under the scheme 'Nanhi Chhan'. Religious leaders have initiated mass plantation programs in the state involving public students and NGOs.

Dept. of Local Govt. (MC, Bathinda)

PSCST, Education Dept., Forests Dept.,

Environment & Ecology Department

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Natural forest City Forests MC, Bathinda Nil

Forests Dept.

Urban Local Bodies, PUDA, Improvement Trusts Forests Dept., Irrigation Dept., Water Resources Directorate, PWD (B&R)

Forests along roads, canals, rivers, streams

Plantation of forest trees Areas under horticultural trees (Fruit bearing trees only) Plantation in government buildings other than schools

Forests Dept.

Horticulture Dept.,

Horticulture Dept., Forests Dept.Respective Depts.

10 Private forests 11 Plantation in Shamlat lands 12 Plantation in cant areas 13 Plantation in industrial units

Forests Dept. Rural Dept., Forest Dept. Army/Forest Dept. Dept. of Industries, PPCB

Environment & Ecology Department

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14 Plantation in Railway colonies

Railway Dept.

Environment & Ecology Department

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7. Mission on Sustainable Agriculture


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current involved key concerns Actions to be taken to achieve the targets Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action to be taken by 13th plan Cost at todays price

Improved irrigation by promoting sprinkler systems

As per PAU, it is estimated that PAU, LudhiaPunjab has a potential of bring- na ing 3,57,000 ha of land under sprinkler irrigation. This method is suitable for irrigating all the close growing crops except paddy. The Sprinkler irrigation system is also suitable in undulating terrain where land shaping is expensive or technically not feasible. PAU had conducted a study on sugarcane using Sprinkler method and found that it saved 36.3 cm (20.6%) of total water used consequently increasing the WUE by 24.7 percent. The sugar yield increased by 1.62 percent under sprinkler method as compared to surface method of irrigation. Dept. of Soil & Water Conser- Soil & Water vation has implemented GOI Conservation sponsored Micro Irrigation scheme and State sponsored NABARD-RIDF Project in 8819 ha. area at a cost of Rs. 2709.77 lac. It proposes to extend the scheme in 21000 ha area. The Dept. is providing 75% subsidy on Drip/Sprinkler systems to the farmers in all districts, 50% subsidy on Farm Water Storage Tanks in Southwestern districts for saving water resources through this scheme.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Improved irrigation by promoting drip irrigation systems

As per PAU estimates, Punjab PAU, Ludhiahas a potential of bringing na 65,000 ha under drip irrigation because State has about 1.5 lakh ha area under vegetables, 0.47 lakh ha area under fruits, 6.0 lakh ha under cotton and 1.25 lakh ha under sugarcane where drip irrigation can be used efficiently. Thus this technology if adopted in proper perspective can prove to be a boon to the farmers of Punjab. It has been estimated that by converting 1 lakh ha land under micro irrigation will result :The total water saving of 347 million Cu.m./annum.- Fertilizer saving of Rs.105 lakh KWH of energy per year worth Rs.7 crores by pumping less water. Employment generation of 1.25 lakh persons. Saving on infrastructural investment on major irrigation projects - 265 crores. AICRP on Application of Plastics in Agriculture - Various vegetable crops like chili, cauliflower, potato, tomato, pea, bottle guard, okra and carrot has been raised with drip irrigation system. The increase in yield and saving in water ranges from 15-56% and 17-63% respectively. - Use of mulches along with drip irrigation has improved the processing quality of potato along with increase in yield by 30-35% as compared to no mulch condition. - Adaptive trials for three years on the use of drip irrigation in cotton showed that it saved 28% water and 20% increase in yield. P a g e | 48

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Effect of Mulches and Drip Irri- PAU gation on Hydrothermal Regimes of Soil, Tuber Yield and Quality of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) to suggest irrigation scheduling for different drip irrigated crops. To study the salt & moisture PAU distribution in the soil profile under drip irrigation system with saline water. Effect of low tunnel environment on growth and yield of capsicum using drip irrigation system. Determination of maximum lateral length for uniform application of water using various design parameters of drip irrigation system Response of Tomato to different levels of fertigation under plastic mulch and crop geometry with drip irrigation to optimize fertigation levels and effect of mulching on yield and quality. Studies on effect of crop geometry, irrigation and fertigation on cauliflower under drip irrigation to optimize irrigation and fertigation levels and its effect on yield and quality. MC, Ludhiana has intimated Dept. of Local that it has imposed a condition Govt. (MC, for installation of Rain Water Ludhiana) Harvesting systems in the residential plots of the size of 250 sq.yds and above. The construction plan will be approved only if this is provided.

Rain water harvesting

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PAU programs include water- PAU, Ludhiashed hydrology studies in Kandi na area under Kandi watershed area development project for:Hydrological parameters for the design of small water harvesting structures for providing supplemental/Lifesaving irrigation in Kandi area.- Performance evaluation and impact assessment of small water harvesting structures in Kandi area.PAU's National Professorship project "Development of technologies for the control of declining water table in irrigated areas" for :- Quality status and optimum utilization of village pond water for irrigation.optimum dike heights for rainfall conservation in paddy fields.- Evaluated impact of water harvesting structures on ground water balance in Kandi area. PAU also proposes for : - Development of an efficient composite filter for groundwater recharge uses surface runoff through gravity well. -Recharging dry shallow aquifers using surface runoff. - Impact of Rainwater harvesting through rooftop for groundwater recharge. - Transfer of Technology. Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation have provided 100 nos. of Rainwater Harvesting Structures under GOI sponsored NWDPRA and State Plan scheme for Rainwater Harvesting in kandi area at an approx. cost of Rs. 500.00 lac. Further it proposes to install 60 nos. Rain Water Harvesting Structures to Environment & Ecology Department PAU, Ludhiana

Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation

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promote natural recharge of ground water.

Recharging of ground water

Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting has been made mandatory in all building above 200 sq.yds. by amending the buildings by-laws vide Chief Town Planner, Local Govt. Dept. Punjab vide notification No. 10/19/05-2LG/803 III dated 28.12.2005.PUDA is also amending building by-laws applicable outside the municipal limits, to make Roof Top Rain Water Harvesting mandatory in building constructed in area where water table is falling. Under All India Coordinated Research Project on Agriculture (AICRP) on Optimization of ground water utilization through tube wells and pumps PAU, Ludhiana has developed: - Design of rainwater harvesting structure through rooftop for groundwater recharge which has been recommended by the University Research Evaluation Committee. The technology has been implemented at field level at various sites which includes educational institutes, marriage palaces, residential houses, etc. - National Professorship project "Development of technologies for the control of declining water table in irrigated areas"

Water Resources & Environment Directorate

PAU, Ludhiana

Environment & Ecology Department

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- Quality status and optimum utilization of village pond water for ground water recharge. By renovating village ponds water table decline can be arrested up to 5 cm/year. - Development low cost filtation technique (Vertical filter) for recharge with silty water. - Studied the feasibility of using surface drains for recharge of ground water. Improvement of water quality of domestic waste water through soil aquifer treatment system (SAT) for ground water recharge. Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation has installed 22 Nos. artificial recharging structures in community buildings with the technical and financial assistance of Central Ground Water Board at a cost of Rs. 178.00 lac. It proposes to install 200 more structures. As per Central Ground Water Board, Chandigarh Report titled Master Plan on Artificial Recharge to Ground Water in Punjab State, 2002. about 1201 MCM of non-committed surface run-off is available from river Ravi, Beas, Sutlej & Ghagar which can be utilized as source of water to recharge ground water reservoir. Besides this 24.58 MCM of rainwater can be harvested from roof tops of urban areas of the State The total number of structures required to recharge the surplus run-off will be 70,640. Besides this 1,38,684 recharge structures will be required to harvest roof top rain water in urban areas. Environment & Ecology Department

Dept. of Soil & Conservation

Water Resources & Environment Directorate

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(a) Work of 8 No. Pilot Artificial Recharge Schemes in various districts of Punjab completed with the financial and technical assistance of Central Ground Water Board. The initial results are encouraging and efforts are being made to implement such schemes in 79% area of the state where ground water table is falling to arrest its decline. Following schemes have been completed : - Dhuri Drain & Dhuri Link Drain, Distt. Sangrur. - Bassian Drain, Distt. Moga. - Sirhind Choe, Miranpura Choe and Patiala Nadi, Distt. Patiala. - Bilga and Sari Canal Rest House, Distt. Jalandhar. - Bhatian Canal Colony, Dist. Ludhiana. On the basis of success of these 8 No. Artificial Recharge Schemes and the Master Plan on artificial recharge for Punjab state (prepared by C.G.W.B.) a project for artificial recharge to augment declining ground water resources of the state amounting to Rs. 31.90 crores, submitted to NABARD for financing, has been partially approved for Rs. 9.62 crores for funding under RIDF-XIII for studying its initial impact. During 2008-09, Rs. 182.76 lacs mobilization advance was released by NABARD, but funds could not be utilized due to time taken to clarify certain conditions laid down by NABARD and increase in cost of project due to escalation. Now this project has been revised amounting to Rs. 15.44 crores Environment & Ecology Department P a g e | 53

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for 59 No. Artificial Recharge Schemes in various Rest Houses in the state of Punjab under NABARD Project by using canal water (b) The area lying between Chandigarh-HoshiarpurDasuya-Mukerian Road and Shivalik Foothills in Punjab is known as Kandi Area. The Govt. of Punjab declared this tract as economically and socially backward area. Till date, 12 low dams have been constructed to provide irrigation facilities to about 13000 hectares of land. These dams constructed for irrigation and flood control and shall also indirectly help in augmenting the ground water resources of the state. In addition, out of total 17 Low Dams to give total irrigation facilities to 15861 hectares, it is proposed to construct 9 No. Low Dams to cater irrigation facilities to 3400 hectares of land under Bharat Nirman Programme costing Rs. 170.00 crores, in addition to check flashy flood menace in the area. These dams indirectly help in augmenting the ground water resources of the state. (c) Pilot Artificial Recharge to augment declining ground water resources of district Moga in Phidda Drain and Chand Bhan Drain amounting to Rs. 1.79 crore has been approved by the Govt. of India under Centrally Sponsored Schemes (For details ref. Annexure-III).

Environment & Ecology Department

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(d) Various departments comprehensive proposal for 'Management of Declining Ground Water Resources to sustain Food Production', which includes 'On Farm Management practices like Proper/Precision land leveling, furrow method of irrigation, suggested pre and post-sowing irrigation schedules adoption, straw mulching, tillage, etc. are being encouraged through PAU, Ludhiana, underground pipeline system n place of Kacha Field Channels for Kotla Branch Canal and Ghaggar Branch Canal system for conservation of water resources amounting to Rs. 3498.40 crores stands submitted to Ministry of Water Resources, Govt. of India in March 2009 for consideration and providing financial aid. (e) Artificial recharge by using canal water to augment declining ground water resources in Amritsar, Tarn Taran and Sangrur districts have been prepared and submitted to Central Ground Water Board for financing under centrally sponsored schemes (For detail ref. Annexure-IV). (f) Various steps, including revival of ponds, water-bodies cleaning of Budha Nallah etc. have been initiated so that the declining ground water level can be revived to help farmers to recoup from additional expenditure for installation of submersible pumps instead of centrifugal pumps.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Recharging of sub soil water

The recharging of subsoil water Dept. of Waby harvesting of rain water in ter Supply & the water works area or roof Sanitation top surface run off from Govt. High/Senior Secondary Schools is being carried out by the department.From the year 200910 the department has started the work of Recharging of sub soil water by harvesting of rain water in the water works area or in the Govt. High/Senior Secondary Schools where sufficient quantity of roof top rain water is available.The work of recharging of subsoil water will be replicated throughout the state in next five years. PAU, Ludhiana PAU, LudhiaAll India Coordinated Research na Project on "Agricultural drainage under actual farming conditions on watershed basis (1982-002)" The following technologies were development - Multiple well point system. Cyclic use of canal water and groundwater. - Sub-surface drainage system Bio-drainage system. Research on Development of Irrigation & Drainage System - Water management practices for enhancing crop production with the application of Adjuvant under waterlogged condition under which 20% water saving & 6.3% increase in yield was reported. - Inventory of salt affected waterlogged areas of southwestern districts of Punjab is prepared. - Preliminary survey of water logged areas of Muktsar district

Measures to remove and prevent water logging of agricultural areas

Environment & Ecology Department

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has been completed for submission of Pilot Project on Agricultural Drainage for reclamation of salt affected waterlogged areas. Promotion of PAU, LudhianaA Network Pro- PAU, Ludhiaorganic farm- ject on organic farming funded na ing by ICAR has been in operation since 2004 and a new research project to evaluate Jeev Amrit (a cow dung and urine preparation) in rice - wheat and maize wheat cropping systems has been sanctioned by Punjab State Farmers' Commission in 2009.Research work already done:The four experiments being conducted since the start of project 'Network Project on Organic Farming' have been concluded with the observation that the cropping system viz Basmati rice - wheat - green manuring, Turmeric - onion, Summer groundnut- Garlic, Maize - durum wheat - cowpea (fodder) and Rice - Garlic + Mentha performance better or at par with the chemical system. The chemical system was maintained as pure chemical and not as per the recommendations in the Package of Practices. The crops like onion, garlic, turmeric, summer groundnut and maize performed exceptionally better under organic management than the conventional system. The soil health improved under organic and integrated management systems. There was an increase in the organic and integrated management.

Environment & Ecology Department

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All the fodder crops and cropping systems (maize-berseembajra, maize-berseemmaize+cowpea, sorghum+guara-oats-cowpeas and sorghum-berseem) responded well to organic management and performed better than the chemical system. The maize yield with farmyard manure, vermicompost and combination of the farmyard manure+vermin compost + crop residue was significantly more than the crop residue alone. Trichogramma japonicum and T. chilonis release proved effective for pest management in rice, basmati rice and maize. Promising cropping systems recommended for Organic farming Rice/Basmati rice - wheat Maize/Soybean - wheat Maize-D.Wheat-Cowpea fodder Maize-Potato-Onion PAU, Ludhiana also plan to PAU, Ludhiaconduct studies with regard to na : The performance of new cropping systems (Basmati Rice-Wheat-Summer Moong, Maize-Potato-Summer Moong, Cotton-Gram (desi), Maize (Popcorn)-Gram (Kabuli) and Turmeric (cowpea mulch)Onion) will be studied under organic, integrated and chemical management systems and the effect of these management systems on soil health will also be studied.The effect of organic manures/preparations like FYM, Panchgavaya, Biodynamic preparations and their combinations will be studied on boi Environment & Ecology Department P a g e | 58

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intensive cropping systems like Maize+Cowpea (fodder)Wheat+Chickpea-S.Moong and Basmati rice-Wheat-Green Manure.The non-chemical management of weeds in organic basmati rice-wheat cropping systems and organic turmeric will be studied. The study on cropping systems based on fodder crops (Sorghum-Barseem, MaizeBarseem, Maize-BarseemMaize+cowpeas and Sorghum+Guara-Oats-cowpeas) under organic, integrated and chemical management system will be continued. The laboratory studies on Jeev Amrit (a cow dung and urine preparation) will be done and its effect on productivity or Rice-Wheat and Maize-Wheat cropping systems will be studied.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Promotion of PAU, LudhianaBased on the PAU, Ludhiatimely sow- optimum sowing time for real- na ing of crops izing the higher yields, the details with respect to various cropping systems which have been recommended are as follows:Maize-potato-onion: This cropping system gave highest net returns with substantial saving of water (82 cm) and gave 2.1 times productivity than rice-wheat system. For this system, sow maize (PMH 1) in mid-June, potato (Kufri Chandermukhi) in first fortnight of October and onion (Punjab Naroya) from 10-15 January for high yield realization.Summer groundnutpotato-bajra (fodder): This system gave better productivity levels than rice-wheat systme with sizeable saving of irrigation water. For this system now groundnut (M 522) in first week of May, potato in first week of October and bajra fodder in the first fortnight of March.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Maize/rice-gobhi sarsonsummer moongbean: These systems produce more yield and economic returns than maize-wheat and rice-wheat systems. Therefore, maize should be sown in first fortnight of June, rice in second fortnight of June, gobhi sarson from 10-30 October and summer mongbean in the first fortnight of April. The summer mongbean can be sown without tillage after applying pre-sowing irrigation. Rice-gram-summer moong: This sytem produces more yield and economic returns than rice-wheat system. Therefore, the rice should be transplanted in the second fortnight of June, gram should be sown from 25 October to 10 November in two lines per bed and sow summer moongbean in the 2-3 week of April. PAU, Ludhiana also proposes to conduct studies to find out biologically productive, remunerative and resource conservative bio-intensive complementary cropping systems. 9 Promotion of :

Environment & Ecology Department

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(i) Optimum - Optimum use of fertilizers is use of ferti- promoted through soil-test lizers based application. - Fertilizer N management through need-based application using leaf color chart (LCC). - Use of FYM, poulty manure, and industrial wastes (rice busk ash, bagasse ash) improved crop yields and saved fertilizer. (ii) Paddy & - Straw can be managed either wheat straw by incorporation in soil to build management up organic carbon status; or to avoid - By surface retention as burning mulching to reduce soil water evaporation and save irrigation water. - Sowing of wheat in zero-tiled field by surface retention of rice residues (Happy Seeder) is a better option to avoid burning. (iii) Reclama- - A sound and economically tion of Alkali reclaiming large tracts of alkali Soils soils. (iv) Use of modern ecofriendly equipment (Happy seeders, straw balers, Laser Levellor, etc.)

PAU, Ludhiana

PAU, Ludhiana

PAU, Ludhiana

The Punjab Agricultural Univer- PAU, Ludhiasity introduced the zero tillage na technology for sowing of wheat after rice. The adoption of this technology can provide multiple benefits with respect to timely farming operations, increased productivity, reduced input requirements, lower cost of production, scope for crop diversification and improved soil and human health and above all increased farmers' profits. In Punjab, area under zero tillage wheat increased from 800 hectare (2000-01) to 5.92 lac hectares during 200708. Farmers could save about 171.68 crores of rupees by skipping tillage operations at P a g e | 62

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(v) Happy Seeders

the time of seed bed preparation on the basis of a saving of about Rs.2900-4400/h. This technology helped to save 50 to 60 litres of diesel/ha (29.6 million litres) and avoided the CO2 emission by about 130 to 156 kg/ha (76960 tons), ultimately, helped to reduce air pollution to a great extent if 2.6 kg CO2 production/one litre of diesel burnt is taken as the basis. Similarly, 1.9 hectare-cm. saving of irrigation water from the first irrigation (911248 hectare meter at state level. Zero tillage also saves the energy @ 30%/ha (3342.4 million MJ) of total energy (18800 MJ/ha) used for sowing of wheat. Taking cue from zero tillage wheat, now this technology has been recommended for barley, oats, raya, linseed, summer moong, maize, kharif moong, soybean and arhar. An ACIAR funded project on PAU, Ludhia'Fine tuning the Happy Seeder na technology for adoption in North West India' is operational at Dept. of FM&PE, PAU, Ludhiana from Oct. 2007 onwards. It has : - Developed light weight Happy Seeder prototype. - Organized demonstrations/trainings on HS for its large scale adoption. - The area under HS technology increased from 700 acres in 2008-09 to 2100 acres in 200910.

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(vi) Laser Farmer participatory research Leveller (LLL) trials were conducted under US Aid funded project through CYMMIT by the DFM&PE, PAU, Ludhiana to evaluate and popularize Laser Land Leveller and it was found that :- It saves irrigation water to the tune of 25-30%.- Improves fertilizer and weed efficacy.- Improves crop production by 5%.- Technology was recommended by the university to the state farmers in 2006.- Organized demonstrations/trainings on LLL for its large scale adoption.Based on the information provided by the Laser Leveller suppliers around 2000 units are operational in Punjab state and has levelled around 6,00,000 ha of land. (vii) Straw Evaluation and modifications of baler field bailing machines for combine harvested paddy fields. Performance evaluation of three commercially available balers vis. CLAAS, New Holland and Kartar was carried out. Compaction ratio of paddy and wheat was 7 to 10 and 3 to 5 respectively. Bailing efficiency was 75% approx. Cost of operation in stubble shaved field was Rs. 3531/- approx. Few demonstrations were also carried out. The cost of operation at present for 30 days operations in paddy alone comes out to be Rs. 7000/- per ha.

PAU, Ludhiana

PAU, Ludhiana

Environment & Ecology Department

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Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements*

Departments Current involved key concerns

Actions to be taken to achieve the targets

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to be taken by 13th plan

Cost at todays price

10 Other programmes

Further, for management of PAU, Ludhiacrop residues, PAU, Ludhiana na proposes to take up programmes on :- Evaluation of kharif and rabi fodder crops under No-tillage/Minimum tillage and conventional tillage after wheat.- Evaluation of conservation technology (Zero tillage, Happy seeder and rotavator) for paddy residue management.- Nutrient management in crops sown with different paddy management techniques.- Studies on long term effects of permanent zero tillage.- Studies on long term effect of different options of paddy residue management on rice-wheat cropping system.Evaluation of different methods of direct seeding rice to sustain the productivity of ricewheat cropping system.

Environment & Ecology Department

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Project: Preparation of State Action Plan for Climate Change Document: 2011074/EC/Annex 4

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8. Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change


Sr. Sector No. Programs & Achievements* Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets Modernization and up gradation of hydrological data collection and storage system to have a welldeveloped Hydrological Information System for water resources planning and proper operation of irrigation systems has been taken up in State. Under the world bank aided hydrology project Phase-II, through the Ministry of Water Resources, Govt. of India, State Data Centre shall be constructed at Mohali, which will improve the institutional and organization arrangements, technical capabilities and physical facilities available for measurement, validation, collection, analysis, transfer and dissemination of water related data. Govt. of Punjab has appointed Dr. Neelima Jerath, Executive Director, PSCST to act as a nodal point/nodal officer. Punjab State Council for Science & Technology had prepared proposal for preparation of Green Budget for the state at a cost of Rs. 1225.29 lacs and submitted to the Govt. of Punjab. Details of the scheme are at Annexure-V. Water Resources & Environment Directorate Actions to be taken by 12th plan Cost of each action at todays price Action to be taken by 13th plan

Data base generation

Any other program

All concerned departments

Environment & Ecology Department

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Project: Preparation of State Action Plan for Climate Change Document: 2011074/EC/Annex 4

Aug 2011 Rev: R0

Sr. Sector No.

Programs & Achievements* Departments Current key Actions to involved concerns be taken to achieve the targets Punjab Energy Development Agency, Local Bodies Dept., Punjab Pollution Control Board All concerned departments

Actions to be taken by 12th plan

Cost of each action at todays price

Action to be taken by 13th plan

R & D Projects for energy efficiency, waste utilization, biofuels, etc.

Education and mass awareness about climate change issues

Brain storming, knowledge sessions, state related national & international symposia/ conferences Remote sensing information of local climate and changing pattern of vegetation

All concerned departments

Punjab Remote Sensing Centre

Networking with relevant agencies

Dept. of Science, Technology & Environment

* Note: All concerned departments need to identify activities relevant to their department , check the data included and provide necessary additional information in the format for updating and finalization of the document tor submission to the Govt. of India

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Annex 5
Evolution of Framework towards preparation of State Action Plan
MOEF

(Draft 1 )

Strategy/ Evolution of a Framework towards Preparation of State Level Climate Change and Action Plan Or Towards evolution of a Framework for the preparation of State Level Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan
1. Introduction: Climate change poses an unprecedented level of threat to life on earth. In addition, predictions about the scale and enormity of the impacts of climate change are continually being revised upwards, so that what was already a serious situation continues to look even more threatening. Atmospheric greenhouse gases are creating warmer temperatures, ice melt, sea-level rise and an unpredictable climate, with a range of extremely serious and hard-to-predict consequences. It has huge economic implications too. Climate change adaptation process alone is estimated to cost US$75100 billion a year from 2010 onwards for developing countries1. The impacts of climate change in India are expected to be significant. India, in fact is considered highly vulnerable to climate change, not only because of high physical exposure to climate-related disasters (65% of India is drought prone, 12% flood prone, and 8% susceptible to cyclones2), but also because of the dependency of its economy and of the majority of its population on natural resources and climate-sensitive sectors (e.g. water resources, agriculture, forests, animal husbandry, fisheries, etc.). Climate change is expected to increase water stress due to the decline in rainfall, with impact on water availability (per capita water availability is expected to decrease from 1820 m3/yr in 2001 to 1140 m3/yr in 20503) and agriculture/food security (60% of crop area in India is under rain fed agriculture). As mentioned in the initial National Communication to UNFCCC, the basic sways of Indian economy such as agriculture, forests, fisheries etc. are likely to be severely hit due to climate change, thus impacting
1 2

Natural Solutions, 2009 NIDM, 2007. 3 IPCC, 2007. P a g e | 68

the lives of large number of people depending on these sectors 4. The poorest of the poor will be the most affected by these changes. In view of the context mentioned above, it has been the endeavour of the national Government to understand and put in place appropriate institutional mechanisms (both at national and sub-national level) for addressing climate change issues in a comprehensive manner. 2. Indias Approach to address climate change: The National Action Plan on Climate Change, 2008 (NAPCC) through its eight Missions 5 provides multi-pronged, long term and integrated framework for addressing climate change. NAPCC outlines the following principles in this regard: Protecting the poor and vulnerable sections of society through an inclusive and sustainable development strategy, sensitive to climate change. Achieving national growth objectives through a qualitative change in direction that enhances ecological sustainability, leading to further mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Devising efficient and cost-effective strategies for end-use Demand Side Management. Deploying appropriate technologies for both adaptation and mitigation of greenhouse gases emissions extensively as well as at an accelerated pace. Engineering new and innovative forms of market, regulatory and voluntary mechanisms to promote sustainable development. Effecting implementation of programmes through unique linkages, including with civil society and local government institutions and through public-privatepartnership. Welcoming international cooperation for research, development, sharing and transfer of technologies enabled by additional funding and a global IPR regime that facilitates technology transfer to developing countries under the UNFCCC.
4

NATCOM

National Solar Mission, National Mission on Enhanced Energy Efficiency, National Mission on Sustainable Habitat, National Water Mission, National Mission for Sustaining Himalayan Eco-System, National Mission for Green India, National Mission for Sustainable Agriculture and National Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change

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NAPCC identifies a number of steps to simultaneously advance India's development and climate change related objectives of adaptation and mitigation. The focus is on promoting understanding of climate change, adaptation and mitigation, energy efficiency and natural resource conservation. In short, India envisages to progress towards a low carbon climate resilient development trajectory. 3. Need for State Level Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan: With climate change becoming increasingly central to policy imperatives of Government at various levels, there is need for coherence between climate change strategies at national and sub-national level. Though the Government (both at national and state level), over the years, has considerably enhanced sectoral budgetary outlays, these inputs still remain vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Unless addressed adequately, the development gains achieved by various sectors could be undone and may even be reversed by the negative impacts of climate change. This will be a major impediment in the national endeavor to achieve national development priorities including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Hence there is need for developing cross-sectoral strategies and Action Plans for effectively combating the impacts of climate change. The implementation of actions to successfully address climate change (both mitigation and adaptation) will only be achieved, and sustained, through involvement and commitment at all levels of decision-making. In particular, sub-national authorities (at State level) have a key role to play in actively incorporating climate change considerations into day-to-day governance and adopting climate-friendly policies, programmes, regulations, and investment decisions. While the national Government remains the central actor by providing overall enabling policy and institutional environment, State level authorities need to play an even more crucial role in tackling climate change at the ground zero. In this context, to operationalise the implementation of the NAPCC and its constituent Missions as well as to address other issues related to climate change, it is imperative that the State Governments may prepare SCCSAPs, which will enable them to address the existing as well as futuristic issues of climate change and reduce risks and vulnerabilities therein. SCCSAP will build on the existing policies of the state Government by taking into consideration the ongoing programmes and schemes being implemented at the state level as well as the NAPCC. The SCCSAP needs to be integrated into the state level planning process so that the resource allocation for the implementation of the identified adaptation / mitigation measures can be defined with an objective to achieve the development goals of the state Governments. As it may not be possible to include complete array of measures to address climate change, the SAPCC should be seen as a
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dynamic document which will follow a continuous interactive process to reflect the changes and developments happening at the national, state and local level. 4. Evolution of an approach and suitable framework for State Level Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan: While awareness about climate change has increased across the country, to ensure a certain level of coherence at the national level, it is important to provide a common generic framework to the states for the preparation of the SAPCC. Although some of the states have initiated the process of preparing climate change policies, strategies or even Action Plans (for example Climate Change Agenda for Delhi 6), it is important to have a common understanding about the purpose and content of State Action Plans with scope to incorporate regional/ site specific variations at the state level. The states would require orientation to ensure uniformity in contents as well in the methodological steps on the preparation of SCCASP particularly on the following: a) Impacts and Vulnerability assessment: The states may require specific guidance, in terms of methodological steps and common guidelines, to analyze the impacts of climate change as well as vulnerability assessment at the regional and local level. Reference for this may be drawn from the national exercises conducted for impacts and vulnerability assessment e.g. Indias National Communication to UNFCCC. b) Identify Adaptation/Mitigation options: The Mission documents under the NAPCC will provide the guiding framework to the states in identifying adaptation / mitigation options7 suiting to regional or local requirements. Various ongoing programmes and schemes should be included and their relevance to complement adaptation / mitigation needs to be examined. This will also include additional interventions and cross cutting issues which are not covered under the eight Missions. The states may also require criteria to distinguish between the business as usual and new adaptation/mitigation actions. c) Prioritize Adaptation/Mitigation options: This will require multi perspective deliberations as views of various stakeholders including Government, research institutions, academia, NGOs and Civil Society needs to be considered while prioritizing the adaptation/mitigation options. The states may require inputs

6
7

http://www.delhi.gov.in/wps/wcm/connect/Environment/environment/our+services/climate+change+agenda+for+delhi+2009-2012. Draft National Water Mission (http://wrmin.nic.in/index2.asp?sublinkid=579&langid=1&slid=794) National Solar Mission (http://mnes.nic.in/) National Mission for Sustaining Himalayan eco-system (http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/national%20mission-4.pdf)

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about the national level priorities to align the actions at the local level. Support will also be required for the stakeholders at the local levels to incorporate these options in the planning process. Adaptation/ mitigation options may also need to be prioritized in terms of time horizon (matching the plan period) and the resources available. d) Financing Adaptation/Mitigation options: Additional resources as well as policy shifts will be required to implement some of the adaptation/mitigation options. States may require active guidance to identify potential financial sources as well as appropriate technology. They may also require support to design the feedback mechanism to the national level missions. In view of the above, it is appropriate that SCCSAPs are prepared according to a common and generic framework under the overarching NAPCC while providing scope for incorporating state specific contexts and situations. This will enable proper coordination of the process of preparation of SCCSAPs and its subsequent implementation at varied sub-national situations. 5. Guiding Principles of SCCSAP Acknowledging climate change is about interacting with complex systems. Understanding the limits of scientific predictions, nature of uncertainties and how to interpret climate data. Going beyond risk management by looking at actions that address climate change and deliver benefits for growth and development. Looking at how climate change will interact with existing vulnerabilities. Considering the distribution and transaction trade-offs (who will win, who will lose & how these may be handled). Identifying what systems & services can build climate resilience. Using longer time frames and promoting greater flexibility to respond to a range of scenarios. Considering what investments needed in knowledge and research to reduce uncertainty and improve knowledge about appropriate responses. Considering role of both state-led (planned) & bottom-up (autonomous) adaptation. Building broader stakeholder engagement to maximize the perspectives and to increase robustness of analysis. Addressing state-specific priority issues, whilst also creating appropriate enabling environment for implementation of NAPCC at state level.

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Looking for adaptations and mitigation options offering substantial development benefits e.g. health, energy security, energy efficiency, growth, jobs and income generation. Exploring existing and new & additional carbon finance potential. Considering governance and institutional contexts and ensuring appropriate Institutional arrangements and building capacities keeping in view the political environment, high-level central ownership, coordination, inter-departmental consultations, stakeholder involvement, and integration with regular planning and budgetary processes. Setting out options, then evaluating and ranking according to criteria (costeffectiveness, cost-benefit, feasibility, ease of implementation, no-regrets, robust to different futures, incremental vs transformative change etc). Estimating additional resource requirements. Linking up with national policies and programmes for consistency and to identify financial or policy support that may be available. Finalizing Action Plan and allocate resources. Monitor, review and refine over time 6. The approach for preparation of SCCSAP: The SCCSAP is to be developed through a participatory planning process involving all major stakeholders including Government officers from various line agencies, organizations, civil society, NGOs, academics, policy makers, scientists, the private sector, peoples representatives, local communities and all those who have a stake in climate change.

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The SCCSAP should be seen as much as a process as a final product, and if a truly participatory approach is achieved, it will evoke much wider ownership of the process and product, and go a long way in ensuring the implementation of what is recommended in the final SCCSAP. In particular, the following will be critical: 1. Workshops and public hearings at districts/ agro-climatic zones seeking inputs from farmers, pastoralists, fisher folk, forest dwellers, disadvantaged communities and other user communities who are directly dependent on climate sensitive Logical framework for the preparation of sectors. SCCSAP 2. Coordination and consultative meetings amongst a variety of line agencies of Government, at state and district/ agoclimatic zone level. 3. Seeking inputs from a wide range of 'expert' and 'experienced' individuals and organizations working on various aspects of environmental and developmental issues in including scientists, social activists, academics, students, industrialists, cultural leaders, etc. In nutshell, a SCCSAP would consist of broadly the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Statement of the issues or problems; Identification of ongoing initiatives regarding this issue; Identification of key actors involved; Identification of major gaps in coverage; Delineation of strategies needed to plug gaps and enhance the effectiveness of ongoing initiatives;

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6. List of measures and actions (short and long term) needed to implement these strategies, with prioritization in terms of importance and immediacy; 7. Identification of key elements needed for implementation: institutional structures, funds, expertise/human resources, policy/legal measures, monitoring, etc; 8. Specific project proposals (Compilation of information); 9. Time frame for implementation. 7. SCCSAP: The process Though the ultimate aim of the SCCSAP process is the production of a comprehensive, ready-to- act State Action Plan, it will also stimulate and facilitate the implementation of the same. To begin with, it is proposed to form appropriate institutional structures at the State level for the preparation SCCSAP. The development of SCCSAP will require support from various Ministries and the Departments so that the identified Missions can be addressed at the local level. As mentioned above, the SAPCC will also include the additional issues specific to the state which are not covered under the eight Missions. (eg. tourism, disaster risk reduction and human health, etc). The lead agency (as identified by the State Government) will coordinate the preparation of the SAPCC in consultation with the line Ministries and relevant stakeholders. A robust preparatory stage is crucial for assuring that the activities are carried out in a way that ensures the quality, consistency, relevance, pertinence and transparency and ownership of the final outputs. During this stage, it will be important to ensure the participation of all relevant Ministries, Government Departments, academia and research institutions. The following flow chart depicts the step-wise process for the formulation of SCCSAP.

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SCCSAP Steering Committee Headed by the Chief Secretary

Formation of Advisory Group

Capacity building of key agency

Identification of key agency for SCCSAP prep.

Sectoral Stakeholder consultations

Prioritization of state issues and activities

Formulation of SCCSAP by Key Agency

Review of existing sectoral policy and programs Agriculture Water Forest and B.D. Rural Development Energy Health Urban Habitat NAP CC

Finalization of SCCSAP by Advisory Group

Validation by State Level Committee

Adoption of SCCSAP

Dissemination & Implementation

7.1 State Steering Committee: In order to generate the highest levels of ownership for the preparation of SCCSAP, it is envisaged to establish a State Steering Committee (SSC) under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary and comprising of representatives from relevant Government Departments (e.g. Agriculture, Water Resources, Planning, Finance, Fisheries, Panchayati Raj, Science and Technology, Finance, State Disaster Management Authority, Rural Development, Environment, Forests, Power, Tourism and Transport, etc.); eminent Academicians, members from civil society and NGOs. The SSC will provide the
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overall guidance, supervision and coordination to the whole process of preparation of SCCSAP and its subsequent implementation. 7.2 State Advisory Group: Under the overall direction of SSC, the State Advisory Group (SAG) shall be responsible for directly monitoring and supervising the preparation of SCCSAP by the Key Agency. SAG would also review the technical quality of data, robustness of analyses and feasibility of recommendations or strategies for the development of SCCSAP. SAG will frequently monitor the progress of preparation of SCCSAP and suggest measures for improving the process. 7.3 Core agency: The State Government may identify and designate an agency or a consortium of agencies for the actual preparation of the SCCSAP. The selected agency should have adequate core competencies for undertaking the task of preparation of SCCSAP. The key agency shall undertake extensive ago-climatic zone/ sector/ district wise stakeholder consultations for the preparation of SCCSAP. Once the SCCSAP is cleared by the Advisory Committee, it shall be validated by the SSC, and thereafter the States may adopt the Plan for implementation. The national Government may also from time to time monitor and provide assistance for the preparation of SCCSAP. 8. Indicative Table of Contents of SCCSAP: Part A: Climate Profile: Introduction 1. Description of regional/state level context; statement of issues and problems 1.1 Regional development issues and priorities vis--vis national priorities and NAPCC 1.2 Baseline assessments: general social, economic, ecological and demographic data on which analyses and scenarios will be built 1.3 Identification of main local stakeholders 1.4 Past and on-going climate change trends and related risk management actions 1.5 Possible future climate scenarios
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1.6 Knowledge gaps 2. Assessment of Vulnerability to Climate Change 2.1 Development of Climate Change scenarios, i.e. projection of possible climate changes at relevant spatial and temporal scales 2.2 Assessment of the physical and economic impact of and vulnerability to climate change in the most vulnerable sectors (agriculture, water, forestry and biodiversity, coastal-zone management, health, tourism, urban, etc.) 2.3 Assessment of impact of and vulnerability to climate change on vulnerable groups 3. GHG emissions and energy needs inventory 3.1 Assessment of existing GHG emissions by sector (transport, buildings, industry, waste, agriculture and forest) and sub-sectors 3.2 Assessment of energy needs by 2020/2050 and expected GHG emissions by 2020/2050 under a business-as-usual scenario Part B: Climate Change Strategy 1. Review of existing climate change and sectoral policies and strategies to identify priorities 2. Description of main entry points, opportunities, trade-offs identified in each sector, including potential synergies and trade-offs identified between priority adaptation and mitigation measures 3. Identification of possible options to achieve policy objectives and identified priorities (affordability, social acceptance, and feasibility of natural solutions over engineering solutions wherever applicable) 4. Identification of criteria to assess identified options 5. Costbenefit analysis to assess environmental, social and economic costs of identified options (CBA should take into consideration, among other factors, GHG emission reductions, job creation, energy access, local pollution reductions, improved biodiversity and livelihoods), and comparison of these options 6. Assessment of adaptive capacity and feasibility of implementing the options
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7. List of prioritized mitigation and adaptation options based on the criteria and CBA (no regrets/low regrets, negative cost, no cost, low cost, higher-cost options; short-term, medium-term, long-term, political and social acceptance, regulatory needs, capacity and financial requirements, irreversibility) Part C: Climate Change Action Plan 1. List of measures (short and long term) needed to implement these strategies (including natural, engineering and locally suitable solutions), including timeframe and sequence for implementation 2. List of (public and private) ongoing and planned initiatives (who is doing what, where, how much is allocated) 3. For each priority option, identification of existing financial instruments to implement it and of possible matching policy/financing instruments to attract and drive direct investment towards lower-carbon/climate resilient activities (optionally in the form of sectoral 2010-2020 roadmaps) 4. Cost implications for the implementation of SCCSAP. What are the existing allocations and how much is the additional resources to be mobilized. Also indicate potential sources for resource mobilization. 5. Design of M&E system (governance, indicators, etc.) and M&E implementation arrangements 6. Review of institutional implementation arrangements, capacity, etc. needed to implement identified measures and capacity development plan. 7. Survey of public opinion Standard Annexes: 1. Present and Future Vulnerability Maps 2. List of proposals from co-construction process, public forums, white papers 3. Project Summaries listed by size and types of financing ********

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