Saturday

November 12
11am-4pm
Veterans Memorial
Civic and
Convention Center
Lima, Ohio
EXPO
2011
The Lima News and LimaOhio.com present…
Sponsored by:
By RUSS PARSONS
Los Angeles Times
(MCT)
Some people mark the start of fall with an
apple pie. Others start breaking out the big reds
from their wine cellars. Me? I’m a bean boy.
All it takes is the first sign of a nip in the air
or the first morning that smells like ocean rain
and I drag my Dutch oven out of the cupboard
and start a big pot of beans simmering.
I’m not sure what it is I like best about beans
— whether it’s the eating of them (so rich, so
delicious, so complementary to other flavors)
or the preparation. It’s involved cooking, but
not so much that it demands an entire after-
noon.
They’re perfect for a lazy fall day: Chop some
vegetables, stew them in oil, add the beans,
add water, bring to a simmer, cover and bake
until tender.
Now, if you were reading carefully, you’ll
notice that there was one step I left out — one
that almost every other bean recipe tells you is
a necessity. Most of the time, I don’t soak my
beans before cooking them.
I learned this many years ago. Ironically, I
was looking for a shortcut for soaking, because
as much as I love beans, I can never seem to
think ahead enough to start preparing them the
night before. So I investigated various quick-
soaks and even tried soaking a big batch of
beans and then freezing it.
But the more I investigated, the more I asked:
Why soak beans at all? In fact, in Mexico,
where beans are a staple, home cooks almost
never soak them. So why do we?
I talked to everyone from Mexican cook-
ing maven Diana Kennedy to a scientist who
studied beans and their cookery (yes, such
scientists do exist), and then I set myself up for
a big trial. One day when I was sure to be home
alone, I cooked up a batch of unsoaked beans
and ate them. Then I sat patiently, waiting for
disaster. But nothing happened.
Actually, I prepared three batches of beans
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E2

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
Senior Living Expo on Saturday
Staff reports
LIMA — On Saturday, an event at Veter-
ans Memorial Civic Center will offer both
entertainment and information.
The Senior Living Expo, presented by
The Lima News and Our Generation’s
Magazine, is planned for Saturday.
“The Lima News Senior Living Expo
is celebrating 11 years of bringing fun,
entertainment and great information to
the vital and active senior community
of this area. We look forward to this
event every year, it is a great way to offer
very valuable information, health checks
and entertainment all in one place,” said
Jolene Molaski, marketing coordinator
for The Lima News.
Admission is free, and expo-goers will
be able to wander through the booths,
offered by area businesses from health to
home improvement companies.
New this year is a coupon class by
Stephanie Wysong, of Stephanie’s Sav-
ings. Her column appears in The Lima
News on Sundays. She is a local self-
taught couponer who shares tips with
others.
Her class is from 9 to 11 a.m. at the
expo. The class is $5 in advance at The
Lima News or $10 at the door. Seniors are
$5 at the door.
Also, the Lima Beane Chorus will per-
form at noon and 1 p.m., and magician
Mike Hemmelgarn will perform at 2 and
3 p.m.
Health screenings available include
blood pressure, hearing, vision, glucose,
bone density and peripheral arterial dis-
ease. Dr. J. Franklin Oaks of Lima Memo-
rial Health System will be available. He
is a board-certified vascular surgeon.
Also, flu shots by Rays Pharmacy will be
available.
Lunch will be available for sale by Old
Barn Out Back, from pot roast to sand-
wiches and dessert.
Everyone at the expo may stop by for
a free cookie.
Sponsors include Bayliff & Son Funeral
Home, Lima Memorial Health System
and Old Barn Out Back.
AT A GLANCE
Who: The Lima News and Our Genera-
tion’s Magazine
What: 2011 Senior Living Expo
When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
Where: Veterans Memorial Civic Cen-
ter, downtown Lima
Admission: Free
Details: Call 419-223-1010
GLENN KOENIG •Los Angeles Times/MCT
Crisp-skinned duck breast on white beans
with dandelion greens. When the weather
begins to cool, few things satisfy more than a
quality bean dish.
Autumn stirs
up a bean pot
See BEANS • E3
Start with
one hour a week
By ELLEN WARREN
Chicago Tribune
(MCT)
You’ve got to love a fitness expert
whose exercise mantra is “make it
short and sweet.”
How short? Twenty minutes, three
times a week. But even less at first.
For those of us who are, shall we
say, exercise averse, this is magical.
Federal guidelines advise Ameri-
cans age 18 to 64 to get 2 1/2 hours
a week of moderate-intensity or 75
minutes a week of vigorous-inten-
sity aerobic physical activity.
Frank Comstock, Tucson, Ariz.,
doctor and author of the book “Anti-
aging 101,” specializes in wellness
and anti-aging. He insists that all
it takes to truly be fit is an hour a
week. So why not start there? Any-
thing is better than nothing!
You’ll also be happy to hear Com-
stock say, “If I’m out of shape, the
last place I would go is a gym. You
see all these machines, and you
see these guys walking around. You
don’t know what you’re doing. The
key is to find something you like.”
So, how does this 20-minute work-
out do the job? It’s all about “interval
training,” he says, which means short
bursts of higher intensity aerobics,
then returning to shorter periods of
lower intensity. For instance, walk at
a normal pace for two minutes than
as fast as you can for 20 or 30 sec-
onds. Then repeat. Gradually increase
the fast bursts and decrease the slow
ones, Comstock recommends:
Find the exercise that is least
objectionable, like walking, swim-
ming, jump rope, jumping jacks,
doing squats.
If you’re just beginning, pick a
shorter time — even 5 minutes twice
a week — then build up slowly.
Don’t give up. If you’re at the
20 minute/three times a week level
and just don’t feel like exercising,
employ the 10-minute rule. “Start
your exercise session and plan on
working out for only 10 minutes”
that day, he recommends.
If that doesn’t work, “look in the
mirror.” Sometimes, says Comstock.
That’ll probably be enough to get
you back off the couch and into
your interval zone again.
PHYSICAL FITNESS
AT A GLANCE
If you’re just beginning, pick a
shorter time — even 5 minutes
twice a week — then build up.
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1 The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E3
Opportunities Await You at
Otterbein Cridersville!
Discover what Otterbein Cridersville is all about! There’s no better time than right now to become part
of a Community that offers comfort, security, and great opportunities that refect your unique style, your
individual sense of purpose and more
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Enjoy our patio homes with attached garages or explore living in our congregate apartments that offer
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Come for a
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or call
419-645-7141
Stop by Booth 17 at the
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receive a small gift!
www.otterbein.org
that afternoon. Besides the unsoaked, I fixed
a batch that had been traditionally pre-soaked
and another that had been quick-soaked (bring
to a boil, sit for an hour, then cook).
Comparing the three was what finally con-
verted me. Not only were the unsoaked beans
safe (and convenient!), they were utterly deli-
cious, so much richer and more flavorful than
the soaked beans that there was no mistaking
them.
What’s going on? Here’s the short version:
Soaking dried beans does nothing for flavor
or digestibility. The one thing it does is cut
down on the cooking time, but just how much
depends on how old and dried out the beans
are.
Let’s take those one at a time.
Part of the cooking process with dried beans
is rehydrating them — having them absorb
enough water that they soften. The drier the
bean, the longer this will take. Soaking jump-
starts this process.
In the best-case scenario, if you buy your
beans from a store that sells a lot of them so
the stock is fresh, soaking will save you 40
to 50 minutes — but remember, that’s unat-
tended cooking time, while the beans are bub-
bling merrily away in the oven.
In the worst case, with old, dried-out beans,
soaking could save a whole lot more time. I’ve
got a bag of pinquitos in my cupboard that I
bought several years ago. When I finally get
around to cooking those, I’ll definitely soak
them first.
The type of bean matters too. Lentils and
split peas, for example, cook so quickly they
never need soaking. Chickpeas, on the other
hand, are so tough that I wouldn’t dream of
cooking them without soaking first.
As for flavor and texture, to me, there is
no comparison. Having cooked soaked and
unsoaked side-by-side multiple times, I can’t
find any difference in the number of split or
broken beans.
Where I do find a huge difference is taste:
To me, beans cooked without soaking are
much deeper and richer in flavor. Part of this
is the broth, which is thicker and much more
flavorful. But the broth is so thick it can be a
bit “clingy.” So when I’m cooking beans for a
stew-type dish (which I usually am), I don’t
soak. But if I’m making something like a bean
salad, where I want the beans to be separate,
that thinner broth is an advantage.
And now, for the most delicate matter. Those
well-known digestive difficulties inspired by
beans happen in large part because they con-
tain certain complex sugars (called oligosac-
charides); the small intestine doesn’t produce
the enzymes to break these down. These
BEANS • from E2 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
White beans with
chorizo, clams and
shrimp. When the
weather begins to
cool, few things
satisfy more than a
quality bean dish.
GLENN KOENIG
•Los Angeles Times/
MCT
See BEANS • E4
sugars pass undigested through the gut
and stimulate shock and awe when they
meet bacteria in the lower intestine.
When people tell you that soaking
reduces flatulence, they’re operating
under the mistaken assumption that the
bean leaks those sugars into the water.
But that doesn’t make much sense when
you think about it. Those sugars are the
food the bean plant will need to sprout.
Releasing them all before the plant has
had a chance even to germinate would be
self-defeating. A recent paper found that
you have to soak the beans for three days
to get a significant reduction in sugars
— and by that time the beans are almost
sprouting.
The good news is that you can buy
enzyme replacements at the grocery
store — Beano — which will reduce the
unpleasantness.
There’s another reason for beans’ noisy
reputation, and that is that they’re really
high in fiber, something that the normal
American diet is very low in. This is cer-
tainly good for your long-term health but
maybe not so great for your short-term
social prospects.
Fortunately, the cure for this part of
beans’ social awkwardness is easy: eat
more beans.
And with the cool, wet season drawing
near and the smell of autumn in the air,
that shouldn’t be a problem.
WHITE BEANS WITH CHORIZO, CLAMS
AND SHRIMP
Total time: 1 hour, plus 2 hours baking
time for the beans
Servings: 6 to 8
Note: Spanish chorizo can be found at
Spanish markets as well as at select gour-
met markets and cooking supply stores.
White beans
1/4 pound Spanish chorizo, diced (or
regular sausage)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 pound dried white beans, such as can-
nellini or Great Northern
7 cups water
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
Freshly ground black pepper
1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cook
the chorizo in olive oil in the bottom of
a Dutch oven over medium heat on the
stove top until the chorizo has rendered
some fat and begun to brown, about 5
minutes. Add the bell pepper and cook
until it begins to soften, about 3 minutes.
Add the onion and cook until soft, about
5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until
fragrant, about 3 minutes.
2. Add the dried beans, water and bay
leaf. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasion-
ally. Cover tightly and bake in the oven
for 1 hour. Add the salt, stir and continue
cooking, covered, until the beans are ten-
der, 45 minutes to 1 hour. The beans
should be like a thin stew; if necessary,
add more water, one-quarter cup at a time.
Remove the bay leaf and discard. Season
to taste with more salt if necessary, and
freshly ground black pepper. (The dish
can be prepared up to this point a day
ahead and refrigerated, tightly covered.)
CLAMS AND SHRIMP AND ASSEMBLY
White beans
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, chopped
3 tablespoons chopped parsley
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 1/4 cups crushed tomatoes
1 pound large peeled and deveined
shrimp, cut into bite-size pieces
2 pounds Manila clams
Salt to taste
Chopped pickled green peppers, such as
pepperoncini, for garnish
Chopped parsley, if desired, for garnish
1. Reheat the beans, if necessary.
2. Heat the olive oil over medium heat
in a large skillet that has a tight-fitting lid.
Add the garlic and parsley and cook until
fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the white
wine and reduce to a thin syrup, about
3 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes
and cook until slightly reduced, about 5
minutes.
3. Add the shrimp and clams, cover
tightly and raise the heat to high. Cook,
frequently giving the pan a vigorous shake
(holding the lid on firmly), until the clams
have opened, about 5 minutes.
4. Gently stir the clams and shrimp into
the warmed beans and heat through. Sea-
son to taste with more salt, if necessary.
This makes about 12 cups stew. Ladle the
stew into shallow soup or pasta bowls
and sprinkle each with about 2 teaspoons
of the chopped pickled peppers and the
parsley if using. Serve immediately.
Each of 8 servings: 415 calories; 30
grams protein; 42 grams carbohydrates;
10 grams fiber; 14 grams fat; 3 grams
saturated fat; 95 mg cholesterol; 2 grams
sugar; 870 mg sodium.
CRISP-SKINNED DUCK BREASTS ON
WHITE BEANS WITH DANDELION GREENS
Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes plus about
2 hours baking time for the beans
Servings: 6
Note: This can also be made without the
duck breast by increasing the garlic sau-
sage to 3/4 pound or more.
White beans
1/4 pound fresh garlic sausage, crumbled
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 carrot, diced
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 pound dried white beans, such as can-
nellini or Great Northern
6 cups water, plus more if necessary
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
Freshly ground black pepper
1 bunch dandelion greens (about 3/4
pound)
1 to 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E4

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
VA approved
Lost Creek Care Center
Now offering senior friendly
computer access like e-mail,
surfng the net and more!
We serve
seniors in
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Call us about our exciting Volunteer Programs.
Medicare, Medicaid approved.
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Lima, Ohio 45804 • 419-225-9040
www.lostcreekcare.org
BEANS • from E3 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
GLENN KOENIG •Los Angeles Times/MCT
White beans with chorizo, clams and shrimp. When the weather begins to cool, few
things satisfy more than a quality bean dish.
See BEANS • E5
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1 The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E5
EASY TASKS.
Prearranging your funeral is simple to do. With our help,
putting your fnal wishes down on paper is as easy as having
a conversation with a close friend. Call today for a free, no
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1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cook
the garlic sausage in olive oil in the bot-
tom of a Dutch oven over medium heat
on the stove top until the sausage has
browned, about 7 minutes. Add the carrot
and cook until it begins to soften, about
5 minutes. Add the onion and cook, stir-
ring constantly to scrape up any browned
sausage bits sticking to the bottom of the
pan, until it begins to soften, about 2 to
3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until
fragrant, about 3 minutes.
2. Add the dried beans, water and bay
leaf. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasion-
ally. Cover tightly and bake in the oven
for 1 hour. Add the salt, stir, and continue
cooking, covered, until the beans are ten-
der, 45 minutes to 1 hour. The beans
should be fairly dry, but if necessary, add
more water, one-quarter cup at a time.
Remove the bay leaf and discard. Season
to taste with more salt if necessary, and
freshly ground black pepper. (The dish
can be prepared up to this point a day
ahead and refrigerated, tightly covered.)
3. When almost ready to serve, chop the
dandelion greens in 1-inch sections down
to where you’re getting almost all stem.
You should have 3 to 4 cups.
4. While the duck breasts are cook-
ing (below), reheat the beans, adding a
little more water if necessary to create a
slightly flowing, risotto-like texture, and
add the dandelion greens. Cook, covered,
until the greens soften, about 5 minutes.
Season to taste with more salt and pep-
per, if necessary, and the red wine vinegar
to taste.
CRISP-SKINNED DUCK BREAST AND
ASSEMBLY
2 tablespoons kosher salt
6 whole cloves
1 1/2 teaspoons whole black pepper-
corns
6 duck breasts (about 4 to 6 ounces each)
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
White beans
1. Grind together the salt, cloves and
peppercorns to a fine powder. Use a sharp
knife to cut a shallow cross-hatching on
the skin side of the duck breasts, through
the skin but not to the meat.
2. Season the breasts on both sides with
the spice mixture, concentrating on the
skin side (you’ll use most, if not all, of the
spice) and place on a plate. Cover tightly
with plastic wrap and refrigerate. (This
recipe may be prepared to this point up to
a day in advance; bring the duck to room
temperature before continuing.)
3. Heat the oil in a large, heavy-bottom
skillet over medium-high heat until it is
hot but not smoking. Pat dry the skin side
of the duck breasts with a paper towel and
place the breasts skin-side down in the
hot pan. Sear until the skin side is a deep
golden brown, 4 to 5 minutes. Depending
on the size of the skillet, the breasts will
probably need to be cooked in batches.
Press down on the breasts from time to
time with a spatula to press out any ren-
dered fat. Reduce the heat to medium and
turn the breasts over. Cook on the second
side until they are medium-rare in the cen-
ter, 3 to 5 minutes more.
4. Remove the duck breasts to a carving
board and let rest for 5 minutes before
slicing on a bias into thick slices.
5. Spoon a generous three-quarters to
1 cup of white beans onto the center of a
plate and arrange a sliced duck breast on
top. Repeat, using all of the duck breast;
you will have some white beans left over
for another meal.
Each serving: 515 calories; 44 grams
protein; 41 grams carbohydrates; 11 grams
fiber; 20 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat;
158 mg cholesterol; 2 grams sugar; 781 mg
sodium.
BEANS • from E4 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Dried white beans
offer a world of
potential. When the
weather begins to
cool, few things sat-
isfy more than a qual-
ity bean dish.
GARY FRIEDMAN
•Los Angeles Times/MCT
Legalization and
regulation of cannabis
Drs. KAY JUDGE and MAXINE BARISH-WREDEN
McClatchy Newspapers
The California Medical Association
recently made news when it became the
first state medical association to recom-
mend the legalization and regulation of
cannabis, better known as marijuana.
The CMA’s Council on Scientific and
Clinical Affairs noted in its recommenda-
tions that there is an increasing body of
evidence that marijuana may be useful
in the treatment of a number of medi-
cal conditions, but research to determine
both risks and benefits is hampered in the
United States because marijuana still is
classified as an illegal drug.
The CMA council believes that the legal-
ization and regulation of marijuana will
allow for broader research and objective
data on the potential benefits and risks
of marijuana. It also will help to regu-
late dispensaries of marijuana, regulate
the physicians who prescribe marijuana,
ensure that safe and consistent products
are available to patients, reduce diversion
and improper use of medical cannabis,
and support the physicians who wish
to appropriately prescribe medical mari-
juana to patients who are most likely to
benefit from its use.
To give you some perspective on the
current controversy around marijuana,
here’s a little background.
Marijuana is classified under the Con-
trolled Substances Act of 1970 as a Sched-
ule 1 drug, meaning that it has a high
potential for abuse and has no accepted
medical benefit. However, marijuana, like
other herbal remedies, has been used as
a medicinal agent for thousands of years
in many parts of the world. The Irish
INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE
See CANNABIS • E6
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E6

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
ALL WORK GUARANTEED SATISFACTORY
We offer the Following Services:
• Pest Control • Heating & A/C Service • Major/Minor Remodeling
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physician and pharmacologist Dr. Wil-
liam O’Shaughnessy, who had spent years
studying its medical benefits in India, first
introduced marijuana into Western medi-
cine in 1841; it was used to relieve pain,
muscle spasm and convulsions.
In the 1930s, marijuana came under fire
in the United States as a harmful drug,
and in spite of a lack of good data about
its potential risk, it was removed from the
U.S. Pharmacopeia in 1942.
In 1970, Congress initiated the Con-
trolled Substances Act, which then
awarded marijuana its Schedule 1 status,
effectively shutting the door on further
research. Shortly thereafter, Congress
authorized the creation of the National
Commission on Marijuana and Drug
Abuse to study the risk of marijuana use.
The commission’s report to Congress in
1972 was titled “Marijuana, A Signal of
Misunderstanding.”
The physicians and other members of
the commission concluded that there was
“little proven danger of physical or psy-
chological harm from the experimental
or intermittent use of the natural prepara-
tions of cannabis,” and that “the actual
and potential harm of use of the drug is
not great enough to justify intrusion by
the criminal law into private behavior.”
They also recommended the decriminal-
ization of simple possession of marijuana.
That recommendation was ignored by
the Nixon administration, and marijuana
remained classified as a Schedule 1 dan-
gerous drug, unsuitable for any medical
use (and this remains puzzling to many
health care providers who work in the
field of substance abuse, considering that
alcohol and nicotine are both considered
significantly more addictive and physi-
cally harmful than marijuana).
The controversy continued, and in 1996,
14 states including California legalized the
use of marijuana for medical purposes.
In 1999, the California Legislature
approved funding for cannabis research,
leading to the formation of the University
of California Center for Medicinal Can-
nabis Research, based at the University of
California-San Diego.
The beginning results of that research
were published last year and were prom-
ising: Cannabis was found to significantly
reduce neuropathic pain as well as muscle
spasm and muscle spasticity, particularly
in patients with multiple sclerosis.
One of the studies showed that mari-
juana significantly reduced HIV-related
pain in more than more than 50 percent
of patients. In other research endeav-
ors, cannabis also has been shown to
reduce pain and neuropathy in cancer
patients and in patients with neurologic
diseases. It also helps to reduce nausea
and vomiting from chemotherapy, and it
may help reduce the loss of appetite that
can accompany cancer and HIV disease.
Cannabis may also help augment the pain-
relieving properties of narcotic drugs.
Even more intriguing, some data also
suggest that cannabis may play a role in
cancer risk reduction.
Rodent studies have shown that THC,
one of the active ingredients in marijuana,
not only reduces the risk of cancer in ani-
mals but also increases survival.
CANNABIS • from E5 ––––––––––––––––––––––
www.limaohio.com
Visit The Lima News online for local news, sports & weather
Collectors’ home
is like a gallery
By KIM PALMER
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
(MCT)
MINNEAPOLIS — What do you get
when you mix collectibles from many eras
and cultures into one stylistic stew?
You could easily end up with visual
indigestion.
But collectors Jamie Becker and Wayne
Beauchemin have found the recipe for
blending Asian, Russian, Mexican, French,
African and Scandinavian artifacts into an
artfully balanced melange.
“It feels like a European house,” said
Becker, describing the Minneapolis home
that they’ve filled with finds collected over
the decades. Becker has made more than
50 trips to the continent, many during his
career in visual marketing for Dayton’s,
Marshall Field’s and Macy’s (he’s now
retired), where he scoured French flea
markets.
“We’re both Francophiles,” Becker said.
“That’s been the inspiration. In Europe,
people have a mishmash of ethnic influ-
ences.”
Their dining room, for example, fea-
tures an antique Irish farm table, a Tibetan
chest, Russian biscuit tins, Chinese fig-
ures, French pottery and Swedish glass-
ware, as well as pieces by contemporary
artists.
That’s this month’s dining room, at least.
TOM WALLACE • Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT
Wayne Beauchemin and Jamie Becker love all things French and have decorated their
home to showcase the items picked up in their travels. They are shown at home
Sept. 20 in Minneapolis, Minn.
See COLLECTORS • E8
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E7
HELP SUPPORT THE LIMA COMMUNITY
BY VOLUNTEERING AT LIMA MEMORIAL
HEALTH SYSTEM. THERE ARE MANY
VOLUNTEER POSITIONS AVAILABLE AND
ALL ARE GUARANTEED TO BRING A
SMILE TO YOUR DAY.
PLEASE CONTACT THE VOLUNTEER
OFFICE AT 419-226-5094 TO FIND THE
POSITION THAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU.
For more information, contact the Volunteer Office at 419-226-5094. www.limamemorial.org
a t L i m a M e m o r i a l
VOLUNTEER
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LINDA NICHOLSON
SERVER AT THE CAFE
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S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E8

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
WoodlaWn
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Becker and Beauchemin alter their
decor frequently, rotating pieces in and
out of the lineup, and accenting with a
revolving gallery of Becker’s own paint-
ings. “We move our collections so much
— about three times a year,” he said.
Sometimes they even repaint rooms
accordingly. A burst water pipe, for
example, called for fresh paint in the
dining room. But instead of repainting
in sage green, the color that set off their
collection of crosses from Santa Fe,
they chose Wedgwood blue, the better
to complement an array of ornaments
that Becker once designed in collabora-
tion with the British pottery maker for a
store promotion.
While many collectors start broadly
and later home in on a target, Becker
and Beauchemin have gone the other
direction, getting more eclectic.
“Our first pieces were mostly Mexi-
can,” Beauchemin said. They started
adding European pieces after they
started traveling there in the late ’80s.
They’ll go out of their way to find
unique items. In Oaxaca, Mexico, for
example, “We hired a kid to take us to
artistic homes,” Becker said.
That excursion led them to an artist
who sold them a striking and unusual
platter, sculpted with spiders and
snakes.
After 27 years together, they know
what each other likes, and they usually
like the same things. “We have the same
taste,” Becker said.
Well, almost the same, Beauchemin
amended. “That print I bought: ‘Little
Chicks.”’
“I hated it,” Becker said. “It’s in the
basement.”
Becker and Beauchemin collect things
they love, not those that they think will
increase in value.
“We’re not serious collectors but
some of the stuff we’ve collected ended
up being serious,” Becker said. That
includes two paintings by American
primitive artist Lee Godie. Godie was a
“bag lady” who, in the early ’70s, was a
fixture on the steps of the Art Institute
of Chicago.
She painted there and sometimes sold
her canvases — “if she liked you,” said
Becker, who was a graduate student
there at the time. She sold him two
pieces for $5 each. Godie, who died in
1994, has become a highly collectible
artist, her works displayed in museums
and sold at exclusive galleries.
Their most prized pieces have per-
sonal value. Becker treasures an Art
Deco vase that his mother gave him.
“I’ve had it my entire life,” he said.
Beauchemin’s personal favorite: “My
Virgin Mary under glass. I bought it in
Connecticut, and it brings back memo-
ries,” he said.
“Some of the little things are my favor-
ite things,” said Becker, citing a match-
box from Bemelmans Bar at the Carlyle,
the New York hotel. The bar is named
for Ludwig Bemelmans, writer and
illustrator of the “Madeline” children’s
books, and the matchbox, decorated
with one of his paintings, shows a mon-
key serving dinner to rabbits. “I paid a
cover charge of $50 just so I could get
it,” he recalled.
A house filled with quirky collectibles
is a great ice-breaker at social gatherings.
“For people just meeting, there are so
many conversation pieces,” Becker said.
Even at large parties, theft and break-
age have been extremely rare events,
they said. In fact, most of their casual-
ties have been self-inflicted. “I’ve broken
things,” Becker said. “But I usually don’t
tell Wayne.”
COLLECTORS • from E6 ––––––––––––––––––––
TOM WALLACE photos • Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT
Wayne Beauchemin and Jamie Becker love all things French and have decorated their
home in Minneapolis, Minn., to showcase the items picked up in their travels.
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E9
R & K Shoes
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If you want true quality
and comfort, let us ft you
and you will see and feel
the difference!
8 ways to fight back
if your insurer balks
By KRISTEN GERENCHER
MarketWatch
(MCT)
SAN FRANCISCO — Millions of Amer-
icans suffer from illnesses that add insult
to injury by being virtually uninsurable.
Patients with controversial or poorly
understood conditions often can’t get
coverage, even if they have robust
employer plans. Many with diagnoses
such as temporomandibular joint, or
TMJ, disorders or autism are left to pay
significant out-of-pocket costs to treat
their conditions.
Take TMJ disorders, which typically
involve pain around the jaw and dif-
ficulty chewing and speaking. Some 35
million Americans or 12 percent of the
population suffers from it. For some
people, it’s mild and intermittent while
others have unrelenting pain that pre-
cludes them from eating solid food.
Yet labeling the complex condition
TMJ can be the “kiss of death” in terms
of getting insurers to cover it and den-
tists and doctors to see patients, said
Terrie Cowley, president of the TMJ
Association, a patient advocacy group in
Milwaukee.
“It’s unconscionable, this mess we are
in,” she said.
Sometimes employers and insurers
don’t want to pay for medical treatments
that don’t help or, worse, harm people
further. By refusing to cover treatments
that aren’t proven effective, health plans
say they can hold down premiums for
the broader pool of their members.
But it’s not always so straightforward.
If you have a diagnosis that insurers
don’t want to touch, you should investi-
gate your options, health-care advocates
say.
Palliative care’s
promise, concerns
By MELISSA HEALY
Los Angeles Times
(MCT)
LOS ANGELES — What if a new medi-
cation for severely ill patients had no role
in curing them but made them feel much
better despite being sick? Let’s say this
elixir were found to decrease the pain and
nausea of cancer patients, improve the
sleep and energy of heart failure patients,
prolong the lives of people with kidney
failure, drive down healthcare expendi-
tures and ease the burdens of caregivers?
Those are the promises of a fledgling
medical specialty called palliative care —
not a new drug but a new way of treating
patients who are living, often for years,
with acute or chronic illnesses that are
life-threatening.
If palliative care were a pill, government
regulators would very likely approve it
for the U.S. market. Federal healthcare
insurance programs would quickly agree
to pay physicians and hospitals for treat-
ing patients with the new therapy. And
patients would make it a blockbuster drug
in no time flat.
Yet uncertainties cloud the prospects
for palliative care. Among the unanswered
questions: Who will pay for these ser-
vices, where will this new field’s work-
force come from, and what is it — cost
savings or compassion — that drives this
new branch of medicine?
As answers to those questions emerge
in the next few years, palliative care could
MEL MELCON • Los Angeles Times/MCT
Dr. Marwa Kilani, MD (from left) and members of her team, Rev. Christina Chambers,
Chaplain, and Leah Phillips, RN, provide palliative care Oct. 19 to patient Gerald Bull-
ock at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills, Calif. Palliative care
focuses on a patient’s comforts and wishes.
THE COSTS
Some of the most daunting chal-
lenges to the expansion of palliative
care come down to payments and
people.
Despite early research suggesting
there are eventual cost savings in pal-
liative care, setting up a palliative care
team does require an investment. And
in a medical care system that largely
rewards doctors and hospitals for per-
forming procedures, many financially
strapped hospitals ask whether and
how palliative care teams will pay for
themselves.
See PALLIATIVE CARE • E10
See INSURANCE • E11
See COSTS • E10
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E10

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
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LIMA MANOR
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Welcome to the HCF communities,where
a traditon of genuine care,dignity and complete
resident satisfaction is our foundation. We would
be honored to give you a personal tour. Simply
call to schedule an appointment – and see for
yourself the HCF care community diference!
A TRADITION OF CARING
OUR WIDE RANGE OF SERVICES INCLUDE: SHORT TERM REHAB, OUTPATIENT THERAPY, ASSISTED LIVING,
INDEPENDENT LIVING, SKILLED NURSING, LONG TERM PLACEMENT AND MEMORY CARE.
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A TRADITION OF CARING
BRIARWOOD VILLAGE
100 Don Desch Drive
Coldwater, OH 45828
(419) 678-2311
www.briarwood-village.com
LIMA MANOR
750 Brower Road
Lima, OH 45801
(419) 227-2611
www.limamanor.com
FOX RUN MANOR
2101 Greendale Boulevard
Findlay, OH 45840
(419) 424-0832
SHAWNEE MANOR
2535 Fort Amanda Road
Lima, OH 45804
(419) 999-2055
www.shawneemanor.com
VAN WERT MANOR
160 Fox Road
Van Wert, OH 45891
(419) 238-6655
www.vanwertmanor.com
ROSELAWN MANOR
420 East Fourth Street
Spencerville, OH 45887
(419) 647-4115
www.roselawnmanor.com
CELINA MANOR
1001 Myers Road
Celina, OH 45822
(419) 586-6645
www.celinamanor.com
WAPAKONETA MANOR
1010 Lincoln Avenue
Wapakoneta, OH 45895
(419) 738-3711
www.wapakonetamanor.com
Welcome to the HCF communities,where
a traditon of genuine care,dignity and complete
resident satisfaction is our foundation. We would
be honored to give you a personal tour. Simply
call to schedule an appointment – and see for
yourself the HCF care community diference!
A TRADITION OF CARING
OUR WIDE RANGE OF SERVICES INCLUDE: SHORT TERM REHAB, OUTPATIENT THERAPY, ASSISTED LIVING,
INDEPENDENT LIVING, SKILLED NURSING, LONG TERM PLACEMENT AND MEMORY CARE.
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end up on the roadside of medical prog-
ress. Or it could become a must-have
service for every hospital and physicians’
group claiming to deliver top-quality
patient care.
Providing comfort, emotional support
and coordination of specialized care used
to be the job of the family physician. But
few families these days have a longstand-
ing relationship with a single physician,
and even fewer doctors have the exper-
tise or time, while trying to cure a very ill
patient, to coordinate his care and tend to
his physical and psychological distress.
Growing quickly over the last few years,
the field of palliative medicine has begun
to step into this breach.
Since 2000, the number of hospital-
based palliative care programs has more
than doubled, according to a report issued
late last month by the Center to Advance
Palliative Care and the National Palliative
Care Research Center, organizations that
have been active in supporting the field’s
growth. Today, professional teams tasked
with ensuring that patients’ symptoms
are managed, their medical options are
clearly explained and their wishes are
respected are available in roughly 63 per-
cent of the nation’s hospitals.
The discipline, says Dr. Diane E. Meier,
who directs the Center to Advance Pal-
liative Care, “is the necessary counterbal-
ance to a highly specialized system of
medicine in which many of our patients’
needs are falling through the cracks. Pal-
liative care, Meier adds, “is needed to
focus on the whole person in the context
of their family — on everything from pain
to spiritual needs.”
For Dr. Marwa Kilani, director of pallia-
tive care at Providence Holy Cross Medi-
cal Center in Mission Hills, Calif., this new
branch of medicine is about adding life to
patients’ years, rather than years to their
lives.
“I tend to think that I don’t prolong peo-
ples’ lives in the sense that I don’t deliver
the curative medicine; I deliver the quality-
of-life medicine — and if that does pro-
long a person’s life, that’s wonderful,” says
Kilani, whose team has been operating
since 2006 and has seen 500 new patients
so far this year. “I discuss what options
patients have, and if a patient says, ’This
sounds like the right course for me and
my values,’ I’m there to support that.”
Palliative care is designed to be deliv-
ered by teams of physicians, nurses, social
workers and chaplains. But instead of
treating the condition that threatens to
shorten a patient’s life, palliative care pro-
fessionals treat the pain, weakness, worry
and decision-making pressure that come
with the illness and medicine’s often-
aggressive efforts to treat it.
The movement to provide such care
has sprung up alongside the nation’s bur-
geoning hospice care sector. But though
hospice and palliative care share many of
the same workforce, goals, patients and
expertise, there are two key differences:
First, to gain access to palliative care,
patients need not have six months or less
PALLIATIVE CARE • from E9 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Currently, they are largely paid for
by philanthropic funds and are most
likely to exist in not-for-profit hospitals.
The federal government’s Medicare
and state Medicaid programs now
pay physicians who provide palliative
services. But for the most part, those
giant government insurance programs
(which influence the coverage decisions
of private insurers) do not pay for the
work of many of the workers — nurse
practitioners, social workers and pasto-
ral counselors — who deliver the most
labor-intensive services that palliative
care teams provide.
Finally, physicians with special pallia-
tive care training are scarce, especially
considering the tidal wave of older Ameri-
cans they may be called upon to treat.
By 2030, 72.1 million Americans — 1 in
5 — will be older than 65 and will prob-
ably live long enough to contend with
multiple medical conditions for which
they’ll need coordinated care.
Palliative care didn’t gain formal recog-
nition as a medical specialty until 2007,
and today there is only one physician
trained in palliative care for every 1,200
Americans living with a severe or chronic
illness. A December 2010 study pub-
lished in the Journal of Pain and Symp-
tom Management estimated that the
current supply of trained palliative and
hospice care physicians falls somewhere
between 6,000 and 18,000 short of the
nation’s needs.
“There are a number of hospitals in
the United States that want to have a
palliative care team and are having dif-
ficulty recruiting,” said Dr. Sean Morrison
of the National Palliative Care Research
Center and Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.
“There just are not enough trained pro-
fessionals to provide this care.”
COSTS /Continued from E9
See PALLIATIVE CARE • E11
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E11
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to live — the current condition under
which hospice care is paid for by Medi-
care and Medicaid.
Second, patients in palliative care get
full support if they wish to pursue any and
all efforts to cure their disease — whereas
to access hospice care, patient and doctor
must have agreed that further “curative
therapy” will not be pursued.
In other words, “All hospice care is pal-
liative care, but not all palliative care is
hospice,” says Dr. Rick Levene, a palliative
care specialist at Spectrum Health Care
Inc. in West Palm Beach, Fla.
Ideally, a palliative care team would
swoop in shortly after a patient’s diagno-
sis, explaining medical options, ensuring
patient and family have a treatment plan,
and standing by to manage the stress and
discomforts ahead.
In fact, a trial involving newly diagnosed
lung cancer patients found that, despite
choosing less aggressive treatment of
their cancer, patients who got early and
continuous palliative care lived about 2
1/2 months longer, on average, than those
who got standard treatment (11.6 months
versus 8.9 months).
The same study, published last year in
the New England Journal of Medicine,
found that those who got palliative care
reported better quality of life and were less
depressed. In their final months of life, the
palliative care patients were more likely
to choose a different path than those who
got the usual care: Among those who did
not get the palliative services, 54 percent
spent many of their final hours in costly
and painful last-ditch efforts to prolong
their lives. Fewer palliative care patients
underwent such treatment.
“Palliative care helps patients ... live as
well as they can for as long as they can,”
says study lead author Dr. Jennifer S.
Temel, an oncology and internal medicine
physician at Massachusetts General Hos-
pital. Helping patients decide whether to
go to their summer house, to have their
families take time off of work or take a
long-planned trip, “that’s where palliative
care really helped patients,” she adds.
Doing that, it turns out, may also reduce
healthcare costs. Informed by clearer
explanations of their options, some
patients choose to forego aggressive (and
expensive) therapies that may make them
feel sicker while offering, at best, a little
more time.
Patients who are cared for at home by
family, friends and nursing help coordi-
nated by palliative care teams leave the
hospital earlier. And they are less likely
to have medical crises once they’ve gone
home. They show up less often in hospi-
tals’ emergency departments and spend
less time in the intensive care unit.
Palliative care patients also appear more
likely to have made their end-of-life care
wishes explicit, so fewer are intubated or
resuscitated in their final days by physi-
cians who don’t know their preferences.
The result: If fully integrated into the
nation’s hospitals, palliative care could
lower the nation’s healthcare expendi-
tures by reducing healthcare usage — to
the tune of more than $6 billion a year,
according to a 2010 estimate by the Insti-
tute of Medicine, which advises the fed-
eral government on medical matters.
A 2008 study led by Meier and Dr. Sean
Morrison of Mt. Sinai School of Medicine
found that, compared with hospitals with
no palliative care services, those that pro-
vided severely ill patients even a single
consultation with a palliative care special-
ist reduced the overall cost of a patient’s
stay by roughly $1,700 and saved hun-
dreds more dollars daily in lab and test
costs. In cases in which the patient died
before leaving the hospital, the cost sav-
ings per admission topped $5,000 when
palliative care was provided.
Levene acknowledges that palliative
care’s touted cost savings — paired with
the fact that the movement has its roots
in hospice care — can generate resistance
from patients, families and doctors. Some
patients, he says, may see palliative care
as a stalking horse for hospice or a bid
to ration healthcare or improve hospitals’
bottom lines.
“There are some physicians, some
patients and families that can’t give up,
and the ’H’ word (hospice) has created
some negative connotations with them,”
Levene says. Palliative care specialists
adamantly support whatever choice a
patient makes about treatment, he adds.
Still, the community actively discusses
whether its motives are sometimes mis-
understood — by patients, politicians and
even fellow members of the medical pro-
fession.
At the first National Palliative Care Sum-
mit in Philadelphia in March, many of
the field’s foot soldiers swapped stories
and strategies aimed at countering this
perception issue. Fresh in their minds
was the partisan tempest over healthcare
reform and how readily fears of “death
panels” affected the public.
Some, including the University of Michi-
gan’s Comprehensive Cancer Care Center,
chose a semantic fix. The center used to
have a palliative care clinic, oncologist
Susan Urba told colleagues. But after it
became evident its name was keeping
patients away, Urba reported, the hospital
changed the clinic’s name to the Symp-
tom Management and Supportive Care
program.
“It’s a little bit of a disservice,” Temel
says, that palliative care is so often bound
to hospice care.
PALLIATIVE CARE • from E10 –––––––––––––––– INSURANCE • from E9 ––––––––––––––––––––
Here are eight tips to protect yourself:
1. Talk with your doctor or health-care
provider about your treatment options.
Ask whether the ones he or she rec-
ommends are supported by scientific
evidence, said Dr. John Santa, director
of Consumer Reports’ Health Ratings
Center in Yonkers, N.Y. Or are the rec-
ommended treatments based on the doc-
tor’s expert opinion or perhaps some-
thing more speculative?
2. Contact nonprofit patient advocacy
and support organizations. These groups
can help you determine whether your
state has any coverage mandates and
give you a sense of their treatment pri-
orities. (Some groups are research-ori-
ented and don’t assist individuals.) You
may be surprised at how conservative
their approach is.
The TMJ Association, for example,
suggests patients stick with the least
invasive and reversible therapies when-
ever possible, including pain medica-
tions and palliative treatments, because
there is little data on what works.
Surgery and implants have caused
some TMJ patients even worse pain
and dysfunction over the years, Cowley
said. “Coverage is extremely haphazard,”
she said. “It boggles the mind to think
(health plans) won’t pay for a heating
pad but they will pay for a surgical pro-
cedure.”
Applying hot and cold compresses to
the jaw, the most common therapy, was
deemed the most effective of 46 treat-
ments including splints, physical therapy
and cortisone injections, according to a
survey of 1,511 TMJ sufferers published
last year in the Clinical Journal of Pain.
For severely autistic children, inten-
sive treatment called applied behavior
analysis is a standard of care, said Lorri
Unumb, the Lexington, S.C.-based vice
president of state government affairs for
Autism Speaks, a nonprofit research and
advocacy group. Even so, only 28 states
require insurers to offer it. Families who
don’t benefit from such mandates some-
times find recourse through the group’s
efforts, she said. “We routinely help fami-
lies petition their (human resources)
department to try to get this benefit
added.”
3. Visit your insurer’s website. Look for
any policy statements related to your con-
dition, and review the services your indi-
vidual plan covers. Learn your rights and
responsibilities for requesting coverage.
See INSURANCE • E14
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1 S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E13 E12

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
13
23
Exhibitor List:
1. Games
2. AllenCountyMuseum
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The Lima News
5
By MONICA ENG
Chicago Tribune
(MCT)
Quick, name the good fats (and their
sources) from the following: monounsatu-
rated, saturated, polyunsaturated, trans.
If you can’t answer right away, don’t
worry. You have a lot of company.
According to recent polls, many Amer-
icans are dropping low-fat diets for
“healthy fat” diets, but only about a third
of us can correctly differentiate between
so-called good and bad fats.
(By the way, the answers: Polyunsatu-
rated and monounsaturated are good fats,
and sources include olive oil, avocados
and oily fish.)
But maybe this isn’t so surprising, given
the flip-floppy advice the nutrition estab-
lishment has issued on fats and choles-
terol over the years. Remember when
avocados and eggs were considered fatty
no-nos, while margarine was seen as a
healthful alternative? How times have
changed.
Though science may have further sur-
prises in store, today’s mainstream nutri-
tional advice largely places heart-healthy
monounsaturated fatty acids and polyun-
saturated fatty acids on the good team and
saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids
on the bad. Basically, eat your sardines
and olive oil but ditch your fatty burgers
and processed snacks made with partially
hydrogenated oils.
New research, however, is challenging
this simple formula and indicating that
some types of saturated fats may actually
be neutral to beneficial. Another impor-
tant finding, according to Harvard Uni-
versity scientist Dariush Mozaffarian: The
recent trend in Western diets of replacing
saturated fats with refined carbohydrates
(such as sugar and white bread) actu-
ally makes health worse. They should be
replaced, instead, with polyunsaturates
(as found in soybean oil and corn oil).
Still, reports from the National Insti-
tutes of Health suggest that we need to be
choosy about our polyunsaturates, based
on their ratio of omega-6 to omega-3.
Researcher Joseph Hibbeln says most
seed oils (soy, corn, etc.) deliver unhealthy
levels of omega-6.
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E14

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
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Come see why we say,
4. Engage someone at your health plan.
It could be a nurse case manager or
the medical director. And insist that the
insurer follow its own rules. “Often times,
an insurer may have a legitimate reason
for being concerned about a test or a
treatment, but they have to follow a spe-
cific process” for denying a claim or pre-
authorizing a service, Santa said. “Your
request may or may not be covered, but
the insurer has an obligation to provide
due process.”
5. Appeal. If you’re not satisfied with
your plan’s response, don’t be afraid to go
through the appeals process. “The track
record on appeals is favorable,” Santa
said. “There’s a good chance you could
win.” In the case of autism, make sure
your treatment plan is medically focused
and targets deficits in social interaction,
communication and repetitive or restric-
tive behaviors, said Kristin Jacobson,
president of Autism Deserves Equal Cov-
erage, an advocacy group in Burlingame,
Calif. “Health plans make it very hard for
families,” she said. “They count on fami-
lies giving up. The ones who don’t give up
are the ones who eventually will prevail.”
6. Beware of signing long-term contracts.
Some TMJ patients have gotten locked
into multiyear contracts with health-care
providers and continue having to pay long
after they’ve stopped treatment, Cowley
said. “In the event that the treatment
doesn’t work or you are worse, you are
still obligated to pay that contract.”
7. Maximize your benefits. If you have
another medical condition that overlaps
with the one you can’t get coverage for,
treat the one that is covered. Children
with autism whose family health plans
exclude that diagnosis, for instance, might
find some relief by pursuing coverage
for related conditions such as speech or
motor-skills delays, Jacobson said. Your
health plan also may have a separate
disease-management program for which
you might qualify that could help you with
pain management or diabetes, should you
need it.
8. Consider hiring a private health-care
advocate. Choose someone who has han-
dled many cases similar to yours. You
can search for professional advocates
near you at AdvoConnection.com and
the database of the National Associa-
tion of Healthcare Advocacy Consultants
(NAHAC.Memberlodge.com.)
INSURANCE • from E11 ––––––––––––––––––––
What’s good? What’s bad?
BREAKING DOWN FATS
Wading through the evolving debate
Eggs are full of protein and other impor-
tant nutrients. Those with cholesterol
issues may want to avoid dietary choles-
terol found in eggs.
ALEX GARCIA photos • Chicago Tribune/MCT
Avocados are a source of polyunsatu-
rated and monounsaturated good fats.
See FATS • E16
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E15
Looking for a Gift for that
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for someone?”
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Studies also show that “bad” foods can
develop healthier fat profiles depending
on what animals are fed and how the fats
are processed. Some advocate the health-
ful consumption of certain animal fats and
dairy from pastured animals.
So how can a consumer sort through all
of this to simply figure out what foods to
eat and avoid? The accompanying charts
show where most experts are in agree-
ment, as well as where debates remain on
dietary fat and cholesterol.
Of course, your best choices will depend
on your cardiovascular health, metabo-
lism, genetics and consultations with your
doctor, but here is some information to
get you started.
Good fats, bad fats
Polyunsaturated fat:
Sources: Corn, soybean and flaxseed
oils, as well as walnuts, flaxseeds and fish.
Best sources of omega-3 polyunsaturates
are oily fish; plant sources offer smaller
levels.
What they do: Lower cholesterol levels
and reduce inflammation among other
benefits.
The debate: Some scientists caution
that seed oils contain too much omega-6
fat at the expense of omega-3 benefits.
Others argue that both omega-3 and 6 are
beneficial.
Daily recommendation: 8 to 10 per-
cent of calories
Monounsaturated fats:
Sources: Peanuts, canola, olive oil, avo-
cados, almonds, hazelnuts, pecans and
pumpkin seeds
What they do: Improve blood choles-
terol levels among other health benefits.
The debate: Their effects when sub-
stituted for saturated fats are still being
studied.
Daily recommendation: 10 to 25 per-
cent of calories
Saturated fats:
Sources: Meat and whole milk dairy as
well as coconuts and palm
What they do: Raise bad cholesterol
levels but also good cholesterol.
The debate: Reductions in saturated
fats have not produced better cardiovas-
cular health but have coincided with a
rise in obesity. Since many have swapped
saturated fats for refined carbohydrates,
experts are debating the wisdom of con-
tinued reduction recommendations.
Daily recommendations: 10 percent
of calories or less
Trans fats:
Sources: This plant oil injected with
hydrogen is found in stick margarine,
some shortening and some processed
snacks.
What they do: Lower good cholesterol
levels while raising bad.
The debate: None
Daily recommendation: None
FOODS TO CONSIDER
1. Eggs
Fat profile: Contain about 5 grams of
fat each, of which only about 1.5 grams is
saturated.
Pros: Full of protein and other impor-
tant nutrients.
Cons: Those with cholesterol issues
may want to avoid dietary cholesterol
found in eggs.
Best version to eat: Pastured chicken
eggs contain higher levels of omega-3 than
those from indoor chickens.
2. Lard
Fat profile: 55 percent unsaturated, 39
percent saturated
Pros: Excellent source of vitamin D
with less saturated fat than butter.
Cons: Can carry pesticide residues,
especially if lard is not organic.
Best version: Pastured, organic pig
lard with higher levels of omega-3s
3. Coconut oil
Fat profile: 87 percent saturated, 8
percent unsaturated
Pros: Unprocessed, virgin coconut oil
is trans-fat-free and low in calories and
it contains high levels of lauric acid that
experts consider neutral to beneficial.
Cons: Hydrogenated versions — most
often studied in the past and found in pro-
cessed foods — can raise bad cholesterol.
Best version: Virgin coconut oil
4. Avocados
Fat profile: 75 percent monounsatu-
rated, 16 percent saturated
Pros: Good source of vitamin E, pro-
tein, fiber, folate and other nutrients
Cons: High in calories
Best version: Any
Note: Because these recommendations
for percentage of fat calories are from
varied sources, taken together they can
exceed official government dietary guide-
lines.
Sources: U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Harvard School of Public Health, “Good
Fats” and Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E16

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
Orthopaedic Institute of Ohio
Ask for the Best! Ask for OIO!
oio2010 spring health ad older.qxd:spring health ad 9/23/10 10:38 AM Page 1
FATS • from E14 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
ALEX GARCIA photos • Chicago Tribune/MCT
Lard is an excellent source of vitamin D with less saturated fat than butter but it can
carry pesticide residues, especially if not organic.
Coconut oil is trans-fat-free and low in cal-
ories and it contains high levels of lauric
acid that experts consider neutral to ben-
eficial. Hydrogenated versions, most often
studied in the past and found in processed
foods, can raise bad cholesterol.
By MARY BETH BRECKENRIDGE
Akron Beacon Journal
(MCT)
HUDSON, Ohio — Chances are you
know how it feels to put on excess pounds.
You’re uncomfortable. Nothing fits right.
Everything seems to take more effort.
Sharon Kreighbaum believes that’s how
it is with houses, too.
The Hudson, Ohio, resident has writ-
ten “Is Your House Overweight? Recipes
for Low-Fat Rooms,” a guide to putting a
home on a clutter diet. The book, released
Tuesday, helps readers streamline their
homes and set them up in a way that sim-
plifies day-to-day life.
The book’s premise is that a bloated
house is an uncomfortable one. Clutter
gets in our way, increases our stress and
wastes our time, energy and resources.
The self-published book grew out of
Kreighbaum’s work as an interior designer
and home stager, as well as her early
experience as a kitchen designer. Through
her staging business, Staged Makeovers,
she mostly rearranges and redecorates
homes for sale, but she said she’s found
that some clients want her services just to
make their homes more livable.
She also was inspired by a few people in
her life, she said.
One is her husband, Mark, whom she
described as a minimalist. Another is a
cousin in California whose home was
devastated by an earthquake, but who
decided not to replace many of her pos-
sessions because she realized she didn’t
need them. The third is her brother, a
priest who once lived in a monastery in
Italy with just one closet and one dresser.
He enjoyed his situation and always
looked sharp, even with a limited ward-
robe, she said. “He had such a full, reward-
ing life living without stuff.”
Kreighbaum said she’s incorporated
those lessons in her work, and she’s seen
the difference decluttering can make in
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E17
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Your Home?
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Facts, awareness are key to
dealing with Alzheimer’s disease
By JANE GLENN HAAS
The Orange County Register
(MCT)
Alzheimer’s Disease is the sixth lead-
ing cause of death in the U.S., well below
the leaders of heart disease, cancer and
stroke.
Yet this disease — which strikes one
in two Americans over 85 — seems to
be the most feared simply because there
is no cure for its manifestations, which
include dementia.
In November — Alzheimer’s Disease
Awareness and National Family Care-
giver Month — it’s time to point out
what you can do to become aware of
Alzheimer’s symptoms and what individ-
uals can do to relieve the stress of caring
for someone with this disease.
By 2014, Medicare will include test-
ing for dementia in its overall approved
annual checkup, says Jim McAleer, pres-
ident/CEO of the Alzeheimer’s Associa-
tion Orange County Chapter (alz.org).
This will give physicians the potential
to begin treatments earlier in the disease
process, says Dr. Gus Alva, a psychia-
trist who treats Alzheimer’s patients and
also is medical director of ATP Clinical
Research in Costa Mesa.
“This disease progresses slowly,” Alva
says. “As the illness gets worse, the
patient needs care beyond the capabili-
ties of an individual family member.
“Because Alzheimer’s begins slowly, it
is often mistaken for normal aging and
precious ground is lost for treatments.
“Although there is no cure for the dis-
ease, treatments can greatly slow down
its progress,” Alva says.
A combination treatment approach of
the drugs Namenda and Aircept can
make a difference in slowing memory
decline, he says.
Namenda — or memantine — is in a
class of medications called NMDA recep-
tor antagonists that work by decreasing
abnormal activity in the brain.
Aircept — or donepezil — is a cholin-
esterase inhibitor that improves mental
function by increasing the occurrence
PHIL MASTURZO • Akron Beacon Journal/MCT
Large mirrors and artwork are one way
Sharon Kreighbaum uses to help declut-
tering in her new book “Is Your House
Overweight?”
Homes
on a diet
Ohio woman’s
book includes
recipes for
‘Low-Fat Rooms’
See HOMES ON A DIET • E18
HOW TO HELP YOUR HOUSE
LOSE WEIGHT
Clutter-dieting tips from Sharon
Kreighbaum:
• Declutter with a friend. He or she
can provide objectivity and encourage
you to keep going.
• Declutter a room by taking every-
thing out and then sorting items into
four laundry baskets marked “keep,”
“move” (to another room, that is),
“throw away” and “donate.” Return to
the room only the things that you love
and that serve your needs.
• Periodically “weed” each room by
putting anything that doesn’t belong
there into a laundry basket. Either
return those things to their proper
homes or put them in a recycling or
donation bin.
• Think twice about buying kitchen
gadgets. Do you really need a chopper
when the knife you already own works
just as well?
• In a pantry or kitchen cupboard,
store like items together. You can see
at a glance whether you need more
of something, so you won’t overbuy or
come up short.
• A single, large item makes a bigger
decorative impact than a lot of small
items.
• Display special items by them-
selves — for example, hang a painting
over a mantel that has nothing else on
it. It will command more attention with-
out the other distractions.
See HOW TO • E18
See ALZHEIMER’S • E20
her clients’ lives. One couple even lost
weight after their house did, probably
because decluttering lowered their stress
and freed space in their kitchen so they
could more easily cook and eat healthful
meals at home, she said.
A clutter-free home, however, doesn’t
have to be a spare one, Kreighbaum
insisted. After all, the artist in her loves
beautiful things, and she loves surround-
ing herself with them just as much as her
clients do.
“You can live with luxury, but just
enough that it’s not clutter,” she said.
Clutter, she said, comes from indecision.
Things accumulate because we haven’t
decided how to handle them or where to
put them. And when we don’t make those
decisions, she said, we set ourselves up
for the frustration and wasted time of con-
tinually searching for things or having to
deal with the consequences of our laxity.
So one of the keys to Kreighbaum’s
approach is assigning everything a home,
which should be where you use the item
or where you need it — your purse and
cell phone near the door, for instance,
and your dishes within reach of the dish-
washer.
Another is deciding which activities you
want to happen regularly in each room
and then keeping in it only the things
that support those activities. In a kitchen,
for example, that might mean putting
the everyday items in easy reach, storing
seldom-used serving pieces in less acces-
sible spots and finding other homes for
the backpacks, mail, paperwork and other
things that tend to accumulate there.
Think of it as living like you’re on vaca-
tion, Kreighbaum said. Even the most lux-
urious hotels and vacation homes contain
only the things their guests will need dur-
ing their stays. “Any more than that and
we wouldn’t be able to relax and unwind,”
she writes in the book.
After all, fewer possessions mean less
stuff to maintain, she pointed out. It’s
easier to put things away properly when
there’s space to store them, and house-
work goes faster when there’s less to
clean.
Decluttering saves money, too. Not only
will you stop buying things that don’t
enrich your life, she said, but you’ll also
have a better handle on what you do own
so you don’t find yourself spending money
on duplicates. And if you’re paying money
to store what you’re not using, you’ll be
able to eliminate that expense.
She recalled one couple she worked
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E18

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
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HOMES ON A DIET • from E17 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
PHIL MASTURZO • Akron Beacon Journal/MCT
Sharon Kreighbaum offers decluttering advice in her new book “Is Your House Over-
weight?” Here, a painted design on her dining room floor that has no table is featured
Oct. 20 at her home in Hudson.
See HOMES ON A DIET • E20
HOW TO /From E17
• Edit collections to a few examples
and display them in a grouping. Rotate
the display occasionally by putting the
current items in storage and bringing
out new ones.
• Gifts and inheritances can be the
biggest stumbling blocks to declutter-
ing. Remember that when someone
gives you a gift, the intention isn’t to
burden you with it. If it doesn’t enhance
your life, it’s OK to sell it or give it away.
Taking a picture of it first lets you keep
the memory but not the object.
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E19
SEE YOU AT THE SENIOR EXPO
One of Ohio’s Finest Restaurants
Wednesdays are always Senior Citizens Day.
Special Senior Citizens Discounts
Plus FREE Coffee All Day
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Closed Monday
Open Thanksgiving Day from 10:30-6pm
3175 West Elm Street, Lima • 419-991-3075
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E20

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
with who paid $175 a month for a storage
unit. They finally decided to clean it out
and have a garage sale, but because the
unit wasn’t climate-controlled, they found
ruined clothes, rusty bikes and furniture
and books that smelled of mildew.
The husband did the math. In the eight
years they’d been renting the unit, he
discovered, they’d spent $16,800 to keep
things that were worthless.
Better to be generous, Kreighbaum said.
It’s a win-win situation: Donating what
you don’t need frees space in your home,
which helps you, she said. It also makes
your unwanted things available to others
who need them, which helps them.
Even cleaning can be a matter of declut-
tering. Manufacturers have convinced us
we need specific cleaners for specific
tasks, Kreighbaum said, but she limits
herself to just a few key supplies — bak-
ing soda, vinegar, lemon oil and dishwash-
ing liquid. They’re cheap, safe and readily
available, and people almost always have
them on hand, she said.
Her own home is an example of her
philosophy. The house is richly appointed
but uncrowded. Walls are hung with large
pieces of art and oversize mirrors, kitchen
counters and other surfaces are kept
mostly clear, and accessories are care-
fully chosen and artfully displayed. Even
her pantry is carefully arranged — canned
beans in one place, pasta in another.
It’s all about balancing beauty and func-
tion, she said.
And in the end, it’s about feeling good
about where you live.
HOMES ON A DIET • from E18 –––––––––––––––
of natural substances that enable healthy
brain activity.
Currently 15 million Americans have
the disease and someone develops
Alzheimer’s every 69 seconds, he says.
As boomers age, the pace will increase
by 2050 to one new patient every 33
seconds.
“We cannot hide our heads in the
sand,” Alva says. “We need to address
this disease directly and do something
about it.” He suggests becoming famil-
iar with issues and news posted on the
Alzheimer’s Association and Alzheimer’s
Foundation websites.
The atpgroup.net website tells about
local efforts to help patients and their
caregivers, as does thefamilycaregiver.
org, he says.
“The best gift a caregiver can make is
to truly care of themselves,” Alva adds.
That means taking advantage of help
and aid when offered and allowing
themselves some respite. For example,
around 30 caregivers will be hosted for
an annual four-night cruise to Mexico.
The respite includes local care for indi-
vidual loved ones. (For details, see cruise
sponsors womansage.org or alz.org.)
“More than 65 percent of caregivers
develop deep anxiety and suffer from
medical problems,” Alva says. “Caregiv-
ers must exercise, stay healthy and enjoy
their own pursuits.”
A survey by the National Family Care-
givers Assn. found that taking care of
their personal health, a lack of respite
care and meeting monthly financial
needs are the concerns of most caregiv-
ers.
ALZHEIMER’S • from E18 ––––––––––––––––––
PHIL MASTURZO • Akron Beacon Journal/MCT
Hudson resident Sharon Krieghbaum’s
book, “Is Your House Overweight?” is a
guide to putting a home on a clutter diet.
New prostate-cancer screening
guidelines may be too
conservative for some doctors
By JAY PRICE
McClatchy Newspapers
Prostate cancer is a major killer and
the most common cancer among men.
So it’s no wonder that a new national rec-
ommendation on screening — or rather,
not screening — for the disease has
triggered a stir in the media, confusion
among the public and an outcry from
patients who credit the test for saving
their lives.
Despite the uproar, several physicians
said, men shouldn’t expect much differ-
ent when they go for an annual physical,
which is when the screening is usually
administered, typically to those age 50
or older.
The new recommendation from the
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
is that men younger than 75 shouldn’t
routinely get a type of test called PSA
screening. The task force, an indepen-
dent group of health care professionals
that crafts disease prevention policies
for the federal government, had recom-
mended three years ago that men older
than 75 shouldn’t get the test.
The test generates a high rate of false
positive results, and studies have shown
that while it does help detect more pros-
tate cancers it doesn’t cut the rate of
death from the disease.
Critics say the false positives often
lead to unnecessary treatment and sur-
geries that can harm patients who might
well have survived the cancer with little
or no problem, as it can often grow
slowly for decades without symptoms.
But several family physicians and urol-
ogists — the doctors who form the front
line of defense against prostate cancer
— say they and their colleagues greeted
the new recommendations with a collec-
tive shrug.
They said the test itself does no harm
and still has a proper role in screening
and informed decision-making about the
disease. Screening should also include
consideration of family history of pros-
tate cancer, age, symptoms and the
results of a standard manual examina-
tion of the prostate for irregularities,
they say.
“For all the talk, I’m not sure a whole
lot has changed,” said Dr. Richard Lord,
a family physician in Winston-Salem and
president of the North Carolina Acad-
emy of Family Physicians.
Lord was on a camping trip with a
friend who is a urologist just after the
panel issued the new recommendation,
and both were scratching their heads
over the stir.
“My sense is that most doctors were
like us: They were wondering what all
the fuss was about,” he said.
Lord hasn’t altered his approach to
screening for the disease nor what he
tells patients about PSA screening. He
has always given patients a brief talk
about the strengths and shortcomings
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The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E21
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of screening and will continue to do so,
he said.
PSA screening is typically done to men
50 or older during their annual physical. It
helps detect prostate cancer by measuring
the level of a protein in the blood produced
by the prostate. An elevated level can indi-
cate the presence of cancer, but it takes a
biopsy of tissue from the prostate to deter-
mine the actual presence of cancer.
The task force has never actually rec-
ommended PSA screening, and basically
made minor changes in its recommenda-
tions, Lord said. Its prior position had
been that it didn’t have enough evidence
to say whether testing was a good idea.
Its new position for men younger than
75 doesn’t address cases of younger
men with symptoms that can suggest
cancer or with factors such as a family
history of the disease, which can greatly
increase chances of developing it.
For someone showing potential symp-
toms, such as decreased or irregular
urinary flow or the need to get up often
at night to urinate, the PSA test becomes
a diagnostic tool rather than a screening
method.
And while many prostate cancers are
slow-growing and can take decades, oth-
ers are aggressive and can kill quickly if
not diagnosed early.
Dr. Mott Blair, a family doctor in Eliza-
bethtown, N.C., said that while he hasn’t
changed the substance of what he tells
patients about PSA screening, he has
used the current furor and complexities
of the issue as an opportunity to educate
them more on the shortcomings of not
just PSA screening but other types of
medical tests, too, such as pap smears
and mammograms.
A widespread criticism among doctors
of the task force recommendations is that
they might make sense when considered
for the entire national population, but not
for thoughtful care of a specific individual
who may turn out to have an aggressive
form of the disease that must be caught
early and treated quickly.
Dr. Frank Tortora, a surgeon with Cary
Urology, said that he has gone to funerals
for prostate cancer victims in their 40s,
and also has an elderly cancer patient
who has outlived two of the doctors who
treated him.
Tortora tells patients it’s naive to think
every case of the cancer is the same,
because all progress at different speeds.
The PSA test is useful, he said, particu-
larly when patients have earlier, baseline
measurements to compare.
PROSTATE • from E20 ––––––––––––––––––––
O’Connor talks of life
as cowgirl and on court
By CHRIS VAUGHN
McClatchy Newspapers
FORT WORTH, Texas — Retired Justice
Sandra Day O’Connor figured prominently
in a number of court cases during her 25
years on the U.S. Supreme Court, often
casting the deciding vote in 5-4 decisions
involving abortion, affirmative action,
the death penalty and First Amendment
rights.
Not one of those constitutional and
controversial cases came up last week,
though, when O’Connor journeyed to
Fort Worth, Texas, for the opening of an
exhibit on her life at the National Cowgirl
Museum, which inducted her into its Hall
of Fame in 2002.
Instead, O’Connor, 81, the first woman
on the court, talked mostly of windmills,
horses, cowboys and her life growing up
on the massive Lazy B Ranch straddling
Arizona and New Mexico.
“It is odd that a cowgirl ended up on
the court as the first woman,” she said in
remarks outside the exhibit, “The Cowgirl
Who Became a Justice.”
O’Connor also helped induct the eight
newest members of the Hall of Fame at
a luncheon Wednesday in the Will Rogers
Memorial Center.
The 3,000-square-foot exhibit, which
runs through March 25, was timed for the
30th anniversary of O’Connor’s appoint-
ment to the court by
President Ronald Reagan, who in nomi-
nating her broke with almost 200 years of
all-male tradition on the nation’s highest
court.
O’Connor had been a powerful Arizona
lawmaker and at the time of her appoint-
ment was serving on the Arizona Court of
Appeals. She said
Wednesday that she believed that her
and Reagan’s common interest in ranch-
ing and horses was crucial to his decision
to nominate her.
“Because I had grown up on the back
of a horse, he had more interest in me,”
she said.
Her confirmation hearings in the Sen-
ate in September 1981 were considered
contentious at the time, although the pro-
cess ended in a 99-0 vote in favor of her
appointment. She conceded that a 99-0
vote “would not happen today” because of
the more politically divisive environment
in Washington, D.C.
In joining the court that year, she
became one of the most recognizable
and powerful women in the country, and
she rewrote the rules for what a woman
KHAMPHA BOUAPHANH • Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT
Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor tours an exhibit Oct. 26
titled “The Cowgirl Who Became a Justice” at the National Cowbirl Museum and Hall
of Fame in Forth Worth, Texas.
See COWGIRL • E22
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E22

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
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Leading Prevention
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could become in public life. A 1981 People
magazine cover is in the exhibit, with
O’Connor front and center as a movie
star would have been. The cover has
two smaller photos next to hers — of
Mick Jagger and Boss Hogg.
“It was a good time for us to look back
at 1981 and see what it was like and
remind people how unusual it was at the
time for her to join the Supreme Court,”
said Diana Vela, associate executive
director of exhibits and education at
the museum. “We wanted to explore not
just her cowgirl ties. We felt we were a
natural fit for both aspects of her life
and upbringing.”
O’Connor’s early years on the Lazy
B Ranch, where she learned to drive
a tractor, brand cattle and shoot rifles
as a girl, did not directly influence her
legal thinking, she said. But she said
they taught her personal responsibility,
initiative and problem-solving skills and
undoubtedly played into her education
at Stanford University, her legal ambi-
tions and her reputation for deciding
cases on individual merits, not judicial
philosophy.
“You have to learn to do things on your
own,” she said of ranch life.
“Cowboys don’t spend a lot of time
telling you how to do things. They just
expect you to get things done and get
them done right.”
After her retirement, O’Connor pushed
for the development of an interactive
online game called iCivics that teaches
children about law, government and civics.
It launched this year at www.icivics.org and
is a focal point of the exhibit in Fort Worth.
COWGIRL • from E21 ––––––––––––––––––––––
KHAMPHA BOUAPHANH • Fort Worth Star-Telegram/MCT
Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor tours an exhibit Oct. 26
titled “The Cowgirl Who Became a Justice” at the National Cowbirl Museum and Hall
of Fame in Forth Worth, Texas.
“It is odd that a cowgirl
ended up on the court as
the first woman.”
— Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O’Connor
www.limaohio.com
Visit The Lima News online
for local news, sports & weather
Food still better
than supplements
By BARBARA QUINN
The Monterey County Herald
“Do you really believe there are any
nutrients left in our food?” a man asked
me recently.
Yes I do, if you mean food that is
freshly harvested. And those nutrients
work pretty well...like they were put
there for a good reason. Research seems
to bear this out as well. Here are three
cases in point:
Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant nutri-
ent that occurs naturally in foods such
as whole grains, nuts and seeds. It helps
protect body cells from damage caused
by free radicals — wayward oxygen
molecules associated with the develop-
ment of heart disease and cancer. Yet a
recent large study in healthy men found
that — instead of protecting against
the development of prostate cancer —
supplements of vitamin E significantly
increased the risk.
What’s the deal? Health benefits of
nutrients and other protective substances
in our food often follow a U-shaped
curve; too much may be as harmful as
too little. And the right amount and bal-
ance of nutrients needed for optimal
health is often the amount and balance
found in real food.
In the case of vitamin E, the recom-
mended daily intake for adults is 22.4
International Units (IU) — about the
amount you would get in a tablespoon of
wheat germ oil. The amount given in this
study was 400 IUs. Was that too much?
ON NUTRITION
See NUTRITION • E23
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
The Lima News Thursday, November 10, 2011 E23
Perhaps, say these researchers. They
remind us that vitamins are “seemingly
innocuous yet biologically active sub-
stances.” That means — in concentrated
doses, they have the potential to cause
harm. Or as food safety expert Carl Win-
ters from the University of California at
Davis likes to say, “The dose makes the
poison.”
Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable
that contains natural substances found
to protect against cancer. These sub-
stances are activated by enzymes that
are also naturally present in broccoli.
When we chew fresh broccoli, these
enzymes are released to do their work
and we reap the benefits of these health-
ful substances. Very convenient.
However, few of these beneficial
enzymes are present in more processed
foods such as broccoli supplements,
according to a recent study in the Jour-
nal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
Real food wins again.
And then there are “whole grains”
— foods that contain the three major
“parts” of a seed grain — the bran,
germ, and endosperm. Within each of
these parts are essential nutrients and
plant chemicals that work together to
provide optimal health benefits, includ-
ing reduced risk for heart disease and
metabolic syndrome, the condition that
can lead to diabetes.
Studies on whole grains have found
that eating the entire “whole” grain con-
tributes more benefit than we would get
from eating isolated parts such as wheat
germ, bran, or supplements of nutrients
found in grain foods. Again in this case,
the “whole” seems to be much better
(and simpler) than the sum of its parts.
(Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian
and certified diabetes educator at the
Community Hospital of the Monterey
Peninsula. Email her at bquinn@chomp.
org.)
NUTRITION • from E22 –––––––––––––––––––
Take care of your health
Dr. Hecht answers questions from readers
on Tuesday’s Health page in The Lima News
Frankie Valli enjoys
late-career spurt thanks
to musical about his life
By JUDITH NEWMARK
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
ST. LOUIS — Frankie Valli, a radio star
who survived the assault of video, cannot
find a station he likes.
They’re all talk, or all sports, or all one
kind of music.
That’s not for him.
What about an Internet radio service
like Pandora, one that tailors its program-
ming to your taste?
What if he entered, say, his own name?
Wouldn’t he get what he wants to hear?
Absolutely not, Valli said. It might even
be worse.
Today’s radio “is all specialized,” said
the original Jersey Boy. “But I think vari-
ety was the key to radio’s success.
“Radio used to have personality. ... Now
you only get what you want, and I am not
sold on that. Isn’t it nice to find something
new—something you didn’t even know
you liked?”
Maybe that describes Valli’s youngest
fans. But they didn’t find him on the radio.
They found him on Broadway.
The Tony-winning hit “Jersey Boys” re-
energized Valli’s fan base. Not only did it
tell the story of Valli and the Four Sea-
sons, working-class kids who made a for-
tune and music history, it also had a could-
not-fail score made up of hits including
“Sherry,” “Walk Like a Man,” “Rag Doll,”
“Big Girls Don’t Cry” “December 1963 (Oh
What a Night),” “My Eyes Adored You”
and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off Of You.”
That’s the kind of material Valli per-
forms in concert, too. He is the only
original member of the Four Seasons
still in the group. Composer Bob Gaudio
stopped singing long ago to write and pro-
duce music (he was instrumental in the
creation of “Jersey Boys”), Tommy DeVito
retired and Nick Massi died in 2000.
But Valli considers his hand-picked new
colleagues perfect for the Four Seasons’
signature sound.
“If we said, we’re doing all new material,
we’d probably get six people to come,” he
said. “We do our hits, and we are blessed
to have had so many.”
Valli says there’s something magical
about a long career. “It’s not just the songs
that people go to hear. It’s what those
songs meant in their own lives.”
They carry special meaning for the
singer, too. When he performs, Valli said,
he puts himself “in a psychological place
where it’s the very first time.” Hearing
them sung by somebody else, as he does
in “Jersey Boys,” is another story.
“When you’re tough on yourself, every-
thing is tough,” he said. “You give your
story to these people and some of it is
hard to see. (Among other things, the
show deals with the break-up of his mar-
riage and the death of his daughter.) It’s
so sensitive.
“But I don’t know anybody in rock ’n’
roll who’s alive and has had a successful
play (about him). That usually happens
after you die. To be able to actually see it,
that’s wonderful.”
• Photo courtesy of ia.media-imdb.com
The Tony-winning hit “Jersey Boys” on
Broadway re-energized Frankie Valli’s fan
base.
www.limaohio.com
Visit The Lima News online for local news, sports & weather
S E N I O R E X P O 2 0 1 1
E24

Thursday, November 10, 2011 The Lima News
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