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THE 2010 HAYS SALARY GUIDE SHARING OUR EXPERTISE

Salaries and recruiting trends across Australia and New Zealand.

hays.com.au hays.net.nz

HAYS AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

10,000+ 8,500+ 670+

PEOPLE PLACED IN PERMANENT JOBS EACH YEAR

TEMPORARY AND CONTRACT STAFF ENGAGED EACH WEEK

CONSULTANTS IN AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

36 33+
Thank you

LOCATIONS ACROSS AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

Feedback We welcome any feedback or comments regarding this survey whether positive or negative to ensure that it continues to be relevant to Australian and New Zealand organisations across all industries. Please address any suggestions to your local Hays office or to: Hays Level 11, The Chifley Tower, 2 Chifley Square Sydney NSW 2000 E: salarysurvey@hays.com.au

Disclaimer The Hays Salary Survey is representative of a value added service to our clients, prospective clients and candidates. Whilst every care is taken in the collection and compilation of data, the survey is interpretive and indicative, not conclusive. Therefore information should be used as a guideline only and should not be reproduced in total or by section without written prior permission from Hays.

Hays would like to express our gratitude to all those organisations that participated in our online survey and provided such invaluable feedback, which we feel has contributed to making this the most accurate and up to date survey of its kind in Australia and New Zealand. A list of all contributors who kindly gave their permission to be named as participants can be found on our website. This survey is reproduced in full in PDF format on our website hays.com.au and hays.net.nz

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 3

THE BEST DECISIONS ARE INFORMED DECISIONS

There is new optimism in the market with 67 per cent of employers surveyed predicting the economy will strengthen in the next 6 to 12 months. This is in stark contrast to this time last year when only 6 per cent thought the economy would improve. This increased confidence is further illustrated by 45 per cent of respondents intending to increase permanent headcount and 22 per cent expecting to increase their use of temporary and contract staff. A very different picture to this time last year. Nigel Heap, Managing Director of Hays Asia Pacific
4 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

SECTION ONE MARKET OVERVIEW & TRENDS


Results gained from over 1,800 employers throughout Australia and New Zealand.

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 5

Market Overview & Trends


1. On average in your last review, by what percentage did you increase salaries?

Salary Policy

6%

3%

Across all industries

29%

62%

Less than 3% From 3% to 6% From 6% to 10% More than 10%

10%

5%

4%

13% 27%

For specific industries

64% 77%

Advertising & Media

Construction, Property & Engineering

4% 2%

5%

2%

26% 30%

68%

63%

Financial Services

Hospitality, Travel & Entertainment

6 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Salary Policy
1. On average in your last review, by what percentage did you increase salaries? continued...
20% 26%

Market Overview & Trends

8%

5%

2%

For specific industries

67% 72%

IT & Telecommunications

Manufacturing

8%

4% 10%

4%

26% 32% 56% 60%

Mining & Resources

Professional Services

4% 1%

5%

2%

43%

27%

52%

66%

Public Sector

Retail

2% 1% 19%

4% 1%

33%

62% 78%

Transport & Distribution

Other

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 7

Market Overview & Trends


2. When you next review, by what percentage do you intend to increase salaries?

Salary Policy

8%

2%

Across all industries

43%

47%

Less than 3% From 3% to 6% From 6% to 10% More than 10%

5%

10%

3%

26% 43%

For specific industries

44% 69%

Advertising & Media

Construction, Property & Engineering

7%

1%

5%

44% 41% 54% 48%

Financial Services

Hospitality, Travel & Entertainment

8 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Salary Policy
2. When you next review, by what percentage do you intend to increase salaries?
continued...

Market Overview & Trends

7%

4% 1%

For specific industries


36% 57% 49%

46%

IT & Telecommunications

Manufacturing

3% 15% 28%

8%

2%

36%

54%

54%

Mining & Resources

Professional Services

1% 1%

1%

47% 51% 47% 52%

Public Sector

Retail

4% 2%

4%

43%

51%

43%

53%

Transport & Distribution

Other

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 9

Market Overview & Trends


3. Does your company offer flexible salary packaging?

Salary Policy

79%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

21%
100%

Yes No

Of those who answered yes, the following benefits were indicated as being commonly offered to... Car Bonuses Private Health Insurance Parking Salary Sacrifice Superannuation Private Expenses Other

All Employees 14% 30% 33% 35% 57% 86% 15% 38%

More than 50% Less than 50% 9% 14% 5% 14% 8% 4% 5% 7% 27% 22% 9% 16% 13% 3% 14% 10%

Few Employees 50% 34% 53% 35% 22% 7% 66% 45%

4. What is your companys Fringe Benefits Tax policy? (Australia only)

5% 12%

Across all industries

52% 31% Employer bears FBT cost Employee bears FBT cost Cost shared between Employer & Employee Other

10 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Recruitment Trends
5. Over the last 12 months, have permanent staff levels in your department...

Market Overview & Trends

Across all departments

Increased 33%
0% 20% 40%

25%
60% 80%

42%
100%

Decreased Remained the same

26% 32% 39%

For specific departments

50%

24% 29%

Accountancy & Finance

Engineering

30%

32% 43%

47%

23%

25%

Human Resources

Information Technology

30% 35% 45%

38%

25%

27%

Marketing

Operations

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 11

Market Overview & Trends


5. Over the last 12 months, have permanent staff levels in your department... continued...
30% 43%

Recruitment Trends

39% 40%

For specific departments

17%

31%

Purchasing

Sales

37% 40%

23%

Other

6. Over the coming year, do you expect permanent staff levels to...

Across all departments

Increase 45% 9%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

46%
100%

Decrease Remain the same

29%

31%

For specific departments

62%

9% 9%

60%

Accountancy & Finance 12 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Engineering

Recruitment Trends
6. Over the coming year, do you expect permanent staff levels to... continued...

Market Overview & Trends

36% 45% 48% 46%

For specific departments

Human Resources

7%

18%

Information Technology

40%

39% 50%

55%

5%

11%

Marketing

Operations

37%

43% 49% 57%

6%

Purchasing

Sales

8%

40%

52%

8%

Other

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 13

Market Overview & Trends


7. If you expect staffing levels to increase, please specify how:

Recruitment Trends

Employment of Part-time Staff Employment of Casual Staff


(on your payroll)

Temporary/Contractors Job Sharing

(through an employment consultancy)

Full time/Permanent Staff Mixture, Other


(inc. overseas recruitment, acquisitions)

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

% of respondents answered yes

8. How often do you employ temporary/contract staff?

Across all departments

Regular ongoing basis 20%


0% 20% 40%

47%
60% 80%

33%
100%

Special projects/ Workloads Exceptional circumstances/Never

12% 25% 29%

For specific departments

42%

46%

46%

Accountancy & Finance 14 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Engineering

Recruitment Trends
8. How often do you employ temporary/contract staff?
continued... 30% 18% 29%

Market Overview & Trends

30%

For specific departments

52%

41%

Human Resources

Information Technology

10% 24% 30% 31%

60% 45%

Marketing

Operations

7% 20%

14%

47%

39% 73%

Purchasing

Sales

29%

25%

46%

Other

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 15

Market Overview & Trends


9. In the next 12 months, do you expect your use of temporary/contract staff to...

Recruitment Trends

Across all departments

Increase 22% 9%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

69%
100%

Decrease Remain the same

12%

8% 37%

For specific departments


56%

80% 7%

Accountancy & Finance

Engineering

20%

25%

10% 11%

64% 70%

Human Resources

Information Technology

25%

25%

60% 15%

63%

12%

Marketing

Operations

16 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Recruitment Trends
9. In the next 12 months, do you expect your use of temporary/contract staff to...
continued...

Market Overview & Trends

10% 29% 17%

For specific departments

65% 73%

6%

Purchasing

Sales

24%

9% 67%

Other

10. In skill-short areas, would you consider employing or sponsoring a qualified overseas candidate?

59%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

41%
100%

Yes No

11. For which areas have you recently found it difficult to recruit? Accountancy & Finance Engineering Human Resources IT Operations Purchasing Sales & Marketing Technical Other

Junior to Mid Management 10% 12% 2% 4% 10% 2% 6% 10% 7%

Senior Management 4% 9% 1% 2% 7% 1% 4% 5% 3% 2010 Hays Salary Guide | 17

Market Overview & Trends


12. Has overtime/extra hours in your organisation over the last 12 months...

Human Resources Trends

26%

60%

14%

Increased Decreased Remained the same

If increased, by how much? Per Week None 5 Hours or Less 5 - 10 Hours More than 10 Hours 21% 37% 31% 11% Month End 41% 11% 23% 25% Year End 46% 5% 10% 39%

13. For non-award staff in your organisation, is overtime/extra hours worked...

27%

73%

Paid Unpaid

18 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Human Resources Trends


14. Is it your policy to counteroffer staff when they resign?

Market Overview & Trends


1%

39%

60%

Yes Sometimes No

Of those you counter-offered, on average , did they....

4% 19%

44%
Across all industries

Stay less than 3 months Stay 3 12 months 33% Stay longer than 12 months Leave anyway

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 19

Market Overview & Trends


15. In the past 12 months, has business activity...

Economic Outlook

21%

Across all industries

56% 23%

Increased Decreased Remained the same

18% 21%

For specific industries

50% 51%

32%

28%

Advertising & Media

Construction, Property & Engineering

18% 27%

53% 58% 15% 29%

Financial Services

Hospitality, Travel & Entertainment

20 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Economic Outlook
15. In the past 12 months, has business activity... continued...
20% 17%

Market Overview & Trends

For specific industries


53% 21% 59% 30%

IT & Telecommunications

Manufacturing

18%

22%

20% 62% 24%

54%

Mining & Resources

Professional Services

18% 28%

5% 27% 67%

55%

Public Sector

Retail

22%

23%

54% 19% 24% 58%

Transport & Distribution

Other

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 21

Market Overview & Trends


16. What are the key factors driving your business activity?
14%

Economic Outlook

13%

Significant impact Some impact No impact


45% 41% 51% 36%

Interest Rates

Currency/Forex Rates

19% 30% 38% 39%

43% 31%

Consumer Confidence

Capex Investment
(by customers)

17. Do you see the general outlook for the economy in the forthcoming 6-12* months as...

Strengthening 67%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

30% 3%
100%

Static Weakening

*This data was collected during March 2010.

22 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

SECTION TWO SALARY INFORMATION

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 23

USING OUR SALARY TABLES


Salaries are in 000. The bold number represents the typical salary. The number(s) underneath represent the salary range. Refer to the notes section under the salary table to determine if superannuation or other benefits are included. All salaries are represented in local currencies.
Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney Finance Director/CFO (Turnover up to $50m) 175 140 - 200
Salary range

Finance Director/CFO Finance Director/CFO (Turnover $50m - $150m) (Turnover > $150m) 220 170 - 240 260 210+

Typical salary

24 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Manufacturing & Operations

...salaries have now started to improve and we expect increases in the third and fourth quarters of 2010 as competition to retain and recruit top talent ignites.
Market changes The arrival of the 2009/10 financial year brought a degree of stability to a manufacturing industry which had suffered hard nationally. Towards the end of 2009 vacancy activity began to increase slowly amid positive sentiment and new projects in the resources sector in both Western Australia and Queensland. Add the continued growth of Chinas export demand and an increase in the number of R&D temporary roles in early 2010, and the manufacturing industry is in a far better shape today. Headcount freezes are lifting, recruitment activity is rising and demand for skilled professionals is slowly returning. Changes to recruitment practices Apart from the obvious decline in vacancy activity, recruitment practices remained unchanged last year. Employers focused on retaining their top talent, necessary for leading them successfully out of the downturn. When recruiting today, employers are cautious. They have high expectations surrounding their ideal candidates suitability, experience, qualifications and cultural fit. This is forcing candidates to raise their standards across the sector. While this will ultimately improve the industry, employers that go one step too far and draw out the timeframe, risk losing the right candidates to competitors with more succinct processes. Finding the right balance is the key. Employers who follow a structured process, listen to advice from a professional recruiter and act decisively will take advantage of the recovering market. Positions in demand Nationally, a broad range of positions are now in demand as organisations recruit in response to rising demand for their products. Most notable is the increase in vacancies for Site Managers and Production Supervisors. Demand is also growing for maintenance candidates as companies rebuild their maintenance and service departments. In trades and labour, permanent Mechanical Fitters and Maintenance Managers are sought. In a significant national trend, there has been a sudden rise in demand within Quality Assurance. Strong candidates who have a proven background in continuous improvement and expertise in efficiency are now sought. Design, Research and Development and Engineering candidates can be heartened by the first glimpses of stabilisation in their job markets as vacancies become available once again. Salary movements In 2009 salaries either fell slightly or remained the same as companies focused on reducing costs and productivity. However salaries have now started to improve and we expect increases in the third and fourth quarters of 2010 as competition to retain and recruit top talent ignites. The salaries for mid-level production candidates are expected to be among the first to move, specifically for Production Supervisors, Planners and Engineers. Quality Assurance salaries will also rise in response to demand. We expect rates for Tradespeople to move back to pre-global financial crisis levels in line with the increased demand for their services. This will occur quickest in Queensland and Western Australia as the resources sector bounces back strongly. Advice to candidates Vacancy activity in Australias manufacturing industry continues to ease back to pre-GFC levels, but at a slower pace than initially expected. It is therefore important to be strategic when looking for your next role and focus your applications on your core skill areas. Rightly or wrongly, employers continue to request candidates with specific skills, rather than train people looking to transfer to a new industry sector, so consolidate your experience and apply for appropriate vacancies. Maintain realistic expectations. The industry is improving but it doesnt follow that demand will be as high as it was in 2007/08. This extends to salaries. With the exception of candidates with continuous improvement or change management skills, if you expect a significant salary increase by changing roles you will be disappointed. Instead, focus your job search on finding a position that offers good work conditions. The industry will continue to improve over the next 12 months with good career opportunities becoming available for experienced candidates.

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 117

Manufacturing & Operations


Product Design & Manufacturing Graduate Production Engineer (all disciplines) Supervisor 40 - 55 40 - 55 40 - 55 40 - 55 40 - 55 65 - 85 65 - 80 60 - 80 60 - 75 60 - 80 Engineering Manager 100 - 130 100 - 150 100 - 135 95 - 135 95 - 135 Operations Manager 110 - 160 110 - 160 110 - 140 105 - 140 110 - 150 Production Manager 100 - 130 80 - 110 80 - 100 80 - 95 80 - 110

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide

Project Engineer (5yrs+ exp) 80 - 120 80 - 120 75 - 110 80 - 120 75 - 110

Process Engineer 70 - 90 70 - 90 65 - 90 65 - 90 65 - 90

Drafter 45 - 70 45 - 70 45 - 70 50 - 70 45 - 60

Electronics/ Elec Engineer 70 - 100 90 - 120 90 - 120 75 - 110 75 - 110

Design Engineer 65 - 85 70 - 90 65 - 90 70 - 90 65 - 85

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide

Controls/ Automation Engineer 75 - 120 65 - 110 65 - 110 60 - 100 60 - 100

R&D Manager 100 - 150 90 - 130 90 - 130 90 - 130 80 - 110

Maintenance Manager 90 - 100 90 - 120 90 - 120 90 - 120 80 - 110

QA Coordinator 55 - 75 55 - 65 60 - 75 60 - 75 60 - 75

QA Manager 80 - 120 75 - 120 80 - 120 80 - 120 80 - 120

Manufacturing Maintenance Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide

Maintenance Fitter 50 - 60 55 - 65 50 - 60 63 - 75 50 - 60

Maintenance Electrician 60 - 70 65 - 75 60 - 70 65 - 80 60 - 70

Maintenance Planner 75 - 80 75 - 80 75 - 80 75 - 80 75 - 80

Service Engineer 65 - 80 65 - 85 75 - 90 65 - 85 65 - 80

Service Manager 90 - 110 90 - 110 90 - 110 90 - 110 80 - 100

Notes
All salaries are representative of the total package value Package includes superannuation

118 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Energy

Counter offers are becoming more prevalent as (employers) realise the cost and time factors involved in finding staff.
Australia
Market changes As the shadow of the GFC recedes, Australias energy market is gaining much needed momentum. Significant investment decisions regarding the state networks and the strong push on clean and renewable energy (in the form of the renewable energy target) have increased investment, particularly from overseas. State-by-state, Victorias energy industry is looking at clean coal initiatives and companies are piloting alternative methods of carbon capture and storage. Following the states 2009 bushfires, the maintenance of transmission and distribution lines has also been a priority. Renewed demand for specialist trades from the generation industry was the first sign of a turnaround in Western Australias energy market. Other contributing factors included new power stations, increased demand on existing stations and major wind farm and solar projects at feasibility and planning stages. While the transmission and distribution industry is yet to fully recover, employers are recruiting experienced Designers and Drafters. Growing residential and industrial demand brought investment in the Northern Territorys energy sector to the fore. A number of solar projects will continue to be a focus of both private enterprise and government. New South Wales major utility companies continue to update an aging infrastructure, which has created job opportunities within the transmission and distribution industry. The states renewable energy sector has grown and opportunities within wind, geothermal and solar are increasing. Queensland has focused on carbon reducing technologies for existing hydrocarbon power generation assets. Changes to recruitment practices During the last 12 months employers were understandably selective when recruiting. Limited graduate recruitment took place, which could put further pressure on skills shortages long-term. The recruitment of overseas talent also fell as organisations reduced their demand. But as the market improves at a significant pace, the search for high calibre talent will once again make the importation of international candidates a necessary option. We also expect to see an increase in candidates moving interstate. A number of organisations are already proactively targeting regions of lower demand. As projects are completed they are also redeploying staff to states with increased demand or projects. The improving market has also led to the return of counter offers. In such a market, both employees and employers need to consider the career planning, training and development offered. Positions in demand Candidates with transmission and distribution experience are definite winners in Australias energy market at present. These skills are sought in most states and territories, and include Drafters and Designers, Electrical Engineers and Project Managers. In other areas of demand, Perth requires Mechanical and Electrical Design Engineers with experience on generation projects, in particular gas and steam turbines. Demand is also high for OH&S Officers and Maintenance Technicians (electrical). Queenslands growing list of skills in demand includes Senior Protection Engineers, Primary and Secondary Design Engineers, Mechanical Power Generation Engineers, Project Managers with switchgear experience, Contracts Managers, Civil Site Engineers with substation/power station experience and Senior Design Managers. In the Northern Territory there is a continuing requirement for Mechanical Engineers to design and maintain both developed and remote turbines and diesel engines. Victoria needs candidates with niche renewable energy skills and New South Wales wants both commercial and technical candidates within the wind, solar and hydro power sectors. Salary movements Salaries were fairly static in 2009. In fact the majority of organisations had a salary freeze in place and instead attracted candidates on the basis of the quality and security of their projects. Today however salaries are increasing and employers are willing to be more flexible for top candidates. For example, good Design Engineers with project experience are in demand and salaries are slowly increasing back to the levels that they attracted 12 months ago. There has been a marked change in the reluctance to offer fly-in fly-out packages to the Northern Territory, although employers are instead offering flexibility when it comes to housing packages, transport and career development. Advice to candidates Career planning remains a critical component of your professional development. Ensure that you continue to achieve continuous progression in your field of expertise. If you are looking to move interstate ensure that you have the right qualifications and tickets required to work. When deciding on future employers take into consideration an organisations project pipeline. There is a shortage of candidates with renewable energy experience so it is worthwhile considering your transferable skills.

New Zealand
Market changes Company restructures and the delay of major projects had an impact on the demand for staff within this sector over the last 12 months. But with a number of major projects now underway or scheduled to start across the generation and transmission sectors, the country is expected to be operating in a highly competitive candidate short-market once again. In fact, the energy sector is poised for a significant uplift. Changes to recruitment practices In response to market changes employers are increasingly considering the way they attract and retain talent. Counter offers are becoming more prevalent as they realise the cost and time factors involved in finding staff. Employers are moving towards strategic partnership recruitment for enhanced candidate attraction. As the search for talent moves offshore organisations with a greater global reach are preferred. Positions in demand Transmission Line Engineers and Protection Engineers are in demand across the market. The need for skilled project professionals with geothermal experience is expected to become a hotspot of demand moving forward. Salary movements Salaries have remained largely static across the market, but as the candidate shortage tightens this will change. As mentioned, counter offers are already taking place for skills in high demand, and it is only a matter of time before these salary increases filter through to the remainder of the workforce. Advice to candidates To be successful candidates need to avoid multiple applications. Instead, we suggest you select one or two consultants who have a good reputation and knowledge of the market to represent you. Keep a track of companies you have applied to directly and ensure you focus on key vacancies relevant to your skill set and experience. 2010 Hays Salary Guide | 119

Energy
Transmission & Distribution/Generation Design Engineer 65 - 95 65 - 85 70 - 100 70 - 110 70 - 85 85 - 110 65 - 80 Senior Design Engineer 100 - 140 100 - 140 90 - 120 90 - 130 80 - 120 110 - 140 80 - 90 Principal Design Engineer 145 - 160 120 - 150 110 - 150 100 - 150 100 - 130 120 - 150 90 - 110

Design Engineering
Engineering Manager 150 - 200 140 - 180 140 - 180 130 - 170 120 - 140 130 -180 120 - 150 Design Manager 110 - 150 110 - 150 110 - 160 110 - 160 110 - 140 130 - 150 100 - 140

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

* Design Engineer - Discipline (Mechanical/Process/Elec/I&C)

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Design Drafter 50 - 80 50 - 80 55 - 80 60 - 85 55 - 75 65 - 80 55 - 60

Senior Design Drafter 70 - 100 70 - 100 65 - 90 70 - 110 70 - 90 75 - 90 70 - 80

Project Engineer (EPCM) 90 - 120 90 - 120 85 - 110 100 - 130 90 - 115 95 - 125 70 - 85

Senior Project Engineer (EPCM) 120 - 160 120 - 160 110 - 150 125 - 165 130 - 145 120 - 155 85 - 100

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Power Systems Engineer 80 - 115 80 - 120 85 - 130 80 - 135 80 - 115 95 - 135 70 - 120

Protection Engineer 110 - 140 110 - 140 115 - 145 120 - 150 100 - 130 100 - 145 70 - 110

Transmission Line Design Engineer 100 - 120 100 - 120 90 - 130 110 - 120 110 - 120 100 - 125 65 - 110

Project Manager 125 - 175 120 - 170 110 - 160 130 - 190 125 - 160 120 - 160 100 - 135

Renewable Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Wind Farm Engineer 95 - 135 100 - 135 90 - 120 110 - 140 90 - 125 N/A 90 - 120

Solar Engineer 95 - 125 100 - 135 85 - 115 100 - 120 100 - 120 105 - 125 N/A

Geothermal Engineer 85 - 120 90 - 125 90 - 140 120 - 150 115 - 140 95 - 125 80 - 120

Technician 65 - 80 65 - 90 65 - 95 70 - 90 70 - 90 85 - 115 60 - 80

Notes
All salaries shown exclude superannuation New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

120 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Operations & Maintenance


Operations & Maintenance Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand Control Room Operator 55 - 75 55 - 75 65 - 80 70 - 100 70 - 100 85 - 95 65 - 75 Control Room Manager 70 - 100 70 - 100 75 - 110 85 - 130 85 - 125 95 - 110 80 - 100 Maintenance Superintendent 85 - 100 85 - 100 95 - 110 110 - 135 90 - 110 105 - 115 75 - 80

Energy
Maintenance Planning/Scheduler 80 - 95 85 - 105 95 - 115 95 - 120 85 - 100 90 - 110 N/A

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Asset Engineer Leading Hand (3-7yrs)* 70 - 90 70 - 90 80 - 105 100 - 125 75 - 85 100 - 130 80 - 90 65 - 80 65 - 85 70 - 100 100 - 130 75 - 95 80 - 90 60 - 75

Electrician 70 - 85 70 - 85 65 - 85 80 - 100 65 - 85 70 - 90 55 - 60

Mechanical Fitter 70 - 85 70 - 85 65 - 80 80 - 100 65 - 80 70 - 85 55 - 60

Instrumentation Technician 60 - 75 70 - 85 65 - 85 90 - 115 70 - 90 75 - 90 65 - 80

* Engineer (Mechanical/Electrical)

Notes
All salaries shown exclude superannuation New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 121

Energy
Project Delivery Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand Project Manager 120 - 175 120 - 175 130 - 160 140 - 175 140 - 160 110 - 130 110 - 120 Project Engineer 80 - 130 80 - 125 90 - 130 110 - 140 80 - 115 95 - 120 80 - 90 Construction Manager 160 - 180 140 - 180 140 - 185 150 - 170 130 - 160 110 - 140 110 - 120

Project Development
Site Superintendent 110 - 140 110 - 140 95 - 130 120 - 145 100 - 135 95 - 125 70 - 80

* Mechanical/Electrical/Instrumentation & Controls

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Site Engineer 80 - 110 90 - 125 85 - 120 120 - 130 85 - 110 105 - 125 75 - 85

Commissioning Engineer 110 - 135 110 - 135 115 - 145 120 - 150 100 - 130 95 - 120 90 - 120

Commissioning Manager 140 - 190 140 - 185 130 - 170 155 - 185 130 - 165 110 - 140 110 - 135

Project Services Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand Estimator 90 - 105 90 - 110 95 - 130 100 - 140 90 - 105 85 - 100 65 - 90 Senior Estimator 120 - 150 120 - 150 110 - 150 130 - 170 120 - 150 90 - 120 80 - 95 Planner/Scheduler Planning Manager 85 - 115 85 - 120 95 - 135 110 - 145 85 - 110 85 - 95 70 - 80 115 - 140 120 - 140 120 - 150 130 - 160 120 - 135 95 - 125 85 - 90

Salaries in 000 NSW - Sydney VIC - Melbourne QLD - Brisbane WA - Perth SA - Adelaide NT - Darwin New Zealand

Contracts Administrator 70 - 110 70 - 110 80 - 120 85 - 130 70 - 100 70 - 90 55 - 65

Contracts Manager 120 - 160 115 - 155 110 - 160 140 - 160 110 - 140 95 - 130 90 - 100

OHS Supervisor 75 - 100 80 - 105 80 - 120 100 - 125 80 - 110 85 - 105 75 - 95

OHS Manager 90 - 120 90 - 125 100 - 140 110 - 145 90 - 120 100 - 120 95 - 120

Notes
All salaries shown exclude superannuation New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

122 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Oil & Gas

Experienced professionals in the oil and gas industry continue to command higher salaries than other industries.
Australia
Market Changes With prices stabilising, confidence is returning to the Australian oil and gas industry. Projects put on hold during the global financial crisis are in focus again and with more than $200 billion of work due to come on line over the next 12 months in Australias gas infrastructure alone, a major skills shortage is imminent. Western Australia remains the hub of activity and the advancement of major LNG projects like Pluto, Gorgon and Prelude will continue to spur momentum. The industry is waiting for a number of final investment decisions to be made on major CSG/LNG projects in Queensland. Exploration and drilling activities continue and engineering consultancies are starting to strengthen their oil and gas capabilities locally rather than relying on international or interstate staff to deliver the work. For the most part there has been a major shift from temporary to permanent staff. The Downstream sector is the exception; refineries are facing increased pressure on profit margins and favour temporary staff to supplement peak workload requirements. Changes to Recruitment Practices Prior to the GFC, sponsorship of overseas workers under the 457 visa program was a popular solution to address the shortage of skilled Australian oil and gas professionals. There has been significant changes to the program, making the process more onerous on the employer. As a result there has been some reluctance from employers to enter into such agreements. As the market tightens again this will slowly change however its clear that employers still have a strong preference for candidates with full Australian work rights. In terms of the interview process, the lead time between initial interview and acceptance of an offer has proven to be a lot longer than during 2007/08. Employers risk missing their preferred candidate as competition for the best talent is high. Candidates in some disciplines are now going into interviews with at least one other offer on the table or are being counter offered when handing in their notice. These candidates are aware of this shift and some are becoming less flexible during negotiations with their salary expectations increasing. So retention will be a primary focus as organisations face the threat of losing their valued staff members. Positions in Demand There has been an increase in demand for permanent staff and this will continue into 2011. Projects in Western Australia are creating opportunities for Senior Geoscientists, Technical Assistants and Data Managers, Subsea Engineers, Commercial Advisors and Analysts, Drilling Engineers, Offshore Process Technicians and Mechanical Engineers. Both operators and engineering consultancies have increased resources. There is demand for Geologists, Geophysicists, Reservoir Engineers and Design and Project Engineers of all disciplines. In Victoria, the majority of opportunities are for Senior and Principal level roles within Mechanical and I&E. We are starting to see a demand for strong applicants in Health & Safety, Quality and Geoscience. CSG/LNG projects in Queensland will create openings for Lead Pipeline Engineers, Senior Pipeline Engineers, Lead Electrical and Instrumentation Engineers, Civil Engineers Design, Study experience, Technical Service Engineers Water treatment, Application Engineers Natural Gas Compression and Reliability Engineers. Salary Movements Experienced professionals in the oil and gas industry continue to command higher salaries than other industries. Day rates for engineers, particularly in Subsea and Drilling disciplines are on the rise but overall annual salaries havent changed dramatically. While base salaries need to be competitive, candidates are interested in the overall salary package including bonuses, superannuation higher than the statutory nine per cent, and in some cases equity in the company. Expatriate packages are becoming a thing of the past, with major operators insisting that their international employees accept local Australian salary packages or be rotated to other locations. Advice to Candidates Whilst the industry is project driven and candidates are more mobile than in other sectors, employers are growing increasingly wary of candidates who jump from company to company. Make sure you are making the right move. Also, be mindful that while salary is an important component when considering a new job, it is not the only factor be sure to consider advancement opportunities, quality of work environment and scope of project work as well.

New Zealand
Market Changes Renewed confidence in the oil and gas industry in New Zealand has seen a number of permits released to the marketplace. The impending drilling on the Great South Basin and the continued exploration and production in the Taranaki region have seen the sector bounce back in 2010, however, with oil prices at such a low last year most companies are still recovering and are somewhat cautious when it comes to future recruitment. Changes to Recruitment Practices Many New Zealanders are returning home so companies have had more choice when recruiting for specialist roles. However this does not diminish the importance of the recruitment process. Hirers have been thorough with recruitment practices, utilising psychometric profiling and behavioural interviews in addition to normal screening practices. Positions in Demand With exploration and drilling back on the agenda, Drilling Engineers and Superintendents will be in high demand. There will also be opportunities for I&E Engineers, Lead Process Engineers and Reservoir Engineers. The lure of higher salary packages, particularly in Australia, will be a major challenge for employers when trying to fill these positions. Salary Movements While salaries have remained stable, organisations have made packages more attractive through non-monetary benefits such as flexible working hours, education and gym memberships. Approximately 80 per cent of companies now have extensive benefits packages. Advice to Candidates As the global economy moves out of recession, the increased demand for resources will create greater opportunities for exploration investment. Highly skilled candidates will be in demand to facilitate this growth, and many are starting to look now, particularly those currently in unsatisfying jobs due to a lack of recent options elsewhere. Candidates should not expect immediate salary movements and employers will need to promote job satisfaction and lifestyle improvements to compete with remuneration packages offered in Australia.

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 131

Oil & Gas


Design/Engineering Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand Graduate Engineer Design Engineer 70 - 100 40 - 50 100 - 140 75 - 80 Senior Design Engineer 140 - 180 90 - 100

Project Development
Principal/Lead Engineer 160 - 220 115 - 150

Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Engineering Manager 180 - 260 150 - 210

Senior Design Drafter 110 - 140 70 - 80

Design Manager 140 - 180 90 - 105

* These salaries represent Onshore salaries - for Offshore you can typically add 15-20 per cent

Subsea Design/Engineering Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Graduate Engineer 80 - 110 40 - 50

Engineer 110 - 150 70 - 90

Senior Engineer 160 - 220 90 - 110

Principal/ Manager Lead Engineer 180 - 250 110 - 130 200 - 280 150 - 200

Project Delivery/Controls Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand Planner 120 - 160 70 - 90

Senior Planner 140 - 180 90 - 120

Planning Manager 170 - 220 120 - 150

Contracts Admin 80 - 130 55 - 75

Senior Contracts Admin 120 - 180 75 - 100

Cost Engineer 120 - 160 80 - 100

Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Senior Cost Engineer 130 - 180 100 - 130

Commercial Manager 180 - 220 130 - 160

Project Controls Manager 180 - 250 100 - 140

Commissioning Commissioning Engineer Manager 120 - 150 70 - 110 150 - 210 110 - 150

Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Project Engineer 120 - 170 80 - 100

Senior Project Project Engineer Manager 140 - 200 100 - 120 170 - 220 110 - 170

Senior Project Superintendent Manager 180 - 240 170 - 200 140 - 180 80 - 90

Project Delivery/Controls HSEQ Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Onshore Offshore HSE Manager Advisor/Officer Advisor/Officer 90 - 140 90 - 120 180 - 260 90 - 120 150 - 200 100 - 160

QA/QC Manager 140 - 170 85-120

Corporate HSE Manager 220 - 290 150 - 180

Subsea Project Delivery Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Technician Senior Installation Technician (non degree) (non degree) Engineer 80 - 120 60 - 80 100 - 160 70 - 90 130 - 175 90 - 110

Senior Installation Engineer 160 - 220 100 - 140

Installation Manager/ Client Rep 180 - 260 120 - 150

Vessel Mgr/ Marine Ops Manager 160 - 220 130 - 150

* Design Engineer - Discipline (Civil/Mechanical/Process/Elec/I&C) * Project Engineer - Discipline (Civil/Structural/Mechanical/Process/Elec/I&C) * Superintendent - Discipline (Civil/Structural/Mechanical/Process/Elec/I&C)

Notes
New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

132 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Operations & Maintenance


Operations & Maintenance Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand Discipline Engineer 140 - 200 120 - 180 Maintenance Planner 110 - 140 75-100 Maintenance Supervisor 120 - 160 80 - 100

Oil & Gas


Production Production Superintendent Manager 120 - 170 120 - 160 150 - 210 140 - 180

Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Discipline Tech OIM 85 - 120 60 - 80 190 - 250 190 - 240

Ops Support Engineer 100 - 150 100 - 130

Ops Ops Manager Superintendent 150 - 190 110 - 150 210 - 290 180 - 250

* Discipline Engineer - Discipline (E&I/Mech/Process/Corrosion/Materials/Reliability) * Discipline Tech - Discipline (E&I/Mech/Process)

Notes
New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

2010 Hays Salary Guide | 133

Oil & Gas


Geosciences Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Geosciences and Petroleum Engineering


Graduate Intermediate Senior Lead Exploration Technical Geoscientist Geoscientist Geoscientist Geoscientist Manager Assistant 70 - 110 60 - 80 90 - 140 100 - 140 130 - 200 130 - 170 200 - 280 200 - 280 230 - 300 230 - 300 80 - 110 50 - 70

Petroleum/ Reservoir Engineering

Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand

Graduate Engineer 80 - 100 60 - 80

Intermediate Engineer 100 - 150 80 - 100

Senior Engineer 140 - 185 100 - 120

Lead Engineer 170 - 240 150 - 190

Engineering Manager 230 - 300 180 - 220

Drilling Salaries in 000 Australia New Zealand Drilling Engineer 145 - 180 150 - 180

Senior Drilling Engineer 170 - 240 180 - 230

Drilling Manager 240 - 320 250 - 300

LWD/MWD Engineer 120 - 150 N/A

Notes
New Zealand salaries are represented in New Zealand Dollars

134 | 2010 Hays Salary Guide

Australia New South Wales


Sydney Chifley Tower Hunter Street Spring Street City South North Sydney Chatswood Parramatta Liverpool Burwood Hurstville Newcastle Wollongong T: 02 8226 9600 T: 02 9249 2200 T: 02 9221 5852 T: 02 9280 3577 T: 02 9957 5733 T: 02 9411 8122 T: 02 9635 1133 T: 02 9601 8822 T: 02 9744 3344 T: 02 9580 8333 T: 02 4925 3663 T: 02 4222 0100

Our international reach operating in 28 countries


Austria Belgium Brazil Canada China Czech Republic Denmark France

Victoria
Melbourne 360 Collins St 410 Collins St St Kilda Rd Mulgrave Moonee Ponds Camberwell Geelong T: 03 9604 9604 T: 03 8638 8400 T: 03 9804 5313 T: 03 8562 4250 T: 03 9326 2149 T: 03 9946 3500 T: 03 5226 8000

Germany Hong Kong Hungary India

Queensland
Brisbane Brisbane Brisbane City Mt. Gravatt Ipswich Gold Coast Townsville Maroochydore Chermside T: 07 3243 3000 T: 07 3231 2600 T: 07 3349 6563 T: 07 3817 1900 T: 07 5571 0751 T: 07 4771 5100 T: 07 5412 1100 T: 07 3259 4900

Ireland Italy Japan Luxembourg Netherlands

ACT
Canberra T: 02 6257 6344

Poland Portugal Russia

Western Australia
Perth T: 08 9254 4595

South Australia
Adelaide T: 08 8231 0820

Singapore Spain Sweden Switzerland United Arab Emirates United Kingdom

Tasmania
Hobart T: 03 6234 9554

Northern Territory
Darwin T: 08 8943 6000

New Zealand
Auckland South Auckland Wellington Christchurch T: 09 377 4774 T: 09 525 1333 T: 04 471 4490 T: 03 377 6656

HAYS and the H device are protected by trade mark and design laws in many jurisdictions HAYS 2009. This guide is reproduced in full in PDF format on our websites.

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