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PT AU BA BE GP AF CA TI SO SE LA DT CT CY CL SP HO DE ID AB C1 RP EM FU FX CR NR TC Z9 PU PI PA SN BN J9 JI PD PY VL IS PN SU SI BP EP AR DI D2 PG P2 WC SC GA UT J Hasanagas, ND Hasanagas, Nikolaos D.

Network Analysis Functionality in Environmental Policy: Combining Abstract Softw are Engineering with Field Empiricism INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTERS COMMU NICATIONS & CONTROL English Article Environmental Policy; Rural Development; Ambiguity; Network Analysis Software; N etwork Density 3-D MODELING FUNCTIONALITY; DOCUMENTATION; BUILDINGS; SYSTEMS; D ESIGN; GIS An empirical application of abstract network analysis software i s presented in this paper. Environmental policy networks are used as a case stud y. The visualization of the real network hierarchy and activity (formal and info rmal) is feasible only by using special software. A system of "actors" (e.g. pub lic institutions, interest groups, enterprises) interacting with each other and dealing with a particular environmental issue constitutes a policy network, whic h influences the environmental policy functionality. The impacts of policy conte nt ambiguity on network characteristics have been analyzed by using network anal ysis software as an example of combining algorithms with empiricism. Recommendat ions are made to software engineers about possible combination of algorithms wit h statistics and enrichment of the network analysis software with more visual an alytic functions. Stronger familiarization of software engineers with policy ana lysis discourse and of policy analysts with positivism becomes more imperative f or this purpose. On the basis of the quantitative results, environmental policymakers are advised to invest more in trust development than in pressure and to i nstrumentalize more scientific information under conditions of ambiguity. Univ Kavala, Inst Technol Greece, Kavala, Greece Hasanagas, ND (reprint a uthor), Univ Kavala, Inst Technol Greece, Kavala, Greece nikolaos.hasanag as@gmail.com Department of Landscape Architecture, Kavala Institute of Techno logy, Drama, Greece; Institute of Forest Policy and Nature Conservation of Goett ingen University (Germany) The research initiative proposed by this paper h as been supported by the Department of Landscape Architecture, Kavala Institute of Technology, Drama, Greece), and by the Institute of Forest Policy and Nature Conservation of Goettingen University (Germany). 34 0 0 CCC PUBL-AGORA UNIV BIHOR PIATA TINERETULUI 8, ORADEA, JUD, BIHOR, 410526, ROMANIA 1841-9836 INT J COMPUT COMMUN Int. J. Comput. Commun. Control DEC 2011 6 4 622 635 14 Automation & Control Sys tems; Computer Science, Information Systems Automation & Control Systems; Co mputer Science 826ID WOS:000295346900004 J Melinte, G; Baia, L; Simon, V; Simon, S Melinte, G.; Baia, L.; Simon, V.; Simon, S. Hydrogen peroxide versus water s ynthesis of bioglass-nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite composites JOURNAL OF MATER IALS SCIENCE English Article TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; GEL BIOACTIVE GLASSES; SYSTEM; SILICA; DEFECTS; RE LEASE; SURFACE; SODIUM This article reports a comparison of the structural and textural properties of bioglass-hydroxyapatite (HA) composites obtained in the S iO(2)-CaO-P(2)O(5) system by sol-gel method, with different amounts of hydrogen peroxide (3% H(2)O(2)) or water (H(2)O). X-ray diffraction, Raman, and FT-IR spe ctroscopy reveal the presence of nanocrystalline HA. Scanning electron microscop y images illustrate that the HA phase is mainly distributed on the glass surface . The results point out that the sintering at 550 degrees C of a sol-gel derived SiO(2)-CaO-P(2)O(5) bioglass leads to a single crystalline phase of HA, and val idate a new processing method for obtaining bioglass-HA composites. Structural a nalyses of the investigated composites indicate the existence of a silicate netw ork built up from Q(3) and Q(2) units. The replacement of water with hydrogen pe roxide has as consequence the increase of depolymerization degree of silica netw ork. Textural properties were investigated with N(2)-adsorption technique. The c

omposites prepared with hydrogen peroxide exhibit a more uniform and narrow meso porous distribution that recommends them for drug uptake and release application s. It was found that the specific surface area and pore volume are clearly influ enced by the H(2)O(2)(H(2)O):TEOS molar ratio. [Melinte, G; Baia, L; Simon, V; Simon, S] Univ Babes Bolyai, Fac Phys, Inst Interdisciplinary Res Bionanosci, Cl uj Napoca 400084, Romania Baia, L (reprint author), Univ Babes Bolyai, Fac Phys, Inst Interdisciplinary Res Bionanosci, M Kogalniceanu 1, Cluj Napoca 4000 84, Romania lucian.baia@phys.ubbcluj.ro Romanian National University Res earch Council-CNCSIS[PNII PCCE-101/2008] This research was accomplished i n the framework of PNII PCCE-101/2008 project granted by the Romanian National U niversity Research Council-CNCSIS. 40 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0022-2461 J MATER SCI J. Mater. Sci. DEC 2011 46 23 7393 7400 10.1007/s10853-011-5700-8 8 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Materials Science 824CS WOS:0002 95179700005 J Brooks, I; Palumbo, G; Hibbard, GD; Wang, ZR; Erb, U Brooks, I.; Palumbo, G.; Hibbard, G. D.; Wang, Zhirui; Erb, U. On the i ntrinsic ductility of electrodeposited nanocrystalline metals JOURNAL OF MATER IALS SCIENCE English Article MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; TENSILE PROPERTIES; GRAIN-SIZE; BEHAVIOR; NICKEL; NI; PER MALLOY; STRENGTH; ALLOY While nanocrystalline materials hold promise for structu ral applications in which increased strength is beneficial, their adoption has b een hindered by concerns over the achievable ductility, resulting largely from c onsiderable data scatter in the literature. A statistically significant set of 1 47 electrodeposited nanocrystalline tensile specimens was used to investigate th is topic, and it was found that while necking elongation obeys similar processin g quality and geometrical dependencies as conventional engineering metals, the i ntrinsic ductility as measured by uniform plastic strain was unexpectedly indepe ndent of microstructure over the grain size range of 10-80 nm. This indicates th at the underlying physical processes of grain boundary-mediated damage formation are strain-oriented phenomena that can be defined by a critical plastic strain regardless of the strength of the material as a whole. [Brooks, I; Hibbard, GD; Wang, ZR; Erb, U] Univ Toronto, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Toronto, ON M5S 3E4, Canad a; [Brooks, I; Palumbo, G] Integran Technol Inc, Mississauga, ON L4V 1H7, Canada Brooks, I (reprint author), Univ Toronto, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Toronto, ON M5S 3 E4, Canada brooks@integran.com Ontario Research Fund; U.S. Department o f Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development[PP-1152] The auth ors gratefully acknowledge the generous support of the Natural Sciences and Engi neering Research Council of Canada, Industry Canada (Technology Partnerships Can ada program), National Research Council (Industrial Research Assistance Program) , Ontario Research Fund, and the U.S. Department of Defense Strategic Environmen tal Research and Development Program project PP-1152. 48 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0022-2461 J MATER SCI J. Mater. Sci. DEC 2011 46 24 7713 7724 10.1007/s10853-011-5751x 12 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Material s Science 824CC WOS:000295177200009 J Park, JE; Todo, M Park, Joo-Eon; Todo, Mit sugu Compressive mechanical properties and deformation behavior of po rous polymer blends of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(l-lactic acid) JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE English Article IN-VITRO DEGRADATION; HYDROXYAPATITE SCAFFOLDS; COMPOSITE SCAFFOLDS; PORE-SIZE; TISSUE; MORPHOLOGY; FABRICATION; POROSITY; FOAMS; PLLA Porous biodegradable pol ymeric scaffolds are developed by physically blending two different kinds of bio degradable polymers, PCL, and PLLA, for application in tissue engineering. The m ain objective of the development of this material is to control the mechanical p roperties, such as, elastic modulus and strength. The results from mechanical te sting showed that the compressive mechanical properties of PCL/PLLA scaffold can be varied by changing the blend ratio. It also showed that these properties can

be well predicted by the rule of mixture. The primary deformation mechanism of the scaffolds was found to be localized buckling of struts surrounding the pores . Localized ductile failure caused by PCL phase tends to be suppressed with incr easing PLLA content. The immiscibility of PCL and PLLA caused the phase-separati on morphology that strongly affected the macroscopic mechanical properties and t he microscopic deformation behavior. [Todo, M] Kyushu Univ, Appl Mech Res Ins t, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580, Japan; [Park, JE] Kyushu Univ, Interdisciplinary Gra d Sch Engn Sci, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580, Japan Todo, M (reprint author), Kyushu Univ, Appl Mech Res Inst, 6-1 Kasuga Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580, Japan todo@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp 30 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0022-246 1 J MATER SCI J. Mater. Sci. DEC 2011 46 24 7850 7857 10.1007/s10853-011-5766-3 8 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Materials Science 824CC WOS:0002 95177200024 J Parajuli, N; Williams, GJ Parajuli, Niranj an; Williams, Gavin J. A high-throughput screen for directed evolution of aminocoumarin amide synthetases ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY English Article Directed evolution; Aminocoumari n; High-throughput screening; Natural products DNA GYRASE; PREVENTION; NOVOBIOC IN; GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE; ANTIBIOTICS; OVEREXPRESSION; BIOSYNTHESIS; COLONIZATION ; PURIFICATION; PROMISCUITY The biosynthesis of aminocoumarin antibiotics in volves the action of amide synthetases which construct amide bonds between amino coumarins and various acyl moieties. Libraries of aminocoumarin analogues have b een generated by in vivo fermentation, via feeding known amide synthetase substr ates into producing microbial strains. Critically, such feeding studies rely on the inherent or engineered substrate promiscuity of each amide synthetase. We ha ve initiated a program of directed evolution in order to create mutant amide syn thetases for the synthesis of new nonnatural amino coumarin analogues. We used t he clorobiocin enzyme CloL as a model amide synthetase to design and validate a fluorimetric high-throughput screen, which can be used to report the activity of mutant amide synthetases toward a broad range of coumarin and acyl donor substr ates. Our assay monitors the decrease in fluorescence of aminocoumarins on acyla tion. The utility of the assay was illustrated by screening a library of amide s ynthetase mutants created by error-prone PCR. The substrate specificity of an am ide synthetase was also rapidly probed using this assay, affording several newly identified substrates. It is anticipated that this high-throughput screen will accelerate the creation of amide synthetase mutants with new specificities by di rected evolution. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Parajuli, N; Wi lliams, GJ] N Carolina State Univ, Dept Chem, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA Williams , GJ (reprint author), N Carolina State Univ, Dept Chem, Box 8204, Raleigh, NC 2 7695 USA gavin_williams@ncsu.edu 27 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 19 00, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0003-2697 ANAL BIOCHEM Anal. Biochem. DEC 1 2011 419 1 61 66 10.1016/j.ab.2011.07.037 6 Biochemi cal Research Methods; Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry, Analytical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry 827KS WOS:000295428000009 J Bayram, M Bayram, Mustafa Comparis on of unsplit inshell and shelled kernel of the pistachio nuts JOURNAL OF FOOD ENGINEERING English Article Pistachio nut; Sphericity; Particle surface area; Particle density; MBayram-1 eq uation MOISTURE-CONTENT; PHYSICAL-PROPERTIES; AIR-FLOW; VARIETY; RESISTANCE; L. In the present study, unsplit inshell (UIPN) and shelled kernel (SKPN) pistachio nuts (Antep type) were analyzed based on their dimensional properties such as p article density, sphericity, particle volume and surface area, where are importa nt for the engineering applications, designs and calculations. The determination of some physical properties of the pistachio nuts is very difficult due to its ellipsoidal shape. In this study, sphericity (using a new model, MBayram-1 equat ion), particle density (using dimensional method), surface area (using a softwar

e method) and volume (using dimensional method) were determined. The average wei ght, particle volume, particle density, sphericity and surface area of UIPN were determined as 1.0852 +/- 0.134 g, 1278.31 +/- 156.17 mm(3), 0.00882 +/- 0.00128 g/mm(3), 0.00882 +/- 0.00128 and 645.22 +/- 47.83 mm(2), respectively. They wer e 0.427 +/- 0.059 g, 457.09 +/- 73.44 mm(3), 0.000940 +/- 0.000074 g/mm(3), 0.00 825 +/- 0.00119 and 324.13 +/- 33.38 mm(2), respectively for SKPN. (C) 2011 Else vier Ltd. All rights reserved. Gaziantep Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Food Engn, TR-273 10 Gaziantep, Turkey Bayram, M (reprint author), Gaziantep Univ, Fac Engn, De pt Food Engn, TR-27310 Gaziantep, Turkey mbayram@gantep.edu.tr Gaziante p BAP Thanks to University of Gaziantep BAP for the support. Also, thanks to B LG arge Consultancy, Food and Machinery Co. (www.BLGarge.com) for their engineer ing helps. 21 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0260-877 4 J FOOD ENG J. Food Eng. DEC 2011 107 3-4 374 378 10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2011.07.001 5 Engineering, Chemical; Food Science & Technology Engineering; Food Scienc e & Technology 829FK WOS:000295563800013 J Sozen, S; Guler, M Sozen, S.; Guler, M. Determination of displacement distributions in bolted steel tension elements usi ng digital image techniques OPTICS AND LASERS IN ENGINEERING English Article Steel connections; Digit al image correlation; Finite element analysis DEFORMATION; FIELDS Digital imaging methods have found a great interest in various engineering fields to stu dy stress-deformation characteristics of materials. Recent enhancements in visua l instrumentation with the availability of cost-effective hardware and software products make the digital imaging techniques a viable tool to replace direct str ain or displacement measurement methods in engineering applications. In this stu dy, deformation characteristics of bolted steel connections are investigated by calculating in-plane displacement distributions using digital image correlation method (DIC). Validation of the method is presented by comparing the strains mea sured in standard tension specimens using electrical resistance strain gages and the DIC method. Finite element analysis of the connection specimen is also perf ormed to compare the in-plane displacement distributions calculated from both me thods. Results from the validation process indicate that the strains obtained fr om the DIC method compare well with the results of strain gages. The findings al so indicate that the displacement distributions calculated from the finite eleme nt method may differ from those of the DIC method in terms of distribution patte rn, and the location and magnitude of the extreme values of displacements. It is suggested that the proposed method can be used to determine the in-plane displa cement distributions for the bolted connections, hence to evaluate their deforma tion characteristics under loading. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Sozen, S] Gaziosmanpasa Univ, Vocat Higher Sch, TR-60200 Tokat, Turkey; [Guler, M] Middle E Tech Univ, Dept Civil Engn, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey Sozen, S (reprint author), Gaziosmanpasa Univ, Vocat Higher Sch, TR-60200 Tokat, Turkey sahinsozen@gmail.com 24 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , OXON, ENGLAND 0143-8166 OPT LASER ENG Opt. Lasers Eng. DEC 2011 49 12 1428 1435 10.1016/j.optlaseng.2011.07.002 8 Optics Optics 823UA WOS:000295150800008 J Mousavi, SM; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, R; Hashemi, H; Mojtahedi, SMH Mousavi, S. M.; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, R.; Hashemi, H.; Mojtahedi, S. M. H. A novel approach based on non-parametric resampling with interval analysis for l arge engineering project risks SAFETY SCIENCE English Article Risk assessment; Large engineering projects; Non-parametric bootstrap; Interval analysis BOOTSTRAP METHODS; CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS; MANAGEMENT; JACKKNIFE; IDENTIFICATION; STATISTICS; FRAMEWORK; SYSTEM The issue of risk assessment has been always the matter of debate in large engineering projects (LEPs). The asse ssment is an indispensable means for the projects to accomplish their objectives . It is firmly accepted that LEPs are particularly subject to more potential ris

ks than other business activities because of their complexity, uncertainty and a mbiguity. These characteristics are often conducive to small sample sizes of the gathered risk data in practice. Consequently, traditional statistical technique s cannot contribute significantly to analyze the risk data. The non-parametric r esampling technique, namely bootstrap, has been used subsequently to solve numer ous complicated problems and evaluate the accuracy of a parameter estimator in s ituations where commonly used techniques are not valid. It is also more natural, applicable and simple to estimate the risk data in an interval form under decis ion-making process by considering the concept of safety by professional experts in LEPs. Hence, in this paper, a new approach based on bootstrap technique with the interval analysis is presented in the context of the project risk assessment . The proposed approach not only plays an important role in reducing risk data a nd saving time but also is more economical. A real case study is conducted to il lustrate the applicability of the approach. Finally, the comparison results indi cate that the proposed approach outperforms the traditional technique in terms o f the accuracy and efficiency. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Mousavi, SM; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, R] Univ Tehran, Dept Ind Engn, Coll Engn, Teh ran, Iran; [Hashemi, H] Zanjan Univ, Dept Civil Engn, Fac Engn, Zanjan, Iran; [M ojtahedi, SMH] Aryana Petro Tavan Co, Planning Manager, Tehran, Iran; [Mojtahedi , SMH] Islamic Azad Univ, Sch Ind Engn, S Tehran Branch, Tehran, Iran Mousavi, SM (reprint author), Univ Tehran, Dept Ind Engn, Coll Engn, POB 11155-4563, Teh ran, Iran sm.mousavi@ut.ac.ir; mojtahedi@ioic.ir 43 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-7535 SAFETY SCI Saf. Sci . DEC 2011 49 10 1340 1348 10.1016/j.ssci.2011.05.004 9 Engineering, Industrial; Operations Research & Management Science Engineering; Operations Research & Management Science 824FW WOS:000295188800006 J Chung, BN; Palukaitis, P Chung, Bong Nam; Palukaitis, Peter Resistance to multiple viruses in transgenic tob acco expressing fused, tandem repeat, virus-derived double-stranded RNAs VIRUS GENES English Article Transgenic resistance; Potato virus Y; Potato leafroll virus; Potato virus A; To bacco rattle virus; Potato mop-top virus; RNA silencing COAT PROTEIN GENE; POTAT O-LEAFROLL-VIRUS; MOP-TOP-VIRUS; CUCUMBER-MOSAIC-VIRUS; CYSTEINE-RICH PROTEIN; M EDIATED RESISTANCE; NICOTIANA-BENTHAMIANA; ARTIFICIAL MICRORNAS; RUSSET-BURBANK; LONG-DISTANCE Transgenic tobacco plants expressing fused, tandem, inverted-rep eat, double-stranded RNAs derived either from the three viruses [potato virus Y (PVY), potato virus A (PVA), and potato leafroll virus (PLRV)] or the five virus es [PVY, PVA, PLRV as well as tobacco rattle virus (TRV), and potato mop-top vir us (PMTV)] were generated in this study to examine whether resistance could be a chieved against these three viruses or five viruses, respectively, in the same p lant. The transgenic lines were engineered to produce 600- or 1000-bp inverted h airpin transcripts with an intron, in two orientations each, which were processe d to silencing-inducing RNAs (siRNAs). Fewer lines were regenerated from the tra nsformants with either 1000-bp inverted hairpin transcripts, or a sense-intron-a ntisense orientation versus antisense-intron-sense orientation. Resistances to P VA and two strains of PVY (-O and -N) were achieved in plants from most of lines examined, as well as resistance to co-infection by a mixture of PVY-O and PVA, applied to the plants by either rub inoculation or using aphids. This was regard less of the orientation of the inserted sequences for the 600-bp insert lines, b ut only for one orientation of the 1000-bp insert lines. The lines containing th e 1000-bp inserts also showed resistance to infection by TRV inoculated by rub i noculation and PMTV inoculated by grafting. However, all the lines showed only l ow-to-moderate (15-43%) resistance to infection by PLRV transmitted by aphids. T he resistances to the various viruses correlated with the levels of accumulation of siRNAs, indicating that the multiple resistances were achieved by RNA silenc ing. [Palukaitis, P] Seoul Womens Univ, Dept Hort Sci, Seoul 139774, South Ko rea; [Palukaitis, P] Invergowrie, James Hutton Inst, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland; [ Chung, BN] Rural Dev Adm, Natl Inst Hort & Herbal Sci, Suwon 440310, South Korea

Palukaitis, P (reprint author), Seoul Womens Univ, Dept Hort Sci, 621 Hwarangno, Seoul 139774, South Korea scripath1@yahoo.co.uk Korean Rural Development Agency; Seoul Women's University The authors thank Brian Fenton, Stuart M ac-Farlane, and Graham Cowan of the James Hutton Institute for providing materia ls, aphids, transmission facilities, advice and/or training. The authors also th ank Jari Valkonen of the University of Helsinki and Lilian Jarvekulg of the Tall inn University of Technology as well as the Plant Virus GenBank, Seoul Women's U niversity, for providing materials. This study was supported in part by a grant for an International Cooperative Research Project from the Korean Rural Developm ent Agency. PP was supported by a special grant from the Seoul Women's Universit y in 2010. 53 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0920-8569 VIRUS GENES Virus Genes DEC 2011 43 3 454 464 10.1007/s11262-011-0655-z 11 Genetics & Heredity; Virology Genetics & Heredity; Virology 822YJ WOS:0002 95086200018 J Hashmi, JA; Zafar, Y; Arshad, M; Mansoor, S; Asad, S Hashmi, Jamil A.; Zafar, Yusuf; Arshad, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid; Asad, Shaheen Engineering cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) for resistance to cotton leaf curl di sease using viral truncated AC1 DNA sequences (vol 42, pg 286, 2011) VIRUS GE NES English Correction [Hashmi, JA; Zafar, Y; Arshad, M; Mansoor, S; Asad, S] Natl Inst Biotechnol & Ge net Engn NIBGE, Agr Biotechnol Div, Faisalabad, Pakistan Zafar, Y (reprin t author), Natl Inst Biotechnol & Genet Engn NIBGE, Agr Biotechnol Div, POB 577, Jhang Rd, Faisalabad, Pakistan y_zafar@yahoo.com; aftab6104@gmail.com 1 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0920-8569 VIRUS GENES Virus Ge nes DEC 2011 43 3 476 476 10.1007/s11262-011-0606-8 1 Genetics & Heredity; Vir ology Genetics & Heredity; Virology 822YJ WOS:000295086200021 J Novalija, I; Mladenic, D; Bradesko, L Novalija , Inna; Mladenic, Dunja; Bradesko, Luka OntoPlus: Text-driven ontology e xtension using ontology content, structure and co-occurrence information KNOWLEDGE-BASED SYSTEMS English Article Knowledge engineering methodologies; Ontology extension; Large-scale ontology; T ext mining; Semantic technologies This paper addresses the process of semi-automatic text-driven ontology extension using ontology content, struct ure and co-occurrence information. A novel OntoPlus methodology is proposed for semi-automatic ontology extension based on text mining methods. It allows for th e effective extension of the large ontologies, providing a ranked list of potent ially relevant concepts and relationships given a new concept (e.g., glossary te rm) to be inserted in the ontology. A number of experiments are conducted, evalu ating measures for ranking correspondence between existing ontology concepts and new domain concepts suggested for the ontology extension. Measures for ranking are based on incorporating ontology content, structure and co-occurrence informa tion. The experiments are performed using a well known Cyc ontology and textual material from two domains - finances and, fisheries & aquaculture. Our experimen ts show that the best results are achieved by combining content, structure and c o-occurrence information. Furthermore, ontology content and structure seem to be more important than co-occurrence for our data in the financial domain. At the same time, ontology content and co-occurrence seem to have higher importance for our fisheries & aquaculture domain. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Novalija, I; Mladenic, D; Bradesko, L] Jozef Stefan Inst, Artificial Intelligen ce Lab, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia Novalija, I (reprint author), Jozef Stef an Inst, Artificial Intelligence Lab, Jamova 39, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia inna.koval@ijs.si Slovenian Research Agency; EC[IST-NoE-216886, IST-2007-2 15040] This work was supported by the Slovenian Research Agency and the IST Pro gramme of the EC under PASCAL2 (IST-NoE-216886) and ACTIVE (IST-2007-215040). 41 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0950-7051 KNOWL-BASED SYST

Knowledge-Based Syst. DEC 2011 24 8 1261 1276 10.1016/j.knosys.2011.06.002 16 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence Computer Science 825BB WOS:000295244800015 J Brnic, J; Turkalj, G; Canadija, M; Lanc, D Brnic, J.; Turkalj, G.; Canadija, M.; Lanc, D. AISI 316Ti (1.4571) stee l-Mechanical, creep and fracture properties versus temperature JOURNAL OF CONST RUCTIONAL STEEL RESEARCH English Article Material properties; Short-time creep behavior; Charpy impact energy; Fracture t oughness calculation; Low and elevated temperatures; 1.4571 steel AUSTENIT IC STAINLESS-STEELS; CORROSION BEHAVIOR; ELEVATED-TEMPERATURES; TOUGHNESS In this paper some useful, experimentally obtained, results regarding material p roperties of austenitic stainless steel 1.4571 are presented. Tests were perform ed at low and elevated temperatures. During uniaxial tests, mechanical propertie s such as ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and short-time c reep behaviour were determined. Charpy impact energy was also determined using t he Charpy impact machine. Engineering stress-strain diagrams are shown at low an d elevated temperatures, whereas creep curves for selected stress levels are pre sented at selected temperatures. Therefore, experimentally obtained data may be of importance for structure designers dealing with design of structures made of similar material and operating under similar environmental conditions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Brnic, J; Turkalj, G; Canadija, M; Lanc , D] Univ Rijeka, Dept Engn Mech, Rijeka, Croatia Brnic, J (reprint author ), Univ Rijeka, Dept Engn Mech, Vukovarska 58, Rijeka, Croatia brnic@riteh.hr Ministry of Science, Education and Sport of the Republic of Croatia The rese arch presented in this paper was carried out within the scientific research fina ncially supported by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport of the Republi c of Croatia. Also, the authors would like to thank the participants of the Mate rial Testing Laboratory of Department of Materials at the Faculty of Engineering Rijeka for their help in determining the testing material chemical composition. 22 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0143-974X J CONSTR STEEL RES J. Constr. Steel. Res. DEC 2011 67 12 1948 1952 10.1016/j.jcsr.2011.06.011 5 Construction & Building Technology; Engineering, Civil Construction & Building Technology; Engineering 820VJ WOS:000294933900016 J Viciana-Abad, R; Reyes-Lecuona, A; Poyade, M; Escolano, J Viciana-Abad, Raquel; Reyes-Lecuona, Arcadio; Poyade, Matthieu; Escolano, Jose The role of mismatches in the sensory feedback provided to indicate selection wi thin a virtual environment MULTIMEDIA TOOLS AND APPLICATIONS English Article Co-location; Delay; Feed back; Mismatches; Performance; Presence; Selection ENGINEERING DESIGN; VISI ON; RECALIBRATION; ADAPTATION; PERCEPTION; DELAY; HAND; VENTRILOQUISM; SIMULTANE ITY; PERFORMANCE It is generally understood that virtual reality simulati ons have a high computational cost. Hence, they rarely can reduce completely all the incoherence within the cross-modal sensory outputs provided. The main resea rch approaches to date have consisted in technically reducing possible mismatche s, however minimal research has been conducted so as to analyse their influence on human capabilities. Thus, the objective of this study is to provide further i nsights to the designers of virtual reality about the negative influence of simu lation lags and interesting design implications. To clearly show this, we have i nvestigated the importance of coherent sensory feedback by incorporating time de lays and spatial misalignments in the feedback provided by the simulation as a r esponse to participantA ' s actions to mimic computationally expensive environme nts. We have also evaluated these misalignments considering two typical interact ion setups. In particular, the sensory mismatches influence has been assessed in human factors, such as the sense of presence, task performance and delay percep tion. Our experimental results indicate that the closer the interaction conditio ns are to real configurations the higher the sensory requirements are regarding accuracy. The implications of this study offer the designer guidelines to priori

tise the reduction of those mismatches in the sensory cues provided depending on the simulations goals. [Viciana-Abad, R; Escolano, J] Univ Jaen, Dept Telecommu n Engn, Jaen, Spain; [Reyes-Lecuona, A; Poyade, M] Univ Malaga, Dept Elect Techn ol, E-29071 Malaga, Spain Viciana-Abad, R (reprint author), Univ Jaen, Dep t Telecommun Engn, Jaen, Spain rviciana@ujaen.es DIANA group (University of Malaga); University of Jaen[UJA2009/12/12] The authors wish to thank the pa rticipants in the study for their collaboration and comments. This work has been partially supported by DIANA group (University of Malaga) and by the University of Jaen through project UJA2009/12/12. 50 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 1380-750 1 MULTIMED TOOLS APPL Multimed. Tools Appl. DEC 2011 55 3 353 378 10.1007/s11042-0 10-0551-x 26 Computer Science, Information Systems; C omputer Science, Software Engineering; Computer Science, Theory & Methods; Engin eering, Electrical & Electronic Computer Science; Engineering 815CV WOS:0002 94504600001 J Fooladi, M; Golbakhshi, H; Mohammadi, M; Soleimani, A Fooladi, M.; Golbakhshi, H.; Mohammadi, M.; Soleimani, A. An impro ved meshless method for analyzing the time dependent problems in solid mechanics ENGINEERING ANALYSIS WITH BOUNDARY ELEMENTS English Article Meshless methods; Radial basis function; LRPIM; Time dependent problems; Dynamic al loads; Taylor Series GALERKIN MLPG METHOD; VIBRATION ANALYSES; PLATES In this paper, the local radial point interpolation method (LRPIM) is developed for the investigation of time dependent problems in solid mechanics. By a new in tegration scheme considered for the obtained meshless weak form, integrands are approximated up to the second order of the Taylor series and the integrals are e valuated on some points, which are located inside the local quadrature domains, called integration points. In order to show the efficiency of the suggested meth od, some time dependent mechanical problems are considered for the engineering s tructures such as beams and plates, which are subjected to dynamical loads, the deflections and stresses are evaluated. Finally, it has been shown that using th e proposed method greatly reduces the number of integration points without affec ting the accuracy of the results. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Fooladi, M] Shahid Bahonar Univ Kerman, Dept Mech Engn, Kerman, Iran; [Golbakhs hi, H; Soleimani, A] Univ Jiroft, Dept Agr Engn, Jiroft, Kerman, Iran; [Mohammad i, M] Islamic Azad Univ, Kerman Branch, Young Researchers Club, Kerman, Iran Fooladi, M (reprint author), Shahid Bahonar Univ Kerman, Dept Mech Engn, Kerman, Iran fooladi@mail.uk.ac.ir 23 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0955-7997 ENG ANAL BOUND ELEM Eng. Ana l. Bound. Elem. DEC 2011 35 12 1297 1302 10.1016/j.enganabound.2011.05.012 6 Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Applications Engineering; Mathematics 816EW WOS:000294582500007 J Xie, Y; Sun, D; Tse, HYG; Liu, C; Cheng, SH Xie, Yu; Sun, Dong; Tse, Ho Yan Gloria; Liu, Chong; Cheng, Shuk Han Force Sensing and Manipulation Strategy in Robot-Assisted Microinjection on Zebr afish Embryos IEEE-ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS English Article Force sensing; manipulation strategy; robot-assisted microinjection; survival ra te; zebrafish embryo CELL INJECTION; DRUG DISCOVERY; SYSTEM; FEEDBACK Robot-assisted microinjection has attracted considerable attention from both eng ineering and biological communities, due to its advantages of high precision and throughput. This paper addresses two issues in the development of enable techno logies for robot-assisted microinjection. One is the microforce measurement duri ng the embryo-injection process. A new injection force-sensing scheme based on a simply supported beam structure is reported. The model combining mechanoelectri cal transduction of the beam and the polyvinylidene fluoride sensing material is theoretically investigated. The other issue to be addressed is the manipulation strategy to mimic human-injection operation, which is based on force sensing an d control techniques. A set of microinjection experiments on zebrafish embryos i

s performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed robot-assisted mani pulation methodology. Experimental results show that satisfied survival rate of the injected cells can be obtained, which is comparable to manual operation by h uman expert. [Sun, D; Liu, C] City Univ Hong Kong, Dept Mfg Engn & Engn Manag ement, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Peoples R China; [Tse, HYG; Cheng, SH] City Univ Hong Kong, Dept Biol & Chem, Kowloon, Hong Kong, Peoples R China Xie, Y (reprint author), Xiamen Univ, Dept Mech & Elect Engn, Xiamen 361005, Peoples R China yuxie2@student.cityu.edu.hk; medsun@cityu.edu.hk; gloriat@cityu.edu.hk; chongliu @cityu.edu.hk; bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China[CityU 120308]; University Grants Council[S EG CityU 01]; City University of Hong Kong[9360128] This work was supported in part by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative R egion, China, under Grant Project CityU 120308, in part by University Grants Cou ncil Special Equipment under Grant SEG CityU 01, and in part by the City Univers ity of Hong Kong under Grant 9360128. 26 0 0 IEEE-INS T ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWA Y, NJ 08855-4141 USA 1083-4435 IEEE-ASME T MECH IEEE-ASM E Trans. Mechatron. DEC 2011 16 6 1002 1010 10.1109/TMECH.2010.2068055 9 Automation & Control Systems; Engineering, Manufacturing; Engineering, Electrica l & Electronic; Engineering, Mechanical Automation & Control Systems; Engineerin g 819TX WOS:000294854700003 J Bassi, L; Secchi, C; Bonfe, M; Fantuzzi, C Bassi, Luca; Secchi, Cristian; Bonfe, Marcello; Fantuzzi, Cesare A SysML-Based Methodology for Manufacturing Machinery Modeling and Design IEEE-ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS English Article Computer-aided engineering (CAE); object-oriented (OO); System Modeling Language (SysML); Unified Modeling Language (UML) MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS; INTEGRATION ; QUOTIENT; UML This paper describes a modeling methodology to support the desig n process of complex systems. The main challenge in modern industrial applicatio ns is the sheer volume of data involved in the design process. While using highlevel abstraction is necessary to manage this data and analyze the system "as a whole," designers need also to retain all the low-level information of the syste m, in order to be able to perform optimizations and modifications at later times . The solution proposed here is to use a hierarchy of models, each one describin g the system at different levels of abstraction, and arrange them in such a way that it is possible to easily "map" each level onto the others. The topmost laye r of the system description is expressed in System Modeling Language, a generalpurpose modeling language based on Unified Modeling Language. [Bassi, L] Univ Bologna, Dept Elect Comp Sci & Syst, I-40100 Bologna, Italy; [Secchi, C; Fantuzz i, C] Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Dept Sci & Methods Engn, I-42100 Reggio Emili a, Italy; [Bonfe, M] Univ Ferrara, Fac Engn, I-44100 Ferrara, Italy Bassi, L (reprint author), European Patent Off, NL-2288 EE The Hague, Netherlands lbassi@epo.org; secchi.cristian@unimore.it; marcello.bonfe@unife.it; cesare.fant uzzi@unimore.it 33 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTR ICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08 855-4141 USA 1083-4435 IEEE-ASME T MECH IEEE-ASME Trans. Mechatron. DEC 2011 16 6 1049 1062 10.1109/TMECH.2010.2073480 14 Automati on & Control Systems; Engineering, Manufacturing; Engineering, Electrical & Elec tronic; Engineering, Mechanical Automation & Control Systems; Engineering 819TX WOS:000294854700008 J Liu, PS; Du, HY Liu, P. S.; Du, H. Y. Modeling failure modes of isotropic three-dimensional reticulated porous metal f oams under several typical loads MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Metal foams; Mechanical properti es; Feature modeling MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; TITANIUM; SIZE Three dimensiona l reticulated porous metal foams are widely used engineering materials. A failur e model with the simplified structure of these porous materials has been establi shed, and the failure modes have been analyzed for the corresponding porous comp

onents under several typical loads, which include torsion, shearing and bending. The failure modes cover the tensile fracture, the shearing and the buckling of the strut, which may lead to the final destruction of the whole porous structure . The mathematical relationships, which characterize different failure modes, ha ve been derived for the strut failure resulting from loading for these porous co mponents under the above loading conditions. The results also show that the fail ure mode is related with the material species for these materials under the abov e loads. The tensile fracture of the strut will occur for the porous body with m etallic materials in most cases, and the shearing fracture of the strut may occu r for that in a relatively little cases. Moreover, the elastic buckling, the ela stic-plastic buckling and the edge yielding may also occur on the strut of porou s bodies when certain conditions are met. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. [Liu, PS; Du, HY] Beijing Normal Univ, Coll Nucl Sci & Technol, Minist Educ, Key Lab Beam Technol & Mat Modificat, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China; [Du, HY] Jil in Elect Power Co Ltd, Res Inst, Changchun 130021, Peoples R China Liu, PS (reprint author), Beijing Normal Univ, Coll Nucl Sci & Technol, Minist Educ, Key Lab Beam Technol & Mat Modificat, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China Liu996@2 63.net Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities[2009SD-26]; Test ing Foundation of Beijing Normal University[C10] This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2009SD-26) a nd the Testing Foundation of Beijing Normal University (No. C10), and these supp orts are both appreciated. 22 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 4786 4793 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06 .029 8 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Material s Science 813NF WOS:000294373500015 J Ahmadinia, E; Zargar, M; Karim, MR; Abdelaziz, M; Shafigh, P Ahmadinia, Esmaeil; Zargar, Majid; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdelaziz, Mahrez; Shaf igh, Payam Using waste plastic bottles as additive for stone mastic asphalt MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Polymers: thermoplastics; Mechanical; Environmental performance MODIFIED FLEXIBL E PAVEMENTS; AGGREGATE REPLACEMENT; MATRIX ASPHALT; TIRE RUBBER; MIXTURES; PERFO RMANCE; CONCRETE; DESIGN Currently, polymer modified asphalt mixture is a relatively costly mixture for paving roads. One way to reduce the cost of such constructions and rendering them more convenient is by using inexpensive polymer s, i.e. waste polymers. The main purpose of this research is to determine the ef fect of incorporating waste plastic bottles (Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)) o n the engineering properties of stone mastic asphalt (SMA) mixture. The volumetr ic and mechanical properties of asphalt mixes that include various percentages o f PET (0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10%) were calculated and assessed with laboratory tests. The appropriate amount of PET was found to be 6% by weight of bitumen. Th e outcomes were statistically analysed and the determination of the significance at certain confidence limits was performed with the two factor variance analysi s (ANOVA). Moreover, some studies conducted on polyethylene modified asphalt mix ture have also been taken into consideration in this paper. The results show tha t the addition of PET has a significant positive effect on the properties of SMA and it can promote the re-use of waste material in industry in an environmental ly friendly and economical way. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Ahmadinia, E; Zargar, M; Karim, MR; Abdelaziz, M; Shafigh, P] Univ Malaya, Fac Engn, Ctr Transportat Res, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia Ahmadinia, E (reprint au thor), Univ Malaya, Fac Engn, Ctr Transportat Res, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia ahmadinia@siswa.um.edu.my 39 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 4844 4849 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06.016 6 Materials Science, Multi disciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:000294373500023 J Zander, J; Sandstrom, R Zander, Johan; Sandstrom , Rolf Merit exponents and control area diagrams in materials selection

MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Material selection charts; Performance indices MATERIALS OPTIMIZATION; MECHANIC AL DESIGN Merit indices play a fundamental role in materials selection, si nce they enable ranking of materials. However, the conventional formulation of m erit indices is associated with severe limitations. They are dependent on the ex plicit solution of the variables in the equations for the constraints from the d esign criteria. Furthermore, it is not always easy to determine which the contro lling merit index is. To enable the ranking of materials in more general design cases, merit exponents are introduced as generalisations of the merit indices. P rocedures are presented for how to compute the merit exponents numerically witho ut having to solve equations algebraically. Merit exponents (and indices) are on ly valid in a certain range of property values. To simplify the identification o f the controlling merit exponent, it is suggested that so called control area di agrams are used. These diagrams consist of a number of domains, each showing the active constraints and the controlling merit exponent. It is shown that the mer it exponents play a crucial role when the control area diagram (CAD) is set up. The principles in the paper are developed for mechanically loaded components and are illustrated for engineering beams with two or three geometric variables. (C ) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Zander, J; Sandstrom, R] KTH, S -10044 Stockholm, Sweden Sandstrom, R (reprint author), KTH, Brinellv 23, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden rsand@kth.se Foundation for Strategic Researc h (SSF); Jernkontoret; Outokumpu; Sandvik; SAPA; SSAB The MATOP programme is f inanced by the Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), Jernkontoret, Outokumpu, Sandvik, SAPA and SSAB, which is gratefully acknowledged. 21 1 1 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 4850 4856 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06.013 7 Material s Science, Multidisciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:000294373500 024 J Zander, J; Sandstrom, R Zander, Johan; Sandstrom , Rolf Materials selection for a cooling plate using control area diagr ams MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Aluminium alloys; Material selection charts; Performance indices MATERIAL S OPTIMIZATION; ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT; ENGINEERING DESIGN; INDEXES Merit in dices are used to rank materials and are of fundamental importance in materials selection. Traditionally, merit indices have only been available for elementary design cases. In the present paper merit indices are generalised to cooling syst ems where heat flow and strength are design criteria in a materials optimisation framework. A cooling tube and a cooling plate are considered. A new concept, me rit exponent is used that is related to the merit indices. A definition of the m erit exponent is given also for cases with many design variables. In each design case a number of merit exponents are involved. It is a non-trivial task to iden tify which they are and when each of them is applicable. For this purpose contro l area diagrams (CAD) are used. A CAD is a diagram with the controlling properti es on the axes, and areas where one or more constraints are active. For the cool ing systems the controlling properties are heat conductivity and strength. The a ctive constraints define the relevant merit exponent. The constraints involve th e controlling properties and geometrical variables. Principles are established f or how to set up the CAD and to derive the merit exponents. (C) 2011 Elsevier Lt d. All rights reserved. [Zander, J; Sandstrom, R] Royal Inst Technol, Mat Sci & Engn & Brinell Ctr, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden Sandstrom, R (reprint author), R oyal Inst Technol, Mat Sci & Engn & Brinell Ctr, Brinellv 23, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden rsand@kth.se Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF); Jernkontoret; O utokumpu; Sandvik; SAPA; SSAB The MATOP programme is financed by the Foundatio n for Strategic Research (SSF), Jernkontoret, Outokumpu, Sandvik, SAPA and SSAB, which is gratefully acknowledged. We also want to thank Claudi. Martin-Callizo from SAPA technology for valuable discussions. 28 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des.

DEC 2011 32 10 4866 4873 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06.008 8 Materials Science, Multi disciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:000294373500026 J Jurczyk, MU; Jurczyk, K; Miklaszewski, A; Jurczyk, M Jurczyk, M. U.; Jurczyk, K.; Miklaszewski, A.; Jurczyk, M. Nanostru ctured titanium-4555 Bioglass scaffold composites for medical applications MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Nano-materials; Mechanical alloying; Microstructure; X-ray analysis HYDROXYA PATITE NANOCOMPOSITES; BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS; OSTEOBLAST ADHESION; SURFACE-ROU GHNESS; NANOPHASE METALS; POROUS TI; IMPLANTS; BIOMATERIALS; FABRICATION; TI6AL4 V Titanium-10 wt.% 4555 Bioglass scaffold nanocomposites were synthesized by the combination of mechanical alloying and by a "space-holder" sintering proc ess. The porous structure and corrosion properties were investigated. In vitro b iocompatibility of these materials was evaluated and compared with a conventiona l microcrystalline titanium, where normal human osteoblast (NHOst) cells from Ca mbrex (CC-2538) were cultured on the disks of the materials and cell growth was examined. The morphology of the cell cultures obtained on Ti-10 wt.% 45S5 Biogla ss nanocomposite was similar to those obtained on the microcrystalline titanium. On the other hand, on porous scaffold, the cells adhered with their whole surfa ce to the insert penetrating the porous structure, while on the polished surface , more spherical cells were observed with a smaller surface of adhesion. The pre sent study has demonstrated that titanium-10 wt.% 4555 Bioglass scaffold nanocom posite is a promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved, [Miklaszewski, A; Jurczyk, M] Poznan Tech Univ, Inst Mat Sci & Engn, PL-60695 Poznan, Poland; [Jurczyk, MU] Karol Marcinkowski U niv Med Sci, Div Mothers & Childs Hlth, PL-60535 Poznan, Poland; [Jurczyk, K] Ka rol Marcinkowski Univ Med Sci, Dept Conservat Dent & Periodontol, PL-60812 Pozna n, Poland Jurczyk, M (reprint author), Poznan Tech Univ, Inst Mat Sci & En gn, M Sklodowska Curie Sq 5, PL-60695 Poznan, Poland mieczyslaw.jurczyk@put.p oznan.pl Polish Ministry of Education and Science[N N507 295039] The part ial financial support of the Polish Ministry of Education and Science under the Contract No. N N507 295039 is gratefully acknowledged. 34 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. D es. DEC 2011 32 10 4882 4889 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06.005 8 Materials Science, Multi disciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:000294373500028 J Jahan, A; Ismail, MY; Shuib, S; Norfazidah, D; Edwards, KL Jahan, Ali; Ismail, Md Yusof; Shuib, S.; Norfazidah, Dayangku; Edwards, K. L. An aggregation technique for optimal decision-making in materials selection MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article Selection of materials; Weighting and ranking factors; Performance indices ENGINEERING DESIGN; OUTRANKING METHODS; BIPOLAR PLATES; VIKOR METHOD; CRITERIA; MODEL Materials selection is an onerous but very important activity in the des ign process. An inappropriate choice of material(s) can adversely affect the pro ductivity and profitability and hence reputation of a manufacturing organization . The complexity of materials selection makes multi-criteria analysis an invalua ble tool in the engineering design process. However, the application of various multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) methods can yield different results, espec ially when alternatives lead to similar performance. Therefore, an aggregation t echnique is proposed in this paper for optimal decision-making. In this approach , ranking orders obtained by various MCDM methods are used as the input of the s uggested procedure and the outputs are aggregation rankings, which help designer s and engineers to reach a consensus on materials selection for a specific appli cation. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the application of this procedure and its effectiveness in obtaining optimal materials selection. (C) 20 11 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Jahan, A] Islamic Azad Univ, Semnan Bra nch, Fac Engn, Semnan, Iran; [Ismail, MY; Shuib, S; Norfazidah, D] Univ Malaysia Pahang, Dept Mfg Engn, Pahang, Malaysia; [Edwards, KL] Aston Univ, Sch Engn & A ppl Sci, Birmingham B4 7ET, W Midlands, England Jahan, A (reprint author), Islam

ic Azad Univ, Semnan Branch, Fac Engn, Semnan, Iran iranalijahan@yahoo.com 42 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DE SIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 4918 4924 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.05.050 7 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:0002 94373500032 J Dhanapal, A; Boopathy, SR; Balasubramanian, V Dhanapal, A.; Boopathy, S. Rajendra; Balasubramanian, V. Developi ng an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of friction stir weld ed AZ61A magnesium alloy under salt fog environment MATERIALS & DESIGN English Article CHLORIDE-ION CON CENTRATION Magnesium (Mg) alloys shows the lowest density among other engin eering metallic materials. As a consequence, this light alloy has a promising fu ture. However, these alloys have great affinity for oxygen and other chemical ox idizing agents. The limitation of low corrosion resistance restricts their pract ical applications. Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were bu tt welded using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Corrosion behavior of the w elds was evaluated by conducting salt fog test in NaCl solution at different chl oride ion concentrations, pH value and spraying time. Also an attempt was made t o develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of friction st ir welded AZ61A magnesium alloy. Three factors and a central composite design we re used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Response surface meth od was used to develop their relationship. The developed relationship can be eff ectively used to predict the corrosion rate of friction stir weld AZ61A magnesiu m alloy at 95% confidence level. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Dhanapal, A] Sri Ramanujar Engn Coll, Dept Mech Engn, Madras 600048, Tamil Nadu , India; [Boopathy, SR] Anna Univ, Coll Engn, Dept Mech Engn, Madras 600025, Tam il Nadu, India; [Balasubramanian, V] Annamalai Univ, Dept Mfg Engn, Ctr Mat Join ing & Res CEMAJOR, Chidambaram 608002, Tamil Nadu, India Dhanapal, A (rep rint author), Sri Ramanujar Engn Coll, Dept Mech Engn, Madras 600048, Tamil Nadu , India sridhanapal2010@gmail.com; boopathy@annauniv.edu; balasubramanian.v.2784 @annamalaiuniversity.ac.in 19 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 5066 5072 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06.038 7 Materials Science, Multi disciplinary Materials Science 813NF WOS:000294373500055 J Vinodh, S; Jayakrishna, K Vinodh, S.; Jaya krishna, K. Environmental impact minimisation in an automotive compo nent using alternative materials and manufacturing processes MATERIALS & DESI GN English Article MATERIALS SELECTION; LIFE-CYCLE; PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT; ENGINEERING DESIGN; MECHAN ICAL DESIGN Sustainable development is seeking to meet the needs of the pres ent without compromising those of future generations. The need to integrate the principles, values, and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of manufacturing, in order to address the social, economic, cultural and environme ntal problems is felt widely among the industrialized society. Selecting or iden tifying a suitable material or manufacturing processes is one way of achieving s ustainability of a product by reducing its end of life impacts to a possible ext ent. But technological changes are unpredictable and so predicting future possib le environmental impacts are highly difficult. This paper tries to explore the p otential of environmental impact minimisation using alternative materials and al ternative manufacturing processes. A case study has been carried out to in this regard in an Indian automotive component manufacturing organization. The results indicate that change in material has higher impact over the manufacturing proce ss in reducing the environmental impact. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reser ved. [Vinodh, S; Jayakrishna, K] Natl Inst Technol, Dept Prod Engn, Tiruchchi rappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu, India Vinodh, S (reprint author), Natl Inst Te chnol, Dept Prod Engn, Tiruchchirappalli 620015, Tamil Nadu, India vinodh@n

itt.edu Department of Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi, India[SR/S3/MERC0102/2009] The authors are grateful to Department of Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi, India for funding towards the implementation of project title d "Development of a model for ensuring sustainable product design in automotive organizations" (Ref No. SR/S3/MERC-0102/2009). This research study forms a part of this chief research project. 33 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0261-3069 MATER DESIGN Mater. Des. DEC 2011 32 10 5082 5090 10.1016/j.matdes.2011.06 .025 9 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Material s Science 813NF WOS:000294373500057 J Dogsa, T; Batic, D Dogsa, Tomaz; Batic, Dav id The effectiveness of test-driven development: an industrial case study SOFTWARE QUALITY JOURNAL English Article Test-driven development; Testing and debugging; Testing strategies; Productivity ; Maintainability; Software quality/SQA; Software engineering process SOFTWARE ; QUALITY; CODE Test-driven development (TDD) is a software development practice , where test cases are incrementally written before implementing the production code. This paper presents the results of a multi-case study investigating the ef fectiveness of TDD within an industrial environment. Three comparable medium-siz ed projects were observed during their development cycle. Two projects were driv en without TDD practice, while the third one introduced TDD into the development process. The effectiveness of TDD was expressed in terms of external code quali ty, productivity, and maintainability. Our results indicate that the TDD develop ers produced higher quality code that is easier to maintain, although we did obs erve a reduction in productivity. [Batic, D] Agileon Doo, Div 51, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia; [Dogsa, T] Univ Maribor, Fac Elect Engn & Comp Sci, Ctr Verif icat & Validat Syst, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia Batic, D (reprint author), Agile on Doo, Div 51, Cesta 14, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia batic@agileon.eu 32 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0963-9314 SOFTWARE QUAL J Softw. Q ual. J. DEC 2011 19 4 SI 643 661 10.1007/s11219-011-9130-2 19 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 814RN WOS:000294474900002 J Fucic, A; Fucic, L; Katic, J; Stojkovic, R; Gamulin, M; Seferovic, E Fucic, Aleksandra; Fucic, Lino; Katic, Jelena; Stojkovic, Ranko; Gamulin, Marija ; Seferovic, Enes Radiochemical indoor environment and possible he alth risks in current building technology BUILDING AND ENVIRONMENT English Article Indoor radon; Fly ash; R adionuclides; Nanoparticles; Human health; Concrete additive FIRED POWER-PLAN T; TITANIUM-DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLES; RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY ASPECTS; LUNG-CANCER; FLY -ASH; NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY; RADON EXHALATION; COLLABORATIVE ANALYSIS; RESIDENTI AL BUILDINGS; ULTRAFINE PARTICLES Tremendous work of civil and environment al engineering has been focused on development of sustainable buildings. From ec onomical and ecological viewpoint, this approach is a significant step forward, but the microenvironment created in such living surroundings may present a compl ex radiochemical setting, which could be a threat to the health of its occupants . This paper gives overview about levels of indoor radon, insight in risks relat ed with radioactivity of fly ash and zircon, current application of nanoparticle s and concrete additives in buildings and their possible impact on human health. As construction engineering is current producer of almost 50% of waste encourag ement of incorporation of toxic and radioactive agents in buildings could in fut ure demand redefinition of building construction waste as hazardous and special waste disposals. Collaboration between governmental and non-governmental bodies, manufacturers, scientific institutions, and chartered engineers is needed in or der to find balance between quality of indoor air, and to enable maintaining of high health standards by application of non-toxic or non-carcinogenic building m aterials that meet energy efficiency, building structure stability and security requirements. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Fucic, A; Katic , J] Inst Med Res & Occupat Hlth, Zagreb 10000, Croatia; [Fucic, L] Minist Envir

onm Protect Phys Planning & Construct, Zagreb, Croatia; [Stojkovic, R] Rudjer Bo skovic Inst, Zagreb, Croatia; [Gamulin, M] Zagreb Univ Hosp, Zagreb, Croatia; [S eferovic, E] CSS Ltd, Zagreb, Croatia Fucic, A (reprint author), Inst Med Res & Occupat Hlth, Ksaverska C 2, Zagreb 10000, Croatia afucic@imi.hr 87 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0360-1323 BUILD ENVIRON Build. Environ. DEC 2011 46 12 2609 2614 10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.06.020 6 Construction & Building Technology; Engineering, Environmental; Engineering, Civ il Construction & Building Technology; Engineering 809CT WOS:000294030100 022 J Wang, JH; Wang, CG; Yang, JH; An, CQ Wang, Je ssie Hui; Wang, Chungang; Yang, Jiahai; An, Changqing A study on key s trategies in P2P file sharing systems and ISPs' P2P traffic management PEER-TOPEER NETWORKING AND APPLICATIONS English Article P2P; ISP; Traffic engineering; Network management PERFORMANCE; NETWORK The flourish of P2P systems draws a lot of attention of networking researchers. Some research efforts focus on P2P systems, trying to understand the mechanism o f various implementations and the behavior pattern of P2P users, and then improv e the systems' performance. Others look at the issue from the angle of ISPs, try ing to help ISPs solve various issues brought by P2P applications. In this artic le, we conduct a review study on recent research efforts in these two areas. The first part of this article focuses on several key strategies that have signific ant influence on the performance of P2P systems. In the second part, we review s ome important techniques for ISPs to manage P2P traffic, i.e., blocking, caching and localization, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. [Wang, J H; Wang, CG; Yang, JH; An, CQ] Tsinghua Univ, Tsinghua Natl Lab Informat Sci & T echnol, Network Res Ctr, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China Wang, JH (reprin t author), Tsinghua Univ, Tsinghua Natl Lab Informat Sci & Technol, Network Res Ctr, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China hwang@cernet.edu.cn 45 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 1936-6442 PEER PEER NETW APPL Peer Peer Netw. Appl. DEC 2011 4 4 410 419 10.1007/s12083-010-0098-7 10 808LL WOS:000293979100005 J Kumar, R; Kalra, P; Prakash, NR Kumar, Rajesh; K alra, Parveen; Prakash, Neelam R. A virtual RV-M1 robot system ROBOTICS AND COMPUTER-INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING English Article RV-M1 robot; MATLAB; Simulation; Kinematics; Teachbox Exploring a virt ual model under simulated environments is the best way to learn about a real sys tem. This is particularly true in robotics where it is quite expensive to provid e the system to each individual. The interdisciplinary area of robotics is being studied commonly in various fields like electrical, computer, mechanical engine ering, nanotechnology, etc. A virtual robot system can help one fully understand the controls and working of a robot. The system may also be helpful to design t he path and plan the trajectory of a robot in an industrial environment or other robotics application. Virtual model of RV-M1 robot has been developed in the MA TLAB environment. The virtual system performs forward kinematics and inverse kin ematics in addition to providing a simulation of the robot teachbox. (C) 2011 El sevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kumar, R] Panjab Univ, Dept Mech Engn, UIET, Chandigarh 160014, India; [Kalra, P] PEC Univ Technol, Dept Prod Engn, Cha ndigarh, India; [Prakash, NR] PEC Univ Technol, Dept Elect & Elect Commun, Chand igarh, India Kumar, R (reprint author), Panjab Univ, Dept Mech Engn, UIET, Ro om 403,Acad Block 2, Chandigarh 160014, India rajeshmadan@rediffmail.com 14 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0736-5845 ROBOT CIM-INT MANUF Robot. Comput.-Integr. Manuf. DEC 2011 27 6 994 1000 10.1016/j.rcim.2011.05.0 03 7 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications ; Engineering, Manufacturing; Robotics Computer Science; Engineering; Robotics

801JW WOS:000293436000004 J Patino, JMR; Pilosof, AMR Rodriguez Patino , Juan Miguel; Pilosof, Ana M. R. Protein-polysaccharide interacti ons at fluid interfaces FOOD HYDROCOLLOIDS English Article Protein; Polysaccharide; Protein-polysaccharide interactions; Fluid interfaces; Air-water interface; Oil-water interface; Food hydrocolloid; Food emulsion; Food foam AIR-WATER-INTERFACE; SURFACE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES; XANTHAN GUM INTERAC TIONS; MILK WHEY-PROTEIN; SUGAR-BEET PECTIN; BETA-LACTOGLOBULIN; SOY PROTEIN; TH ERMODYNAMIC INCOMPATIBILITY; HYDROXYPROPYL METHYLCELLULOSE; EMULSION STABILITY Protein-polysaccharide interactions find many applications in food engineering a nd new food formulations. This review article describes recent research on the e ffect of protein-polysaccharide interactions on the properties of air-water and oil-water interfaces, as affected by their behaviour in the bulk phase. The inte rfacial behaviour of protein-polysaccharide mixtures exhibiting associative (i.e ., net attractive) interactions as well as their performance in food emulsions a nd foams has been the subject of several reviews in the last decade. Much less a ttention has been paid to the interfacial behaviour of protein-polysaccharide mi xtures exhibiting unfavourable interactions. Thus we are concerned here with the interfacial behaviour of both kinds of mixtures. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rig hts reserved. [Patino, JMR] Univ Seville, Fac Quim, Dept Ingn Quim, Seville 41 012, Spain; [Pilosof, AMR] Univ Buenos Aires, Fac Ciencias Exactas & Nat, Dept I nd, RA-1428 Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina; [Pilosof, AMR] Consejo Nacl Invest Cien t & Tecn, RA-1033 Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina Patino, JMR (reprint author), Un iv Seville, Fac Quim, Dept Ingn Quim, C Prof Garcia Gonzalez 1, Seville 41012, S pain jmrodri@us.es; apilosof@di.fcen.uba.ar CICYT[AGL2007-60045]; ANPCYT[PIC T545]; Universidad de Buenos Aires[Ubacyt X 175]; CYTED[XI.17, 105PI0274] This research was supported by CICYT through Grant AGL2007-60045 by ANPCYT(PICT5 45) and by Universidad de Buenos Aires (Ubacyt X 175). Also we acknowledge Ibero american projects CYTED XI.17 and 105PI0274. 125 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0268-005X FOOD HYDROCOLLOID Food Hyd rocolloids DEC 2011 25 8 1925 1937 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2011.02.023 13 Chemistr y, Applied; Food Science & Technology Chemistry; Food Science & Technology 803KN WOS:000293580300015 J Zawilska, E; Brooks, MJ Zawilska, E.; Brooks, M. J. An assessment of the solar resource for Durban, South Africa RENEWABLE ENERGY English Article Solar resource; Radiometry data; Meteorological data; Renewable energy; Durban; South Africa RENEWABLE ENERGY; RADIATION; IRRADIATION; DIFFUSE Renewabl e energy's role as an alternative to fossil-based power is growing in the develo ping world. The city of Durban, South Africa, is an example of a rapidly expandi ng urban center which can benefit from the implementation of solar energy techno logies. This paper presents a year-long data record of the solar flux intensity for the city of Durban (29 degrees 58'N 30 degrees 55'E). Global horizontal irra diance (G(t)), direct normal irradiance (G(DN)), diffuse horizontal irradiance ( G(d)) and daily average clearness index (K(T)) are used. The data were recorded at the Solar Thermal Applications Research Laboratory (STARlab) at Mangosuthu Un iversity of Technology. Ground-based measurements obtained from STARlab are comp ared with data from a variety of sources including NASA's SSE database and the l iterature. The aim of this study is to build a reliable record of the solar reso urce for urban planning, engineering design and effective operation of solar ene rgy systems and applications. Results show that Durban has a considerable solar energy resource, which remains to be exploited. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All right s reserved. [Brooks, MJ] Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Mech Engn, Durban, South Af rica; [Zawilska, E] Mangosuthu Univ Technol, Dept Mech Engn, Durban, South Afric a Brooks, MJ (reprint author), Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Mech Engn, Durban, South Africa brooks@ukzn.ac.za 33 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0960-1481 RENEW ENERG

Renew. Energy DEC 2011 36 12 3433 3438 10.1016/j.renene.2011.05.023 6 Energy & Fuels Energy & Fuels 801FS WOS:000293424400024 J Classen, A; Boucher, Q; Heymans, P Classen, Andreas; Boucher, Quentin; Heymans, Patrick A text-based approach to feature modelling: Syntax and semantics of TVL SCIENCE OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING English Article Feature models; Code; Mo delling; Language; Syntax; Semantics; Software product lines LANGUAGES In the scientific community, feature models are the de-facto standard for repres enting variability in software product line engineering. This is different from industrial settings where they appear to be used much less frequently. We and ot her authors found that in a number of cases, they lack concision, naturalness an d expressiveness. This is confirmed by industrial experience. When modelling var iability, an efficient tool for making models intuitive and concise are feature attributes. Yet, the semantics of feature models with attributes is not well und erstood and most existing notations do not support them at all. Furthermore, the graphical nature of feature models syntax also appears to be a barrier to indus trial adoption, both psychological and rational. Existing tool support for graph ical feature models is lacking or inadequate, and inferior in many regards to to ol support for text-based formats. To overcome these shortcomings, we designed T VL, a text-based feature modelling language. In terms of expressiveness. TVL sub sumes most existing dialects. The main goal of designing TVL was to provide engi neers with a human-readable language with a rich syntax to make modelling easy a nd models natural, but also with a formal semantics to avoid ambiguity and allow powerful automation. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Classen , A; Boucher, Q; Heymans, P] Univ Namur, PReCISE Res Ctr, B-5000 Namur, Belgium Classen, A (reprint author), Univ Namur, PReCISE Res Ctr, Rue Grandgagnage 21, B -5000 Namur, Belgium acs@info.fundp.ac.be; qbo@info.fundp.ac.be; phe@info.fun dp.ac.be Walloon Region under the ERDF; NAPLES; IAP; Belgian State; Belgi an Science Policy; BNB; FNRS We thank our colleagues for their feedback on th e language design, particularly Ebrahim Abbasi, Arnaud Hubaux, Raphael Michel, G ermain Saval and Pierre-Yves Schobbens. We also thank Paul Faber who implemented most of the TVL Java library and Anthony Cleve for his help with the ASF+SDF im plementation. This work was partially funded by the Walloon Region under the ERD F and the NAPLES project, the IAP Programme, Belgian State, Belgian Science Poli cy under the MoVES project, the BNB and the FNRS. 38 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, N ETHERLANDS 0167-6423 SCI COMPUT PROGRAM Sci. Comput. Pro gram. DEC 1 2011 76 12 SI 1130 1143 10.1016/j.scico.2010.10.005 14 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 793FX WOS:000292806900005 J Di Cosmo, R; Di Ruscio, D; Pelliccione, P; Pierantonio, A; Zacchiroli, S Di Cosmo, Roberto; Di Ruscio, Davide; Pelliccione, Patrizio; Pierantonio, Alfons o; Zacchiroli, Stefano Supporting software evolution in component-based FOSS systems SCIENCE OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING English Article System's upgrade; FOSS systems; Open source project; Model-driven engineering (M DE); Configuration management FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) sys tems present interesting challenges in system evolution. On one hand, most FOSS systems are based on very fine-grained units of software deployment - called pac kages - which promote system evolution; on the other hand, FOSS systems are amon g the largest software systems known and require sophisticated static and dynami c conditions to be verified, in order to successfully deploy upgrades on users' machines. The slightest error in one of these conditions can turn a routine upgr ade into a system administrator's nightmare. In this paper we introduce a modelbased approach to support the upgrade of FOSS systems. The approach promotes the simulation of upgrades to predict failures before affecting the real system. Bo th fine-grained static aspects (e.g. configuration incoherences) and dynamic asp ects (e.g. the execution of configuration scripts) are taken into account, impro ving over the state of the art of upgrade planners. The effectiveness of the app roach is validated by instantiating the approach to widely-used FOSS distributio

ns. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Di Ruscio, D; Pelliccione, P; P ierantonio, A] Univ Aquila, Dipartimento Informat, I-67100 Laquila, Italy; [Di C osmo, R; Zacchiroli, S] Univ Paris Diderot, PPS, UMR 7126, Paris, France Pelliccione, P (reprint author), Univ Aquila, Dipartimento Informat, I-67100 Laq uila, Italy roberto@dicosmo.org; davide.diruscio@univaq.it; patrizio.pellicc ione@univaq.it; alfonso.pierantonio@univaq.it; zack@pps.jussieu.fr European Community[FP7/2007-2013, 214898] This work is partly supported by they Eu ropean Community's 7th Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013), http://www.mancoosi. org MANCOOSI project, grant agreement n. 214898. 35 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, N ETHERLANDS 0167-6423 SCI COMPUT PROGRAM Sci. Comput. Pro gram. DEC 1 2011 76 12 SI 1144 1160 10.1016/j.scico.2010.11.001 17 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 793FX WOS:000292806900006 J Meyers, B; Vangheluwe, H Meyers, Bart; Va ngheluwe, Hans A framework for evolution of modelling languages SCIENCE OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING English Article Evolution; Modelling languages; Language engineering; Model-driven engineering; Model transformation TRANSFORMATION; TOOL In model-driven engineering, evo lution is inevitable over the course of the complete life cycle of complex softw are-intensive systems and more importantly of entire product families. Not only instance models, but also entire modelling languages are subject to change. This is in particular true for domain-specific languages, whose language constructs are tightly coupled to an application domain. The most popular approach to evolu tion in the modelling domain is a manual process, with tedious and error-prone m igration of artefacts such as instance models as a result. This paper provides a taxonomy for evolution of modelling languages and discusses the different evolu tion scenarios for various kinds of modelling artefacts, such as instance models , meta-models, and transformation models. Subsequently, the consequences of evol ution and the required remedial actions are decomposed into primitive scenarios such that all possible evolutions can be covered exhaustively. These primitives are then used in a high-level framework for the evolution of modelling languages . We suggest that our structured approach enables the design of(semi-)automatic modelling language evolution solutions. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserv ed. [Meyers, B; Vangheluwe, H] Univ Antwerp, MSDL, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium; [Vangheluwe, H] McGill Univ, MSDL, Montreal, PQ H3A 2A7, Canada Vangheluwe, H (r eprint author), Univ Antwerp, MSDL, Middelheimlaan 1, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium Bart.Meyers@ua.ac.be; Hans.Vangheluwe@ua.ac.be National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada We would like to thank the reviewers of this paper for their valuable comments. We would also like to thank the organise rs and the participants of the Transformation Tool Contest 2010, Model Migration Case Study for the fruitful discussions on the subject of this paper. Finally, the participants of the 2008-2010 Bellairs Computer Automated Multi-Paradigm mod elling workshops are acknowledged for the stimulating discussions which have ult imately led to this paper. Partial support of this work by a discovery grant of the National Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada is grate fully acknowledged. 56 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0167-6423 SCI COMPUT PROGRAM Sci. Comput. Program. DEC 1 2011 76 12 SI 1223 1246 10.1016/j.scico.2011.01.002 24 Computer Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 793FX WOS:0002 92806900011 J van der Spek, P; Klusener, S van der Spek, Pi eter; Klusener, Steven Applying a dynamic threshold to improve cluster detection of LSI SCIENCE OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING English Article Feature extraction; Clustering; Reverse engineering; Software architecture; Late nt Semantic Indexing LATENT SEMANTIC ANALYSIS; RECOVERING TRACEABILITY LINKS; IN-SOURCE CODE; INFORMATION-RETRIEVAL; SOFTWARE EVOLUTION; SYSTEMS; TOPICS; TRE E Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) is a standard approach for extracting and representing the meaning of words in a large set of documents. Recently it has

been shown that it is also useful for identifying concerns in source code. The t ree cutting strategy plays an important role in obtaining the clusters, which id entify the concerns. In this contribution the authors compare two tree cutting s trategies: the Dynamic Hybrid cut and the commonly used fixed height threshold. Two case studies have been performed on the source code of Philips Healthcare to compare the results using both approaches. While some of the settings are parti cular to the Philips-case, the results show that applying a dynamic threshold, i mplemented by the Dynamic Hybrid cut, is an improvement over the fixed height th reshold in the detection of clusters representing relevant concerns. This makes the approach as a whole more usable in practice. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All righ ts reserved. [van der Spek, P; Klusener, S] Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Sci, Am sterdam, Netherlands van der Spek, P (reprint author), Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands pvdspek@cs.vu.nl; steven@cs.vu.nl Dutch Mi nistry of Economic Affairs This work has been carried out as a part of the DARWIN project at Philips Healthcare under the responsibilities of the Embedded Systems Institute. This project is partially supported by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs under the BSIK program. 55 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLAN DS 0167-6423 SCI COMPUT PROGRAM Sci. Comput. Program. DEC 1 2011 76 12 SI 1261 1274 10.1016/j.scico.2010.12.004 14 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 793FX WOS:000292806900013 J Heimdahl, MPE; Taentzer, G Heimdahl, Mats P . E.; Taentzer, Gabriele special issue on selected topics in auto mated software engineering Specification mining and defect detection AUTOMATE D SOFTWARE ENGINEERING English Editorial Material [Heimdahl, MPE] Univ Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA; [Taentzer, G] Univ Ma rburg, Marburg, Germany Heimdahl, MPE (reprint author), Univ Minnesota, Minneapo lis, MN 55455 USA heimdahl@cs.umn.edu; taentzer@informatik.uni-marburg.de 0 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0928-8910 AUTOMAT SOFTW ENG Automat. Softw. Eng. DEC 2011 18 3-4 SI 225 226 10.1007/s10515-011-0087-y 2 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 789YV WOS:000292556500001 J Thummalapenta, S; Xie, T Thummalapenta, S uresh; Xie, Tao Alattin: mining alternative patterns for defect detectio n AUTOMATED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING English Article Alternative patterns; Static defect detection; Mining software engineering data; Code search engine To improve software quality, static or dynamic d efect-detection tools accept programming rules as input and detect their violati ons in software as defects. As these programming rules are often not well docume nted in practice, previous work developed various approaches that mine programmi ng rules as frequent patterns from program source code. Then these approaches us e static or dynamic defect-detection techniques to detect pattern violations in source code under analysis. However, these existing approaches often produce man y false positives due to various factors. To reduce false positives produced by these mining approaches, we develop a novel approach, called Alattin, that inclu des new mining algorithms and a technique for detecting neglected conditions bas ed on our mining algorithm. Our new mining algorithms mine patterns in four patt ern formats: conjunctive, disjunctive, exclusive-disjunctive, and combinations o f these patterns. We show the benefits and limitations of these four pattern for mats with respect to false positives and false negatives among detected violatio ns by applying those patterns to the problem of detecting neglected conditions. [Thummalapenta, S; Xie, T] N Carolina State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Raleigh, NC 276 95 USA; [Thummalapenta, S] IBM Res Corp, Bangalore, Karnataka, India Thummala penta, S (reprint author), N Carolina State Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Raleigh, NC 276 95 USA sthumma@ncsu.edu; xie@csc.ncsu.edu NSF[CCF-0725190, CCF-0845272, CN S-0958235, CCF-0915400]; ARO[W911NF-08-1-0443, W911NF-08-1-0105]; NCSU CACC This work is supported in part by NSF grants CCF-0725190, CCF-0845272, CNS-09582 35, and CCF-0915400, ARO grant W911NF-08-1-0443, ARO grant W911NF-08-1-0105 mana

ged by NCSU Secure Open Systems Initiative (SOSI), and an NCSU CACC grant. 29 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0928-8910 AUTOMAT SOFTW ENG Automat. Softw. Eng. DEC 2011 18 3-4 SI 293 323 10.1007/s10515-011-0086-z 31 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 789YV WOS:000292556500004 J de Mast, J de Mast, Jeroen The tact ical use of constraints and structure in diagnostic problem solving OMEGA-IN TERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE English Article Problem-solving; Artificial intelligence; Decision making/process; Heuristics; L earning MODEL-BASED DIAGNOSIS; CREATIVITY; SYSTEM This paper presents a pr escriptive account of diagnostic problem solving, or diagnosis, in quality and p rocess control. This paper identifies a general strategy, named branch-and-prune , whose manifestations can be found in disciplines such as medical diagnosis, tr oubleshooting of devices, and model-based diagnosis in artificial intelligence. The work aims to offer a clear conceptualization of this strategy, based on the notions of structures for the search space, and constraints to the cause's natur e. The idea is to treat the search space of candidate explanations as a tree str ucture, in which general and high-level causal directions are branched into more specific and detailed explanations. Constraints eliminate all but a few branche s (pruning), which are explored in more detail. We enumerate eight generic struc tures as a basis for branching the search tree. We demonstrate that our conceptu alization in terms of structures and constraints gives a rationale for generally known methods and heuristics in quality engineering and operations management. The paper contributes a unifying conceptual understanding of a class of diagnost ic techniques, and it improves the strategy's operationality by offering generic structures, and a simpler and more flexible account of its working. A descripti on of a real-life quality problem solving effort forms a tangible basis for the discussion. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Univ Amsterdam, Inst Bus iness & Ind Stat, NL-1018 TV Amsterdam, Netherlands de Mast, J (reprint auth or), Univ Amsterdam, Inst Business & Ind Stat, Plantage Muidergracht 12, NL-1018 TV Amsterdam, Netherlands j.demast@uva.nl 32 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0305-0483 OMEGA-IN T J MANAGE S Omega-Int. J. Manage. Sci. DEC 2011 39 6 702 709 10.1016/j.omega.2011.02.002 8 Management; Operations Research & Management Science Business & Economics; Op erations Research & Management Science 773FR WOS:000291292900012 J Cherubini, D; Fanni, A; Mereu, A; Frangioni, A; Murgia, C; Scutella, MG; Zuddas, P Cherubini, D.; Fanni, A.; Mereu, A.; Fra ngioni, A.; Murgia, C.; Scutella, M. G.; Zuddas, P. Linear programmi ng models for traffic engineering in 100% survivable networks under combined ISIS/OSPF and MPLS-TE COMPUTERS & OPERATIONS RESEARCH English Article Routing problems; LP models; Robustness DESIGN; OPTIMIZATION; PATHS; FLOWS; MATE This paper concerns the problem of minimizing the maximum link utilization of IP telecommunication networks under the joint use of traditional IGP routing proto cols, such as IS-IS and OSPF, and the more sophisticated MPLS-TE technology. It is shown that the problem of choosing the optimal routing, both under working co nditions and under single link failure scenarios, can be cast as a linear progra m of reasonable size. The proposed model is validated by a computational experim entation performed on synthetic and real networks: the obtained results show tha t the new approach considerably reduces the maximum link utilization of the netw ork with respect to simply optimizing the IGP weights, at the cost of adding a l imited number of label switched paths (LSPs). Optimizing the set of IGP weights within the overall approach further improves performances. The computational tim e needed to solve the models matches well with real-time requirements, and makes it possible to consider network design problems. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd All righ ts reserved. [Fanni, A; Mereu, A] Univ Cagliari, DIEE, Cagliari, Italy; [Zudd as, P] Univ Cagliari, DIT, Cagliari, Italy; [Frangioni, A; Scutella, MG] Univ Pi sa, Dipartimento Informat, Pontecorvo 3, Italy; [Murgia, C] Tiscali Italia SpA,

Cagliari, Italy; [Cherubini, D] Tiscali Int Network, Cagliari, Italy Cherubin i, D (reprint author), Alcatel Lucent Bell Labs Ireland, Blanchardstown Ind Pk, Blanchardstown, Ireland davide.cherubini@alcatel-lucent.com; fanni@diee.unica.it ; anna.mereu@diee.unica.it; frangio@di.unipi.it; cmurgia@tiscali.com; scut@di.un ipi.it; zuddas@unica.it Tiscali S.p.A of the ICE Lab (Information and Communicat ions Engineering Academy joint Laboratory) This work has been partially sup ported by Tiscali S.p.A within the framework of the ICE Lab (Information and Com munications Engineering Academy joint Laboratory). The authors would like to tha nk Mr. Paolo Susnik and Mr. Giorgio Lembo for supporting the work and the review ers for their valuable comments that helped improve the manuscript. 57 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0305-0548 COMPUT OPER RES Comput. Oper. Res. DEC 2011 38 12 1805 1815 10.1016/j.cor.2011.02.019 11 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Engineering, Industrial; Opera tions Research & Management Science Computer Science; Engineering; Operation s Research & Management Science 768KB WOS:000290932100015 J Yakhno, T; Ekin, E Yakhno, Tatyana; Ekin, E mine Student Conference as a Student Centred Environment for Integrat ing Technical Writings into Computer Engineering Curriculum EGITIM ARASTIRMA LARI-EURASIAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH English Article Project Based Learning; Student Centered Environment; Technical English; Confere nce Management IMPLEMENTATION Problem Statement: In today's world there are pr essures on universities to ensure that graduates have the capacity to meet the n eeds of employers. One aspect of this is to ensure that students, along with pro fessional skills, possess personal skills such as communication, teamwork, and p resentation skills. At the same time, many faculty members note that at the begi nning of education freshmen students have a low level of self-confidence, lack o f communication skills, and teamwork experience. The introductory part of the Co mputer Engineering curriculum contains one or two courses which can improve stud ents' communication skills. These courses are Technical Writings or Technical En glish. Usually these courses are given by English language instructors in a trad itional way and communication skills are not in practical use on an introductory level. Purpose: The main purpose of the study is to develop a new approach for integrating Technical English courses into computer engineering curriculum. Such integration has to increase students' involvement into project design (team wor k) from the very beginning of education, increase motivation to study technical English, improve language knowledge, and increase students' self-confidence and communication skills. Method: As a research method we have applied the Project-B ased Learning approach for the Technical English course. The project we suggeste d to freshman students is a Student Conference, which they have to organize and host by themselves. During the project, every student has to play three differen t roles: to participate in organizing and hosting the conference, to write and p resent a research paper, and to review submitted research papers. These roles su pport the students to improve team working, project management, research, and wr itten and oral communication skills. Dealing with topics from the popular subjec ts of computer engineering area, the Student Conference bridges the gap between engineering courses and technical writing. Six different committees were formed by the students: Advisory Board, Program Committee, Conference Chairs, Organizat ion Committee, Publishing Group, and the Technical Support Group. During the sem ester, the members of the Advisory Board gave lectures on project/conference man agement, research methods, plagiarism, and presentation techniques as well as on advanced English grammar. At the end of the project, a one day conference was h osted by students where they presented their posters and released conference pro ceedings. Findings and Results: As a project, the Student Conference has allowed Computer Engineering students to be involved in a real life project. The studen ts engaged in activities that develop and foster the use of learning strategies such as goal setting, planning, self-evaluation, confidence, and risk-taking. Th e language knowledge of students has been increased, and they were introduced to technical writing methods. However, by this project, technical writings became

a tool for knowledge of a topic of choice rather than the focus of study. Conclu sions and Recommendations: Because this project was by nature multidimensional, it lends itself well to evaluate multiple outcomes. Within our framework we have included three sources of assessment: instructors, peers, and students. All of them have shown the increasing level of satisfaction among students and instruct ors. This approach can be used for integrating social elective courses into engi neering curricula on all levels of university education. [Yakhno, T] Izmi r Univ, Dept Comp Engn, Izmir, Turkey; [Ekin, E] Isik Univ, Dept Comp Engn, Izmi r, Turkey Yakhno, T (reprint author), Izmir Univ, Dept Comp Engn, Izmir, T urkey tatyana.yakhno@izmir.edu.tr; emine.ekin@isikun.edu.tr 17 0 0 ANI YAYINCILIK BAKANLIKLAR KIZILIRMAK SOK NO 10-A, BAKANLIKLAR, ANKARA 00000, TURKEY 1302-597X EGIT ARAST Egit. Arast. WIN 2011 11 42 259 272 14 Education & Educational Research Education & Educational Research 767SB WOS:000290875200016 J Eslaminejad, MB; Bagheri, F; Zandi, M; Nejati, E; Zomorodian, E Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Bagheri, Fatemeh; Zandi, Mojgan; Nejati, Elha m; Zomorodian, Elham Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Bone Differentiation on Composite Scaffolds of PLLA and Nano Hydroxyapatite wit h Different Morphologies YAKHTEH English Article Hydroxyapatite; Scaffold; Mesenchymal Stem Cell; Osteogenesis; Cell Proliferatio n IN-VITRO; EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX; ENGINEERING BONE; EXPRESSION; TISSUES; R AT; BIOMATERIALS; FABRICATION; CHALLENGES; PROTEIN Objective: Nowadays, bon e constructs elaborated according to tissue engineering principles are being reg arded as an ideal choice for the reconstruction of segmental bone defects. In th is study, proliferation and bone differentiation of marrow-derived mesenchymal s tem cells (MSCs) were compared in different composite scaffolds containing varyi ng morphologies of nano hydroxyapatite (nHAP). Materials and Methods: Needle nHA P/PLLA (poly (L-Iactide acid)), spherical nHAP/PLLA and rod nHAP/PLLA scaffolds were prepared and 3D cultures of passaged-3 rat MSCs were established using the scaffolds. The loading of the cells onto the scaffold internal spaces was confir med with microscopy and their proliferation was determined by MTT assay. To comp are the osteogenic differentiation of the cells on the scaffold surfaces, osteog enic 3D cultures were established and kept for 21 days. At the end of this perio d culture mineralization and relative bone-related gene expression were quantifi ed using the alizarin red quantification assay and semi quantitative RT-PCR anal ysis respectively. ANOVA was used to compare the data. Results: According to the MU assays, cells adhered to all the studied scaffold surfaces tended to prolife rate. In this respect the microenvironment provided by the needle nHAP/PLLA appe ared much better than that of either the spherical or rod nHAP/PLLA scaffolds (P <0.05). Similarly, mineralization was observed to be heavier for the needle nHAP /PLLA scaffold compared to the two other composite scaffolds. In addition, the r elative expression of coll I, osteocalcin, runx2 and ALP genes all appeared to b e significantly higher in the cells cultivated on needle nHAP/PLLA scaffolds ver sus their spherical and rod counterparts. Conclusion: Overall, needle nHAP/PLLA scaffolds appear to provide the most appropriate matrix for producing bone const ruct using MSCs. [Eslaminejad, MB; Bagheri, F; Zomorodian, E] ACECR, Roya n Inst Stem Cell Biol & Technol, Dept Stem Cells & Dev Biol, Cell Sci Res Ctr, T ehran, Iran; [Zandi, M] Iran Polymer & Petrochem Inst, Tehran, Iran; [Nejati, E] Amir Kabir Univ Technol, Dept Biomed Engn, Tehran, Iran Eslaminejad, MB (reprint author), ACECR, Royan Inst Stem Cell Biol & Technol, Dept Stem Cells & Dev Biol, Cell Sci Res Ctr, POB 16635-148, Tehran, Iran eslami@royaninstitute.or g Royan Institute; Amirkabir University; Iran Polymer and Petrochamical In stitute The authors wish to thank Dr Henning Urch of Duisburg-Essen University f or SEM preparation of spherical nHAP particles. The authors also wish to thank R oyan Institute, Amirkabir University and Iran Polymer and Petrochamical Institut e for their financial support of the present study. 34 0 0 ROYAN INST TEHRAN ROYAN INST, PO BOX 19395-4644, TEHRAN, 00000, IR AN 1561-4921 YAKHTEH Yakhteh WIN 2011 12 4 469 476 8 Medicine, Research & Exp

erimental Research & Experimental Medicine 741TY WOS:000288889200 007 J Bruckmann, C Bruckmann, Clive status of engineers TCE English Letter FIChemE, Bryanston, South Africa Bruckmann, C (reprint author), FIChemE, Bryanston, South Africa 0 0 0 INST CHEMICAL ENGINEERS RUGBY 165-189 RAILWAY TERRACE, DAVIS BLDG, RUGBY CV21 3HQ, ENGLAND 0302-0797 TCE-THE CHEM ENG TCE DEC-JAN 2011 834 2 2 1 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 738FV WOS:000288626200 001 J Birkinshaw, J; Bouquet, C; Barsoux, JL Birkinsh aw, Julian; Bouquet, Cyril; Barsoux, J. -L. The 5 Myths of Innovatio n MIT SLOAN MANAGEMENT REVIEW English Article INTRINSIC MOTIVATION Historically, most managers equated innovation primarily with the development of new products and new technologies. But increasingly, in novation is seen as applying to the development of new service offerings, busine ss models, pricing plans and routes to market, as well as new management practic es. There is now a greater recognition that novel ideas can transform any part o f the value chain - and that products and services represent just the tip of the innovation iceberg. This shift of focus has implications for who "owns" innovat ion. It used to be the preserve of a select band of employees - be they designer s, engineers or scientists - whose responsibility it was to generate and pursue new ideas, often in a separate location. But increasingly, innovation has come t o be seen as the responsibility of the entire organization. For many large compa nies, in fact, the new imperative is to view innovation as an "all the time, eve rywhere" capability that harnesses the skills and imagination of employees at al l levels. Making innovation everyone's job is intuitively appealing but very har d to achieve, but many companies have tried - and nearly all believe that's it's critical to continue trying. To understand these challenges, and to identify th e innovation practices that work, the authors spent three years studying the pro cess of innovation in 13 global companies. Many of the standard arguments for ho w to encourage innovation in large organizations were confirmed, but some surpri ses were uncovered as well. In this article the authors focus on the key insight s that emerged from their research, organized around five persistent "myths" tha t continue to haunt the innovation efforts of many companies. The five myths are : (1) The Eureka Moment; (2) Built It and They Will Come; (3) Open Innovation Is the Future; (4) Pay Is Paramount; and, (5) Bottom Up Innovation Is Best. Reprin t 52210. To order reprints of this article, see page 8. [Birkinshaw, J] London B usiness Sch, London, England; [Bouquet, C; Barsoux, JL] IMD, Lausanne, Switzerla nd Birkinshaw, J (reprint author), London Business Sch, London, England 16 0 0 SLOAN MANAGEMENT REVIEW ASSOC, MIT SLOAN SCHOOL MANAGEME NT CAMBRIDGE 77 MASSACHUSETTS AVE, E60-100, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139-4307 USA 1532-9194 MIT SLOAN MANAGE REV MIT Sloan Manage. Rev. WIN 2011 52 2 43 + 9 Business; Management Business & Economics 718KA WOS:0002 87118800007 J Zirpoli, F; Becker, MC Zirpoli, Francesco; Beck er, Markus C. What Happens When You Outsource Too Much? MIT SLOA N MANAGEMENT REVIEW English Article PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT; KNOWLEDGE; PERSPECTIVE; INTERFIRM In industry after indust ry, managers have taken deliberate steps to separate their value chains and shif t important activities and functions to outside suppliers. But what happens when companies become too dependent on outside suppliers and cede them too much cont rol when they lack the same degree of understanding and awareness about how impo rtant product or service elements fit together and what's necessary? How can the y go about reestablishing critical internal levers? These questions arose during a multiyear research project examining supply strategy relating to new product development at a major European automotive company. In the late 1980s, the compa ny - the authors call it Alpha - had direct supply relationships with more than

3,000 suppliers, most of them small companies that were involved in component pr oduction. In the early 1990s, however, management began shifting increasing amou nts of design and engineering work to suppliers - a trend that was hastened by t he proliferation of electronics in cars. By the mid-1990s, Alpha began to outsou rce the design of complete systems, such as dashboards, seats and safety systems . Alpha management hoped to increase flexibility, reduce lead times and cut deve lopment costs while improving product quality. But as the internal engineering t eams got smaller and less up to date on the specific design and technical issues , problems emerged with integrating systems and making decisions about trade-off s. The article examines the difference between integrating physical systems and integrating the performance of such systems. The authors found that successful n ew product development depends on three main factors: component-specific knowled ge; learning by doing; and technological renewal. Modular product architecture m ay make good sense for dealing with physical integration, but it is not adequate for resolving issues of performance. Reprint 52208. To order reprints of this a rticle, see page 8. [Zirpoli, F] Univ Ca Foscari, Venice, Italy; [Becker, MC ] Univ So Denmark, Strateg Org Design Unit, Odense, Denmark Zirpoli, F (repr int author), Univ Ca Foscari, Venice, Italy 10 0 0 SLOAN MANAGEMENT REVIEW ASSOC, MIT SLOAN SCHOOL MANAGEME NT CAMBRIDGE 77 MASSACHUSETTS AVE, E60-100, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139-4307 USA 1532-9194 MIT SLOAN MANAGE REV MIT Sloan Manage. Rev. WIN 2011 52 2 59 + 7 Business; Management Business & Economics 718KA WOS:0002 87118800009 J Suthersan, S; Nelson, D; Schnobrich, M Suthersa n, Suthan; Nelson, Denice; Schnobrich, Matthew Hybridized Design Concep ts and Their Application to ERD Systems GROUND WATER MONITORING AND REMEDIATION English Article SOURCE ZONES; TR ICHLOROETHENE; DISSOLUTION; REMOVAL Optimization of large-scale injection-ba sed remedial systems requires engineering to intentionally capitalize on the bio logical, chemical, and physical mechanisms that occur within and between the zon es of reagent application. These types of systems can be called hybrid designs a s they employ multiple processes to achieve remediation endpoints (Figure 1), re sulting in optimized system performance and a reduction in the overall life-cycl e cost. While all remedial applications incorporate these mechanisms to some ext ent, the importance of each of these processes is magnified in large-scale appli cations. This column discusses the dominant mechanisms responsible for mass redu ction within both source and distal plume footprints, with a focus on the applic ation of "Hybridized Design" for enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) systems . [Suthersan, S] ARCADIS US Inc, Environm Div, Newtown, PA 18940 USA; [Nel son, D] ARCADIS US, Bioremediat Serv, Minneapolis, MN 55401 USA; [Schnobrich, M] ARCADIS US, King Of Prussia, PA 19406 USA Suthersan, S (reprint author), A RCADIS US Inc, Environm Div, 6 Terry Dr,Suite 300, Newtown, PA 18940 USA suthan.suther-san@arcadis-us.com; denice.nelson@arcadis-us.com; matthew.schnobri ch@arcadis-us.com 15 1 1 WILEY-BL ACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA US A 1069-3629 GROUND WATER MONIT R Ground Water Monit. Reme diat. WIN 2011 31 1 45 49 10.1111/j.1745-6592.2011.01323.x 5 Water Resources Water Resources 723DR WOS:000287487000003 J Ahmed, MI; Elturabi, LDA Ahmed, M., I; El turabi, Abdella L. D. Sectoral Evaluation of EIA Practice in the Sudan INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH English Article EIA; Sudan; Environment; Policy; Management; Planning; Sustainability SYSTEM Environmental Impact Assessment (ETA) reports of projects in different developme nt sectors in Sudan (Agriculture, Roads and highways, Power generation, Oil prod uction, River engineering projects) were analyzed to investigate how these studi es corresponded with the local, regional, international and good practice requir ements. The results of the analysis illustrated some variations in the practice among the different sectors. Most of the practices failed in some major areas of

ETA such as: timing of EIA in the project cycle, alternative analysis, limited tools applied which in most cases were insufficient for specific projects, EMP i n most cases was not complete and was not considered in the cost-benefit analysi s, monitoring plan, poor public participations and bad interaction with the deci sion making process. Generic ETA report review process devaluated the monitoring plan and sustainability of the EIA mitigations. Advantageously, ETA practice is becoming more popular in Sudanese development planning and there are lots of ar guments about enhancing the legislation and regulations. However, common obstruc tions facing implementation of best EIA practices and compatibility with interna tional norms are; the legal, institutional and administrative frameworks; shortc oming of expert agencies and specialists, and other difficulties related to the data collection and measurement. [Ahmed, MI; Elturabi, LDA] Univ Khartoum , Fac Eng & Architecture, Civil Eng Dept, Khartoum, Sudan Ahmed, MI (repri nt author), Univ Khartoum, Fac Eng & Architecture, Civil Eng Dept, POB 321, Khar toum, Sudan ahmemoh@iit.edu University of Khartoum Consulting Corporation (U KCC) This paper is a part of an ongoing research effort by the first author f ocusing on EIA practice in the Sudan and the Nile basin countries at the departm ent Civil Eng., University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. The paper relied a grea t deal on the findings of the MSCE research thesis of the second author. The res earch has been supported by many national consulting firms in the field of envir onment in Sudan specially the University of Khartoum Consulting Corporation (UKC C) and the invaluable support of the HCENR in providing information and EIA stud ies and statistics. Dr Osman Mirghani Ali of the Institute of Environmental Stud ies, University of Khartoum, Sudan has provided many EIA reports and valuable As sistance. 20 0 0 UNIV TEHRAN TEHRAN GRADUATE FAC ENV, NO 20 GHODS ST, ENGHELAB AVE, PO BOX 14155-6135, TEHRAN, 00000, IRAN 1735-6865 INT J ENVIRON RES Int. J. Environ. Res. WIN 2011 5 1 189 + 16 Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences & Ecology 699SD WOS:000285682200020 J Knoester, DB; McKinley, PK Knoester, David B.; McKinley, Philip K. Evolution of Synchronization and Desynchronizati on in Digital Organisms ARTIFICIAL LIFE English Article Evolutionary computation; synchronization; desynchronization; cooperation; digit al evolution; Avida platform We present a study in the evolution of t emporal behavior, specifically synchronization and desynchronization, through di gital evolution and group selection. In digital evolution, a population of selfreplicating computer programs exists in a user-defined computational environment and is subject to instruction-level mutations and natural selection. Group sele ction links the survival of the individual to the survival of its group, thus en couraging cooperation. Previous approaches to engineering synchronization and de synchronization algorithms have taken inspiration from nature: In the well-known firefly model, the only form of communication between agents is in the form of flash messages among neighbors. Here we demonstrate that populations of digital organisms, provided with a similar mechanism and minimal information about their environment, are capable of evolving algorithms for synchronization and desynch ronization, and that the evolved behaviors are robust to message loss. We furthe r describe how the evolved behavior for synchronization mimics that of the wellknown Ermentrout model for firefly synchronization in biology. In addition to di scovering self-organizing behaviors for distributed computing systems, this resu lt indicates that digital evolution may be used to further our understanding of synchronization in biology. [Knoester, DB; McKinley, PK] Michigan State Univ , Dept Comp Sci & Engn, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA Knoester, DB (reprint author), M ichigan State Univ, Dept Comp Sci & Engn, 3115 Engn Bldg, E Lansing, MI 48824 US A dk@cse.msu.edu; mckinley@cse.msu.edu National Science Foundation[CNS0915855, CCF-0820220, CNS-0751155]; U.S. Army[W911NF-08-1-0495]; Michigan State University We thank the anonymous reviewers for their many thoughtful sugge stions on how to improve the manuscript. We also thank members of the Digital Ev olution Laboratory and the Software Engineering and Network Systems Laboratory f or their contributions to this work, including early feedback. This research was

supported in part by National Science Foundation grants CNS-0915855, CCF-082022 0, and CNS-0751155; by U.S. Army grant W911NF-08-1-0495; and by a Quality Fund g rant from Michigan State University. 39 1 1 MIT PRES S CAMBRIDGE 55 HAYWARD STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02142 USA 1064-546 2 ARTIF LIFE Artif. Life WIN 2011 17 1 1 20 10.1162/artl_a_00014 20 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Computer Science, Theory & Methods Computer Science 706BD WOS:000286188200001 J Balyasnikova, IV; Ferguson, SD; Han, Y; Liu, FF; Lesniak, MS Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Ferguson, Sherise D.; Han, Yu; Liu, Feifei; Lesniak, Mac iej S. Therapeutic effect of neural stem cells expressing TRAIL and bor tezomib in mice with glioma xenografts CANCER LETTERS English Article Neural stem cells; TRAIL; Bortezomib; Glioma; Brain cancer APOPTOSIS-INDUCI NG LIGAND; PROSTATE-CANCER CELLS; MALIGNANT GLIOMA; PROTEASOME INHIBITORS; ANTIT UMOR-ACTIVITY; SOLID TUMORS; TNF-FAMILY; IN-VIVO; RECEPTOR; BRAIN Treatmen t of glioblastoma remains a challenge in neuro-oncology. We investigated if trea tment with neural stem cells engineered to express membrane-bound TRAIL (NSCs-mT RAIL) alone or in combination with proteasome inhibitors is a feasible therapeut ic approach for experimental glioma. Glioma cells showed resistance to soluble T RAIL and proteasome inhibitors alone, but responded well to their combined treat ment. In co-culture with NSCs-mTRAIL, glioma cells appeared to be more prone to apoptosis than to treatment with soluble TRAIL, which was enhanced by proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. In vivo, the survival of animals bearing intracranial gli al xenografts was significantly improved by NSCs-mTRAIL. The addition of bortezo mib further enhanced the efficacy of NSCs-TRAIL treated group in one of examined tumor models. These data demonstrate that therapy with NSCs-mTRAIL is a potent cell based approach for treatment of glioma. Such an approach warrants further s earch for therapeutics capable of increasing sensitivity of glioma cells to mTRA IL in vivo. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [Balyasnikova, I V; Ferguson, SD; Han, Y; Liu, FF; Lesniak, MS] Univ Chicago, Brain Tumor Ctr, Ch icago, IL 60637 USA Lesniak, MS (reprint author), Univ Chicago, Brain Tumor Ctr, 5841 S Maryland Ave,MC 3026, Chicago, IL 60637 USA mlesniak@surgery.bsd.uch icago.edu NCI[R01CA122930, R01CA138587]; National Institute of Neurologica l Disorders and Stroke[U01NS069997]; American Cancer Society[RSG-07-276-01-MGO] This research was supported by the NCI (R01CA122930, R01CA138587), the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (U01NS069997), and the American C ancer Society (RSG-07-276-01-MGO). We thank Bart Thaci, MD for his assistance in performing animal surgery. 50 0 0 ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD CLARE ELSEVIER HOUSE, BROOKVALE PLAZA, EAST PARK SHANNON, CO, CLARE, 0 0000, IRELAND 0304-3835 CANCER LETT Cancer Lett. NOV 28 2011 310 2 148 159 10.1016/ j.canlet.2011.06.029 12 Oncology Oncology 820DA WOS:000294884500004 J Wilson, KE; Szechtman, R; Atkinson, MP Wilson, Kurt E.; Szechtman, Roberto; Atkinson, Michael P. A sequential per spective on searching for static targets EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPERATIONAL RESEARCH English Article Applied probability; OR in military; Sequential analysis WHEREABOUTS SEAR CH; OPTIMIZATION; SENSORS We present a sequential approach to detect stati c targets with imperfect sensors, which range from tower-mounted cameras to sate llites. The scenario is operationally relevant to many military, homeland securi ty, search and rescue, environmental engineering, counter-narcotics, and law enf orcement applications. The idea is to stop the search as soon as there is enough probabilistic evidence about the targets' locations, given an operator-prescrib ed error tolerance, knowledge of the sensors' parameters, and a sequence of dete ction signals from the sensors. By stopping the search as soon as possible, we p romote efficiency by freeing up sensors and operators to perform other tasks. Th e model we develop has the added benefits of decreasing operator workload and pr oviding negative information as a search progresses. Published by Elsevier B.V. [Wilson, KE; Szechtman, R; Atkinson, MP] USN, Postgrad Sch, Dept Operat Res, Mon

terey, CA 93943 USA Szechtman, R (reprint author), USN, Postgrad Sch, Dept O perat Res, Monterey, CA 93943 USA kurt.e.wilson@afghan.swa.army.mil; rszec htm@nps.edu; mpatkins@nps.edu 20 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLAN DS 0377-2217 EUR J OPER RES Eur. J. Oper. Res. NOV 16 2011 215 1 218 226 10.1016/ j.ejor.2011.05.045 9 Management; Operations Research & Management Science Business & Economics; Operations Research & Management S cience 813UC WOS:000294394700023 J Pareo, P; De Gregorio, GL; Manca, M; Pianesi, MS; De Marco, L; Cavallaro , F; Mari, M; Pappada, S; Ciccarella, G; Gigli, G Pareo, Paola; De Gregorio, Gian Luca; Manca, Michele; Pianesi, Maria Savina; De Marco, Luisa; Cavallaro, Francesco; Mari, Margherita; Pappada, Silvio; Ciccarell a, Giuseppe; Gigli, Giuseppe Ultra lightweight PMMA-based composite p lates with robust super-hydrophobic surfaces JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE English Article Composite materials; Fluoroacrylic polymers; Superhydrophobic surfaces; Easy-toclean effect SILICA NANOPARTICLES; MECHANICAL-BEHAVIOR; FILMS; NANOCOMPOSITES ; FABRICATION; WATER; SUPERHYDROPHOBICITY; METHACRYLATE); CONTACT; PLASMA Extremely lightweight plates made of an engineered PMMA-based composite material loaded with hollow glass micro-sized spheres, nano-sized silica particles and a luminum hydroxide prismatic micro-flakes were realized by cast molding. Their in teresting bulk mechanical properties were combined to properly tailored surface topography compatible with the achievement of a superhydrophobic behavior after the deposition of a specifically designed hydrophobic coating. With this aim, we synthesized two different species of fluoromethacrylic polymers functionalized with methoxysilane anchoring groups to be covalently grafted onto the surface pr otruding inorganic fillers. By modulating the feed composition of the reacting m onomers, it was possible to combine the hydrophobic character of the polymer wit h an high adhesion strength to the substrate and hence to maximize both the wate r contact angle (up to 157 degrees) and the durability of the easy-to-clean effe ct (up to 2000 h long outdoor exposure). (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reser ved. [Pareo, P; De Gregorio, GL; Manca, M; De Marco, L] Italian Inst Technol, CBN, I-73010 Lecce, Italy; [Ciccarella, G; Gigli, G] Univ Salento, NNL, CNR, Na nosci Inst, I-73100 Lecce, Italy; [Pianesi, MS; Cavallaro, F; Mari, M] TEUCO GUZ ZINI Spa, I-62010 Montelupone, MC, Italy; [Pappada, S] Consorzio CETMA, Dept Mat , Technol & Proc Area, I-72100 Brindisi, Italy; [Pappada, S] Consorzio CETMA, De pt Struct Engn, Technol & Proc Area, I-72100 Brindisi, Italy Manca, M (reprin t author), Italian Inst Technol, CBN, Via Barsanti, I-73010 Lecce, Italy michele.manca@iit.it TEUCO GUZZINI group This work has been partially sup ported by TEUCO GUZZINI group as an industrial partner. The authors thank Federi co Grisotto for the technical support in the GPC measurements, Carlo Sempio and Gianvito De Iaco for helpful discussions. 37 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0021-9797 J COLLOID INTERF SCI J. Colloid Interface Sci. NOV 15 2011 363 2 668 675 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.07.075 8 Chemistry, Physical Chemistry 824HL WOS:000295192900033 J DeLuca, S; Dorr, B; Meiler, J DeLuca, Samuel; Dorr, Brent; Meiler, Jens Design of Native-like Proteins through a n Exposure-Dependent Environment Potential BIOCHEMISTRY English Article We hypothesize t hat the degree of surface exposure of amino acid side chains within a globular, soluble protein has been optimized in evolution, not only to minimize the solvat ion free energy of the monomeric protein but also to prevent protein aggregation . This effect needs to be taken into account when engineering proteins de novo. We test this hypothesis through addition of a knowledge-based, exposure-dependen t energy term to the ROSETTADESIGN solvation potential [Lazaridis, T., and Karpl us, M. (1999) Proteins 35, Exposed vs 133-152]. Correlation between amino acid t ype and surface exposure is determined from a representative set of experimental

protein structures. The amino acid solvent accessible surface area (SASA) is es timated with a neighbor vector measure that increases in accuracy compared to th e neighbor count measure while remaining pairwise decomposable [Durham, E., et a l. (2009) J. Mol. Model. 15, 1093-1108]. Benchmarking of this potential in prote in design displays a 3.2% improvement in the overall sequence recovery and an 8. 5% improvement in recovery of amino acid types tolerated in evolution. Vanderbi lt Univ, Struct Biol Ctr, Dept Chem, Inst Biol Chem, Nashville, TN 37212 USA; Va nderbilt Univ, Struct Biol Ctr, Dept Pharmacol, Inst Biol Chem, Nashville, TN 37 212 USA; Vanderbilt Univ, Struct Biol Ctr, Dept Biomed Informat, Inst Biol Chem, Nashville, TN 37212 USA Meiler, J (reprint author), Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Chem, 5144B MRB 3 BioSci,465 21st Ave S, Nashville, TN 37232 USA jens.meiler@vanderbilt.edu Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA )[04 12] This work was supported by the Protein Design Project of the Def ense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA Grant 04 12). 12 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHIN GTON, DC 20036 USA 0006-2960 BIOCHEMISTRY-US Biochemistry NOV 11 2011 50 40 8521 8528 10.1021/bi200664b 8 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 828FU WOS:000295487700001 J He, CM; Neya, S; Knipp, M He, Chunmao; Ney a, Saburo; Knipp, Markus Breaking the Proximal Fe(II)-N(His) Bond in Heme Proteins through Local Structural Tension: Lessons from the Heme b Prot eins Nitrophorin 4, Nitrophorin 7, and Related Site-Directed Mutant Proteins BIOCHEMISTRY English Article SOLUBLE GUANYLATE-CYCLASE; RESONANCE RAMAN-SPECTROSCOPY; CYTOCHROME B(6)F COMPLE X; INSECT RHODNIUS-PROLIXUS; AXIAL LIGAND COMPLEXES; NITRIC-OXIDE COMPLEXES; X-R AY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DISTAL POCKET MUTANTS; HORSE HEART MYOGLOBIN; C-13 NMR-SPECT ROSCOPY The factors leading to the breakage of the proximal iron-histidine bond in the ferroheme protein soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) are still a matter of d ebate. This event is a key mechanism in the sensing of NO that leads to the prod uction of the second-messenger molecule cGMP. Surprisingly, in the heme protein nitrophorin 7 (NP7), we noticed by UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy that heme reduction leads to a loss of the proximal histidine coordination, which is not observed for the other isoproteins (NP1-4). Structur al considerations led to the generation and spectroscopic investigation of sitedirected mutants NP7(E27V), NP7(E27Q), NP4(D70A), and NP2(V24E). Spectroscopic i nvestigation of these proteins shows that the spatial arrangement of residues Gl u27, Phe43, and His60 in the proximal heme pocket of NP7 is the reason for the w eakened Fe(II)-His60 bond through steric demand. Spectroscopic investigation of the sample of NP7 reconstituted with 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin ("symmetric heme") demonstrated that the heme vinyl substituents are also responsible. Whereas the breaking of the iron-histidine bond is rarely seen among unliganded ferroheme p roteins, the breakage of the Fe(II)-His bond upon binding of NO to the sixth coo rdination site is sometimes observed because of the negative trans effect of NO. However, it is still rare among the heme proteins, which is in contrast to the case for trans liganded nitrosyl model hemes. Thus, the question of which factor s determine the Fe(II)-His bond labilization in proteins arises. Surprisingly, m utant NP2(V24E) turned out to be particularly similar in behavior to sGC; i.e., the Fe(II)-His bond is sensitive to breakage upon NO binding, whereas the unliga nded form binds the proximal His at neutral pH. To the best of our knowledge, NP 2(V24E) is the first example in which the ability to use the His-on <-> His-off switch was engineered into a heme protein by site-directed mutagenesis other tha n the proximal His itself. Steric tension is, therefore, introduced as a potenti al structural determinant for proximal Fe(II)-His bond breakage in heme proteins . [He, CM; Knipp, M] Max Planck Inst Bioanorgan Chem, D-45470 Mulheim An D er Ruhr, Germany; [Neya, S] Chiba Univ, Grad Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Dept Phys Chem, Chiba 2638522, Japan Knipp, M (reprint author), Max Planck Inst Bioanorgan Ch em, Stiftstr 34-36, D-45470 Mulheim An Der Ruhr, Germany mknipp@mpi-muelh eim.mpg.de Max Planck Society (MPG); Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)[ KN 951/1-1, KN 951/1-2] This work was financially supported by the Max Planck So

ciety (MPG) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), Grants KN 951/1-1 and -2 (to M.K.). 110 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0006-2960 BIOCHEMISTRY-US Biochemistry NOV 11 2011 50 40 8559 8575 10.1021/bi201073t 17 Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 828FU WOS:000295487700005 J Lim, KH; Huang, H; Pralle, A; Park, S Lim, Kok Hong; Huang, Heng; Pralle, Arnd; Park, Sheldon Engineered Streptavidin Monomer and Dimer with Improved Stability and Function BIOCHEMISTRY English Article BETA-SHEET PROPE NSITIES; BIOTIN-BINDING; PROTEIN STABILITY; SUBUNIT ASSOCIATION; MOLECULAR-DYNAM ICS; SALT BRIDGES; AMINO-ACIDS; AVIDIN; AFFINITY; SURFACE Although strepta vidin's high affinity for biotin has made it a widely used and studied binding p rotein and labeling tool, its tetrameric structure may interfere with some assay s. A streptavidin mutant with a simpler quaternary structure would demonstrate a molecular-level understanding of its structural organization and lead to the de velopment of a novel molecular reagent. However, modulating the tetrameric struc ture without disrupting biotin binding has been extremely difficult. In this stu dy, we describe the design of a stable monomer that binds biotin both in vitro a nd in vivo. To this end, we constructed and characterized monomers containing ra tionally designed mutations. The mutations improved the stability of the monomer (increase in T(m) from 31 to 47 degrees C) as well as its affinity (increase in K(d) from 123 to 38 nM). We also used the stability-improved monomer to constru ct a dimer consisting of two streptavidin subunits that interact across the dime r dimer interface, which we call the AID dimer. The biotin binding pocket is con served between the tetramer and the AID dimer, and therefore, the dimer is expec ted to have a significantly higher affinity than the monomer. The affinity of th e dimer (K(d) = 17 nM) is higher than that of the monomer but is still many orde rs of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type tetramer, which suggests there are other factors important for high-affinity biotin binding. We show that the e ngineered streptavidin monomer and dimer can selectively bind biotinylated targe ts in vivo by labeling the cells displaying biotinylated receptors. Therefore, t he designed mutants may be useful in novel applications as well as in future stu dies in elucidating the role of oligomerization in streptavidin function. [Lim, KH; Park, S] SUNY Buffalo, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA; [ Huang, H; Pralle, A] SUNY Buffalo, Dept Phys, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA Park, S (reprint author), SUNY Buffalo, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, 905 Furnas Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA sjpark6@buffalo.edu NSF[1053608, DBI 0923133] We thank Cheng Kuo Hsu for assistance with the characterization of A/D dimer. The work w as supported in part by the NSF CAREER grant to SP (#1053608). The Zeiss LSM 710 "In Tune" Confocal Microscope used for imaging was purchased through NSF Major Research Instrumentation grant #DBI 0923133. 52 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 U SA 0006-2960 BIOCHEMISTRY-US Biochemistry NOV 11 2011 50 40 8682 8691 10.1021/bi201036 6 10 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology 828FU WOS:000295487700017 J Little, MA; Jones, NS Little, Max A.; Jones, N ick S. Generalized methods and solvers for noise removal from piecewise constant signals. II. New methods PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHE MATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES English Article edge; jump; shift; step; change; level MOLECULE FRET TRAJECTORIES; REGULARIZATI ON; OPTIMIZATION; WAVELETS; SPLINES; MODELS Removing noise from signals whic h are piecewise constant (PWC) is a challenging signal processing problem that a rises in many practical scientific and engineering contexts. In the first paper (part I) of this series of two, we presented background theory building on resul ts from the image processing community to show that the majority of these algori thms, and more proposed in the wider literature, are each associated with a spec ial case of a generalized functional, that, when minimized, solves the PWC denoi

sing problem. It shows how the minimizer can be obtained by a range of computati onal solver algorithms. In this second paper (part II), using this understanding developed in part I, we introduce several novel PWC denoising methods, which, f or example, combine the global behaviour of mean shift clustering with the local smoothing of total variation diffusion, and show example solver algorithms for these new methods. Comparisons between these methods are performed on synthetic and real signals, revealing that our new methods have a useful role to play. Fin ally, overlaps between the generalized methods of these two papers and others su ch as wavelet shrinkage, hidden Markov models, and piecewise smooth filtering ar e touched on. [Little, MA; Jones, NS] Univ Oxford, Dept Phys, Oxford OX1 2JD, England; [Little, MA; Jones, NS] Univ Oxford, Oxford Ctr Integrat Syst Biol, Oxf ord OX1 2JD, England; [Little, MA] MIT, Media Lab, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; [Jon es, NS] Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Math, London SW7 2AZ, England Little, MA (reprint author), Univ Oxford, Dept Phys, Oxford OX1 2JD, Eng land max.little@physics.ox.ac.uk Wellcome Trust-MIT[WT090651MF]; BBSRC/EP SRC[BBD0201901, EP/H046917/1, EP/I005765/1, EP/I005986/1] Thanks to John A ston for comments. M.A.L. is funded through Wellcome Trust-MIT postdoctoral fell owship grant number WT090651MF, and BBSRC/EPSRC grant number BBD0201901. N.S.J. thanks the EPSRC and BBSRC and acknowledges grants EP/H046917/1, EP/I005765/1 an d EP/I005986/1. 43 0 0 ROYAL SOC LONDON 6-9 CARL TON HOUSE TERRACE, LONDON SW1Y 5AG, ENGLAND 1364-5021 P ROY SO C A-MATH PHY Proc. R. Soc. A-Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. NOV 8 2011 467 2135 3115 3140 10.1098/rspa.2010.0674 26 Multidisciplinary Sciences Science & Technology - Other Top ics 825ES WOS:000295254400004 J Wells, PNT; Liang, HD Wells, Peter N. T.; Lian g, Hai-Dong Medical ultrasound: imaging of soft tissue strain and el asticity JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE English Review medical ultrasound; ultrasonic imaging; tissue palpation; soft tissue; ultrasoni c elastography; strain in tissue ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE; TO-NOISE RATIO ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY; INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND; REAL-TIME SONOE LASTOGRAPHY; IN-VIVO; TRANSIENT ELASTOGRAPHY; EX-VIVO; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; VI BRO-ACOUSTOGRAPHY After X-radiography, ultrasound is now the most common o f all the medical imaging technologies. For millennia, manual palpation has been used to assist in diagnosis, but it is subjective and restricted to larger and more superficial structures. Following an introduction to the subject of elastic ity, the elasticity of biological soft tissues is discussed and published data a re presented. The basic physical principles of pulse-echo and Doppler ultrasonic techniques are explained. The history of ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue stra in and elasticity is summarized, together with a brief critique of previously pu blished reviews. The relevant techniques-low-frequency vibration, step, freehand and physiological displacement, and radiation force (displacement, impulse, she ar wave and acoustic emission)-are described. Tissue-mimicking materials are ind ispensible for the assessment of these techniques and their characteristics are reported. Emerging clinical applications in breast disease, cardiology, dermatol ogy, gastroenterology, gynaecology, minimally invasive surgery, musculoskeletal studies, radiotherapy, tissue engineering, urology and vascular disease are crit ically discussed. It is concluded that ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is now sufficiently well developed to have clinical utility. The potential for further research is examined and it is anticipated that the techno logy will become a powerful mainstream investigative tool. [Wells, PNT; Lia ng, HD] Cardiff Univ, Sch Engn, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales; [Liang, HD] Uni v Hosp Bristol NHS Fdn Trust, Bristol Gen Hosp, Dept Med Phys & Bioengn, Bristol BS1 6SY, Avon, England Wells, PNT (reprint author), Cardiff Univ, Sch Engn, Que ens Bldg, Cardiff CF24 3AA, S Glam, Wales wellspn@cardiff.ac.uk 258 0 1 ROYAL SOC LONDON 6-9 CARLTON HOUSE TERRACE, LONDO N SW1Y 5AG, ENGLAND 1742-5689 J R SOC INTERFACE J. R. So c. Interface NOV 7 2011 8 64 1521 1549 10.1098/rsif.2011.0054 29 Multidisciplinar y Sciences Science & Technology - Other Topics 824OJ WOS:000295211200

001 J Pled, F; Chamoin, L; Ladeveze, P Pled, F. ; Chamoin, L.; Ladeveze, P. On the techniques for constructing admis sible stress fields in model verification: Performances on engineering examples INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING English Article verification; finite element met hod; admissible stress field; non-intrusive techniques; strict error bounds A-POSTERIORI ERROR; FINITE-ELEMENT METHODS; VISCOELASTICITY PROBLEMS; LINEAR ELA STICITY; ELLIPTIC PROBLEMS; LOCAL QUANTITIES; BOUNDS; ESTIMATORS; STRICT; MECHAN ICS Robust global/goal-oriented error estimation is used nowadays to control the approximate finite element (FE) solutions obtained from simulation. In the context of computational mechanics, the construction of admissible stress fields (i.e. stress tensors which verify the equilibrium equations) is required to set up strict and guaranteed error bounds (using residual-based error estimators) a nd plays an important role in the quality of the error estimates. This work focu ses on the different procedures used in the calculation of admissible stress fie lds, which is a crucial and technically complicated point. The three main techni ques that currently exist, called the element equilibration technique (EET), the star-patch equilibration technique (SPET), and the element equilibration+star-p atch technique (EESPT), are investigated and compared with respect to three diff erent criteria, namely the quality of associated error estimators, computational cost, and easiness of practical implementation into commercial FE codes. The nu merical results that are presented focus on industrial problems; they highlight the main advantages and drawbacks of the different methods and show that the beh avior of the three estimators, which have the same convergence rate as the exact global error, is consistent. 2D and 3D experiments have been carried out in ord er to compare the performance and the computational cost of the three different approaches. The analysis of the results reveals that the SPET is more accurate t han EET and EESPT methods, but the corresponding computational cost is higher. O verall, the numerical tests prove the interest of the hybrid method EESPT and sh ow that it is a correct compromise between the quality of the error estimate, pr actical implementation and computational cost. Furthermore, the influence of the cost function involved in the EET and the EESPT is studied in order to optimize the estimators. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [Pled, F; Chamoi n, L; Ladeveze, P] Univ Paris 06, CNRS, ENS Cachan, LMT Cachan, F-94235 Cachan, France Ladeveze, P (reprint author), Univ Paris 06, CNRS, ENS Cachan, LMT Cacha n, 61 Ave President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan, France ladeveze@lmt.ens-cachan. fr 42 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0029-5981 INT J NUMER METH ENG Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. NOV 4 2011 88 5 409 441 10.1002/nme.3180 33 Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Mathematics, Interdisciplinary A pplications Engineering; Mathematics 824UD WOS:000295226800001 J Chen, J; Innes, JL; Kozak, RA Chen, Juan; Inne s, John L.; Kozak, Robert A. An exploratory assessment of the attitud es of Chinese wood products manufacturers towards forest certification JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT English Article Forest certification; China; Forest products; Wood products WILLINGNESS-TO-P AY; ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION; CONSUMER PERSPECTIVE; SUPPLYING COUNTRIES; PRIC E PREMIUMS; UNITED-STATES; MARKET; US; IMPACTS; FURNITURE Interviews with Chinese forest products manufacturers were conducted to explore their attitudes towards forest certification and related issues. Participants comprised owners, CEOs, and managers in 20 Chinese wood products companies, including producers of furniture, doors, flooring, and various engineered wood products. The interview s were used to analyze the extent to which participants were considering adoptin g forest certification and what might motivate such a decision. This was done by assessing their awareness and knowledge of certification. The results indicated that participants' understanding of forest certification was extremely low, des pite major efforts in China to raise awareness of the issue. Potential economic benefits were the most frequently cited reason to adopt certification, including

gaining or maintaining competitive advantage over their industry counterparts, improved access to both domestic and export markets, better customer recognition , and enhanced corporate responsibility practices. Some interviewees (3 out of 2 0) considered that certification would become a mandatory requirement or industr y standard, and that this would be the only viable motivation for certification given that the financial benefits were potentially limited. According to the par ticipants, the main differences between certified and uncertified wood products operations related to improved market access and public image. Interviewees felt that cooperation between and support from governments and the forest industry w ould enable the enhanced awareness of certification amongst manufacturers and th e general public. This, in turn, could serve to stimulate demand for certified p roducts. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Chen, J; Innes, JL; Koz ak, RA] Univ British Columbia, Fac Forestry, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Chen, J (reprint author), Univ British Columbia, Fac Forestry, 2045-2424 Main Ma ll, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada candice10933@yahoo.ca; john.innes@ubc.ca ; rob.kozak@ubc.ca Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canad a Support for this work is gratefully acknowledged from the Social Science s and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The authors would also like to than k two anonymous reviewers for providing comments that helped to improve our manu script. 79 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD LONDON 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND 0301-4797 J ENVIRO N MANAGE J. Environ. Manage. NOV 2011 92 11 2984 2992 10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.07.012 9 Environmental Sciences; Environmental Studies Environmental Sciences & Ecology 825RK WOS:000295299600016 J Laszlo, JA; Yu, Y; Lutz, S; Compton, DL Laszlo, Joseph A.; Yu, Ying; Lutz, Stefan; Compton, David L. Glycerol acyl-tr ansfer kinetics of a circular permutated Candida antarctica lipase B JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR CATALYSIS B-ENZYMATIC English Article Glycerolysis; Transesterification; Specific activity; Enzyme engineering; Circul ar permutation BIODIESEL FUEL PRODUCTION; ENZYMATIC-SYNTHESIS; FATTY-ACID; TRAN SESTERIFICATION; ESTERIFICATION; BIOCATALYST; OIL; ESTERS; LIPIDS Triacylg lycerols containing a high abundance of unusual fatty acids, such as gamma-linol enic acid, or novel arylaliphatic acids, such as ferulic acid, are useful in pha rmaceutical and cosmeceutical applications. Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) i s quite often used for non-aqueous synthesis, although the wildtype enzyme can b e rather slow with bulky and sterically hindered acyl donor substrates. The cata lytic performance of a circularly permutated variant of CALB, cp283, with variou s acyl donors and glycerol was examined. In comparison to wild-type CALB, butyl oleate and ethyl gamma-linolenate glycerolysis rates were 2.2- and 4.0-fold grea ter, respectively. Cp283 showed substrate inhibition by glycerol, which was not the case with the wild-type version. With either ethyl ferulate or vinyl ferulat e acyl donors, cp283 matched the performance of wild-type CALB. Changes in activ e site accessibility resulting from circular permutation led to increased cataly tic rates for bulky fatty acid esters but did not overcome the steric hindrance or energetic limitations experienced by arylaliphatic esters. Published by Elsev ier B.V. [Laszlo, JA; Compton, DL] ARS, USDA, Natl Ctr Agr Utilizat Res, Peoria, IL 61604 USA; [Yu, Y; Lutz, S] Emory Univ, Dept Chem, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA Laszlo, JA (reprint author), ARS, USDA, Natl Ctr Agr Utilizat Res, 1815 N Univ St, Peoria, IL 61604 USA Joe.Laszlo@ars.usda.gov Biotechnology Research a nd Development Corporation; US National Science Foundation[CBET-0730312]; Americ an Chemical Society[PRF 47135-AC1] Leslie Smith (NCAUR) provided valuable t echnical support for this research. This work was supported in part by funding f rom the Biotechnology Research and Development Corporation (to J.A.L. and D.L.C. ), US National Science Foundation (CBET-0730312 to S.L.), and the Petroleum Rese arch Fund by the American Chemical Society (PRF 47135-AC1 to S.L.). These organi zations did not contribute to the study design, data collection, analysis and in terpretation, or writing of the report. 33 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 1381-1177 J MOL CATAL B-ENZYM J. Mol. Catal. B-Enzym. NOV

2011 72 3-4 175 180 10.1016/ j.molcatb.2011.06.002 6 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Chemistry, Physical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry 825RM WOS:000295299800015 J Kotzia, GA; Labrou, NE Kotzia, Georgia A.; Labr ou, Nikolaos E. Engineering substrate specificity of E. carotovora L-asp araginase for the development of biosensor JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR CATALYSIS B -ENZYMATIC English Article L-Asparaginase; Hydrolase; Enzyme engineering; Leukemia; Substrate specificity; Directed evolution; Biosensor GUINEA PIG SERUM; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA; CHRYSANTHEMI L-ASPARAGINASE; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; ERWINIA ASPARAGINASE; ACRYLAMIDE FORMATION; DIRECTED EVOLUTION; AMINO-ACIDS; EXPRESSION; MUTAGENESIS L-Aspara ginase (E.C.3.5.1.1, L-ASNase) is an enzyme extensively used as an anti-neoplast ic agent in the chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the prese nt study, we report the use of in vitro directed evolution for the creation of a new L-ASNase variant lacking glutaminase activity. A library of enzyme variants was constructed by staggered extension process (StEp) using the genes that code for the L-ASNases from Erwinia chrysanthemy (ErL-ASNase) and Erwinia carotovora (EcaL-ASNase) and screened using activity assays. A variant of the E. carotovor a enzyme lacking detectable glutaminase activity was identified. Sequence analys is showed that this variant contained a single point mutation (Leu71lle). Steady -state kinetic measurements and the analysis of the pH dependence of V(max) and V(max)/K(m) of L-Asn hydrolysis showed that the mutation causes significant alte rations in binding and catalytic properties. Analysis of the molecular model of the mutant enzyme showed that Ile71 may perturb the conformation of important am ino acid residues in the linker region which directly affects the catalytic func tion. The Leu71lle mutant enzyme was used to assemble a cuvette-based biosensor specific for L-Asn. The enzyme was immobilized by crosslinking with glutaraldehy de on the side of a transparent plastic cuvette. The sensing scheme was based on the colorimetric measurement of ammonia formation using the Nessler's reagent. Calibration curve was obtained for L-Asn, with useful concentration range of 0-1 00 mu M for L-Asn. The method's reproducibility was in the order of +/-2-5% and L-Asn recoveries were 102.1%. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Kotzia, GA; Labrou, NE] Agr Univ Athens, Dept Agr Biotechnol, Lab Enzyme Techno l, Athens 11855, Greece Labrou, NE (reprint author), Agr Univ Athens, Dept Agr B iotechnol, Lab Enzyme Technol, Iera Odos 75, Athens 11855, Greece Lambrou@ aua.gr Hellenic General Secretariat for Research and Technology This wor k was partially supported by the Hellenic General Secretariat for Research and T echnology: Operational Programme for Competitiveness, Joint Research and Technol ogy Programmes. 45 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDA M PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 1381-1177 J MOL CATAL B-ENZYM J. Mol. Catal. B-Enzym. NOV 2011 72 3-4 95 101 10.1016/j.molcatb.2011.05.003 7 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry, Physical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry 825RM WOS:000295299800003 J Lam, TT; Fong, E Lam, Tung T.; Fong, Ed Application of solution structure theorem to non-Fourier heat conduction problem s: Analytical approach INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER English Article Solution structure theor em; Superposition principle; Fourier series theory; Cattaneo-Vernotte model; Las er interaction FINITE MEDIUM; PROPAGATION; PULSE; RADIATION; EQUATION; DAMAGE This study presents an analytical method which combines the superposition techni que along with the solution structure theorem such that a closed-form solution o f the hyperbolic heat conduction (HHC) equation can be obtained using fundamenta l mathematics. The method is applied to investigate two one-dimensional HHC prob lems with different boundary and initial conditions to study the effect of spati ally-decaying and time-varying laser incidence at the surface. The methodology p rovides a convenient, accurate, and efficient solution to the HHC equation, whic h is applicable to a variety of HHC analyses for various engineering application s. The examples presented in this study can be used as benchmark problems for fu

ture numerical method validations. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Lam, TT; Fong, E] Aerosp Corp, El Segundo, CA 90245 USA Lam, TT (reprint author), Aerosp Corp, El Segundo, CA 90245 USA tung.t.lam@aero.org; ed.fong@aer o.org 28 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN D 0017-9310 INT J HEAT MASS TRAN Int. J. Heat Mass Transf . NOV 2011 54 23-24 4796 4806 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2011.06.028 11 Thermody namics; Engineering, Mechanical; Mechanics Thermodynamics; Engineering; Mec hanics 823IO WOS:000295115900003 J Ghommem, M; Balasubramanian, G; Hajj, MR; Wong, WP; Tomlin, JA; Puri, IK Ghommem, Mehdi; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Wong, William P.; To mlin, Jennifer A.; Puri, Ishwar K. Release of stored thermochemical energy from dehydrated salts INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER English Article Thermochemical reaction; Energy storage; Salt hydrates; Sensitivity analysis; Polynomial chaos expansion POLYNOMIAL CHAOS; HEAT-CONDUCTION; THERMAL STORAGE; UNCERTAINTY; ZEOLITES Thermochemical materials, particularly salt hydrates, have significant potential for use in thermal energy storage applications. When a salt hydrate is heated t o a threshold temperature, a chemical reaction is initiated to dissociate it int o its anhydrous form and water vapor. The anhydrous salt stores the sensible ene rgy that was supplied for dehydration, which can be later extracted by allowing cooler water or water vapor to flow through the salt, transforming the stored en ergy into sensible heat. We model the heat release that occurs during a thermoch emical hydration reaction using relations for mass and energy conservation, and for chemical kinetics and stoichiometry. A set of physically significant dimensi onless parameters reduces the number of design variables. Through a robust sensi tivity analysis, we identify those parameters from this group that more signific antly influence the performance of the heat release process, namely a modified D amkohler number, the thermochemical heat capacity, and the heat flux and flowrat e. There is a strong nonlinear relationship between these parameters and the pro cess efficiency. The optimization of the efficiency with respect to the paramete rs provides guidance for designing engineering solutions in terms of material se lection and system properties. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Ghommem, M; Balasubramanian, G; Hajj, MR; Puri, IK] Virginia Tech, Dept Engn Sc i & Mech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA; [Wong, WP] Sci Applicat Int Corp, Ottawa, ON K1P 5Y7, Canada; [Tomlin, JA] Sci Applicat Int Corp, Blacksburg, VA 24060 USA Puri, IK (reprint author), 223A Norris Hall,MC 0219, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA ikpuri@vt.edu 27 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0017-9310 INT J HEAT MASS TRAN Int. J. Heat Mas s Transf. NOV 2011 54 23-24 4856 4863 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2011.06.041 8 Thermodynamics; Engineering, Mechanical; Mechanics Thermodynamics; Engineer ing; Mechanics 823IO WOS:000295115900009 J Skedros, JG; Brand, RA Skedros, John G.; Brand, Richard A. Biographical Sketch: Georg Hermann von Meyer (1815-1892) CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH English Biographical-Ite m This biographica l sketch on Georg Hermann von Meyer highlights the interactions in the 1860s tha t von Meyer, a famous anatomist, had with Karl Culmann, a famous structural engi neer and mathematician. The published papers from this interaction caught the at tention of Julius Wolff and stimulated his development of the trajectorial hypot hesis of bone adaptation-now called "Wolff's Law." The corresponding translation s are provided: (1) von Meyer's 1867 paper that highlights the regularity of arc hed trabecular patterns in various human bones, and his discussions with Culmann about their possible mechanical relevance; and (2) Wolff's 1869 paper that firs t mentions the correspondence of stress trajectories in a solid, crane-like stru cture to the arched trabecular patterns in the proximal human femur. This biogra phical sketch on Georg Hermann von Meyer corresponds to the historic texts, The

Classic: The Architecture of the Trabecular bone (by von Meyer), and The Classic : On the Significance of the Architecture of the Spongy Substance for the Questi on of Bone Growth. A preliminary publication (by Wolff) available at DOIs 10.100 7/s11999-011-2041-5, 10.1007/s11999-011-2042-4. [Skedros, JG; Brand, RA] Clin Or thopaed & Related Res, Philadelphia, PA 19103 USA Brand, RA (reprint autho r), Clin Orthopaed & Related Res, 1600 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19103 USA dick.brand@clinorthop.org 0 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0009-921 X CLIN ORTHOP RELAT R Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res. NOV 2011 469 11 3072 3076 10.1007/s11999-0 11-2040-6 5 Orthopedics; Surgery Orthopedics; Sur gery 827FY WOS:000295415000015 J von Meyer, GH von Meyer, Georg Hermann The Classic: The Architecture of the Trabecular Bone (Tenth Contribution on the Mechanics of the Human Skeletal Framework) CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATE D RESEARCH English Reprint Hermann von Meyer may rightfully be considered the original proposer of the conc ept of trabecular architecture following patterns suggesting the directions of p rinciple compressive and tensile stresses in a similarly shaped trabecular struc ture. Until the mid 19th Century, few had observed trabecular architecture, and when depicted was generally considered to have little regularity. In the 1830s B ourgery, Ward, and Wyman independently described the regularity of trabecular ar chitecture, but according to Koch (1917) the proposed explanations were in error or overly simplified. Karl Culmann, an engineer and the developer of "graphic s tatics," attended a lecture of von Meyer and made the connection, which was then developed by the latter in this seminal paper. We present the paper in translat ion here. The original German article entitled "Die Architectur der Spongiosa" w as often written in long, cumbersome sentences, with sometimes obscure meanings. We have taken considerable license in translating, rearranging punctuation, and condensing the material into modern terminology and style, while attempting to maintain the flavor of von Meyer's writing. We thank Dr. Per K. Amundson for the original translation; Drs. John Skedros and Richard Brand made additional sugge stions. An accompanying biographical sketch of Hermann von Meyer is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-011-2040-6. corr@clinorthop.org 1 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0009-921X CLIN ORTHOP RELAT R Clin. Orthop. Re l. Res. NOV 2011 469 11 3079 3084 10.1007/s11999-011-2042-4 6 Orthopedics; Surgery Orthopedics; Surgery 827FY WOS:000295415000017 J Ball, MD; Bonzani, IC; Bovis, MJ; Williams, A; Stevens, MM Ball, Michael D.; Bonzani, Ian C.; Bovis, Melissa J.; Williams, Andrew; Stevens, Molly M. Human Periosteum Is a Source of Cells for Orthopaedic Ti ssue Engineering: A Pilot Study CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH English Article HUMAN-BONE-MARRO W; MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; ADULT HUMAN BONE; IN-VITRO; PROGENITOR CELLS; TRANSFO RMING GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA-1; STROMAL CELLS; CFU-F; CHONDROGENESIS; GROWTH Periosteal cells are important in embryogenesis, fracture healing, and cartilage repair and could provide cells for osteochondral tissue engineering. We determi ned whether a population of cells isolated from human periosteal tissue contains cells with a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) phenotype and whether these cells can be expanded in culture and used to form tissue in vitro. We obtained periosteal tissue from six patients. Initial expression of cell surface markers was assesse d using flow cytometry. Cells were cultured over 10 generations and changes in g ene expression evaluated to assess phenotypic stability. Phenotype was confirmed using flow cytometry and colony-forming ability assays. Mineral formation was a ssessed by culturing Stro-1(-) and unsorted cells with osteogenic supplements. T hree cell culture samples were used for a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, four for flow cytometry, three for colony-forming assay, and three fo r mineralization. Primary cultures, containing large numbers of hematopoietic ce lls were replaced initially by Stro-1 and ALP-expressing immature osteoblastic c

ell types and later by ALP-expressing cells, which lacked Stro-1 and which becam e the predominant cell population during subculture. Approximately 10% of the to tal cell population continued to express markers for Stro1(+)/ALP(-) cells throu ghout. These data suggest periosteum contains a large number of undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into neotissue and persist despite culture in nonc ell-specific media for over 10 passages. Cultured periosteal cells may contribut e to tissue formation and may be applicable for tissue engineering applications. [Ball, MD; Bonzani, IC; Bovis, MJ; Stevens, MM] Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Te chnol & Med, Dept Mat, Royal Sch Mines, London SW7 2AZ, England; [Bonzani, IC; S tevens, MM] Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Inst Biomed Engn, Londo n SW7 2AZ, England; [Williams, A] Chelsea & Westminster Healthcare NHS Trust, Lo ndon, England Stevens, MM (reprint author), Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Tech nol & Med, Dept Mat, Royal Sch Mines, London SW7 2AZ, England m.stevens@imperi al.ac.uk EPSRC[EP/C520742/1]; Leverhulme Trust; Marshall Aid Commemoratio n Commission; British Association of the Knee One or more of the authors (MMS) received funding from EPSRC (grant number EP/C520742/1) and the Leverhulme Trus t. One of the authors (ICB) received funding from the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission. One of the authors (AW) received funding from the British Associati on of the Knee. 48 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0009-921X CLIN ORTHOP RELA T R Clin. Orthop. Rel. Res. NOV 2011 469 11 3085 3093 10.1007/s11999-011-1895-x 9 Orthopedics; Surgery Orthopedics; Surgery 827FY WOS:000295415000018 J Silva, J Silva, Josep A survey on algorithmic debugging strategies ADVANCES IN ENGINEERING SOFTWARE English Article Debugging; Algorithmic d ebugging; Algorithmic debugging strategy; Divide & query; Execution tree; Softwa re engineering Algorithmic debugging is a debugging technique that has been extended to practically all programming paradigms. Roughly speaking, the te chnique constructs an internal representation of all (sub)computations performed during the execution of a buggy program; and then, it asks the programmer about the correctness of such computations. The answers of the programmer guide the s earch for the bug until it is isolated by discarding correct parts of the progra m. After twenty years of research in algorithmic debugging many different techni ques have appeared to improve the original proposal. Surprisingly, no study exis ts that joins together all these techniques and compares their advantages and th eir performance. This article presents a study that compares all current algorit hmic debugging techniques and analyzes their differences and their costs. The re search identifies the dimensions on which each strategy relies. This information allows us to combine the strong points of different strategies. (c) 2011 Elsevi er Ltd. All rights reserved. Univ Politecn Valencia, DSIC, Valencia 46022, Sp ain Silva, J (reprint author), Univ Politecn Valencia, DSIC, Camino Vera S-N , Valencia 46022, Spain jsilva@dsic.upv.es Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion[TIN2008-06622-C03-02]; Generalitat Valenciana[PROMETEO/2011/052] This work has been partially supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e In novacion under Grant TIN2008-06622-C03-02 and by the Generalitat Valenciana unde r Grant PROMETEO/2011/052. 29 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0965-9978 ADV ENG SOFTW Adv. Eng. Softw. NOV 2011 42 11 976 991 10.1016/j.adveng soft.2011.05.024 16 Computer Science, Interdisciplin ary Applications; Computer Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 826KM WOS:000295353000009 J Yang, DY; Yang, JW; Lu, FG; Li, CH; Yang, JB; Liang, JL Yang, Dongye; Yang, Junwen; Lu, Fanggen; Li, Caihong; Yang, Jingbo; Liang, Jieli ng A new membrane re-anchored protein originating from GPC3 against hepatoma cells HepG2 MOLECULAR MEDICINE REPORTS English Article strong epitope hAFP(542-550); glypican 3; protein engineering; localization; ant i-HepG2 HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA; ALPHA-FETOPROTEIN; GLYPICAN-3; RESPONSES; MARK ER The aim of this study was to confirm the localization of recombinant pGP

C3+afp-EGFP which expressed a new re-anchored protein named GPC3+afp-EGFP on the cytoplasmic membrane and to investigate its functions against hepatocellular ca rcinoma (HCC). EGFP expression in transfected HepG2 cells was observed using flu orescence and a confocal microscope. pGPC3+afp-EGFP expression was detected in m embranous and soluble proteins extracted from transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells by Western blot analysis using GPC3 mAb. The proliferation of transfe cted HepG2 cells with pGPC3+afp-EGFP (experimental group) was detected using SRB assay and compared to those of transfected HepG2 cells with pGPC3 (control grou p) and non-transfected HepG2 cells (blank group). Quantitative analysis of mRNA expression of the Fas gene was conducted by real-time PCR using the beta-actin h ousekeeping gene as the internal control at variable times. Apoptotic HepG2 cell s in the three groups were counted and statistically analyzed by a contingency t able Chi-square test using Spss 11.5 software and TUNEL assay. Production of bot h TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma/IL2 was detected by ELISPOT after co-cultivation of tr ansfected HepG2 cells with peripheral blood lymphocytes at different time-points in the experimental group. Green fluorescence was mainly found around the trans fected HepG2 cell periphery through fluorescence and confocal microscopy. GPC3+a fp-EGFP could not be detected in soluble protein but only in membranous protein. Proliferation curves showed that the proliferative quantities of transfected He pG2 cells in the experimental group decreased, whereas the mRNA expression of th e Fas gene increased significantly compared to those of the other two groups. Th e numbers of apoptotic cells in the experimental group were significantly higher compared to those in the other two groups, as shown by statistical analysis. Bo th TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma/IL2 were induced and were much higher in the experime ntal groups than in the diverse control groups at variable times. A new re-ancho red protein GPC3+afp-EGFP expressed by recombinant pGPC3+afp-EGFP was localized on the cytoplasmic membrane, and had multiple functions against HCC, such as inh ibition of transfected HepG2 cell proliferation, promotion of transfected HepG2 apoptosis and induction of antitumor cytokine excretion. [Yang, DY; Yang, JW; Lu, FG; Li, CH; Yang, JB; Liang, JL] Cent S Univ, XiangYa Hosp 2, Dept Dige st Dis, Changsha 410011, Hunan, Peoples R China Yang, DY (reprint author), Cent S Univ, XiangYa Hosp 2, Dept Digest Dis, 139 Renmin Middle Rd, Changsha 410011, Hunan, Peoples R China dongyeyang@yahoo.com.cn National Science Foundation of C hina[30500239, 81072037] This study was supported by grants from the Nati onal Science Foundation of China (No. 30500239 and No. 81072037), and carried ou t partly in the National Laboratory of Medical Genetics of China. The authors si ncerely thank academician Xia Jia-hui and everyone in the laboratory for their k ind assistance. 18 0 0 SPANDIDOS PUBL LTD ATHENS POB 18179, ATHENS, 116 10, GREECE 1791-2997 MOL MED REP Mol. Med. Rep. NOV-DEC 2011 4 6 1067 1073 10.3892/mmr.2011.536 7 Oncology; Medici ne, Research & Experimental Oncology; Research & Experimental Medicine 826XR WOS:000295389400005 J Liu, BL; Li, XH; Liang, GQ; Liu, XX Liu, Bol ing; Li, Xihai; Liang, Guiqing; Liu, Xianxiang VEGF expression in mesen chymal stem cells promotes bone formation of tissue-engineered bones MOLECULA R MEDICINE REPORTS English Article vascular endothelial growth factor; bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells; tissue-e ngineered bone; vascularization; ectopic osteogenesis ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTO R; GENE-THERAPY; IN-VITRO; ANGIOGENESIS; DIFFERENTIATION; MATRIX; DELIVERY The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo vascularization and bon e formation activity of tissue-engineered bone constructed using bone marrow mes enchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF). The expression of VEGF165 in rat bone marrow MSCs was confirmed using RTPCR and immunohistochemistry. The MSCs were cultured together with nano-hydroxya patite/collagen (NHAC) to form tissue-engineered bone. Untransfected MSCs were u sed as controls. The mice were sacrificed, and the bone xenografts were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantified for the degree of vascularization and new bone formation. Based on our results, expression of the VEGF165 gene was de tected using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry following transfection and 4 weeks

of selection. The co-cultured NHAC- and VEGF-transfected MSCs had significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity compared to the controls (P<0.05). In the mice that received the tissue-engineered bone xenografts, clumps of cartilag e cells, irregular bone-like tissue and microvessels were observed. The growth o f these structures progressed with time. In the control mice, however, only smal l amounts of bone-like and fibrotic tissue were observed. The differences betwee n the control and experimental groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). I n conclusion, VEGF165-transfected bone marrow MSCs promotes vascularization of t issue-engineered bone and ectopic osteogenesis. [Li, XH; Liu, XX] Fujian Univ Tr adit Chinese Med, Acad Integrated Chinese & Western Med, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian, Peoples R China; [Liu, BL; Liang, GQ] Fuzhou Integrated Chinese & Western Med Ho sp Fuji, Fuzhou 350007, Peoples R China Liu, XX (reprint author), Fujian Univ Tr adit Chinese Med, Acad Integrated Chinese & Western Med, 1 Huatuo Rd, Fuzhou 350 108, Fujian, Peoples R China liuxianxiang@163.com Fujian Key Laboratory of Integrative Medicine on Geriatrics[2008J1004-16]; Development Fund of Chen Keji Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine[CKJ2008003] This study was supported by the Open Fund of Fujian Key Laboratory of Integrative Medicine on Geriatrics (no. 2008J1004-16) and the Development Fund of Chen Keji Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine (no. CKJ2008003). The authors thank Dr Xia Bai from the Jiangs u Province Blood Research Institute for providing the hVEGF165 full-length cDNA expression vector pcDNA3.1-hVEGF165 and Professor Qingling Feng from the Tsinghu a University for providing the NHAC material. 22 0 0 SPANDIDOS PUBL LTD ATHENS POB 18179, ATHENS, 116 10, GREECE 1791-299 7 MOL MED REP Mol. Med. Rep. NOV-DEC 2011 4 6 1121 1126 10.3892/mmr.2011.559 6 Oncology ; Medicine, Research & Experimental Oncology; Research & Experimental Medici ne 826XR WOS:000295389400013 J Roy, ED; Martin, JF; Irwin, EG; Conroy, JD; Culver, DA Roy, Eric D.; Martin, Jay F.; Irwin, Elena G.; Conroy, Joseph D.; Culver, David A. Living within dynamic social-ecological freshwater systems: Syst em parameters and the role of ecological engineering ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article Social-ecological landsc ape; Lake Erie; Phosphorus; Invasive species; Cultural eutrophication; Lake mana gement MUSSEL DREISSENA-POLYMORPHA; LAURENTIAN GREAT-LAKES; ECOSYSTEM SERVICES; TECHNOLOGICAL-CHANGE; AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION; EUTROPHICATION CONTROL; ENVIRONM ENTAL-POLICY; PHOSPHORUS EXCRETION; ERIE ECOSYSTEM; WASTE-WATER The objective of ecological engineering is to design sustainable ecosystems that integrate human communities and their natural environment for the benefit of both. In this pape r, we illustrate how social-ecological modeling can be used as a tool to clarify this objective at a landscape scale for freshwater systems. Coupled social-ecol ogical systems (SESs) are open, dynamic systems subject to both ecological and s ocioeconomic perturbations. Here we demonstrate the interactive effects of socia l and technological uncertainties on SES dynamics over time. Additionally, we in tegrate research on ecosystem stability, social-ecological modeling, and ecologi cal engineering to offer guidance for research at the human-environment interfac e. Based on a case study of Lake Erie's Sandusky watershed, we use an integrated human-biophysical model to investigate the influence of two parameters on SES d ynamics: (1) regional societal preferences that impact watershed management and (2) technological innovation that alters agricultural nutrient efficiency. Our r esults illustrate ways in which SES dynamics and optimum management strategies d epend on societal preferences within the region, indicating a key area of uncert ainty for future investigation. As guidance for SES restoration, our model resul ts also illustrate the conditions under which technological change that increase s nutrient efficiency on farms can and cannot create a win-win, or increase both human welfare and SES resistance to eutrophication simultaneously. Using these results, we elucidate the value of ecological engineering and offer guidance for assessments of ecological engineering projects using social-ecological modeling . (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Roy, ED] Louisiana State Univ, Dept Oceanog & Coastal Sci, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA; [Martin, JF] Ohio State U niv, Ecol Engn Grp, Dept Food Agr & Biol Engn, Columbus, OH 43210 USA; [Irwin, E

G] Ohio State Univ, Dept Agr Environm & Dev Econ, Columbus, OH 43210 USA; [Conro y, JD] Ohio Dept Nat Resources, Inland Fisheries Res Unit, Hebron, OH 43025 USA; [Culver, DA] Ohio State Univ, Dept Ecol Evolut & Organismal Biol, Columbus, OH 43210 USA Roy, ED (reprint author), Louisiana State Univ, Dept Oceanog & C oastal Sci, Energy Coast & Environm Bldg,Rm 3221, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA eroy5@tigers.lsu.edu; martin.1130@osu.edu; irwin.78@osu.edu; joseph.conroy@dnr.s tate.oh.us; culver.3@osu.edu US National Science Foundation[DEB-0410336]; US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Ohio Sea Grant Program; Ohio Ag ricultural and Research Development Center; The Ohio State University; Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund[04-16]; Franz Theodore Stone Laboratory; Ohio Department o f Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife as part of the Federal Aid in Sport Fi sh Restoration[FADB02, F-69-P] This research was supported through grants from the US National Science Foundation Biocomplexity Program Grant DEB-0410336, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Ohio Sea Grant Program, and the Ohio Agricultural and Research Development Center Interdisciplinary Seed Grant Program. Support was also partially provided to E.D.R. during the prepara tion of this manuscript by a Graduate Student Fellowship at The Ohio State Unive rsity. Collection of field data for model calibration was sponsored primarily by the Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund (Grant No. 04-16) administered by the Ohio L ake Erie Commission with additional funds provided by the Franz Theodore Stone L aboratory and the Ohio Sea Grant College Program. Funds for additional sample pr ocessing (State Project FADX09) and to support J.D.C. during the preparation of this manuscript (State Project FADB02) were provided by the Ohio Department of N atural Resources, Division of Wildlife as part of the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Program (Project F-69-P, Sport Fish Management in Ohio) administered jointly by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Division of Wild life. We also would like to acknowledge the helpful comments of two anonymous re viewers. 91 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDA M PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-8574 ECOL ENG Ecol. Eng. NOV 2011 37 11 1661 1672 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.06.044 12 Ecology; Engineering, Environmental; Environmental Sciences Environmental Sc iences & Ecology; Engineering 825SX WOS:000295303500008 J Li, B; Yuan, XZ; Xiao, HY; Chen, ZL Li, Bo; Yuan, Xingzhong; Xiao, Hongyan; Chen, Zhongli Design of the dike-pond system in the littoral zone of a tributary in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article Dike-pond engineering; Eco-friendly utilization; Littoral zone; Three Gorges Res ervoir POLLUTION-CONTROL; WETLANDS; EROSION; RUNOFF; AREA The Three Gorges Dam is the greatest water control project in the world with the largest fresh w ater littoral zone. Emergence of the littoral zone during the growing season pro vides some plants with the opportunity to complete their growth cycle, but the f luctuating water level also brings about some environmental problems, such as so il erosion, water pollution, and biodiversity reduction. A series of cascading t erraced ponds located in the littoral zone of a secondary branch of the Yangtze River at Laotudi Bay was designed to be a dike-pond system for resolving the env ironmental problems of this special littoral zone while also making use of resou rces in an eco-friendly manner. The design of the dike-pond system is described in detail in this article, and some monitoring protocols are recommended for eva luating the environmental benefits of the system. The economic value of the dike -ponds was estimated to be about (sic)125,986. Due to the ecological management mode adopted, 14 species of wild aquatic plants and 6 species of wading birds we re found in the dike-pond system, in contrast to 9 species of wild aquatic plant s and 3 species of wading birds in a comparable conventional farming area. It is hoped that dike-pond ecological engineering will be instrumental in reducing wa ter pollution and increasing biodiversity in the littoral zone of the Three Gorg es Reservoir. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Li, B; Yuan, XZ ; Xiao, HY; Chen, ZL] Chongqing Univ, Coll Resources & Environm Sci, Chongqing 4 00044, Peoples R China; [Li, B; Yuan, XZ; Xiao, HY; Chen, ZL] Chongqing Univ, Ke y Lab Exploitat SW Resources & Environm Hazards, Minist Educ, Chongqing 400044,

Peoples R China Yuan, XZ (reprint author), Chongqing Univ, Coll Resources & Envi ronm Sci, Chongqing 400044, Peoples R China xzyuan63@yahoo.com.cn Chongqin g Science and Technology Commission[CSTC2009AB1079] This study was financial ly supported by the Key Scientific and Technological Project of Chongqing Scienc e and Technology Commission (CSTC2009AB1079). We thank Pengxi River Wetland Rese arch Station, Pengxi River Wetland Reserve Management Bureau and the Xianghuan A griculture Co. Ltd. for assisting our research. We also thank the Yameijia Aquat ic Plant Co. Ltd for providing us with the study field and the hydrophytes. At l ast, sincerely thanks to Martin Willison for his thorough and responsible work i n proofing this article. 40 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-857 4 ECOL ENG Ecol. Eng. NOV 2011 37 11 1718 1725 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.06.028 8 Ecology; Engineering, Environmental; Environmental Sciences Environmental Sc iences & Ecology; Engineering 825SX WOS:000295303500014 J Chang, YH; Wang, HW; Hou, WS Chang, Yuan-Hsio u; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Hou, Wen-Shang Effects of construction material s and design of lake and stream banks on climbing ability of frogs and salamande rs ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article Ecological indicators; Bank substrate; Climbing ability; Amphibian; Hynobius ari sanensis DECLINING AMPHIBIAN POPULATIONS; IMPACTS; TAIWAN; FLUCTUATIONS; EXTINCTIONS; GONE With the increasing development of many areas in recent years, concrete structures are often installed along water bodies in order to pr otect the safety of local residents. However, effects of these concrete structur es on environments and mobility of amphibian species are still unknown. The cons truction of concrete banks along rivers associated with human development has be come a serious problem in Taiwan. Most ecosystems used by amphibians are lakes a nd stream banks, yet no related design solutions to accommodate the needs of amp hibians have been used in Taiwan. In this research, we selected eight species of amphibians and investigated their climbing abilities in an effort to improve la ke and river bank designs. We evaluated their climbing abilities on five angles of bank slopes, identified relationships between an amphibian's climbing ability and different surface substrates of banks, i.e. Japanese silvergrass (Miscanthu s floridulus) mixed with moss, cobblestone, wood (Philippine mahogany), clay, an d concrete, under high humidity and different temperatures to simulate changes a cross the four seasons. The results showed that climbing ability of these amphib ians is slightly decreased at low temperatures. For example, on a 450 slope in w inter, the average climbing ability decreased 8% from results in summer. The upp er limit of bank design slope suitable for Hynobius arisanensis on rock and wood surfaces is 45 degrees. For amphibians from alpine areas in Taiwan, such as Buf o bankorensis, the maximum suitable slope is 15 degrees. With concrete as the wa ter bank material, slopes <30 degrees are preferable. The results presented here can serve as a reference for technicians involved in future ecological engineer ing designs of banks throughout the world. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights res erved. [Hou, WS] Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Bioenvironm Syst Engn, Taipei 106, Taiw an; [Chang, YH] Mingdao Univ, Dept Landscape & Architecture, Chanhua 52345, Taiw an; [Wang, HW] Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Hydraul & Ocean Engn, Tainan 701, Taiw an Hou, WS (reprint author), Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Bioenvironm Syst Engn, Taipei 106, Taiwan houws@ccms.ntu.edu.tw 37 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMST ERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-8574 ECOL ENG Ecol. Eng. NOV 2011 37 11 1726 1733 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.07.005 8 Ecology; Engineering, En vironmental; Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Engine ering 825SX WOS:000295303500015 J Lee, S; Brown, MT Lee, Seungjun; Brown, Ma rk T. Understanding self-organization of ecosystems under disturbance using a microcosm study ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article Self-organization; Disturbance; Productivity; Microcosm; Restoration; Network th eory NATURAL COMMUNITIES; CARBON-DIOXIDE; DIVERSITY; PRODUCTIVITY; METABOLISM

; ECOLOGY; LAKE; RESILIENCE; MECHANISMS; SUCCESSION It is a key to success o f ecological engineering to understand self-organization of a target ecosystem. Self-organizing patterns of ecosystems, however, become complicated due to a wid e range of disturbance regimes in nature. We investigated how disturbances influ ence self-organization of ecosystems from energetic perspectives using 14 freshw ater aquatic microcosms transplanted from lakes in Florida. We observed five dif ferent disturbance-productivity relationships from the microcosm tests and these variable relationships were attributed to the different initial states of the m icrocosms under the same input sequence of test plans and disturbance regimes. T hrough processes of self-organization, as the microcosms matured with time, resi stance increased and resilience decreased. The microcosm study provided insights regarding restoration and management of ecosystems including the insight that i nitial seeds for restoration of an ecosystem should be carefully selected in con sideration of typical disturbance regimes of the region. It is also suggested th at consideration or manipulation of disturbance regimes in each successional sta ge is sometimes needed for maximum productivity or a designated goal of a restor ation project because self-organizing patterns that result under disturbances va ry depending on a system's maturity. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Lee, S; Brown, MT] Univ Florida, Dept Environm Engn Sci, Ctr Environm Policy, P helps Lab, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA Lee, S (reprint author), Univ Florida, D ept Environm Engn Sci, Ctr Environm Policy, Phelps Lab, Gainesville, FL 32611 US A slee@ufl.edu 53 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-8574 ECOL ENG Ecol. Eng. NOV 2011 37 11 1747 1756 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.0 7.009 10 Ecology; Engineering, Environmental; Environment al Sciences Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Engineering 825SX WOS:0002 95303500017 J Bice, CM; Zampatti, BP Bice, Christopher M.; Za mpatti, Brenton P. Engineered water level management facilitates re cruitment of non-native common carp, Cyprinus carpio, in a regulated lowland riv er ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article River Murray; Environmental engineering; Freshwater fish; River regulation; Exot ic species; Acid sulfate soils; Environmental water allocation FISH COMMUNITIES ; FLOW REGULATION; AUSTRALIA; VARIABILITY; CALIFORNIA; INVASIONS; PATTERNS; IMPA CTS; COORONG; WETLAND River regulation can advantage non-native aquatic biota at the expense of native species. Nevertheless, flow regulating structures are s ometimes used with the aim of achieving positive environmental outcomes in aquat ic ecosystems. In the lower River Murray, Australia, drought-induced water level recession and acid sulfate soil exposure prompted the construction of an earthe n levee, isolating a section of river channel (the Goolwa weir pool (GWP)) withi n which water levels were managed to mitigate a risk of water body acidification . The present study aimed to determine the impact of water level management on t he fish community by investigating variation in species abundance and recruitmen t between sites subject to water level management in the GWP and unmanaged sites in Lake Alexandrina. Prior to levee construction, in August 2009, the abundance of the non-native common carp was similar in the GWP and Lake Alexandrina. Foll owing water level management, in December 2009 and April 2010, the abundance of common carp in the GWP was approximately 1000 and 250 times greater than abundan ce in Lake Alexandrina, as a result of recruitment of young-of-year fish. No nat ive freshwater species were significantly more abundant in the GWP in August 200 9, December 2009 or April 2010. The results of this study suggest that the isola tion of a river reach and a managed rise in water level facilitated spawning and recruitment of a non-native fish species. As such, the ecological benefits and risks of restoration and mitigation projects that involve the construction of fl ow regulating structures and water level management should be carefully consider ed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Bice, CM; Zampatti, BP] SARDI, Inland Waters & Catchment Ecol Program, Henley Beach, SA 5022, Australia Bice, CM (reprint author), SARDI, Inland Waters & Catchment Ecol Program, POB 12 0, Henley Beach, SA 5022, Australia chris.bice@sa.gov.au Department of En

vironment and Natural Resources (DENR) The authors would like to thank Jason Hi gham and Alec Rolston of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DE NR) for support and financial funding of this project. Thanks to David Short and Neil Wellman for field assistance and to Kathleen Beyer (Flinders University), Alec Rolston (DENR), William Mitsch and two anonymous reviewers for constructive comments on a draft of this manuscript. All sampling was conducted under an exe mption (No. 9902132) of section 115 of the Fisheries Management Act 2007. 41 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-8574 ECOL ENG Ecol. En g. NOV 2011 37 11 1901 1904 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.06.046 4 Ecology; Engineering, En vironmental; Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Engine ering 825SX WOS:000295303500035 J Song, LY; Shi, L; Zhao, YC; Li, HJ Song, Li yan; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Youcai; Li, Hongjiang Novel engineering contro ls to increase leachate contaminant degradation by refuse: From lab test to in s itu engineering application ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING English Article Refuse; Leachate contaminants removal; Biodegradation; Bioremediation engineerin g LANDFILL LEACHATE; AGED-REFUSE; REVERSE-OSMOSIS; CLOSED LANDFILL; PERFOR MANCE; BIOFILTER; TOXICITY; WETLAND Here we provide direct evidence through a series laboratory and field-scale experiments using different age refuse to tr eat landfill leachate that aged refuse exhibits increased leachate contaminants removal ability with refuse stabilization time addition. Ten-years aged refuse s howed best contaminant removal in a laboratory-scale test, removing 70.0% (8340. 0-2540.0 mg/L) chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 75.0% (910.0-215.0 mg/L) ammoniu m-N, as well as removing 61.5-67.0% COD and 50.4-58.1% ammonium-N with variable COD (9948.0-12286.0 mg/L) and NH(3)-N (780.0-1184.0 mg/L) in a field-scale test, respectively. When the 10-years aged refuse was disinfected by 20% NaClO (wt%), COD, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)), total nitrogen (TN), and ammonium-N re moval showed a dramatic decrease throughout operation time from 84.4-86.2% to 15 .2-34.5%, 94.4-99.8% to 26.2-54.4%, 31.2-33.9% to 2.1-10.1%, and 88.5-90.1% to 1 .5-14.5%, respectively, suggesting biodegradation is the dominant contaminant re moval. Based on this finding, a 3-stages (8 years) age refuse bioreactor (ARB) w as constructed to treat leachate and ARB efficiently reduced chemical oxygen dem and (COD) from 5478.0-10842.0 mg/L to 261.0-1020 mg/L (87.8-96.2% removal), ammo nium-N from 811.4-1582.0 mg/L to 8.5-43.3 mg/L (96.9-99.4%), respectively, in 18 months running. In summary, the present studies suggest that increased leachate contaminant biodegradation ability of aged refuse could be used directly to cre ate an engineering approach to treat leachate with operational and economic adva ntages. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Song, LY] Univ Michigan , Dept Environm Hlth Sci, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA; [Song, LY; Shi, L; Zhao, YC; Li, HJ] Tongji Univ, State Key Lab Pollut Control & Resource Reuse, Shanghai 200 092, Peoples R China Song, LY (reprint author), Univ Michigan, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, 7647 SPH Tower,1415 Washington Hts, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA liyans@u mich.edu; Shilei19770728@hotmail.com; Zhaoyoucai@mail.tongji.edu.cn; hongjiangle e@yahoo.com.cn Doctoral Program Foundation of the China Education Ministry[3050 05]; Shanghai Municipality Science and Technology Commission[05DZ12003] We are g rateful for the financial support by Doctoral Program Foundation of the China Ed ucation Ministry with contract No. 305005 and by the Shanghai Municipality Scien ce and Technology Commission with contract No. 05DZ12003. We thank the Shanghai Laogang municipal solid waste landfill for their long-term materials provision a nd test support. 24 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0925-8574 ECOL ENG Ecol. Eng. NOV 2011 37 11 1914 1919 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.06.023 6 Ecology; Engineering, Environmental; Environmental Sciences Environmental Sc iences & Ecology; Engineering 825SX WOS:000295303500038 J Yoo, DJ Yoo, Dong J. Porous scaffold design using the distance field and triply periodic minimal surface models BIOMATERIALS English Article

Distance field; Triply periodic minimal surface; Tissue engineering; Porous scaf fold design TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; FREEFORM FA BRICATION; BONE; RECONSTRUCTION; STEREOLITHOGRAPHY; ARCHITECTURES; MESH; CT An effective method for the 3D porous scaffold design of human tissue is present ed based on a hybrid method of distance field and triply periodic minimal surfac e (TPMS). By the creative application of traditional distance field algorithm in to the Boolean operations of the anatomical model and TPMS-based unit cell libra ry, an almost defects free porous scaffolds having the complicated micro-structu re and high quality external surface faithful to a specific anatomic model can b e easily obtained without the difficult and time-consuming trimming and re-meshi ng processes. After generating the distance fields for the given tissue model an d required internal micro-structure, a series of simple modifications in distanc e fields enable us to obtain a complex porous scaffold. Experimental results sho w that the proposed scaffold design method has the potential to combine the perf ectly interconnected pore networks based on the TPMS unit cell libraries and the given external geometry in a consistent framework irrespective of the complexit y of the models. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Daejin Univ, Dep t Comp Aided Mech Design Engn, Sundan Dong 487711, Pocheon Si, South Korea Yoo, DJ (reprint author), Daejin Univ, Dept Comp Aided Mech Design Engn, San 111, Sundan Dong 487711, Pocheon Si, South Korea djyoo@daejin.ac.kr 40 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATER IALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7741 7754 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.019 14 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Mat erials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600001 J Ji, SZ; Xiao, SC; Luo, PF; Huang, GF; Wang, GY; Zhu, SH; Wu, MJ; Xia, ZF Ji, Shi-zhao; Xiao, Shi-chu; Luo, Peng-fei; Huang, Guo-feng; Wang, Guang-yi; Zhu , Shi-hui; Wu, Min-juan; Xia, Zhao-fan An epidermal stem cells niche mi croenvironment created by engineered human amniotic membrane BIOMATERIALS English Article Microcarriers; Amniotic membrane; Epidermal stem cells; Expansion; Skin substitutes EX-VIVO EXPANSIO N; LIMBAL EPITHELIAL-CELLS; STROMAL CELLS; IN-VITRO; TRANSPLANTATION; MATRIX; PO LYMER; GROWTH; RECONSTRUCTION; KERATINOCYTES How to amplify epidermal stem ce lls (ESCs) rapidly is a challenging crux in skin tissue engineering research. Th e present study describes the preparation of 3D micronized (300-600 mu m) amniot ic membrane (mAM) by means of repeated freeze-thawing cycles to deplete cell com ponents and homogenized with a macrohomogenizer in liquid nitrogen. This newly p repared mAM not only possessed the characteristics of a microcarrier but complet ely retained the basement membrane structure and abundant active substances such as NGF, HGF, KGF, bFGF, TGF-beta 1 and EGF in the AM matrix. The result showed that mAM combined with rotary cell culture system (RCCS) was able to amplify ESC s quickly. The relative cell viability at day 7 and 14 was significantly higher than that of the conventional 2D plate culture (326 +/- 28% and 535 +/- 47% vers us 232 +/- 21% and 307 +/- 32%, P < 0.05). In addition, the new method was able to prevent cell differentiation effectively and retain the characteristics of st em cells. When mAM loaded with ESCs (ESC-mAM) was further transplanted to full-t hickness skin defects in nude mice, ESCs survived well and formed a new epidermi s. Four weeks after transplantation, papilla-like structures were observed, and collagen fibers were well and regularly arranged in the newly formed dermal laye r. In conclusion, the mAM as a novel natural microcarrier possesses an intact ba sement membrane structure and bioactivities. It not only provides the microenvir onment similar to the stem cell niche within the human body favorable for ex viv o culture and amplification of ESCs but can be used as the dermal scaffold in co nstructing a skin substitute containing ESCs for the repair of full-thickness sk in defects. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Ji, SZ; Xiao, SC; Luo, PF; Huang, GF; Wang, GY; Zhu, SH; Xia, ZF] Mil Med Coll 2, Changhai Hosp, Burns Inst Peoples Liberat Army, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China; [Wu, MJ] Mil Med Co ll 2, Coll Basic Med Sci, Dept Histol & Embryol, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R Chin a Xia, ZF (reprint author), Mil Med Coll 2, Changhai Hosp, Burns Inst Peop

les Liberat Army, Shanghai 200433, Peoples R China xiazhaofan@hotmail.com National Natural Science Foundation of China[C30600646, 81071555, 30730091]; Ste m Cell and Medicine Research Center of the Second Military Medical University[SC OP100610] This project was supported by the National Natural Science Found ation of China (C30600646, 81071555, 30730091) and the Stem Cell and Medicine Re search Center's Innovation Research Program of the Second Military Medical Unive rsity (SCOP100610). 34 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7801 7811 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.06.076 11 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600 006 J Frisman, I; Seliktar, D; Bianco-Peled, H Frisman, Ilya; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet Nanostructuring PEG-fibrinogen hydrogels to control cellular morphogenesis BIOMATERIALS English Article Tissue engineering; Cell morphology; Scaffold; Nanostructuring EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX; TISSUE REGENERATIO N; SCAFFOLDS; STIFFNESS; CELLS; BIOMATERIALS; FIBROBLASTS; MORPHOLOGY; MIGRATION ; CULTURES The nanostructuring of hydrogel scaffolds used in tissue enginee ring aims to provide an ability to control cellular morphogenesis through define d cell matrix interactions. Toward this objective, we developed a method that al ters the molecular network structure of biosynthetic hydrogel scaffolds made fro m crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen conjugates (PEG-fibrinogen, PF). The modifications were based on Pluronic (R) F127 micelles that were formed in t he hydrogel precursor solution and that altered the hydrogel network assembly du ring photopolymerization crosslinking. Two variations of the cell-encapsulating hydrogels (high and low crosslinking density) were prepared with three concentra tions of Pluronic (R) F127 (3%, 7%, 10% w/v). Quantitative morphometrics were us ed to characterize fibroblast shape parameters (both transient and stable) in al l hydrogels, and theological characterizations were used to measure the elastic (storage) component of the complex shear modulus of these hydrogels. The morphom etric data was then correlated to both the nanostructure and modulus of the hydr ogels for day 1 and day 4 in culture. These correlations revealed that structura l features imparted by the Pluronic (R) F127 micelles were able to reverse the n ormally strong correlations found between indicators of cell spreading and the h ydrogel's mechanical properties. Therefore, the data supports the conclusion tha t nanostructural features in the encapsulating hydrogel culture environment can facilitate better cell spreading in a dense hydrogel milieu, simply by introduci ng imperfections into the network structure. This research also provides further prospective regarding biocompatible approaches toward making structural modific ations to hydrogel scaffolds for the purpose of 3-D cell culture and tissue engi neering. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Frisman, I; Bianco-Pele d, H] Technion Israel Inst Technol, Dept Chem Engn, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel; [Sel iktar, D] Technion Israel Inst Technol, Dept Biomed Engn, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel ; [Seliktar, D; Bianco-Peled, H] Technion Israel Inst Technol, Russell Berrie Na notechnol Inst, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel Bianco-Peled, H (reprint author), Techni on Israel Inst Technol, Dept Chem Engn, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel bianco@tx.techni on.ac.il Singapore National Research Foundation; Russell Berrie Nanotechn ology Institute; United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF)[200736 6] This study was funded in part by the Singapore National Research Foundat ion. The partial financial support of the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institut e (NEVET Program) is gratefully acknowledged. This research was partially suppor ted by grant no. 2007366 from the United States-Israel Binational Science Founda tion (BSF). 34 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-961 2 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7839 7846 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.06.078 8 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Mat erials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600010

J Xu, F; Finley, TD; Turkaydin, M; Sung, YR; Gurkan, UA; Yavuz, AS; Guldik en, RO; Demirci, U Xu, Feng; Finley, Thomas D.; Tur kaydin, Muge; Sung, Yuree; Gurkan, Umut A.; Yavuz, Ahmet S.; Guldiken, Rasim O.; Demirci, Utkan The assembly of cell-encapsulating microscale hydrogels using acoustic waves BIOMATERIALS English Article Microgel assembly; Acoustic manipulation MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS; PARTICLE; VITRIFICATION; TECHNOLOGY; SEPARATION; DROPLETS; ARRAYS Microscale hydro gels find widespread applications in medicine and biology, e.g., as building blo cks for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In these applications, the se microgels are assembled to fabricate large complex 3D constructs. The success of this approach requires non-destructive and high throughput assembly of the m icrogels. Although various assembly methods have been developed based on modifyi ng interfaces, and using microfluidics, so far, none of the available assembly t echnologies have shown the ability to assemble microgels using non-invasive fiel ds rapidly within seconds in an efficient way. Acoustics has been widely used in biomedical arena to manipulate droplets, cells and biomolecules. In this study, we developed a simple, non-invasive acoustic assembler for cell-encapsulating m icrogels with maintained cell viability (>93%). We assessed the assembler for bo th microbeads (with diameter of 50 mu m and 100 mu m) and microgels of different sizes and shapes (e.g., cubes, lock-and-key shapes, tetris, saw) in microdrople ts (with volume of 10 mu L 20 mu L, 40 mu L, 80 mu L). The microgels were assemb led in seconds in a non-invasive manner. These results indicate that the develop ed acoustic approach could become an enabling biotechnology tool for tissue engi neering, regenerative medicine, pharmacology studies and high throughput screeni ng applications. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Demirci, U] Har vard MIT Hlth Sci & Technol, Cambridge, MA USA; [Xu, F; Finley, TD; Turkaydin, M ; Sung, YR; Gurkan, UA; Yavuz, AS; Demirci, U] Harvard Univ, Brigham & Womens Ho sp, Sch Med,Dept Med, Ctr Biomed Engn,Demirci Bioacoust MEMS Med BAMM L, Boston, MA 02115 USA; [Guldiken, RO] Univ S Florida, Dept Mech Engn, Tampa, FL 33620 US A Demirci, U (reprint author), Harvard MIT Hlth Sci & Technol, Cambridge, MA USA udemirci@rics.bwh.harvard.edu W.H. Coulter Foundation; Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) under U.S. Army Medical Research; U.S . Army Medical Research & Materiel Command (USAMRMC); Telemedicine & Advanced Te chnology Research Center (TATRC), at Fort Detrick, MD; [RO1 A1081534]; [R21 A108 7107]; [R21 HL095960] The authors would like to acknowledge the W.H. Coulter F oundation Young Investigation Award. This was also supported by RO1 A1081534, R2 1 A1087107, R21 HL095960, and Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) under U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity Cooperative Agreem ent, as well as made possible by a research grant that was awarded and administe red by the U.S. Army Medical Research & Materiel Command (USAMRMC) and the Telem edicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), at Fort Detrick, MD. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to p ublish, or preparation of the manuscript. 47 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7847 7855 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.010 9 Engineering, Bio medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600011 J Lesman, A; Koffler, J; Atlas, R; Blinder, YJ; Kam, Z; Levenberg, S Lesman, Ayelet; Koffler, Jacob; Atlas, Roee; Blinder, Yaron J.; Kam, Zvi; Levenb erg, Shulamit Engineering vessel-like networks within multicellular fi brin-based constructs BIOMATERIALS English Article Fibrin; Scaffold; Angiogenesis; Endothelial cell; Co-culture; Cell encapsulation EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS; REAL-TIME PCR; IN-VITRO; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; CARDIAC-MUSCLE ; TISSUE; ANGIOGENESIS; DIFFERENTIATION; MATRIX; STIFFNESS Sufficient vascu larization in engineered tissues can be achieved through coordinated application of improved biomaterial systems with proper cell types. In this study, we emplo yed 3D fibrin gels alone or in combination with the synthetic poly(L-lactic acid ) (PLLA)/polylactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) sponges to support in-vitro construct v

ascularization and to enhance neovascularization upon implantation. Two multicel lular assays were embedded in these constructs: (a) co-culture of endothelial (E C) and fibroblast cells, and (b) a tri-culture combination of ECs, fibroblasts a nd tissue specific skeletal myoblast cells. In-vitro vessel network formation wa s examined under advanced confocal microscopy in various time points from cell s eeding. Vessel network maturity levels and morphology were found to be highly re gulated by fibrinogen concentrations in-vitro. Combination of PLLA/PLGA sponges with fibrin matrices provided added mechanical strength and featured highly matu re vessels-like networks. Implantation studies revealed that the implanted ECs d eveloped into 3D interconnected vessel-like networks in-vivo. The PLLA/PLGA scaf fold proved to be a key stimulator of neovascularization and perfusion of implan ted grafts. Our findings demonstrate that complex biomaterial platform involving fibrin and PLLA/PLGA synthetic scaffold provide a way to enhancing vascularizat ion in-vitro and in-vivo. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Lesman, A; Koffler, J; Blinder, YJ; Levenberg, S] Technion Israel Inst Technol, Dept Bi omed Engn, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel; [Atlas, R] Omrix Biopharmaceut Ltd, Ness Zion a, Israel; [Kam, Z] Weizmann Inst Sci, Dept Mol Cell Biol, IL-76100 Rehovot, Isr ael Levenberg, S (reprint author), Technion Israel Inst Technol, Dept Biomed Engn, IL-32000 Haifa, Israel shulamit@bm.technion.ac.il Israeli Ministry of Industry Trade; Nofar program; Omrix Biopharmaceuticals Ltd. We would like to thank Prof. David Yaffe (Weizmann Institute, Faculty of Biology. Israel ) for providing the C2 cell line. We would like to acknowledge Shirley Rachel Ro chman for the graphic assistance, and Yehudit Posen for editing the manuscript. The research was funded by The Israeli Ministry of Industry & Trade, Nofar progr am and Omrix Biopharmaceuticals Ltd. 38 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7856 7869 10.1016/ j.biomaterials.2011.07.003 14 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600012 J Perniconi, B; Costa, A; Aulino, P; Teodori, L; Adamo, S; Coletti, D Perniconi, Barbara; Costa, Alessandra; Aulino, Paola; Teodori, Laura; Adamo, Ser gio; Coletti, Dario The pro-myogenic environment provided by whole o rgan scale acellular scaffolds from skeletal muscle BIOMATERIALS English Article ECM (extracellular matri x); In vivo test; Muscle; Stem cell MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; TUMOR-NECROSIS-F ACTOR; EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX; IN-VIVO; DECELLULARIZED MATRIX; CHRONIC REJECTION; PRECURSOR CELLS; TISSUE; REGENERATION; CYCLOSPORINE In the pursuit of a tran splantable construct for the replacement of large skeletal muscle defects arisin g from traumatic or pathological conditions, several attempts have been made to obtain a highly oriented, vascularized and functional skeletal muscle. Acellular scaffolds derived from organ decellularization are promising, widely used bioma terials for tissue engineering. However, the acellular skeletal muscle extra cel lular matrix (ECM) has been poorly characterized in terms of production, storage and host-donor interactions. We have produced acellular scaffolds at the whole organ scale from various skeletal muscles explanted from mice. The acellular sca ffolds conserve chemical and architectural features of the tissue of origin, inc luding the vascular bed. Scaffolds can be sterilely stored for weeks at +4 degre es C or +37 degrees C in tissue culture grade conditions. When transplanted in w t mice, the grafts are stable for several weeks, whilst being colonized by infla mmatory and stem cells. We demonstrate that the acellular scaffold per se repres ents a pro-myogenic environment supporting de novo formation of muscle fibers, l ikely derived from host cells with myogenic potential. Myogenesis within the imp lant is enhanced by immunosuppressive treatment. Our work highlights the fundame ntal role of this niche in tissue engineering application and unveils the clinic al potential of allografts based on decellularized tissue for regenerative medic ine. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Costa, A; Teodori, L] E NEA Frascati, UTAPRAD DIM, Diagnost & Metrol Lab, I-00044 Frascati, Italy; [Pern iconi, B; Costa, A; Aulino, P; Adamo, S; Coletti, D] Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dept

Anat Histol Forens & Orthopaed Sci, Histol & Med Embryol Sect, I-00161 Rome, It aly; [Perniconi, B; Coletti, D] Univ Paris 06, UR4, F-75005 Paris, France Teodori, L (reprint author), ENEA Frascati, UTAPRAD DIM, Diagnost & Metrol Lab, I-00044 Frascati, Italy laura.teodori@enea.it AFM; Italian MIUR; Sapienza Univ ersity of Rome; UPMC Emergence We gratefully acknowledge the technical help pro vided by Carla Ramina and Fabrizio Padula (Sapienza University of Rome) for the confocal and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. We thank Giovanna Marazzi an d David Sassoon, who have provided the 370 (anti-PW1) Ab. The authors are also g rateful to Dario Rossi for his multimedia advice and expertise. Grant support fr om the following institution is acknowledged: AFM, Italian MIUR, Sapienza Univer sity of Rome to SA; UPMC Emergence to DC. 48 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7870 7882 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.016 13 Engineering, Bio medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600013 J Kim, M; Kim, SE; Kang, SS; Kim, YH; Tae, G Kim, Mihye; Kim, Se Eun; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Young Ha; Tae, Giyoong The use of de-differentiated chondrocytes delivered by a heparin-based hydrogel to regenerate cartilage in partial-thickness defects BIOMATERIALS English Article Chondrocytes; De-differe ntiation; Heparin; Hydrogel; Partial-thickness defect MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; HUMAN ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES; TISSUE-ENGINEERED CARTILAGE; LINKING DENSITY INFLU ENCES; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA; IN-VITRO; CHONDROGENIC DIFFERENTIATION; GENE-EXPRESSI ON; TGF-BETA; STROMAL CELLS Partial-thickness cartilage defects, with no sub chondral bone injury, do not repair spontaneously, thus there is no clinically e ffective treatment for these lesions. Although the autologous chondrocyte transp lantation (ACT) is one of the promising approaches for cartilage repair, it requ ires in vitro cell expansion to get sufficient cells, but chondrocytes lose thei r chondrogenic phenotype during expansion by monolayer culture, leading to de-di fferentiation. In this study, a heparin-based hydrogel was evaluated and optimiz ed to induce cartilage regeneration with de-differentiated chondrocytes. First, re-differentiation of de-differentiated chondrocytes encapsulated in heparin-bas ed hydrogels was characterized in vitro with various polymer concentrations (fro m 3 to 20 wt.%). Even under a normal cell culture condition (no growth factors o r chondrogenic components), efficient re-differentiation of cells was observed w ith the optimum at 10 wt.% hydrogel, showing the complete re-differentiation wit hin a week. Efficient redifferentiation and cartilage formation of de-differenti ated cell/hydrogel construct were also confirmed in vivo by subcutaneous implant ation on the back of nude mice. Finally, excellent cartilage regeneration and go od integration with surrounding, similar to natural cartilage, was also observed by delivering dedifferentiated chondrocytes using the heparin-based hydrogel in partial-thickness defects of rabbit knees whereas no healing was observed for t he control defects. These results demonstrate that the heparin-based hydrogel is very efficient for re-differentiation of expanded chondrocytes and cartilage re generation without using any exogenous inducing factors, thus it could serve as an injectable cell-carrier and scaffold for cartilage repair. Excellent chondrog enic nature of the heparin-based hydrogel might be associated with the hydrogel characteristic that can secure endogenous growth factors secreted from chondrocy tes, which then can promote the chondrogenesis, as suggested by the detection of TGF-beta 1 in both in vitro and in vivo cell/hydrogel constructs. (C) 2011 Else vier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kim, M; Kim, YH; Tae, G] Gwangju Inst Sci & Tec hnol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Oryong Dong 500712, Gwangju, South Korea; [Kim, M; Kim , YH; Tae, G] Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol, Dept Nanobio Mat & Elect, Oryong Dong 500712, Gwangju, South Korea; [Kim, SE; Kang, SS] Chonnam Natl Univ, Coll Vet Me d, Kwangju 500757, South Korea Tae, G (reprint author), Gwangju Inst Sci & Tech nol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Oryong Dong 500712, Gwangju, South Korea gytae@gi st.ac.kr NRF; MEST, Korea[20110015196, R31-2008-000-10026-0]; World Class University (WCU) program at GIST; GIST, Korea This work was partially supporte

d by the Basic Science Research Program through NRF funded by MEST, Korea (20110 015196), the World Class University (WCU) program at GIST through a grant provid ed by MEST, Korea (R31-2008-000-10026-0), and by a GIST Specialized Research Pro ject provided by GIST, Korea. 70 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7883 7896 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.07.015 14 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600 014 J Szot, CS; Buchanan, CF; Freeman, JW; Rylander, MN Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N . 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels BIOMATERIALS English Article Collagen I; Hydrogel; Three-dimensional; Tumor microenvironment; Hypoxia HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR-1-ALPHA; BREAST-CANCER; GENE-EXPRESSION; CULTURE MODELS ; TISSUE; CELLS; MORPHOGENESIS; ANGIOGENESIS; PROGRESSION; PHENOTYPE Cells cu ltured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological system s. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells w ere bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell-c ell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of coll agen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of similar to 150-200 pm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxy gen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intracellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HI F-1 alpha gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation o f vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comp arable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increas e of HIF-1 alpha (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on twodimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demo nstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized s tages of in vivo solid tumor progression. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights rese rved. [Szot, CS; Buchanan, CF; Freeman, JW; Rylander, MN] Virginia Tech Wake F orest Univ, Sch Biomed Engn & Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA Szot, CS (reprin t author), Virginia Tech Wake Forest Univ, Sch Biomed Engn & Sci, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA szotc@vt.edu NSF[CBET 0955072]; NIH/NHLBI[R01HL098912] We would like to thank Andrea Martin for generously donating the Sprague Dawley rat tails. We also acknowledge our funding, which was provided by the NSF Early CAREER Award CBET 0955072 and the NIH/NHLBI R01HL098912. 36 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 31 7905 7912 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.001 8 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Mat erials Science 822TN WOS:000295072600016 J Liu, Y; Wang, XT; Kaufman, DS; Shen, W Liu, Yan g; Wang, Xintong; Kaufman, Dan S.; Shen, Wei A synthetic substrate to support early mesodermal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells BIOMATER IALS English Article Stem cel l; Biomimetic material; Surface modification; Peptide; Integrin MATRIX; MORPHOGE NESIS; INTEGRINS; ADHESION; LAMININ; CARDIOMYOCYTES; THERAPY; SYSTEM; GROWTH; GE

NE Our ability to guide differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hP SCs) toward desired lineages efficiently and reproducibly in xeno-free condition s is the key to advancing hPSC technology from the laboratory to clinical use. H ere we report an engineered biomimetic substrate functionalized with both peptid e ligands for alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 integrins to support efficient e arly mesodermal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) when cultu red in a differentiation medium containing BMP4. In contrast, mesodermal differe ntiation is not induced on substrates functionalized with either ligand alone ev en though the culture medium is identical. Mesodermal differentiation was charac terized by immunofluorescent staining, flow cytometric analysis, and RT-PCR anal ysis of early mesodermal markers Brachyury, Mixl1, and Wnt3. The early mesoderma l progenitors derived on the substrate functionalized with both integrin ligands have the normal developmental potential to further differentiate along the hema to-endothelial and cardiac lineages. Immobilized ligands for alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 integrins both are permissive, necessary, and sufficient insolubl e ligands in this engineered system to support early mesodermal differentiation of hESCs. This synthetic substrate, in conjunction with defined soluble factors, constructs a well-controlled and xeno-free early mesodermal differentiation nic he that offers advantages over the previously reported niche constructed with th e Matrigel-coated substrate. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Liu, Y; Wang, XT; Shen, W] Univ Minnesota, Dept Biomed Engn, Minneapolis, MN 55 455 USA; [Kaufman, DS] Univ Minnesota, Dept Med, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA; [Kau fman, DS] Univ Minnesota, Stem Cell Inst, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA Shen, W (reprint author), Univ Minnesota, Dept Biomed Engn, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA shenx104@umn.edu Institute for Engineering in Medicine of the University of Minnesota; NIH/NHLBI[R01 HL077923, U01 HL100407] This research was partia lly supported by a seed grant from the Institute for Engineering in Medicine of the University of Minnesota. Prof. Kaufman was supported by NIH/NHLBI grants R01 HL077923 and U01 HL100407. 57 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8058 8066 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.07.052 9 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200 003 J Gillette, BM; Rossen, NS; Das, N; Leong, D; Wang, MX; Dugar, A; Sia, SK Gillette, Brian M.; Rossen, Ninna S.; Das, Nikkan; Leong, Debra; Wang, Meixin; D ugar, Arushi; Sia, Samuel K. Engineering extracellular matrix structu re in 3D multiphase tissues BIOMATERIALS English Article Adhesion; Alginate; Collagen; Hydrogel; Interface; Micropatterning IN-VITRO ; COLLAGEN FIBRILLOGENESIS; CELL-CULTURE; SCAFFOLDS; STIFFNESS; INTEGRATION; MIC ROSCOPY; POLYMERIZATION; ALIGNMENT; ADHESIVE In native tissues, microscale va riations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure can drive different cellula r behaviors. Although control over ECM structure could prove useful in tissue en gineering and in studies of cellular behavior, isotropic 3D matrices poorly repl icate variations in local microenvironments. In this paper, we demonstrate a met hod to engineer local variations in the density and size of collagen fibers thro ughout 3D tissues. The results showed that, in engineered multiphase tissues, th e structures of collagen fibers in both the bulk ECM phases (as measured by mesh size and width of fibers) as well as at tissue interfaces (as measured by densi ty of fibers and thickness of tissue interfaces) could be modulated by varying t he collagen concentrations and gelling temperatures. As the method makes use of a previously published technique for tissue bonding, we also confirmed that sign ificant adhesion strength at tissue interfaces was achieved under all conditions tested. Hence, this study demonstrates how collagen fiber structures can be eng ineered within all regions of a multiphase tissue scaffold by exploiting knowled ge of collagen assembly, and presents an approach to engineer local collagen str ucture that complements methods such as flow alignment and electrospinning. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Gillette, BM; Rossen, NS; Das, N; Leong , D; Wang, MX; Dugar, A; Sia, SK] Columbia Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, New York, NY

10027 USA Sia, SK (reprint author), Columbia Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, 351 E ngn Terrace,500 W 120th St, New York, NY 10027 USA ss2735@columbia.edu American Heart Association; National Science Foundation; National Institutes of Health[R01HL095477] We thank the American Heart Association (Scientist Devel opment Grant), the National Science Foundation (CAREER), and the National Instit utes of Health (Grant R01HL095477) for financial support of this work. We thank Prof. Helen Lu, Nora Khanarian, and Sid Subramony for advice in the mechanical t esting experiments, and Keith Yeager and Mario Modena for assisting with buildin g the testing rig. 38 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8067 8076 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.05.043 10 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200 004 J Chen, BKK; Knight, AM; Madigan, NN; Gross, L; Dadsetan, M; Nesbitt, JJ; Rooney, GE; Currier, BL; Yaszemski, MJ; Spinner, RJ; Windebank, AJ Chen, Bingkun K.; Knight, Andrew M.; Madigan, Nicolas N.; Gross, LouAnn; Dadseta n, Mahrokh; Nesbitt, Jarred J.; Rooney, Gemma E.; Currier, Bradford L.; Yaszemsk i, Michael J.; Spinner, Robert J.; Windebank, Anthony J. Comparis on of polymer scaffolds in rat spinal cord: A step toward quantitative assessmen t of combinatorial approaches to spinal cord repair BIOMATERIALS English Article OPF; PLGA; PCLF; Axon re generation; Spinal cord injury; Schwann cell PERIPHERAL-NERVE REGENERATION; E NSHEATHING GLIA TRANSPLANTS; GLYCOL) FUMARATE) HYDROGELS; PROMOTE FUNCTIONAL REC OVERY; B DECOY OLIGONUCLEOTIDES; SCHWANN-CELLS; GUIDANCE CHANNELS; AXONAL REGENE RATION; POLY(CAPROLACTONE FUMARATE); INJURY The transected rat thoracic (T(9 /10)) spinal cord model is a platform for quantitatively comparing biodegradable polymer scaffolds. Schwann cell-loaded scaffolds constructed from poly (lactic co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly(c-caprolactone fumarate) (PCLF), oligo(polyethyle ne glycol) fumarate (OPF) hydrogel or positively charged OPF (OPF+) hydrogel wer e implanted into the model. We demonstrated that the mechanical properties (3-po int bending and stiffness) of OPF and OPF + hydrogels closely resembled rat spin al cord. After one month, tissues were harvested and analyzed by morphometry of neurofilament-stained sections at rostra!, midlevel, and caudal scaffold. All po lymers supported axonal growth. Significantly higher numbers of axons were found in PCLF (P < 0.01) and OPF+ (P < 0.05) groups, compared to that of the PLGA gro up. OPF + polymers showed more centrally distributed axonal regeneration within the channels while other polymers (PLGA, PCLF and OPF) tended to show more evenl y dispersed axons within the channels. The centralized distribution was associat ed with significantly more axons regenerating (P < 0.05). Volume of scar and cys t rostral and caudal to the implanted scaffold was measured and compared. There were significantly smaller cyst volumes in PLGA compared to PCLF groups. The mod el provides a quantitative basis for assessing individual and combined tissue en gineering strategies. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Chen, B KK; Knight, AM; Madigan, NN; Gross, L; Nesbitt, JJ; Rooney, GE; Windebank, AJ] M ayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Neurol, Rochester, MN 55905 USA; [Dadsetan, M; Currier, BL; Yaszemski, MJ] Mayo Clin, Dept Orthoped Surg, Rochester, MN 55905 USA; [Spi nner, RJ] Mayo Clin, Dept Neurosurg, Rochester, MN 55905 USA Windebank, AJ (r eprint author), Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Neurol, 200 1st St SW, Rochester, MN 5 5905 USA windebank.anthony@mayo.edu NIH[EB02390]; Wilson Foundation; Morton Foundation; Neilsen Foundation; Mayo Foundation We thank James Tarara fo r his critical help in imaging of the axon counting and measure of the scar and cyst formation. We thank Jane Meyer for her administrative role in manuscript pr eparation. This work was supported by a grant from the NIH (EB02390) and the Wil son, Morton, Neilsen and Mayo Foundations (AJW). 76 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomater ials NOV 2011 32 32 8077 8086 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.029 10 Engineering, Bio

medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200005 J Ker, EDP; Nain, AS; Weiss, LE; Wang, J; Suhan, J; Amon, CH; Campbell, PG Ker, Elmer D. P.; Nain, Amrinder S.; Weiss, Lee E.; Wang, Ji; Suhan, Joseph; Amo n, Cristina H.; Campbell, Phil G. Bioprinting of growth factors on to aligned sub-micron fibrous scaffolds for simultaneous control of cell differe ntiation and alignment BIOMATERIALS English Article Bone; Muscle; Tendon; Growth factors TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS; ELECTRO SPUN NANOFIBERS; EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX; SCLERAXIS EXPRESSION; TENDON PROGENITORS; STEM-CELLS; TENOMODULIN; ACTIVATION; INTERFACE; PATTERNS The capability t o spatially control stem cell orientation and differentiation simultaneously usi ng a combination of geometric cues that mimic structural aspects of native extra cellular matrix (ECM) and biochemical cues such as ECM-bound growth factors (GFs ) is important for understanding the organization and function of musculoskeleta l tissues. Herein, oriented sub-micron fibers, which are morphologically similar to musculoskeletal ECM, were spatially patterned with GFs using an inkjet-based bioprinter to create geometric and biochemical cues that direct musculoskeletal cell alignment and differentiation in vitro in registration with fiber orientat ion and printed patterns, respectively. Sub-micron polystyrene fibers (diameter similar to 655 nm) were fabricated using a Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Pa rameters (STEP) technique and coated with serum or fibrin. The fibers were subse quently patterned with tendon-promoting fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) or bo ne-promoting bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) prior to seeding with mouse C2 C12 myoblasts or C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal fibroblasts. Unprinted regions of STEP fi bers showed myocyte differentiation while printed FGF-2 and BMP-2 patterns promo ted tenocyte and osteoblast fates, respectively, and inhibited myocyte different iation. Additionally, cells aligned along the fiber length. Functionalizing orie nted sub-micron fibers with printed GFs provides instructive cues to spatially c ontrol cell fate and alignment to mimic native tissue organization and may have applications in regenerative medicine. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. [Ker, EDP; Suhan, J; Campbell, PG] Carnegie Mellon Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Pittsbur gh, PA 15213 USA; [Weiss, LE] Carnegie Mellon Univ, Inst Robot, Pittsburgh, PA 1 5213 USA; [Weiss, LE; Campbell, PG] Carnegie Mellon Univ, Inst Complex Engn Syst , Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA; [Ker, EDP; Weiss, LE; Campbell, PG] UPMC, McGowan In st Regenerat Med, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 USA; [Nain, AS; Wang, J] Virginia Tech, D ept Mech Engn, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA; [Amon, CH] Univ Toronto, Dept Ind & Mec h Engn, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4, Canada Campbell, PG (reprint author), Carnegie Mellon Univ, Dept Biol Sci, 1201 Hamburg Hall,5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15 213 USA nain@vt.edu; pcampbel@cs.cmu.edu NIH[RO1EB004343, RO1EB007369]; P ennsylvania Infrastructure Technology Alliance (PITA); NICHD We would like to thank Bur Chu and Larry Schultz for assistance with GF printing. We would also like to thank Dr. Haibing Teng for assistance with confocal microscopy. This wor k was supported by NIH grants RO1EB004343 and RO1EB007369 as well as funding fro m the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Technology Alliance (PITA). The MF20 monoclona l antibody developed by Donald A. Fischman was obtained from the Developmental S tudies Hybridoma Bank developed under the auspices of the NICHD and maintained b y The University of Iowa, Department of Biology, Iowa City, IA 52242. A. N and J . W are also thankful to Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) along with Nanoscale Characterization and Fabrication Laboratory (NCFL) at VT for SEM work. 54 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8097 8107 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.07.025 11 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200 007 J Ekaputra, AK; Prestwich, GD; Cool, SM; Hutmacher, DW Ekaputra, Andrew K.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Cool, Simon M.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W. The three-dimensional vascularization of growth factor-releasing hybrid scaffold of poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/collagen fibers and hyaluronic acid hydrogel

BIOMATERIALS English Article Angiogenesis; Hyaluronic acid/hyaluronan; Polycaprolactone; Collagen; Scaffold; Endothelial cell TISSUE-ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; BLOOD-VESSEL FORMATION; LO NG-TERM CULTURE; IN-VITRO; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX; MOLECULAR-BA SIS; FACTOR DELIVERY; TUBE FORMATION; ANGIOGENESIS A significant stumbling block in the creation of functional three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues is the proper vascularization of the constructs. Furthermore, in the context of el ectrospinning, the development of 3D constructs using this technique has been hi ndered by the limited infiltration of cells into their structure. In an attempt to address these issues, a hybrid mesh of poly (epsilon-caprolactone)-collagen b lend (PCL/Col) and hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, Heprasil (TM) was created via a dual electrodeposition system. Simultaneous deposition of HA and PCL/Col allow ed the dual loading and controlled release of two potent angiogenic growth facto rs VEGF(165) and PDGF-BB over a period of five weeks in vitro. Furthermore, this manner of loading sustained the bioactivity of the two growth factors. Utilizin g an in-house developed 3D co-culture assay model of human umbilical vein endoth elial cells and lung fibroblasts, the growth factor-loaded hybrid meshes was sho wn to not only support cellular attachment, but also their infiltration and the recapitulation of primitive capillary network in the scaffold's architecture. Th us, the creation of a PCL/Col-Heprasil hybrid scaffold is a step forward toward the attainment of a 3D bio-functionalized, vascularized tissue engineering const ruct. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Hutmacher, DW] Queensla nd Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, Brisbane, Qld 4059, Australia; [Eka putra, AK] NUS Tissue Engn Program, Grad Program Bioengn, Singapore 117510, Sing apore; [Prestwich, GD] Univ Utah, Dept Med Chem, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 USA; [ Cool, SM] Agcy Sci Technol & Res, Inst Med Biol, Singapore 138673, Singapore Hutmacher, DW (reprint author), Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Inno vat, 60 Musk Ave, Brisbane, Qld 4059, Australia dietmar.hutmacher@qut.edu.au A*STAR SERC[062 120 0013] The authors acknowledge A*STAR SERC grant 062 12 0 0013 as a source of funding for the work presented here. 68 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8108 8117 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.022 10 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Mat erials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200008 J Wong, ML; Leach, JK; Athanasiou, KA; Griffiths, LG Wong, Maelene L.; Leach, J. Kent; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.; Griffiths, Leigh G. The role of protein solubilization in antigen removal from xenogeneic tissue for heart valve tissue engineering BIOMATERIALS English Article Antigen removal; Xenogeneic scaffold; Decellularization; Extracellular matrix; H eart valve tissue engineering BOVINE PERICARDIUM; DECELLULARIZED PORCINE; PULM ONARY VALVE; EXTRACTION; ELECTROPHORESIS; XENOANTIGENS; CHALLENGES; CONDUITS; FA ILURE; MATRIX Decellularization techniques have been developed in an attempt t o reduce the antigenicity of xenogeneic biomaterials, a critical barrier in thei r use as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, numerous studies have demonstrat ed inadequate removal and subsequent persistence of antigens in the biomaterial following decellularization, resulting in an immune response upon implantation. Thus, methods to enhance antigen removal (AR) are critical for the use of xenoge neic biomaterials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In the presen t study, AR methods incorporating protein solubilization principles were investi gated for their ability to reduce antigenicity of bovine pericardium (BP) for he art valve tissue engineering. Bovine pericardium following AR (BP-AR) was assess ed for residual antigenicity, tensile properties, and extracellular matrix compo sition. Increasing protein solubility during AR significantly decreased the resi dual antigenicity of BP-AR by an additional 80% compared to hypotonic solution o r 60% compared to 0.1% (w/v) SDS decellularization methods. Moreover, solubilizi ng agents have a dominant effect on reducing the level of residual antigenicity of BP-AR beyond that achieved by AR additives alone. Tested AR methods did not c ompromise the tensile properties of BP-AR compared to native BP. Furthermore, re

sidual cell nuclei did not correlate to residual antigenicity, demonstrating tha t residual nuclei counts may not be an appropriate indicator of successful AIL I n conclusion, AR strategies promoting protein solubilization significantly reduc ed residual antigens compared to decellularization methods without compromising biomaterial functional properties. This study demonstrates the importance of sol ubilizing protein antigens for their removal in the generation of xenogeneic sca ffolds. Published by Elsevier Ltd. [Wong, ML; Griffiths, LG] Univ Calif Dav is, Dept Vet Med Med & Epidemiol, Davis, CA 95616 USA; [Wong, ML; Leach, JK; Ath anasiou, KA] Univ Calif Davis, Dept Biomed Engn, Davis, CA 95616 USA Griffith s, LG (reprint author), Univ Calif Davis, Dept Vet Med Med & Epidemiol, 1 Shield s Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA lggriffiths@ucdavis.edu American Heart Associati on[11SDG4980023]; HHMI Med into Grad Initiative[56005706] The authors woul d like to thank Janelle L. Wong for her technical assistance with the quantitati ve biochemical assays and histology. The authors would also like to thank Dr. Je rry Hu, Sriram V. Eleswarapu, Donald Responte, and Vincent P. Willard from the A thanasiou lab for their advice regarding tensile testing and biochemical assays and Dr. Clare E. Yellowley for use of her microscope. This work was funded by th e American Heart Association (11SDG4980023, LGG) and HHMI Med into Grad Initiati ve (56005706, MLW). 41 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8129 8138 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.07.030 10 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200 010 J Ghanaati, S; Unger, RE; Webber, MJ; Barbeck, M; Orth, C; Kirkpatrick, JA ; Booms, P; Motta, A; Migliaresi, C; Sader, RA; Kirkpatrick, CJ Ghanaati, Shahram; Unger, Ronald E.; Webber, Matthew J.; Barbeck, Mike; Orth, Ca rina; Kirkpatrick, Jenny A.; Booms, Patrick; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claud io; Sader, Robert A.; Kirkpatrick, C. James Scaffold vascularization in vivo driven by primary human osteoblasts in concert with host inflammatory c ells BIOMATERIALS English Article Angiogenesis; Bone tissue engineering; Osteoblasts; Multinucleated giant cells; Silk fibroin OUTGROWTH ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; HUMAN PERIP HERAL-BLOOD; SILK FIBROIN; GROWTH-FACTOR; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; ANGIOGENESIS; BIOMA TERIALS; VITRO; CULTURES Successful cell-based tissue engineering require s a rapid and thorough vascularization in order to ensure long-term implant surv ival and tissue integration. The vascularization of a scaffold is a complex proc ess, and is modulated by the presence of transplanted cells, exogenous and endog enous signaling proteins, and the host tissue reaction, among other influencing factors. This paper presents evidence for the significance of pre-seeded osteobl asts for the in vivo vascularization of a biodegradable scaffold. Human osteobla sts, cultured on silk fibroin micronets in vitro, migrated throughout the interc onnected pores of the scaffold and produced extensive bone matrix. When these co nstructs were implanted in SCID mice, a rapid and thorough vascularization of th e scaffold by the host blood capillaries occurred. This profound response was no t seen for the silk fibroin scaffold alone. Moreover, when the pre-cultivation t ime of human osteoblasts was reduced from 14 days to only 24 h, the significant effect these cells exerted on vascularization rate in vivo was still detectable. From these studies, we conclude that matrix and soluble factors produced by ost eoblasts can serve to instruct host endothelial cells to migrate, proliferate, a nd initiate the process of scaffold vascularization. This finding represents a p otential paradigm shift for the field of tissue engineering, especially in bone, as traditional strategies to enhance scaffold vascularization have focused on e ndovascular cells and regarded osteoblasts primarily as cell targets for mineral ization. In addition, the migration of host macrophages and multinucleated giant cells into the scaffold was also found to influence the vascularization of the biomaterial. Therefore, the robust effect on scaffold vascularization seen by pr e-culturing with osteoblasts appears to occur in concert with the pro-angiogenic stimuli arising from host immune cells. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reser

ved. [Ghanaati, S; Unger, RE; Barbeck, M; Kirkpatrick, JA; Kirkpatrick, CJ] J ohannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Pathol, REPAIR Lab, D-55101 Mainz, Germany; [ Webber, MJ] Northwestern Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, Evanston, IL 60208 USA; [Orth, C] Univ Jena, Inst Pathol, Jena, Germany; [Booms, P] Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Mol Med, Sect Translat Anaesthet & Surg Sci, Leeds LS2 9JT, W Yorkshire, England; [M otta, A; Migliaresi, C] Univ Trent, Dept Mat Engn & Ind Technol, I-38100 Trento, Italy; [Motta, A; Migliaresi, C] Univ Trent, BIOtech Res Ctr, I-38100 Trento, I taly; [Ghanaati, S; Sader, RA] Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Clin Maxillofacial & Plast Surg, Frankfurt, Germany Ghanaati, S (reprint author), Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Inst Pathol, REPAIR Lab, Langenbeckstr 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany ghanaati@uni-mainz.de European commission[500283- 2]; German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF German-Chinese Cooperation in Regenerative Medic ine) The authors would like to thank A. Sartoris und U.Hilbig for their excel lent technical assistance. This work was financially supported by grants from th e European commission (EXPERTISSUES Contract no.: 500283- 2) and the German Fede ral Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF German-Chinese Cooperation in Regen erative Medicine). 40 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8150 8160 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2 011.07.041 11 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Scien ce, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200 012 J Li, XA; Sun, HX; Lin, NC; Hou, XL; Wang, JM; Zhou, BM; Xu, PZ; Xiao, ZF; Chen, B; Dai, JW; Hu, YL Li, Xinan; Sun, Haixiang ; Lin, Nacheng; Hou, Xianglin; Wang, Jingmei; Zhou, Bai; Xu, Peizhen; Xiao, Zhif eng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu; Hu, Yali Regeneration of uterine horns in rats by collagen scaffolds loaded with collagen-binding human basic fibroblast growth factor BIOMATERIALS English Article Collagen; Basic fibroblast growth factor; Uterine horn regeneration; Tissue engi neering INTRAPERITONEAL COMPOSITE MESH; SMALL-INTESTINAL SUBMUCOSA; INFECTION RI SK; OPEN PLACEMENT; IN-VITRO; UTERUS; MATRIX; VASCULARIZATION; TRANSPLANTATION; REPLACEMENT Severe damages of uterine endometrium which prevent embryos from implantation and placentation finally often result in infertility or pregnant c omplications. There is lack of effective treatments due to the limitation of nat ive materials available and complexity of the function and internal environment of uterus. In the present study, a collagen targeting basic fibroblast growth fa ctor (bFGF) delivery system was constructed by a collagen membrane loaded with b FGF fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to the N-terminal which limits the dif fusion of bFGF from collagen. We tested the bFGF delivery system in rats under t he severe uterine damage model (partial rat uterine horn excision/reconstruction ), and found this delivery system improved regeneration abilities of uterine end ometrium and muscular cells, improved vascularization, as well as better pregnan cy outcomes in rats. Therefore, this targeting delivery system may be an effecti ve strategy for uterine tissue regeneration. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights r eserved. [Li, XA; Sun, HX; Lin, NC; Zhou, BM; Hu, YL] Nanjing Univ, Nanji ng Drum Tower Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Sch Med, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R Ch ina; [Hou, XL] Yantai Zhenghai Biotechnol Co Ltd, Yantai 264006, Shangdong, Peop les R China; [Wang, JM] Nanjing Univ, Nanjing Drum Tower Hosp, Sch Med, Dept Pat hol, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R China; [Xu, PZ] Women & Childrens Hosp Changzhou City, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Changzhou 213003, Peoples R China; [Xiao, ZF; Chen, B; Dai, JW] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Genet & Dev Biol, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China Hu, YL (reprint author), Nanjing Univ, Nanjing Drum Tower Hosp, Dept Obs tet & Gynecol, Sch Med, 321 Zhongshan Rd, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R China jwdai@genetics.ac.cn; yali_hu@hotmail.com Ministry of Science and Technolo gy of China[2007CB947504, 2010CB945104]; Chinese Academy of Sciences[XDA01030401 ]; Key Laboratory of Obstetric & Gynecologic Diseases, Ministry of Health; Jiang su Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine[BM2007208]; Key Laboratory, Department of Health, Jiangsu Province, China[XK200709] The authors would like to thank Dr Kui Meng, Dr Jun Yang and Dr Qiang Zhou for their technical assistance in imm

unohistochemistry. This work is supported by grants from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2007CB947504, 2010CB945104); the "Strategic Priority R esearch Program" of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA01030401); Key Laborator y of Obstetric & Gynecologic Diseases, Ministry of Health; Jiangsu Key Laborator y for Molecular Medicine (BM2007208); and Key Laboratory (XK200709), Department of Health, Jiangsu Province, China. 32 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8172 8181 10.1016/ j.biomaterials.2011.07.050 10 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200014 J de Guzman, RC; Merrill, MR; Richter, JR; Hamzi, RI; Greengauz-Roberts, O K; Van Dyke, ME de Guzman, Roche C.; Merrill, Michelle R .; Richter, Jillian R.; Hamzi, Rawad I.; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K.; Van Dyke, M ark E. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials BIOMATERIALS English Article Keratin; Biomaterial; Protein oxidation; Compatibility; Tissue engineering; Rege nerative medicine HUMAN HAIR; KERATINS; CHEMISTRY; PROTEIN; WOOL; IDENTIFI CATION; REGENERATION; CULTIVATION; SCAFFOLDS; FRACTION The oxidized form of ext ractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaini ng interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including t hose directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not pos sess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays subst antially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the co mposition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterial s are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis o f lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass w ith amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage an d drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic a cid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identi fied the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair kerati ns (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithe lial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded f orms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-lik e hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon w etting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were att ained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. I mplantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose reso rption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression with 92% degradation by an 8week time point. Keratose was shown to integrate with the host tissue as evidenc ed by infiltration of leukocytes and fibroblasts, bulk material angiogenesis, an d minimal fibrous encapsulation. Tissue response benchmarks were superior in ker atose compared to the control PLGA 90:10 mesh. Finally, the degraded keratose wa s observed to remodel with the natural collagen extracellular matrix, verifying the benefit of using keratose as a temporary matrix for regenerative medicine ap plications. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [de Guzman, RC; Merrill, MR; Richter, JR; Hamzi, RI; Greengauz-Roberts, OK; Van Dyke, ME] Wake Forest Un iv Hlth Sci, Inst Regenerat Med, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA; [Richter, JR] Virg inia Tech Wake Forest Univ, Sch Biomed Engn & Sci, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA Van Dyke, ME (reprint author), Wake Forest Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Regenerat Med, Wi nston Salem, NC 27157 USA mavandyk@wfubmc.edu US Army; KeraNetics, LLC . The authors would like to thank Maria Bahawdory, Bailey Fearing, Lauren Pace, Helen Melito, and Dr. Mark Lively for their invaluable assistance. This wo rk was supported by the US Army and KeraNetics, LLC. 50 0

0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomater ials NOV 2011 32 32 8205 8217 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.054 13 Engineering, Bio medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200017 J Mi, Y; Li, K; Liu, Y; Pu, KY; Liu, B; Feng, SS Mi, Yu; Li, Kai; Liu, Yutao; Pu, Kan-Yi; Liu, Bin; Feng, Si-Shen Herceptin functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane - conjugated oligo mers - silica/iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor cell sorting and detection BIOMATERIALS English Article CTC; Cancer nanotechnology; Conjugated oligomers; Iron oxides; Silica nanopartic les; Trastuzumab METASTATIC BREAST-CANCER; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY; CLINICALPRACTICE; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD; QUANTUM DOTS; THERAPY; CAPTURE Sorting and dete ction of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood as an efficient and n on-invasive method to diagnose cancer have recently attracted much attention. In this article, we developed a multiply-engineered nanoparticle system for CTC so rting and detection, which consists of (1) conjugated oligomer (CO) as fluoresce nce signal source, (2) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) scaffold for CO localization for better fluorescent effects, (3) silica nanoparticles (SiNPs ) as formulation matrix of the POSS containing CO, (4) iron oxide (IO) layer on the silica nanoparticles (IO-SiNPs) for magnetic collection, and (5) herceptin s urface functionalization of the IO-SiNPs to target cancer cells of HER2 overexpr ession. Such a multiply-engineered structure can be used for either traditional immunomagnetic methods or microfluidic devices for CTC sorting and detection. (C ) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Mi, Y; Li, K; Liu, Y; Pu, KY; L iu, B; Feng, SS] Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Fac Engn, Singapo re 117576, Singapore; [Feng, SS] Natl Univ Singapore, Div Bioengn, Fac Engn, Sin gapore 117576, Singapore; [Feng, SS] Natl Univ Singapore, Nanosci & Nanoengn Ini tiat NUSNNI, Singapore 117581, Singapore Feng, SS (reprint author), Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Fac Engn, Block E5,02-11,4 Engn Dr 4, S ingapore 117576, Singapore chefss@nus.edu.sg Agency of Science, Techn ology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore; Ministry of Education[R-279-000-255-112] ; National Research Foundation[R-279-000-323-281] This work is supported b y the 7th Singapore-China Cooperative Research Project Call between Agency of Sc ience, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore (PI: Feng SS) and Ministry of Education (R-279-000-255-112), National Research Foundation (R-279-000-323-281) . 35 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOUL EVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8226 8233 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.040 8 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Mat erials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200019 J Oh, SH; Kim, TH; Lee, JH Oh, Se Heang; Ki m, Tae Ho; Lee, Jin Ho Creating growth factor gradients in three dimens ional porous matrix by centrifugation and surface immobilization BIOMATER IALS English Article Growth f actor gradient; Scaffold; Polycaprolactone; Centrifugation; Surface immobilizati on MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; CHONDROGENIC DIFFERENTIATION; CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR S; MOLECULAR GRADIENTS; NEURITE OUTGROWTH; PROTEIN GRADIENTS; HEPARIN; TISSUE; C HEMOTAXIS; SCAFFOLDS Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 cylindrical scaffol ds with gradually increasing growth factor concentrations were fabricated by the centrifugation of fibril-like PCLs and the subsequent fibril surface immobiliza tion of growth factors. The cylindrical scaffolds exhibited gradually increasing surface areas along the longitudinal direction [from 3.17 +/- 0.05 m(2)/g (top position) to 5.42 +/- 0.01 m(2)/g (bottom position)]. The growth factors (BMP-7, TGF-beta(2) and VEGF(165)) as model bioactive molecules were immobilized onto t he fibril surfaces of the scaffolds via heparin binding to produce scaffolds wit h gradually increasing concentrations of growth factors from the top position (B MP-7, 60.89 +/- 2.51; TGF-beta(2), 42.85 +/- 2.00; VEGF(165), 42.52 +/- 3.22 ng/

scaffold section) to the bottom position (BMP-7, 181.07 +/- 3.21; TGF-beta(2), 1 42.08 +/- 2.91: VEGF(165), 112.00 +/- 4.00 ng/scaffold section). The released am ount of growth factor (VEGF(165)) from the cylindrical scaffold gradually decrea sed along the longitudinal direction in a sustained manner for up to 35 days, wh ich can allow for a minutely controlled spatial distribution of growth factors i n a 3D environment. The 3D porous scaffold with a concentration gradient of grow th factors may become a useful tool for basic studies, including in vitro invest igations of 3D chemotaxis/haptotaxis for the control of specific biological proc ess. It may also be used as a tissue engineering scaffolding system for a variet y of tissues/organs requiring the spatial regulation of growth factors for effec tive regeneration. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Oh, SH; Kim, TH ; Lee, JH] Hannam Univ, Dept Adv Mat, Taejon 305811, South Korea Lee, JH (reprint author), Hannam Univ, Dept Adv Mat, 461-6 Jeonmin Dong, Taejon 305811, South Korea jhlee@hnu.kr National Research Foundation of Korea[NRF-2008-3 14-D00515] This work was supported by a grant from the National Research Fo undation of Korea (NRF-2008-314-D00515). 59 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0142-9612 BIOMATERIALS Biomaterials NOV 2011 32 32 8254 8260 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.027 7 Engineering, Bio medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 824ZR WOS:000295241200022 J Kokusho, T; Suzuki, T Kokusho, Takaji; Suzuki, Taku Energy flow in shallow depth based on vertical array records dur ing recent strong earthquakes SOIL DYNAMICS AND EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING English Article DISSIPATION; WAV E Wave energy flow in shallow ground depth is calculated based on main sho ck records obtained at 30 vertical array sites throughout Japan during nine rece nt strong earthquakes (M(J)=6.4-8.0) by assuming vertical propagation of SH wave s. It is generally found that upward energy tends to decrease considerably as it goes up from the base (about 100 m deep) to the ground surface. Large energy is reflected at layer boundaries with clear impedance contrast and returns to deep er ground, so that only less than 10-30% of the upward energy at the base level arrives at the ground surface in most sites. Energy dissipation calculated from the upward and downward energies tends to increase with the increase of damping ratio of the ground back-calculated from the seismic records. It is also found t hat the upward energy at the base may roughly be estimated for engineering purpo ses using spherical energy radiation of the body wave despite strong effects of fault rupture/path mechanisms. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kokusho, T; Suzuki, T] Chuo Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Bunkyo Ku, Tokyo 1128551, Jap an; [Suzuki, T] Tokyo Elect Power Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan Kokusho, T (reprint auth or), Chuo Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Bunkyo Ku, 1-13-27 Kasuga, Tokyo 1128551, Japan kokusho@civil.chuo-u.ac.jp 20 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0267-7261 SOIL DYN EARTHQ ENG Soil Dyn . Earthq. Eng. NOV 2011 31 11 1540 1550 10.1016/j.soildyn.2011.06.003 11 Engineer ing, Geological; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Engineering; Geology 824JQ WOS:000295198600008 J Lyu, S Lyu, Siwei Dependency Reduc tion with Divisive Normalization: Justification and Effectiveness NEURAL C OMPUTATION English Article NATURAL IMAGES; SCALE MIXTURES; VISUAL-CORTEX; CONTRAST GAIN; V1 NEURONS; STATIS TICS; INFORMATION; RESPONSES; MODEL; DISTRIBUTIONS Efficient coding transfo rms that reduce or remove statistical dependencies in natural sensory signals ar e important for both biology and engineering. In recent years, divisive normaliz ation (DN) has been advocated as a simple and effective nonlinear efficient codi ng transform. In this work, we first elaborate on the theoretical justification for DN as an efficient coding transform. Specifically, we use the multivariate t model to represent several important statistical properties of natural sensory

signals and show that DN approximates the optimal transforms that eliminate stat istical dependencies in the multivariate t model. Second, we show that several f orms of DN used in the literature are equivalent in their effects as efficient c oding transforms. Third, we provide a quantitative evaluation of the overall dep endency reduction performance of DN for both the multivariate t models and natur al sensory signals. Finally, we find that statistical dependencies in the multiv ariate t model and natural sensory signals are increased by the DN transform wit h low-input dimensions. This implies that for DN to be an effective efficient co ding transform, it has to pool over a sufficiently large number of inputs. SUNY Albany, Dept Comp Sci, Albany, NY 12222 USA Lyu, S (reprint author), SUNY Albany, Dept Comp Sci, Albany, NY 12222 USA lsw@cs.albany.edu National Science Foundation[0953373] Thanks to Eero Simoncelli for helpful di scussions and the two anonymous referees for their critical and constructive com ments. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundati on under CAREER Award grant no. 0953373. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. 82 0 0 MIT PRESS CAMBRIDGE 55 HAYWARD STREET, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02142 U SA 0899-7667 NEURAL COMPUT Neural Comput. NOV 2011 23 11 2942 2973 32 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Neurosciences Computer Science; Neurosciences & Neurology 825ZO WOS:000295321100008 J Chan, YH; Huang, TW; Young, TH; Lou, PJ Chan, Ye n-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Young, Tai-Horng; Lou, Pei-Jen Human Salivary G land Acinar Cells Spontaneously Form Three-Dimensional Structures and Change the Protein Expression Patterns JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY English Article EPITHELIAL-CELLS; PRIMAR Y CULTURE; IN-VITRO; TISSUE; CULTIVATION; SECRETION; DIFFERENTIATION; AQUAPORINS ; GROWTH; CANCER Applying tissue engineering principles to design an auto -secretory device is a potential solution for patients suffering loss of salivar y gland function. However, the largest challenge in implementing this solution i s the primary culture of human salivary gland cells, because the cells are highl y differentiated and difficult to expand in vitro. This situation leads to the l ack of reports on the in vitro cell biology and physiology of human salivary gla nd cells. This study used a low-calcium culture system to selectively cultivate human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells from tissues with high purity in cell co mposition. This condition enables PGAC cells to continuously proliferate and ret ain the phenotypes of epithelial acinar cells to express secreting products (a-a mylase) and function-related proteins (aquaporin-3, aquaporin-5, and ZO-1). Nota bly, when the cells reached confluence, three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates w ere observed in crowded regions. These self-formed cell spheres were termed post -confluence structures (PCSs). Unexpectedly, despite being cultured in the same media, cells in PCSs exhibited higher expression levels and different expression patterns of function-related proteins compared to the two-dimensional (2D) cell s. Translocation of aquoporin-3 from cytosolic to alongside the cell boundaries, and of ZO-1 molecules to the boundary of the PCSs were also observed. These obs ervations suggest that when PGAC cells cultured on the 2D substrate would form P CSs without the help of 3D scaffolds and retain certain differentiation and pola rity. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to introduce 2D substrates ins tead of 3D scaffolds into artificial salivary gland tissue engineering. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 3076-3085, 2011. (C) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [Chan, YH; Huang , TW; Young, TH] Natl Taiwan Univ, Inst Biomed Engn, Coll Med, Taipei 10764, Tai wan; [Chan, YH; Huang, TW; Young, TH] Natl Taiwan Univ, Coll Engn, Taipei 10764, Taiwan; [Huang, TW] Far Eastern Mem Hosp, Dept Otolaryngol, Taipei, Taiwan; [Lo u, PJ] Natl Taiwan Univ Hosp, Dept Otolaryngol, Taipei, Taiwan; [Lou, PJ] Coll M ed, Taipei, Taiwan Young, TH (reprint author), 1,Sec 1 Jen Ai Rd, Taipei, T aiwan thyoung@ntu.edu.tw; pjlou@ntu.edu.tw National Science Council, Republ ic of China[NSC99-2628-B-002-050-MY3] Contract grant sponsor: National Science Council, Republic of China;Contract grant number: NSC99-2628-B-002-050-MY3. 28 1 1 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL

DEN 02148, MA USA 0021-9541 J CELL PHYSIOL J. Cell. Physiol . NOV 2011 226 11 3076 3085 10.1002/jcp.22664 10 Cell Biology; Physiology Cell Biology; Physiology 824XF WOS:000295234800038 J Keiser, NW; Engelhardt, JF Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F. New animal models of cystic fibrosis: wh at are they teaching us? CURRENT OPINION IN PULMONARY MEDICINE English Article cystic fibrosis; ferret; mouse; pathology; pathophysiology; pig TRACHEAL SUBMUCOSAL GLANDS; AIRWAY SURFA CE DEHYDRATION; MOUSE MODELS; ION-TRANSPORT; CFTR GENE; DISEASE; PIGS; MICE; SEC RETION; PATHOLOGY Purpose of review Cystic fibrosis is the first human gen etic disease to benefit from the directed engineering of three different species of animal models (mice, pigs, and ferrets). Recent studies on the cystic fibros is pig and ferret models are providing new information about the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis in various organ systems. Additionally, new conditional cyst ic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice are teachin g unexpected lessons about CFTR function in surprising cellular locations. Compa risons between these animal models and the human condition are key to dissecting the complexities of disease pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis. Recent findings Cystic fibrosis pigs and ferrets have provided new models to study the spontane ous development of disease in the lung and pancreas, two organs that are largely spared overt spontaneous disease in cystic fibrosis mice. New cystic fibrosis m ouse models are now interrogating CFTR functions involved in growth and inflamma tion at an organ-based level using conditional knockout technology. Together, th ese models are providing new insights on the human condition. Summary Basic and clinical cystic fibrosis research will benefit greatly from the comparative path ophysiology of cystic fibrosis mice, pigs, and ferrets. Both similarities and di fferences between these three cystic fibrosis models will inform pathophysiologi cally important mechanisms of CFTR function in humans and aid in the development of both organ-specific and general therapies for cystic fibrosis. [Keiser, NW; Engelhardt, JF] Univ Iowa, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, Carver Coll Med, Iowa Cit y, IA 52242 USA; [Engelhardt, JF] Univ Iowa, Dept Internal Med, Carver Coll Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA; [Engelhardt, JF] Univ Iowa, Ctr Gene Therapy Cyst Fibr osis & Other Genet Dis, Carver Coll Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA Engelhar dt, JF (reprint author), Univ Iowa, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, Carver Coll Med, Room 1-111,Bowen Sci Bldg,51 Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA john-engelhardt@ uiowa.edu NIH[DK047967, HL091842, R24DK091211, RC1HL099516]; Cystic Fibros is Foundation Authors thank Dr Mitchell Drumm for his advice regarding conditi onal cystic fibrosis mouse models. Funding sources are the NIH (DK047967, HL0918 42, R24DK091211, and RC1HL099516) and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 54 0 0 LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS PHILADELPHIA 530 WALN UT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA 1070-5287 CURR OPIN PULM M ED Curr. Opin. Pulm. Med. NOV 2011 17 6 478 483 10.1097/MCP.0b013e32834b14c9 6 Respiratory System Respiratory System 825ZK WOS:000295320700014 J Watling, JI; Hickman, CR; Orrock, JL Watling, James I.; Hickman, Caleb R.; Orrock, John L. Invasive shrub alters na tive forest amphibian communities BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION English Article Amphibians; Habitat; Invasive pl ant; Lonicera maackii; Microclimate; Litho bates clamitans EXOTIC PLANT INV ASIONS; LONICERA-MAACKII; ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS; PERFORMANCE; ECOLOGY; HABITAT; SA LAMANDERS; ABUNDANCE; RESPONSES; BEHAVIOR Although invasive plants can hav e transformative effects on native plant communities, studies of the consequence s of plant invasion for native fauna are generally restricted to primary consume rs. Here we investigate whether an invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii, impacts nat ive amphibians and evaluate evidence for the role of invasive plant-induced alte ration of forest understory microclimate as a mechanism driving amphibian respon ses to L maackii invasion. We sampled amphibian communities in forest plots with high or low density of L. maackii, and monitored microclimate (temperature and humidity at ground level) in the same forest plots. Amphibian species richness a

nd evenness were lower in invaded plots. Invasion also resulted in shifts in amp hibian species composition. Mean daily maximum temperature and mean daily temper ature were lower in invaded plots, and counts of the Green frog Litho bates clam itans were marginally negatively related to mean daily temperature. Our work ill ustrates how an invasive ecosystem engineer may affect native organisms with whi ch it shares no trophic connection, and suggests that changes in microclimate ma y be one mechanism by which alien plants affect communities where they invade. ( C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Watling, JI] Washington Univ, S t Louis, MO 63130 USA; [Hickman, CR; Orrock, JL] Univ Wisconsin, Dept Zool, Madi son, WI 53706 USA Watling, JI (reprint author), Univ Florida, Ft Lauderdal e Res & Educ Ctr, 3205 Coll Ave, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33314 USA watlingj@ufl.edu Washington University We thank M. Kim, E. Lee and K. Wang for assistance in th e field, and the SURF Program at Washington University for providing partial sup port for E. Lee and K. Wang. We appreciate the support for our work provided by J. Vogel and L Bollmann at the Busch Conservation Area. M. Craig, A. Duval, M. M elnechuk, K. Powell, M. Schuler and three anonymous reviewers provided helpful s uggestions on the manuscript. 36 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0006-3207 BIOL CONSERV Biol. Conserv. NOV 2011 144 11 2597 2601 10.1016/j.biocon.2011.07 .005 5 Biodiversity Conservation; Ecology; Environmenta l Sciences Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Sciences & Ecology 827QL WOS:000295442900006 J Hacker, HG; Sisay, MT; Gutschow, M Haecker, Hans-Georg; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Guetschow, Michael Allosteric modul ation of caspases PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS English Review Apoptosis; Allosteric inhibitors; Caspases; Cysteine proteases; Enzyme activator s; Inflammation; Cancer INTERLEUKIN-1-BETA CONVERTING-ENZYME; SMALL-MOLECULE INH IBITORS; SELECTIVE NONPEPTIDE INHIBITORS; ISATIN SULFONAMIDE ANALOGS; VIRAL SERP IN CRMA; STRUCTURAL BASIS; CYSTEINE PROTEASE; CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE; CELL-DEATH; INVITRO Caspases are proteolytic enzymes mainly involved in the induction and ex ecution phases of apoptosis. This type of programmed cell death is an essential regulatory process required to maintain the integrity and homeostasis of multice llular organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis is attributed a key role in many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic damage, autoimmune di seases and cancer. Allosteric modulation of the function of a protein occurs whe n the regulatory trigger, such as the binding of a small effector or inhibitor m olecule, takes place some distance from the protein's active site. In recent yea rs. several caspases have been identified that possess allosteric sites and bind ing of small molecule to these sites resulted in the modulation of enzyme activi ties. Regulation of caspase activity by small molecule allosteric modulators is believed to be of great therapeutic importance. In this review we give brief hig hlights on recent developments in identifying and characterizing natural and syn thetic allosteric inhibitors as well as activators of caspases and discuss their potential in drug discovery and protein engineering. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Hacker, HG; Sisay, MT; Gutschow, M] Univ Bonn, Inst Pha rmaceut, D-53121 Bonn, Germany; [Sisay, MT] Univ Bonn, Limes Program Unit Chem B iol & Med Chem, B IT, Dept Life Sci Informat, D-53113 Bonn, Germany Gutschow , M (reprint author), Univ Bonn, Inst Pharmaceut, Immenburg 4, D-53121 Bonn, Ger many guetschow@uni-bonn.de Dr. August und Dr. Anni Lesmuller-Stiftung, Muni ch H.-G. H. thanks Dr. August und Dr. Anni Lesmuller-Stiftung, Munich, for financial support. 119 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN D 0163-7258 PHARMACOL THERAPEUT Pharmacol. Ther. NOV 2011 132 2 180 195 10.1016/j.pharmthera.2011.07.003 16 Pharmacology & P harmacy Pharmacology & Pharmacy 827MX WOS:000295433700005 J Sinikovic, B; Schumann, P; Winkler, M; Kuestermeyer, J; Tavassol, F; von See, C; Carvalho, C; Mulhaupt, R; Bormann, KH; Kokemueller, H; Meyer-Lindenberg , A; Laschke, MW; Menger, MD; Gellrich, NC; Rucker, M

Sinikovic, Branko; Schumann, Paul; Winkler, Meike; Kuestermeyer, Julian; Tavasso l, Frank; von See, Constantin; Carvalho, Carlos; Muelhaupt, Rolf; Bormann, Kai-H endrik; Kokemueller, Horst; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; Laschke, Matthias W.; Meng er, Michael D.; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Ruecker, Martin Calvaria bone chamber-A new model for intravital assessment of osseous angiogenesis JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article bone chamber; mouse; intravital fluorescence microscopy; bone tissue engineering ; skull; dura mater; PLGA scaffold ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION INJURY; OSTEOBLASTLIKE CELLS; MARROW IN-VIVO; STRIATED-MUSCLE; HEMATOPOIETIC-CELLS; SCAFFOLDS; MIC ROSCOPY; VITRO; BLOOD; PROLIFERATION The faith of tissue engineered bone repl acing constructs depends on their early supply with oxygen and nutrients, and th us on a rapid vascularization. Although some models for direct observation of an giogenesis are described, none of them allows the observation of new vessel form ation in desmal bone. Therefore, we developed a new chamber model suitable for q uantitative in vivo assessment of the vascularization of bone substitutes by int ravital fluorescence microscopy. In the parietal calvaria of 32 balb/c mice a cr itical size defect was set. Porous 3D-poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-blocks were inserted into 16 osseous defects (groups 3 and 4) while other 16 osseous d efects remained unequipped (groups 1 and 2). By placing a polyethylene membrane onto the dura mater, the angiogenesis was mainly restricted to the osseous margi ns (groups 2 and 4). Microvascular density, angiogenesis, and microcirculatory p arameters were evaluated repetitively during 22 days. In all animals, only a mil d inflammatory reaction was observed with a climax after 2 weeks. The implantati on of PLGA scaffolds resulted in a vascular growth directed towards the center o f the defect as demonstrated by the significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced central mi crovascular densitiy from day 3 to day 22 when compared with unequipped chambers . The additional application of polyethylene membrane was found to reduce signif icantly the microvessel density mainly in the center of both scaffolds and defec ts. The present calvaria bone chamber allows for the first time to assess quanti tatively the angiogenesis arising from desmal bone directly in vivo. Therefore, this chronic model may support the future research in the biological adequacy of bone substitutes. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 9 9A: 151-157, 2011. [Sinikovic, B; Schumann, P; Winkler, M; Kuestermeyer, J; Tavassol, F; von See, C; Kokemueller, H; Gellrich, NC; Rucker, M] Hannover Med Sch, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, D-30625 Hannover, Germany; [Carvalho, C; Mu lhaupt, R; Bormann, KH] Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Inst Mat Res & Macromol Chem, D79104 Freiburg, Germany; [Meyer-Lindenberg, A] Univ Vet Med Hannover, D-30559 Ha nnover, Germany; [Laschke, MW; Menger, MD] Univ Saarland, Inst Clin & Expt Surg, D-66421 Homburg, Germany Sinikovic, B (reprint author), Hannover Med Sch, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, D-30625 Hannover, Germany sinikovic.branko @mh-hannover.de Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft[RU 1224/1-1, GE 820/6-1] Contract grant sponsor: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; contract grant numbers: RU 1224/1-1, GE 820/6-1 40 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 151 157 10.1002/jbm.a.32955 7 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:000295142400001 J Wattamwar, PP; Hardas, SS; Butterfield, DA; Anderson, KW; Dziubla, TD Wattamwar, Paritosh P.; Hardas, Sarita S.; Butterfield, D. Allan; Anderson, Kimb erly W.; Dziubla, Thomas D. Tuning of the pro-oxidant and antioxidan t activity of trolox through the controlled release from biodegradable poly(trol ox ester) polymers JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article oxidative stress; antiox idant polymers; trolox; nanoparticles; biocompatibility OXIDATIVE STRESS; IN-VIT RO; SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE; PROTEIN OXIDATION; REDOX STATE; VITAMIN-C; CELLS; NEUR OTOXICITY; CULTURES; DAMAGE In a variety of biomedical applications (e.g., t issue engineering, drug delivery, etc.), the role of a bioactive material is to serve as a platform by which one can modulate the cellular response into a desir ed role. Of the methods by which one may achieve this control (e.g., shape, stru

cture, binding, growth factor release), the control of the cellular redox state has been under evaluated. Ideally, the ability to tune the redox state of a cell provides an additional level of control over a variety of cellular responses in cluding, cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Yet, in order to ac hieve such control, it is important to know both the overall oxidative status of the cell and what molecular targets are being oxidized. In this work, poly (tro lox ester) nanoparticles were evaluated for their ability to either inhibit or i nduce cellular oxidative stress in a dose-dependent fashion. This polymer delive ry form possessed a unique ability to suppress protein oxidation, a feature not seen in the free drug form, emphasizing the advantage of the delivery/dosage for mulation has upon regulating cellular response. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A: 184-191, 2011. [Wattamwar, PP; Anderson, KW; Dz iubla, TD] Univ Kentucky, Dept Chem & Mat Engn, Lexington, KY 40506 USA; [Hardas , SS; Butterfield, DA] Univ Kentucky, Dept Chem, Lexington, KY 40506 USA; [Butte rfield, DA] Univ Kentucky, Ctr Membrane Sci, Lexington, KY 40506 USA Dziubla, TD (reprint author), Univ Kentucky, Dept Chem & Mat Engn, Lexington, KY 40506 U SA dziubla@engr.uky.edu University of Kentucky Research Foundation; Offi ce of Naval Research (ONR DEPSCoR) Contract grant sponsors: University of K entucky Research Foundation; Office of Naval Research (ONR DEPSCoR) 45 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biome d. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 184 191 10.1002/jbm.a.33174 8 Engineer ing, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials S cience 823RQ WOS:000295142400005 J Li, ZH; Kreiner, M; Edrada-Ebel, R; Cui, ZF; van der Walle, CF; Mardon, HJ Li, Zhaohui; Kreiner, Michaela; Edrada-Ebel, RuA ngelie; Cui, Zhanfeng; van der Walle, Christopher F.; Mardon, Helen J. Perfusion culture enhanced human endometrial stromal cell growth in alginate-mul tivalent integrin alpha 5 beta 1 ligand scaffolds JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MA TERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article functional alginate; endometrium; tissue engineering; fibronectin; perfusion mic robioreactor 10TH FIII DOMAINS; HUMAN FIBRONECTIN; BIOLOGICAL-ACTIVITY; BIORE ACTOR SYSTEM; MATRIX PRODUCTION; ADHESION; TISSUE; HYDROGELS; PROTEIN; DESIGN A method to functionalize alginate by introducing monomeric or self-assembling ( tetrameric) fibronectin (FN) domains is described, leading to a functional scaff old, which is used for three dimensional (3D) culture of human endometrial strom al cells (EnSCs). EnSCs encapsulated in the functional alginate were cultured un der perfusion using the TissueFlex (R) platform, a multiple parallel microbiorea ctor system for 3D cell culture. The effect of the novel scaffold and the effect of perfusion were examined. Cell viability, proliferation, and extracellular ma trix (ECM) deposition were determined and the results compared with those obtain ed with cells encapsulated in non-functionalized alginate, and also those withou t perfusion. Staining for focal adhesions and actin showed maximal cell adhesion only for alginate-tetrameric FN scaffolds under perfusion, associated with a si gnificant increase in cell number over 7 days culture; in contrast to poor cell adhesion and a decrease in cell number for non-functionalized alginate scaffolds (irrespective of perfused/static culture) and 3D static culture (irrespective o f the scaffold). Conjugation of alginate to FN was an absolute requirement to at tenuate the loss of cell metabolic activity over 7 days culture. ECM deposition for blank alginate and alginate-monomeric FN was similar, but increased around 2 -fold and 3-fold for alginate-tetrameric FN under static and perfusion culture, respectively. It is concluded that the requirement for EnSC engagement with mult ivalent integrin alpha 5 beta 1 ligands and perfused culture are both essential as a first step toward endometrial tissue engineering. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodical s, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A: 211-220, 2011. [Kreiner, M; Edrada-Ebel , R; van der Walle, CF] Univ Strathclyde, Inst Pharm & Biomed Sci, Glasgow G4 0R E, Lanark, Scotland; [Li, ZH; Mardon, HJ] Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuff ield Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oxford OX3 9DU, England; [Cui, ZF] Univ Oxford, Dep t Engn Sci, Inst Biomed Engn, Oxford OX3 7DQ, England van der Walle, CF (repri

nt author), Univ Strathclyde, Inst Pharm & Biomed Sci, 161 Cathedral St, Glasgow G4 0RE, Lanark, Scotland chris.walle@strath.ac.uk; helen.mardon@obs-gyn.o x.ac.uk Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council[BB/D522497/1]; Me dical Research Council Contract grant sponsor: Biotechnology and Biological Sci ences Research Council; contract grant number: BB/D522497/1Contract grant sponso r: Medical Research Council Milstein Fund 49 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 211 220 10.1002/jbm.a.33177 10 Engineering, Biomedical; Materia ls Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:0002 95142400008 J Ng, KK; Thatte, HS; Spector, M Ng, Karen K.; Th atte, Hemant S.; Spector, Myron Chondrogenic differentiation of adult me senchymal stem cells and embryonic cells in collagen scaffolds JOURNAL OF BIOME DICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article cartilage tissue engineering; mesenchymal stem cell; embryonic cell; collagen sc affold SMOOTH-MUSCLE ACTIN; CARCINOMA-CELLS; IN-VITRO; CROSS-LINKING; PROGENITO R CELLS; RETINOIC ACID; GAG SCAFFOLDS; MARROW; MODEL; CONTRACTION Many cel l types and cellular microenvironments have been explored for articular cartilag e tissue engineering. We compared the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchym al stem cells (MSCs) and P19 embryonic carcinoma cells (ECCs), a pluripotent der ivative of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for cartilage histogenesis in porous col lagen scaffolds in vitro. We found that while both MSCs and ECCs express alpha-s mooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), only MSCs exhibit condensation and contraction n ecessary for cartilage histogenesis. Furthermore, histology confirmed that only MSCs exhibited sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II formation after 14 days in culture. We conclude that MSCs appear to be superior over ECCs for ca rtilage regeneration under particular culture conditions. The alpha-SMA-expressi ng ECCs may not have contracted due to the absence of actin unit polymerization or the absence of myosin molecules. Our observations may explain the absence of a contractile scar in fetal wound healing. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A: 275-282, 2011. [Ng, KK; Spector, M] MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; [Ng, KK; Thatte, HS; Spector, M] VA Boston Healthcare Syst, Boston, M A 02130 USA; [Thatte, HS; Spector, M] Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Brigham & Womens Ho sp, Boston, MA 02115 USA Spector, M (reprint author), MIT, 77 Massachuset ts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA mspector@rics.bwh.harvard.edu Department of Ve terans Affairs; Veterans Health Administration; Rehabilitation Research and Deve lopment Service Contract grant sponsors: Department of Veterans Affairs, Veteran s Health Administration, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service 34 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biome d. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 275 282 10.1002/jbm.a.33163 8 Engineer ing, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials S cience 823RQ WOS:000295142400015 J Kheir, E; Stapleton, T; Shaw, D; Jin, ZM; Fisher, J; Ingham, E Kheir, Ehab; Stapleton, Thomas; Shaw, David; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Ingham , Eileen Development and characterization of an acellular porcine cartilage bone matrix for use in tissue engineering JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MA TERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article cartilage; decellularization; scaffold; osteochondral graft; substitute ARTICULA R-CARTILAGE; OSTEOCHONDRAL ALLOGRAFTS; SULFATED GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS; IMMUNOLOGICA L RESPONSES; BIPHASIC INDENTATION; KNEE; DEFECTS; REPAIR; TRANSPLANTATION; HYDRO XYPROLINE The aim of this study was to develop a technique to decellulariz e a porcine cartilage bone construct with view to using this as a biological sca ffold for cartilage substitution. The decellularization protocol applied freeze/ thaw cycles; this was followed by cyclic incubation in hypotonic tris buffer and 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in hypotonic buffer plus protease inhibitors. Nucleases (RNase and DNase) were used to digest nucleic acids followed by disin

fection using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Histological analysis confirmed the abs ence of visible cells within the decellularized tissue. DNA analysis revealed th e near-complete removal of genomic DNA from the decellularized tissues. The dece llularization process had minimal effect on the collagen content of the cartilag e. However, there was a significant reduction in the glycosaminoglycan content i n the decellularized tissues. There was no evidence of the expression of the maj or xenogeneic epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose. Biomechanical indentation testing of decellularized tissues showed a significant change in comparison to t he fresh cartilage. This was presumed to be caused by the reduction in the glyco saminoglycan content. Biocompatibility of the acellular scaffold was determined using contact cytotoxicity assays and a galactosyltransferase knockout mouse mod el. Decellularized porcine cartilage tissue was found to exhibit favorable compa tibility in both in vitro and in vivo tests. In conclusion, this study has gener ated data on the production of an acellular cartilage bone matrix scaffold for u se in osteochondral defect repair. To our knowledge, this is the first study tha t has successfully removed whole cells and alpha-gal from xenogeneic cartilage a nd bone tissue. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A: 283-294, 2011. [Kheir, E; Stapleton, T; Jin, ZM; Fisher, J; Ingham, E] Univ Lee ds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England; [Shaw, D] Bradford Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, Bra dford, W Yorkshire, England Kheir, E (reprint author), Univ Leeds, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England ekheir@doctors.org.uk EPSRC; Leeds Centre of Excellenc e in Medical Engineering; WELMEC; Wellcome Trust; EPSRC[088908/Z/09/Z]; Leeds Mu sculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit (LMBRU); NIHR Contract grant sponsors: EPSRC, The Leeds Centre of Excellence in Medical Engineering, WELMEC, Wellcome Trust and EPSRC; contract grant number: 088908/Z/09/ZContract grant sponsors: Le eds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit (LMBRU), NIHR 46 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214 8, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater . Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 283 294 10.1002/jbm.a.33171 12 Engineering, Bio medical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:000295142400016 J Novajra, G; Vitale-Brovarone, C; Knowles, JC; Maina, G; Aina, V; Ghigo, D; Bergandi, L Novajra, G.; Vitale-Brovarone, C.; Knowl es, J. C.; Maina, G.; Aina, V.; Ghigo, D.; Bergandi, L. Effects of TiO(2 )-containing phosphate glasses on solubility and in vitro biocompatibility JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article phosphate glasses; dissolution; titanium dioxide; cytotoxicity; human MG-63 oste oblasts CONTROLLED-RELEASE GLASSES; BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS; INVERT GLASSES; AQU EOUS-MEDIUM; TITANIUM; DISSOLUTION; DEGRADATION; KINETICS; FIBERS; SYSTEM Phosphate-based glasses with different amounts of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), hav ing the following molar composition 50P(2)O(5)-30CaO-9Na(2)O-3SiO(2)-3MgO-(5-x) K(2)O-xTiO(2), (where x = 0, 2.5, 5 mol %), were synthesised and characterized i n terms of solubility (according to ISO 10993-14), and in vitro biocompatibility using human MG-63 osteoblast cells. Dissolution tests were carried out in TrisHCl (pH 7.4) to simulate the physiological pH and in citric acid (pH 3.0) to sim ulate an acidic environment. The weight loss decreased with increasing TiO(2) co ntent, a process further enhanced in acidic medium. TiO(2) reduced the pH change s usually caused by the dissolution products released. Cellular tests showed tha t all the glasses studied (0-5 mol % TiO(2)) and TiCl(4), used to investigate th e biocompatibility of titanium ions, did not produce cytotoxic effects on human MG-63 osteoblasts for up to 5 days in culture. On the basis of these results, we suggest that TiO(2)-containing phosphate glasses could be promising substrates for bone tissue engineering applications. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Bio med Mater Res Part A: 99A: 295-306, 2011. [Novajra, G; Vitale-Brovarone, C ] Politecn Torino, Dept Mat Sci & Chem Engn, I-10129 Turin, Italy; [Knowles, JC] UCL, Eastman Dent Inst, Div Biomat & Tissue Engn, London WC1X 8LD, England; [Kn owles, JC] Dankook Univ, WCU Res Ctr Nanobiomed Sci, Cheonan Si 330714, Chungnam , South Korea; [Maina, G] Univ Turin, Traumatol Orthopaed & Occupat Med Dept, I10126 Turin, Italy; [Aina, V] Univ Turin, Dept Chem IFM, I-10125 Turin, Italy; [

Aina, V] Univ Turin, Ctr Excellence NIS, I-10125 Turin, Italy; [Ghigo, D; Bergan di, L] Univ Turin, Dept Genet Biol & Biochem, I-10126 Turin, Italy Vitale-B rovarone, C (reprint author), Politecn Torino, Dept Mat Sci & Chem Engn, Corso D uca Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Turin, Italy chiara.vitale@polito.it National Researc h Foundation of Korea (NRF), Ministry of Education, Science and Technology[R31-1 0069]; Regione Piemonte (Ricerca Sanitaria Finalizzata); National Research Found ation of Korea (NRF); Ministry of Education, Science and Technology[R31-10069] Contract grant sponsor: WCU Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), Ministry of Education, Science and Technology; contract grant numbe r: R31-10069Contract grant sponsor: Regione Piemonte (Ricerca Sanitaria Finalizz ata)The authors want to thank Dott. Bergo and Dott. Spinelli for the ICP-MS and GFAAS measurements. This work was supported in part (JCK) by WCU Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Educa tion, Science and Technology (No. R31-10069). 34 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 295 306 10.1002/jbm.a.33186 12 Engineering, Biomedical; Materia ls Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:0002 95142400017 J Prosecka, E; Rampichova, M; Vojtova, L; Tvrdik, D; Melcakova, S; Juhasov a, J; Plencner, M; Jakubova, R; Jancar, J; Necas, A; Kochova, P; Klepacek, J; To nar, Z; Amler, E Prosecka, E.; Rampichova, M.; Vo jtova, L.; Tvrdik, D.; Melcakova, S.; Juhasova, J.; Plencner, M.; Jakubova, R.; Jancar, J.; Necas, A.; Kochova, P.; Klepacek, J.; Tonar, Z.; Amler, E. Optimized conditions for mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into osteoblast s on a collagen/hydroxyapatite matrix JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article collagen /HA scaffold; MSCs; osteoblasts; pore size; mechanical testing BONE TISSUE REGE NERATION; COLLAGEN SCAFFOLDS; ENGINEERED BONE; HYDROXYAPATITE; BIOMATERIALS; CAR TILAGE; OSTEOGENESIS; CARBONATE; SURFACE Collagen/hydroxyapatite (HA) com posite scaffolds are known to be suitable scaffolds for seeding with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiated into osteoblasts and for the in vitro producti on of artificial bones. However, the optimal collagen/HA ratio remains unclear. Our study confirmed that a higher collagen content increased scaffold stiffness but that a greater stiffness was not sufficient for bone tissue formation, a com plex process evidently also dependent on scaffold porosity. We found that the sc affold pore diameter was dependent on the concentration of collagen and HA and t hat it could play a key role in cell seeding. In conclusion, the optimal scaffol d for new bone formation and cell proliferation was found to be a composite scaf fold formed from 50 wt % HA in 0.5 wt % collagen I solution. (C) 2011 Wiley Peri odicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A: 307-315, 2011. [Prosecka, E; Ra mpichova, M; Plencner, M; Jakubova, R; Amler, E] Acad Sci Czech Republic, Inst E xpt Med, Dept Tissue Engn, Prague 14240, Czech Republic; [Prosecka, E; Rampichov a, M; Plencner, M; Jakubova, R; Amler, E] Charles Univ Prague, Inst Biophys, Pra gue 15006 5, Motol, Czech Republic; [Vojtova, L; Jancar, J] Tech Univ, Dept Mat Sci, Fac Chem, Brno 61200, Czech Republic; [Tvrdik, D; Melcakova, S] Charles Uni v Prague, Inst Pathol, Dept Mol Pathol, Prague 12800, Czech Republic; [Juhasova, J] Acad Sci Czech Republic, Inst Anim Physiol & Genet, Dept Cell Regenerat & Pl ast, Libechov 27721, Czech Republic; [Necas, A] Univ Vet & Pharmaceut Sci, Fac V et Med, Small Anim Clin, Dept Surg & Orthopaed, Brno 61242, Czech Republic; [Koc hova, P; Klepacek, J; Tonar, Z] Univ W Bohemia, Fac Sci Appl, Dept Mech, Plzen 3 0614, Czech Republic Prosecka, E (reprint author), Acad Sci Czech Republic, I nst Expt Med, Dept Tissue Engn, Videnska 1083, Prague 14240, Czech Republic prosecka@biomed.cas.cz Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic[AV0Z50390703, AV0Z50390512]; Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic[NPV II 2B06130, 1M0510, P304/10/1307, 4977751303]; Grant Agency of the Academy of S ciences[IAA500390702]; Czech Science Foundation[GA202/09/1151]; EU[7E09088]; Gra nt Agency of the Charles University[119009, 96610, 119209, 97110, 80009]; Grant Agency of Czech Republic[106/09/P226]; Ministry of Education of the Czech Republ

ic[ME 10145] Contract grant sponsor: Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republi c; contract grant numbers: AV0Z50390703, AV0Z50390512.Contract grant sponsor: Mi nistry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic; contract grant numb ers: NPV II 2B06130, 1M0510, P304/10/1307, 4977751303.Contract grant sponsor: Gr ant Agency of the Academy of Sciences; contract grant number: IAA500390702.Contr act grant sponsor: Czech Science Foundation; contract grant number: GA202/09/115 1.Contract grant sponsor: EU Project BIOSCENT; contract grant number: 7E09088.Co ntract grant sponsor: The Grant Agency of the Charles University; contract grant numbers: 119009, 96610, 119209, 97110, 80009.Contract grant sponsor: Grant Agen cy of Czech Republic; contract grant number: 106/09/P226.Contract grant sponsor: The Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic (project ERA-NET CARSILA); cont ract grant number: ME 10145 31 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 307 315 10.1002/jbm.a.33189 9 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:000295142400018 J Yu, YX; Deng, C; Meng, FH; Shi, Q; Feijen, J; Zhong, ZY Yu, Yuexin; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Shi, Qin; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan Novel injectable biodegradable glycol chitosan-based hydrogels crosslinked by Mi chael-type addition reaction with oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-b-poly(ethylene glyc ol)-b-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) copolymers JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH PART A English Article biodegradable hydrogels; injectable; chitosan; Michael addition; tissue engineer ing TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS; DEGRADABLE DEXTRAN HYDROGELS; BIOMEDICA L APPLICATIONS; PEG HYDROGELS; ANTITUMOR EFFICACY; CLICK CHEMISTRY; DRUG-DELIVER Y; SITU; HYALURONAN; RELEASE Novel injectable biodegradable glycol chitosan h ydrogels were developed based on thiolated glycol chitosan (GC-SH) and water sol uble oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(acryloyl carbonat e) (OAC-PEG-OAC) triblock copolymers via Michael-type addition reaction. The rhe ology measurements showed that robust hydrogels were formed rapidly upon mixing aqueous solutions of GC-SH and OAC-PEG-OAC at remarkably low total polymer conce ntrations of 1.5-4.5 wt % under physiological conditions. The gelation times (va rying from 10 s to 17 min) and storage moduli (100 to 4300 Pa) of hydrogels coul d be controlled by degrees of substitution (DS) of GC-SH, solution pH, and polym er concentration. These glycol chitosan hydrogels had microporous structures, lo w swelling and slow hydrolytic degradation (stable for over 6 months) under phys iological conditions. Notably, these hydrogels were prone to enzymatic degradati on with lysozyme. The multiple acryloyl functional groups of OAC-PEG-OAC allowed facile conjugation with thiol-containing biomolecules prior to gelation endowin g hydrogels with specific bioactivity. The preliminary cell culture studies reve aled that these glycol chitosan hydrogels were cell non-adhesive while Gly-Arg-G ly-Asp-Cys (GRGDC) peptide modified hydrogels could well support adhesion and gr owth of both MG63 osteoblast and L929 fibroblast cells. These rapidly in situ fo rming enzymatically biodegradable hybrid hydrogels have great potentials in the development of injectable cell-specific bioactive extracellular matrices for tis sue engineering. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 99A : 316-326, 2011. [Yu, YX; Deng, C; Meng, FH; Feijen, J; Zhong, ZY] Soocho w Univ, Biomed Polymers Lab, Coll Chem Chem Engn & Mat Sci, Suzhou 215123, Peopl es R China; [Yu, YX; Deng, C; Meng, FH; Feijen, J; Zhong, ZY] Soochow Univ, Jian gsu Key Lab Adv Funct Polymer Design & Applic, Coll Chem Chem Engn & Mat Sci, Su zhou 215123, Peoples R China; [Yu, YX; Deng, C; Meng, FH; Feijen, J; Zhong, ZY] Soochow Univ, Dept Polymer Sci & Engn, Coll Chem Chem Engn & Mat Sci, Suzhou 215 123, Peoples R China; [Shi, Q] Soochow Univ, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Orthopaed S urg, Suzhou 215006, Peoples R China Zhong, ZY (reprint author), Soochow Univ , Biomed Polymers Lab, Coll Chem Chem Engn & Mat Sci, Suzhou 215123, Peoples R C hina zyzhong@suda.edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[NSF C 51003070, 50703028, 20974073, 50973078, 20874070]; Priority Academic Program D evelopment of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions; Innovative Research Team of Soochow University Contract grant sponsor: National Natural Science Foundat

ion of China; contract grant numbers: NSFC 51003070, 50703028, 20974073, 5097307 8, 20874070Contract grant sponsors: Priority Academic Program Development of Jia ngsu Higher Education Institutions, The Program of Innovative Research Team of S oochow University 41 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 1549-3296 J BIOMED MATER RES A J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A NOV 2011 99A 2 316 326 10.1002/jbm.a.33199 11 Engineering, Biomedical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Engineering; Materials Science 823RQ WOS:000295142400019 J Castronuovo, MM Castronuovo, Marco M. Active space debris removal-A preliminary mission analysis and design ACTA AST RONAUTICA English Article Space debris; Removal; Capture; Low Earth orbit (LEO) The active remov al of five to ten large objects per year from the low Earth orbit (LEO) region i s the only way to prevent the debris collisions from cascading. Among the three orbital regions near the Earth where most catastrophic collisions are predicted to occur, the one corresponding to a sun-synchronous condition is considered the most relevant. Forty-one large rocket bodies orbiting in this belt have been id entified as the priority targets for removal. As part of a more comprehensive sy stem engineering solution, a space mission dedicated to the de-orbiting of five rocket bodies per year from this orbital regime has been designed. The selected concept of operations envisages the launch of a satellite carrying a number of d e-orbiting devices, such as solid propellant kits. The satellite performs a rend ezvous with an identified object and mates with it by means of a robotic arm. A de-orbiting device is attached to the object by means of a second robotic arm, t he object is released and the device is activated. The spacecraft travels then t o the next target. The present paper shows that an active debris removal mission capable of de-orbiting 35 large objects in 7 years is technically feasible, and the resulting propellant mass budget is compatible with many existing platforms . (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. ASI, I-00198 Rome, Italy Castronuovo, MM (reprint author), ASI, Viale Liegi 26, I-00198 Rome, Italy marco.castronuovo@asi.it Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) The present paper is based on the work carried out by the author for the Central Case Project (CCP) of the 12th SpaceTech post-graduate master program on Space Systems Engineering of the Delft University of Technology. The SpaceTech CCP has been partly sponsored by the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) an d developed during the 2009/2010 academic year by the following 12 participants: Marco M. Castronuovo (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana), Fabio Covello (Agenzia Spazia le Italiana), Frank J. de Bruin (European Space Agency), James Geary (European S pace Agency), Simon Hyde (Advanced Operations and Engineering Services), Wolfgan g Jung (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt), Martin Loesch (Astrium Satel lites GmbH), Francesco Longo (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana), Monica Martinez Fernan dez (Serco Group Plc), Shawn Mason (COM DEV Limited), Kristina Springborn (The B oeing Company), Susanne Wagenbach (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt). 12 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0094-5765 ACTA ASTRONAUT Acta Astronaut. NOV-DEC 2011 69 9-10 848 859 10.1016/j.actaastro.2011.04.017 12 Engineering, Aerospace Engineering 822SJ WOS:000295069600010 J de Leon, P; Pena, MAS de Leon, Pablo; Sanchez Pena, Miguel Alejandro, Jr. Miguel Sanchez Pena (1925-2009) organize r of the space activities in Argentina ACTA ASTRONAUTICA English Article; Proceedings Paper 61st International Astronautical Congress (IAC) 2010 Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC Argentina; CNIE; Space; Latin Am erica; IIAE; Argentine Air Force One of the most important and ac tive pioneers of the space activities in Argentina was Miguel Sanchez Pena, an a eronautical engineer and an officer of the Argentine Air Force. Sanchez Pena was the organizer of Argentina's governmental space program in the 1970s and part o f the 80s, and contributed immeasurably to the Nation's sounding rocket program. Born in Mendoza, Argentina in 1925, Sanchez Pena attended the Military Aviation

School (Escuela de Aviacion Militar) in Cordoba, and later the Air Force Engine ering School. Graduated as an engineer in 1959 he was sent to the University of Michigan in the United States to complete his graduate studies earning a Masters of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering. There he had the opportunity to stu dy with several future NASA astronauts such as Theodore Freeman, Edward White an d James McDivitt. After his return to Argentina in 1961 he was put in charge of the Space Development Group (Grupo de Desarrollos Espaciales) of the Air Force i n Cordoba. While with the Air Force he managed the development of a family of va rious sounding rockets for high altitude research. Sanchez Pena was also in char ge of the first Argentine rockets launched from Antarctica in 1965, as well as t he first tests on an Argentine-fabricated rocket (Orion) from Wallops Island in the United States, in 1966. The Orion was the first operational sounding rocket constructed in South America. In the middle of the 1970s Miguel Sanchez Pena was named president of the CNIE (National Space Research Commission). Starting with just a modest one-desk office at the Argentine Air Force headquarters, in only a few years he turned CNIE into a multi-center organization with several hundred employees, three operational launch centers across the country and a family of research rockets open to the international scientific community. He was also act ively representing Argentina in many IAF congresses, and was a member of the Int ernational Academy of Astronautics. After leaving CNIE he became president of th e Asociacion Argentina de Ciencias Espaciales (AACE), an IAF Member organization which was the continuation of the space organization created by Teofilo Tabaner a in 1951. Miguel Sanchez Pena was, without doubt, the most active president of CNIE and thanks to his vision, hard work and the international trust he created, his efforts made it possible for Argentina to participate in many cooperative s pace experiments with partners like France, Germany, Peril, the United Kingdom a nd the United States. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [de Leon , P] Argentine Assoc Space Technol, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina; Inst Nacl Newbe riano, Chubut, Argentina de Leon, P (reprint author), Argentine Assoc Spa ce Technol, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina deleon@aate.org 0 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0094-5765 ACTA ASTRONAUT Acta Astronaut. NOV-DEC 2011 69 9-10 892 898 10.1016/j.actaastro.2011.04.005 7 Engineering, Aerospace Engineering 822SJ WOS:000295069600014 J Hu, SL; Huang, ZH Hu, Sheng-Long; Huang, Z heng-Hai Alternating direction method for bi-quadratic programmin g JOURNAL OF GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION English Article Alternating direction method; Bi-quadratic programming; Quadratic semidefinite p rogramming INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS; OPTIMIZATION; APPROXIMATION; TEN SORS; CONES Bi-quadratic programming (Bi-QP for short) was studied systemati cally in Ling et al. (SIAM J. Optim. 20:1286-1320, 2009) due to its various appl ications in engineering as well as optimization. Several approximation methods w ere given in the same paper since it is NP-hard. In this paper, we introduce a q uadratic SDP relaxation of Bi-QP and discuss the approximation ratio of the meth od. In particular, by exploiting the favorite structure of the quadratic SDP rel axation, we propose an alternating direction method for solving such a problem a nd show that the method is globally convergent without any assumption. Some prel iminary numerical results are reported which show the effectiveness of the metho d proposed in this paper. [Hu, SL; Huang, ZH] Tianjin Univ, Sch Sci, Dept Math, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China Huang, ZH (reprint author), Tianjin Univ , Sch Sci, Dept Math, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China senoghoo@tju.edu.cn; hua ngzhenghai@tju.edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[10871144] This work is partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of C hina (Grant No. 10871144). 30 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0925-500 1 J GLOBAL OPTIM J. Glob. Optim. NOV 2011 51 3 429 446 10.1007/s10898-010-9635-4 18 Operations Research & Management Science; Mathematics, Applied Operations Resea rch & Management Science; Mathematics 824BP WOS:000295174900004

J Zhou, ZD; Liu, Q; Ai, QS; Xu, C Zhou ZuDe; Liu Q uan; Ai QingSong; Xu Cheng Intelligent monitoring and diagnosis for modern mechanical equipment based on the integration of embedded technology and FBGS technology MEASUREMENT English Article Embedded based technology and system; Fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBGS); Modern mechanical equipment (MME); Intelligent monitoring and diagnosis; High-speed dem odulation system; Embedded integration system BRAGG GRATING SENSOR The embe dded technology as a technological fundament plays an important role in the inte lligent monitoring and diagnosis for modern mechanical equipment (MME). The fibe r Bragg grating sensor (FBGS) technology has been rapidly applied to most of the industrial and mechanical engineering fields in recent years. This paper focuse s on the new principle and new method of intelligent monitoring and diagnosis sy stem for MME based on the integration of embedded technology and FBGS technology . According to the principle of embedded technology, the embedded network and fi eldbus gateway for the integration of monitoring and diagnosis system are invest igated, and the embedded high-speed demodulation is studied. Based on FBGS, the new embedded sensor for online state monitoring of MME is introduced. Moreover, the embedded sensing signal processing and data transmission, which can meet the requirements of multi-parameter measurement, synchronous sampling and long-term intelligent monitoring for MME, are proposed. In addition, by integrating the F BGS technology and embedded technology, the embedded integration system of intel ligent monitoring and diagnosis for MME is presented. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Zhou, ZD; Liu, Q; Ai, QS; Xu, C] Wuhan Univ Technol, Sc h Informat Engn, Wuhan 430070, Peoples R China Ai, QS (reprint author), Wuhan U niv Technol, Sch Informat Engn, Wuhan 430070, Peoples R China qingsongai@whut. edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[50935005, 50905133]; Nation al High Technology Research and Development Program (863 Program) of China This research is funded and supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50935005 and 50905133) and the National High Technology Res earch and Development Program (863 Program) of China. 12 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0263-2241 MEASUREMENT Measurem ent NOV 2011 44 9 1499 1511 10.1016/j.measurement.2011.05.018 13 Engineering, Mul tidisciplinary; Instruments & Instrumentation Engineering; Instruments & Instr umentation 824IF WOS:000295194900002 J Gomez, E; Maresca, P; Caja, J; Barajas, C; Berzal, M Gomez, E.; Maresca, P.; Caja, J.; Barajas, C.; Berzal, M. Developi ng a new interactive simulation environment with Macromedia Director for teachin g applied dimensional metrology MEASUREMENT English Article DE-learning; Dimensional metrology; Bologna process TECHNOLOGY The purp ose of this paper is to describe the objectives, methodology and structure of a virtual didactic environment developed by the educational research group New Tea ching Methodologies in Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing at the Technical University of Madrid, designed to carry out dimensional metrology practical les sons. This development has allowed teaching to be focused on the student in a DE -learning (driven electronic learning) environment capable of efficiently replac ing the traditional method based on master classes and practical hands-on experi ence with real equipment. In fact, the developed environment directs and assists students, step by step, in their practical experience, proving dynamic and inte ractive through the use of animations, video and audio contributions, connection s with hypertexts and simulations. The model presented in this work seeks a prog ressive adaptation to the new training paradigms, incorporating emerging communi cation technologies so that students can harness an even greater role that has h itherto been untapped, hence approaching one of the objectives in the Bologna pr ocess. The project has been undertaken entirely with the software house Macromed ia: Director MX 2004 and Flash MX 2004, which has afforded the creation of a mul timedia application with animations of the highest quality. Scripting languages (Lingo, JavaScript and ActionScript) have likewise been incorporated, permitting the evolution of even more complex elements for user interaction. The project h

as been undertaken in Spanish and English with a view to meeting the communicati on needs of students in a multicultural environment, in harmony with the framewo rk program for didactic strategies in the European Higher Education Area. (C) 20 11 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Gomez, E; Maresca, P; Caja, J; Barajas, C; Berzal, M] Tech Univ Madrid, Dept Mech Ind Engn, Madrid 28012, Spain Maresca, P (reprint author), Tech Univ Madrid, Dept Mech Ind Engn, Ronda de Vale ncia 3, Madrid 28012, Spain emilio.gomez@upm.es; piera.maresca@upm.es; jesus .caja@upm.es; cintia.barajas@upm.es; m.berzal@upm.es 47 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0263-2241 MEASUREM ENT Measurement NOV 2011 44 9 1730 1746 10.1016/j.measurement.2011.07.004 17 Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Instruments & Instrumentation Engineering; Ins truments & Instrumentation 824IF WOS:000295194900029 J Wu, Q Wu, Qi Fuzzy measurable house o f quality and quality function deployment for fuzzy regression estimation proble m EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article Product design; Time estimation; House of quality; Fuzzy measure; Fuzzy support vector regression machine SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES; ARTIFICIAL NEURAL-NETWO RKS; DEVELOPMENT CYCLE TIME; QFD; PREDICTION; ALGORITHM; DESIGN; MODELS; LOGIC In present competitive environment, it is necessary for companies to evaluate de sign time and effort at the early stage of product development. However, there i s somewhat lacking in systemic analytical methods for product design time (PDT). For this end, this paper explores an intelligent method to evaluate the PDT. At the early development stage, designers are short of sufficient product informat ion and have difficulty in determining PDT by subjective evaluation. Thus, a fuz zy measurable house of quality (FM-HOQ) model is proposed to provide measurable engineering information. Quality function deployment (QFD) is combined with a ma pping pattern of "function -> principle -> structure" to extract product charact eristics from customer demands. Then, a fuzzy support vector regression machine (FSVRM) model is built to fuse data and realize the estimation of PDT, which mak es use of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation to simplify structure. In a word, the w hole estimation method consists of four steps: time factors identification, prod uct characteristics extraction by QFD and function mapping pattern, FSVRM learni ng, and PDT estimation. Finally, to illustrate the procedure of the estimation m ethod, the case of injection mold design is studied. The results of experiments show that the fuzzy method is feasible and effective. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Wu, Q] Southeast Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Nanjing 210096, J iangsu, Peoples R China; [Wu, Q] Southeast Univ, Sch Automat, Minist Educ, Key L ab Measurement & Control CSE, Nanjing 210096, Jiangsu, Peoples R China Wu, Q (r eprint author), Southeast Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Nanjing 210096, Jiangsu, Peoples R China wuqi7812@hotmail.com China Postdoctoral Science Foundation[2009045115 2]; Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds[0901023C] This res earch is supported by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (20090451152), and J iangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (0901023C). 31 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0957-4174 EXPERT SYST APPL Expert Syst. Appl. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 14398 14406 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.04.095 9 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & Management Science Computer Science; Engineering; O perations Research & Management Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400006 J Wang, XT; Xiong, W Wang, Xiao-Tun; Xiong, W ei An integrated linguistic-based group decision-making approach fo r quality function deployment EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article Quality function deploym ent; House of quality; Linguistic variables; Group decision-making; Multi-granul arity PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT; KANOS MODEL; CUSTOMER SATISFACTION; PREFERENCE RELA TIONS; DESIGN REQUIREMENTS; PROGRAMMING MODEL; OWA OPERATORS; TERM SETS; QFD; IM PLEMENTATION Quality function deployment (QFD) is a well-known customer-drive

n approach for new or improved product/service design and development to maximiz e customer satisfaction. A typical QFD analysis process involves a series of gro up decision-making (GDM) processes, such as determination of the importance of c ustomer requirements (CRs), the relationship between CRs and engineering charact eristics (ECs), and the correlation among ECs. Properly handling these GDM proce sses is essential because it will significantly affect the prioritization of ECs , the target value setting of ECs, and the following deployment phases of QFD. D ue to different personal experiences and/or lack of sufficient knowledge and inf ormation, decision-makers who participate in the QFD analysis process tend to pr ovide their opinions by using different types and multi-granularity linguistic i nformation, which are inherently vague and imprecise. Unlike most of the previou s studies, which excessively rely on fuzzy approaches, this study proposes an in tegrated linguistic-based GDM approach, which can compute with words directly an d avoid the risk of loss of information, to cope with multiple types and multi-g ranularity linguistic assessments given by a group of decision-makers in QFD act ivity process. Finally, a numerical example is taken to illustrate the applicabi lity of the proposed approach. The linguistic-based approach can effectively man age the imprecise and vague input information in QFD and facilitate decision-mak ing in product design and development. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. [Wang, XT; Xiong, W] Zhejiang Univ, Sch Management, Dept Enterprises Management, Hangzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China; [Wang, XT] Ind & Commercial Bank Ch ina, Zhejiang Prov Branch, Hangzhou 310009, Zhejiang, Peoples R China Xiong, W (reprint author), Zhejiang Univ, Sch Management, Dept Enterprises Management, H angzhou 310058, Zhejiang, Peoples R China wangxt84@gmail.com; zjuquality@y ahoo.com.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[90718038]; Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China[Y7080086]; Zhejiang Provincial S ocial Science Planning Project of China[10CGGL20YBB] This work is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No. 9071 8038), Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No. Y708 0086), and Zhejiang Provincial Social Science Planning Project of China (Project No. 10CGGL20YBB). 48 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN D 0957-4174 EXPERT SYST APPL Expert Syst. Appl. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 14428 14438 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.04.103 11 Computer Science, Artifi cial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & M anagement Science Computer Science; Engineering; Operations Research & Man agement Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400009 J Yang, ZL; Bonsall, S; Wang, J Yang, Z. L.; Bon sall, S.; Wang, J. Approximate TOPSIS for vessel selection under un certain environment EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article Vessel selection; Interval TOPSI S; Fuzzy set; Degree of belief; MCDM GROUP DECISION-MAKING; EVIDENTIAL REASON ING APPROACH; FUZZY ENVIRONMENT; PREFERENCE RELATIONS; MANAGEMENT; EXTENSIONS The selection of appropriate vessels to carry out shipping activities is crucial for many maritime stakeholders including charterers, shipowners, brokers, surve yors and safety engineers. The task is essentially a process of multiple criteri a decision making (MCDM) under uncertainty requiring analysts to derive rational decisions from ambiguous and incomplete data contained in different quantitativ e and qualitative forms. Fuzzy Techniques for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) have been well documented in the literature and commo nly used in the process of group decision-making under fuzzy environment. While showing the attractiveness in dealing with ambiguous estimates, they have been c riticised to be incapable of modelling incompleteness encountered in decision an alysis. This paper therefore uses the concept of degrees of belief to develop a novel approximate interval TOPSIS approach for overcoming some of the drawbacks of classical fuzzy TOPSIS methods and facilitating the development of reliable v essel selection models under uncertain environment. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All r ights reserved. [Yang, ZL; Bonsall, S; Wang, J] Liverpool John Moores Univ, Sch Engn, Liverpool L3 3AF, Merseyside, England Yang, ZL (reprint author), Liver

pool John Moores Univ, Sch Engn, Liverpool L3 3AF, Merseyside, England Z.yang@l jmu.ac.uk 24 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0957-4174 EXPERT SYST APPL Expert Syst. App l. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 14523 14534 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.05.032 12 Computer Science, Artifi cial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & M anagement Science Computer Science; Engineering; Operations Research & Man agement Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400017 J Jin, JH; Park, SC; Pyon, CU Jin, Jae Hoon; P ark, Sang Chan; Pyon, Chong Un Finding research trend of convergence te chnology based on Korean R&D network EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article Social network; Converge nce technology; R&D; Network construction SCIENCE; COOPERATION; KNOWLEDGE Traditionally, collaboration network or citation network is used to answer the o ld question how scientists or engineers interact with each other. This paper int roduces a R&D network to make up the missing aspect of the traditional approache s about using multi-sources and to find out the trend of convergence technology R&D in Korea. We collect data about human resources and national R&D projects fr om Korean national R&D databases, and then construct a weighted network between experts by using meta-data mapping and the network folding technique. And we app ly Newman's grouping algorithm that is generalized to a weighted network for det ecting the community structure of the network. Gathering data from multi-sources is useful to reveal the structure of network rather than to use only one databa se. Lastly, we perform a network analysis to examine important experts. The resu lt shows significant information about research trend and core experts in Korea. We expect this study will be helpful in three ways: (1) how to make a network f rom heterogeneous multi-sources, (2) how to figure out the current situation of convergence technology R&D, (3) how to discover who are important people in Kore an convergence technology R&D network. And this paper is just a cornerstone of t he work to investigate the current situation of national R&D projects in Korea. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Pyon, CU] Korea Inst Machinery & Mat, Dept R&D Policy, Taejon 305343, South Korea; [Jin, JH] Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Dept Ind & Syst Engn, Taejon 305701, South Korea; [Park, SC] Kyung H ee Univ, Coll Business Adm, Seoul, South Korea Pyon, CU (reprint author), Korea Inst Machinery & Mat, Dept R&D Policy, 156 Gajungbukno, Taejon 305343, South Ko rea jinjae@kaist.ac.kr; sangchan@khu.ac.kr; pcu@kimm.re.kr 41 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0957-4174 EXPERT SYST APPL Expert Syst. Appl. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 15159 15171 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.05.088 13 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & Management Science Computer Science; Engineering; O perations Research & Management Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400085 J Cheah, WP; Kim, YS; Kim, KY; Yang, HJ Cheah, W ool Ping; Kim, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyoung-Yun; Yang, Hyung-Jeong Systemat ic causal knowledge acquisition using FCM Constructor for product design decisio n support EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article Causal reasoning; Fuzzy cognitive map; Bayesian belief network; Knowledge acquis ition; Product design knowledge FUZZY COGNITIVE MAPS; BAYESIAN NETWORKS Despite its usefulness, design knowledge is not often captured or documented, and is the refore lost or damaged after a product design is completed. As a way to address this issue, two major formalisms can be used for modeling, representing, and rea soning about causal design knowledge: fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) and Bayesian bel ief network (BBN). Although FCM has been used extensively in knowledge engineeri ng, few methodologies exist for systematically constructing it. In this paper, w e present a methodology and application-FCM Constructor-to systematically acquir e design knowledge from domain experts, and to construct a corresponding BBN. To show the system's usability, we use three realistic product design cases to com pare BBNs that are directly generated by domain experts, with BBNs that are gene

rated using the FCM Constructor. We find that the BBN constructed through the FC M Constructor is similar, based on reasoning results, to the BBN constructed dir ectly by specifying conditional probability tables of BBNs. (C) 2011 Elsevier Lt d. All rights reserved. [Yang, HJ] Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Elect & Comp Engn, Gwa ngjusi, South Korea; [Cheah, WP] Multimedia Univ, Fac Informat Sci & Technol, Me laka, Malaysia; [Kim, YS; Kim, KY] Wayne State Univ, Dept Ind & Mfg Engn, Detroi t, MI 48202 USA Yang, HJ (reprint author), Chonnam Natl Univ, Sch Elect & Comp E ngn, Gwangjusi, South Korea cheahwooiping@gmail.com; sean0831@wayne.edu; kyk im@eng.wayne.edu; hjyang@jnu.ac.kr MKE (The Ministry of Knowledge Economy), Korea, under the ITRC (Information Technology Research Center); NIPA (National IT Industry Promotion Agency)[NIPA-2011-C1090-1111-0008] This research wa s supported by the MKE (The Ministry of Knowledge Economy), Korea, under the ITR C (Information Technology Research Center) support program supervised by the NIP A (National IT Industry Promotion Agency) (NIPA-2011-C1090-1111-0008). 35 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0957-4174 EXPERT SYST APPL Expert Syst. Appl. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 15316 15331 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.06.032 16 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & Management Science Computer Science; Engineering; O perations Research & Management Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400102 J Lin, CS; Chen, LS; Hsu, CC Lin, Chin-Sen; C hen, Long-Sheng; Hsu, Chun-Chin An innovative approach for RFID product functions development EXPERT SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS English Article RFID; New service creation; TRIZ ; Kano analysis QUALITY FUNCTION DEPLOYMENT; KANOS MODEL; QFD; CLASSIFICATION; T ECHNOLOGY; MANAGEMENT; TRIZ Today, new services creation is very crucial for RFID (radio frequency identification) products manufacturers. A newly successfu l RFID application can enhance their change in organization and to manage growth in an increasingly competitive environment. But, there is a high failure rate i n new products development processes. Thus, RFID manufacturers need an effective tool to assist them to create novel RFID product functions. This study proposes a newly systematic approach called QT-Kano model which integrates three managem ent tools, quality function deployment (QFD), the theory of inventive problem so lving (TRIZ), and a refined Kano's model, to create new product functions of RFI D products. In QT-Kano model, QFD has firstly been used to transform customer de mands into engineering quality characteristics. Secondly, based on the contradic tion relationship between those engineering quality characteristics, the novel d esigned functions are created by TRIZ. Finally, to reduce the high failure rate in new products development processes, a refined Kano's model are applied to off er a better understanding from customer's viewpoint and to assist service design ers focusing on the most important attributes that need to be improved. A real c ase of RFID product function development is demonstrated to show the effectivene ss of the proposed model. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Chen, L S] Chaoyang Univ Technol, Dept Informat Management, Taichung 41349, Taiwan; [Lin , CS] Univ Sci & Technol China, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Taipei 115, Taiwan; [Hsu, CC] Chaoyang Univ Technol, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Taichung 41349, Tai wan Chen, LS (reprint author), Chaoyang Univ Technol, Dept Informat Manageme nt, 168 Jifong E Rd, Taichung 41349, Taiwan cslin@cc.chit.edu.tw; lschen@cyu t.edu.tw; cchsu@cyut.edu.tw National Science Council of Taiwan, ROC[NSC 98-2 410-H-324-007-MY2] This work is supported, in part, by the National Science Council of Taiwan, ROC under grant NSC 98-2410-H-324-007-MY2. 32 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0957-4174 EXPERT S YST APPL Expert Syst. Appl. NOV-DEC 2011 38 12 15523 15533 10.1016/j.eswa.2011.06.007 11 Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Operations Research & Management Science Computer Science; Engineering; O perations Research & Management Science 824HQ WOS:000295193400122 J Tungtur, S; Skinner, H; Zhan, HL; Swint-Kruse, L; Beckett, D

Tungtur, Sudheer; Skinner, Harlyn; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Beckett, D orothy In vivo tests of thermodynamic models of transcription repressor function BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY English Article LacI; GalR; BirA; Repression; Protein-DNA affinity; Equilibrium ESCHERICHIA-COLI REPRESSOR; PROTEIN-DNA INTERACTIONS; LAC REPRESSOR; BIOTIN REPRESSOR; INTERACTI ONS DOMINATE; OPERATOR DNA; BINDING; BIOSYNTHESIS; OPERON; EXPRESSION One emph asis of the Gibbs Conference on Biothermodynamics is the value of thermodynamic measurements for understanding behaviors of biological systems. In this study, t he correlation between thermodynamic measurements of in vitro DNA binding affini ty with in vivo transcription repression was investigated for two transcription repressors. In the first system, which comprised an engineered LacI/GalR homolog , mutational changes altered the equilibrium constant for binding DNA. Changes c orrelated with altered repression, but estimates of in vivo repressor concentrat ion suggest a >= 25-fold discrepancy with in vitro conditions. In the second sys tem, changes in ligand binding to BirA altered dimerization and subsequent DNA o ccupancy. Again, these changes correlate with altered in vivo repression, but co mparison with in vitro measurements reveals a similar to 10-fold discrepancy. Fu rther analysis of each system suggests that the observed discrepancies between i n vitro and in vivo results reflect the contributions of additional equilibria t o the transcription repression process. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserv ed. [Tungtur, S; Zhan, HL; Swint-Kruse, L] Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Dept Bioche m & Mol Biol, Kansas City, KS 66160 USA; [Skinner, H; Beckett, D] Univ Maryland, Dept Chem & Biochem, College Pk, MD 20742 USA Swint-Kruse, L (reprint author), Univ Kansas, Med Ctr, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 USA lswint-kruse@kumc.edu; dbeckett@umd.edu NIH; ARRA[GM079423, GM46 511] This work was supported by grants from the NIH and the ARRA stimulus fun ds to LSK (GM079423) and DB (GM46511). We thank Renae Springe and Josh Riepe for assistance purifying LLhG variants. We also thank Emily Streaker for preparatio n of the BirA that was used for these measurements. 56 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, N ETHERLANDS 0301-4622 BIOPHYS CHEM Biophys. Chem. NOV 2011 159 1 SI 142 151 10.1016/ j.bpc.2011.06.005 10 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophy sics; Chemistry 823TC WOS:000295148400017 J Bell-Upp, P; Robinson, AC; Whitten, ST; Wheeler, EL; Lin, JI; Stites, WE ; Garcia-Moreno, B Bell-Upp, Peregrine; Robinson, A aron C.; Whitten, Steven T.; Wheeler, Erika L.; Lin, Janine; Stites, Wesley E.; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand Thermodynamic principles for the enginee ring of pH-driven conformational switches and acid insensitive proteins BIOPHYSI CAL CHEMISTRY English Article Acid unfolding; pK(a); Electrostatic; pH effects; Staphylococcal nuclease APPARENT DIELECTRIC-CONSTANTS; STAPHYLOCOCCAL NUCLEASE; PK(A) VALUES; AMINO-ACID S; HYDROPHOBIC INTERIOR; WATER PENETRATION; DENATURED STATE; MOLTEN GLOBULE; STA BILITY; RESIDUES The general thermodynamic principles behind pH driven co nformational transitions of biological macromolecules are well understood. What is less obvious is how they can be used to engineer pH switches in proteins. The acid unfolding of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) was used to illustrate differ ent factors that can affect pH-driven conformational transitions. Acid unfolding is a structural transition driven by preferential H(+) binding to the acid unfo lded state (U) over the native (N) state of a protein. It is the result of carbo xylic groups that titrate with more normal pK(a) values in the U state than in t he N state. Acid unfolding profiles of proteins reflect a balance between electr ostatic and non-electrostatic contributions to stability. Several strategies wer e used in attempts to turn SNase into an acid insensitive protein: (1) enhancing global stability of the protein with mutagenesis or with osmolytes, (2) use of high salt concentrations to screen Coulomb interactions, (3) stabilizing the N s tate through specific anion effects, (4) removing Asp or Glu residues that citra te with depressed pK(a) values in the N state, and (5) removing basic residues t hat might have strong repulsive interactions in the N state at low pH. The only

effective way to engineer acid resistance in SNase is not through modulation of pK(a) values of Asp/Glu but by enhancing the global stability of the protein. Mo dulation of pH-driven conformational transitions by selective manipulation of th e electrostatic component of the switch is an extremely difficult undertaking. ( C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Bell-Upp, P; Robinson, AC; Whee ler, EL; Lin, JI; Garcia-Moreno, B] Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Biophys, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA; [Whitten, ST] Texas State Univ San Marcos, Dept Chem & Biochem, S an Marcos, TX 78666 USA; [Stites, WE] Univ Arkansas, Dept Chem & Biochem, Fayett eville, AR 72701 USA Garcia-Moreno, B (reprint author), Johns Hopkins Univ, D ept Biophys, 3400 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA bertrand@jhu.edu NIH[ROI GM-073838] This work was supported by NIH GrantROI GM-073838 to B. G-M. E. 30 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0301-4622 BIOPHYS CHEM Biophys. Chem. NOV 2011 159 1 SI 217 226 10.1016/j.bpc.2011.06.016 10 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; Chemistry 823TC WOS:000295148400025 J Patel, MM; Tzul, F; Makhatadze, GI Patel, M ayank M.; Tzul, Franco; Makhatadze, George I. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of protein cooperativity using urea-induced folding/unfolding of a Ubq-U IM fusion protein BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY English Article Protein cooperativity; Protein stability; Protein engineering MULTIDOMAIN PROT EIN; STABILITY; THERMODYNAMICS; UBIQUITIN; PEPTIDES; TOPOLOGY; ENTHALPY; 2-STATE ; MODEL Understanding the origins of cooperativity in proteins remains an import ant topic in protein folding. This study describes experimental folding/unfoldin g equilibrium and kinetic studies of the engineered protein Ubq-UIM, consisting of ubiquitin (Ubq) fused to the sequence of the ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM ) via a short linker. Urea-induced folding/unfolding profiles of Ubq-UIM were mo nitored by far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies and compare d to those of the isolated Ubq domain. It was found that the equilibrium data fo r Ubq-UIM is inconsistent with a two-state model. Analysis of the kinetics of fo lding shows similarity in the folding transition state ensemble between Ubq and Ubq-UIM, suggesting that formation of Ubq domain is independent of UIM. The majo r contribution to the stabilization of Ubq-UIM, relative to Ubq, was found to be in the rates of unfolding. Moreover, it was found that the kinetic m-values for Ubq-UIM unfolding, monitored by different probes (far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies), are different; thereby, further supporting deviat ions from a two-state behavior. A thermodynamic linkage model that involves four states was found to be applicable to the urea-induced unfolding of Ubq-UIM, whi ch is in agreement with the previous temperature-induced unfolding study. The ap plicability of the model was further supported by site-directed variants of UbqUIM that have altered stabilities of Ubq/UIM interface and/or stabilities of ind ividual Ubq- and UIM-domains. All variants show increased cooperativity and one variant, E43N_Ubq-UIM, appears to behave very close to an equilibrium two-state. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Rensselaer Polytech Inst, Ctr Bi otechnol & Interdisciplinary Studies, Troy, NY 12065 USA; Rensselaer Polytech In st, Dept Biol, Troy, NY 12065 USA Makhatadze, GI (reprint author), Renssel aer Polytech Inst, Ctr Biotechnol & Interdisciplinary Studies, 110 8th St, Troy, NY 12180 USA makhag@rpi.edu [NIH/NIGMSRO1-GM054537] This work was supported by a grant from NIH/NIGMSRO1-GM054537. We would like to thank Dr. Werner Streich er for the help with the stopped flow experiments. Instrumentation at the Core F acilities at the Center of Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies at RPI we re used for some of the experiments reported in this paper. 34 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMST ERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0301-4622 BIOPHYS CHEM Biophys. Chem. NOV 2011 159 1 SI 58 65 10.1016/j.bpc.2011.05.004 8 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Biophysics; Chemistry 823TC WOS:000295148400008 J Pozzi, N; Chen, R; Chen, ZW; Bah, A; Di Cera, E

Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na(+) binding to thrombin BIOPHYSI CAL CHEMISTRY English Article Thrombin; Na(+) binding; Allostery; X-ray crystallography ACTIVATED PROTEI N-C; MONO-VALENT CATIONS; SODIUM-ION BINDING; FACTOR-XA; CATALYTIC-ACTIVITY; CRY STAL-STRUCTURE; MURINE THROMBIN; RAPID KINETICS; PROTHROMBINASE COMPLEX; ANTICOA GULANT ACTIVITY Binding of Na(+) to thrombin ensures high activity toward physio logical substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the bindi ng affinity of Na(+) is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes ass ociated with binding, and the K(d) = 80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the si te at the concentration of Na(+) in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na( +) binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the int eraction of Na(+) with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under p hysiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replac ement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na (+) affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzy me. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change asso ciated with Na(+) binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stabi lity of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering s tudies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. Al l rights reserved. [Pozzi, N; Chen, R; Chen, ZW; Bah, A; Di Cera, E] St Lou is Univ, Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, St Louis, MO 63104 USA Di Cera, E (reprint author), St Louis Univ, Sch Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, St Louis, MO 63104 USA enrico@slu.edu NIH[HL049413, HL058141, HL073813, HL095315] This work was supported in part by NIH research grants HL049413, HL058141, HL073 813 and HL095315. 91 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0301-4622 BIOPHYS CHEM Biophys. Chem. NOV 2011 159 1 SI 6 13 10.1016/j.bpc.2011.04.003 8 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; Chemistry 823TC WOS:000295148400002 J Dinulovic, M; Rasuo, B Dinulovic, Mirko; Rasuo, Bosko Dielectric modeling of multiphase composites COMPOSITE STRUCT URES English Article Dielectr ic modeling; Multiphase composites; Physical properties; Analytical modeling EFFECTIVE PERMITTIVITY; BOUNDS; CONSTANT; MIXTURES In this paper effective medium theory based on Clausius-Mossoti relation was used to predict dielectric properties of multiphase composite system. The composite consisted of E-glass fi bers (plain weave S-glass, J.B. Martin) embedded in bisphenol A diglycidylether epoxy matrix (D.E.R. 324, D.O.W. chemicals) with hollow ceramic spherical inclus ions (SF 14, P.Q. Corp.) at different volume fractions. In many engineering appl ications, materials with designed dielectric properties are often sought. An imp ortant question in engineering design of a composite material is how the overall properties of the composite depend on those of the individual constituents. Mix ing the epoxy resin with hollow ceramic inclusions can effectively reduce dielec tric constant of the resin, which is often desirable, rendering composites as go od candidates for many applications, especially in telecommunications. Compensat ion for degradation of mechanical properties of matrix (due to inclusion inserti on) is obtained by embedding fibers into the mixture. Measurements of dielectric constant and loss tangent for this multiphase composite system were conducted i n the region between 0.1 and 100 kHz range using DEA 290 (T.A. Instruments) diel ectric analyzer and experimental results are presented. Good correlation between analytical model and experimental results was observed throughout all frequency range of investigation. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Dinulov ic, M; Rasuo, B] Univ Belgrade, Aerosp Dept, Fac Mech Engn, Belgrade 11120 35, S erbia Rasuo, B (reprint author), Univ Belgrade, Aerosp Dept, Fac Mech Engn, Kr aljice Marije 16, Belgrade 11120 35, Serbia brasuo@mas.bg.ac.rs 45 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD

LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0263-8223 COMPOS S TRUCT Compos. Struct. NOV 2011 93 12 3209 3215 10.1016/j.compstruct.2011.05.036 7 Materials Science, Composites Materials Science 821OP WOS:000294984600 012 J Pinto, M; Fuentes, L; Troya, JM Pinto, Monica; F uentes, Lidia; Maria Troya, Jose Specifying aspect-oriented archi tectures in AO-ADL INFORMATION AND SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY English Article Software Engineering; Software A rchitectures; Languages; Aspect-Oriented Software Development; Metrics Context: Architecture description languages (ADLs) are a well-accepted approach to software architecture representation. The majority of well-known ADLs are def ined by means of components and connectors. Architectural connectors are mainly used to model interactions among components, specifying component communication and coordination separately. However, there are other properties that cut across several components and also affect component interactions (e.g. security). Obje ctive: It seems reasonable therefore to model how such crosscutting properties a ffect component interactions as part of connectors. Method: Using an aspect-orie nted approach, the AO-ADL architecture description language extends the classica l connector semantics with enough expressiveness to model the influences of such crosscutting properties on component interactions (defined as 'aspectual compos itions' in connectors). Results: This paper describes the AO-ADL language puttin g special emphasis on the extended connectors used to specify aspectual and nonaspectual compositions between concrete components. The contributions of AO-ADL are validated using concern-oriented metrics available in the literature. Conclu sion: The measured indicators show that using AO-ADL it is possible to specify m ore reusable and scalable software architectures. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rig hts reserved. [Pinto, M; Fuentes, L; Troya, JM] Univ Malaga, Dpto Lenguajes & Ciencias Comp, E-29071 Malaga, Spain Pinto, M (reprint author), Univ Malaga, Dpto Lenguajes & Ciencias Comp, Campus Teatinos S-N, E-29071 Malaga, Spain pinto@lcc.uma.es; lff@lcc.uma.es; troya@lcc.uma.es Spanish Project[TIN200801942]; regional project FamWare[P09-TIC-5231] This research was funded by the Spanish Project TIN2008-01942 and by the regional project FamWare P09-TIC-5231. 45 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0950-5849 INFORM SOFTWARE TECH Inf. Softw. Technol. NOV 2011 53 11 1165 1182 10.1016/j.infsof.2011.04.003 18 Computer Science, Information Systems; Computer Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 820CQ WOS:000294883500001 J Golfarelli, M; Rizzi, S Golfarelli, Matteo; Rizz i, Stefano Data warehouse testing: A prototype-based methodology INFORMATION AND SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY English Article Testing; Business intelligence; Data warehouse; Software engineering DESIGN Context: Testing is an essential part of the development life-cycle of any softw are product. While most phases of data warehouse design have received considerab le attention in the literature, not much has been written about data warehouse t esting. Objective: In this paper we propose a comprehensive approach to testing data warehouse systems. Its main features are earliness with respect to the life -cycle, modularity, tight coupling with design, scalability, and measurability t hrough proper metrics. Method: We introduce a number of specific testing activit ies, we classify them in terms of what is tested and how it is tested, and we sh ow how they can be framed within a prototype-based methodology. We apply our app roach to a real case study for a large retail company. Results: The case study w e faced, based on an iterative prototype-based medium-size project, confirmed th e validity of our approach. In particular, the main benefits were obtained in te rms of project transparency, coordination of the development team, and organizat ion of design activities. Conclusion: Though some general-purpose testing techni ques can be applied to data warehouse projects, the effectiveness of testing can be largely improved by applying specifically-devised techniques and metrics. (C ) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Golfarelli, M; Rizzi, S] DEIS U

niv Bologna, Bologna, Italy Rizzi, S (reprint author), DEIS Univ Bologna, Vi ale Risorgimento 2, Bologna, Italy matteo.golfarelli@unibo.it; stefano.rizz i@unibo.it 45 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0950-584 9 INFORM SOFTWARE TECH Inf. Softw. Technol. NOV 2011 53 11 1183 1198 10.1016/j.infsof .2011.04.002 16 Computer Science, Information Systems; C omputer Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 820CQ WOS:0002 94883500002 J Wilkie, FG; McChesney, IR; Morrow, P; Tuxworth, C; Lester, NG Wilkie, F. G.; McChesney, I. R.; Morrow, P.; Tuxworth, C.; Lester, N. G. The value of software sizing INFORMATION AND SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY English Article Software size estimation ; Empirical software engineering; NESMA; Project planning; Size metrics; Functio n points Context: One of the difficulties faced by software devel opment Project Managers is estimating the cost and schedule for new projects. Pr evious industry surveys have concluded that software size and cost estimation is a significant technical area of concern. In order to estimate cost and schedule it is important to have a good understanding of the size of the software produc t to be developed. There are a number of techniques used to derive software size , with function points being amongst the most documented. Objective: In this pap er we explore the utility of function point software sizing techniques when appl ied to two levels of software requirements documentation in a commercial softwar e development organisation. The goal of the research is to appraise the value (c ost/benefit) which functional sizing techniques can bring to the project plannin g and management of software projects within a small-to-medium sized software de velopment enterprise (SME). Method: Functional counts were made at the bid and d etailed functional specification stages for each of five commercial projects use d in the research. Three variants of the NESMA method were used to determine the se function counts. Through a structured interview session, feedback on the sizi ng results was obtained to evaluate its feasibility and potential future contrib ution to the company. Results: The results of our research suggest there is valu e in performing size estimates at two appropriate stages in the software develop ment lifecycle, with simplified methods providing the optimal return on effort e xpended. Conclusion: The 'Estimated NESMA' is the most appropriate tool for use in size estimation for the company studied. The use of software sizing provides a valuable contribution which would augment, but not replace, the company's exis ting cost estimation approach. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Wilkie, FG; McChesney, IR; Morrow, P] Univ Ulster, Sch Comp & Math, Newtownabbe y BT37 0QB, Antrim, North Ireland; [Tuxworth, C] Equiniti ICS Ltd, Belfast BT3 9 ED, Antrim, North Ireland; [Lester, NG] Univ Ulster, Informat Serv Directorate, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, Antrim, North Ireland Wilkie, FG (reprint author), Uni v Ulster, Sch Comp & Math, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, Antrim, North Ireland fg.wilki e@ulster.ac.uk; ir.mcchesney@ulster.ac.uk; Morrow-P4@email.ulster.ac.uk; Charlie .Tuxworth@equiniti-ics.com; ng.lester@ulster.ac.uk Department for Employmen t and Learning The research team gratefully acknowledges the access to staff an d documentation, and participation of Equiniti-ICS in this project. The research team also gratefully acknowledges financial support from the Department for Emp loyment and Learning. 39 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0950-5849 INFORM SOFTWARE TECH Inf. Softw. Technol. NOV 2011 53 11 1236 1249 10.1016/j.infsof.2011.05.008 14 Computer Science, Information Systems; Computer Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 820CQ WOS:000294883500006 J Zahrani, EM; Fathi, MH; Alfantazi, AM Zahrani, E. Mohammadi; Fathi, M. H.; Alfantazi, A. M. Sol-Gel Derived Nanocrys talline Fluoridated Hydroxyapatite Powders and Nanostructured Coatings for Tissu e Engineering Applications METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A-PHYSI CAL METALLURGY AND MATERIALS SCIENCE English Article SUBSTITUTED HYDROXYAPATITE; FLUORAPATITE; FLUORINE; FILMS; SUBSTRATE; CERAMICS;

APATITES; SPECTROSCOPY; HYDROLYSIS; SOLUBILITY Nanocrystalline fluoridated hydr oxyapatite (FHA) powders and coatings with a chemical composition of Ca(10)(PO(4 ))(6)OH(2-x) F (x) (where x values were selected equal to 0.0 ,0.5, 1.0, 1.5, an d 2.0) were prepared through a modified simple sol-gel technique in comparison w ith conventional alkoxide-based sol-gel route. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmis sion electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier tran sform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, pF-meter with a fluorine-sensitive electrode , and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysi s techniques were employed in order to evaluate phase composition, particle size distribution, morphology, functional groups, fluorine content, and purity of pr epared FHA nanopowders, respectively. SEM analysis was used to study the surface morphology and cross section of the FHA coatings, deposited on 316L stainless s teel substrate. Results indicated that single-phase and homogeneous FHA nanopowd ers with carbonate peaks in the FTIR spectrum were synthesized through the modif ied sol-gel technique. TEM analysis revealed that fluorapatite (FA) powder was c omposed of nanosized particles, similar to 25 nm in size, with polyhedron shape and straight corners. In the modified sol-gel technique, polymerization and gela tion kinetic of the sol were significantly improved without any need to use addi tives or pH control. Uniform, dense, well-adhered, and compacted FHA coatings we re formed on the 316L stainless steel substrate after 24 hours of aging. [Zahrani, EM; Alfantazi, AM] Univ British Columbia, Dept Mat Engn, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; [Fathi, MH] Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Grp, E sfahan 8415683111, Iran Zahrani, EM (reprint author), Univ British Columbia, Dep t Mat Engn, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada ehsanmoh@interchange.ubc.ca 63 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 1073-5623 METALL MATER TRANS A Metall. Mater. T rans. A-Phys. Metall. Mater. Sci. NOV 2011 42A 11 3291 3309 10.1007/s11661-010-0465-2 19 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering Materials Science; Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering 822IV WOS:0002 95038900010 J Murr, LE; Martinez, E; Gaytan, SM; Ramirez, DA; Machado, BI; Shindo, PW; Martinez, JL; Medina, F; Wooten, J; Ciscel, D; Ackelid, U; Wicker, RB Murr, L. E.; Martinez, E.; Gaytan, S. M.; Ramirez, D. A.; Machado, B. I.; Shindo , P. W.; Martinez, J. L.; Medina, F.; Wooten, J.; Ciscel, D.; Ackelid, U.; Wicke r, R. B. Microstructural Architecture, Microstructures, and Mecha nical Properties for a Nickel-Base Superalloy Fabricated by Electron Beam Meltin g METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A-PHYSICAL METALLURGY AND MATER IALS SCIENCE English Article NI-NI3NB; SOLIDIFICATION; COMPONENTS; BEHAVIOR; ALLOYS Microstructures and a mi crostructural, columnar architecture as well as mechanical behavior of as-fabric ated and processed INCONEL alloy 625 components produced by additive manufacturi ng using electron beam melting (EBM) of prealloyed precursor powder are examined in this study. As-fabricated and hot-isostatically pressed ("hipped") [at 1393 K (1120 A degrees C)] cylinders examined by optical metallography (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispe rsive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) exhibited an initi al EBM-developed gamma aEuro(3) (bct) Ni(3)Nb precipitate platelet columnar arch itecture within columnar [200] textured gamma (fcc) Ni-Cr grains aligned in the cylinder axis, parallel to the EBM build direction. Upon annealing at 1393 K (11 20 A degrees C) (hot-isostatic press (HIP)), these precipitate columns dissolve and the columnar, gamma, grains recrystallized forming generally equiaxed grains (with coherent {111} annealing twins), containing NbCr(2) laves precipitates. M icroindentation hardnesses decreased from similar to 2.7 to similar to 2.2 GPa f ollowing hot-isostatic pressing ("hipping"), and the corresponding engineering ( 0.2 pct) offset yield stress decreased from 0.41 to 0.33 GPa, while the UTS incr eased from 0.75 to 0.77 GPa. However, the corresponding elongation increased fro m 44 to 69 pct for the hipped components. [Murr, LE; Martinez, E; Gaytan, SM; Ramirez, DA; Machado, BI; Shindo, PW; Martinez, JL] Univ Texas El Paso, Dept Met & Mat Engn, El Paso, TX 79968 USA; [Medina, F; Wicker, RB] Univ Texas El Pa

so, WM Keck Ctr Innovat 3D, El Paso, TX 79968 USA; [Wooten, J; Ciscel, D] CalRAM Inc, Simi Valley, CA 93065 USA; [Ackelid, U] Arcam AB, SE-43137 Molndal, Sweden Murr, LE (reprint author), Univ Texas El Paso, Dept Met & Mat Engn, El Paso, TX 79968 USA lemurr@utep.edu Mr. and Mrs. MacIntosh Murchison Endowed Chairs This research was supported, in part, by Mr. and Mrs. MacIntosh Murchison Endowe d Chairs (LEM and RBW) as well as graduate research assistantships at the Univer sity of Texas at El Paso. We thank ARCAM AB-Sweden and Metals Technology, Inc. f or technical support and services. 30 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 1073-5623 METALL MATER TRANS A Metall. Mater. Trans. A-Phys. Metall. Mater. Sci. NOV 2011 42A 11 3491 3508 10.1007/s11661-011-0748-2 18 Materials Science, Multi disciplinary; Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering Materials Science; Metal lurgy & Metallurgical Engineering 822IV WOS:000295038900030 J Lenci, S; Rega, G Lenci, Stefano; Rega, Gi useppe Load carrying capacity of systems within a global safety perspec tive. Part II. Attractor/basin integrity under dynamic excitations INTERNAT IONAL JOURNAL OF NON-LINEAR MECHANICS English Article Load carrying capacity; Dynamic excitations; Global safety; Attractor-basin port raits; Dynamical integrity; Koiter; Thompson The effects of the dynam ic excitation on the load carrying capacity of mechanical systems are investigat ed with reference to the archetypal model addressed in Part I. which permits to highlight the main ideas without spurious mechanical complexities. First, the ef fects of the excitation on periodic solutions are analyzed, focusing on bifurcat ions entailing their disappearance and playing the role of Koiter critical thres holds. Then, attractor robustness (i.e., large magnitude of the safe basin) is s hown to be necessary but not sufficient to have global safety under dynamic exci tation. In fact, the excitation strongly modifies the topology of the safe basin s, and a dynamical integrity perspective accounting for the magnitude of the sol ely compact part of the safe basin must be considered. By means of extensive num erical simulations, robustness/erosion profiles of dynamic solutions/basins for varying axial load and dynamic amplitude are built, respectively. These curves p ermit to appreciate the practical reduction of system load carrying capacity and , upon choosing the value of residual integrity admissible for engineering desig n, the Thompson practical stability. Dwelling on the effects of the interaction between axial load and lateral dynamic excitation, this paper supports and, inde ed, extends the conclusions of the companion one, highlighting the fundamental r ole played by global dynamics as regards a reliable estimation of the actual loa d carrying capacity of mechanical systems. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights res erved. [Lenci, S] Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Architecture Bldg & Struct, Ancona , Italy; [Rega, G] Univ Roma La Sapienza, Dept Struct & Geotech Engn, Rome, Ital y Lenci, S (reprint author), Polytech Univ Marche, Dept Architecture Bldg & Struct, Ancona, Italy lenci@univpm.it; Giuseppe.Rega@uniroma1.it 11 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0020-7462 INT J NONLIN MECH Int. J. Non-Linear Mech. NOV 2011 46 9 1240 1251 10.1016/j.ijnonlinmec.20 11.05.021 12 Mechanics Mechanics 819AF WOS:000294797100015 J Lee, HS; Thorson, JS Lee, Hyun Soo; Thorson, Jon S. Development of a universal glycosyltransferase assay amenable to high-throughput formats ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY English Article Glycosyltransferase; Enzyme; Evolution; Engineering; Carbohydrate; Sugar nucleot ide DIRECTED EVOLUTION; PROMISCUITY; GLYCORANDOMIZATION; GLYCOSYLATION; CHEM OSENSOR; BIOLOGY The development of a general 1-Zn(II) nucleoside diphosp hate (NDP) sensor assay for rapid evaluation of glycosyltransferase (GT) activit y is described. The 1-Zn(II) NDP sensor assay offers submicromolar sensitivity, compatibility with both purified enzymes and crude cell extracts, and exquisite selectivity for NDPs over the corresponding NDP-sugars. Thus, the 1-Zn(II) NDP s ensor assay is anticipated to offer broad applicability in the context of GT eng

ineering and characterization. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Lee, HS; Thorson, JS] Univ Wisconsin, Div Pharmaceut Sci, Sch Pharm, Wisconsin Ctr Nat Prod Res, Madison, WI 53705 USA; [Lee, HS] Sogang Univ, Dept Chem, Seoul 121742, South Korea Thorson, JS (reprint author), Univ Wisconsin, Div Pharma ceut Sci, Sch Pharm, Wisconsin Ctr Nat Prod Res, Madison, WI 53705 USA jsthorso n@pharmacy.wisc.edu NIH[AI52218]; Laura and Edward Kremers Chair in Natural Products Chemistry This work was supported by funding from the NIH (AI52218 ) and the Laura and Edward Kremers Chair in Natural Products Chemistry (J.S.T.). 28 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0003-2697 ANAL BIOCHEM Anal. Biochem. NOV 1 2011 418 1 85 88 10.1016/j.ab.2011.06.016 4 Biochemical Research Methods; Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry, Analy tical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry 819ON WOS:000294836300 013 J Taillades, G; Batocchi, P; Essoumhi, A; Taillades, M; Jones, DJ; Roziere , J Taillades, Gilles; Batocchi, Pierre; Essoumhi, A bdel; Taillades, Melanie; Jones, Deborah J.; Roziere, Jacques Engineer ing of porosity, microstructure and electrical properties of Ni-BaCe(0.9)Y(0.1)O (2.95) cermet fuel cell electrodes by gelled starch porogen processing MICROPOR OUS AND MESOPOROUS MATERIALS English Article Ni-cermet; Starch; Mercury porosimetry; Proton ceramic fuel cell NI-SDC C ERMETS; IT-SOFC ANODE; SINTERING TEMPERATURE; COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS; YSZ CERMET; CERAMICS; COMPOSITES; CATHODE The synthesis of electrode materials with contro lled microstructural characteristics and high conductivity over 1000 S cm(-1) is a key factor in improving the performance of fuel cells. In this work, we propo se an alternative route to the partial sintering of a powder mixture to control the porosity of a ceramic-metal composite currently used as an anode material in Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cells working at 400-600 degrees C. This new method is ba sed on the use of nanopowdered cermet materials and starch in gelling form for t he elaboration of Ni-BaCe(0.9)Y(0.1)O(3) (Ni-BCY) cermets. The microstructure an d the electrical properties have been investigated with respect to the initial s tarch content. A porous microstructure consisting of hornogenously distributed N i and BCY phases is observed. It is shown that the degree of open porosity and t he electrical conductivity of the cermets are sensitive to the starch content. A nodes elaborated from initial compositions comprising 10 and 20 wt.% of starch o ffer sufficient mechanical strength and an open porosity >30 vol.%. The measured conductivities vary with the composition, from 1000 to 3000 S cm(-1) at 600 deg rees C. The use of starch in gelled form as porogen allows the engineering of th e porosity and the control of pore shape and distribution. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc . All rights reserved. [Taillades, G; Batocchi, P; Essoumhi, A; Taillades, M; J ones, DJ; Roziere, J] Univ Montpellier 2, UMR CNRS 5253, ICGM, F-34095 Montpelli er, France Taillades, G (reprint author), Univ Montpellier 2, UMR CNRS 5253 , ICGM, F-34095 Montpellier, France gilles.taillades@univ-montp2.fr Agence N ationale de la Recherche; Languedoc-Roussillon regional council under ARPE initi ative This work was funded under the CONDOR project of the Hydrogen and Fuel C ells programme of the Agence Nationale de la Recherche. We also gratefully ackno wledge financial support from the Languedoc-Roussillon regional council under th e ARPE initiative. 25 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 1387-1811 MICROPOR MESOPOR MAT Microporous Mesoporous Mat. NOV 2011 145 1-3 26 31 10.1016/j.micromeso.2011 .04.020 6 Chemistry, Applied; Chemistry, Physical; Nanosci ence & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Scien ce & Technology - Other Topics; Materials Science 821KO WOS:000294974100 005 J Tait, M; Pegoretti, A; Dorigato, A; Kalaitzidou, K Tait, Massimiliano; Pegoretti, Alessandro; Dorigato, Andrea; Kalaitzidou, Kyriak i The effect of filler type and content and the manufacturing proc ess on the performance of multifunctional carbon/poly-lactide composites

CARBON English Article LAYERED SILICATE NANOCOMPOSITES; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; POLY(LACTIC ACID); GRAPH ITE; FIBERS Two nanosized carbonaceous fillers, vapor grown carbon nanofiber s and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets, were used to prepare poly(lactide acid) composites at various concentrations from 0 up to 20 wt.%. The two fillers were also combined in order to explore possible synergistic actions. Two compounding processes, melt mixing and polymer dissolution, and two forming methods, inject ion and compression molding, were used to manufacture the composites. The flexur al properties, impact strength, storage and loss modulus, Vicat softening temper ature, and electrical conductivity of neat matrix and composites were determined as a function of the filler type and content, and of the processing method used . The filler dispersion within the polymer matrix, the presence of agglomerates and the existence of voids were studied using field-emission scanning electron m icroscopy. It is concluded that compounding by polymer dissolution followed by c ompression molding leads to composites with the lowest percolation threshold and surface conductivity and highest storage modulus whereas extrusion injection mo lding results in composites with the highest mechanical properties. The results can be used to engineer biodegradable composites with specific properties for ta rgeted applications. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Tait, M ; Kalaitzidou, K] Georgia Inst Technol, George W Woodruff Sch Mech Engn, Atlanta , GA 30322 USA; [Tait, M; Pegoretti, A; Dorigato, A] Univ Trent, Dept Mat Engn & Ind Technol, Trento, Italy; [Kalaitzidou, K] Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA Kalaitzidou, K (reprint author), Georgia Inst Te chnol, George W Woodruff Sch Mech Engn, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA kyriaki.kalaitzi dou@me.gatech.edu 25 0 0 PERGAMON -ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0008-6223 CARBON Carbon NOV 2011 49 13 4280 4290 10.1016/j.carbon .2011.06.009 11 Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Materials Science 817BL WOS:000294645700 022 J Sui, ZY; Zhang, XT; Lei, Y; Luo, YJ Sui, Zhu yin; Zhang, Xuetong; Lei, Yu; Luo, Yunjun Easy and green synthesis of reduced graphite oxide-based hydrogels CARBON English Article WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES; L-ASCORBIC-ACID; GRAPHENE OXIDE; DRUG-DELIVERY; CHEMICA L-REDUCTION; VITAMIN-C; WATER; NANOMATERIALS; SUSPENSIONS; FABRICATION We repor t an environmentally-friendly and easy to scale-up route to synthesize reduced g raphite oxide (RGO) hydrogel by simple reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide (G O) with excess vitamin C (VC). Mono-layer graphene sheets self-assembling into a well-defined and interconnected 3D porous network through pi-pi interaction dur ing gelation can be seen by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force micros copy images. The RGO hydrogels were further functionalized and the corresponding RGO/carbon nanotube or RGO/noble metal hybrid hydrogels were obtained after sim ilar reduction or co-reduction when carbon nanotubes were added to and stabilize d with GO sheets or when noble metal precursors were added and incorporated with GO sheets. Rheological performance and electrical conductivities of these RGO-b ased hydrogels were also investigated in this study. The residual VC retained in these hydrogels as a biofunctional component can be gradually released in a dif fusion-controlled manner, which may endow these RGO-based hydrogels with a bio-f unctionality. Because encapsulated bioactive VC simultaneously occurs with the f ormation of these assemblies, the resulting RGO-based hydrogels may have great p otential in use as transdermal systems for controlled delivery of VC, tissue eng ineering, biosensors, etc. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Sui, ZY ; Zhang, XT; Lei, Y; Luo, YJ] Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China Zhang, XT (reprint author), Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Ma t Sci & Engn, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China zhangxtchina@yahoo.com National Natural Science Foundation of China[20903009]; Science Foundation for the Excel lent Youth Scholars of Beijing Institute of Technology[2010YS0903] This wor k was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 20903009) and the Science Foundation for the Excellent Youth Scholars

of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 2010YS0903). Many thanks to Prof. David Smith (Department of Chemistry, University of York, UK) for the English c orrection of this manuscript. 61 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0008-6223 CARBON Carbon NOV 2011 49 13 4314 4321 10.1016/j.carbon.2011.06 .006 8 Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidis ciplinary Chemistry; Materials Science 817BL WOS:000294645700025 J Megharaj, M; Ramakrishnan, B; Venkateswarlu, K; Sethunathan, N; Naidu, R Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; S ethunathan, Nambrattil; Naidu, Ravi Bioremediation approaches for or ganic pollutants: A critical perspective ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL English Review Bioremediation approache s; Organic pollutants; Electrobioremediation; GEMs; Rhizoremediation; Limitation s POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS; IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION; GENETICALLY-EN GINEERED MICROORGANISMS; ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION ANALYSIS; DIESEL-CONTAMINATED SOI L; PAH-DEGRADING BACTERIA; NATURAL ATTENUATION; POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYLS; ENVIR ONMENTAL-POLLUTANTS; ELECTROKINETIC TRANSPORT Due to human activities to a gre ater extent and natural processes to some extent, a large number of organic chem ical substances such as petroleum hydrocarbons, halogenated and nitroaromatic co mpounds, phthalate esters, solvents and pesticides pollute the soil and aquatic environments. Remediation of these polluted sites following the conventional eng ineering approaches based on physicochemical methods is both technically and eco nomically challenging. Bioremediation that involves the capabilities of microorg anisms in the removal of pollutants is the most promising, relatively efficient and cost-effective technology. However, the current bioremediation approaches su ffer from a number of limitations which include the poor capabilities of microbi al communities in the field, lesser bioavailability of contaminants on spatial a nd temporal scales, and absence of bench-mark values for efficacy testing of bio remediation for their widespread application in the field. The restoration of al l natural functions of some polluted soils remains impractical and, hence, the a pplication of the principle of function-directed remediation may be sufficient t o minimize the risks of persistence and spreading of pollutants. This review sel ectively examines and provides a critical view on the knowledge gaps and limitat ions in field application strategies, approaches such as composting, electrobior emediation and microbe-assisted phytoremediation, and the use of probes and assa ys for monitoring and testing the efficacy of bioremediation of polluted sites. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Venkateswarlu, K] Sri Krishnade varaya Univ, Dept Microbiol, Anantapur 515055, Andhra Pradesh, India; [Megharaj, M; Ramakrishnan, B; Venkateswarlu, K; Naidu, R] Univ S Australia, Ctr Environm Risk Assessment & Remediat, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia; [Ramakrishnan, B] Indi an Agr Res Inst, Div Microbiol, New Delhi 110012, India; [Megharaj, M; Ramakrish nan, B; Venkateswarlu, K; Naidu, R] Cooperat Res Ctr Contaminat Assessment & Rem ediat, Salisbury S, SA 5106, Australia Venkateswarlu, K (reprint author), Sri K rishnadevaraya Univ, Dept Microbiol, Anantapur 515055, Andhra Pradesh, India v_kadiyala@hotmail.com Government of Australia (Department of Education, Employ ment and Workplace Relations) BR and KN thank the Government of Australia (Dep artment of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations) for the Endeavour Rese arch Fellowship and Endeavour Executive Award, respectively. 196 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0160-4120 ENVIRON INT Environ. Int. NOV 2011 37 8 1362 1375 10.1016/j.envint.2011.06.003 14 Environmental Sciences Environmental Sciences & Ecology 816EV WOS:0002 94582400009 J Kolahdoozan, M; Imanian, H; Falconer, RA Kolahdoozan, Morteza; Imanian, Hanifeh; Falconer, Roger A. On the c riteria for the initiation of motion in tidal inlets, deterministic and stochast ic approaches COASTAL ENGINEERING English Article Sediment transport; Mathematical models; Bed load; Stochastic and deterministic

approaches; Tidal inlets SEDIMENT TRANSPORT; SUSPENDED SEDIMENT; BED-LOAD ; ESTUARINE; WATERS; SCHEME Details are given herein of the refinement and a pplication of a three-dimensional layer integrated numerical model to predict mo rphological changes in tidal basins. The solution of governing differential equa tions, which consist of the conservation of mass and momentum for the hydrodynam ics, the transport equation for the suspended sediment fluxes and the sediment m ass conservation equation for the bed level changes are carried out by the use o f Alternating Direction implicit (ADI) Finite Difference Method (FDM). The model includes different criteria for the initiation of motion namely Shields (1936, Application of Similarity Principles and Turbulence Research to Bed load Movemen t, Hydrodynamics Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pub. No. 167), Kolandoozan (1999, Numerical Modelling of Geomorphological Processes in Estuarin e Waters, PhD Thesis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univers ity of Bradford, Bradford, UK, 288) and Zanke (2003, On the Influence of Turbule nce on the Initiation of Sediment Motion, International Journal of Sediment Rese arch, 18(1), 17-31), to compare different aspects of flow conditions. As the flo w is highly turbulent with the random nature of its components, many researchers have tried to express sediment transport processes by using stochastic approach es. In the current study both deterministic and stochastic methods are included in the numerical model to evaluate their accuracy and efficiency. To validate th e numerical model results, laboratory measurements are used, with these being ob tained from an earlier experimental program undertaken by the authors. Results o f a short term bed level changes in a laboratory model harbor are included for t he model verification purposes. Comparisons are undertaken using different crite ria for the initiation of motion, with the results highlighting that the unstead iness in the flow parameters included in the numerical model has a major effect on the bed level changes inside the harbor, in compare with the turbulence struc ture of the flow. The model is then applied to a real case study of the Humber E stuary, located in the UK, with comparisons being undertaken for different crite ria for the initiation of motion, using both deterministic and stochastic approa ches for the long term bed level predictions. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Kolahdoozan, M; Imanian, H] Amir Kabir Univ Technol, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Tehran, Iran; [Falconer, RA] Cardiff Univ, Sch Engn, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales Kolahdoozan, M (reprint author), Amir Kabir Univ Technol, Dept C ivil & Environm Engn, 424 Hafez Ave, Tehran, Iran mklhdzan@aut.ac.ir; hani feh_iman@aut.ac.ir; falconerra@cardiff.ac.uk 42 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMST ERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0378-3839 COAST ENG Coast. Eng. NOV 2011 58 11 1013 1022 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2011.05.002 10 Engineering, Civ il; Engineering, Ocean Engineering 815KX WOS:000294525600001 J Miranda, T; Dias, D; Eclaircy-Caudron, S; Correia, AG; Costa, L Miranda, T.; Dias, D.; Eclaircy-Caudron, S.; Correia, A. Gomes; Costa, L. Back analysis of geomechanical parameters by optimisation of a 3D model of an un derground structure TUNNELLING AND UNDERGROUND SPACE TECHNOLOGY English Article Geomechanical parameters ; Back analysis; Optimisation; Evolutionary algorithms; Underground structures GENETIC ALGORITHMS; GEOTECHNICAL BACKANALYSIS; CONSTITUTIVE MODEL; FIELD-MEASURE MENTS; INVERSE ANALYSIS; SOIL PARAMETERS; IDENTIFICATION; TUNNELS; ROCK; DISPLAC EMENTS One of the major difficulties for geotechnical engineers during project phase is to estimate the geomechanical parameters values of the adopted constitu tive model in a reliable way. In project phase, they are normally evaluated by l aboratory and in situ tests and, in the specific case of rock masses, by the app lication of empirical classification systems. However, all methodologies lead to uncertainties due to factors like local heterogeneities, representativeness of the tests, etc. In order to reduce these uncertainties, geotechnical engineers c an use inverse analysis during construction, using monitoring data to identify t he parameters of the involved formations. This paper shows the back analysis of geomechanical parameters by the optimisation of a 3D numerical model of the hydr oelectric powerhouse cavern of Venda Nova II built in Portugal. For this purpose

, two optimisation techniques were considered: one classical optimisation algori thm and an evolutionary optimisation algorithm. In the optimisation process, dis placements measured by extensometers during excavation were used to identify roc k mass parameters, namely the deformability modulus (E) and the stress ratio (K( 0)). Efficiency of both algorithms is evaluated and compared. Both approaches al lowed obtaining the optimal set of parameters and provided a better insight abou t the involved rock formation properties. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights rese rved. [Miranda, T; Correia, AG] Univ Minho, Dept Civil Engn, Sch Engn, P-48000 58 Guimaraes, Portugal; [Dias, D] INSA, LGCIE, F-69621 Villeurbanne, France; [Ec laircy-Caudron, S] EDF RTE, Ctr Natl Expertises Reseau, Besancon, France; [Costa , L] Univ Minho, Sch Engn, Dept Prod & Syst, P-4710057 Braga, Portugal Miranda, T (reprint author), Univ Minho, Dept Civil Engn, Sch Engn, Campus Azurem, P-480 0058 Guimaraes, Portugal tmiranda@civil.uminho.pt; daniel.dias@insa-lyon. fr; stephanie.eclaircy@rte-france.com; agc@civil.uminho.pt; lac@dps.uminho.pt FCT[POCI/ECM/57495/2004] The authors wish to acknowledge the EDP Company (Portuguese Electricity Company) for providing the test results. This work was f inanced by the FCT project POCI/ECM/57495/2004 entitled "Geotechnical Risk in Tu nnels for High Speed Trains". 61 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0886-7798 TUNN UNDERGR SP TECH Tunn. Undergr. S pace Technol. NOV 2011 26 6 659 673 10.1016/j.tust.2011.05.010 15 Construc tion & Building Technology; Engineering, Civil Construction & Building Technolo gy; Engineering 813VQ WOS:000294398700002 J Chu, YC; Cao, Y; He, XM; Luo, M Chu, Yuchuan; Ca o, Yong; He, Xiaoming; Luo, Min Asymptotic boundary conditions with imme rsed finite elements for interface magnetostatic/electrostatic field problems wi th open boundary COMPUTER PHYSICS COMMUNICATIONS English Article Immersed finite elements; Open boundary problems; Magnetostatic/electrostatic fi eld; Asymptotic boundary condition NONHOMOGENEOUS JUMP CONDITIONS; DISCONTI NUOUS COEFFICIENTS; APPROXIMATION CAPABILITY; ELLIPTIC-EQUATIONS; ION OPTICS; SP ACE; SIMULATION Many of the magnetostatic/electrostatic field problems encounter ed in aerospace engineering, such as plasma sheath simulation and ion neutraliza tion process in space, are not confined to finite domain and non-interface probl ems, but characterized as open boundary and interface problems. Asymptotic bound ary conditions (ABC) and immersed finite elements (IFE) are relatively new tools to handle open boundaries and interface problems respectively. Compared with th e traditional truncation approach, asymptotic boundary conditions need a much sm aller domain to achieve the same accuracy. When regular finite element methods a re applied to an interface problem, it is necessary to use a body-fitting mesh i n order to obtain the optimal convergence rate. However, immersed finite element s possess the same optimal convergence rate on a Cartesian mesh, which is critic al to many applications. This paper applies immersed finite element methods and asymptotic boundary conditions to solve an interface problem arising from electr ic field simulation in composite materials with open boundary. Numerical example s are provided to demonstrate the high global accuracy of the IFE method with AB C based on Cartesian meshes, especially around both interface and boundary. This algorithm uses a much smaller domain than the truncation approach in order to a chieve the same accuracy. Published by Elsevier B.V. [He, XM] Missouri Univ S ci & Technol, Dept Math & Stat, Rolla, MO 65401 USA; [Chu, YC; Cao, Y] Harbin In st Technol, Shenzhen Grad Sch, Dept Mech Engn & Automat, Shenzhen 518055, Guangd ong, Peoples R China; [Luo, M] Sichuan Univ, Uncertainty Decis Making Lab, Cheng du 610064, Peoples R China; [Luo, M] Chengdu Univ Informat Technol, Coll Math, C hengdu 610225, Peoples R China He, XM (reprint author), Missouri Univ Sci & Tec hnol, Dept Math & Stat, Rolla, MO 65401 USA cychu@hitsz.edu.cn; yongc@hitsz. edu.cn; hex@mst.edu; luomin@cuit.edu.cn National Science Foundation of China[106 71136] This work is supported by the National Science Foundation of China (1067 1136). 44 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0010-4655 COMPUT P HYS COMMUN Comput. Phys. Commun. NOV 2011 182 11

2331 2338 10.1016/j.cpc.2011.06.014 8 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Physics, Mathematical Computer Science; Physics 815KZ WOS:000294525800004 J Cipolla, SJ Cipolla, Sam J. ISICS201 1, an updated version of ISICS: A program for calculation K-, L-, and M-shell cr oss sections from PWBA and ECPSSR theories using a personal computer COMPUTER PHYSICS COMMUNICATIONS English Article Atomic K-, L-, M-shell ionization; PWBA and ECPSSR cross sections; Ion-atom coll isions; C package; Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration techniques In this new version of ISICS, called ISICS2011, a few omissions and incorrect en tries in the built-in file of electron binding energies have been corrected: ope rational situations leading to un-physical behavior have been identified and fla gged. New version program summary Program title: ISICS2011 Catalogue identifier: ADDS_v5_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADDS_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library. Queen's University. Belfast, N. I reland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licen ce/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6011 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130 587 Dis tribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: 80486 or higher-level PCs Operating system: WINDOWS XP and all earlier operating systems Classificati on: 16.7 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADDS_v4_0 Journal reference o f previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 180 (2009) 1716. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Ionization and X-ray pro duction cross section calculations for ion-atom collisions. Solution method: Num erical integration of form factor using a logarithmic transform and Gaussian qua drature, plus exact integration limits. Reasons for new version: General need fo r higher precision in output format for projectile energies: some built-in bindi ng energies needed correcting: some anomalous results occur due to faulty read-i n data or calculated parameters becoming un-physical: erroneous calculations cou ld result for the L and M shells when restricted K-shell options are inadvertent ly chosen: to achieve general compatibility with ISICSoo, a companion C++ versio n that is portable to Linux and MacOS platforms, has been submitted for publicat ion in the CPC Program Library approximately at the same time as this present ne w standalone version of ISICS [1]. Summary of revisions: The format field for pr ojectile energies in the output has been expanded from two to four decimal place s in order to distinguish between closely spaced energy values. There were a few entries in the executable binding energy file that needed correcting: K shell o f Eu. M shells of Zn, M1 shell of Kr. The corrected values were also entered in the ENERGY.DAT file. In addition, an alternate data file of binding energies is included, called ENERGY_GW.DAT. which is more up-to-date [2]. Likewise, an alter nate atomic parameters data file is now included, called FLOURE_JC.DAT, which is more up-to-date [3] fluorescence yields for the K and L shells and Coster-Kroni g parameters for the L shell. Both data files can be read in using the -f usage option. To do this, the original energy file should be renamed and saved (e.g.. ENERGY_BB.DAT) and the new file (ENERGY_GW.DAT) should be duplicated as ENERGY.D AT to be read in using the -f option. Similarly for reading in an alternate FLOU RE.DAT file. As with previous versions, the user can also simply input different values of any input quantity by invoking the "specify your own parameters" opti on from the main menu. You can also use this option to simply check the values o f the built-in values of the parameters. If it still happens that a zero binding energy for a particular sub-shell is read in, the program will not completely a bort, but will calculate results for the other sub-shells while setting the affe cted sub-shell output to zero. In calculating the Coulomb deflection factor, if the quantity inside the radical sign of the parameter z(s) z(s) = root(1-(4/M ze ta(s)theta(s))(zeta(s)/xi(s)))(2) becomes zero or negative, to prevent the progr am from aborting, the PWBA cross sections are still calculated while the ECPSSR cross sections are set to zero. This situation can happen for very low energy co llisions, such as were noticed for helium ions on copper at energies of E <= 11. 2 keV. It was observed during the engineering of ISICSoo [1] that erroneous calc ulations could result for the L- and M-shell cases when restricted K-shell R or

HSR scaling options were inappropriately chosen. The program has now been fixed so that these inappropriate options are ignored for the L and M shells. In the p revious versions, the usage for inputting a batch data file was incorrectly stat ed in the Users Manual as -Bxxx; the correct designation is -Fxxx. or alternativ ely, -Ixxx, as indicated on the usage screen in running the program. A revised U sers Manual is also available. Restrictions: The consumed CPU time increases wit h the atomic shell (K, L, M), but execution is still very fast. Running time: Th is depends on which shell and the number of different energies to be used in the calculation. The running time is not significantly changed from the previous ve rsion. Creighton Univ, Dept Phys, Omaha, NE 68178 USA Cipolla, SJ (reprint aut hor), Creighton Univ, Dept Phys, Omaha, NE 68178 USA samcip@creighton.edu 2 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0010-4655 COMPUT PHYS COMMUN Comput. Phys. Commun. NOV 2011 182 11 2439 2440 10.1016/j.cpc.2011.06.004 2 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Physics, Mathematical Computer Science; Physics 815KZ WOS:000294525800011 J Badia, JM; Movilla, JL; Climente, JI; Castillo, M; Marques, M; Mayo, R; Quintana-Orti, ES; Planelles, J Badia, J. M.; Movilla, J . L.; Climente, J. I.; Castillo, M.; Marques, M.; Mayo, R.; Quintana-Orti, E. S. ; Planelles, J. A parallel solver for huge dense linear systems COMPUTER PHYSICS COMMUNICATIONS English Article LU decomposition; Out-of-core; Parallel computing HDSS (Huge Dense Linear System Solver) is a Fortran Application Programming Interface (API) to f acilitate the parallel solution of very large dense systems to scientists and en gineers. The API makes use of parallelism to yield an efficient solution of the systems on a wide range of parallel platforms, from clusters of processors to ma ssively parallel multiprocessors. It exploits out-of-core strategies to leverage the secondary memory in order to solve huge linear systems O(100.000). The API is based on the parallel linear algebra library PLAPACK. and on its Out-Of-Core (OOC) extension POOCLAPACK. Both PLAPACK and POOCLAPACK use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) as the communication. layer and BLAS to perform the local matrix operations. The API provides a friendly interface to the users, hiding almost a ll the technical aspects related to the parallel execution of the code and the u se of the secondary memory to solve the systems. In particular, the API can auto matically select the best way to store and solve the systems, depending of the d imension of the system, the number of processes and the main memory of the platf orm. Experimental results on several parallel platforms report high performance. reaching more than 1 TFLOP with 64 cores to solve a system with more than 200 0 00 equations and more than 10 000 right-hand side vectors. New version program s ummary Program title: Huge Dense System Solver (HDSS) Catalogue identifier: AEHU _v1_1 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHU_v1_1.html Prog ram obtainable from: CPC Program Library. Queen's University, Belfast, N. Irelan d Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence. http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/li cence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 87 06 2 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 069 110 Dist ribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90. C Computer: Parallel ar chitectures: multiprocessors, computer clusters Operating system: Linux/Unix Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, includes MPI primitives. RAM: T ested for up to 190 GB Classification: 6.5 External routines: MPI (http://www.mp i-forum.org/), BLAS (http://www.netlib.org/blas/), PLAPACK (http://www.cs.utexas .edu/-plapack/). POOCLAPACK (ftp://ftp.cs.utexas.edu/pub/rvdg/PLAPACK/pooclapack .ps) (code for PLAPACK and POOCLAPACK is included in the distribution). Catalogu e identifier of previous version: AEHU_v1_0 Journal reference of previous versio n: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182 (2011) 533 Does the new version supersede the previou s version?: Yes Nature of problem: Huge scale dense systems of linear equations, Ax = B. beyond standard LAPACK capabilities. Solution method: The linear system s are solved by means of parallelized routines based on the LU factorization, us ing efficient secondary storage algorithms when the available main memory is ins ufficient. Reasons for new version: In many applications we need to guarantee a

high accuracy in the solution of very large linear systems and we can do it by u sing double-precision arithmetic. Summary of revisions: Version 1.1 Can be used to solve linear systems using double-precision arithmetic. New version of the in itialization routine. The user can choose the kind of arithmetic and the values of several parameters of the environment. Running time: About 5 hours to solve a system with more than 200 000 equations and more than 10000 right-hand side vec tors using double-precision arithmetic on an eight-node commodity cluster with a total of 64 Intel cores. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Badia, JM; Castillo, M; Marques, M; Mayo, R; Quintana-Orti, ES] Univ Jaume 1, Dept Engn & Ciencia Computadors, E-12080 Castellon de La Plana, Spain; [Movilla, JL; Clim ente, JI; Planelles, J] Univ Jaume 1, Dept Quim Fis & Analit, E-12080 Castellon de La Plana, Spain Badia, JM (reprint author), Univ Jaume 1, Dept Engn & Ci encia Computadors, Box 224, E-12080 Castellon de La Plana, Spain badia@ic c.uji.es 0 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0010-465 5 COMPUT PHYS COMMUN Comput. Phys. Commun. NOV 2011 182 11 2441 2442 10.1016/j.cpc.20 11.06.010 2 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Appl ications; Physics, Mathematical Computer Science; Physics 815KZ WOS:0002 94525800012 J Chen, CC; Jeng, MS; Leu, CH; Yang, CC; Lin, YL; King, SC; Wu, SY Chen, Cheng-Chun; Jeng, Ming-Shan; Leu, Chih-Hsing; Yang, Chang-Chung; Lin, Yu-L i; King, Shun-Chih; Wu, Shu-Yii Low-level CO in hydrogen-rich gas suppli ed by a methanol processor for PEMFCs CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article Fuel; Methanol reforming ; Catalytic combustion; Catalysis; Hydrogen; Reaction engineering FUEL-CEL L APPLICATIONS; SELECTIVE CATALYTIC-OXIDATION; COPPER-BASED CATALYSTS; CARBON-MO NOXIDE; MICROCHANNEL REACTOR; PORTABLE POWER; STEAM REFORMER; CUZNAL(ZR)-OXIDE C ATALYSTS; MULTILAYERED MICROREACTOR; CU/ZNO/AL2O3 CATALYSTS The present stud y developed a low-CO methanol processor for the online supply of hydrogen to a p roton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) composed of a steam reformer, a cataly tic combustor and a reactor for the removal of CO. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al(2)O(3)and Pt/Al(2)O(3)-based catalysts were used in the methanol steam reforming and t he preferential oxidation (PROX) reactor, respectively. The steam reformer was s uccessfully heated with a catalytic combustor at room temperature without any ad ditional electrical power supply. Hydrogen gas was obtained at a flow rate of 43 .0 L h(-1) using a feed flow rate of 39.5 ml h(-1) (S/C=1.1) and an operation te mperature of 250 degrees C, corresponding to a power output of 59 W(e). The CO c oncentration could be maintained at 4-5 ppm for stable operation. (C) 2011 Elsev ier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Chen, CC; Wu, SY] Feng Chia Univ, Dept Chem Eng n, Taichung 40724, Taiwan; [Chen, CC; Jeng, MS; Leu, CH; Yang, CC; Lin, YL; King , SC] Ind Technol Res Inst, Green Energy & Environm Res Labs, Hsinchu 31040, Tai wan Wu, SY (reprint author), Feng Chia Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Taichung 40724, Taiwan sywu@fcu.edu.tw Bureau of Energy, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taiwan, Republic of China; Feng Chia University[FCU-09G27102, FCU-10G27101] The auth ors gratefully acknowledge funding from the Bureau of Energy, Ministry of Econom ic Affairs, Taiwan, Republic of China, and thanks Feng Chia University for suppo rting this work (FCU-09G27102; FCU-10G27101). The authors thank to Prof. Chi-Chu an Wang for his valuable suggestions on the final manuscript. 112 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. NOV 1 2011 66 21 5095 5106 10.1016/j.ces.2011.07.002 12 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 811JQ WOS:000294205800013 J Appari, S; Janardhanan, VM; Jayanti, S; Maier, L; Tischer, S; Deutschman n, O Appari, Srinivas; Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Jayanti , Sreenivas; Maier, Lubow; Tischer, Steffen; Deutschmann, Olaf Micro-ki netic modeling of NH(3) decomposition on Ni and its application to solid oxide f uel cells CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article NH(3) decomposition; Catalysis; Kinetics; SOFC; Mathematical modeling; Reaction

engineering PROTON-CONDUCTING ELECTROLYTE; AMMONIA DECOMPOSITION; HYDROGEN; PERFORMANCE; ADSORPTION This paper presents a detailed surface reaction mechanis m for the decomposition of NH(3) to H(2) and N(2) on a Ni surface. The mechanism is validated for temperatures ranging from 700 to 1500 K and pressures from 5.3 Pa to 100 kPa. The activation energies for various elementary steps are calcula ted using the unity bond index-quadratic exponential potential (UBI-QEP) method. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to study the influence of various kinetic p arameters on reaction rates. The NH(3) decomposition mechanism is used to simula te SOFC button cell operating on NH(3) fuel. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights r eserved. [Appari, S; Janardhanan, VM] IIT Hyderabad, Dept Chem Engn, Yedd umailaram 502205, Andhra Pradesh, India; [Jayanti, S] IIT Madras, Dept Chem Engn , Madras 600036, Tamil Nadu, India; [Maier, L; Tischer, S; Deutschmann, O] Karls ruhe Inst Technol, D-76131 Karlsruhe, Germany Janardhanan, VM (reprint author) , IIT Hyderabad, Dept Chem Engn, Yeddumailaram 502205, Andhra Pradesh, India vj@iith.ac.in 31 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. NOV 1 2011 66 21 5184 5191 10.1016/ j.ces.2011.07.007 8 Engineering, Chemical Engineer ing 811JQ WOS:000294205800021 J Metkar, PS; Balakotaiah, V; Harold, MP Metkar, Pranit S.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Harold, Michael P. Experimental stu dy of mass transfer limitations in Fe- and Cu-zeolite-based NH(3)-SCR monolithic catalysts CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article Catalysis; Chemical reactors; Mass transfer; Reaction engineering; Washcoat diff usion; External mass transfer TRANSFER CONTROLLED REGIME; REACTION-MECHANISM; FE-ZSM-5 CATALYST; NOX STORAGE; REDUCTION; AMMONIA; NITROGEN; NH3; OXIDATION; CU -ZSM-5 An experimental study of steady-state selective catalytic reduction (SCR ) of NO(x) with NH(3) on both Fe-ZSM-5 and Cu-ZSM-5 monolithic catalysts was car ried out to investigate the extent of mass transfer limitations in various SCR r eactions. Catalysts with different washcoat loadings, washcoat thicknesses and l engths were synthesized for this purpose. SCR system reactions examined included NO oxidation, NH(3) oxidation, standard SCR, fast SCR and NO(2) SCR. Comparison s of conversions obtained on catalysts with the same washcoat volumes but differ ent washcoat thicknesses indicated the presence of washcoat diffusion limitation s. NH(3) oxidation, an important side reaction in SCR system, showed the presenc e of washcoat diffusion limitations starting at 350 degrees C on Fe-zeolite and 300 degrees C on Cu-zeolite catalysts. Washcoat diffusion limitations were obser ved for the standard SCR reaction (NH(3) + NO + O(2)) on both Fe-zeolite (>= 350 degrees C) and Cu-zeolite (>= 250 degrees C). For the fast (NH(3) +NO + NO(2)) and NO(2) SCR (NH(3) + NO(2)) reactions, diffusion limitations were observed thr oughout the temperature range explored (200-550 degrees C). The experimental fin dings are corroborated by theoretical analyses. Even though the experimentally o bserved differences in conversions clearly indicate the presence of washcoat dif fusion limitations, the contribution of external mass transfer was also found to be important under certain conditions. The transition temperatures for shifts i n controlling regimes from kinetic to washcoat diffusion to external mass transf er are determined using simplified kinetics. The findings indicate the necessity of inclusion of mass transfer limitations in SCR modeling, catalyst design and optimization. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Metkar, PS; Bal akotaiah, V; Harold, MP] Univ Houston, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Houston, TX 7720 4 USA Balakotaiah, V (reprint author), Univ Houston, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, 4800 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204 USA bala@uh.edu; mharold@uh.edu U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory[DE-FC26-05NT42630, DE-EE0000205] This stu dy was funded by grants from the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Vehicles Technologies Program (DE-FC26-05NT42630, DE-EE0000205). 29 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. NOV 1 2011 66 21 5192 5203 10.1016/j.ces.2011.07.014 12

Engineering, Chemical Engineering 811JQ WOS:000294205800022 J Alorda, B; Suenaga, K; Pons, P Alorda, B.; Suen aga, K.; Pons, P. Design and evaluation of a microprocessor course combining three cooperative methods: SDLA, PjBL and CnBL COMPUTERS & EDUC ATION English Article Applicat ions in subject areas; Cooperative/collaborative learning; Teaching/learning str ategies; Improving classroom teaching ANALOG ELECTRONICS This paper repor ts on the design, implementation and assessment of a new approach course structu re based on the combination of three cooperative methodologies. The main goal is to reduce the percentage of non-passed students focusing the learning process o n students by offering different alternatives and motivational activities based on working in small groups on a robotic project and changing the course assessme nt. The microprocessor course is a subject in the undergraduate program of telec ommunication engineering at the University of the Balearic Islands (UIB) in Spai n. Its traditional teaching methodology was based on Lecture sessions, Problem s essions and Practical activities in the lab (L/P/P). This methodology was change d to comply with the Bologna requirements, where new skills must be addressed an d learned during the educational process. Self-Directed Learning activities (SDL A) for lecture sessions and Project based learning (PjBL) for Laboratory session s were implemented in combination with a final competition activity between grou ps (CnBL). This paper describes the design, implementation and results; showing the benefits of these new teaching methods, improving student's motivation inclu ding a robotic buggy project and allowing new learning strategies based on a pra ctical point of view and adaptability to students' previous skills. (C) 2011 Els evier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Alorda, B; Suenaga, K; Pons, P] Univ Illes Bale ars, Dept Phys, Palma De Mallorca 07122, Spain Alorda, B (reprint author), Univ Illes Balears, Dept Phys, Edifici Mateu Orfila,Ctra Valldemossa,Km 7-5, Palma D e Mallorca 07122, Spain tomeu.alorda@uib.es 17 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0360-1315 COMPUT E DUC Comput. Educ. NOV 2011 57 3 1876 1884 10.1016/j.compedu.2011.04.004 9 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Education & Educational Resear ch Computer Science; Education & Educational Research 810AY WOS:0002 94099000003 J Jalonen, S; Lakkala, M; Paavola, S Jalonen, Satu; Lakkala, Minna; Paavola, Sami Investigating knowledge creation technology in an engineering course COMPUTERS & EDUCATION English Article Cooperative/collaborative learni ng; Pedagogical issues; Distributed learning environments; Spatial organization; Knowledge creation technology The aim of the present study was to exam ine the technological affordances of a web-based collaborative learning technolo gy, Knowledge Practices Environment (KPE), for supporting different dimensions o f knowledge creation processes. KPE was used by engineering students in a practi cally oriented undergraduate engineering course. The study concentrated on stude nts' usage and selfreported experiences of the tool, and student-adopted strateg ies for spatially arranging items in KPE's main knowledge space. According to th e results, students used KPE mainly to share and organize project documentation. KPE appears to offer an advantage over traditional folder-based learning enviro nments by providing a structured visual overview of the process and materials in the content view, thus facilitating pragmatic and epistemic dimensions of knowl edge creation at the same time. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Jalonen, S; Lakkala, M; Paavola, S] Univ Helsinki, Inst Behav Sci, FI-00014 Hel sinki, Finland Jalonen, S (reprint author), Univ Helsinki, Inst Behav Sci, POB 9, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland satu.jalonen@helsinki.fi 27 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0360-1315 COMPUT EDUC Comput. Educ. NOV 2011 57 3 1930 1942 10.1016/j.compedu.2011.03.017 13 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Education & Educational Resear

ch Computer Science; Education & Educational Research 810AY WOS:0002 94099000008 J Corter, JE; Esche, SK; Chassapis, C; Ma, J; Nickerson, JV Corter, James E.; Esche, Sven K.; Chassapis, Constantin; Ma, Jing; Nickerson, Je ffrey V. Process and learning outcomes from remotely-operated, si mulated, and hands-on student laboratories COMPUTERS & EDUCATION English Article Remote laboratories; Coo perative learning; Collaborative learning; Simulations; Evaluation of CAI learni ng; Distance education; Post-secondary education SCIENCE-EDUCATION; ENVIR ONMENTS; TECHNOLOGY; PHYSICS; ONLINE; CONSTRUCTION; METAANALYSIS; FOUNDATIONS; S ETTINGS; INTERNET A large-scale, multi-year, randomized study compared lea rning activities and outcomes for hands-on, remotely-operated, and simulation-ba sed educational laboratories in an undergraduate engineering course. Students (N = 458) worked in small-group lab teams to perform two experiments involving str ess on a cantilever beam. Each team conducted the experiments in one of three la b formats (hands-on, remotely-operated, or simulation-based), collecting data ei ther individually or as a team. Lab format and data-collection mode showed an in teraction, such that for the hands-on lab format learning outcomes were higher w hen the lab team collected data sets working as a group rather than individually collecting data sets to be combined later, while for remotely-operated labs ind ividual data collection was best. The pattern of time spent on various lab-relat ed activities suggests that working with real instead of simulated data may indu ce higher levels of motivation. The results also suggest that learning with comp uter-mediated technologies can be improved by careful design and coordination of group and individual activities. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Corter, JE] Columbia Univ, Teachers Coll, New York, NY 10027 USA; [Esche, SK; C hassapis, C; Nickerson, JV] Stevens Inst Technol, Hoboken, NJ USA; [Ma, J] SW Un iv Finance & Econ, Chengdu, Peoples R China Corter, JE (reprint author), Col umbia Univ, Teachers Coll, Grace Dodge Hall,Rm 453,525W 120th St, New York, NY 1 0027 USA jec34@columbia.edu 70 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0360-1315 COMPUT EDUC Comput. Educ. NOV 2011 57 3 2054 2067 10.1016/j.compedu.2011.04.009 14 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Education & Educational Research Computer Science; Education & Educational Research 810AY WOS:000294099000 018 J Akbarzade, M; Kargar, A Akbarzade, M.; Kargar, A . Application of the Hamiltonian approach to nonlinear vibrating e quations MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTER MODELLING English Article Nonlinear oscillation; Hamiltonian approach; Natural frequency; Energy balance m ethod HOMOTOPY PERTURBATION METHOD; ENERGY-BALANCE METHOD; VARIATIONAL APPROAC H; OSCILLATORS; DISCONTINUITIES; MASS In this paper, the Hamiltonian approach is applied to nonlinear vibrations and oscillations. Periodic solutions are anal ytically verified and consequently the relationship between the natural frequenc y and the initial amplitude is obtained in an analytical form. The method is app lied to four nonlinear differential equations. It has indicated that by utilizin g the Hamiltonian approach the first iteration leads us to a high accuracy of so lutions. The results obtained employing the Hamiltonian approach are compared wi th those achieved by using another analytical technique, named the Energy Balanc e Method (EBM) and also an accurate numerical solution to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The results reveal that the Hamiltonian approach is very e ffective and simple. It is predicted that the Hamiltonian approach can prove ver satile when confronted with engineering problems, as indicated in following exam ples. The obtained results may be useful for the explanation of some practical p hysical problems. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Akbarzade, M; K argar, A] Islamic Azad Univ, Quchan Branch, Dept Mech Engn, Quchan, Iran Akbarzade, M (reprint author), Islamic Azad Univ, Quchan Branch, Dept Mech Engn, Quchan, Iran mehdiakbarzade@yahoo.com 33 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD

LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0895-7177 MATH COM PUT MODEL Math. Comput. Model. NOV 2011 54 9-10 2504 2514 10.1016/j.mcm.2011.06.012 11 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Computer Science, Software Eng ineering; Mathematics, Applied Computer Science; Mathematics 806RW WOS:0002 93829300061 J Defraeye, T; Blocken, B; Carmeliet, J Defraeye , Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Carmeliet, Jan An adjusted temperature wall fun ction for turbulent forced convective heat transfer for bluff bodies in the atmo spheric boundary layer BUILDING AND ENVIRONMENT English Article Wall function; Computational fluid dynamics; RANS; Convective heat transfer coef ficient; Cube; Urban heat transfer MOUNTED CUBE; WIND ENVIRONMENT; TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS; CFD SIMULATIONS; FLOW; MODELS; RANS; PREDICTION; VELOCITY; SURFAC E Accurate convective heat transfer predictions are required in building e ngineering and environmental studies on urban heat islands, building energy perf ormance, building-envelope durability or conservation and (natural) ventilation of buildings. When applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for these computa tionally-expensive studies at high-Reynolds numbers, wall functions are mostly u sed to model the boundary-layer region. In this study, an adjustment to the stan dard temperature wall function is proposed for forced convective heat transfer a t surfaces of typical wall-mounted bluff bodies in turbulent boundary layers, su ch as the atmospheric boundary layer, at moderate to high Reynolds numbers. The methodology to determine this customised temperature wall function (CWF) from va lidated numerical data of CFD simulations using low-Reynolds number modelling (L RNM) is explained, where a logarithmic-law behaviour is found. The performance o f this CWF is evaluated for several bluff-body configurations. Standard wall fun ctions (SWFs) yield deviations of about 40% for the convective heat transfer coe fficient, compared to LRNM. With the CWF however, these deviations are reduced t o about 10% or lower. The CWF therefore combines increased (wall-function) accur acy for convective heat transfer predictions with the typical advantage of wall functions compared to LRNM, being a lower grid resolution in the near-wall regio n, which increases computational economy and facilitates grid generation. Furthe rmore, this CWF can be easily implemented in existing CFD codes, and is implemen ted in the commercial CFD code Fluent in this study. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Defraeye, T] Katholieke Univ Leuven, Div Mechatron Bios tat & Sensors, Dept Biosyst, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium; [Defraeye, T] Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Civil Engn, Lab Bldg Phys, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium; [Blocken, B] Eindhoven Univ Technol, NL-5600 Eindhoven, Netherlands; [Carmeliet, J] Swiss Fed Inst Technol Zurich ETHZ, Chair Bldg Phys, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland; [Ca rmeliet, J] Swiss Fed Labs Mat Testing & Res Empa, Lab Bldg Sci & Technol, CH-86 00 Dubendorf, Switzerland Defraeye, T (reprint author), Katholieke Univ Le uven, Div Mechatron Biostat & Sensors, Dept Biosyst, Willem de Croylaan 42, B-30 01 Heverlee, Belgium thijs.defraeye@biw.kuleuven.be Government of Flanders; Flemish government institution, IWT-Flanders (Institute for the Promotion of Inn ovation by Science and Technology in Flanders) This research was funded by the Government of Flanders. As a Flemish government institution, IWT-Flanders (Insti tute for the Promotion of Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders) supp orts and stimulates industrial research and technology transfer in the Flemish i ndustry. Their contribution is gratefully acknowledged. This sponsor had no invo lvement in: the study design, in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript: and in the decision to submit the manusc ript for publication. 60 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN D 0360-1323 BUILD ENVIRON Build. Environ. NOV 2011 46 11 2130 2141 10.1016/j.builde nv.2011.04.013 12 Construction & Building Technology; Engi neering, Environmental; Engineering, Civil Construction & Building Technolo gy; Engineering 802CR WOS:000293487400003 J Rodriguez-Rojas, F; Ortiz, AL; Guiberteau, F; Nygren, M Rodriguez-Rojas, F.; Ortiz, A. L.; Guiberteau, F.; Nygren, M. Anomalou

s oxidation behaviour of pressureless liquid-phase-sintered SiC JOURNAL OF THE E UROPEAN CERAMIC SOCIETY English Article SiC; Liquid-phase sintering; Oxidation HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES; PRESSED SIL ICON-CARBIDE; AIR; RESISTANCE; ADDITIVES; CERAMICS; KINETICS; ALN; YB; ER The oxidation behaviour of pressureless liquid-phase-sintered (PLPS) SiC, an imp ortant non-oxide engineering ceramic, was investigated, and was found to be univ ersally anomalous. Thermogravimetry oxidation tests performed in oxygen in the t emperature range 1000-1225 degrees C on three PLPS SiC ceramics fabricated with different combinations of Al(2)O(3) RE(2)O(3) (RE=Gd, Sc, or Sm) as sintering ai ds indicated that the oxidation is in all cases passive and protective, but unex pectedly anomalous in the sense that the oxidation resistance does not scale inv ersely with temperature. In particular, in all cases it was observed that there is less oxidation above 1100 degrees C than below, in clear contradiction to the expectation for a diffusional process. Exhaustive characterization of the oxide scales by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, a nd X-ray diffractometry, together with detailed modeling of the oxidation curves , showed that the origin of this universal anomalous oxidation behaviour lies in the marked crystallization within the oxide scale of rare-earth silicates that act as effective barriers against the inward diffusion of oxygen thus improving notably the oxidation resistance. A strategy is proposed to provide PLPS SiC, an d probably other SiO(2)-scale-forming ceramics that are sintered using rare-eart h oxides, with the superior oxidation resistance at moderate temperatures (i.e., <1100 degrees C) that they do not currently have. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All ri ghts reserved. [Rodriguez-Rojas, F; Ortiz, AL; Guiberteau, F] Univ Extremadura, Dept Ingn Mecan Energet & Mat, E-06071 Badajoz, Spain; [Nygren, M] Univ Stockho lm, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden Ortiz, AL (reprint autho r), Univ Extremadura, Dept Ingn Mecan Energet & Mat, E-06071 Badajoz, Spain alortiz@materiales.unex.es Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia (Government o f Spain); FEDER[MAT 2007-61609, MAT2010-16848] This work was partly supported b y the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia (Government of Spain) and FEDER funds u nder Grants No. MAT 2007-61609 and MAT2010-16848. 21 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0955-2219 J EUR CERAM SOC J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. NOV 2011 31 13 2393 2400 10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2011.05.015 8 Materials Science, Ceramics Materials Science 807VL WOS:000293931000 026 J Oldham, DJ; Egan, CA Oldham, David J.; Egan, Christopher A. A parametric investigation of the performance of T-profi led highway noise barriers and the identification of a potential predictive appr oach APPLIED ACOUSTICS English Article Top edge treatment; T-profile; Noise barriers; Predictive technique QUADRATI C RESIDUE DIFFUSERS; GENETIC ALGORITHMS; TOP SURFACE; OPTIMIZATION; SHAPES; SOUN D Although a considerable amount of research has been undertaken regarding the performance of T-profile noise barriers, the information available to the p racticing highway engineer is confusing. For example, there is a widespread beli ef that the performance of a top edge, expressed as an insertion loss relative t o that of the simple barrier on which it is mounted, is constant, irrespective o f the relative locations of the source, barrier and receiver. In order to clarif y the situation an investigation has been undertaken, using computer modelling, of the performance afforded by highway noise barriers with T-profile tops with d ifferent acoustic treatments. The relative insertion loss was found to increase systematically with increasing top width. Although the relative insertion loss a fforded by a reflective T-top is small, significant attenuation can be obtained with an absorptive top. Examination of the effect on performance of the location s of source and receiver relative to that of the noise barrier indicated that, f or source and receiver locations typical of those experienced for highway noise barriers, the relative insertion loss for a given width of T-top was a function of (a) the path difference between sound travelling to the receiver via the barr ier top and direct sound from the source to the receiver and (b) the barrier hei

ght. Plots of relative insertion loss versus the path difference, normalised wit h respect to barrier heights, for a range of T-top widths and absorbent treatmen t, resulted in a collapse of data around well defined trend lines which offer th e potential of being developed into a prediction method. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Oldham, DJ; Egan, CA] Univ Liverpool, Sch Architecture, Acoust Res Unit, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Oldham, DJ (repr int author), Univ Liverpool, Sch Architecture, Acoust Res Unit, Liverpool L69 3B X, Merseyside, England djoldham@liv.ac.uk European Community[NMP2-CT-2005011799] The results presented were developed within the IP-SME project Holiwood. This project is carried out with the financial support from the European Commun ity within the Sixth 6th Framework Program (NMP2-CT-2005-011799). This publicati on reflects the authors view. The European Community is not liable for any use t hat may be made of the information contained therein. 29 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0003-682X APPL ACOUST Appl. Ac oust. NOV 2011 72 11 803 813 10.1016/j.apacoust.2011.04.012 11 Acoustics Acoustic s 801GD WOS:000293425600001 J Tao, Z; Uy, B; Liao, FY; Han, LH Tao, Zho ng; Uy, Brian; Liao, Fei-Yu; Han, Lin-Hai Nonlinear analysis of co ncrete-filled square stainless steel stub columns under axial compression JOURNAL OF CONSTRUCTIONAL STEEL RESEARCH English Article Concrete-filled steel tubes; Stainless steel; Stub columns; Axial compression; N onlinear analysis; Finite element; Strength; Parametric analysis TUBE COL UMNS; CROSS-SECTIONS; STRENGTH; BEHAVIOR; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE Concrete-filled stainless steel tubes (CFSST) can be considered as a new and innovative kind of composite construction technique, and have the potential to be used extensively in civil engineering. This paper employs a nonlinear analysis of square CFSST st ub columns under axial compression. A three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) model is developed using ABAQUS, where nonlinear material behaviour, enhan ced strength corner properties of steel, and initial geometric imperfections are included. Close agreement is achieved between the test and FE results in terms of load-deformation response and ultimate strength. In light of the numerical re sults, the behaviour of stainless steel composite columns is compared with that of carbon steel composite columns. A simple model is proposed to calculate the u ltimate strength of square CFSST stub columns. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Tao, Z; Uy, B] Univ Western Sydney, Civ Res Ctr, Penrith, NSW 2 751, Australia; [Liao, FY; Han, LH] Tsinghua Univ, Dept Civil Engn, Beijing 1000 84, Peoples R China; [Liao, FY] Fujian Agr & Forestry Univ, Coll Transportat, Fu zhou 350002, Fujian, Peoples R China Tao, Z (reprint author), Univ Western Sy dney, Civ Res Ctr, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia z.tao@uws.edu.au Australi an Research Council (ARC)[FT0991433]; University of Western Sydney This wor k is supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) under its Future Fellows hips scheme (project no: FT0991433). It has also been partially supported by the Research Grant Scheme and the Eminent Research Visitors Scheme provided by the University of Western Sydney. The financial support is gratefully acknowledged. 38 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0143-974X J CONSTR STEEL RES J. Constr. Steel. Res. NOV 2011 67 11 1719 1732 10.1016/j.jcsr.2011.04.012 14 Construction & Building Technology; Engineering, Civil Construction & Building Technology; Engineering 801GP WOS:000293426900003 J Bahadori, A Bahadori, Alireza Simple method for estimation of effectiveness in one tube pass and one shell pas s counter-flow heat exchangers APPLIED ENERGY English Article Heat exchanger; Effectiveness; Thermal capacity ratio; Heat transfer GENETIC ALGORITHM; OPTIMAL-DESIGN; OPTIMIZATION; MODEL In one tube pass and one shell p ass counter-flow heat exchangers, when both streams change temperature by differ ent amounts, the effectiveness is defined as the temperature change for the stre am with lower capacity divided by the maximum possible change and the effectiven

ess depends on the number of transfer units and the thermal capacity ratio. In t his paper, an attempt has been made to formulate a simple-to-use method which is easier than existing approaches, less complicated and with fewer computations f or accurate and rapid estimation of effectiveness in one tube pass and one shell pass counter-flow heat exchangers as a function of number of transfer units and the thermal capacity ratio. The proposed method permits estimating the exit tem perature for a one tube pass and one shell pass counter-flow heat exchanger with out a trial-and-error calculation. The average absolute deviations between the r eported data and the proposed correlations are found to be less than 2% demonstr ating the excellent performance of proposed correlation. The tool developed in t his study can be of immense practical value for engineers and scientists to have a quick check on the effectiveness in one tube pass and one shell pass counterflow heat exchangers at various conditions without opting for any experimental m easurements. In particular, practice engineers would find the predictive tool to be user-friendly with transparent calculations involving no complex expressions . (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Curtin Univ, Sch Chem & Petr Eng n, Perth, WA 6845, Australia Bahadori, A (reprint author), Curtin Univ, Sch C hem & Petr Engn, GPO Box 1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia Alireza.bahadori @postgrad.curtin.edu.au 26 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , OXON, ENGLAND 0306-2619 APPL ENERG Appl. Energy NOV 2011 88 11 4191 4196 10.1016/ j.apenergy.2011.05.003 6 Energy & Fuels; Engineering, Che mical Energy & Fuels; Engineering 798ID WOS:000293195500066 J Muhlenstadt, T; Kuhnt, S Muehlenstaedt, T homas; Kuhnt, Sonja Kernel interpolation COMPUTATIONAL STATISTICS & DATA ANALYSIS English Article Delaunay triangulation; Computer experiment; Kriging; Inverse distance weighting COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS; SCATTERED DATA; LARGE SETS; DESIGN Surrogate interp olation models for time-consuming computer experiments are being increasingly us ed in scientific and engineering problems. A new interpolation method, based on Delaunay triangulations and related to inverse distance weighting, is introduced . This method not only provides an interpolator but also uncertainty bands to ju dge the local fit, in contrast to methods such as radial basis functions. Compar ed to the classical Kriging approach, it shows a better performance in specific cases of small data sets and data with non-stationary behavior. (C) 2011 Elsevie r B.V. All rights reserved. [Muhlenstadt, T; Kuhnt, S] TU Dortmund Univ, Fac Stat, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany Muhlenstadt, T (reprint author), TU Dort mund Univ, Fac Stat, Vogelpothsweg 87, D-44221 Dortmund, Germany muehlens @statistik.tu-dortmund.de DFG[SFB 708, C3] The financial support of the DFG (SFB 708 Project C3, Graduiertenkolleg Statistische Modelbildung) is gr atefully acknowledged. 31 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0167-9473 COMPUT STAT DATA AN Comput. Stat. Data Anal. NOV 1 2011 55 11 2962 2974 10.1016/j.csda.2011.05.0 01 13 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications ; Statistics & Probability Computer Science; Mathematics 799WS WOS:0002 93317500006 J Cachim, PB Cachim, Paulo B. Using artificial neural networks for calculation of temperatures in timber under fire loading CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS English Article Artificial neural networks; Timber; Fire HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE; COMPRESS IVE STRENGTH; FLY-ASH; PREDICTION Artificial neural networks have been use d in recent years as a tool to model properties and behavior of materials in man y areas of civil engineering applications. Because of their ability to learn and adapt they can be used to find complex relations between different properties. In the present paper artificial neural networks are used for predicting the temp eratures in timber under fire loading. The artificial neural network model has b een trained and tested using available numerical results obtained using design m ethods of Eurocode 5 for the calculation of temperatures in timber under fire lo

ading. A multilayer feed forward network has been used with input data arranged in a format of three input parameters that cover the density of timber, the time of fire exposure and the distance from exposed side and the output parameter be ing the temperature in timber. The training and testing results in the neural ne twork model have shown that neural networks can accurately calculate the tempera ture in timber members subjected to fire. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights rese rved. Univ Aveiro, Dept Civil Engn LABEST, P-3810193 Aveiro, Portugal Cachim, PB (reprint author), Univ Aveiro, Dept Civil Engn LABEST, P-3810193 Aveiro, Port ugal pcachim@ua.pt 12 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , OXON, ENGLAND 0950-0618 CONSTR BUILD MATER Constr. Build. M ater. NOV 2011 25 11 4175 4180 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2011.04.054 6 Construction & B uilding Technology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Construction & B uilding Technology; Materials Science 799XK WOS:000293319600010 J Muntohar, AS Muntohar, Agus Setyo Engineering characteristics of the compressed-stabilized earth brick CONSTRUC TION AND BUILDING MATERIALS English Article Soil stabilization; Brick; Lime; Rice husk ash; Compressive strength; Flexural s trength RICE HUSK ASH; LIME; SOIL; CEMENT Utilization of lime and rice hus k ash for soil stabilization produced considerable strength gain and other geote chnical properties of the stabilized soils. Its application could be also superi or for construction materials as compressed-stabilized earth (CSE) or unfired-br ick. This paper presents the investigation result of the application of lime and rice husk for unfired brick or compressed stabilized earth. The compressive and three-point flexural strength tests including compressive strength after water submersion were carried out in this present study. The investigation results sho w that compressive and flexural strength of clay brick are improved by adding of lime and RHA. The best quantity of lime and RHA in this study, is obtained by r atio 1:1 of lime and RHA. The addition of sand in stabilized clay resulted in mo re improvement in the water retention ability. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Univ Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta, Dept Civil Engn, Taman Tirto 55183 , Yogyakarta, Indonesia Muntohar, AS (reprint author), Univ Muhammadiyah Yogyaka rta, Dept Civil Engn, Taman Tirto 55183, Yogyakarta, Indonesia muntohar@umy.ac. id Directorate General of Higher Education (DGHE), Ministry of National Edu cation, Republic of Indonesia; Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta; [146/SPPP/PP /DP2M/II/2006] The author is grateful thank to the research funding from the Di rectorate General of Higher Education (DGHE), Ministry of National Education, Re public of Indonesia. The research presented in this paper was part of Research G rant with contract number 146/SPPP/PP/DP2M/II/2006. Acknowledgement also goes to the support from Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta. A great thank is addresse d to Erfin Nur Hidayat and Tri Harso for their helps during the laboratory works . 22 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOUL EVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0950-0618 CONSTR BUILD MATER Constr. Build. Mater. NOV 2011 25 11 4215 4220 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2011.04.061 6 Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science 799XK WOS:000293319600 016 J Yilmaz, M; Kok, BV; Kuloglu, N Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kok, Baha Vural; Kuloglu, Necati Effects of using asphaltite as f iller on mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDIN G MATERIALS English Article Hot mix asphalt; Asphaltite; Moisture damage; Fatigue STYRENE-BUTADIENE-STYREN E; BITUMEN; CONCRETE; WASTE This study focuses on determining the engineerin g characteristics of hot mix asphalt using mineral filler with asphaltite. Since asphaltite which consists of high amount of sulfur leads to air pollution when used as a heating material and also being hydrocarbon sourced, it seems better t o use asphaltite in the hot mix asphalts. The hot mix asphalts in this study wer e prepared by using 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% mixing ratios based on the mineral f

iller ratio to analyze the possibility of using asphaltite. The results reveal t hat using asphaltite as a whole filler significantly increased the retained Mars hall stability by 27% and increased the stiffness modulus by 91% at 15 degrees C . As for the tensile strength test, it was determined that the control mixtures lost 35% of its tensile strength ratio after one freeze-thaw cycle, however the mixtures containing completely asphaltite as filler lost only 13%. A remarkable increase was found at fatigue test. The cycle number leading to failure of the m ixtures containing 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% asphaltite by weight of filler were 2. 9, 3.6, 5.4 and 7.9 times greater than those of the control mixtures respectivel y at 300 kPa stress level. Using asphaltite as filler exhibited high performance by improving especially the resistance to moisture damage and fatigue life. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Yilmaz, M; Kok, BV; Kuloglu, N] Firat Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Civil Engn, TR-23119 Elazig, Turkey Yilmaz, M (repri nt author), Firat Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Civil Engn, TR-23119 Elazig, Turkey mehmetyilmaz@firat.edu.tr 22 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0950-0618 CONSTR BUILD MATER Constr. Build. Mater. NOV 2011 25 11 4279 4286 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2011.04.072 8 Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science 799XK WOS:000293319600 023 J Peled, A; Weiss, J Peled, Alva; Weiss, Jaso n Hydrated cement paste constituents observed with Atomic Force an d Lateral Force Microscopy CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING MATERIALS English Article Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); Lateral Force Microscope (LFM); Cement; Mortar; Calcium silicate hydrates (CSH); Calcium hydroxide (CH) MICROSTRUCTURE Engineers have frequently used m icroscopy to better understand the structure of materials. Optical microscopy an d scanning electron microscopy have been used for several decades to better unde rstand the microstructure of cementitious composites. Very limited work has been performed to date in the cement area to study the structural characteristics of cementitious materials by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). This technical note de scribes observations from a series of images acquired using AFM as well as Later al Force Microscopy (LFM). The objective of this work is to better understand ho w AFM and LFM techniques can be used as tools to better understand the nano and microstructure of cementitious materials. In this work the AFM and LFM technique s could distinguish between CSH particles and crystals of CH on the microscale. The LFM appears to be more sensitive to topographic changes and could more clear ly distinguish between the different phases. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights r eserved. [Peled, A] Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Dept Struct Engn, IL-84105 Bee r Sheva, Israel; [Weiss, J] Purdue Univ, Sch Civil Engn, W Lafayette, IN 47907 U SA Peled, A (reprint author), Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Dept Struct Engn, IL-8 4105 Beer Sheva, Israel alvpeled@bgu.ac.il 8 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0950-0618 CONSTR BUILD MAT ER Constr. Build. Mater. NOV 2011 25 11 4299 4302 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2011.04.066 4 Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Construction & Building Technology; Materials Science 799XK WOS:000293319600 026 J Dam, HK; Winikoff, M Dam, Hoa Khanh; Winikoff , Michael An agent-oriented approach to change propagation in soft ware maintenance AUTONOMOUS AGENTS AND MULTI-AGENT SYSTEMS English Article Agent-oriented software engineering; Software maintenance and evolution; Change propagation MODEL-DR IVEN DEVELOPMENT; UML MODELS; INCONSISTENCIES; CONSISTENCY; SUPPORT Software maintenance and evolution is a lengthy and expensive phase in the life cycle of a software system. In this paper we focus on the change propagation problem: gi ven a primary change that is made in order to meet a new or changed requirement,

what additional, secondary, changes are needed? We propose a novel, agent-orien ted, approach that works by repairing violations of desired consistency rules in a design model. Such consistency constraints are specified using the Object Con straint Language (OCL) and the Unified Modelling Language (UML) metamodel, which form the key inputs to our change propagation framework. The underlying change propagation mechanism of our framework is based on the well-known Belief-DesireIntention (BDI) agent architecture. Our approach represents change options for r epairing inconsistencies using event-triggered plans, as is done in BDI agent pl atforms. This naturally reflects the cascading nature of change propagation, whe re each change (primary or secondary) can require further changes to be made. We also propose a new method for generating repair plans from OCL consistency cons traints. Furthermore, a given inconsistency will typically have a number of repa ir plans that could be used to restore consistency, and we propose a mechanism f or semi-automatically selecting between alternative repair plans. This mechanism , which is based on a notion of cost, takes into account cascades (where fixing the violation of a constraint breaks another constraint), and synergies between constraints (where fixing the violation of a constraint also fixes another viola ted constraint). Finally, we report on an evaluation of the approach, covering e ffectiveness, efficiency and scalability. [Winikoff, M] Univ Otago, Dunedi n, New Zealand; [Winikoff, M] RMIT Univ, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; [Dam, HK] Un iv Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia Winikoff, M (reprint author), Un iv Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand hoa@uow.edu.au; michael.winikoff@otago.ac.nz 77 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 1387-2532 AUTON AGENT MULTI-AG Auton. Agents Multi-Agent Syst. NOV 2011 23 3 384 452 10.1007/s10458-010-9163-0 69 Automation & Control Systems; Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence Automati on & Control Systems; Computer Science 799OF WOS:000293295300003 J Ohmata, N; Uebo, T; Nakasako, N; Shinohara, T Ohmata, Norimitsu; Uebo, Tetsuji; Nakasako, Noboru; Shinohara, Toshihiro A Trial Implementation of a Distance Estimation Method Based on Standing Waves o f Audible Sound ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING IN JAPAN English Article distance estimation; standing wave; short distance; range spectrum; multiple tar gets In many engineering fields, the distance to target is very impor tant information. In a typical method, the distance is estimated by measuring th e time delay between transmitted and reflected waves. However, it is difficult t o estimate short distances with a method like this. In the field of microwave ra dar, a method using standing waves to measure short distances and multiple targe ts is known. We have applied this method to distance estimation using audible so und and have shown the validity of this method by our simulations and experiment s. In this paper, we present a prototype system for distance estimation in which this method is implemented, and evaluate the performance of this system by expe riments in an actual sound field. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Electr Eng Jp n, 177(2): 41-48, 2011; Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelib rary.com). DOI 10.1002/eej.21160 [Ohmata, N] Osaka Prefecture Univ, Sch E ngn, Osaka, Japan; [Uebo, T] Saika Technol Inst Fdn, Saika, Japan; [Uebo, T; Nak asako, N; Shinohara, T] Kinki Univ, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577, Japan Ohmata, N (reprint author), Osaka Prefecture Univ, Sch Engn, Osaka, Japan 10 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0424-7760 ELECTR ENG JPN Electr. Eng. Jpn . NOV 2011 177 2 41 48 10.1002/eej.21160 8 Engineering, Electrical & Electr onic Engineering 795HV WOS:000292966200005 J Pernici, B Pernici, Barbara Special issue on advanced information systems engineering INFORMATION SYST EMS English Editorial Material Politecn Milan, I-20133 Milan, Italy Pernici, B (reprint author), Politecn Mi lan, Piazza Leonardo Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan, Italy barbara.pernici@polimi.i t 0 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN

D 0306-4379 INFORM SYST Inf. Syst. NOV 2011 36 7 SI 991 991 10.1016/j.is.201 1.05.001 1 Computer Science, Information Systems Computer Science 793BW WOS:000292796400001 J Jarke, M; Loucopoulos, P; Lyytinen, K; Mylopoulos, J; Robinson, W Jarke, Matthias; Loucopoulos, Pericles; Lyytinen, Kalle; Mylopoulos, John; Robin son, William The brave new world of design requirements INFORMAT ION SYSTEMS English Article Requirements; Requirements principles; Requirements engineering; Architectures; Complexity; Evolution; Future of requirements engineering SOFTWARE REQUIRE MENTS; SYSTEMS; SPECIFICATIONS; ACQUISITION; MODEL Despite its success over the last 30 years, the field of Requirements Engineering (RE) is still experien cing fundamental problems that indicate a need for a change of focus to better g round its research on issues underpinning current practices. We posit that these practices have changed significantly in recent years. To this end we explore ch anges in software system operational environments, targets, and the process of R E. Our explorations include a field study, as well as two workshops that brought together experts from academia and industry. We recognize that these changes in fluence the nature of central RE research questions. We identify four new princi ples that underlie contemporary requirements processes, namely: (1) intertwining of requirements with implementation and organizational contexts, (2) dynamic ev olution of requirements, (3) emergence of architectures as a critical stabilizin g force, and (4) need to recognize unprecedented levels of design complexity. We recommend a re-focus of RE research based on a review and analysis of these fou r principles, and identify several theoretical and practical implications that f low from this analysis. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. [Lyytinen, K] Ca se Western Reserve Univ, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA; [Jarke, M] Rhein Westfal TH Aa chen, Aachen, Germany; [Loucopoulos, P] Univ Loughborough, Loughborough, Leics, England; [Mylopoulos, J] Univ Trent, Trento, Italy; [Robinson, W] Georgia State Univ, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA Lyytinen, K (reprint author), Case Western Reser ve Univ, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA kalle@case.edu National Science Foundat ion's "Science of Design" initiative[CCF0613606]; DFG; Natural Sciences and Engi neering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada We thank Barbara Pernici and thr ee anonymous reviewers for constructive criticisms which lead to significant imp rovement in the papers argument and organization. We thank Sean Hansen, Nicholas Berente, Dominik Schmitz, and Anna Glukhova for helping to organize the worksho ps, and the workshop participants for inspiring discussions and Sol Greenspan fo r constructive comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript. This research was i n part funded by National Science Foundation's "Science of Design" initiative, G rant no. CCF0613606, by DFG projects CONTICI and the UMIC Excellence Cluster; al so by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. 90 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0306-4379 INFORM SYST Inf. Syst. NOV 2011 36 7 SI 992 1008 10.1016/j.is.2011.04.003 17 Computer Science, Information Systems Computer Science 793BW WOS:0002 92796400002 J Jafari, V; Labafzadeh, SR; Jeihanipour, A; Karimi, K; Taherzadeh, MJ Jafari, Vahid; Labafzadeh, Sara Rahim; Jeihanipour, Azam; Karimi, Keikhosro; Tah erzadeh, Mohammad J. Construction and demolition lignocellulosic wast es to bioethanol RENEWABLE ENERGY English Article Construction engineered wood waste; Wallpaper; Ethanol; Pretreatment; Phosphoric acid; NMMO ENHANCED ENZYMATIC-HYDROLYSIS; ALKALINE PRETREATMENT; ETHANOL-PR ODUCTION; BIOGAS PRODUCTION; CELLULOSE; SPRUCE; SACCHARIFICATION This wor k deals with conversion of four construction and demolition (C&D) lignocellulosi c wastes including OSB, chipboard, plywood, and wallpaper to ethanol by separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF). Similar to other lignocelluloses, the wastes were resistant to the enzymatic hydrolysis, in which only up to 7% of their cellulose was hydrolyzed. Therefore, the lignocellulosic wastes were trea ted with phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, or N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO)

, which resulted in improving the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis to 38.2-94.6% of the theoretical yield. The best performance was obtained after pretreatment b y concentrated phosphoric acid, followed by NMMO. The pretreated and hydrolyzed C&D wastes were then successfully fermented by baker's yeast to ethanol with 70. 5-84.2% of the theoretical yields. The results indicate the possibility of produ cing 160 ml ethanol from each kg of the C&D wastes at the best conditions. (C) 2 011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Karimi, K] Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept C hem Engn, Esfahan 8415683111, Iran; [Jafari, V; Labafzadeh, SR; Jeihanipour, A; Karimi, K; Taherzadeh, MJ] Univ Boras, Sch Engn, Boras, Sweden; [Jeihanipour, A] Chalmers, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden Karimi, K (reprint author), Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Chem Engn, Esfahan 8415683111, Iran karimi@cc.iut.ac 22 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0960-1481 RENEW ENERG Renew. Energy NOV 2011 36 11 2771 2775 10.1016/j.renene.2011.04.028 5 Energy & Fuels Energy & Fuels 788JO WOS:000292441400002 J Lozano-Minguez, E; Kolios, AJ; Brennan, FP Lozano-Minguez, E.; Kolios, A. J.; Brennan, F. P. Multi-criteria a ssessment of offshore wind turbine support structures RENEWABLE ENERGY English Article TOPSIS method; Multi-cri teria decision making; Jacket; Monopile; Tripod offshore support structure; Offs hore wind turbines Wind power, especially offshore, is considered o ne of the most promising sources of 'clean' energy towards meeting the EU and UK targets for 2020 and 2050. Deployment of wind turbines in constantly increasing water depths has raised the issue of the appropriate selection of the most suit able support structures' options. Based on experience and technology from the of fshore oil and gas industry, several different configurations have been proposed for different operational conditions. This paper presents a methodology for the systematic assessment of the selection of the most preferable, among the differ ent configurations, support structures for offshore wind turbines, taking into c onsideration several attributes through the widely used multi-criteria decision making method TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solu tion) for the benchmarking of those candidate options. An application comparing a monopile, a tripod and a jacket, for a reference 5.5 MW wind turbine and a ref erence depth of 40 m, considering multiple engineering, economical and environme ntal attributes, will illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Lozano-Minguez, E; Kolios, AJ; Brennan, FP] Cranfield Univ, Dept Offshore Proc & Energy Engn, Cranfield MK43 0A L, Beds, England Lozano-Minguez, E (reprint author), Cranfield Univ, Dept Offshore Proc & Energy Engn, Room 137,Whittle Bldg B52, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Bed s, England e.lozanominguez@cranfield.ac.uk 44 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0960-1481 RENEW EN ERG Renew. Energy NOV 2011 36 11 2831 2837 10.1016/j.renene.2011.04.020 7 Energy & Fuels Energy & Fuels 788JO WOS:000292441400008 J Jo, JH; Otanicar, TP Jo, J. H.; Otanicar, T. P. A hierarchical methodology for the mesoscale assessment of build ing integrated roof solar energy systems RENEWABLE ENERGY English Article Building integrated rene wable energy; Solar energy systems; Urban energy consumption; Remote sensing; En ergy modeling; Green-house-gas emissions CLIMATE-CHANGE; PHOTOVOLTAICS; D EMAND Buildings and other engineered structures that form cities are responsib le for a significant portion of the global and local impacts of climate change. Consequently, the installation of building integrated renewable energy sources s uch as photovoltaic or solar thermal systems on building rooftops is being widel y investigated. Although the advantages for individual buildings have been studi ed, as yet there is little understanding of the potential benefits of urban scal e implementation of such systems. Here we report the development of a new method ology for assessing the potential capacity and benefits of installing rooftop ph

otovoltaic systems in an urbanized area. Object oriented image analysis and geog raphical information systems are combined with remote sensing image data to quan tify the rooftop area available for solar energy applications and a renewable en ergy computer simulation is included to predict the potential benefits of urban scale photovoltaic system implementation. The new methodology predicts energy ge neration potential that can be utilized to meet Arizona's Renewable Portfolio St andard 2025 renewable energy generation requirements. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Jo, JH] Illinois State Univ, Dept Technol, Normal, IL 6 1761 USA; [Otanicar, TP] Loyola Marymount Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Los Angeles, CA 90045 USA Jo, JH (reprint author), Illinois State Univ, Dept Technol, Camp us Box 5100, Normal, IL 61761 USA jjo@ilstu.edu 32 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0960-1481 RENEW ENERG Renew. Energy NOV 2011 36 11 2992 3000 10.1016/j.renene.2011.03.038 9 Energy & Fuels Energy & Fuels 788JO WOS:000292441400028 J Perez-Castillo, R; de Guzman, IGR; Piattini, M Perez-Castillo, Ricardo; Garcia-Rodriguez de Guzman, Ignacio; Piattini, Mario Knowledge Discovery Metamodel-ISO/IEC 19506: A standard to modernize legacy syst ems COMPUTER STANDARDS & INTERFACES English Article KDM; ISO19506; Knowledge management; Software modernization; Legacy system Legacy systems age over time as a consequence of uncontrolled maintenance, thus they must be evolved while its valuable embedded knowledge is preserved. Softwar e modernization, and particularly Architecture-Driven Modernization, has become the best solution in the legacy systems' evolution. ADM defines the Knowledge Di scovery Metamodel specification, now being adopted as ISO/IEC 19506 by the Inter national Standards Organization. The KDM metamodel allows to represent all the s oftware artifacts recovered during reverse engineering techniques at different a bstraction levels. This paper presents how to use KDM to modernize legacy system s, making them more agile, preserving the embedded business knowledge and reduci ng maintenance costs. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Perez-C astillo, R; de Guzman, IGR; Piattini, M] Univ Castilla La Mancha, Alarcos Res Gr p, E-13071 Ciudad Real, Spain Perez-Castillo, R (reprint author), Univ Castill a La Mancha, Alarcos Res Grp, P Univ 4, E-13071 Ciudad Real, Spain ricardo. pdelcastillo@uclm.es; ignacio.grodriguez@uclm.es; mario.piattini@uclm.es Spanish FPU Programme; JCCM[PII2109-0106-2463]; MICIN[TIN2009-13718-C02-01]; FED ER[TIN2009-13718-C02-01]; MICINN[IDI-20090557] This work was supported by the S panish FPU Programme, and by the R+D projects ALTAMIRA (JCCM, PII2109-0106-2463) , PEGASO/MAGO (MICIN and FEDER, TIN2009-13718-C02-01) and MEDUSAS (CDTI (MICINN) , IDI-20090557). 56 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0920-5489 COMPUT STAND INTER Comput. Stand. Interfaces NOV 2011 33 6 519 532 10.1016/j.csi.2011.02.00 7 14 Computer Science, Hardware & Architecture; Compu ter Science, Software Engineering Computer Science 789QY WOS:0002 92532600001 J Cagiao, J; Gomez, B; Domenech, JL; Mainar, SG; Lanza, HG Cagiao, Juan; Gomez, Breixo; Luis Domenech, Juan; Gutierrez Mainar, Salvador; Gu tierrez Lanza, Hortensia Calculation of the corporate carbon foot print of the cement industry by the application of MC3 methodology ECOLOGIC AL INDICATORS English Article Corporate ecological footprint; Carbon footprint; MC3 methodology; CO(2) emissio ns; Cement; Sustainable development; Construction; Civil engineering; LIS Cement is one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. Its c haracteristics, physicochemical properties and manufacturing process have long b een the object of study. However, at this moment in time, the production of this basic construction material still accounts for 5% of worldwide emissions of CO( 2) into the atmosphere. Thus, in this age of the ongoing battle against climate change, cement alone has become a key objective to which measures must be applie d to mitigate the negative impact of this material on the environment. This arti

cle evaluates the sustainability of a cement industry by using one of the most r igorous tools currently in existence - the Composed Method of Financial Accounts (MO) in its second version V.2.0. The study is based on the analysis of three m odel plants: (A) a conventional integral plant, (B) a grinding plant, and (C) an integral plant which has introduced the best available techniques or BAT into t he manufacturing process. Therefore, the two most common scenarios in today's ma rket (A and B) can be compared with another plant of the same size (C) in which CO(2) emissions are reduced thanks to the application of BAT. Lastly, the result s are compared in each case study, establishing a diagnosis of weaknesses and op portunities for each production system as well as specific measures for action t o be applied to each link in the chain that makes up the production process. Als o computed is the amount in tons of CO(2) generated in the manufacture of one to n of cement. This value is of great use in the application of other methodologie s such as LCA, or in the feedback of the MO methodology used here. (C) 2011 Else vier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Cagiao, J; Gomez, B] Univ A Coruna, LIS, Fdn In gn Civil Galicia, ETS Ingn Caminos Canales & Puertos, La Coruna 15704, Spain; [D omenech, JL] Autoridad Portuaria Gijon, Gijon 33201, Asturias, Spain; [Mainar, S G; Lanza, HG] SGM Consulting, Madrid 28016, Spain Cagiao, J (reprint autho r), Univ A Coruna, LIS, Fdn Ingn Civil Galicia, ETS Ingn Caminos Canales & Puert os, Campus Elvina S-N, La Coruna 15704, Spain juancagiao@lis.edu.es; jdomenech @telecable.es; salvadorgutierrezmainar48@gmail.com 37 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 1470-160X ECOL INDIC Ecol. In dic. NOV 2011 11 6 1526 1540 10.1016/j.ecolind.2011.02.013 15 Biodiversity Conservatio n; Environmental Sciences Biodiversity & Conservation; Environmental Scien ces & Ecology 788GT WOS:000292434100004 J Deng, QT; Yang, ZC Deng Qing-tian; Yang Zhi -chun Propagation of guided waves in bonded composite structures with tapered adhesive layer APPLIED MATHEMATICAL MODELLING English Article Guided waves; Adhesively bonded; Composite structures; Tapered layer; SAFE metho d; Phase velocity dispersion LAMB WAVES; LAP JOINTS; COMPONENTS; DEFECTS; DAM AGE Adhesively bonded composites are becoming increasingly important in engi neering applications due to its advantages for structural repair and integrated manufacturing of advanced composite structures. Characteristics of guided waves propagation in bonded composite structures with tapered adhesive layer are inves tigated in this paper. Hamilton's principle and a semi-analytical finite element method are combined to study the wave propagation problem numerically that acco unt for different properties of adhesive layer. Several adhesive bonded composit e models are analyzed, including dimensions of adhered joints, local separation of adhesive and material degradation. Dispersion curves of different bonded stat es are studied numerically by accounts for effects of varying adhesive thickness . Results provided some suggestions in selecting more suitable mode for interrog ating of adhesive bonded composite with different states. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Deng, QT] Changan Univ, Sch Sci, Xian 710064, Peoples R China; [Yang, ZC] NW Polytech Univ, Sch Aeronaut, Xian 710072, Peoples R China Deng, QT (reprint author), Changan Univ, Sch Sci, Xian 710064, Peoples R China deng_qingtian@yahoo.com.cn Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Educati on of China[20060699001]; Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Univ ersities[B07050]; Project of New Century Excellent Talents of China[NCET-04-0965 ] This work was funded by the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Edu cation of China (Grant No. 20060699001), the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities (111 Project B07050) and the Project of New Century Excellent Talents of China (Grant No. NCET-04-0965). 33 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC NEW YORK 360 PARK AVE SOUTH, NEW YORK, NY 10010-1710 USA 0307-904X APPL MATH MODEL Appl. Math. Model. NOV 2011 35 11 5369 5381 10.1016/j.apm.2011.04.042 13 Engineering, Multidiscip linary; Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Applications; Mechanics Engineering; Mat hematics; Mechanics 783XU WOS:000292119000011

J Tsai, NC; Lee, RM Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Lee, R ong-Mao Interaction between cardiovascular system and respiration APPLIED MATHEMATICAL MODELLING English Article Cardiovascular system; Heart-lung interaction; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenati on (ECMO) COMPUTATIONAL MODEL; MECHANICAL VENTILATION; MORPHOMETRIC MODEL; EXPIRATORY FLOW; SIMULATION; LUNG A set of nonlinear dynamic models for th e interactive respiration/cardiovascular mechanism is constructed and analyzed i n this work. By employing equivalent electric circuits for heart/blood and lung/ air systems, the dynamics of cardiovascular system and respiration cycle are est ablished. In order to verify the validity of the dynamic models, numerical simul ations and analysis on heart-lung interactions, including the valvular closure i ncompetence and pulmonary obstruction, are presented and compared with the empir ical reports in literature. The derived dynamics of heart-lung interactions can be realized and examined in the biomechanical and medical engineering fields. In addition, the dynamic models can also be employed for the model-based controlle r synthesis in medical instrumentations, e.g., the Extracorporeal Membrane Oxyge nation (ECMO), to retain the function of blood circulation and/or respiration by artificial intelligence. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Tsai, N C; Lee, RM] Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tainan 70101, Taiwan Tsai, NC (reprint author), Natl Cheng Kung Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tainan 70101, Taiwan nortren@mail.ncku.edu.tw 28 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC NEW YORK 360 PARK AVE SOUTH, NEW YORK, NY 10010-1 710 USA 0307-904X APPL MATH MODEL Appl. Math. Model. NOV 2011 35 11 5460 5469 10.1016/ j.apm.2011.04.033 10 Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Applications; Mechanics Engineering; Mathematics ; Mechanics 783XU WOS:000292119000018 J Venturella, MA; Patil, MJ; McCue, LS Venturel la, Michael A.; Patil, Mayuresh J.; McCue, Leigh S. Modal Analysis o f the Ice-Structure Interaction Problem JOURNAL OF OFFSHORE MECHANICS AND ARCTIC ENGINEERING-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME English Article MODEL In this paper the authors present a multimode ice-structure interaction model based on the single degree of freedom ice-structure interaction model init ially proposed by Matlock et al. (1969, " A Model for the Prediction of Ice-Stru cture Interaction," Proceedings of the First Offshore Technology Conference, Hou ston, TX, Vol. 1, pp. 687-694, Paper No. OTC 1066; 1971, "Analytical Model for I ce Structure Interaction," ASCE Journal of the Engineering Mechanics Division, E M4, pp. 1083-1092). The model created by Matlock et al. assumed that the primary response of the structure would be in its fundamental mode of vibration. In ord er to glean a greater physical understanding of the ice-structure interaction ph enomena, it was critical that this study set out to develop a multimode forced r esponse for the pier when a moving ice floe makes contact at a specific vertical pier location. Modal analysis is used in this study, in which the response of e ach mode is superposed to find the complete modal response of the entire length of a pier subject to incremental ice loading. This incremental ice loading inclu des ice fracture points as well as loss of contact between ice and structure. In the work of Matlock et al., the physical system is a bottom supported pier mode led as a cantilever beam. Realistic conditions such as ice accumulation on the p ier modeled as a point mass and uncertainties in the ice characteristics are int roduced in order to provide a stochastic response. The impact of number of modes in modeling is studied as well as dynamics due to fluctuations of ice impact he ight as a result of typical tidal fluctuations. A Poincare based analysis follow ing on the research of Karr et al. (1992, " Nonlinear Dynamic Response of a Simp le Ice-Structure Interaction Model," Proceedings of the 11th International Confe rence of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, Vol. 4, pp. 231-237) is empl oyed to identify any periodic behavior of the low and high velocity ice system r esponses. Recurrence plotting is also utilized to further define any existing st ructure of the ice-structure interaction time series for low and high speed ice floes. While the Matlock model on which this research is based is admittedly sim plistic, the intention of this work is to provide a foundation for future work u

sing time series analysis and modal analysis on more sophisticated models coupli ng multiple piers and connecting structure for a comprehensive ice-wind-structur al dynamics model. [DOI:10.1115/1.4003388] [Venturella, MA] US Coast Guard, Washington, DC 20593 USA; [Patil, MJ; McCue, LS] Virginia Polytech Inst & State Univ, Dept Aerosp & Ocean Engn, Blacksburg, VA 24061 USA Venturella, MA ( reprint author), US Coast Guard, 2100 2nd St, Washington, DC 20593 USA United States Coast Guard Marine Engineering Graduate School The authors woul d like to thank the United States Coast Guard Marine Engineering Graduate School program for their support. The authors also wish to thank the anonymous reviewe rs of this paper for their valuable feedback. 33 0 0 ASME-AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENG NEW YORK THREE PARK AVE, NEW YORK, NY 100 16-5990 USA 0892-7219 J OFFSHORE MECH ARCT J. Offshore Mech . Arct. Eng. Trans. ASME NOV 2011 133 4 041501 10.1115/1.4003388 18 Engineering, Ocean; Engi neering, Mechanical Engineering 748ZF WOS:000289431200009 J Piccirilli, JA; Koldobskaya, Y Piccirilli, Jose ph A.; Koldobskaya, Yelena Crystal structure of an RNA polymerase r ibozyme in complex with an antibody fragment PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF TH E ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES English Review ligase ribozyme; antibody; RNA world X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; SMALL NUCLEAR RIB ONUCLEOPROTEIN; DELTA VIRUS RIBOZYME; SYNTHETIC ANTIBODIES; MOLECULAR RECOGNITIO N; BINDING-PROTEINS; BINARY-CODE; CRYSTALLIZATION; DOMAIN; CATALYSIS All mode ls of the RNA world era invoke the presence of ribozymes that can catalyse RNA p olymerization. The class I ligase ribozyme selected in vitro 15 years ago from a pool of random RNA sequences catalyses formation of a 3',5'-phosphodiester link age analogous to a single step of RNA polymerization. Recently, the three-dimens ional structure of the ligase was solved in complex with U1A RNA-binding protein and independently in complex with an antibody fragment. The RNA adopts a tripod arrangement and appears to use a two-metal ion mechanism similar to protein pol ymerases. Here, we discuss structural implications for engineering a true polyme rase ribozyme and describe the use of the antibody framework both as a portable chaperone for crystallization of other RNAs and as a platform for exploring step s in evolution from the RNA world to the RNA-protein world. [Piccirilli, JA] Univ Chicago, Gordon Ctr Integrat Sci, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Chicago, IL 606 37 USA; [Piccirilli, JA; Koldobskaya, Y] Univ Chicago, Gordon Ctr Integrat Sci, Dept Chem, Chicago, IL 60637 USA Piccirilli, JA (reprint author), Univ Ch icago, Gordon Ctr Integrat Sci, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Room W406, Chicago, IL 60637 USA jpicciri@uchicago.edu 50 1 1 ROYAL SOC LONDON 6-9 CARLTON HOUSE TERRACE, LONDON SW1Y 5AG, ENGL AND 0962-8436 PHILOS T R SOC B Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B -Biol. Sci. OCT 27 2011 366 1580 2918 2928 10.1098/rstb.2011.0144 11 Biology Life Sci ences & Biomedicine - Other Topics 821RW WOS:000294993100009 J Clark, KM; Johnson, JB; Kock, ND; Mizel, SB; Parks, GD Clark, Kimberly M.; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Mizel, Steven B.; Parks, G riffith D. Parainfluenza virus 5-based vaccine vectors expressing v accinia virus (VACV) antigens provide long-term protection in mice from lethal i ntranasal VACV challenge VIROLOGY English Article Parainfluenza virus; Viral vectors RESPIRATORY-TRACT; NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODY ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES; L1 PROTEIN; PARAMYXOVIRUS; SIMIAN-VIRUS-5; COMPLEMENT; INFECTION; GENE; DNA To test the potential for parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5)-b ased vectors to provide protection from vaccinia virus (VACV) infection, PIV5 wa s engineered to express secreted VACV L1R and B5R proteins, two important antige ns for neutralization of intracellular mature (IMV) and extracellular enveloped (EEV) virions, respectively. Protection of mice from lethal intranasal VACV chal lenge required intranasal immunization with PIV5-L1R/B5R in a prime-boost protoc ol, and correlated with low VACV-induced pathology in the respiratory tract and anti-VACV neutralizing antibody. Mice immunized with PIV5-L1R/B5R showed some di sease symptoms following VACV challenge such as loss of weight and hunching, but these symptoms were delayed and less severe than with unimmunized control mice.

While immunization with PIV5 expressing B5R alone conferred at least some prote ction, the most effective immunization included the PIV5 vector expressing L1R a lone or in combination with PIV5-B5R. PIV5-L1R/B5R vectors elicited protection f rom VACV challenge even when CD8+ cells were depleted, but not in the case of mi ce that were defective in B cell production. Mice were protected from VACV chall enge out to at least 1.5 years after immunization with PIV5-L1R/B5R vectors, and showed significant levels of anti-VACV neutralizing antibodies. These results d emonstrate the potential for PIV5-based vectors to provide long lasting protecti on against complex human respiratory pathogens such as VACV, but also highlight the need to understand mechanisms for the generation of strong immune responses against poorly immunogenic viral proteins. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights res erved. [Clark, KM; Johnson, JB; Mizel, SB; Parks, GD] Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA Parks, G D (reprint author), Wake Forest Univ, Bowman Gray Sch Med, Dept Microbiol & Immu nol, Med Ctr Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA gparks@wfubmc.edu NIH[AI-0 60642, AI-081022] We are grateful to Drs. Biao He and Robert A. Lamb for t he original gift of the PIV5 infectious clones, Ellen Young and Lara Voltz-Smith for technical support. We are grateful for the excellent technical help that Ja mes Phipps provided in generating the soluble L1 and B5 proteins. This work was supported by NIH grant AI-060642 (SBM) and AI-081022 (GDP). 44 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST , STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0042-6822 VIROLOGY Virology OCT 25 2011 419 2 97 106 10.1016/j.virol.2011.08.005 10 Virology Virology 827IP WOS:000295422500006 J Mullarney, MP; Beach, LE; Dave, RN; Langdon, BA; Polizzi, M; Blackwood, DO Mullarney, Matthew P.; Beach, Lauren E.; Dave, R ajesh N.; Langdon, Beth A.; Polizzi, Mark; Blackwood, Daniel O. Applying dry powder coatings to pharmaceutical powders using a comil for improving powde r flow and bulk density POWDER TECHNOLOGY English Article Comil; Powder flow; Bulk density; Dry powder coating; Nanocoating; Shear cell COHESIVE POWDERS; FLUIDIZATION; FLOWABILITY A method for applying nano-sized silicon dioxide guest particles onto host pharmaceutical particles (a.k.a. "dry -coating" or "nanocoating") has been developed using conventional pharmaceutical processing equipment. It has been demonstrated that under selected conditions, a comil can be used to induce sufficient shear to disperse silicon dioxide parti cles onto the surfaces of host particles such as active pharmaceutical ingredien ts (API) without significant host particle attrition. In accordance with previou s studies on dry coating, the dispersed silicon dioxide adheres to the host part icle surface through van der Waals attractions, and reduces bulk powder cohesion . In this work, laboratory and pilot scale comils were used to dry coat pharmace utical API and excipient powders with 1% w/w silicon dioxide by passing them thr ough the mill with an appropriate combination of screen and impeller. In general , the uncoated powders exhibited poor flow and/or low bulk density. After dry co ating with a comil, the powders exhibited a considerable and in some cases outst anding improvement in flow performance and bulk density. This coating process wa s successful at both the laboratory and pilot scale with similar improvements in flow. The superior performance of the coated powders translated to subsequent f ormulated blends, demonstrating the benefit of using nanocoated powders over unc oated powders. This particle engineering work describes the first successful dem onstration of using a traditional pharmaceutical unit operation that can be run continuously to produce uniform nanocoating and highlights the substantial impro vements to powder flow properties when this approach is used. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Mullarney, MP; Langdon, BA; Polizzi, M; Blackwo od, DO] Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT 06340 USA; [Beach, LE; Dave, RN] New Jersey Inst Technol, Newark, NJ 07102 USA Mullarney, MP (reprint author), Pfizer Inc, East ern Point Rd, Groton, CT 06340 USA matthew.p.mullarney@pfizer.com National Science Foundation[EEC-0540855] The authors would like to acknowledge th e technical guidance and support from Michael Hawley and Bruno Hancock as well a s partial financial support from the National Science Foundation through grant E

EC-0540855. Matthew Mullarney acknowledges scientific discussions with Professor Calvin Sun of the University of Minnesota. 15 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA LAUSANNE PO BOX 564, 1001 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 0032-5910 POWDER TECHNOL Powder Technol. OCT 25 2011 212 3 397 402 10.1016/j.powtec.2011.06 .008 6 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 820YH WOS:000294941500003 J Jamieson, AJ; Fujii, T Jamieson, Alan J.; Fujii , Toyonobu Trench Connection BIOLOGY LETTERS English Editorial Material hadal zone; tren ch ecology; deep-sea biology; deep submergence technology 'Trench Connection' was the first international symposium focusing primarily on the hada l zone (depths greater than 6000 m). It was held at the University of Tokyo's At mosphere and Ocean Research Institute in November 2010. The symposium was succes sful in having attracted an international collective of scientists and engineers to discuss the latest developments in the exploration and understanding of the deepest environments on Earth. The symposium sessions were categorized into thre e themes: (i) new deep-submergence technology; (ii) trench ecology and evolution ; and (iii) the physical environment. Recent technological developments have ove rcome the challenges of accessing the extreme depths, which have in turn prompte d an international renewed interest in researching physical and biological aspec ts of the hadal ecosystems. This bringing together of international participants from different disciplines led to healthy discussions throughout the symposium, providing potential opportunities and realizations of where the future of unrav elling hadal ecology lies. Hadal science is still at relatively rudimentary leve ls compared with those of shallower marine environments; however, it became appa rent at the symposium that it is now an ever-expanding scientific field. [Jamieson, AJ; Fujii, T] Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Aberdeen AB41 6AA, Scotland Jamieson, AJ (reprint author), Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Enviro nm Sci, Main St, Aberdeen AB41 6AA, Scotland a.jamieson@abdn.ac.uk 8 0 0 ROYAL SOC LONDON 6-9 CARLTON HOUSE TERRACE, LONDO N SW1Y 5AG, ENGLAND 1744-9561 BIOL LETTERS Biol. Lett. OCT 23 2011 7 5 641 643 10.1098/rsbl.2011.0231 3 Biology; Ecology; Evolutionary B iology Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Environmental Sciences & Eco logy; Evolutionary Biology 818QE WOS:000294768400001 J Vuong, J; Hellmich, C Vuong, Jenny; Hellmich, Christian Bone fibrillogenesis and mineralization: Quantitative an alysis and implications for tissue elasticity JOURNAL OF THEORETICAL BIOLOGY English Article Bone; Mineralization; El asticity; Continuum micromechanics; Computer tomography GENERALIZED PACKING MODE L; TURKEY LEG TENDON; CORTICAL BONE; CONTINUUM MICROMECHANICS; COLLAGEN MINERALI ZATION; ANISOTROPIC ELASTICITY; ELLIPSOIDAL INCLUSION; CELL-DIFFERENTIATION; NEU TRON-DIFFRACTION; ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY Data from bone drying, demineralization, and deorganification tests, collected over a time span of more than 80 years, e vidence a myriad of different chemical compositions of different bone materials. However, careful analysis of the data, as to extract the chemical concentration s of hydroxyapatite, of water, and of organic material (mainly collagen) in the extracellular bone matrix, reveals an astonishing fact: it appears that there ex ists a unique bilinear relationship between organic concentration and mineral co ncentration, across different species, organs, and age groups, from early childh ood to old age: During organ growth, the mineral concentration increases linearl y with the organic concentration (which increases during fibrillogenesis), while from adulthood on, further increase of the mineral concentration is accompanied by a decrease in organic concentration. These relationships imply unique mass d ensity-concentration laws for fibrillogenesis and mineralization, which - in com bination with micromechanical models - deliver 'universal' mass density-elastici ty relationships in extracellular bone matrix-valid across different species, or gans, and ages. They turn out as quantitative reflections of the well-instrument ed interplay of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and their precursors, cont

rolling, in a fine-tuned fashion, the chemical genesis and continuous transforma tion of the extracellular bone matrix. Consideration of the aforementioned rules may strongly affect the potential success of tissue engineering strategies, in particular when translating, via micromechanics, the aforementioned growth and m ineralization characteristics into tissue-specific elastic properties. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Vuong, J; Hellmich, C] Vienna Tech Univ TU Wien, Inst Mech Mat & Struct, A-1040 Vienna, Austria Hellmich, C (rep rint author), Vienna Tech Univ TU Wien, Inst Mech Mat & Struct, A-1040 Vienna, A ustria jenny.vuong@tuwien.ac.at; christian.hellmich@tuwien.ac.at European Commission[FP7-2008-SME-1, 232 164] This work was partially supported by the European Commission under the Theme FP7-2008-SME-1 of the 7th Framework Program , project no. 232 164, BIO-CT-EXPLOIT. The authors gratefully acknowledge the su pport of Andreas Fritsch. 98 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS L TD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD LONDON 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND 0022-5193 J THEOR BIOL J. Theor. Biol. OCT 21 2011 287 115 130 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.07.028 16 Biology; Mathematical & Computational Biology Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Ot her Topics; Mathematical & Computational Biology 824JE WOS:000295197400 013 J Tongay, S; Berke, K; Lemaitre, M; Nasrollahi, Z; Tanner, DB; Hebard, AF; Appleton, BR Tongay, S.; Berke, K.; Lemaitre, M.; Nas rollahi, Z.; Tanner, D. B.; Hebard, A. F.; Appleton, B. R. Stable h ole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparen cy NANOTECHNOLOGY English Article CHEMICAL-VAPOR-DEPOSITION; SOLAR-CELLS; FILMS We report on the p doping of gra phene with the polymer TFSA ((CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH). Modification of graphene with T FSA decreases the graphene sheet resistance by 70%. Through such modification, w e report sheet resistance values as low as 129 Omega, thus attaining values comp arable to those of indium-tin oxide (ITO), while displaying superior environment al stability and preserving electrical properties over extended time scales. Ele ctrical transport measurements reveal that, after doping, the carrier density of holes increases, consistent with the acceptor nature of TFSA, and the mobility decreases due to enhanced short-range scattering. The Drude formula predicts tha t competition between these two effects yields an overall increase in conductivi ty. We confirm changes in the carrier density and Fermi level of graphene throug h changes in the Raman G and 2D peak positions. Doped graphene samples display h igh transmittance in the visible and near-infrared spectrum, preserving graphene 's optical properties without any significant reduction in transparency, and are therefore superior to ITO films in the near infrared. The presented results all ow integration of doped graphene sheets into optoelectronics, solar cells, and t hermoelectric solar cells as well as engineering of the electrical characteristi cs of various devices by tuning the Fermi level of graphene. [Tongay, S; Berk e, K; Nasrollahi, Z; Tanner, DB; Hebard, AF] Univ Florida, Dept Phys, Gainesvill e, FL 32611 USA; [Tongay, S; Lemaitre, M; Appleton, BR] Univ Florida, Dept Mat S ci & Engn, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA Tongay, S (reprint author), Univ Florida , Dept Phys, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA tongay@phys.ufl.edu; afh@phys.ufl.edu; a ppleton@eng.ufl.edu Office of Naval Research (ONR)[00075094]; National Scien ce Foundation (NSF)[1005301] This work is supported by the Office of Naval Re search (ONR) under contract number 00075094 (BA) and by the National Science Fou ndation (NSF) under Contract Number 1005301 (AFH). 26 0 0 IOP PUBLISHING LTD BRISTOL TEMPLE CIRCUS, TEMPLE WAY, BRISTOL BS1 6 BE, ENGLAND 0957-4484 NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology OCT 21 2011 22 42 425701 10.1088/ 0957-4484/22/42/425701 6 Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Ma terials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied Science & Technology - O ther Topics; Materials Science; Physics 827YZ WOS:000295467800012 J Feng, L; Hu, CM; Chen, XL; Li, RF; Tian, LQ; Murch, B Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin; Chen, Xiaoling; Li, Rongfang; Tian, Liqiao; Murch, Bro ck MODIS observations of the bottom topography and its inter-annual variability of Poyang Lake REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT English

Article Poyang Lake; Bottom topography; Bathymetry; MODIS; Inundation; Remote sensing SHALLOW-WATER BATHYMETRY; FLOOD FREQUENCY; AVIRIS DATA; IMAGERY; DYNAMICS; DEPTHS; CHINA; MODEL; LIDAR; GEOMETRY Using MODIS 250-m resolution data, we developed a novel approach to derive the b ottom topography of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake of China (>3000 km( 2) at maximum inundation) for every year between 2000 and 2009. The approach dif fers from other traditional methods (sonar, Lidar, optical inversion, and Radar) but takes advantage of the fast-changing nature of the lake's inundation area. On every image, the water/land boundary is effectively a topographic isobath aft er correction for the water level gradient. Thus, the -10/year carefully selecte d MODIS images provided incremental topographic isobaths, from which bottom topo graphy was derived every year. Such-derived topographic maps were validated usin g limited historical data and other consistency checks. Most of the lake bottom showed an elevation of 12 m to 17 m (referenced against the elevation reference of the Woosung Horizontal Zero). Significant inter-annual variability of the bot tom topography from 2000 to 2009 was found for some of the lake's bottom, with m ore areas associated with bottom elevation increases than decreases. The changes and inter-annual variability in the bottom topography were attributed to the co mbined effect of human activities (e.g., sand dredging and levee construction) a nd weather events. One example was the increased bottom elevation from 2002 to 2 003, which was apparently due to the excessive precipitation in 2002 and the imp oundment of the Three-Gorges Dam in 2003. The 10-year record of the bottom topog raphy of this highly dynamic lake provides baseline information to monitor the i mpact of future engineering and management activities, to estimate the lake's wa ter and sediment budgets, and to aid ship navigation. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Feng, L; Chen, XL; Tian, LQ] Wuhan Univ, State Key Lab Informat Engn Surveying Mapping & R, Wuhan 430079, Peoples R China; [Feng, L; Hu , CM; Murch, B] Univ S Florida, Coll Marine Sci, St Petersburg, FL 33701 USA; [C hen, XL] JiangXi Normal Univ, Minist Educ, Key Lab Poyang Lake Wetland & Watersh ed Res, Nanchang 330022, Peoples R China; [Li, RF] Donghua Univ, Coll Informat S ci & Technol, Shanghai 201620, Peoples R China; [Li, RF] Jiangxi Prov Inst Water Sci, Nanchang 330029, Peoples R China Chen, XL (reprint author), Wuhan Univ, S tate Key Lab Informat Engn Surveying Mapping & R, Wuhan 430079, Peoples R China cecxl@yahoo.com Major State Basic Research Development Program of China[2009CB72 3905]; National Natural Science Foundation of China[41071261, 41021061, 40906092 ]; U.S. NASA; Ministry of Water Resources[201001054] This study was supported by the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (2009CB723905), National Natural Science Foundation of China (41071261, 41021061 and 40906092), the U.S. NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Program and Water and Energy Cyc le Program, Water Project funded by the Ministry of Water Resources (201001054), the Self-research program for Doctoral Candidates (including Mphil-PhD) of Wuha n University in 2008. We thank NASA/GSFC for providing MODIS data and China Mete orological Data Sharing Service System for providing meteorological data. We als o thank the two anonymous reviewers for their detailed comments and suggestions. 59 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC NEW YORK 360 PARK AVE SOU TH, NEW YORK, NY 10010-1710 USA 0034-4257 REMOTE SENS ENVIRON Remote Sens. Environ. OCT 17 2011 115 10 2729 2741 10.1016/j.rse.2011.06.013 13 Environmental Sciences; Remote Sensing; Imaging Science & Photographic Technolog y Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Remote Sensing; Imaging Science & Phot ographic Technology 809EF WOS:000294033900026 J Boyer, TH; Persaud, A; Banerjee, P; Palomino, P Boyer, Treavor H.; Persaud, Amar; Banerjee, Poulomi; Palomino, Pedro Comparison of low-cost and engineered materials for phosphorus removal from orga nic-rich surface water WATER RESEARCH English Article Alum sludge; Eutrophication; Ion exchange; Natural organic matter; Phosphate PHOSPHATE REMOVAL; WASTE-WATER; DRINKING-WATER; TREATMENT RESIDUALS; IRON-OXIDE; ADSORPTION; NANOPARTICLES; ADSORBENT; SORBENTS; MERCURY Excess phosphoru s (P) in lakes and rivers remains a major water quality problem on a global scal e. As a result, new materials and innovative approaches to P remediation are req

uired. Natural materials and waste byproduct materials from industrial processes have the potential to be effective materials for P removal from surface water. Advantages of natural and waste byproduct materials include their low-cost, abun dant supply, and minimal preparation, especially compared with engineered materi als, such as ion exchange resins and polymeric adsorbents. As a result, natural and waste byproduct materials are commonly referred to as low-cost materials. De spite the potential advantages of low-cost materials, there are critical gaps in knowledge that are preventing their effective use. In particular, there are lim ited data on the performance of low-cost materials in surface waters that have h igh concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and there are no systematic studies that track the changes in water chemistry following treatment with low-c ost materials or compare their performance with engineered materials. Accordingl y, the goal of this work was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of low-co st and engineered materials for P removal from NOM-rich surface water. Seven low -cost materials and three engineered materials were evaluated using jar tests an d mini-column experiments. The test water was a surface water that had a total P concentration of 132-250 mu g P/L and a total organic carbon concentration of 1 5-32 mg C/L. Alum sludge, a byproduct of drinking water treatment, and a hybrid anion exchange resin loaded with nanosize iron oxide were the best performing ma terials in terms of selective P removal in the presence of NOM and minimum undes irable secondary changes to the water chemistry. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All righ ts reserved. [Boyer, TH; Persaud, A; Banerjee, P; Palomino, P] Univ Florida, Dept Environm Engn Sci, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA Boyer, TH (reprint autho r), Univ Florida, Dept Environm Engn Sci, POB 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA thboyer@ufl.edu SJRWMD[25104] This work was funded in part by SJRWMD contract number 25104 Lake Jesup Total Phosphorus Removal Treatment Technologies Floating Island Pilot Project. The authors thank project manager Dr. Sherry Brandt-Willi ams for her assistance throughout the project. This manuscript was improved by t he helpful comments of two anonymous reviewers. 42 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0043-1354 WATER RES Water Re s. OCT 15 2011 45 16 4803 4814 10.1016/j.watres.2011.06.020 12 Engineering, Environment al; Environmental Sciences; Water Resources Engineering; Environmental Scien ces & Ecology; Water Resources 826WR WOS:000295386800011 J Khan, SS; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N Khan, S. Sudheer; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N. Impact o f exopolysaccharides on the stability of silver nanoparticles in water WATER RE SEARCH English Article Silver n anoparticles; Exopolysaccharides; Zeta potential; Adsorption; Stabilization CYTOTOXICITY; ENVIRONMENT; PARTICLES; TOXICITY; EXPOSURE; BACTERIA The stab ility of commercial silver nanoparticles (SNPs) in aquatic environment plays a s ignificant role in its toxicity to the environment and to human health. Here, we have studied the impact of bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) to the stability of engineered SNPs. When nanoparticles are present in neutral water, the nanopar ticles exhibited low zeta potential and are least stable. However, in the presen ce of EPS (10-250 mg/L), the negative surface charge of nanoparticles increased and therefore the propensity of nanoparticles to aggregate is reduced. In UV-vis ible spectroscopic analysis a decrease in absorbance at plasmon peak of SNPs (42 5 nm) was observed till the addition of 50 mg/L of EPS, beyond that a blue shift towards 417 nm was observed. The adsorption of EPS was confirmed by Fourier-tra nsform infrared spectroscopy. The EPS adsorbed SNPs were more stable and exhibit ed the zeta potential of higher than -30 mV. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights r eserved. [Khan, SS; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N] VIT Univ, Ctr Nanobi otechnol, Sch Biosci & Technol, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu, India Chandras ekaran, N (reprint author), VIT Univ, Ctr Nanobiotechnol, Sch Biosci & Technol, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu, India nchandrasekaran@vit.ac.in VIT Univ ersity Authors thank VIT University Chancellor, for providing us with funding t o carry out our research. 36 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB

, ENGLAND 0043-1354 WATER RES Water Res. OCT 15 2011 45 16 5184 5190 10.1016/ j.watres.2011.07.024 7 Engineering, Environmental; Envi ronmental Sciences; Water Resources Engineering; Environmental Sciences & Ec ology; Water Resources 826WR WOS:000295386800047 J Lambs, L; Leopold, A; Zeller, B; Herteman, M; Fromard, F Lambs, Luc; Leopold, Audrey; Zeller, Bernd; Herteman, Melanie; Fromard, Francois Tracing sewage water by (15)N in a mangrove ecosystem to test its bioremediation ability RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY English Article; Proceedings Paper 6th Congress of the French-Society-of-Stables-Is otopes OCT 26-29, 2010 Toulouse, FRANCE French Soc Stables Isotopes ENSAT Sch, Ecolab Lab WASTE-WATER; ORGANIC-MATTER; COASTAL WATERS; NIT ROGEN; DENITRIFICATION; SEDIMENTS; GROWTH; PHOSPHORUS; DISCHARGE; RESPONSES Mangrove forests could be a simple and effective alternative to conventional sew age treatment, particularly for island communities given its low cost and low ma intenance. Due to their high adaptation capacity, these plants are able to toler ate and bioremediate the high levels of nutrients and pollutants found in sewage water. This solution could be applied to small tropical islands with high popul ation density such as Mayotte in the Indian Ocean. This paper reports on a trial by stable isotopic (15)N tracing of such a bioremediation process on pre-treate d wastewater near the village of Malamani, in the middle of the large coastal ma ngrove in the bay near Chirongui. The first results show a boost in the mangrove growth, but a longer period of observation is needed to confirm the beneficial effects, and also to clarify the role of the local crab population, whose engine ering activities play an important part in the ecosystem. The exact denitrificat ion process is not yet understood, and the mass balance equation also reveals lo ss of nitrogen-containing compounds, which needs to be analyzed more closely. Co pyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [Lambs, L; Leopold, A; Fromard, F] Univ Toulouse, INP, UPS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France; [Lambs, L; Herte man, M; Fromard, F] CNRS, Ecolab, F-31062 Toulouse, France; [Leopold, A] UNC, PP ME, EA 3325, Noumea, New Caledonia; [Leopold, A] Ctr Noumea, IRD, Noumea 98848, New Caledonia; [Zeller, B] INRA Nancy, UR BEF 1138, F-54280 Champenoux, France; [Herteman, M] Impact Mer, Fort De France 97200, Martinique Lambs, L (reprin t author), UMR 5245 CNRS UPS INPT, EcoLab, 118 Route Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse 9, France lambs@cict.fr 35 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0951-4198 RAPID COMMUN MASS SP Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. OCT 15 2011 25 19 2777 2784 10.1002/rcm.5120 8 Biochemical Research Methods; Ch emistry, Analytical; Spectroscopy Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemis try; Spectroscopy 826QP WOS:000295369100014 J Soto, R; Caspeta, L; Barron, B; Gosset, G; Ramirez, OT; Lara, AR Soto, Rene; Caspeta, Luis; Barron, Blanca; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramirez, Octavio T .; Lara, Alvaro R. High cell-density cultivation in batch mode for plasmid DNA production by a metabolically engineered E-coli strain with minimize d overflow metabolism BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL English Article pDNA vaccines; Acetate; Metabolic engineering; High cell-density; Batch; Fed-bat ch GENE-THERAPY; CULTURE; PROTEIN; SYSTEM; SCALE; PERFORMANCE; IMPROVES; AC ETATE; GLUCOSE; VACCINE Progress on plasmid-based (pDNA) vaccines requires simpl er and efficient cultivation techniques for their production. A prevalent proble m in the cultivation of Escherichia coli (the main host for pDNA vaccines produc tion) is the aerobic production of acetate. In this work, a metabolically engine ered Escherichia cob strain with strongly reduced acetate formation was tested f or the production of a plasmid vaccine at high cell-densities. The wild type (W3 110) and engineered (VH33) strains were cultivated in batch mode using 100 g/L o f initial glucose concentration. This elevated amount of glucose allowed attaini ng high cell-densities of strain VH33 without external substrate feeding, simpli fying the cultivation process. While W3110 produced 17 mg/L of pDNA and 5.3 g/L of acetate, VH33 reached 40 mg/L of pDNA and only 2 g/L of acetate. While the pl asmid supercoiling degree progressively decreased in W3110 cultivations, it rema

ined nearly constant for VH33. These results show the successful application of cell engineering concepts for improving DNA vaccine production processes. (C) 20 11 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Lara, AR] Univ Aurallama Metropolitana Cuajimalpa, Dept Proc & Tecnol, Mexico City 01120, DF, Mexico; [Soto, R; Caspeta , L; Ramirez, OT] Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Dept Med Mol & Bioproc, Inst Biotec nol, Mexico City 04510, DF, Mexico; [Barron, B] Inst Politecn Nacl, Dept Microbi ol, Escuela Nacl Ciencias Biol, Mexico City 07738, DF, Mexico; [Gosset, G] Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Dept Ingn Celular & Biocatalisis, Inst Biotecnol, Mexico C ity 04510, DF, Mexico Lara, AR (reprint author), Univ Aurallama Metropolitana Cuajimalpa, Dept Proc & Tecnol, Artificios 40,Col Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico City 01 120, DF, Mexico alara@correo.cua.uam.mx CONACyT[84447, 126663]; PROMEP[47410089] This work was supported by CONACyT grants 84447 and 126663, and PROMEP 47410089. 28 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA LAUSANNE PO BOX 564, 1001 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 1369-703X BIOCHEM ENG J Biochem. Eng. J. OCT 15 2011 56 3 165 171 10.1016/j.bej.2011.06.003 7 Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Engineering, Chemical Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; En gineering 824JA WOS:000295197000009 J Richards, MD; Van Tyne, CJ; Matlock, DK Richards , M. D.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Matlock, D. K. The influence of dynamic strain aging on resistance to strain reversal as assessed through the Bausching er effect MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING A-STRUCTURAL MATERIALS PROPERT IES MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROCESSING English Article Mechanical characterization; Steel; Bauschinger effect; Dynamic strain aging; Di slocations ALUMINUM-ALLOYS; FLOW STRESS; PRE-STRAIN; STEEL; AL; CU; BEHAVIO R; METALS; COPPER; IRON The Bauschinger effect of three commercially produced me dium carbon bar steels representing different microstructural classes with simil ar tensile strengths and substantially different yielding and work-hardening beh aviors at low-strain was evaluated at room temperature and in situ at temperatur es up to 361 degrees C. The influence of deformation at dynamic strain aging tem peratures as a means to produce a more stable dislocation structure was evaluate d by measuring the resistance to strain reversal during in situ Bauschinger effe ct tests. It was shown that the three medium carbon steels exhibited substantial increases in strength at dynamic strain aging temperatures with the peak in flo w stress occurring at a test temperature of 260 degrees C for an engineering str ain rate of 10(-4) s(-1). Compressive flow stress data following tensile plastic prestrain levels of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03 increased with an increase in temperatu re to a range between 260 degrees C and 309 degrees C, the temperature range whe re dynamic strain aging was shown to be most effective. The increased resistance to flow on strain reversal at elevated temperature was attributed to the genera tion of more stable dislocation structures during prestrain. It is suggested tha t Bauschinger effect measurements can be used to assess the potential performanc e of materials in fatigue loading conditions and to identify temperature ranges for processing in applications that utilize non-uniform plastic deformation (e.g . shot peening, deep rolling, etc.) to induce controlled residual stress fields stabilized by the processing at temperatures where dynamic strain aging is activ e. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Richards, MD; Van Tyne, CJ; Mat lock, DK] Colorado Sch Mines, Adv Steel Proc & Prod Res Ctr, Golden, CO 80401 US A Richards, MD (reprint author), Natl Inst Stand & Technol, Div Mat Reliab il, Boulder, CO 80305 USA mark.richards@nist.gov Advanced Steel Processin g and Products Research Center, an industry/university cooperative research cent er at the Colorado School of Mines The authors gratefully acknowledge the s upport of the sponsors of the Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Ce nter, an industry/university cooperative research center at the Colorado School of Mines. 51 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA LAUSANNE PO BOX 564, 1001 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 0921-5093 MAT SCI ENG A-ST RUCT Mater. Sci. Eng. A-Struct. Mater. Prop. Microstruct. Process. OCT 15 2011 528 27 7926 7932 10.1016/ j.msea.2011.07.015 7 Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Ma terials Science, Multidisciplinary Science & Technology - Other Topics; Mat

erials Science 823FI WOS:000295107500012 J Aly, M; Hashmi, MSJ; Olabi, AG; Messeiry, M; Hussain, AI Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.; Hussain, A. I. Effect of nano clay particles on mechanical, thermal and physical behaviours of waste-glass cement mortars MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING A-STRUCTURAL M ATERIALS PROPERTIES MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROCESSING English Article Nano clay; Glass powder; Cement mortar INDUSTRIAL BY-PRODUCTS; REACTION-KINETIC S; SILICA FUME; CONCRETE; ASH; CALORIMETRY; NANO-SIO2; CULLET; FINE Worldwid e, around 2.6 billion tons of cement is produced annually. This huge size of pro duction consumes large amounts of energy and is one of the largest contributors to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) release. Accordingly, there is a pressing demand to mi nimise the quantity of cement used in the concrete industry. The main challenge to this is to get durable concrete with less cement and within reasonable cost. The economic, environmental and engineering benefits of reusing ground waste-gla ss powder (WGP) as a partial cement replacement has been established, but low gl ass reactivity and the possible alkali-silica reaction (ASR) are a drawback. Rec ent advances in nano-technology have revealed that nano-sized particles such as nano clay (NC) have a high surface area to volume ratio that provides the potent ial for tremendous chemical reactivity, accelerating pozzolanic activity and hin dering ASR. This paper presents a laboratory study of the properties of NC/WGP c ement composites. The microstructure, ASR, fracture energy, compressive and flex ural properties of cement mortars containing WGP as a cement replacement with an d without NC are investigated and compared with plain matrix. In addition, the h ydration of cement compounds was followed by differential thermal analysis (DTA) , thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and also X-ray diffraction (XRD). The result s showed that incorporation of glass powder has a positive effect on the mechani cal properties of cement mortars after 28 days of hydration. Also, the results r evealed that the mechanical properties of the cement mortars with a hybrid combi nation of glass powder and NC were all higher than those of plain mortar and wit h glass powder after 28 days of hydration. In addition, the DTA/TGA results and XRD analysis showed a reduction in the calcium hydroxide (CH) content in mortars with glass powder and with a hybrid combination of glass powder and NC, which c onfirms the improvements of mechanical properties and occurrence of pozzolanic r eaction after 28 days of hydration. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Aly, M; Hashmi, MSJ; Olabi, AG] Dublin City Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Dublin 9, Irel and; [Messeiry, M] Cairo Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Engn Phys, Cairo, Egypt; [Hussain, AI] Natl Res Ctr, Dept Polymers & Pigments, Cairo, Egypt Aly, M (reprint author), Dublin City Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Dublin 9, Ireland marwa.aly2@mail. dcu.ie Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education; Dublin City University This wor k is financed by the Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education and facilitated by Du blin City University. The authors are deeply indebted to Mr. Christopher Crouch and Mr. Michael May in Dublin City University for their technical support and co operation. The authors gratefully acknowledge Southern Clay Products Inc., USA f or their supply of nano clay particles. 41 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA LAUSANNE PO BOX 564, 1001 LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND 0921-509 3 MAT SCI ENG A-STRUCT Mater. Sci. Eng. A-Struct. Mater. Prop. Microstruct. Process. OCT 15 2011 528 27 7991 7998 10.1016/j.msea.2011.07.058 8 Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Science & Technology - Other Topics; Materials Science 823FI WOS:000295107500022 J Garcia-Gonzalez, CA; Alnaief, M; Smirnova, I Garcia-Gonzalez, C. A.; Alnaief, M.; Smirnova, I. Polysaccharide-b ased aerogels-Promising biodegradable carriers for drug delivery systems CARBOHYDRATE POLYMERS English Review Polysaccharide; Aerogel; Aerogel technology; Drug carrier; Nanoporous bio-based material NANOFIBRILLAR CELLULOSE AEROGELS; TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATION S; HYDROPHILIC SILICA AEROGELS; COHERENT EXPANDED AEROGELS; POORLY SOLUBLE DRUGS ; CARBON-DIOXIDE; ALGINATE AEROGELS; FTIR SPECTROSCOPY; INTERNAL GELATION; DISSO LUTION RATE Polysaccharides are regarded as key ingredients for the producti on of bio-based materials in life sciences (e.g., food, cosmetics, medical devic

es, pharmaceutics). The biodegradability and biocompatibility of these biopolyme rs, coupled to the large variety of chemical functionalities they encompass, mak e them promising carriers for drug delivery systems. Aerogels are a special clas s of nanoporous materials with growing interest in biomedical and pharmaceutical applications due to their open pore structure and high surface area. Polysaccha ride-based aerogel's result in highly porous (epsilon=90-99%), lightweight (rho = 0.07-0.46 g/cm(3)) drug carriers with high surface area (S(a) = 70-680 m(2)/g) , able to provide enhanced drug bioavailability and drug loading capacity. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the production of polysaccharide-based aerogels with emphasis on the influence of processing parameters on the resulti ng end material properties. Case studies on polysaccharide-based aerogels from s everal sources and own results as well as their behavior regarding drug loading capacity and release are described. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Garcia-Gonzalez, CA; Alnaief, M; Smirnova, I] Hamburg Univ Technol, Inst Therma l Separat Proc, D-21073 Hamburg, Germany Garcia-Gonzalez, CA (reprint aut hor), Hamburg Univ Technol, Inst Thermal Separat Proc, Eissendorferstr 38, D-210 73 Hamburg, Germany carlos.garcia@tuhh.de; irina.smirnova@tuhh.de Spanish Ministry of Education; German-Jordan University C.A. Garcia-Gonzalez acknowledge s the Spanish Ministry of Education for the financial support through a postdoct oral fellowship in the frame of the National Program for Staff Mobility from the R&D&D&i National Plan 2008-2011. M. Alnaief is thankful to the German-Jordan Un iversity for supporting him with a personal scholarship. 145 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0144-8617 CARBOHYD POLYM Carbohydr. Polym. OCT 15 2011 86 4 1425 1438 10.1016/j.carbpol.2011.06.066 14 Chemistry, Applied; Chemistry, Organic; Polymer Science Chemistry; Polymer Scien ce 820YD WOS:000294941100001 J Fan, CJ; Tu, JX; Yang, XG; Liao, LQ; Liu, LJ Fan, Changjiang; Tu, Jiaxing; Yang, Xiaogang; Liao, Liqiong; Liu, Lijian Hydrogel containing hyaluronan and aliphatic oligo-carbonate moieties with tunab le physical properties for potential application in protein release CARBOHYD RATE POLYMERS English Article Photopolymerization; Hyaluronan; 2, 2-Dimethyltrimethylene carbonate; Poly(ethyl ene glycol) TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; ACID HYDROGELS; POLY(TRIMETHYLENE CARBONATE); BIODEGRADABLE POLYMERS; CYCLIC CARBONATES; IN-VITRO; DELIVERY; DEGRA DATION; BEHAVIOR; DIMETHACRYLATE Hyaluronan (HA) and aliphatic oligo-carb onate based biodegradable hydrogels were synthesized via photopolymerization of a methacrylated HA(HA-GMA) with oligo(2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate)-blockpoly(ethylene glycol)-block -oligo(2,2-dimethyltrimethylene carbonate) diacrylat e (DPD-DA). Hydrogels with tunable physical properties such as swelling behavior , crosslink density, and mesh size were fabricated with different concentrations of HA-GMA or DPD-DA. Hydrogel-bovine serum albumin (BSA) construct was prepared by in situ photopolymerization. BSA release from the construct was evaluated in vitro and the release behavior can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of the precursors. By tailoring the concentration of different precursors in th e hydrogels, more sustained release of BSA can be achieved (i.e., 120 h). The cy totoxicity of this novel hydrogel was also investigated and the hydrogel proved to be comparably cytocompatible to PEG hydrogels. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rig hts reserved. [Fan, CJ; Tu, JX; Yang, XG; Liao, LQ; Liu, LJ] Wuhan Univ, Dept Polymer Sci, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China Liao, LQ (reprint author ), Wuhan Univ, Dept Polymer Sci, Wuhan 430072, Hubei, Peoples R China liqiongl iao@hotmail.com National Natural Science Foundation of China[20904042]; Fundamen tal Research Funds for the Central Universities[2082005] The authors are grateful to the financial support of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant no. 20904042) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Un iversities (Grant no. 2082005). 33 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0144-8617 CARBOHYD POLYM Carbohydr. Polym. OCT 15 2011 86 4 1484 1490 10.1016/j.carbpo

l.2011.06.048 7 Chemistry, Applied; Chemistry, Organic; Polymer Science Chemistry; Polymer Science 820YD WOS:000294941100008 J Kristiansen, KA; Tomren, HB; Christensen, BE Kristiansen, Kare A.; Tomren, Henrik Berg; Christensen, Bjorn E. Periodate oxidized alginates: Depolymerization kinetics CARBOHYDRATE POLYMERS English Article Alginate; Periodate oxid ation; Degradation; beta-Elimination; Biomaterial; Tissue engineering CHAIN ST IFFNESS; OXIDATION; DEGRADATION; POLYSACCHARIDES; HYDROGELS; RESIDUES Limited periodate oxidation (0-8%) of alginates results in enhanced degradability, exten ding the range of applications of alginates as biomaterials, e.g. in tissue engi neering. Oxidation produces dialdehydes that are highly sensitive to alkaline be ta-elimination, even under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Alth ough all periodate is consumed during limited oxidation, not all of the resultin g dialdehydes are equally degradable, leading to a characteristic level off in m olecular weight upon prolonged degradation. A significant fraction (20-50%) of t he oxidized residues were resistant even at pH 10.4. We tentatively assign this finding to the presence of particularly stable intramolecular hemiacetals known to form in periodate oxidized alginates (PGA). The enhanced degradation of POA p ersists into the gel state, allowing tailoring of more biodegradable alginate ge ls. The activation energy for beta-elimination of dialdehydes was 88 kJ/mol comp ared to 113 kJ/mol for unoxidized residues, presumably reflecting the absence of strain in the non-cyclic transition state of the former. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kristiansen, KA; Tomren, HB; Christensen, BE] Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Biotechnol, NOBIPOL, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway Christensen, BE (reprint author), Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Biotec hnol, NOBIPOL, Sem Saelands Veg 6-8, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway b.christensen@bi otech.ntnu.no Research Council of Norway[1459457/120, 146974/130] Eng. Ann -Sissel Ulset is thanked for technical assistance in the laboratory. This work w as supported by the Research Council of Norway (Grant nos. 1459457/120 and 14697 4/130). 20 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOUL EVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0144-8617 CARBOHYD POLYM Carbohydr. Polym. OCT 15 2011 86 4 1595 1601 10.1016/j.carbpol.2011.06.069 7 Chemistry, Applied; Chemistry, Organic; Polymer Science Chemistry; Polymer Scien ce 820YD WOS:000294941100022 J Flipsen, SFJ; Spitas, C Flipsen, S. F. J.; Spita s, C. Direct methanol fuel cells: A database-driven design procedure JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES English Article Direct methanol fuel cells; Preliminary design; Model; Algorithm POWER SO URCES; OPTIMIZATION To test the feasibility of DMFC systems in preliminary s tages of the design process the design engineer can make use of heuristic models identifying the opportunity of DMFC systems in a specific application. In gener al these models are to generic and have a low accuracy. To improve the accuracy a second-order model is proposed in this paper. The second-order model consists of an evolutionary algorithm written in Mathematica, which selects a component-s et satisfying the fuel-cell systems' performance requirements, places the compon ents in 3D space and optimizes for volume. The results are presented as a 3D dra ft proposal together with a feasibility metric. To test the algorithm the design of DMFC system applied in the MP3 player is evaluated. The results show that vo lume and costs are an issue for the feasibility of the fuel-cell power-system ap plied in the MP3 player. The generated designs and the algorithm are evaluated a nd recommendations are given. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Flipsen, SFJ; Spitas, C] Delft Univ Technol, Sch Ind Design Engn, NL-2627 CE De lft, Netherlands Flipsen, SFJ (reprint author), Delft Univ Technol, Sch I nd Design Engn, Landbergstr 15, NL-2627 CE Delft, Netherlands s.f.j.flipsen@tu delft.nl 25 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0378-775 3 J POWER SOURCES J. Power Sources OCT 15 2011 196 20 8472 8483 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2011. 06.014 12 Electrochemistry; Energy & Fuels Electroc

hemistry; Energy & Fuels 818GF WOS:000294739000040 J He, L; Lin, DM; Wang, YP; Xiao, YH; Che, JF He, Lei; Lin, Demeng; Wang, Yanping; Xiao, Yinghong; Che, Jianfei Electroactive SWNT/PEGDA hybrid hydrogel coating for bio-electrode interface COLLOIDS AND SURFACES B-BIOINTERFACES English Article Hybrid hydrogel; Electroactive interface; Bio-electrode; SWNT WALLED CARBON NA NOTUBES; CONDUCTING POLYMERS; NEURAL STIMULATION; TISSUE; SURFACE; BIOSENSORS; S UBSTRATE; DEVICES; MATRIX; GROWTH Electric interface between neural tissue and electrode plays a significant role in the development of implanted devices for continuous monitoring and functional stimulation of central nervous system i n terms of electroactivity, biocompatibility and long-term stability. To enginee r an interface that possesses these merits, a polymeric hydrogel based on poly(e thylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) we re employed to fabricate a hybrid hydrogel via covalent anchoring strategy, i.e. , self-assembly of cysteamine (Cys) followed by Michael addition between Cys and PEGDA. XPS characterization proves that the Cys molecules are linked to gold su rface via the strong S-Au bond and that the PEGDA macromers are covalently bonde d to Cys. FTIR spectra indicate the formation of hybrid hydrogel coating during photopolymerization. Electrochemical measurements using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectrum clearly show the enhancement of electric properties to th e hydrogel by the SWNTs. The charge transfer of the hybrid hydrogel-based electr ode is quasi-reversible and charge transfer resistance decreases to the tenth of that of the pure hydrogel due to electron hopping along the SWNTs. Additionally , this hybrid hydrogel provides a favorable biomimetic microenvironment for cell attachment and growth due to its inherent biocompatibility. Combination of thes e merits yields hybrid hydrogels that can be good candidates for application to biosensors and biomedical devices. More importantly, the hybrid hydrogel coating s fabricated via the current strategy have good adhesion to the electrode substr ate which is highly desired for chronically implantable devices. (C) 2011 Elsevi er B.V. All rights reserved. [Wang, YP; Xiao, YH] Nanjing Normal Univ, Jiangs u Key Lab Biofunct Mat, Nanjing 210097, Peoples R China; [He, L; Che, JF] Nanjin g Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Chem Engn, Nanjing 210014, Peoples R China Xiao, YH (reprint author), Nanjing Normal Univ, Jiangsu Key Lab Biofunct Mat, Nanjing 21 0097, Peoples R China xiaoche@mail.njust.edu.cn Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions; Jiangsu Province Natural Science Foundation, China[BK2008406]; Na njing University of Science and Technology[ZDJH07, 2010GJPY012] Financial suppor t from the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Ins titutions, Jiangsu Province Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. BK20084 06) and Nanjing University of Science and Technology (Project No. ZDJH07 and 201 0GJPY012) are greatly acknowledged. 37 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0927-7765 COLLOID SURFACE B Colloid Surf. B-Biointerfaces OCT 15 2011 87 2 273 279 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2011.05.028 7 Biophysics; Chemistry, P hysical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Biophysics; Chemistry; Materials Science 810QT WOS:000294142900009 J Nistor, MT; Chiriac, AP; Vasile, C; Verestiuc, L; Nita, LE Nistor, Manuela-Tatiana; Chiriac, Aurica P.; Vasile, Cornelia; Verestiuc, Lilian a; Nita, Loredana Elena Synthesis of hydrogels based on poly(NIPAM) inse rted into collagen sponge COLLOIDS AND SURFACES B-BIOINTERFACES English Article Collagen; Poly(N-isoprop yl acrylamide); Hydrogel; Swelling behaviour; Tissue engineering SUPERPOR OUS HYDROGELS; DRUG-DELIVERY; SYSTEMS; POLYMER The study presents the preparati on of a semi-synthetic hydrogel based on poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-diethyle ne glycol diacrylate) inserted onto the collagen porous membrane. The synthesis of the hydrogels was performed through radical copolymerization of N-isopropyl a crylamide (NIPAM) with diethylene glycol diacrylate (DEGDA) also as crosslinking agent, using ammonium persulfate as initiator and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylene diamine as activator, and it was achieved in the presence of the collagen matri x. The prepared hydrogels were characterized by Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fou

rier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The swell ing behaviour of the semi-interpenetrated polymer network related on the hydroge l composition, it was also evaluated. The pore sizes of the synthesized hydrogel s, much larger than the typical mesh size of a conventional hydrogel, allow to c onsider the hybrid hydrogel based on the inserted poly(NIPAM-co-DEGDA) onto coll agen fibrils as a super-porous hydrogel. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reser ved. [Nistor, MT; Chiriac, AP; Vasile, C; Nita, LE] Petru Poni Inst Macromol Chem, Iasi 700487, Romania; [Verestiuc, L] Gr T Popa Univ Med & Pharm, Iasi 7001 15, Romania Chiriac, AP (reprint author), Petru Poni Inst Macromol Chem, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487, Romania achiriac1@yahoo.com CNCSIS[466]; Ministry of Education Research This research was supported by a CNCSIS-Idea Project, no. 466: Researches in the Field of Polymeric Matrices Des ign for Sensitive Structures Romania, Ministry of Education Research, 2009-2011. 20 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0927-7765 COLLOID SURFACE B Colloid Surf. B-Biointerfaces OCT 15 2011 87 2 382 390 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2011.05.046 9 Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Biophysi cs; Chemistry; Materials Science 810QT WOS:000294142900024 J Heikkinen, JJ; Kivimaki, L; Maatta, JAE; Makela, I; Hakalahti, L; Takkin en, K; Kulomaa, MS; Hytonen, VP; Hormi, OEO Heikkine n, Jarkko J.; Kivimaki, Liisa; Maatta, Juha A. E.; Makela, Inka; Hakalahti, Leen a; Takkinen, Kristiina; Kulomaa, Markku S.; Hytonen, Vesa P.; Hormi, Osmo E. O. Versatile bio-ink for covalent immobilization of chimeric avidin on sol-gel subs trates COLLOIDS AND SURFACES B-BIOINTERFACES English Article Biomolecule immobilization; Printing; Sol-gel; Maleimide; Chimeric avidin; Avidi n-biotin technology; Biosensing PROTEIN BIOCHIPS; HETEROBIFUNCTIONAL REAGENT; BI OACTIVE PAPER; GLASS-SURFACE; MICROARRAYS; STREPTAVIDIN; STRATEGIES; OLIGONUCLEO TIDES; CONSTRUCTION; FABRICATION A bio-ink for covalent deposition of the rmostable, high affinity biotin-binding chimeric avidin onto sol-gel substrates was developed. The bio-ink was prepared from heterobifunctional crosslinker 6-ma leimidohexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide which was first reacted either with 3a minopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to form silane li nkers 6-maleimide N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)hexanamide or -(ethoxydimethylsily l)propyl)-hexanamide. C-terminal cysteine genetically engineered to chimeric avi din was reacted with the maleimide group of silane linker in methanol/PBS soluti on to form a suspension, which was printed on sol-gel modified PMMA film. Differ ent concentrations of chimeric avidin and ratios between silane linkers were tes ted to find the best properties for the bio-ink to enable gravure or inkjet prin ting. Bio-ink prepared from 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was found to provide th e highest amount of active immobilized chimeric avidin. The developed bio-ink wa s shown to be valuable for automated fabrication of avidin-functionalized polyme r films. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Heikkinen, JJ; Hormi, O EO] Univ Oulu, Dept Chem, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland; [Kivimaki, L; Makela, I; Hakal ahti, L] VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, FI-90571 Oulu, Finland; [Maatta, JAE; Kulomaa , MS; Hytonen, VP] Univ Tampere, Inst Biomed Technol, FI-33014 Tampere, Finland; [Maatta, JAE; Kulomaa, MS; Hytonen, VP] Tampere Univ Hosp, FI-33014 Tampere, Fi nland; [Takkinen, K] VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, FI-02044 Espoo, Finland Hormi, O EO (reprint author), Univ Oulu, Dept Chem, POB 3000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland jarkko.j.heikkinen@oulu.fi; lissa.kivimaki@vtt.fi; juha.maatta@uta.fi; inka.make la@vtt.fi; leena.hakalahti@vtt.fi; kristiina.takkinen@vtt.fi; markku.kulomaa@uta .fi; vesa.hytonen@uta.fi; osmo.hormi@oulu.fi Tekes - the Finnish Funding Agen cy for Technology and Innovation[BioFace 40055/08]; Faculty of Science at the Un iversity of Oulu; Oulu University Scholarship Foundation; Tampere University Hos pital This work was financially supported by Tekes - the Finnish Funding Agenc y for Technology and Innovation (BioFace 40055/08). JJH thanks the Faculty of Sc ience at the University of Oulu and the Oulu University Scholarship Foundation f or financial support. This study was financially supported by the Competitive Re search Funding of the Tampere University Hospital (MSK, VPH). 24 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMST

ERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0927-7765 COLLOID SURFACE B Colloid Surf. B-Biointerfaces OCT 15 2011 87 2 409 414 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2011.05.052 6 Biophysics; Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Biomaterials Biophysi cs; Chemistry; Materials Science 810QT WOS:000294142900027 J Vafaei, S; Wen, DS Vafaei, Saeid; Wen, Dong sheng Spreading of triple line and dynamics of bubble growth inside na noparticle dispersions on top of a substrate plate JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND I NTERFACE SCIENCE English Article Bubble; Boiling; Critical heat flux; Surface wettability; Bubble contact angle; Droplet contact angle; Gold nanofluids; Alumina nanofluids; Solid surface tensio ns; Surface tension CRITICAL HEAT-FLUX; CONTACT-ANGLE; NANOFLUIDS; POOL; SUR FACE; LIQUID; SIZE This work investigates the feasibility of engineering su rface wettability by using different nanoparticles. As an illustration, detailed formation of gas bubbles on top of a stainless steel substrate plate in a quies cent pool of aqueous gold and alumina nanofluids is studied. The presence of nan oparticles is shown to be able to modify the dynamics of triple line and bubble growth significantly. An early pinning of the bubble triple line is observed and a larger bubble contact angle is found for bubbles growing in a gold nanofluid, whereas an opposite phenomenon is observed for bubbles growing in an alumina na nofluid compared to those of pure water. Other bubble parameters such as departu re volume, bubble frequency, and waiting time of bubble formation are also affec ted by the presence of nanoparticles. The variation of solid surface tensions du e to the existence of nanoparticles and the resultant force at the triple line s hould be responsible for such differences. Such results illustrate the big poten tial of nanoparticle in engineering surface wettability of a solid-liquid-gas sy stem. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Vafaei, S; Wen, DS] Que en Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, London, England; [Vafaei, S] Univ Warwi ck, Sch Engn, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England Wen, DS (reprint author) , Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Engn & Mat Sci, London, England d.wen@qmul.ac.uk EPSRC[EP/E065449/1] The authors are grateful for the financial support of EP SRC under the Grant number EP/E065449/1. 27 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0021-9797 J COLLOID INTERF SCI J. Colloid Interface Sci. OCT 15 2011 362 2 285 291 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.06.048 7 Chemistry, Physical Chemistry 810QP WOS:000294142500006 J Boanini, E; Bigi, A Boanini, Elisa; Bigi, Ad riana Biomimetic gelatin-octacalcium phosphate core-shell microspheres JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE English Article Microspheres; Calcium phosphate; Gelatin; Biomimetic material; Bisphosphonate SODIUM POLYACRYLATE; OXIDIZED ALGINATE; HYDROXYAPATITE; ALENDRONATE; NANOPARTICL ES; FILMS; CRYSTALLIZATION; BISPHOSPHONATES; NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOCRYSTALS Calcium phosphate/polymeric microparticles synthesized through a biomimetic appr oach are regarded with increasing interest for their various potential applicati ons, including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Herein we report th e synthesis and characterization of gelatin/octacalcium phosphate core/shell mic rospheres. Deposition of the calcium phosphate shell on the polymeric microspher es was obtained through bio-inspired mineralization on the surface of functional ized gelatin microparticles. Gelatin microspheres stabilized by alginate dialdeh yde were prepared using an inverse microemulsion. Functionalization was achieved by enriching the microspheres composition with calcium ions or, alternatively, with alendronate, a bisphosphonate widely employed for the treatment of bone dis eases. Functionalization and synthesis of the inorganic phase in the microemulsi on environment were key factors for the achievement of a complete coating of the microspheres with calcium phosphate. The inorganic shell is constituted of smal l crystals of octacalcium phosphate, which control gelatin and alendronate relea se. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Boanini, E; Bigi, A] Univ Bolog na, Dept Chem G Ciamician, I-40126 Bologna, Italy Bigi, A (reprint author) , Univ Bologna, Dept Chem G Ciamician, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna, Italy

adriana.bigi@unibo.it MIUR This research was carried out with the financial support of MIUR. 27 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEV IER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0021-9797 J COLLOID INTERF SCI J. Colloid Interface Sci. OCT 15 2011 362 2 594 599 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.06.061 6 Chemistry, Physical Chemistry 810QP WOS:000294142500045 J Evje, S Evje, Steinar Global weak solu tions for a compressible gas-liquid model with well-formation interaction JOURNAL OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS English Article Two-phase flow; Well-reservoir flow; Weak solutions; Lagrangian coordinates; Fre e boundary problem NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS; 2-PHASE FLOW MODEL; MULTIPHASE FLOW; PRESSURE LAW; VACUUM; EXISTENCE; BEHAVIOR; MIXTURE The objective of this work is to explore a compressible gas-liquid model designed for modeling o f well flow processes. We build into the model well-reservoir interaction by all owing flow of gas between well and formation (surrounding reservoir). Inflow of gas and subsequent expansion of gas as it ascends towards the top of the well (a so-called gas kick) represents a major concern for various well operations in t he context of petroleum engineering. We obtain a global existence result under s uitable assumptions on the regularity of initial data and the rate function that controls the flow of gas between well and formation. Uniqueness is also obtaine d by imposing more regularity on the initial data. The key estimates are to obta in appropriate lower and upper bounds on the gas and liquid masses. For that pur pose we introduce a transformed version of the original model that is highly con venient for analysis of the original model. In particular, in the analysis of th e transformed model additional terms, representing well-formation interaction, c an be treated by natural extensions of arguments that previously have been emplo yed for the single-phase Navier-Stokes model. The analysis ensures that transiti on to single-phase regions do not appear when the initial state is a true gas-li quid mixture. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Univ Stavanger, NO-4068 Stavanger, Norway Evje, S (reprint author), Univ Stavanger, NO-406 8 Stavanger, Norway steinar.evje@uis.no A/S Norske Shell The rese arch has been supported by A/S Norske Shell. 28 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 0022-0396 J DIFFER EQUATIONS J. Differ. Equ. OCT 15 2011 251 8 2352 2386 10.1016/j.jde.2011.07.013 35 Mathemat ics Mathematics 809VM WOS:000294084800015 J Bin Shams, MA; Budman, HM; Duever, TA Bin Sham s, M. A.; Budman, H. M.; Duever, T. A. Fault detection, identification and diagnosis using CUSUM based PCA CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article Parameter identification ; Process control; Safety; Systems engineering; Fault detection and diagnosis; P CA PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS; NONLINEAR PROCESSES; DISTURBANCES; KPCA In this paper, a cumulative sum based statistical monitoring scheme is used to m onitor a particular set of the Tennessee Eastman Process (TEP) faults that could not be properly detected or diagnosed with other fault detection and diagnosis methodologies previously reported. T(2) and Q statistics based on the cumulative sums of all available measurements were successful in observing these three fau lts. For the purpose of fault isolation, contribution plots were found to be ina dequate when similar variable responses are associated with different faults. Fa ult historical data is then used in combination with proposed CUSUM based PCA mo del to unambiguously characterize the different fault signatures. The proposed C USUM based PCA was successful in detecting, identifying and diagnosing both indi vidual as well as simultaneous occurrences of these faults. (C) 2011 Elsevier Lt d. All rights reserved. [Bin Shams, MA; Budman, HM; Duever, TA] Univ Waterloo, D ept Chem Engn, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada Budman, HM (reprint author), Uni v Waterloo, Dept Chem Engn, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada hbudman@uwaterlo o.ca 28 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN

D 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. OCT 15 2011 66 20 4488 4498 10.1016/j.ces.20 11.05.028 11 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 808TI WOS:000294000900004 J Datta, M; Jackson, MD; Datta, R Datta, Meenal; J ackson, Meera D.; Datta, Ravindra Of mice and men: Their diet, met abolism, and weight change CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article Diet; Metabolism; Energy balance ; Obesity; Thermogenesis; Basic metabolic rate WATER-INDUCED THERMOGENESIS; FAT -FREE MASS; ENERGY-EXPENDITURE; BODY-COMPOSITION; MODEL; OBESITY; TEMPERATURE; E QUATIONS; EXERCISE; MAMMALS Since the days of the hunter-gatherer, food inta ke has been limited by its availability, and significant physical effort was inv olved in bringing it home. For the first time in our history, the society suffer s from an excess of food, coupled with an increasing lack of physical activity. Thus, human will power is called for to limit intake, eat the right kind of food s, and do voluntary exercise in order to avoid obesity. Consequently, many comme rcial diets have proliferated, but maintaining a healthy weight and diet remains a daily struggle for many. A better understanding of the basic aspects of human diet vis-a-vis energy balance would help in this regard. Although chemical engi neering science has so far been applied mainly to industrial problems to the gre at benefit of society, it can also inform many problems of day-to-day existence. Here, we provide an example of a simple analysis of diet and energy balance, wh ich could help in improved understanding of personal nutrition and diet. With th e use of a single fitted parameter, the model can adequately describe weight cha nge in men, women, and in mice. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Datta, R] Worcester Polytech Inst, Dept Chem Engn, Worcester, MA 01609 USA; [Da tta, M] Tufts Univ, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Medford, MA 02155 USA; [Jackson, MD] Air Prod & Chem Inc, Allentown, PA 18195 USA Datta, R (reprint author), Worce ster Polytech Inst, Dept Chem Engn, Worcester, MA 01609 USA rdatta@wpi.edu 50 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. OCT 15 2011 66 20 4510 4520 10.1016/j.ces.2011.06.007 11 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 808TI WOS:000294000900006 J Kasinathan, P; Hwang, DW; Lee, U; Hwang, YK; Chang, JS Kasinathan, Palraj; Hwang, Dong Won; Lee, Uhwang; Hwang, Young Kyu; Chang, JongSan Effect of solvent and impurity on synthesis of ethyl lactate fro m fermentation-derived ammonium lactate CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE English Article Biochemical engineering; Catalysis; Chemical processes; Fermentation; Ammonium lactate; Ethyl lactate ESTERIFICATION; ACID Fermentation-derived ammonium lactate was converted into ethyl lactate by decomposition in various organic solvents followed by esterifi cation with ethanol over Amberlyst catalyst. The ammonium lactate was decomposed more efficiently in an organic solvent with high boiling point, where the produ ced lactic acid was stabilized well as a monomer without oligomerization. Howeve r, only the nonreactive phosphate-type solvent such as triethyl phosphate and tr ibutyl phosphate showed a notable ethyl lactate yield in the subsequent esterifi cation reaction compared with dimethyl sulfoxide and N-methyl pyrolidine. The la ctic acid yield in ammonium lactate decomposition and the subsequent ethyl lacta te yield were also highly dependent on solvent ratio to ammonium lactate, temper ature and pressure in ammonium lactate decomposition reaction. The amino acid im purity contained in the fermented ammonium lactate as well as the unreacted ammo nium lactate reduced the acid strength of Amberlyst-36, which resulted in the fi nal ethyl lactate yield. Crown Copyright (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kasinathan, P; Hwang, DW; Lee, U; Hwang, YK; Chang, JS] Korea Res Inst Chem Technol, Biorefinery Res Ctr, Taejon 305600, South Korea; [ Kasinathan, P; Hwang, YK; Chang, JS] Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Sci, Taejon 305333, South Korea Hwang, DW (reprint author), Korea Res Inst Chem Technol, Biorefi nery Res Ctr, Sinseoungno 19, Taejon 305600, South Korea dwhwang@krict.re .kr; jschang@krict.re.kr MKE/KEIT[10031795]; KRICT This work was su

pported by the R&D Program of MKE/KEIT [10031795, Conversion of C3 Platform Chem icals from Biomass] and by Institutional Research Program of KRICT. We also ackn owledge the kind supply of fermented solution of lactic acid from Dr. In Suk Cho i and Mr. Jae Young Oh in Daesang corporation. 14 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. En g. Sci. OCT 15 2011 66 20 4549 4554 10.1016/j.ces.2011.06.017 6 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 808TI WOS:000294000900009 J Hosseinpour, V; Kazemeini, M; Mohammadrezaee, A Hosseinpour, Vahid; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Mohammadrezaee, Alireza A study of the water-gas shift reaction in Ru-promoted Ir-catalysed methanol car bonylation utilising experimental design methodology CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCI ENCE English Article Chemical process; Kinetics; Reaction engineering; Multiphase reactions; Methanol carbony lation; Experimental design RESPONSE-SURFACE METHODOLOGY; ACETIC-ACID; IRIDI UM CATALYST The water-gas shift reaction occurs competitively to the main re action of the Ir-catalysed methanol carbonylation process. To study the effect o f seven factors including temperature, pressure, iridium, ruthenium, methyliodid e, methyl acetate and water concentrations on the formation of hydrogen and carb on dioxide as a result of the water-gas shift reaction and other side reactions in the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, the experimental design method combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was utilised. Central composite design at five levels (with alpha = 1.63) was used to design experiments. A qua dratic model that included the main and interaction effects of variables for H(2 ) and CO(2) formation was developed. For two responses, R(2) was in reasonable a greement "Adj-R(2)". Furthermore, statistical tests confirmed the accuracy and t he precision of models developed in this research. For CO(2) formation, pressure , iridium and methyl iodide concentrations and for H(2) formation, water and iri dium concentrations had the most pronounced effects. Optimum conditions to minim ise H(2) and CO(2) and CH(4) formation were determined as follows: temperature o f 189 degrees C, pressure of 32.0 bar, iridium content of 859 ppm, ruthenium con centration of 528 ppm, methyl iodide content of 8.68 wt%, methyl acetate concent ration of 23.9 wt% and water content of 6.49 wt%. Ultimately, an experiment at o ptimum conditions revealed satisfactory agreement between the experimental and p redicted data. Crown Copyright (c) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights re served. [Hosseinpour, V; Kazemeini, M] Sharif Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Petr Eng n, Tehran, Iran; [Mohammadrezaee, A] Natl Petrochem Co, Petrochem Res & Technol Co, Tehran, Iran Kazemeini, M (reprint author), Sharif Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Petr Engn, Azadi Ave,POB 11365-9465, Tehran, Iran kazemini@sharif. edu 29 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENC E LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAN D 0009-2509 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. OCT 15 2011 66 20 4798 4806 10.1016/j.ces.20 11.06.053 9 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 808TI WOS:000294000900033 J Sa, S; Sousa, JM; Mendes, A Sa, Sandra; Sous a, Jose M.; Mendes, Adelio Steam reforming of methanol over a CuO/Z nO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst, part I: Kinetic modelling CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SCI ENCE English Article Methanol steam reforming; Reverse water gas shift; Kinetics; Packed bed; Chemical reacto rs; Reaction engineering HYDROGEN-PRODUCTION; MEMBRANE REACTOR; CU/ZNO/AL 2O3 CATALYST; FUEL-CELLS; MECHANISM; H-2 A kinetic study of the methanol steam reforming reaction was performed over a commercial CuO/ZnO/Al(2)O(3) catal yst (Sud-Chemie, G66 MR), in the temperature range of 200-300 degrees C. The rea ctions considered in this work were methanol steam reforming (MSR) and reverse w ater gas shift (rWGS). Several MSR kinetic rate models developed by different au thors were compared and the one was determined that best fitted the experimental data. A kinetic Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was proposed based on the work by Pe ppley et al. (1999a). The kinetic expressions that presented the best fit were u

sed to simulate the paced bed reactor with a one-dimensional model. A good agree ment between the mathematical model and the experimental data was observer. (c) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Sa, S; Sousa, JM; Mendes, A] Univ Porto , Fac Engn, LEPAE Dept Engn Quim, P-4200465 Oporto, Portugal; [Sousa, JM] Univ T ras Os Montes & Alto Douro, Dept Quim, Escola Ciencias Vida & Ambiente, P-500191 1 Vila Real Codex, Portugal Mendes, A (reprint author), Univ Porto, Fac Engn , LEPAE Dept Engn Quim, Rua Dr Roberto Frias, P-4200465 Oporto, Portugal mendes@fe.up.pt FCT[SFRH/BD/30385/2006, PTDC/EQU-EQU/71617/2006, PTDC/EQU-EQU/10 4217/2008, PTDC/CTM/108454/2008] The work of Sandra Sa was supported by F CT (Grant SFRH/BD/30385/2006). The research was also supported by funds from FCT projects PTDC/EQU-EQU/71617/2006, PTDC/EQU-EQU/104217/2008 and PTDC/CTM/108454/ 2008. 35 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0009-250 9 CHEM ENG SCI Chem. Eng. Sci. OCT 15 2011 66 20 4913 4921 10.1016/j.ces.2011.06.063 9 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 808TI WOS:000294000900043 J Zahid, M; Loyau, S; Bouabdelli, M; Aubrey, N; Jandrot-Perrus, M; Billial d, P Zahid, Muhammad; Loyau, Stephane; Bouabdelli, Ma xime; Aubrey, Nicolas; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Billiald, Philippe Design and reshaping of an scFv directed against human platelet glycoprotein VI with diagnostic potential ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY English Article Platelet; Glycoprotein VI; scFy; Antibody fragment SINGLE-CHAIN ANTIBODY; C OLLAGEN RECEPTOR; PROTEIN-L; IMMUNOGLOBULIN SUPERFAMILY; GPVI; ACTIVATION; FRAGM ENTS; METALLOPROTEINASE; HUMANIZATION; EXPRESSION Blood platelets play a k ey role in physiological hemostasis and in thrombosis. As a consequence, platele t functional analysis is widely used in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorders a s well as in the evaluation of thrombosis risks and of the efficacy of antithrom botics. Glycoprotein (GP) VI is a platelet-specific collagen-signaling receptor. Clinical studies suggest that increased GPVI expression is associated with a ri sk of arterial thrombosis. Conversely. GPVI deficiencies have been identified in patients with defective platelet responses to collagen. Currently, there is no standard test available for measuring GPVI expression, essentially because antib odies usually cross-link GPVI upon binding, leading to platelet activation and c onsecutive changes in GPVI expression. Here, we designed a recombinant monovalen t antibody fragment (scFv) derived from an anti-GPVI monoclonal IgG, 3J24, with the characteristics required to analyze GPVI expression. Guided by in silico mod eling and V-KAPPA chain analysis, a Protein L (PpL) recognition pattern was engi neered in the scFv, making possible its purification and detection using PpL con jugates. The PpL affinity-purified scFv is functional. It retains GPVI-binding s pecificity and allows detection of platelet surface-expressed GPVI without induc ing platelet activation. In conclusion, the reshaped scFv may be very useful in the development of diagnostic approaches. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights rese rved. [Zahid, M; Loyau, S; Bouabdelli, M; Jandrot-Perrus, M] Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, INSERM, U698, F-75018 Paris, France; [Zahid, M; Billiald, P] Univ Pari s 11, IFR 141, Fac Pharm, F-92260 Chatenay Malabry, France; [Aubrey, N] UMR Univ INRA 483, Fac Pharm, F-37200 Tours, France; [Jandrot-Perrus, M] Univ Paris 07, UMR698, F-75018 Paris, France; [Billiald, P] Museum Natl Hist Nat, F-75005 Paris , France Jandrot-Perrus, M (reprint author), Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, I NSERM, U698, F-75018 Paris, France martine.jandrot-perrus@inserm.fr; philip -pe.billiald@u-psud.fr SFERE/HEC; AGIP[ANR-07EPMB-002-01 (AGIP)]; Foundation de France[2007001960] M. Zahid is grateful to SFERE/HEC for financial support. We are indebted to Gilles Ponchel and Magali Noiray (University of Paris-Sud 11 , France) for their help in carrying out and interpreting the SPR analysis. This work was supported by grants from ANR-07EPMB-002-01 (AGIP) and from the Foundat ion de France No. 2007001960. 40 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS I NC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 921014495 USA 0003-2697 ANAL BIOCHEM Anal. Biochem. OCT 15 2011 417 2 274 282 10.1016/ j.ab.2011.06.036 9 Biochemical Research Methods; Bi ochemistry & Molecular Biology; Chemistry, Analytical Biochemistry & Molecular

Biology; Chemistry 808QN WOS:000293993600015 J Wang, Y; Li, B; Weise, T; Wang, JY; Yuan, B; Tian, QJ Wang, Yu; Li, Bin; Weise, Thomas; Wang, Jianyu; Yuan, Bo; Tian, Qiongjie Self-adaptive learning based particle swarm optimization INFORMATION SCIE NCES English Article Particle swarm; Self-adaptive learning; Numerical optimization; Economic load dispatch; Power system EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM; GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION; ACCELERATION COEFFI CIENTS; DIFFERENTIAL EVOLUTION; ECONOMIC-DISPATCH; SEARCH; ANT; ADAPTATION; SELE CTION; STRATEGY Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a population-based stochast ic search technique for solving optimization problems over continuous space, whi ch has been proven to be efficient and effective in wide applications in scienti fic and engineering domains. However, the universality of current PSO variants, i.e., their ability to achieve good performance on a variety of different fitnes s landscapes, is still unsatisfying. For many practical problems, where the fitn ess landscapes are usually unknown, employing a trial-and-error scheme to search for the most suitable PSO variant is computationally expensive. Therefore, it i s necessary to develop a more adaptive and robust PSO version to provide users a black-box tool for various application problems. In this paper, we propose a se lf-adaptive learning based PSO (SLPSO) to make up the above demerits. SLPSO simu ltaneously adopts four PSO based search strategies. A probability model is used to describe the probability of a strategy being used to update a particle. The m odel is self-adaptively improved according to the strategies ability of generati ng better quality solutions in the past generations. In order to evaluate the pe rformance of SLPSO, we compare it with eight state-of-the-art PSO variants on 26 numerical optimization problems with different characteristics such as uni-moda lity, multi-modality, rotation, ill-condition, mis-scale and noise. The experime ntal results clearly verify the advantages of SLPSO. Moreover, a practical engin eering problem, the economic load dispatch problem of power systems (ELD), is us ed to further evaluate SLPSO. Compared with the previous effective ELD evolution ary algorithms, SLPSO can update the best solution records. (C) 2010 Elsevier In c. All rights reserved. [Wang, Y; Li, B; Weise, T; Wang, JY; Yuan, B; Tian, QJ] Univ Sci & Technol China, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China Li, B (reprint author), Univ Sci & Technol China, 4th Mailbox, Hefei, Anhui, Peoples R China wyustc@m ail.ustc.edu.cn; binli@ustc.edu.cn; tweise@ustc.edu.cn; jywang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; yuanbo@mail.ustc.edu.cn; tianqjie@mail.ustc.edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[60401015, U0835002]; Chinese Academy of Science (CAS); IEEE ; University of Science and Technology of China. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 60401015, U08350 02), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) Special Grant for Postgraduate Researc h, Innovation and Practice, IEEE Walter Kaplus Student Summer Research Grant, an d Graduate Innovation Fund of University of Science and Technology of China. 69 2 2 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC NEW YORK 360 PARK AVE SOU TH, NEW YORK, NY 10010-1710 USA 0020-0255 INFORM SCIENCES Inf. Sci . OCT 15 2011 181 20 4515 4538 10.1016/j.ins.2010.07.013 24 Computer Science, Inform ation Systems Computer Science 802ZG WOS:000293548900010 J Saleem, M; Di Caro, GA; Farooq, M Saleem, Muhammad; Di Caro, Gianni A.; Farooq, Muddassar Swarm intelligence based routing protocol for wireless sensor networks: Survey and future directions INFORMATION SCIENCES English Article Wireless sensor networks; Routing protocols; Swarm intelligence; Ant colony rout ing; Bee-inspired routing ENERGY-EFFICIENT; ANT; ALGORITHM; OPTIMIZATION; AGGREGATION; QUALITY Swarm intelligence is a relatively novel field. It addre sses the study of the collective behaviors of systems made by many components th at coordinate using decentralized controls and self-organization. A large part o f the research in swarm intelligence has focused on the reverse engineering and the adaptation of collective behaviors observed in natural systems with the aim of designing effective algorithms for distributed optimization. These algorithms , like their natural systems of inspiration, show the desirable properties of be ing adaptive, scalable, and robust. These are key properties in the context of n

etwork routing, and in particular of routing in wireless sensor networks. Theref ore, in the last decade, a number of routing protocols for wireless sensor netwo rks have been developed according to the principles of swarm intelligence, and, in particular, taking inspiration from the foraging behaviors of ant and bee col onies. In this paper, we provide an extensive survey of these protocols. We disc uss the general principles of swarm intelligence and of its application to routi ng. We also introduce a novel taxonomy for routing protocols in wireless sensor networks and use it to classify the surveyed protocols. We conclude the paper wi th a critical analysis of the status of the field, pointing out a number of fund amental issues related to the (mis) use of scientific methodology and evaluation procedures, and we identify some future research directions. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Saleem, M] CASE, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan; [Di Caro, GA] Ist Dalle Molle Studi Intelligenza Artificiale ID, CH-6900 Lugano, Sw itzerland; [Farooq, M] NUCES, NexGIN RC, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan Saleem, M (reprint author), CASE, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan msaleem@case.edu.pk; gia nni@idsia.ch; muddassar.farooq@nu.edu.pk 90 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC NEW YORK 360 PARK AVE SOUTH, NEW YORK, NY 10010-1710 USA 0020-0255 INFORM SCIENCES Inf. Sci. OCT 15 2011 181 20 4597 4624 10.1016/j.ins.2010.07.005 28 Computer Science, Inform ation Systems Computer Science 802ZG WOS:000293548900015 J Song, BT; Cui, WG; Chang, J Song, Botao; Cui , Wenguo; Chang, Jiang Study on the Effect of Inorganic Salts on the Al ignment of Electrospun Fiber JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE English Article electrospinning; fibers; morphology; orientation; inorganic salt UNIAXIALLY ALIGNED ARRAYS; POLY( ETHYLENE OXIDE); NANOFIBERS; POLYSTYRENE; ALCOHOL) Well-aligned and highly ordered architectures are always required in many fields, such as tissue enginee ring, electronics, and preparation of composite materials. In this study, electr ospun mats with well-aligned fibers and various fiber assemblies were successful ly fabricated by electrospinning of poly(vinylbutyral) (PVB)/inorganic salt solu tion under the optimal salt condition. Then, the effect of inorganic salts on th e degree of electrospun fiber alignment was comprehensively investigated, and th e results indicated that the viscosity and conductivity of the solutions were th e key factors influencing the degree of fiber alignment. It was expected that th is simple and feasible method could be helpful for the fabrication of the well-a ligned electrospun fibers and various fiber assemblies. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodica ls, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 122: 1047-1052, 2011 [Song, BT; Chang, J] Chinese Aca d Sci, State Key Lab High Performance Ceram & Superfine, Shanghai Inst Ceram, Sh anghai 200050, Peoples R China; [Song, BT] Chinese Acad Sci, Grad Sch, Shanghai 200050, Peoples R China; [Cui, WG; Chang, J] Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Med X Res Inst, Shanghai 200030, Peoples R China Chang, J (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, State Key Lab High Performance Ceram & Superfine, Shanghai Inst Ceram, Shan ghai 200050, Peoples R China jchang@mail.sic.ac.cn National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of P.R. China[2005CB522704]; Natural Science Foundation of China[30730034] Contract grant sponsor: National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of P.R. China; contract grant number: 2005CB522704.Contract grant sponsor: Natural Science Foundation of China; contract grant number: 30730034. 29 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0021-8995 J APPL POLYM SCI J. Appl. Polym. Sci. OCT 15 2011 122 2 1047 1052 10.1002/app.34197 6 Polymer Science Polymer Science 805PQ WOS:000293741800039 J Xie, ZW; Buschle-Diller, G; DeInnocentes, P; Bird, RC Xie, Zhiwei; Buschle-Diller, Gisela; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis Electrospun Poly(D,L)-Lactide Nonwoven Mats for Biomedical Application: Surface Area Shrinkage and Surface Entrapment JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE English Article electrospinning; poly(D, L)-lactide; surface modification; tissue engineering CONTROLLING BIOLOGICAL I NTERACTIONS; POLY(LACTIC ACID) FILMS; DRUG-DELIVERY; NANOFIBERS; FIBERS; MEMBRAN

E; POLYPROPYLENE; POLYURETHANE; DEGRADATION; STABILITY Nanofibrous poly(D,L)-la ctide mats prepared by electrospinning are useful for numerous biomedical applic ations. However, it was observed that these mats tend to shrink under physiologi cal conditions. In this research, a physical entrapment method to modify the pol ymer surface with poly(ethylene glycol) was developed to ensure dimensional stab ility and to increase the hydrophilicity of the surface of the mats. Nanofiber m orphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Surface element ana lysis was performed by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water c ontact angles were determined to identify surface properties before and after su rface entrapment. Canine fibroblasts were prepared and seeded onto the poly(D,L) -lactide mats, followed by cell morphology study by SEM and cell viability tests by MTT assay, which confirmed the improvement of biocompatibility by surface mo dification. Taking the results into account, hydrophilic and area-stable nanofib rous nonwoven mats were successfully produced, with potential applications as in vivo biomedical material. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 122 : 1219-1225, 2011 [Xie, ZW; Buschle-Diller, G] Auburn Univ, Dept Polymer & Fiber Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA; [DeInnocentes, P; Bird, RC] Auburn Univ, Dept Pathobiol, Auburn, AL 36849 USA Buschle-Diller, G (reprint author), Aubu rn Univ, Dept Polymer & Fiber Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA buschgi@auburn.e du 43 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0021-8995 J APPL POLYM SCI J. Appl. Polym. Sci. OCT 15 2011 122 2 1219 1225 10.1002/app.34239 7 Polymer Science Polymer Science 805PQ WOS:000293741800059 J Torres-Giner, S; Gimeno-Alcaniz, JV; Ocio, MJ; Lagaron, JM Torres-Giner, Sergio; Gimeno-Alcaniz, Jose V.; Ocio, Maria J.; Lagaron, Jose M. Optimization of Electrospun Polylactide-Based Ultrathin Fibers for Osteoconducti ve Bone Scaffolds JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE English Article polylactide; electrospinning; bi oactive fibers; bone interfaces TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; POLY(LACTIC ACID); COLLAGEN NANOFIBERS; THERMAL-PROPERTIES; DRUG-DELIVERY; IN-VITRO; PLA; MORPHOLO GY; BLENDS; COMPOSITE Bone tissue interfacial scaffolds, which encourage cell growth, are critical determinants for clinical success after implant surgery. Ov er the years, a number of resorbable configurations have emerged for bone cell s upport and growth, but only a few have demonstrated clinical efficacy. Polymer c oatings produced by electrospinning are regarded as very promising bone interfac es because of the ultrathin-scaled dimensions of its physical structure. In this study, the morphology, composition, thermal properties, and cell growth viabili ty of a number of polylactide-based systems containing different binary and tern ary formulations of this biomaterial with collagen and commercial hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were characterized. The best performance in terms of biocompatibi lity was obtained for the tricomponent system in which the submicron fibers were further subjected to uniaxial orientation process during formation. The in vitr o proliferation of the cells, which harbored on these ultrathin-structured mats, was examined by means of a metabolic activity indicator and ensured by means of scanning electron microscopy, and cell anchorage was checked by fluorescent opt ical microscopy. Finally, the optimum tricomponent material was successfully ste rilized for the first time by gamma radiation without noticeable losses in cellseeding capacity. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 122: 914-925 , 2011 [Torres-Giner, S; Ocio, MJ; Lagaron, JM] IATA CSIC, Novel Mat & Nanotech nol Grp, Burjassot 46980, Spain; [Gimeno-Alcaniz, JV] IATA CSIC, Cell Culture La b, Burjassot 46980, Spain; [Ocio, MJ] Univ Valencia, Fac Pharm, Dept Prevent Med , E-46100 Burjassot, Spain Lagaron, JM (reprint author), IATA CSIC, Novel M at & Nanotechnol Grp, Avda Agustin Escardino 7, Burjassot 46980, Spain lagaron@ iata.csic.es MEC[MAT2009-14533-C02-01, MAT2006-10261-C03]; Nanobiomatters Ltd . (Spain); IP of the EU, NEWBONE Contract grant sponsor: MEC; contract gr ant numbers: MAT2009-14533-C02-01, MAT2006-10261-C03.Contract grant sponsors: Na nobiomatters Ltd. (Spain) and the IP of the EU FP6, NEWBONE. 54 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214 8, MA USA 0021-8995 J APPL POLYM SCI J. Appl. Polym.

Sci. OCT 15 2011 122 2 914 925 10.1002/app.34208 12 Polymer Science Polymer Science 805PQ WOS:000293741800023 J Tichy, MC; Mintert, F; Buchleitner, A Tichy, M alte C.; Mintert, Florian; Buchleitner, Andreas Essential entanglement f or atomic and molecular physics JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B-ATOMIC MOLECULAR AND OPTICA L PHYSICS English Review HIDDEN-VARIABLE THEORIES; HYDROGEN-LIKE IONS; HELIUM-LIKE IONS; COMPOSITE QUANTU M-SYSTEMS; INTERACTING ELECTRON-GAS; SINGLE-PHOTON; 2-PHOTON DECAY; POLARIZATION CORRELATION; BELL INEQUALITIES; DOUBLE-SLIT Entanglement is nowadays conside red as a key quantity for the understanding of correlations, transport propertie s and phase transitions in composite quantum systems, and thus receives interest beyond the engineered applications in the focus of quantum information science. We review recent experimental and theoretical progress in the study of quantum correlations under that wider perspective, with an emphasis on rigorous definiti ons of the entanglement of identical particles, and on entanglement studies in a toms and molecules. [Tichy, MC; Mintert, F; Buchleitner, A] Univ Freiburg, I nst Phys, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany; [Mintert, F] Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Inst A dv Studies FRIAS, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany Tichy, MC (reprint author), Univ Freiburg, Inst Phys, Hermann Herder Str 3, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany a.buchle itner@physik.uni-freiburg.de German National Academic Foundation; DFG; DAAD The authors enjoyed fruitful and stimulating discussions with Celsus Bouri, Vivi an Franca, Dominik Horndlein, Pierre Lugan, Fernando de Melo, Benno Salwey, Tors ten Scholak, Markus Tiersch and Hannah Venzl, and are indebted to Vivian Franca and Pierre Lugan for careful proofreading. Financial support by the German Natio nal Academic Foundation (MCT), by DFG (FM) and by DAAD within the PROCOPE progra m (MCT and AB) is gratefully acknowledged. 397 0 0 IOP PUBLISHING LTD BRISTOL TEMPLE CIRCUS, TEMPLE WAY, BRISTOL BS1 6BE, ENGL AND 0953-4075 J PHYS B-AT MOL OPT J. Phys. B-At. Mol. Opt. Phys. OCT 14 2011 44 19 192001 10.1088/0953-4075/44/19/192001 37 Optics; Physics, Atomic, Molecular & Chemical Optics; Physics 824QO WOS:000295217300004 J Michelmore, A; Mierczynska, A; Poh, Z; Goreham, RV; Losic, D; Short, RD; Vasilev, K Michelmore, Andrew; Mierczynska, Agniesz ka; Poh, Zihan; Goreham, Renee V.; Losic, Dusan; Short, Robert D.; Vasilev, Kras imir Versatile gradients of chemistry, bound ligands and nanoparticle s on alumina nanopore arrays NANOTECHNOLOGY English Article ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE; HEXAGONAL PORE ARRAYS; ANODIC ALUMINA; SURFACE MODIFICA TION; CHEMICAL GRADIENTS; CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS; MORPHOGEN GRADIENT; CELL-PROLIFER ATION; COLLOIDAL FORCES; POLYMER BRUSHES Nanoporous alumina (PA) arrays p roduced by self-ordering growth, using electrochemical anodization, have been ex tensively explored for potential applications based upon the unique thermal, mec hanical and structural properties, and high surface-to-volume ratio of these mat erials. However, the potential applications and functionality of these materials may be further extended by molecular-level engineering of the surface of the po re rims. In this paper we present a method for the generation of chemical gradie nts on the surface of PA arrays based upon plasma co-polymerization of two monom ers. We further extend these chemical gradients, which are also gradients of sur face charge, to those of bound ligands and number density gradients of nanoparti cles. The latter represent a highly exotic new class of materials, comprising al igned PA, capped by gold nanoparticles around the rim of the pores. Gradients of chemistry, ligands and nanoparticles generated by our method retain the porous structure of the substrate, which is important in applications that take advanta ge of the inherent properties of these materials. This method can be readily ext ended to other porous materials. [Michelmore, A; Poh, Z; Goreham, RV; Sho rt, RD; Vasilev, K] Univ S Australia, Mawson Inst, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia; [Mierczynska, A; Poh, Z; Losic, D] Univ S Australia, Ian Wark Res Inst, Adelaid e, SA 5095, Australia Michelmore, A (reprint author), Univ S Australia, Mawson Inst, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia Krasimir.vasilev@unisa.edu.au ARC[FT10 0100292] KV thanks ARC for support through fellowship FT100100292.

62 0 0 IOP PUBLISHING LTD BRISTOL TEMPLE CIRCUS, TEMPLE WA Y, BRISTOL BS1 6BE, ENGLAND 0957-4484 NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotech nology OCT 14 2011 22 41 415601 10.1088/0957-4484/22/41/415601 9 Nanoscience & Na notechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied Science & Technology - Other Topics; Materials Science; Physics 823YJ WOS:000295163900 012 J Fabre, F; Hetreux, G; Le Lann, JM; Zarate, P Fabre, Florian; Hetreux, Gilles; Le Lann, Jean-Marc; Zarate, Pascale Dynamic hybrid simulation of batch processes driven by a scheduling module COMPUTERS & CHEMICAL ENGINEERING English Article Dynamic hybrid simulation Environment; Batch processes; Scheduling; Petri nets; Mixed Integer Linear Programming; Object oriented modeling ROBUST OPTIMIZAT ION APPROACH; CONTINUOUS-TIME; FORMULATION; UNCERTAINTY Simulation is now a CAPE tool widely used by practicing engineers for process design and control. In par ticular, it allows various offline analyses to improve system performance such a s productivity, energy efficiency, waste reduction, etc. In this framework, we h ave developed the dynamic hybrid simulation environment PrODHyS whose particular ity is to provide general and reusable object-oriented components dedicated to t he modeling of devices and operations found in chemical processes. Unlike contin uous processes, the dynamic simulation of batch processes requires the execution of control recipes to achieve a set of production orders. For these reasons, Pr ODHyS is coupled to a scheduling module (ProSched) based on a MILP mathematical model in order to initialize various operational parameters and to ensure a prop er completion of the simulation. This paper focuses on the procedure used to gen erate the simulation model corresponding to the realization of a scenario descri bed through a particular scheduling. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Fabre, F; Hetreux, G; Le Lann, JM] INPT ENSIACET, UMR CNRS 5503, Lab Genie Chim PSI GI, F-31030 Toulouse 4, France; [Zarate, P] INPT ENSIACET, IRIT, F-31062 To ulouse 9, France Hetreux, G (reprint author), INPT ENSIACET, UMR CNRS 550 3, Lab Genie Chim PSI GI, 4 Allee Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse 4, France gilles.hetreux@ensiacet.fr 28 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON , OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0098-1354 COMPUT CHEM ENG Comput. Chem. Eng. OCT 13 2011 35 10 2098 2112 10.1016/j.compchemeng.2011.04.007 15 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Engineering, Chemical Computer Science; Engineering 820XO WOS:000294939600014 J Gu, Q; Ozcelik, O Gu, Quan; Ozcelik, Ozgur Integrating Open Sees with other software - with application to coupling problem s in civil engineering STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANICS English Article coupling systems; OpenSees - Sim ulink; software integration; client-server techniques; soil-structure interactio n; shake table modeling UCSD SHAKE TABLE; IMPEDANCE FUNCTIONS; TEST SYSTEM; HALF -SPACE; FRAMEWORK; IDENTIFICATION; FOUNDATION; PROGRAM Integration of finite el ement analysis (FEA) software into various software platforms is commonly used i n coupling systems such as systems involving structural control, fluid-structure , wind-structure, soil-structure interactions and substructure method in which F EA is used for simulating the structural responses. Integrating an FEA program i nto various other software platforms in an efficient and simple way is crucial f or the development and performance of the entire coupling system. The lack of si mplicity of the existing integration methods makes this integration difficult an d therefore entails the motivation of this study. In this paper, a novel practic al technique, namely CS technique, is presented for integrating a general FEA so ftware framework Open Sees into other software platforms, e.g., Matlab-Simulink (R) and a soil-structure interaction (SSI) system. The advantage of this integra tion technique is that it is efficient and relatively easy to implement. Instead of Open Sees, a cheap client handling TCL is integrated into the other software . The integration is achieved by extending the concept of internet based clientserver concept, taking advantage of the parameterization framework of Open Sees,

and using a command-driven scripting language called tool command language (TCL ) on which the Open Sees' interface is based. There is no need for any programmi ng inside Open Sees. The presented CS technique proves as an excellent solution for the coupling problems mentioned above (for both linear and nonlinear problem s). Application examples are provided to validate the integration method and ill ustrate the various uses of the method in the civil engineering. [Ozcelik , O] Dokuz Eylul Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Civil Engn, TR-35160 Buca Izmir, Turkey; [ Gu, Q] Xiamen Univ, Sch Architecture & Civil Engn, Dept Civil Engn, Xiamen 36100 5, Fujian, Peoples R China Ozcelik, O (reprint author), Dokuz Eylul Univ, S ch Engn, Dept Civil Engn, TR-35160 Buca Izmir, Turkey ozgur.ozcelik@deu.edu.tr Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China[2010111075] The research was partially supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the C entral Universities of China under Award No. 2010111075. This support is gratefu lly acknowledged. The writers would like to thank Professor Joel P. Conte and Pr ofessor J. Enrique Luco from University of California at San Diego for their inv aluable discussions and advices during this research work. 42 0 0 TECHNO-PRESS DAEJEON PO BOX 33, YUSEONG, DAEJEON 305-600, SOU TH KOREA 1225-4568 STRUCT ENG MECH Struct. Eng. Mech. OCT 10 2011 40 1 85 103 19 Engineering, Civil; Engineering, Mechanical Engineering 826YH WOS:000295391000006 J Voronov, RS; VanGordon, SB; Sikavitsas, VI; Papavassiliou, DV Voronov, Roman S.; VanGordon, Samuel B.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; Papavassiliou , Dimitrios V. Efficient Lagrangian scalar tracking method for reactive local mass transport simulation through porous media INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FO R NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS English Article transport in porous media; Lagrangian methods; Lattice Boltzmann simulations; re active flows LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD; NAVIER-STOKES EQUATION; MESENCHYMAL ST EM-CELLS; TURBULENT TRANSPORT; MATRIX DEPOSITION; SHEAR STRESSES; GAS AUTOMATA; FLUID-FLOWS; SCAFFOLDS; CHANNEL Mass transfer in the presence of chemical reacti ons for flows through porous media is of interest to many disciplines. The Latti ce Boltzmann method (LBM) is particularly attractive in such cases due to the ea se with which it handles complicated boundary conditions. However, useful Lagran gian information (such as solute survival distance, effective diffusivity, colli sion frequency) is challenging to obtain from the LBM. In this paper, we present a straightforward and efficient Lagrangian methodology (Lagrangian scalar track ing, LST) for performing solute transport simulations in the presence of heterog eneous, first-order, irreversible reactions, based on a velocity field obtained from LBM. The hybrid LST/LBM technique tracks passive mass markers that have two contributions to their movement: convective (obtained through interpolation of a previously obtained velocity field) and Brownian. Various Schmidt number solut es and different solute release modes can be modeled with a single solvent flow field using this method. Moreover, the mass markers can have a range of reaction rate coefficients. This allows for the exploration of the whole spectrum of fir st-order heterogeneous reaction rates with just a single simulation. In order to show the applicability of the LST/LBM scheme, results from a case study are pre sented in which the consumption of oxygen and/or nutrients within a porous bone tissue engineering scaffold is modeled under flow perfusion culturing conditions . Although the reactive LST methodology described in this paper compliments the LBM, it can also be used with any other flow simulation that can generate the ve locity field. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [Voronov, RS; Va nGordon, SB; Sikavitsas, VI; Papavassiliou, DV] Univ Oklahoma, Sch Chem Biol & M at Engn, Norman, OK 73019 USA Papavassiliou, DV (reprint author), Univ Oklahom a, Sch Chem Biol & Mat Engn, 100 E Boyd,SEC T-335, Norman, OK 73019 USA dvpapava @ou.edu NSF[CBET-0700813, CBET-0651180]; DoE[ER64239 0012293] Financial suppor t from NSF is gratefully acknowledged (CBET-0700813). Dimitrios Papavassiliou al so acknowledges support from the DoE-funded Carbon Nanotubes Technology Center-( Award Register #: ER64239 0012293) and from NSF under CBET-0651180. Computations were carried out at the OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCE R) utilizing a Dell Pentium4 Xeon64 Linux Cluster (topdawg.oscer.ou.edu) and at

the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) under TeraGrid allocations TG-CTS-070 050 and TG-CTS-090017. TACC utilized a Dell Neon Intel Duo-Core 64-bit Linux Clu ster. The authors are thankful to Dr Henry Neeman, for his technical support. 44 1 1 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0271-2091 INT J NUMER METH FL Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids OCT 10 2011 67 4 501 517 10.1002/fld.2369 17 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Applica tions; Mechanics; Physics, Fluids & Plasmas Computer Science; Mathematics; M echanics; Physics 823UX WOS:000295153100005 J Mehta, J; Van Dorst, B; Rouah-Martin, E; Herrebout, W; Scippo, ML; Blust , R; Robbens, J Mehta, Jaytry; Van Dorst, Bieke; Rouah-M artin, Elsa; Herrebout, Wouter; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Blust, Ronny; Robbens, Joh an In vitro selection and characterization of DNA aptamers recogniz ing chloramphenicol JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY English Article DNA aptamers; Antibiotics; Chloramphenicol; Detection; Molecular recognition SSDNA APTAMERS; HIGH-AFFINITY; LIGANDS; ACID; BIOSENSORS; FOOD Chloramphenicol (Cam), although an effective antibiotic, has lost favour due to some fatal side effects. Thus there is an urgent need for rapid and sensitive methods to detect residues in food, feed and environment. We engineered DNA aptamers that recogniz e Cam as their target, by conducting in vitro selections. Aptamers are nucleic a cid recognition elements that are highly specific and sensitive towards their ta rgets and can be synthetically produced in an animal-friendly manner, making the m ethical innovative alternatives to antibodies. None of the isolated aptamers i n this study shared sequence homology or structural similarities with each other , indicating that specific Cam recognition could be achieved by various DNA sequ ences under the selection conditions used. Analyzing the binding affinities of t he sequences, demonstrated that dissociation constants (K(d)) in the extremely l ow micromolar range, which were lower than those previously reported for Cam-spe cific RNA aptamers, were achieved. The two best aptamers had G rich (> 35%) nucl eotide regions, an attribute distinguishing them from the rest and apparently re sponsible for their high selectivity and affinity (K(d) similar to 0.8 and 1 mu M respectively). These aptamers open up possibilities to allow easy detection of Cam via aptamer-based biosensors. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Mehta, J; Van Dorst, B; Rouah-Martin, E; Blust, R; Robbens, J] Univ Antwerp, De pt Biol, Lab Ecophysiol Biochem & Toxicol, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium; [Mehta, J; V an Dorst, B; Rouah-Martin, E; Robbens, J] Inst Agr & Fisheries Res, B-8400 Ooste nde, Belgium; [Herrebout, W] Univ Antwerp, Dept Chem, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium; [ Scippo, ML] Univ Liege, Dept Food Sci, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Mehta, J (reprin t author), Groenenborgerlaan 171 U532, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium Jaytry.Mehta@ua. ac.be Federal Public Service of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment[RT 0 7/11 INVITRAB] The authors thank Professor Erik Goormaghtigh (Free University o f Brussels) for helping us with the IR spectroscopy measurements and Mandira Ban erji for editorial assistance. This study was funded by the Federal Public Servi ce of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment (contract RT 07/11 INVITRAB) 34 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0168-1656 J BIOTECHNOL J. Biote chnol. OCT 10 2011 155 4 361 369 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2011.06.043 9 Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 814WW WOS:000294488900 001 J Ohlrich, M Ohlrich, Mogens Predicti ng transmission of structure-borne sound power from machines by including termin al cross-coupling JOURNAL OF SOUND AND VIBRATION English Article POINT-CONNECTED SYSTEMS; RECEIVER Structure-borne sound generated by audib le vibration of machines in vehicles, equipment and house-hold appliances is oft en a major cause of noise. Such vibration of complex machines is mostly determin ed and quantified by measurements. It has been found that characterization of th e vibratory source strength and the prediction of power transmission to a suppor ting structure or the machine casing itself can be greatly simplified if all mob

ility cross-terms and spatial cross-coupling of source velocities can be neglect ed in the analysis. In many cases this gives an acceptable engineering accuracy, especially at mid- and high-frequencies. For structurally compact machines, how ever, the influence of cross-coupling cannot always be ignored. The present pape r addresses this problem and examines the transmission of structure-borne sound power by including spatial cross-coupling between pairs of translational termina ls in a global plane. This paired or bi-coupled power transmission represents th e simplest case of cross-coupling. The procedure and quality of the predicted tr ansmission using this improved technique is demonstrated experimentally for an e lectrical motor unit with an integrated radial fan that was mounted resiliently in a vacuum cleaner casing. It is found that cross-coupling plays a significant role, but only at frequencies below 100 Hz for the examined system. (C) 2011 Els evier Ltd. All rights reserved. Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Elect Engn, DK-2800 Lyng by, Denmark Ohlrich, M (reprint author), Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Elect Engn, Bldg 352, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark mo@elektro.dtu.dk 50 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD LONDON 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND 0022-460X J SOUND VIB J. Sound Vibr. OCT 10 2011 330 21 5058 5076 10.1016/j.jsv.2011.05.014 19 Acoustic s; Engineering, Mechanical; Mechanics Acoustics; Engineering; Mechanics 805KO WOS:000293725500008 J Karlsson, M; Abom, M Karlsson, Mikael; Abom, Mats Quasi-steady model of the acoustic scattering properties of a Tjunction JOURNAL OF SOUND AND VIBRATION English Article AEROACOUSTIC RESPONSE; DUCT T-junctions are common elements in flow duct net works. It is shown that for low Strouhal numbers, based on the duct diameter, th eir acoustic scattering properties can be described using an incompressible quas i-steady model. Models are derived for systems subjected to combinations of graz ing and bias mean flow, and are shown to work in both the limiting cases that is , grazing or bias flow alone as well as for the joining or dividing flow configu rations. The upper Strouhal number for which the quasi-steady models are applica ble is limited by flow-acoustic interaction effects, which differ significantly between the different flow configurations. Generally the models are applicable u p to Strouhal numbers of approximately 0.1-0.2, which is comparable with previou s published models for other configurations such as bends and orifices. This ran ge is sufficient to make the model useful in many important engineering applicat ions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Karlsson, M] KTH, Marcu s Wallenberg Lab Sound & Vibrat Res, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden; [Abom, M] KTH, L inne Flow Ctr, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden Karlsson, M (reprint author), KT H, Marcus Wallenberg Lab Sound & Vibrat Res, Teknikringen 8, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden kmk@kth.se; matsabom@kth.se Swedish Energy Agency[32022-1] The fina ncial support of the Swedish Energy Agency, Project 32022-1, is kindly acknowled ged. 17 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD LONDON 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND 0022-460X J SOUND VIB J. Sound Vibr. OCT 10 2011 330 21 5131 5137 10.1016/j.jsv.2011.05.012 7 Acoustics; Engineering, Mechanical; Mechanics Acoustics; Engineering; Mechanic s 805KO WOS:000293725500012 J McDonnell, MD; Grant, AJ; Land, I; Vellambi, BN; Abbott, D; Lever, K McDonnell, Mark D.; Grant, Alex J.; Land, Ingmar; Vellambi, Badri N.; Abbott, De rek; Lever, Ken Gain from the two-envelope problem via information asymm etry: on the suboptimality of randomized switching PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY A-MATHEMATICAL PHYSICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCES English Article two-envelope problem; two-envelo pe paradox; exchange paradox; game theory; randomized switching; information asy mmetry EXCHANGE PARADOX; BAYESIAN RESOLUTION; PARRONDOS PARADOX; ENVELOPE; MODE LS The two-envelope problem (or exchange problem) is one of maximizing the payoff in choosing between two values, given an observation of only one. This pa radigm is of interest in a range of fields from engineering to mathematical fina nce, as it is now known that the payoff can be increased by exploiting a form of

information asymmetry. Here, we consider a version of the 'two-envelope game' w here the envelopes' contents are governed by a continuous positive random variab le. While the optimal switching strategy is known and deterministic once an enve lope has been opened, it is not necessarily optimal when the content's distribut ion is unknown. A useful alternative in this case may be to use a switching stra tegy that depends randomly on the observed value in the opened envelope. This ap proach can lead to a gain when compared with never switching. Here, we quantify the gain owing to such conditional randomized switching when the random variable has a generalized negative exponential distribution, and compare this to the op timal switching strategy. We also show that a randomized strategy may be advanta geous when the distribution of the envelope's contents is unknown, since it can always lead to a gain. [Abbott, D] Univ Adelaide, Sch Elect & Elect Engn, Adela ide, SA 5005, Australia; [McDonnell, MD; Grant, AJ; Land, I; Vellambi, BN; Lever , K] Univ S Australia, Inst Telecommun Res, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia; [L ever, K] Cardiff Univ, Cardiff Sch Engn, Cardiff CF10 3XQ, S Glam, Wales Abbott, D (reprint author), Univ Adelaide, Sch Elect & Elect Engn, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia dabbott@eleceng.adelaide.edu.au Australian Research Council[DP10 93425] Mark D. McDonnell is the recipient of an Australian Research Fellowship funded by the Australian Research Council (project number DP1093425). 36 0 0 ROYAL SOC LONDON 6-9 CARLTON HOUSE TERRACE, LONDO N SW1Y 5AG, ENGLAND 1364-5021 P ROY SOC A-MATH PHY Proc. R. Soc. A-Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. OCT 8 2011 467 2134 2825 2851 10.1098/rspa.2010.0541 27 Multidis ciplinary Sciences Science & Technology - Other Topics 812JG WOS:0002 94288800006 J Norris, CJ; Meadway, GJ; O'Sullivan, MJ; Bond, IP; Trask, RS Norris, Christopher J.; Meadway, Gregory J.; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bond, Ian P .; Trask, Richard S. Self-Healing Fibre Reinforced Composites via a B ioinspired Vasculature ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS English Article EMBEDDED OPTICAL-FIBERS; INTERNAL SENSOR CAVITIES; POLYMER COMPOSITE; MICRODAMAG E ACCUMULATION; MICROVASCULAR NETWORKS; DAMAGE TOLERANCE; EPOXY COMPOSITE; IMPAC T DAMAGE; BONE TISSUE; FRACTURE This paper demonstrates the first steps towards self-healing composites that exploit a design philosophy inspired by the damage tolerance and self-repair functions of bone. Cracking in either fibre reinforced polymers (FRP) or bone, if left unattended, can grow under subsequent cyclic st resses eventually leading to catastrophic failure of the structure. On detection of cracks, an FRP component must be repaired or completely replaced, whereas bo ne utilises a series of complex processes to repair such damage. Under normal ci rcumstances, these processes allow the skeleton to continually perform over the lifespan of the organism, a highly desirable aspiration for engineering material s. A simple vasculature design incorporated into a FRP via a "lost wax" process was found to facilitate a self-healing function which resulted in an outstanding recovery (>= 96%) in post-impact compression strength. The process involved inf usion of a healing resin through the vascule channels. Resin egress from the bac kface damage, ultrasonic C-scan testing, and microscopic evaluation all provide evidence that sufficient vascule-damage connectivity exists to confer a reliable and efficient self-healing function. [Norris, CJ; Meadway, GJ; O'Sullivan, MJ ; Bond, IP; Trask, RS] Univ Bristol, Adv Composite Ctr Innovat & Sci, Dept Aeros p Engn, Bristol BS8 1TR, Avon, England Norris, CJ (reprint author), Univ Bristo l, Adv Composite Ctr Innovat & Sci, Dept Aerosp Engn, Queens Bldg, Bristol BS8 1 TR, Avon, England R.S.Trask@bristol.ac.uk UK Engineering and Physical Scie nces Research Council; UK Ministry of Defence via the Defence Science and Techno logy Laboratory under CRASHCOMPS[EP/G003599]; Airbus UK The authors would like t o thank the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and UK Ministr y of Defence via the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory for funding this work under CRASHCOMPS (EP/G003599), Airbus UK for their additional financial sup port and the following individuals for their help in preparing this paper, Mr S. N. Chilton for machining of the numerous CAI specimens and Mr I. K. Chorley for his assistance in the preparation of the composite laminates. 66 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214

8, MA USA 1616-301X ADV FUNCT MATER Adv. Funct. Mater. OCT 7 2011 21 19 3624 3633 10.1002/adfm.201101100 10 Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Ch emistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidiscipl inary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter Chemistry; Science & Tec hnology - Other Topics; Materials Science; Physics 824TK WOS:000295224900 003 J Feng, JS; Tuominen, MT; Rothstein, JP Feng, Ji ansheng; Tuominen, Mark T.; Rothstein, Jonathan P. Hierarchical Sup erhydrophobic Surfaces Fabricated by Dual-Scale Electron-Beam-Lithography with W ell-Ordered Secondary Nanostructures ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS English Article SOLAR-CELLS; DES IGN; STABILITY; ADHESIVES; CREATION; SU-8 Recent studies on superhydrophob ic surfaces have revealed the important roles of structural hierarchy in the ove rall properties of these surfaces. Here, a novel, versatile, and efficient techn ique is introduced for fabricating macroscopic hierarchical superhydrophobic sur faces with both well-defined primary microstructures and well-ordered secondary nanostructures using electron-beam lithography. With this technique, the enginee ring capability of controlling the size, shape, and distribution of the secondar y-features is demonstrated, which allows a systematic and quantitative study of the individual effects of these parameters. Superhydrophobic surfaces produced b y this new technique exhibit two distinctive wetting behaviors, high and low adh esion. The structural characteristics and structure-property relations of each o f those two regimes are discussed. [Feng, JS; Tuominen, MT] Univ Massachuse tts, Dept Phys, Amherst, MA 01003 USA; [Rothstein, JP] Univ Massachusetts, Dept Mech & Ind Engn, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Feng, JS (reprint author), Univ Massachu setts, Dept Phys, Amherst, MA 01003 USA jianshen@physics.umass.edu; tuominen@phy sics.umass.edu; rothstein@ecs.umass.edu NSF Center for Hierarchical Manufacturin g at UMASS[CMMI-0531171] The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the NSF Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing at UMASS (Grant number CMMI-053117 1). We would also like to extend our appreciations to Stefan Dickert, Nicholas H endricks, and John Nicholson for the helpful discussions. 47 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214 8, MA USA 1616-301X ADV FUNCT MATER Adv. Funct. Mater. OCT 7 2011 21 19 3715 3722 10.1002/adfm.201100665 8 Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Ch emistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidiscipl inary; Physics, Applied; Physics, Condensed Matter Chemistry; Science & Tec hnology - Other Topics; Materials Science; Physics 824TK WOS:000295224900 014 J Jim, SR; Oko, AJ; Taschuk, MT; Brett, MJ Jim, S. R.; Oko, A. J.; Taschuk, M. T.; Brett, M. J. Morphological mo dification of nanostructured ultrathin-layer chromatography stationary phases JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY A English Article Ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC); Glancing angle deposition (GLAD); Nanostr uctured thin films; Reactive ion etching (RIE); Concentration zones THIN-FIL MS; PLANAR CHROMATOGRAPHY; ELECTROSPUN; DEPOSITION; REMOVAL; SILICON Ultrathi n-layer chromatography (UTLC) provides the high sensitivities and rapid separati ons over short distances desirable in many analytical applications. The dependen ce of these performance benefits on UTLC layer microstructure motivates continue d stationary phase engineering efforts. A new method of modifying the elution be haviours of nanostructured thin film UTLC stationary phases is investigated in t his report. Macroporous normal phase silica thin films similar to 5 mu m thick w ere fabricated using glancing angle deposition (GLAD). Reactive ion etching (RIE ) and a subsequent annealing treatment modified stationary phase morphology to t une migration velocity, analyte retention, and overall separation performance. C ombining this technique with a RIE shadow mask enabled fabrication of adjacent c oncentration and separation zones with markedly different elution properties. Al though produced using an entirely new approach, GLAD UTLC concentration zone med ia behaved in a manner consistent with traditional thin-layer chromatography (TL

C) and high-performance TLC (HPTLC) concentration zone plates. In particular, th ese new media focused large volume, low concentration dye mixture spots into nar row bands to achieve high-quality separations. The described approach to modifyi ng the morphology and resultant elution behaviours of nanostructured stationary phases expands the capabilities of the GLAD UTLC technique. (C) 2011 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved. [Jim, SR; Oko, AJ; Taschuk, MT; Brett, MJ] Univ Alberta, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4, Canada; [Brett, MJ] NRC Natl Inst Nanotechnol, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M9, Canada Brett, MJ (reprint author), Univ Alberta, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, 2nd Floor ECERF,9107-116 St NW, Edmonton, AB T 6G 2V4, Canada sjim@ualberta.ca; ajoko@ualberta.ca; mtaschuk@ualberta.ca; mbret t@ualberta.ca Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Can ada; Alberta Informatics Circle of Research Excellence (iCORE), Micralyne Inc. ( Edmonton, Alberta, Canada); Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures The auth ors appreciate the support provided in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineer ing Research Council (NSERC) of Canada, the Alberta Informatics Circle of Resear ch Excellence (iCORE), Micralyne Inc. (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), and Alberta I nnovates - Technology Futures. They are also grateful for the assistance provide d by S. Munro (University of Alberta NanoFab) with the RIE-processing. The autho rs further acknowledge the expert scanning electron microscopy work of G. Braybr ook (University of Alberta Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SEM Lab), J. Siewert ( Glancing Angle Deposition Laboratory, University of Alberta), and the NRC Nation al Institute for Nanotechnology Electron Microscopy Facility. The authors also r ecognize the assistance provided by L. Huck (Buriak Research Group, University o f Alberta) and N. Beckers (Glancing Angle Deposition Laboratory, University of A lberta) in the FTIR surface characterization of etched GLAD media. 37 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0021-9673 J CHROMATOGR A J. Chrom atogr. A OCT 7 2011 1218 40 7203 7210 10.1016/j.chroma.2011.08.024 8 Biochemi cal Research Methods; Chemistry, Analytical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Chemistry 825RU WOS:000295300600016 J Misener, JA; Biswas, S; Larson, G Misener, James A.; Biswas, Subir; Larson, Greg Development of V-to-X systems in North America: The promise, the pitfalls and the prognosis COMPUTER NETWORK S English Article Vehicle Infrastructure Integration; IntelliDrive(SM); Connected vehicle; SafeTrip-21,DSR C,3G,4G The development of V-to-X systems in North America is described with a focus on the services and applications that may appear, particularly in t he United States. The scope of this article is therefore broad, and while it inv olves engineering the emphasis is on transportation applications from V-to-X: th is dictates consideration of societal and institutional considerations. Differen t types of over-the-air interfaces are covered, followed by a description of the evolution of the Vehicle Infrastructure Integration program into IntelliDrivesm , and subsequently to the more generic term, connected vehicle next, vehicle-toinfrastructure and vehicle-to-vehicle components are covered. The vehicle-to-veh icle section describes an analysis that suggests that the USDOT path toward mand ating Dedicated Short Range Communications transceivers on vehicles may be wellfounded. Anticipated institutional arrangements in addition to research and depl oyment ideas for the vehicle and infrastructure are then covered in a section en titled "the short horizon". Finally, the future of V-to-X in North America is di scussed from "the long horizon" view. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved . [Misener, JA] Booz Allen Hamilton, San Francisco, CA 94111 USA; [Biswas, S] Michigan State Univ, Associate Chair Res, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA; [Larson, G] Calif Dept Transportat, Div Res & Innovat, Office Traff Operat Res, Sacrament o, CA 95814 USA Misener, JA (reprint author), Booz Allen Hamilton, 101 Calif St, Suite 3300, San Francisco, CA 94111 USA misener@path.berkeley.edu; sbiswa-s@egr. msu.edu 21 1 1 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 1389-1286 COMPUT NETW Comput. Netw. OCT 6 2011 55 14 SI 3120 3133 10.1016/j.comnet.2011.04.003 14

Computer Science, Hardware & Architecture; Computer Science, Information Systems ; Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Telecommunications Computer Science ; Engineering; Telecommunications 825VD WOS:000295309300003 J Paudel, HP; Zhong, LL; Bayat, K; Baroughi, MF; Smith, S; Lin, CK; Jiang, CY; Berry, MT; May, PS Paudel, Hari P.; Zhong, Lanlan; Bayat, Khadijeh; Baroughi, Mahdi Farrokh; Smith, Steve; Lin, Cuikun; Jiang, Chao yang; Berry, Mary T.; May, P. Stanley Enhancement of Near-Infrared-toVisible Upconversion Luminescence Using Engineered Plasmonic Gold Surfaces JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C English Article DOPED NAYF4 NANOCRYSTALS; PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY; SILVER NANOPARTICLES; FIELD ENHA NCEMENT; HEXAGONAL-PHASE; PBO-GEO2 GLASS; IN-VIVO; FLUORESCENCE; TRANSPARENT; EM ISSION An engineered plasmonic gold surface, specifically designed to couple wi th 980 nm radiation, is shown to enhance near-infrared-to-visible upconversion l uminescence from a monolayer of beta-NaYF(4): 17%Yb, 3%Er nanocrystals in poly(m ethyl methacrylate) on that gold surface. Confocal imaging of upconversion lumin escence from the surface is used to characterize the nature of the enhancement. It is shown that the luminescence data were acquired below the so-called "high p ower limit" for excitation, but some saturation was evident, as the observed pow er dependence was less than quadratic. Over the range of excitation power densit ies used, the intrinsic enhancement factor for upconversion from the patterned s urface was greater than a factor of 3 but decreased slowly with increasing excit ation power. The red and green upconversion were enhanced by similar factors, wh ich would support the intensification of the excitation field by the plasmonic s urface as being the mechanism of enhancement. In the absence of other enhancemen t or quenching mechanisms, the data imply an approximate 2-fold magnification of the excitation field intensity relative to smooth gold. [Lin, CK; Jiang, CY; Berry, MT; May, PS] Univ S Dakota, Dept Chem, Vermillion, SD 57069 USA; [Pa udel, HP; Bayat, K; Baroughi, MF] S Dakota State Univ, Dept Elect Engn & Comp Sc i, Brookings, SD 57007 USA; [Zhong, LL; Smith, S] S Dakota Sch Mines & Technol, Nanosci & Nanoengn Dept, Rapid City, SD 57701 USA May, PS (reprint author) , Univ S Dakota, Dept Chem, Vermillion, SD 57069 USA smay@usd.edu National Science Foundation[EPSCoR 0903804, CHE 0840507]; State of South Dakota; Researc h Corporation[CC6748]; National Aeronautics and Space Administration[NNX10AN34A] This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (E PSCoR 0903804 and CHE 0840507) and by the State of South Dakota. Additional supp ort was provided by Research Corporation (CC6748) and the National Aeronautics a nd Space Administration (Cooperative Agreement Number: NNX10AN34A). The authors acknowledge Lynn Gedvilas of the Electro-optics Characterization group at NREL f or making the reflectivity measurements. The authors also acknowledge the Nanofa brication Center at the University of Minnesota for providing access to the elec tron beam lithography and thermal evaporation systems. 57 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 1932-7447 J PHYS CHEM C J. Phys. Chem. C OCT 6 2011 115 39 19028 19036 10.1021/jp206053f 9 Chemistry, Physical; Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Science & Tec hnology - Other Topics; Materials Science 825BI WOS:000295245500015 J Bueno, CZ; Moraes, AM Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Mo raes, Angela Maria Development of Porous Lamellar Chitosan-Alginate Membranes: Effect of Different Surfactants on Biomaterial Properties JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE English Article membranes; biopolymers; biomaterials; chitosan; alginate; surfactants; wound dre ssing TISSUE ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS; LIPOPHILIC DRUGS; SCAFFOLD; DELIVERY; S PONGES; BIODEGRADATION; MICROCAPSULES; MICROSPHERES; MORPHOLOGY; HYDROGELS In this work, porous lamellar chitosan-alginate membranes were developed without the use of freeze-drying methods or other vacuum-based approaches. The effects of two different surfactants, Tween 80 and Pluronic F68, on the properties of th e membranes were evaluated, aiming at the production of stable consistent foams with improved polysaccharide dispersion. The membranes prepared with Tween 80 ha d a tensile strength around 1.5 MPa, elongation at break of 2.1% and liquid upta

ke from 590 to 1370% in distinct solutions, increasing their thickness in up to 3.9 times when immersed in water. The membranes obtained with Pluronic F68 had a tensile strength of 1.0 MPa, elongation at break of 2.0% and liquid uptake from 774 to 1380%, showing an increase in thickness around 3.2 times after exposure to water. The antimicrobial properties of both membranes were also evaluated, sh owing that despite being porous, the membranes can provide some protection again st bacterial permeation. Therefore, membranes produced with Tween 80 and Pluroni c F68 were considered to have high potential for use in the production of wound dressings and scaffolds for tissue engineering. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 122: 624-631, 2011 [Bueno, CZ; Moraes, AM] Univ Estadual Ca mpinas, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Biotechnol Proc, BR-13083970 Campinas, SP, Brazil Moraes, AM (reprint author), Univ Estadual Campinas, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Biotech nol Proc, BR-13083970 Campinas, SP, Brazil ammoraes1@gmail.com Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq); Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estudo de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) from Brazil Contract grant sponsors: Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq), the Funda cao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estudo de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) from Brazil. 45 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0021-8995 J APPL POLYM SCI J. Appl. Polym. Sci. OCT 5 2011 122 1 624 631 10.1002/app.34192 8 Polymer Science Polymer Science 802NZ WOS:000293519600070 J Palacios, MA; Benito-Pena, E; Manesse, M; Mazzeo, AD; LaFratta, CN; Whit esides, GM; Walt, DR Palacios, Manuel A.; Benito-Pena , Elena; Manesse, Mael; Mazzeo, Aaron D.; LaFratta, Christopher N.; Whitesides, George M.; Walt, David R. InfoBiology by printed arrays of microor ganism colonies for timed and on-demand release of messages PROCEEDINGS OF T HE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA English Article biotechnology; infochemistry; in formation technology INFORMATION; DNA; STORAGE; INFOCHEMISTRY; TRANSMISSION; INFOFUSES; PATTERNS; COLOR This paper presents a proof-of-principle method, called InfoBiology, to write and encode data using arrays of genetically engine ered strains of Escherichia coli with fluorescent proteins (FPs) as phenotypic m arkers. In InfoBiology, we encode, send, and release information using living or ganisms as carriers of data. Genetically engineered systems offer exquisite cont rol of both genotype and phenotype. Living systems also offer the possibility fo r timed release of information as phenotypic features can take hours or days to develop. We use growth media and chemically induced gene expression as cipher ke ys or "biociphers" to develop encoded messages. The messages, called Steganograp hy by Printed Arrays of Microbes (SPAM), consist of a matrix of spots generated by seven strains of E. coli, with each strain expressing a different FP. The cod ing scheme for these arrays relies on strings of paired, septenary digits, where each pair represents an alphanumeric character. In addition, the photophysical properties of the FPs offer another method for ciphering messages. Unique combin ations of excited and emitted wavelengths generate distinct fluorescent patterns from the Steganography by Printed Arrays of Microbes (SPAM). This paper shows a new form of steganography based on information from engineered living systems. The combination of bio- and "photociphers" along with controlled timed-release e xemplify the capabilities of InfoBiology, which could enable biometrics, communi cation through compromised channels, easy-to-read bar-coding of biological produ cts, or provide a deterrent to counter-feiting. [Palacios, MA; Benito-Pena, E; M anesse, M; LaFratta, CN; Walt, DR] Tufts Univ, Dept Chem, Medford, MA 02155 USA; [Mazzeo, AD; Whitesides, GM] Harvard Univ, Dept Chem & Chem Biol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA; [LaFratta, CN] Bard Coll, Dept Chem, Annandale on Hudson, NY 12504 U SA Walt, DR (reprint author), Tufts Univ, Dept Chem, 62 Talbot Ave, Medford , MA 02155 USA David.Walt@tufts.edu Defense Advanced Research Projects Agenc y[W911NF-07-1-0647]; Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) We thank Dr. Lorena B. Harris and Dr. Kristina H. Schmidt and her lab at Univers ity of South Florida for the assistance with the cloning and for providing some vectors for this project. Also, we thank Aaron Phillips and Stephanie M. Schuber

t for insightful discussions during the preparation of this manuscript. This wor k was supported by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Award W911NF-07-1-0 647 under the Chemical Communications program. E. B. P. also acknowledges suppor t from the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT). 22 0 0 NATL ACAD SCIENCES WASHINGTON 2101 CONSTITUTIO N AVE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20418 USA 0027-8424 P NATL ACAD SCI USA Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. OCT 4 2011 108 40 16510 16514 10.1073/pnas.1109554108 5 Multidis ciplinary Sciences Science & Technology - Other Topics 828WX WOS:0002 95536000013 J Roberts, JJ; Wood, RA; Haszeldine, RS Roberts, Jennifer J.; Wood, Rachel A.; Haszeldine, R. Stuart Assessing the he alth risks of natural CO(2) seeps in Italy PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACAD EMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA English Article carbon dioxide; storage leak; public acceptance; engineered sequestration; aquif er GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL RESERVOIR; CARBON-DIOXIDE; MAMMOTH MOUNTAIN; STORAGE; LEAKAGE; CALIFORNIA; EMISSIONS; FLOW; SOIL Industrialized societies which c ontinue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Cap ture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Dee p geological storage of CO(2) onshore faces opposition regarding potential healt h effects of CO(2) leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commerc ial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure . Studying risk from natural CO(2) seeps can guide assessment of potential healt h risks from leaking onshore CO(2) stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of inten se natural CO(2) degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e. g., temperature/flux), and location environment s. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO(2) poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO(2) seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e. g., top ography and wind speed), CO(2) flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental huma n death from these CO(2) seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed po pulation. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less that Italian natu ral flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized. [Roberts, JJ; Wo od, RA; Haszeldine, RS] Univ Edinburgh, Sch GeoSci, Grant Inst, Edinburgh EH9 3J W, Midlothian, Scotland Roberts, JJ (reprint author), Univ Edinburgh, Sch GeoSci , Grant Inst, W Mains Rd, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Midlothian, Scotland jen.robe rts@ed.ac.uk Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage consortium; College of Scien ce and Engineering, University of Edinburgh We thank C. Cardellini, G. Chiod ini, S. Giammanco, and A. Caracausi for valued discussions and information. This research is funded by the Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage consortium and th e College of Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh. 34 0 0 NATL ACAD SCIENCES WASHINGTON 2101 CONSTITUTION AVE NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20418 USA 0027-8424 P NATL ACAD SCI USA Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. OCT 4 2011 108 40 16545 16548 10.1073/pnas.1018590108 4 Multidis ciplinary Sciences Science & Technology - Other Topics 828WX WOS:0002 95536000019 J Fukunishi, H; Yagi, H; Kamijo, K; Shimada, J Fukunishi, Hiroaki; Yagi, Hirotaka; Kamijo, Ken'ichi; Shimada, Jiro Role of a Mutated Residue at the Entrance of the Substrate Access Channel in Cyt ochrome P450 Engineered for Vitamin D(3) Hydroxylation Activity BIOCHEMISTRY English Article MOLECULAR-DYNAMI CS SIMULATIONS; FREE-ENERGY DIFFERENCES; PARTICLE MESH EWALD; PRODUCTS EXIT; FOR CE-FIELD; MEAN FORCE; RESP MODEL; COMPLEX; BINDING; SITE The cytochrome P 450 enzyme engineered for enhancement of vitamin D(3) (VD(3)) hydroxylation acti vity, Vdh-K1, includes four mutations (T70R, V156L, E216M, and E384R) compared t o the wild-type enzyme. Plausible roles for V156L, E216M, and E384R have been su ggested by crystal structure analysis (Protein Data Bank 3A50), but the role of

T70R, which is located at the entrance of the substrate access channel, remained unclear. In this study, the role of the T70R mutation was investigated by using computational approaches. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and steered molec ular dynamics (SMD) simulations were performed, and differences between R70 and T70 were compared in terms of structural change, binding free energy change (PMF ), and interaction force between the enzyme and substrate. MD simulations reveal ed that R70 forms a salt bridge with D42 and the salt bridge affects the locatio ns and the conformations of VD(3) in the bound state. SMD simulations revealed t hat the salt bridge tends to be formed strongly when VD(3) passes through the bi nding pocket. PMFs showed that the T70R mutation leads to energetic stabilizatio n of enzyme-VD(3) binding in the region near the heme active site. Interestingly , these results concluded that the D42-R70 salt bridge at the entrance of the su bstrate access channel affects the region near the heme active site where the hy droxylation of VD(3) occurs; i.e., it is thought that the T70R mutation plays an important role in enhancing VD(3) hydroxylation activity. A significant future challenge is to compare the hydroxylation activities of R70 and T70 directly by a quantum chemical calculation, and three-dimensional coordinates of the enzyme and VD(3) obtained from MD and SMD simulations will be available for the future challenge. [Fukunishi, H; Kamijo, K; Shimada, J] NEC Corp Ltd, Green Innova t Res Labs, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058501, Japan; [Yagi, H] NEC Soft Ltd, VALWAY Tech nol Ctr, Koto Ku, Tokyo 1368627, Japan Fukunishi, H (reprint author), NEC Corp Ltd, Green Innovat Res Labs, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058501, Japan h-fukunishi@bu.jp.nec.com project on the "Development of Basic Technologie s for Advanced Production Methods Using Microorganism Functions" This wor k was supported in part by the project on the "Development of Basic Technologies for Advanced Production Methods Using Microorganism Functions" organized by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). 45 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0006-2960 BIOCHEMISTRY-US Biochemi stry OCT 4 2011 50 39 8302 8310 10.1021/bi2006493 9 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 824FG WOS:000295187200006 J Ames, BD; Lee, MY; Moody, C; Zhang, WJ; Tang, Y; Tsai, SC Ames, Brian D.; Lee, Ming-Yue; Moody, Colleen; Zhang, Wenjun; Tang, Yi; Tsai, Sh iou-Chuan Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Zhul Arom atase/Cyclase from the R1128 Polyketide Pathway BIOCHEMISTRY English Article ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN; FA TTY-ACID SYNTHASE; ENGINEERED BIOSYNTHESIS; AROMATIC POLYKETIDES; CRYSTAL-STRUCT URE; GENE-CLUSTER; HETEROLOGOUS EXPRESSION; COELICOLOR A3(2); CYCLIZATION; RECON STITUTION Aromatic polyketides comprise an important class of natural prod ucts that possess a wide range of biological activities. The cyclization of the polyketide chain is a critical control point in the biosynthesis of aromatic pol yketides. The aromatase/cyclases (ARO/CYCs) are an important component of the ty pe II polyketide synthase (PKS) and help fold the polyketide for regiospecific c yclizations of the first ring and/or aromatization, promoting two commonly obser ved first-ring cyclization patterns for the bacterial type II PKSs: C7-C12 and C 9-C14. We had previously reported the crystal structure and enzymological analys es of the TcmN ARO/CYC, which promotes C9-C14 first-ring cyclization. However, h ow C7-C12 first-ring cyclization is controlled remains unresolved. In this work, we present the 2.4 angstrom crystal structure of ZhuI, a C7-C12-specific firstring ARO/CYC from the type II PKS pathway responsible for the production of the R1128 polyketides. Though ZhuI possesses a helix-grip fold shared by TcmN ARO/CY C, there are substantial differences in overall structure and pocket residue com position that may be important for directing C7-C12 (rather than C9-C14) cycliza tion. Docking studies and site-directed mutagenesis coupled to an in vitro activ ity assay demonstrate that ZhuI pocket residues R66, H109, and D146 are importan t for enzyme function. The ZhuI crystal structure helps visualize the structure and putative dehydratase function of the didomain ARO/CYCs from KR-containing ty pe II PKSs. The sequence-structure-function analysis described for ZhuI elucidat es the molecular mechanisms that control C7-C12 first-ring polyketide cyclizatio

n and builds a foundation for future endeavors into directing cyclization patter ns for engineered biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides. [Ames, BD; Lee, MY; Mood y, C; Tsai, SC] Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Mol Biol & Biochem, Irvine, CA 92697 USA ; [Tsai, SC] Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Chem, Irvine, CA 92697 USA; [Tsai, SC] Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Irvine, CA 92697 USA; [Zhang, WJ; Tang, Y] U niv Calif Los Angeles, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, Los Angeles, CA 90096 USA Tsai, SC (reprint author), Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Mol Biol & Biochem, Irvine, C A 92697 USA sctsai@uci.edu Pew Foundation; National Institute of General Me dical Sciences[R01GM076330]; NIH[1RO1GM085128] S.-C.T., B.D.A., and M.-Y.L. are supported by the Pew Foundation and the National Institute of General Medical S ciences (Grant R01GM076330). Y.T. is supported NIH Grant 1RO1GM085128. 59 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0006-2960 BIOCHEMISTRY-US Biochemi stry OCT 4 2011 50 39 8392 8406 10.1021/bi200593m 15 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 824FG WOS:000295187200015 J Deniz, E; Tomasulo, M; Cusido, J; Sortino, S; Raymo, FM Deniz, Erhan; Tomasulo, Massimiliano; Cusido, Janet; Sortino, Salvatore; Raymo, Francisco M. Fast and Stable Photochromic Oxazines for Fluorescence S witching LANGMUIR English Article SPIROPYRAN-DERIVED MEROCYANINES; RING-OPENING REACTION; ENERGY-TRANSFER; LASER P HOTOLYSIS; ULTRAFAST DYNAMICS; ELECTRON-TRANSFER; TRIPLET PATHWAY; SINGLET; NITR OSPIROPYRANS; PHOTOPROCESSES The stringent limitations imposed by diffraction on the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopes demand the identification of viable strategies to switch fluorescence under optical control. In this cont ext, the photoinduced and reversible transformations of photochromic compounds a re particularly valuable. In fact., these molecules can be engineered to regulat e the emission intensities of complementary fluorophores in response to optical stimulations. On the basis of this general design logic, we assembled a function al molecular construct consisting of a borondipyrromethene fluorophore and a nit rospiropyran photochrome and demonstrated that the emission of the former can be modulated with the interconversion of the latter. This fluorophore photochrome dyad, however, has a slow switching speed and poor fatigue resistance. To improv e both parameters, we developed a new family of photochromic switches based on t he photoinduced opening and thermal closing of an oxazine ring. These compounds switch back and forth between ring-closed and -open isomers on nanosecond micros econd timescales and tolerate thousands of switching cycles with no sign of degr adation. In addition, the attachment of appropriate chromophoric fragments to th eir switchable oxazine ring can be exploited to either deactivate or activate fl uorescence reversibly in response to illumination with a pair of exciting beams. Specifically, we assembled three dyads, each based on either a borondipyrrometh ene or a coumarin fluorophore and an oxazine photochrome, and modulated their fl uorescence in a few microseconds with outstanding fatigue resistance. The unique photochemical and photophysical properties of our fluorophore photochrome dyads can facilitate the development of switchable fluorophores for superresolution i maging and, ultimately, provide valuable molecular probes for the visualization of biological samples on the nanometer level. [Sortino, S] Univ Catania, Dept Drug Sci, Lab Photochem, I-95125 Catania, Italy; [Deniz, E; Tomasulo, M; Cusido, J; Raymo, FM] Univ Miami, Dept Chem, Lab Mol Photon, Coral Gables, FL 33146 USA Sortino, S (reprint author), Univ Catania, Dept Drug Sci, Lab Photochem, Viale A ndrea Doria 6, I-95125 Catania, Italy ssortino@unict.it; fraymo@miami.edu National Science Foundation[CHE-0237578, CHE-0749840]; University of Miami We thank the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award CHE-0237578 and CHE-07498 40) and the University of Miami for financial support. 102 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0743-7463 LANGMUIR Langmuir OCT 4 2011 27 19 11773 11783 10.1021/ la201062h 11 Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Materials Science 824FH WOS:000295187300009

J Losego, MD; Guske, JT; Efremenko, A; Maria, JP; Franzen, S Losego, Mark D.; Guske, Joshua T.; Efremenko, Alina; Maria, Jon-Paul; Franzen, S tefan Characterizing the Molecular Order of Phosphonic Acid Self-Assem bled Monolayers on Indium Tin Oxide Surfaces LANGMUIR English Article LIGHT-EMITTING-DIODES; T HIN-FILMS; GOLD NANOPARTICLES; CHARGE INJECTION; SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; ORIENTATION; ALKANETHIOL; TEMPERATURE; DEPENDENCE Self-assembled monolayer s (SAMs) of alkanephosphonic acids with chain lengths between 8 and 18 carbon un its were formed on thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) sputter-deposited on sil icon substrates with 400 nm thermally grown SiO(2). The silicon substrates, whil e not intended for use in near-IR or visible optics applications, do provide smo oth surfaces that permit systematic engineering of grain size and surface roughn ess as a function of the sputter pressure. Argon sputter pressures from 4 to 20 mTorr show systematic changes in surface morphology ranging from smooth, microme ter-sized grain structures to <50 nm grains with 3 x higher surface roughness. N ear-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy experiments are c onducted for alkanephosphonic acids deposited on these wide range of ITO surface s to evaluate the effects of these morphological features on monolayer ordering. Results indicate that long-chain SAMs are more highly ordered, and have a small er tilt angle, than short-chain SAMs. Surprisingly, the 1-octadecyl phosphonic a cids maintain their order as the lateral grain dimensions of the ITO surface shr ink to similar to 50 nm. It is only when the ITO surface roughness becomes great er than the SAM chain length (similar to 15 angstrom) that SAMs are observed to become relatively disordered. [Guske, JT; Efremenko, A; Franzen, S] N Carolina State Univ, Dept Chem, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA; [Losego, MD; Maria, JP] N Carolin a State Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA Franzen, S (repr int author), N Carolina State Univ, Dept Chem, Box 8204, Raleigh, NC 27695 USA Stefan_Franzen@ncsu.edu U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science s; U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences The NEXAFS exper iments were conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven Nat ional Laboratory, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Science; and Division of Chemical Sciences. We gratefully acknowledge the help and advice of Dan Fischer and Chemo Jaye of Brookhaven National Laborat ory. 42 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0743-7463 LANGMUIR Langmuir OCT 4 2011 27 19 11883 11888 10.1021/la201161q 6 Chemistry, Multi disciplinary; Chemistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistr y; Materials Science 824FH WOS:000295187300022 J Hou, WC; Moghadam, BY; Westerhoff, P; Posner, JD Hou, Wen-Che; Moghadam, Babak Yaghoubi; Westerhoff, Paul; Posner, Jonathan D. Distribution of Fullerene Nanomaterials between Water and Model Biological Membr anes LANGMUIR English Article PARTITION-COEFFICIENT; LIPOSOME-WATER; ORGANIC-ACIDS; ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS; UNIL AMELLAR VESICLES; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; LIPID-MEMBRANES; C-60; OCTANOL; NANOPARTICL ES Biological membranes are one of the important interfaces between cells a nd pollutants. Many polar and hydrophobic chemicals can accumulate within these membranes. For this reason, artificial biological membranes are appealing surrog ates to complex organisms for assessing the bioaccumulation potential of enginee red nanomaterials (ENMs). To our knowledge, this work presents the first quantit ative study on the distribution of fullerene ENMs between lipid bilayers, used a s model biologica membranes, and water. We evaluated the lipid bilayer-water ass ociation coefficients (K(lipw)) of aqueous fullerene aggregates (nC(60)) and ful lerol (C(60)(ONa)(x)(OH)(y), x + y = 24). Kinetic studies indicated that fullero l reached apparent equilibrium more rapidly than nC(60) (2 h versus >9 h). Nonli near isotherms can describe the distribution behavior of nC60 and fullerol. The lipid bilayer water distributions of both nC(60) and fullerol were pH-dependent with the accumulation in lipid bilayers increasing systematically as the pH decr eased from 8.6 (natural water pH) to 3 (the low end of physiologically relevant pH). This pH dependency varies with the zeta potentials of the ENMs and leads to

patterns similar to those previously observed for the lipid bilayer water distr ibution behavior of ionizable organic pollutants. The K(lipw) value for nC(60) w as larger than that of fullerol at a given pH, indicating a greater propensity f or nC(60) to interact with lipid bilayers. For example, at pH 7.4 and an aqueous concentration of 10 mg/L, K(lipw), was 3.5 times greater for nC(60) (log K(lipw ) = 2.99) relative to fullerol (log K(lipw) = 2.45). Comparisons with existing a quatic organism bioaccumulation studies suggested that the lipid bilayer water d istribution is a potential method for assessing the bioaccumulation potentials o f ENMs. [Hou, WC; Westerhoff, P] Arizona State Univ, Sch Sustainable Engn & Buil t Environm, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA Hou, WC (reprint author), Arizona State Univ, Sc h Sustainable Engn & Built Environm, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA whou4@asu.edu; j onathan.posner@asu.edu United States Department of Energy[DE-FG02-08ER64613] Financial support was provided by the United States Department of Energy under a ward no. DE-FG02-08ER64613 with Daniel Drell as the program manager. We thank Dr . Guixue Song for recording the FTIR spectrum for the fullerol sample. 49 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0743-7463 LANGMUIR Langmuir OCT 4 2011 27 19 11899 11905 10.1021/la2017837 7 Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Ch emistry, Physical; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary Chemistry; Materials Sci ence 824FH WOS:000295187300024 J Wu, JCS; Banares, MA Wu, Jeffrey C. S.; Banar es, Miguel A. Challenges for Changing Catalysis in Asia - selected pap ers from The 13th Asia Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering Congress Pr eface CATALYSIS TODAY English Editorial Material [Wu, JCS] Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Taipei 10617, Taiwan; [Banares, MA] CSIC, Inst Catalisis, Catalyt Spect Lab, E-28049 Madrid, Spain Wu, JCS (reprint author), Natl Taiwan Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Taipei 10617, Taiwan cswu@ntu .edu.tw; banares@icp.csic.es 0 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLAN DS 0920-5861 CATAL TODAY Catal. Today OCT 2 2011 174 1 1 1 10.1016/j.cattod .2011.06.020 1 Chemistry, Applied; Chemistry, Physical; Engineering, Chemical Chemistry; Engineering 812PE WOS:000294304600001 J Elkins, KM Elkins, Kelly M. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Lab oratory JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION English Article Upper-Division Undergraduate; Biochemistry; Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary; Laboratory Instruction; Internet/Web-Based Learning; Problem Solving/Decision M aking; Biotechnology; Forensic Chemistry; Molecular Biology; Nucleic Acids/DNA/R NA DNA; AMPLIFICATION; SAMPLES; FOOD The polymerase chain reaction (P CR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have beco me more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers t o amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for PCR and analyze the results. However, primers can also be designed in undergraduate laboratories with students at this level. In a course that focuses on forensic D NA molecular biology for forensic chemistry students, students have used the App lied Biosystems AmpF/STR SGM Plus kit that amplifies DNA at eleven regions in a single test tube. It is important for forensic chemistry students to be able to design and analyze a single set of primers and, more importantly, create multipl exes of primers. This enables students to more fully understand how the primers and the kits that are routinely employed by the crime laboratories function. Cre ating a single set of primers does not demonstrate the extent of design and engi neering inherent in creating multiplexes or adequately prepare students for rese arch and careers in the field. The in silk method described herein uses free bio informatics tools and results in student-designed multiplexes for Combined DNA I ndex System (CODIS) loci. Sample student data are shown. [Elkins, KM] Met ropolitan State Coll, Dept Chem, Denver, CO 80217 USA; [Elkins, KM] Metropolitan State Coll, Criminalist Program, Denver, CO 80217 USA Elkins, KM (reprint auth

or), Metropolitan State Coll, Dept Chem, Denver, CO 80217 USA kelkins1@mscd.ed u ACS Project SEED ACS Project SEED is gratefully acknowledged for a summer stipend for Ain Ealey who tested revisions of this lab in the summer of 2009 and provided useful suggestions. I wish to thank my students in the spring 2011 CHE 3710 Criminalistics II course for trying the improved version of the e xperiment including experimentally testing their primers: Benjamin Bender, Audri onna Kingsley, Hannah Leger, Megan Owens, Tiffany Stone, and Francesca Garcia Wh eeler. I wish to thank my students in the spring 2009 CHE 3710 Criminalistics II course for their suggestions for improvement: Patrick Bevins, Sarah Bonsall, Li ndsay Christopherson Powis, Kali Gipson, Natalie Hernandez, Raelynn Kadunc, Jeff rey Minutillo, Carrie Melanson, Tanya Mokelki, Michelle Montoya, and Zachary Mor in. I wish to thank my students in the spring 2008 CHE 3710 Criminalistics II co urse for their patience, cooperation and input in the inaugural running of this lab: Katelin Arnold, Jennifer Auger, Lydia Benyam, Megan Jones McDowell, Jacquel ine Keller, Erin Knopka, Gina Mann, Susan McLaughlin, Andrea Moore, Melanie Newm an, Stephanie Sauter, Kurt Smith, Nia Travers, and Nikole Whitsitt. 20 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0021-9584 J CHEM EDUC J. Chem. Educ. OCT 2011 88 10 1422 1427 10.1021/ed100676b 6 Chemistry, Multidisciplinary; Ed ucation, Scientific Disciplines Chemistry; Education & Educational Research 827QI WOS:000295442600020 J Rosa-Clot, M; Rosa-Clot, P; Tina, GM Rosa-Clo t, M.; Rosa-Clot, P.; Tina, G. M. TESPI: Thermal Electric Solar Pa nel Integration SOLAR ENERGY English Article Hybrid PV/T system; Solar water heater; Spectral absorption; Thermal efficiency; Electrical efficiency COLLECTOR; SYSTEMS A photovoltaic panel with a heat extraction system is studied. The solution we suggest consists in superimposing a water layer on the PV panel: the water layer absorbs the infrared radiation l eaving the visible part almost unaffected. This allows a good PV efficiency and heat production. This particular setup is called Thermal Electric Solar Panel In tegration (TESPI) and it is discussed in detail both for the electric and the th ermal part. The engineering problems are briefly analyzed and results of an expe rimental campaign are given. A definition of the global thermal-electric efficie ncy is given. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Tina, GM] Univ Catania, DIEES Dept Elect Elect & Systemist Engn, I-95125 Catania, Italy; [RosaClot, M; Rosa-Clot, P] Sci Ind Tecnol Srl, I-56023 Navacchio, PI, Italy Tina, GM (reprint author), Univ Catania, DIEES Dept Elect Elect & Systemist Engn, Vle A Doria 6, I-95125 Catania, Italy gtina@diees.unict.it 19 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0038-092X SOL ENERGY Sol. Energy OCT 2011 85 10 2433 2442 10.1016/j.solener.2011.07.003 10 Energy & Fuels Energy & Fuels 829GV WOS:000295567500003 J Lombardo, A; Cesana, D; Genovese, P; Di Stefano, B; Provasi, E; Colombo, DF; Neri, M; Magnani, Z; Cantore, A; Lo Riso, P; Damo, M; Pello, OM; Holmes, MC ; Gregory, PD; Gritti, A; Broccoli, V; Bonini, C; Naldini, L Lombardo, Angelo; Cesana, Daniela; Genovese, Pietro; Di Stefano, Bruno; Provasi, Elena; Colombo, Daniele F.; Neri, Margherita; Magnani, Zulma; Cantore, Alessio; Lo Riso, Pietro; Damo, Martina; Pello, Oscar M.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, P hilip D.; Gritti, Angela; Broccoli, Vania; Bonini, Chiara; Naldini, Luigi Site-specific integration and tailoring of cassette design for sustainable gene transfer NATURE METHODS English Article ZINC-FINGER NUCLEASES; EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS; LOCUS-CONTROL REGION; IN-VIVO; ADEN OASSOCIATED VIRUS; RELATIVE QUANTIFICATION; LENTIVIRAL VECTOR; THERAPY; EXPRESSI ON; VITRO Integrative gene transfer methods are limited by variable transg ene expression and by the consequences of random insertional mutagenesis that co nfound interpretation in gene-function studies and may cause adverse events in g ene therapy. Site-specific integration may overcome these hurdles. Toward this g oal, we studied the transcriptional and epigenetic impact of different transgene

expression cassettes, targeted by engineered zinc-finger nucleases to the CCR5 and AAVS1 genomic loci of human cells. Analyses performed before and after integ ration defined features of the locus and cassette design that together allow rob ust transgene expression without detectable transcriptional perturbation of the targeted locus and its flanking genes in many cell types, including primary huma n lymphocytes. We thus provide a framework for sustainable gene transfer in AAVS 1 that can be used for dependable genetic manipulation, neutral marking of the c ell and improved safety of therapeutic applications, and demonstrate its feasibi lity by rapidly generating human lymphocytes and stem cells carrying targeted an d benign transgene insertions. [Lombardo, A; Cesana, D; Genovese, P; Colombo, D F; Neri, M; Cantore, A; Lo Riso, P; Damo, M; Pello, OM; Gritti, A; Naldini, L] I st Sci San Raffaele, San Raffaele Telethon Inst Gene Therapy, Div Regenerat Med Gene Therapy & Stem Cells, I-20132 Milan, Italy; [Lombardo, A; Cesana, D; Genove se, P; Provasi, E; Colombo, DF; Neri, M; Cantore, A; Lo Riso, P; Damo, M; Naldin i, L] Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; [Di Stefano, B; Broccoli, V] Ist Sci San Raffaele, Stem Cell & Neurogenesis Unit, Div Neurosci, I-20132 Milan , Italy; [Provasi, E; Magnani, Z; Bonini, C] Ist Sci San Raffaele, Expt Hematol Unit, Div Regenerat Med Gene Therapy & Stem Cells, Program Immunol & Bioimmunoth erapy Canc, I-20132 Milan, Italy; [Holmes, MC; Gregory, PD] Sangamo BioSci Inc, Richmond, CA USA Naldini, L (reprint author), Ist Sci San Raffaele, San R affaele Telethon Inst Gene Therapy, Div Regenerat Med Gene Therapy & Stem Cells, I-20132 Milan, Italy naldini.luigi@hsr.it Telethon[TGT06B02]; EU[222878]; European Research Council[249845]; Fondazione Cariplo; Italian Ministry of Healt h (Giovani Ricercatori); Italian Ministry of Research and University (Ideas), It alian Ministry of Health (Giovani Ricercatori); Associazione Italiana per la Ric erca sul Cancro We thank B. Celona, A. Anselmo and F. Ungaro for help with some experiments, A. Agresti, M. Bianchi and D. Gabellini for critical discussion, C. Di Serio and A. Nonis for statistical counseling, K. Ponder (Washington Univers ity, St. Louis), C. Miao (University of Washington, Seattle) and A. Recchia (Uni versity of Modena and Reggio Emilia) for providing reagents. Research was suppor ted by Telethon (Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy grant), 7<SUP>th</SUP> EU F ramework Programme (grant agreement 222878, PERSIST), European Research Council Advanced grant (249845 Targeting Gene Therapy), Fondazione Cariplo (Nobel Projec t) to L.N., Italian Ministry of Health (Giovani Ricercatori) to V.B.; Telethon ( TGT06B02) to A.G.; Italian Ministry of Research and University (Ideas), Italian Ministry of Health (Giovani Ricercatori), Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca s ul Cancro and Fondazione Cariplo to C.B. 45 0 0 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP LONDON MACMILLAN BUILDING, 4 CRINAN ST, LONDON N1 9XW, ENGLAND 1548-7091 NAT METHODS Nat. Methods OCT 2011 8 10 861 U135 10.1038/NMETH.16 74 11 Biochemical Research Methods Biochemistry & M olecular Biology 826MJ WOS:000295358000023 J Rosenberg, SA Rosenberg, Steven A. Cell transfer immunotherapy for metastatic solid cancer-what clinicians need to know NATURE REVIEWS CLINICAL ONCOLOGY English Review TUMOR-INFILTRATING LYMPHOCYTES; CD8(+) T-CELLS; ENHANCED ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY; VER SUS-HOST-DISEASE; ADOPTIVE IMMUNOTHERAPY; GENE-THERAPY; RECOMBINANT INTERLEUKIN2; MALIGNANT-MELANOMA; IMMUNE-RESPONSES; AUTOLOGOUS TUMOR Cancer immunothe rapy using the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes re sults in objective cancer regression in 49-72% of patients with metastatic melan oma. In a pilot trial combining cell transfer with a maximum lymphodepleting reg imen, complete durable responses were seen in 40% of patients, with complete res ponses ongoing beyond 3 to 7 years. Current approaches to cell transfer therapy using autologous cells genetically engineered to express conventional or chimeri c T-cell receptors have mediated cancer regression in patients with metastatic m elanoma, synovial sarcoma, neuroblastoma and refractory lymphoma. Adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy is a rapidly developing new approach to the therapy of me tastatic cancer in humans. This Review will emphasize the current available appl ications of cell transfer immunotherapy for patients with cancer. Rosenberg, S. A. Nat. Rev. Clin. Oncol. 8, 577-585 (2011); published online 2 August 2011; doi

:10.1038/nrclinonc.2011.116 NCI, Surg Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA Rosenberg, SA (reprint author), NCI, Surg Branch, NIH, CRC Bldg 10,Room 3-3940,1 0 Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA sar@nih.gov 61 0 0 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP NEW YORK 75 VARICK ST, 9T H FLR, NEW YORK, NY 10013-1917 USA 1759-4774 NAT REV CLIN ONC OL Nat. Rev. Clin. Oncol. OCT 2011 8 10 577 585 10.1038/nrclinonc.2011.116 9 Oncology Oncology 827CJ WOS:000295403400005 J Lee, J; Choi, YJ; Kim, CH; Kim, HY; Son, Y Lee, Jungsun; Choi, Young-Joo; Kim, Chun Ho; Kim, Hwi-yool; Son, Youngsook Articular Cartilage Repair with Tissue-Engineered Hyaline Cartilage Reconstructe d in a Chitosan-Hyaluronic Acid Scaffold by Costal Chondrocytes TISSUE ENGINEERI NG AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE English Article chitosan; costal chondrocyte; hyaline cartilage; hyaluronic acid; cartilage repa ir MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; IN-VIVO DEGRADATION; VITRO; KNEE; DEFECTS; TRANS PLANTATION; BEHAVIOR; CULTURE; MATRIX; LINES In this study, we evaluated the accessibility of chitosan-based scaffold for tissue-engineered hyaline cartilage (TEHC) in vitro and in vivo using costal chondrocytes (CCs) as an alternative d onor source. Acetylated chitosan scaffold (ACS) was prepared by the treatment of the porous chitosan scaffold (CS) with acetic anhydride. After acetylation of C S, the structural integrity and porosity were maintained but the strength of the scaffold was reduced and the dissolubility was increased. To evaluate the effec tiveness of ACS as a scaffold for TEHC, ASCs with or without hyaluronic acid (HA ) coating and commercial collagen scaffold (COL) as a control were used for cart ilage reconstruction in vitro. In three-dimensional culture within sponge-form s caffolds, CCs re-differentiated to hyaline cartilage-like constructs, which were featured by GAG, type 11 collagen expression and lacunae-like structure. In con trast to no infiltration of inoculated CCs in the COL, extensive infiltration of CCs to the inner part of the scaffold was observed in ACSs with or without hyal uronic acid coating. For the in vivo evaluation of TEHC in the capacity to repai r osteochondral defects, TEHC was transplanted to the full thickness cartilage d efects made on the patellar grove of rabbit knee and was evaluated by immunohist ological examination and Wakitani's histological scoring method of the regenerat ive tissues. TEHC successfully restored hyaline type cartilage and subchondral b one as well, in contrast to the fibrocartilage formation in the untreated contro l. In conclusion, ACSs serve a scaffold for the reconstruction of hyaline cartil age by inoculated CCs in vitro and also for the repair of osteochondral defect o n the articular cartilage in vivo. [Son, Y] Kyung Hee Univ, Coll Life Sci, Dept Genet Engn, Yongin, South Korea; [Son, Y] Kyung Hee Univ, Grad Sch Biotechn ol, Yongin, South Korea; [Lee, J; Choi, YJ] Modern Cell & Tissue Technol Inc, In st Res & Dev, Seoul, South Korea; [Kim, CH] Korea Inst Radiol & Med Sci, Lab Tis sue Engn, Seoul, South Korea; [Kim, HY] Konkuk Univ, Coll Vet Med, Seoul, South Korea Son, Y (reprint author), Kyung Hee Univ, Coll Life Sci, Dept Genet Engn, Yongin, South Korea ysson@khu.ac.kr Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare; R &D Institute, Modern Cell and Tissue Technologies This work was supported by a grant given by the Musculoskeletal Bioorgan Center Project of the Korean Mi nistry of Health and Welfare given to Youngsook Son, and by Research Funds from the R&D Institute, Modern Cell and Tissue Technologies given to Jungsun Lee. 28 0 0 KOREAN TISSUE ENGINEERING REGENERATIVE MEDICINE SOC JONGRO-GU 199-1, DONGSUNG-DONG,, JONGRO-GU, SEOUL 110-810, SOUTH KOREA 1738-2696 TISSUE ENG REGEN MED Tissue Eng. Regen. Med. OCT 2011 8 5 446 453 8 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Engineering, Biomedical Cell Bio logy; Engineering 828JH WOS:000295496800003 J Faraj, KA; Brouwer, KM; Geutjes, PJ; Versteeg, EM; Wismans, RG; Deprest, JA; Chajra, H; Tiemessen, DM; Feitz, WFJ; Oosterwijk, E; Daamen, WF; Kuppevelt, TH Faraj, Kaeuis A.; Brouwer, Katrien M.; Geutjes, Paul J.; Versteeg, Elly M.; Wismans, Ronnie G.; Deprest, Jan A.; Chajra, Hanane; Tiemessen, Dorien M.; Feitz, Wout F. J.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Daamen, Willeke F. ; van Kuppevelt, Toin H. The Effect of Ethylene Oxide Sterilisati

on, Beta Irradiation and Gamma Irradiation on Collagen Fibril-Based Scaffolds TISSUE ENGINEERING AND REGENERATIVE MEDICINE English Article collagen; scaffolds; sterilisation; beta irradiation; gamma irradiation; ethylen e oxide IN-VITRO; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; CONSTRUCTION; BIOMATERIAL; DEGRADATION; MOLECULES; PROTEINS; BEHAVIOR; TISSUES; DESIGN Ethylene oxide (EtO) gassing and beta- and gamma-irradiation are currently used for sterilising collagen scaffol ds. During the process, scaffolds may undergo chemical and physical alterations that may compromise their structural integrity and functional characteristics. I n this study, we compared the effects of EtO gassing, and beta- and gamma-irradi ation at 15 and 25 kGy on type I collagen fibril-based scaffolds with and withou t crosslinking, and with and without heparin. Evaluation was performed using a w ide range of biophysical, biochemical, morphological and biological parameters. EtO treatment, beta-irradiation and gamma-irradiation did not induce morphologic al changes, nor did they have an effect on the amount of primary amine groups, o r the amount of heparin covalently attached to the scaffolds. Cytocompatibility was also not affected. Irradiation, however, did result in collagen degradation products, a decrease in collagen denaturation temperature, and an increase in pr oteolytic degradation, all in a dose dependent fashion. These parameters were ha rdly influenced by EtO treatment. Sterilisation methods had hardly any effect on tensile strength of crosslinked scaffolds, but -surprisingly- they increased th e tensile strength of non-crosslinked scaffolds. In conclusion, a number of the collagen scaffold parameters were influenced by sterilisation, whereas others we re not. Irradiation had a much larger effect than EtO. However, tensile strength and cytocompatibility, important in tissue engineering, were not negatively inf luenced by any of the methods. Therefore, aspects like costs, safety and practic ality of use may be taken into account in the choice of sterilisation method. [Faraj, KA; Brouwer, KM; Versteeg, EM; Wismans, RG; Daamen, WF; Kuppevelt, TH] R adboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Biochem 280, NCMLS, NL-6500 HB Nijmegen, Net herlands; [Faraj, KA] EMCM BV, Aap Bioimplant, NL-6545 CH Nijmegen, Netherlands; [Geutjes, PJ; Tiemessen, DM; Feitz, WFJ; Oosterwijk, E] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Urol 659, NL-6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands; [Deprest, JA] Katholie ke Univ Leuven, Fac Med, Ctr Surg Technol, B-3000 Louvain, Belgium; [Chajra, H] ZI Les Troques, Symatese Biomat, F-69630 Chaponost, France; [Faraj, KA] Univ Sal ahaddin, Dept Chem, Coll Educ Sci, Erbil, Kurdistan Regio, Iraq Kuppevelt, TH (r eprint author), Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Biochem 280, NCMLS, POB 910 1, NL-6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands A.vanKuppevelt@ncmls.ru.nl EU[LSHBCT-2006-037409]; NWO CASIMIR program[018.003.023.2008] Paul van Rensch is kindl y acknowledged for his work on the tensiometric measurements. The Microscopical Imaging Centre (NCMLS, RUNMC) is acknowledged for facilitating electron microsco pical services. This work was financially supported by EU-FP6 project EuroSTEC ( soft tissue engineering for congenital birth defects in children; LSHB-CT-2006-0 37409); parts were supported by NWO CASIMIR program 018.003.023.2008. The author s have no conflicting financial interests. 36 0 0 KOREAN TISSUE ENGINEERING REGENERATIVE MEDICINE SOC JONGRO-GU 199-1, D ONGSUNG-DONG,, JONGRO-GU, SEOUL 110-810, SOUTH KOREA 1738-2696 TISSUE ENG REGEN MED Tissue Eng. Regen. Med. OCT 2011 8 5 460 470 11 Cell & Tissue Engineerin g; Engineering, Biomedical Cell Biology; Engineering 828JH WOS:0002 95496800005 J Nedosekin, DA; Khodakovskaya, MV; Biris, AS; Wang, DY; Xu, Y; Villagarci a, H; Galanzha, EI; Zharov, VP Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Kh odakovskaya, Mariya V.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Wang, Daoyuan; Xu, Yang; Villagarci a, Hector; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P. In Vivo Plant Fl ow Cytometry: A First Proof-of-Concept CYTOMETRY PART A English Article photothermal method; photoacoust ics; flow cytometry; scanning cytometry; imaging; plants; tomato; nanotechnology CIRCULATING TUMOR-CELLS; CARBON NANOTUBES; QUANTUM DOTS; CANCER-CELLS; ENGINEERE D NANOPARTICLES; GOLD NANOPARTICLES; CONTRAST AGENTS; PUMPKIN PLANTS; LYMPH-FLOW ; TRANSPORT In vivo flow cytometry has facilitated advances in the ultrasens itive detection of tumor cells, bacteria, nanoparticles, dyes, and other normal

and abnormal objects directly in blood and lymph circulatory systems. Here, we p ropose in vivo plant flow cytometry for the real-time noninvasive study of nanom aterial transport in xylem and phloem plant vascular systems. As a proof of this concept, we demonstrate in vivo real-time photoacoustic monitoring of quantum d ot-carbon nanotube conjugates uptake by roots and spreading through stem to leav es in a tomato plant. In addition, in vivo scanning cytometry using multimodal p hotoacoustic, photothermal, and fluorescent detection schematics provided multip lex detection and identification of nanoparticles accumulated in plant leaves in the presence of intensive absorption, scattering, and autofluorescent backgroun ds. The use of a portable fiber-based photoacoustic flow cytometer for studies o f plant vasculature was demonstrated. These integrated cytometry modalities usin g both endogenous and exogenous contrast agents have a potential to open new ave nues of in vivo study of the nutrients, products of photosynthesis and metabolis m, nanoparticles, infectious agents, and other objects transported through plant vasculature. (C) 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry [Nedosekin, DA; Galanzha, EI; Zharov, VP] Univ Arkansas Med Sci, Winthrop P Rock efeller Canc Inst, Phillips Class Laser & Nanomed Labs, Little Rock, AR 72205 US A; [Khodakovskaya, MV; Biris, AS; Wang, DY; Xu, Y; Villagarcia, H] Univ Arkansas , Dept Appl Sci, Dept Syst Engn, UALR Nanotechnol Ctr, Little Rock, AR 72204 USA ; [Khodakovskaya, MV] Russian Acad Sci, Far Eastern Branch, Inst Biol & Soil Sci , Vladivostok 690022, Russia; [Biris, AS; Wang, DY; Xu, Y] Univ Arkansas, Nanote chnol Ctr, Little Rock, AR 72204 USA Zharov, VP (reprint author), Univ Arkans as Med Sci, Winthrop P Rockefeller Canc Inst, Phillips Class Laser & Nanomed Lab s, Little Rock, AR 72205 USA zharovvladimirp@uams.edu National Institu te of Health[R01CA131164, R01 EB009230, R01EB000873, R21CA139373]; National Scie nce Foundation[DBI-0852737]; Department of Defense[W88XWH-10-2-0130, W81XWH-10-B CRP-CA, W81XWH-11-1-0129]; ASTA[08-CAT-03]; Arkansas Space Consortium[UALR19845] Grant sponsor: National Institute of Health; Grant numbers: R01CA131164, R01 EB0 09230, R01EB000873 and R21CA139373 (to V.P.Z.); Grant sponsor: National Science Foundation; Grant number: DBI-0852737 (to V.P.Z.); Grant sponsor: Department of Defense; Grant numbers: W88XWH-10-2-0130, W81XWH-10-BCRP-CA, and W81XWH-11-1-012 9; Grant sponsor: ASTA; Grant number: 08-CAT-03 (to A.S.B.); Grant sponsor: Arka nsas Space Consortium; Grant number: UALR19845 (to M.V.K.) 63 1 1 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214 8, MA USA 1552-4922 CYTOM PART A Cytom. Part A OCT 2011 79A 10 SI 855 865 10.1002/ cyto.a.21128 11 Biochemical Research Methods; Cell Biolo gy Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Cell Biology 825XS WOS:000295316100 012 J Jiang, ZK; Sato, M; Wei, LH; Kao, CH; Wu, L Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Sato, Makoto; Wei, Liu H.; Kao, Chinghai; Wu, Lily Androgen-Independent Molecular Imaging Vectors to Detect Castration-Resistant an d Metastatic Prostate Cancer CANCER RESEARCH English Article MEMBRANE ANTIGEN PSMA; GENE-EXPRESSION; BONE METASTASES; F-18-FLUORIDE PET/CT; D EPRIVATION THERAPY; ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY; ADENOVIRAL VECTOR; IN-VIVO; PROMOTER; RE CEPTOR Prostate-specific promoters are frequently employed in gene-mediated mol ecular imaging and therapeutic vectors to diagnose and treat castration-resistan t prostate cancer (CRPC) that emerges from hormone ablation therapy. Many of the conventional prostate-specific promoters rely on the androgen axis to drive gen e expression. However, considering the cancer heterogeneity and varying androgen receptor status, we herein evaluated the utility of prostate-specific enhancing sequence (PSES), an androgen-independent promoter in CRPC. The PSES is a fused enhancer derived from the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen gene regulatory region. We augmented the activity of PSES by th e two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system to drive the expression o f imaging reporter genes for either bioluminescent or positron emission tomograp hy (PET) imaging. The engineered PSES-TSTA system exhibits greatly elevated tran scriptional activity, androgen independency, and strong prostate specificity, ve rified in cell culture and preclinical animal experimentations. These advantageo us features of PSES-TSTA elicit superior gene expression capability for CRPC in

comparison with the androgen-dependent PSA promoter-driven system. In preclinica l settings, we showed robust PET imaging capacity of PSES-TSTA in a castrated pr ostate xenograft model. Moreover, intravenous administrated PSES-TSTA biolumines cent vector correctly identified tibial bone marrow metastases in 9 of 9 animals , whereas NaF- and FDG-PET was unable to detect the lesions. Taken together, thi s study showed the promising utility of a potent, androgen-independent, and pros tate cancer-specific expression system in directing gene-based molecular imaging in CRPC, even in the context of androgen deprivation therapy. Cancer Res; 71(19 ); 6250-60. (C)2011 AACR. [Jiang, ZK; Sato, M; Wei, LH; Wu, L] Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Mol & Med Pharmacol, Los Angeles, CA 900 95 USA; [Jiang, ZK; Sato, M; Wu, L] Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med , Inst Mol Med, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA; [Wu, L] Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Urol, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA; [Kao, CH] Indiana Univ, S ch Med, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA; [Kao, CH] Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Walther Oncol Ctr, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA; [Kao, CH] Indiana Univ, Sch Med, Dept Urol, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA Wu, L (reprint author), Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Mol & Med Pharmacol, CHS 33-1 64,10833 LeConte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA LWu@mednet.ucla.edu NCI/NIH[ RO1 CA101904-01]; SPORE program[P50 CA092131]; UCLA This work was supported by NCI/NIH RO1 CA101904-01 and SPORE program P50 CA092131 (to L. Wu). Z.K. Jiang was supported by a UCLA JCCC fellowship. 50 0 0 AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH PHILADELPHIA 615 CHESTNUT ST, 17TH FLOOR, PHI LADELPHIA, PA 19106-4404 USA 0008-5472 CANCER RES Cancer R es. OCT 1 2011 71 19 6250 6260 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-1520 11 Oncology Oncology 827AQ WOS:000295397700018 J Teo, CH; Ma, L; Kapusi, E; Hensel, G; Kumlehn, J; Schubert, I; Houben, A ; Mette, MF Teo, Chee How; Ma, Lu; Kapusi, Eszter; H ensel, Goetz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schubert, Ingo; Houben, Andreas; Mette, Michael F lorian Induction of telomere-mediated chromosomal truncation and stabil ity of truncated chromosomes in Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT JOURNAL English Article minichromosome; Arabidop sis thaliana; engineered chromosome; telomere; telomere seeding; artificial chro mosome T-DNA; HOMOLOGOUS RECOMBINATION; ENGINEERED MINICHROMOSOMES; ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES; LENGTH REGULATION; CONSTRUCTION; PLANTS; MAIZE; TRANSFORMATION; FRA GMENTATION Minichromosomes possess functional centromeres and telomeres and thus should be stably inherited. They offer an enormous opportunity to plant bi otechnology as they have the potential to simultaneously transfer and stably exp ress multiple genes. Segregating independently of host chromosomes, they provide a platform for accelerating plant breeding. Following a top-down approach, we t runcated endogenous chromosomes in Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium-mediate d transfer of T-DNA constructs containing telomere sequences. Blocks of A. thali ana telomeric repeats were inserted into a binary vector suitable for stable tra nsformation. After transfer of these constructs into the natural tetraploid A. t haliana accession Wa-1, chromosome truncation by T-DNA-induced de novo formation of telomeres could be confirmed by DNA gel blot analysis, PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The addition of new telomere repeats in this process could start alternatively from within the T-DNA-derived telomere repeats or from adjacent sequences close to the right border of the TDNA. Truncated chromosomes were transmissible in sexual reproduction, but were i nherited at rates lower than expected according to Mendelian rules. [Teo, CH ; Ma, L; Kapusi, E; Hensel, G; Kumlehn, J; Schubert, I; Houben, A; Mette, MF] Le ibniz Inst Plant Genet & Crop Plant Res IPK, D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany Mette, MF (reprint author), Leibniz Inst Plant Genet & Crop Plant Res IPK, Corre nsstr 3, D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany mette@ipk-gatersleben.de German L eibniz Association (WGL) We are grateful to Christa Fricke, Inge Glaser a nd Beate Kamm for excellent technical assistance. The work was generously suppor ted by a grant from the German Leibniz Association (WGL) in the context of the ' Pakt fur Forschung und Innovation/WGL Wettbewerb 2009-2011 Leuchtturmprojekte' p rogramme. 48 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE

PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0960-7412 PLANT J Plant J. OCT 2011 68 1 28 39 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2011.04662.x 12 Plant Sciences Plant Sciences 827AE WOS:000295395900003 J Yurdakul, H; Idrobo, JC; Pennycook, SJ; Turan, S Yurdakul, Hilmi; Idrobo, Juan C.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Turan, Servet Towards atomic scale engineering of rare-earth-doped SiAlON ceramics through abe rration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy SCRIPTA MATERIAL IA English Article Ceramics ; Rare earth; Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM); SiAlON; Z-contra st microscopy LIGHT-EMITTING-DIODES; ALPHA-SIALON; OPTICAL-PROPERTIES; PHOSPHO RS; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; STABILITY; NITRIDE; YTTRIUM; POWDER; SIAION Direct v isualization of rare earths in alpha- and beta-SiAlON unit-cells is performed th rough Z-contrast imaging technique in an aberration-corrected scanning transmiss ion electron microscope. The preferential occupation of Yb and Ce atoms in diffe rent interstitial locations of beta-SiAlON lattice is demonstrated, yielding hig her solubility for Yb than Ce. The triangular-like host sites in alpha-SiAlON un it cell accommodate more Ce atoms than hexagonal sites in beta-SiAlON. We think that our results will be applicable as guidelines for many kinds of rare-earth-d oped materials. (C) 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rig hts reserved. [Yurdakul, H; Turan, S] Anadolu Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, TR-26 480 Eskisehir, Turkey; [Yurdakul, H; Idrobo, JC; Pennycook, SJ] Oak Ridge Natl L ab, Div Mat Sci & Technol, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA; [Idrobo, JC; Pennycook, SJ] Vanderbilt Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Nashville, TN 37235 USA Turan, S (reprin t author), Anadolu Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, TR-26480 Eskisehir, Turkey sturan@anadolu.edu.tr The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Tur key (TUBITAK)[2214]; National Science Foundation[DMR-0605964]; Oak Ridge Nationa l Laboratory; Office of Basic Energy Sciences; US Department of Energy; Office o f Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, US Departm ent of Energy; Technology and Innovation Funding Programmes Directorate (TEYDEB) , Turkey[3040287] This research was supported by The Scientific and Techno logical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) through 2214-International Doctoral Research Fellowship Program (H.Y.), by National Science Foundation through Gran t No. DMR-0605964 (J.C.I.), Oak Ridge National Laboratory's SHaRE User Facility (J.C.I.), which is sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Departme nt of Energy, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and En gineering Division, US Department of Energy (S.J.P.). We also would like to than k MDA Advanced Ceramics (Eskisehir, Turkey) for the provision of the samples pro duced from the project with a contract number of 3040287 - Technology and Innova tion Funding Programmes Directorate (TEYDEB), Turkey. 41 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KI DLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 1359-6462 SCRIPTA MATER Scr. Mater. OCT 2011 65 8 656 659 10.1016/j.scriptamat.2011.06.038 4 Nanoscience & Nanotechnology; Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering Science & Technology - Other Topics; Materials S cience; Metallurgy & Metallurgical Engineering 823GC WOS:000295109500002 J Kim, MJ; Son, MJ; Son, MY; Seol, B; Kim, J; Park, J; Kim, JH; Kim, YH; P ark, SA; Lee, CH; Lee, KS; Han, YM; Chang, JS; Cho, YS Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A.; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Si k; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook Generation of Hu man Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells From Osteoarthritis Patient-Derived Synovial Cells ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM English Article ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE; X COLLAGEN; IN-VITRO; PROGENITOR CELLS; HYPERTROPHY; EXPRES SION; PLASMA; GROWTH; DIFFERENTIATION; TRANSPLANTATION Objective. This study wa s undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells ( PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling an d drug discovery. Methods. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old wo

men with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ec topic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with hu man embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Results. We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as i ndicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, C D45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene e xpression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confi rmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gen e expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to different iate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, a nd chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for res pective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differ entiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone s caffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Conclus ion. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartil age tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. [Kim, MJ ; Son, MJ; Son, MY; Seol, B; Kim, J; Park, J; Kim, YH; Lee, CH; Cho, YS] Korea R es Inst Biosci & Biotechnol, Taejon 305806, South Korea; [Kim, MJ; Park, J; Cho, YS] Univ Sci & Technol, Taejon, South Korea; [Kim, JH; Lee, KS; Chang, JS] Univ Ulsan, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea; [Kim, JH; Lee, KS; Chang, JS] Asan Med Ctr , Seoul, South Korea; [Park, SA] Korea Inst Machinery & Mat, Taejon, South Korea ; [Han, YM] Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, Taejon 305701, South Korea Cho, YS (reprint author), Korea Res Inst Biosci & Biotechnol, 125 Gwahak Ro, Taejon 3058 06, South Korea june@kribb.re.kr Korean Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs (MHWFA)[A084697]; Korean Ministry of Education, Science, and Tech nology; National Research Foundation of Korea (MEST/NRF)[2010-0020272[3]]; Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology; Korea Research Council of F undamental Science and Technology (KRIBB/KRCF Research Initiative) Supporte d by the Korean Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs (MHWFA grant A08 4697), by the Korean Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology and the Nati onal Research Foundation of Korea (MEST/NRF grant 2010-0020272[3]), and by the K orea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and the Korea Research C ouncil of Fundamental Science and Technology (KRIBB/KRCF Research Initiative Pro gram; NAP). 41 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0004-3591 ARTHRITI S RHEUM-US Arthritis Rheum. OCT 2011 63 10 3010 3021 10.1002/art.30488 12 Rheumato logy Rheumatology 825PN WOS:000295293000020 J Kontoe, S; Zdravkovic, L; Potts, DM; Menkiti, CO Kontoe, S.; Zdravkovic, L.; Potts, D. M.; Menkiti, C. O. On the r elative merits of simple and advanced constitutive models in dynamic analysis of tunnels GEOTECHNIQUE English Article constitutive relations; earthquakes; numerical modelling; tunnels This paper compares simple constitutive models that are widely used in engineeri ng practice with more sophisticated methods in the context of a case study. In p articular, four constitutive modelling approaches have been considered: a simple elasto-plastic constitutive model (modified Cam-clay), with and without Rayleig h damping; the same model coupled with a cyclic non-linear model that can simula te pre-yield hysteresis; and finally an advanced kinematic hardening model, whic h is an improved version of the Al-Tabbaa & Wood two-surface model. These four a pproaches are used to analyse the seismic response of a section of the Bolu tunn els during the 1999 Duzce earthquake. To shed light on the performance of the co nstitutive models, simple site response finite-element analyses were first under taken for the studied site, paying particular attention to the calibration of th e Rayleigh damping parameters. The results of these analyses, in terms of maximu

m shear strain, were then used as input to an analytical elastic method (extende d Hoeg method) for calculating the thrust and bending moment acting in the tunne l lining. Finally the results of dynamic time domain plane-strain analyses, empl oying the four adopted constitutive modelling approaches, are compared against f ield observations and results obtained by the extended Hoeg method, to investiga te the ability of the models, of ranging complexity, to mimic soil response unde r seismic excitation. [Kontoe, S; Zdravkovic, L; Potts, DM] Univ London Imperi al Coll Sci Technol & Med, London, England; [Menkiti, CO] Geotech Consulting Grp , London, England Kontoe, S (reprint author), Univ London Imperial Coll Sc i Technol & Med, London, England 36 0 0 ICE PUBL LONDON 40 MARSH WALL, 2 FL, LONDON E14 9TP, ENG LAND 0016-8505 GEOTECHNIQUE Geotechnique OCT 2011 61 10 815 829 10.1680/geot.9.P .141 15 Engineering, Geological; Geosciences, Multidisci plinary Engineering; Geology 824NN WOS:000295208700001 J Rengaswamy, V; Kontny, U; Rossler, J Rengaswa my, Venkatesh; Kontny, Udo; Roessler, Jochen New approaches for pedia tric rhabdomyosarcoma drug discovery: targeting combinatorial signaling EXPERT O PINION ON DRUG DISCOVERY English Review combined therapy; drug discovery; drug targets; gene expression profile; microRN A; PAX-FOXO1a; preclinical animal models; rhabdomyosarcoma; small interfering RN A CHILDRENS ONCOLOGY GROUP; PAX3-FKHR FUSION ONCOPROTEIN; FUNCTIONAL RNA I NTERFERENCE; GENE-EXPRESSION SIGNATURES; ENGINEERED MOUSE MODELS; SOFT-TISSUE SA RCOMA; ALVEOLAR RHABDOMYOSARCOMA; EMBRYONAL RHABDOMYOSARCOMA; GROWTH-FACTOR; DOW N-REGULATION Introduction: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are rare heterogeneous ped iatric tumors that are treated by surgery, chemotherapy and irradiation. New the rapeutic approaches are needed, especially in the advanced stages to target the pro-oncogenic signals. Exploring the molecular interactions of the regulatory si gnals and their roles in the developmental aspects of different subtypes of RMS is essential to identify potential targets and develop new therapeutic drugs. Ar eas covered: Insights into different drug discovery approaches are discussed wit h specific emphasis on gene expression profiling, fusion protein, role of small interfering RNA (siRNA)- and microRNA (miRNA)-based discovery approaches, target ing cancer stem cells, and in vitro and in vivo model systems. Targeting some ov erexpressed signals along with the possibilities of combination therapy of valid ated drug targets is discussed. Additionally, methods to overcome the limitation s of discovery-based research are briefly discussed. Expert opinion: Due to drug resistance, ineffective therapy in advanced stages and relapse, there is a dema nd to explore new drug targets and discovery approaches. Implementing miRNA-base d profiling would reveal the extent of miR-based regulation, various biomarkers and potential targets in RMS. A suitable combination of innovative techniques an d the use of model systems might assist the identification and validation of nov el targets and drug discovery methods. Combining specific drugs along with typespecific target inhibition of overexpressed mRNAs through siRNA approaches would enable the development of personalized therapy. [Rengaswamy, V; Kontny, U; Rossler, J] Univ Hosp Freiburg, Ctr Pediat & Adolescent Med, Clin Pediat Hema tol & Oncol 4, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany Rossler, J (reprint author), Uni v Hosp Freiburg, Ctr Pediat & Adolescent Med, Clin Pediat Hematol & Oncol 4, Mat hildenstr 1, D-79106 Freiburg, Germany jochen.roessler@uniklinik-freiburg.de Translational Sarcoma Network2[BMBF-01GM0875]; DFG[RO 1263/9-1] The authors woul d like to thank the peer reviewers for their critical comments and constructive suggestions, and Lakshmi Narayan for his insight and feedback during the prepara tion of this manuscript. The authors research is supported by grants from Transl ational Sarcoma Network2 (BMBF-01GM0875 to UK) and DFG grant (RO 1263/9-1 to VR and JR). 136 0 0 INFORMA HEALTHCARE LONDON TELEPHONE HOUSE, 69-77 PAUL STREET, LONDON EC2A 4LQ, ENGLAND 1746-0441 EXPERT OPIN DRUG DIS Expert. Opin. Drug Discov. OCT 2011 6 10 1103 1125 10.1517/17460441.2011.61 1498 23 Pharmacology & Pharmacy Pharmacology & Pharmacy 824BG WOS:000295173500008

J Rockwood, DN; Preda, RC; Yucel, T; Wang, XQ; Lovett, ML; Kaplan, DL Rockwood, Danielle N.; Preda, Rucsanda C.; Yucel, Tuna; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lovett, M ichael L.; Kaplan, David L. Materials fabrication from Bombyx mori s ilk fibroin NATURE PROTOCOLS English Article MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; ENGINEERED VASCULAR GRAFTS; IN-VITRO; POLY(ETHYLENE OXID E); ADENOSINE RELEASE; 3-D SCAFFOLDS; 3D SCAFFOLDS; BONE-MARROW; BIOMATERIALS; P OLYMER Silk fibroin, derived from Bombyx mori cocoons, is a widely used and stu died protein polymer for biomaterial applications. Silk fibroin has remarkable m echanical properties when formed into different materials, demonstrates biocompa tibility, has controllable degradation rates from hours to years and can be chem ically modified to alter surface properties or to immobilize growth factors. A v ariety of aqueous or organic solvent-processing methods can be used to generate silk biomaterials for a range of applications. In this protocol, we include meth ods to extract silk from B. mori cocoons to fabricate hydrogels, tubes, sponges, composites, fibers, microspheres and thin films. These materials can be used di rectly as biomaterials for implants, as scaffolding in tissue engineering and in vitro disease models, as well as for drug delivery. [Rockwood, DN; Preda, RC ; Yucel, T; Wang, XQ; Lovett, ML; Kaplan, DL] Tufts Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, Medf ord, MA 02155 USA Kaplan, DL (reprint author), Tufts Univ, Dept Biomed Eng n, Medford, MA 02155 USA david.kaplan@tufts.edu National Institutes of H ealth[P41 EB002520]; National Science Foundation; Air Force Office of Scientific Research The authors acknowledge the following researchers for their cont ributions to these protocols: E.S. Gil, C. Wittmer, H. J. Kim, E.A. Pritchard, X . Wang, J.A. Kluge and F. Omenetto. This work was supported by the National Inst itutes of Health (P41 EB002520-Tissue Engineering Resource Center), the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. 71 0 0 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP LONDON MACMILLAN BUILDING, 4 CR INAN ST, LONDON N1 9XW, ENGLAND 1754-2189 NAT PROTOC Nat. Pro toc. OCT 2011 6 10 1612 1631 10.1038/nprot.2011.379 20 Biochemical Research Methods Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 826OS WOS:000295364100009 J Zhang, G; Wu, Z; Yoo, WJ Zhang, Gang; Wu, Zhe; Yoo, Won Jong High-Speed Multilevel NAND Flash Memory With Tig ht V(th) Distribution Using an Engineered Potential Well and Forward-Bias Adjust ed Programming IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES English Article Engineered potential well (EW); forward-bias adjusted programming (FBAP); multil evel cell (MLC); NAND Flash memory NEW-GENERATION This paper reports a hig h-speed multilevel-cell NAND Flash memory device using a Si-SiO(2)-TiN-TiO(2)-Si O(2)-TaN (SOTTOT) engineered potential well (EW). The SOTTOT EW Flash memory dev ice has very fast cell programming speed and good data retention. A 16-kbit NAND memory block using SOTTOT cells was programmed using a forward-bias-adjusted pr ogramming scheme, which enables bit adjustability during page programming to sup press the development of fast bits. The SOTTOT memory block shows fast programmi ng speed (similar to 40 mu s/page), tight threshold voltage (V(th)) distribution (similar to 0.22 V/level), and clear V(th)-level margins (similar to 0.9 V) for the eight-level programming. The SOTTOT memory block also shows good resistance against pass/read disturbances as well as good ten-year data retention at an am bient temperature of 75 degrees C throughout 10(5) programming/erasing cycling. [Zhang, G; Yoo, WJ] Sungkyunkwan Univ, SKKU Adv Inst Nano Technol, Samsung SKKU Graphene Ctr, Dept Nano Sci & Technol, Suwon 440746, South Korea; [Zhang, G; Wu, Z] Korea Inst Sci & Technol, Elect Mat Res Ctr, Seoul 136791, South Korea; [Wu, Z] Samsung Elect Co, Hwasung 445701, South Korea Zhang, G (reprint author ), Sungkyunkwan Univ, SKKU Adv Inst Nano Technol, Samsung SKKU Graphene Ctr, Dep t Nano Sci & Technol, Suwon 440746, South Korea yoowj@skku.edu National Researc h Foundation of Korea of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology[20110006268, 2011-0010274] This research was supported by the Basic Science Researc h Program of the National Research Foundation of Korea of the Ministry of Educat ion, Science and Technology under Grant 2011-0006268 and Grant 2011-0010274. The review of this paper was arranged by Editor S. Deleonibus. 20 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY

445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9383 IEEE T E LECTRON DEV IEEE Trans. Electron Devices OCT 2011 58 10 3321 3328 10.1109/TED.2011.2162731 8 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Physics, Applied Engineering; Physics 823CR WOS:000295100300013 J Demoisson, F; Ariane, M; Leybros, A; Muhr, H; Bernard, F Demoisson, Frederic; Ariane, Moustapha; Leybros, Antoine; Muhr, Herve; Bernard, Frederic Design of a reactor operating in supercritical water con ditions using CFD simulations. Examples of synthesized nanomaterials JOURNAL OF SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS English Article Supercritical water; Powder synthesis; Nanomaterials; CFD simulations; Fluent; N ano-oxides CONTINUOUS HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS; METAL-OXIDE NANOPARTICLES; NA NOCRYSTALS; NANOPOWDERS; PARTICLES; MIXER Direct information about fluids under supercritical water conditions is unfeasible due to the engineering restri ctions at high pressure and high temperature. Numerical investigations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are widely used in order to get extensive information on the fluid behavior, particularly to help the design of a new reactor. This paper presents the numerical investigations performed on an original supercritical water device, especially in the level of the reactor. CFD calculations allow to design and optimize the present reactor described in this study. Currently, this process produces some nanometric oxide powders in contin uous way with a production rate of 10-15g h(-1). Examples of synthesized nanomat erials are presented in order to prove the process efficiency. Crystalline ZrO(2 ) and TiO(2) were produced from a metallic salt and an organometallic as precurs ors, respectively. XRD and HRTEM analyses show nanosized particles with an unifo rm size distribution (<= 7nm) and a high crystallinity. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. A ll rights reserved. [Demoisson, F; Ariane, M; Leybros, A; Bernard, F] Univ B ourgogne, Lab Interdisciplinaire Carnot Bourgogne ICB, CNRS, UMR 5209, F-21078 D ijon, France; [Muhr, H] Univ Lorraine, LRGP, CNRS, UPR 3349, F-54001 Nancy, Fran ce Demoisson, F (reprint author), Univ Bourgogne, Lab Interdisciplinaire Ca rnot Bourgogne ICB, CNRS, UMR 5209, 9 Ave Alain Savary,BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon, France Frederic.Demoisson@u-bourgogne.fr OSEO organization; ANR[ANR-08-CP 2D-18] This work is financially supported by the OSEO organization and the ANR SUSE project ("Sustaining carbonic esters synthesis with carbon dioxide feedstoc k"), contract number ANR-08-CP2D-18. The authors thank the Department of Analysi s and Instrumentation (DAI) of the LICB for their assistance in the process deve lopment and material characterization. 31 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0896-8446 J SUPERCRIT FLUID J. Supercrit. Fluids OCT 2011 58 3 371 377 10.1016/ j.supflu.2011.07.001 7 Chemistry, Physical; Engineering , Chemical Chemistry; Engineering 825TA WOS:000295303800007 J Ibata, M; Takahashi, T; Shimizu, T; Inoue, Y; Maeda, S; Tashiro-Yamaji, J; Okada, M; Ueda, K; Kubota, T; Yoshida, R Ibata, M inenori; Takahashi, Takeshi; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Shog o; Tashiro-Yamaji, Junko; Okada, Masashi; Ueda, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshid a, Ryotaro Spontaneous rejection of intradermally transplanted nonengineered tumor cells by neutrophils and macrophages from syngeneic strains of mice MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY English Article macrophage; neutrophil; rodent; spontaneous tumor rejection; T cell COLONY-S TIMULATING FACTOR; MURINE MAMMARY ADENOCARCINOMA; T-CELLS; IFN-GAMMA; INFILTRATI NG LYMPHOCYTES; ADOPTIVE IMMUNOTHERAPY; REDUCED TUMORIGENICITY; CYTOTOXIC MACROP HAGE; IMMUNE-RESPONSE; NECROSIS-FACTOR It is not surprising that tumors arising spontaneously are rarely rejected by T cells, because in general they lack mole cules to elicit a primary T-cell response. In fact, cytokine-engineered tumors c an induce granulocyte infiltration leading to tumor rejection. In the present st udy, we i.d. injected seven kinds of non-engineered tumor cells into syngeneic s trains of mice. Three of them(i.e. B16, KLN205, and 3LL cells) continued to grow , whereas four of them (i.e. Meth A, I-10, CL-S1, and FM3A cells) were spontaneo usly rejected after transient growth or without growth. In contrast to the i.d.

injection of B16 cells into C57BL/6 mice, which induces infiltration of TAMs int o the tumors, the i.d. injection of Meth A cells into BALB/c mice induced the in vasion of cytotoxic inflammatory cells, but not of TAMs, into or around the tumo rs leading to an IFN-gamma-dependent rejection. On day 5, the cytotoxic activity against the tumor cells reached a peak; and the effector cells were found to be neutrophils and macrophages. The i.d. Meth A or I-10 cell-immunized, but not no n-immunized, mice rejected i.p.-or i.m.-transplanted Meth A or I-10 cells withou t growth, respectively. The main effector cells were CTLs; and there was no cros s-sensitization between these two kinds of tumor cells, suggesting specific reje ction of tumor cells by CTLs from i.d. immunized mice. These results indicate th at infiltration of cytotoxic myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and macrophages, bu t not TAMs) into or around tumors is essential for their IFN-gamma-dependent spo ntaneous rejection. [Yoshida, R] Osaka Med Coll, Res Lab, Dept Physiol, Taka tsuki, Osaka 5698686, Japan; [Ibata, M; Okada, M; Ueda, K] Osaka Med Coll, Dept Plast & Reconstruct Surg, Takatsuki, Osaka 5698686, Japan Yoshida, R (repr int author), Osaka Med Coll, Res Lab, Dept Physiol, Daigaku Machi 2-7, Takatsuki , Osaka 5698686, Japan ryoshida@art.osaka-med.ac.jp Osaka Medical College; M inistry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan[22791740 ] We thank K. Shimokawa and T. Ueno for skillful technical assistance. Thi s work was supported in part by the Mori Memorial Research Funds from Osaka Medi cal College and by a grant-in-aid for Young Scientists (B) (Grant No. 22791740) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japa n. 47 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0385-5600 MICROBIOL IMMUNO L Microbiol. Immunol. OCT 2011 55 10 726 735 10.1111/j.1348-0421.2011.00369.x 10 Immunology; Microbiology Immunology; Microbiology 825LY WOS:0002 95279100006 J Dong, M; Li, XL Dong Ming; Li XinLiang Problems of the conventional BL model as applied to super/hypersonic turbulent b oundary layers and its improvements SCIENCE CHINA-PHYSICS MECHANICS & ASTRON OMY English Article turbulen ce modeling; supersonic; hypersonic; turbulent boundary layer; DNS; BL model DIRECT NUMERICAL-SIMULATION; TEMPERATURE; COMPUTATION; FLOWS Turbulence model ing has played important roles in solving engineering problems. However, with th e development of aerospace technology, turbulence modeling faces new challenges. How to further improve turbulence modeling for super/hypersonic flows is an urg ent problem. Through analyzing a set of data resulting from DNS and experiments, it is found that some most popular models suffer from essential flaws, and can be hardly improved following the traditional mode of thinking. On the contrary, the BL model, which is one of the simplest and widely-used models, can be furthe r improved. In this paper, through analyzing results from DNS data, the main cau se of the inaccuracy in applying the BL model to supersonic and hypersonic turbu lent boundary layers is found to have resulted from the mismatch between the loc ation of the matching point of the inner and outer layers of the BL model determ ined by the conventional way and those given by DNS. Improvement on this point, as well as other improvements is proposed. Its effectiveness is verified through the comparison with DNS results. [Dong, M] Tianjin Univ, Dept Mech, Tianj in 300072, Peoples R China; [Dong, M] Tianjin Key Lab Modern Engn Mech, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China; [Li, XL] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Mech, Key Lab High Temp Gas Dynam, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China Dong, M (reprint author), Tianji n Univ, Dept Mech, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China dongming@tju.edu.cn National Basic Research Program of China[2009CB724103]; National Aeronautics Bas e Science Foundation of China[2010ZA48002] The cooperation of the two autho rs of this paper was brought about by Professor Zhou Heng of Tianjin University, and Professor Zhou has also made valuable contributions to the paper in the for m of offering suggestions and comments to the first author, to which we are grat eful. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (G rant No. 2009CB724103) and the National Aeronautics Base Science Foundation of C hina (Grant No. 2010ZA48002). 19 0 0 SCIENCE PRESS

BEIJING 16 DONGHUANGCHENGGEN NORTH ST, BEIJING 100717, PEOPLES R CHINA 1674-734 8 SCI CHINA PHYS MECH Sci. China-Phys. Mech. Astron. OCT 2011 54 10 1889 1898 10.1007/ s11433-011-4450-6 10 Physics, Multidisciplinary Physics 824PA WOS:000295213100026 J Yitagesu, FA; van der Meer, F; van der Werff, H; Hecker, C Yitagesu, Fekerte Arega; van der Meer, Freek; van der Werff, Harald; Hecker, Chr istoph Spectral characteristics of clay minerals in the 2.5-14 mu m wav elength region APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE English Article Clay minerals; Montmorillonite; Illite; Kaolinite; Spectral characteristics; PLS DIFFUSE-REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY; INFRARED-SPECTROSCOPY; TERRESTRIAL MATERIALS; PARTICULATE MINERALS; ATMOSPHERIC WINDOW; EXPANSIVE SOILS; FIELD; IDENTIFICATION ; EMISSIVITY; REGRESSION Identification and quantification of clay minera ls, particularly those that are responsible for susceptibility of soils to expan sion and shrinkage, is a constant focus of research in geotechnical engineering. The visible, near infrared and short wave infrared wavelength regions are well explored. However, little is understood about the spectral characteristics of su ch clay minerals in the wavelength longer than 2.5 mu m. The objective in this s tudy was to explore the potential of laboratory spectroscopy in the 2.5-14 mu m wavelength region for characterizing clay minerals. Montmorillonite, Hike and ka olinite were investigated, for these clay minerals are key indicators of soil ex pansion and shrinkage potential. Characteristic absorption bands and their chang es for mixtures of clay minerals were determined. Partial least squares (PLS) re gressions in combination with continuum removal analyses were used to determine wavelength regions that best discriminate differences in mineralogical contents. Spectral contrast was high in the 3-5 mu m wavelength region but overall low in the 8-14 mu m. The clay minerals were characterized by strong, diagnostic absor ption bands. Much of the variation in compositions of the mixtures was explained by the PLS models (coefficients of correlations of >0.90). Thus, spectroscopy i n the 2.5-14 gm wavelength region is a useful technique for characterizing clay minerals. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Yitagesu, FA; van der M eer, F; van der Werff, H; Hecker, C] Univ Twente, ITC, Fac Geoinformat Sci & Ear th Observat, NL-7500 AA Enschede, Netherlands; [Yitagesu, FA] Ethiopians Rd Auth or, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Yitagesu, FA (reprint author), Univ Twente, ITC, Fac Geoinformat Sci & Earth Observat, POB 6,99 Hengelosestr, NL-7500 AA Ensched e, Netherlands yitagesu@itc.nl 72 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLAN DS 0169-1317 APPL CLAY SCI Appl. Clay Sci. OCT 2011 53 4 581 591 10.1016/j.clay.2 011.05.007 11 Mineralogy Mineralogy 823HT WOS:000295113800008 J Jing, QS; Fang, LX; Liu, HY; Liu, P Jing, Qi angshan; Fang, Linxia; Liu, Hongyan; Liu, Peng Preparation of surface-v itrified micron sphere using perlite from Xinyang, China APPLIED CLAY SCI ENCE English Article Perlite; Micron sphere; Expansion; Preheating; Horizontal electric furnace; Expansion ra tio SORPTION Micron porous spheres with vitrified surface were prepar ed by expanding the perlite from Shangtianti in Xinyang, China. The samples were extensively characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning elec tron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the types of water in raw particles were det ermined by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Expansion was simulated in a pilot-pla nt furnace allowing the careful control of temperature and time. The study of se veral perlites with different grain sizes showed that water content, preheating temperature, expanding temperature, calcination time and size of raw particles h ad considerable effect on the glassy structure and expansion volume. Perlite exp ansion process was optimized for preheating temperature 250-350 degrees C, expan sion temperature 1150-1200 degrees C and expansion time of 10-15 s. Infrared spe ctroscopy provided evidence for the states of water in the particle, which expan ded. The expansion ratio was strongly influenced by the raw grain size. Using el ectric furnace, micron perlite spheres with grain size of 50-800 mu m and bulk d

ensity of 200-500 g/cm(3)were efficiently produced. Horizontal electric furnace was a good candidate to be considered in engineering applications. (C) 2011 Else vier B.V. All rights reserved. [Jing, QS; Fang, LX; Liu, HY; Liu, P] Xinyang No rmal Univ, Inst Nonmet Mat, Xinyang 464000, Peoples R China Jing, QS (reprin t author), Xinyang Normal Univ, Inst Nonmet Mat, 237 Changan Rd, Xinyang 464000, Peoples R China 9jqshan@163.com Education Department of Henan Province[2 010A50019] This research project is supported by the Science and Technology Project of the Education Department of Henan Province (2010A50019). 16 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0169-1317 APPL CLAY SCI Appl. Cl ay Sci. OCT 2011 53 4 745 748 10.1016/j.clay.2011.07.005 4 Mineralogy Mineralo gy 823HT WOS:000295113800031 J Kanashiro-Takeuchi, RM; Schulman, IH; Hare, JM Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Hare, Joshua M. Pharmacologic and genetic strategies to enhance cell therapy for cardiac regener ation JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR CARDIOLOGY English Review Chemokines; Growth factors; Small molecules; Stem cell; Cardiogenesis; Regenerat ion MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS; ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-I NFARCTION; COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR; NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE; MARROW STROMAL CELL S; GROWTH-FACTORS; HEART-FAILURE; DEFINED FACTORS; DOUBLE-BLIND Cell-based thera py is emerging as an exciting potential therapeutic approach for cardiac regener ation following myocardial infarction (MI). As heart failure (HF) prevalence inc reases over time, development of new interventions designed to aid cardiac recov ery from injury are crucial and should be considered more broadly. In this regar d, substantial efforts to enhance the efficacy and safety of cell therapy are co ntinuously growing along several fronts, including modifications to improve the reprogramming efficiency of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS), genetic engi neering of adult stem cells, and administration of growth factors or small molec ules to activate regenerative pathways in the injured heart. These interventions are emerging as potential therapeutic alternatives and/or adjuncts based on the ir potential to promote stem cell homing, proliferation, differentiation, and/or survival. Given the promise of therapeutic interventions to enhance the regener ative capacity of multipotent stem cells as well as specifically guide endogenou s or exogenous stem cells into a cardiac lineage, their application in cardiac r egenerative medicine should be the focus of future clinical research. This artic le is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy a nd Heart Failure." (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [Kanashiro-Takeu chi, RM; Schulman, IH; Hare, JM] Univ Miami, Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Inst, M iller Sch Med, Miami, FL 33101 USA; [Schulman, IH] Miami Vet Affairs Healthcare Syst, Nephrol Hypertens Sect, Miami, FL USA Hare, JM (reprint author), Univ Miami, Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Inst, Miller Sch Med, Biomed Res Bldg,1501 NW 10th Ave,Room 824,POB 016, Miami, FL 33101 USA jhare@med.miami.edu NIH[RO1 HL094849, P20 HL101443, RO1 HL084275, RO1 HL107110, U54 HL081028] Dr. Hare is supported by NIH grants RO1 HL094849, P20 HL101443, RO1 HL084275, RO1 HL1071 10, and U54 HL081028. 102 1 1 ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSE VIER SCIENCE LTD LONDON 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON NW1 7DX, ENGLAND 0022-282 8 J MOL CELL CARDIOL J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol. OCT 2011 51 4 619 625 10.1016/j.yjmcc. 2011.05.015 7 Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems; Cell B iology Cardiovascular System & Cardiology; Cell Biology 825SR WOS:0002 95302900034 J Chui, TYP; Zhong, ZY; Burns, SA Chui, Toco Y. P. ; Zhong, Zhangyi; Burns, Stephen A. The relationship between peripap illary crescent and axial length: Implications for differential eye growth VISION RESEARCH English Article Myopia; Optic disc; Optic disc crescent; Spectral domain optical coherence tomog raphy; Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope PARAPAPILLARY CHORIORETI NAL ATROPHY; REFRACTIVE ERROR; FUNDUS; MYOPIA; ALIGNMENT; FOVEA; SIZE We evalu ated the relationship between the size of the peripapillary crescent and the axi

al length (AL) of the eye as well as the fine structure of the peripapillary cre scent in selected eyes. Infrared fundus imaging and spectral domain optical cohe rence tomography (SDOCT) (Spectralis HRA + OCT, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) centered at the fovea were performed on 72 healthy adults. On the infrared fund us images, we measured (a) the distance between the foveola and the temporal edg e of the optic disc (FOD) and (b) the distance between the foveola and the tempo ral edge of the peripapillary crescent (FOC) (if present). A peripapillary cresc ent presented at the nasal margin of the disc in 64% of the subjects. The FOD an d FOC were 4.22 mm +/- 0.46 and 3.97 mm +/- 0.25, respectively. Only the FOD was significantly correlated with axial length. As AL increased by 10%, the FOD inc reased by 13%, the outer neural retina only expanded by 4% (as indicated by the FOC). This result emphasizes that retinal stretching may not mirror scleral grow th, and the existence in some eyes of a difference between the photoreceptor mar gin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) margin suggests that within the retina there could be slippage during eye growth. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights res erved. [Chui, TYP; Zhong, ZY; Burns, SA] Indiana Univ, Sch Optometry, Bloomingt on, IN 47405 USA Chui, TYP (reprint author), Indiana Univ, Sch Optometry, 800 E Atwater Ave, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA ypchui@indiana.edu NIH[R01EY14375, R01-EY04395, P30EY019008] The authors acknowledge Drs. Arthur Brad ley and Larry N. Thibos for their helpful discussions. This work was supported b y NIH Grants R01-EY14375, R01-EY04395, and P30EY019008 to S.A.B. 25 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0042-6989 VISION RES Vision Res. OCT 1 2011 51 19 2132 2138 10.1016/j.visres.2011.08.008 7 Neurosciences; Ophthalmology Neurosciences & Neurology; Ophthalmology 828GJ WOS:000295489200004 J Zorpette, G Zorpette, Glenn RE-ENGIN EERING AFGHANISTAN IEEE SPECTRUM English Article Electricity; Cities and towns; Government; Dogs; Clocks; Hardware; Economics 0 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAW AY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9235 IEEE SPECTRUM IEEE Spectr. OCT 2011 48 10 30 43 10.1109/MSPEC.2011.6027246 14 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 826FP WOS:000295338100 011 J Stevenson, R Stevenson, Richard A Driver's Sixth Sense IEEE SPECTRUM English Article Radar; Silicon; Automotive engineering; Transistors; Gallium arsenide; Radar ant ennas; Gallium 0 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAW AY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9235 IEEE SPECTRUM IEEE Spectr. OCT 2011 48 10 50 55 10.1109/MSPEC.2011.6027249 6 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 826FP WOS:000295338100 013 J Hassler, S Hassler, Susan Re-engin eering Afghanistan: At What Cost? IEEE SPECTRUM English Editoria l Material 0 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAW AY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9235 IEEE SPECTRUM IEEE Spectr. OCT 2011 48 10 8 8 10.1109/MSPEC.2011.6027229 1 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 826FP WOS:000295338100 002 J Kulik, VB; Sobolev, GA; Vettegren, VI; Kireenkova, SM Kulik, V. B.; Sobolev, G. A.; Vettegren, V. I.; Kireenkova, S. M. A study of nanocrystals in rocks subjected to natural and engineered mechanical and thermal impacts IZVESTIYA-PHYSICS OF THE SOLID EARTH English Article RAMAN-SPECTROSCOPY; HIGH

-PRESSURE; ALPHA-QUARTZ; ANATASE TIO2; TEMPERATURES; SPECTRA; GARNETS; GAAS The results are reported of Raman spectroscopy for nanocrystals of a variety of mineral species (quartz, anatase, plagioclase, pyrope, omphacite, and albite) in rocks from different depth intervals. It was found that average dimensions of t he nanocrystals vary from 5 to 30 nm. The crystallographic cell in the nanocryst als is deformed. The effective stresses responsible for these deformations vary from -0.4 to +1.2 GPa. After having been exposed to high pressure under high tem perature, the nanocrystals of quartz and albite shrank in size, while the effect ive tensile stresses increased. [Kulik, VB; Vettegren, VI] Russian Acad Sci, AF Ioffe Phys Tech Inst, St Petersburg 194021, Russia; [Sobolev, GA; Kireenkova, SM ] Russian Acad Sci, Schmidt Inst Phys Earth, Moscow 123996, Russia Kulik, V B (reprint author), Russian Acad Sci, AF Ioffe Phys Tech Inst, Ul Politekh Skaya 26, St Petersburg 194021, Russia Russian Foundation for Basic Res earch[10-05-00505] The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Bas ic Research, grant no. 10-05-00505. 22 0 0 MAIK NAU KA/INTERPERIODICA/SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 1001 3-1578 USA 1069-3513 IZV-PHYS SOLID EART+ Izv.-Phys. Solid Earth OCT 2011 47 10 873 878 10.1134/S1069351311100065 6 Geochemistry & Geophysic s Geochemistry & Geophysics 826ON WOS:000295363600003 J Browne, MA; Chapman, MG Browne, Mark A.; Chapman , M. Gee Ecologically Informed Engineering Reduces Loss of Intert idal Biodiversity on Artificial Shorelines ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLO GY English Article ARMORED SHORELINES; URBAN STRUCTURES; SEAWALLS; HABITAT; ENVIRONMENTS; CONSERVAT ION; INFRASTRUCTURE; COMPETITION; IMPROVE; LIMPETS Worldwide responses to u rbanization, expanding populations and climatic change mean biodiverse habitats are replaced with expensive, but necessary infrastructure. Coastal cities suppor t vast expanses of buildings and roads along the coast or on "reclaimed" land, l eading to "armouring" of shorelines with walls, revetments and offshore structur es to reduce erosion and flooding. Currently infrastructure is designed to meet engineering and financial criteria, without considering its value as habitat, de spite artificial shorelines causing loss of intertidal species and altering ecol ogical natural processes that sustain natural biodiversity. Most research on ame liorating these impacts focus on soft-sediment habitats and larger flora (e.g., restoring marshes, encouraging plants to grow on walls). In response to needs fo r greater collaboration between ecologists and engineers to create infrastructur e to better support biodiversity, we show how such collaborations lead to smallscale and inexpensive ecologically informed engineering which reduces loss of sp ecies of algae and animals from rocky shores replaced by walls. Adding experimen tal novel habitats to walls mimicking rock-pools (e.g., cavities, attaching flow erpots) increased numbers of species by 110% within months, in particular mobile animals most affected by replacing natural shores with walls. These advances pr ovide new insights about melding engineering and ecological knowledge to sustain biodiversity in cities. [Browne, MA; Chapman, MG] Univ Sydney, Sch Biol Sci, Ctr Res Ecol Impacts Coastal Cities, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; [Browne, MA] Univ Coll Dublin, Sch Biol & Environm Sci, Dublin 2, Ireland Browne, MA (reprint author), Univ Sydney, Sch Biol Sci, Ctr Res Ecol Impacts Coastal Cit ies, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia mark.browne@ucd.ie North Sydney Cou ncil; Woollahra Municipal Council; City of Sydney; The Centre for Research on Ec ological Impacts of Coastal Cities (University of Sydney); ECS Services; Antique Stone We thank North Sydney Council, Woollahra Municipal Council and the City of Sydney for support and access to study sites. J. Thompson of John Nixon Engin eering Pty Ltd and MacLeod Consultants were particularly helpful in many of thes e experiments. A. Luck, B. Panayotakos, G. Deavin, C. Myers, M. Day, J. Sidie, B . Twist, J. Commins, D. Beechey are thanked for assistance and photographs. The Centre for Research on Ecological Impacts of Coastal Cities (University of Sydne y), ECS Services, Antique Stone and various local government authorities provide d support for this research. Manuscript was improved by comments from S. J. Simp son, R Shine, A. J. Underwood and three anonymous referees. 36

0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW, WASHIN GTON, DC 20036 USA 0013-936X ENVIRON SCI TECHNOL Environ. Sci. Technol. OCT 1 2011 45 19 8204 8207 10.1021/es201924b 4 Engineering, Env ironmental; Environmental Sciences Engineering; Environmental Sciences & Ec ology 825BJ WOS:000295245600036 J Hussain, MA; Soujanya, Y; Sastry, GN Hussain, M. Althaf; Soujanya, Yarasi; Sastry, G. Narahari Evaluating the E fficacy of Amino Acids as CO(2) Capturing Agents: A First Principles Investigati on ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY English Article CARBON-DIOXIDE ABSORPTION; NANOPOROUS MATERIALS; AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS; KINETICS; AL KANOLAMINES; SALTS; DIPEPTIDES Comprehension of the basic concepts for the desi gn of systems for CO(2) adsorption is imperative for increasing interest in tech nology for CO(2) capture from the effluents. The efficacy of 20 naturally occurr ing amino acids (AAs) is demonstrated as the most potent CO(2) capturing agents in the process of chemical absorption and physisorption through a systematic com putational study using highly parametrized MOS -2X/6-311+G(d,p) method. The abil ity of AAs to bind CO(2) both in the noncovalent and covalent fashion and presen ce of multiple adsorption sites with varying magnitude of binding strengths in a ll 20 AAs makes them as most promising materials in the process of physisorption . The binding energies (BEs) estimating the strength of noncovalent interaction of AAs and CO(2) are calculated and results are interpreted in terms of the natu re and strength of the various types of cooperative interactions which are prese nt. The study underlines the possibility to engineer the porous solid materials with extended networks by judiciously employing AA chains as linkers which can s ubstantially augment their efficacy. Results show that a significant increase in the CO(2)center dot center dot center dot AA affinity is achieved in the case o f AAs with polar neutral side chains. Furthermore, the study proposes AAs as eff ective alternatives to alkanolamines in chemical dissolution of CO(2). [Hussain , MA; Soujanya, Y; Sastry, GN] Indian Inst Chem Technol, Mol Modeling Grp, Hyder abad 500607, Andhra Pradesh, India Soujanya, Y (reprint author), Indian Ins t Chem Technol, Mol Modeling Grp, Hyderabad 500607, Andhra Pradesh, India gnsastry@gmail.com DST, New Delhi; Swarnajayanthi Fellowship; CSIR We thank DST, New Delhi, for the financial assistance in INDO-EU sponsored AMCOS project and Swarnajayanthi Fellowship to GNS. MAR thanks CSIR for JRF fellowship. 37 0 0 AMER CHEMICAL SOC WASHINGTON 1155 16TH ST, NW , WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA 0013-936X ENVIRON SCI TECHNOL Environ. Sci. Technol. OCT 1 2011 45 19 8582 8588 10.1021/es2019725 7 Engineer ing, Environmental; Environmental Sciences Engineering; Environmental Scien ces & Ecology 825BJ WOS:000295245600085 J Fan, JW; Friedman, C Fan, Jung-Wei; Friedman, Carol Deriving a probabilistic syntacto-semantic grammar for biomedici ne based on domain-specific terminologies JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL INFORMATIC S English Article Natural language processing; Biomedical terminology; Semantic grammar; Probabilistic par sing CLINICAL RADIOLOGY; LANGUAGE SYSTEM; TEXT; LEXICON; IDENTIFICATION; EXTR ACTION Biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) is a useful technique th at unlocks valuable information stored in textual data for practice and/or resea rch. Syntactic parsing is a critical component of BioNLP applications that rely on correctly determining the sentence and phrase structure of free text. In addi tion to dealing with the vast amount of domain-specific terms, a robust biomedic al parser needs to model the semantic grammar to obtain viable syntactic structu res. With either a rule-based or corpus-based approach, the grammar engineering process requires substantial time and knowledge from experts, and does not alway s yield a semantically transferable grammar. To reduce the human effort and to p romote semantic transferability, we propose an automated method for deriving a p robabilistic grammar based on a training corpus consisting of concept strings an d semantic classes from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), a comprehens ive terminology resource widely used by the community. The grammar is designed t

o specify noun phrases only due to the nominal nature of the majority of biomedi cal terminological concepts. Evaluated on manually parsed clinical notes, the de rived grammar achieved a recall of 0.644, precision of 0.737, and average crossbracketing of 0.61, which demonstrated better performance than a control grammar with the semantic information removed. Error analysis revealed shortcomings tha t could be addressed to improve performance. The results indicated the feasibili ty of an approach which automatically incorporates terminology semantics in the building of an operational grammar. Although the current performance of the unsu pervised solution does not adequately replace manual engineering, we believe onc e the performance issues are addressed, it could serve as an aide in a semi-supe rvised solution. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Fan, JW; Friedm an, C] Columbia Univ, Dept Biomed Informat, New York, NY 10032 USA; [Fan, JW] Ka iser Permanente So Calif, Syst Solut & Deployment, Pasadena, CA USA Friedman , C (reprint author), Columbia Univ, Dept Biomed Informat, 622 W 168th St,Vander bilt Clin 5th Floor, New York, NY 10032 USA carol.friedman@dbmi.columbia.edu National Library of Medicine[LM008635] We thank Dr. Wendy Chapman for help with access to the University of Pittsburgh NLP Repository. We thank Drs. Noemie Elh adad, Yang Huang, Herbert Chase, Chintan Patel, and Francis Morrison for their i ntellectual input in discussing the research ideas. This study was performed dur ing the first author's Ph.D. training in the Department of Biomedical Informatic s, Columbia University, and was supported by Grant LM008635 from the National Li brary of Medicine. 42 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEV IER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA 1532-0464 J BIOMED INFORM J. Biomed. Inform. OCT 2011 44 5 805 814 10.1016/j.jbi.20 11.04.006 10 Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Appl ications; Medical Informatics Computer Science; Medical Informatics 828HL WOS:000295492000008 J Costa, CM; Menarguez-Tortosa, M; Fernandez-Breis, JT Martinez Costa, Catalina; Menarguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Tomas Fernandez-Breis, Jesu aldo Clinical data interoperability based on archetype transformation JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS English Article Electronic healthcare records; Semantic interoperability; ISO 13606; OpenEHR; Ar chetypes; Ontology MODEL-DRIVEN; INFRASTRUCTURE The semantic interoperab ility between health information systems is a major challenge to improve the qua lity of clinical practice and patient safety. In recent years many projects have faced this problem and provided solutions based on specific standards and techn ologies in order to satisfy the needs of a particular scenario. Most of such sol utions cannot be easily adapted to new scenarios, thus more global solutions are needed. In this work, we have focused on the semantic interoperability of elect ronic healthcare records standards based on the dual model architecture and we h ave developed a solution that has been applied to ISO 13606 and openEHR. The tec hnological infrastructure combines reference models, archetypes and ontologies, with the support of Model-driven Engineering techniques. For this purpose, the i nteroperability infrastructure developed in previous work by our group has been reused and extended to cover the requirements of data transformation. (C) 2011 E lsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [Costa, CM; Menarguez-Tortosa, M; Fernan dez-Breis, JT] Univ Murcia, Fac Informat, E-30100 Murcia, Spain Fernandez-Breis, JT (reprint author), Univ Murcia, Fac Informat, E-30100 Murcia, Spain cmartine zcosta@um.es; marcos@um.es; jfernand@um.es Spanish Ministry for Science and Education[TSI2007-66575-C02-02, TIN2010-21388-C02-02] This work has been possi ble thanks to the Spanish Ministry for Science and Education through Grants TSI2 007-66575-C02-02 and TIN2010-21388-C02-02. Special thanks to Daniel Karlsson, Ma rcelo Rodrigues dos Santos and Diego Bosca for providing us with data extracts f or the evaluation of our method. 32 0 0 ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE SAN DIEGO 525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, C A 92101-4495 USA 1532-0464 J BIOMED INFORM J. Biomed. Infor m. OCT 2011 44 5 869 880 10.1016/j.jbi.2011.05.006 12 Computer Science, Interd isciplinary Applications; Medical Informatics Computer Science; Medical Inform

atics 828HL WOS:000295492000015 J Song, XB; Liu, SH; Qu, X; Hu, YW; Zhang, XY; Wang, T; Wei, FC Song, Xiaobin; Liu, Shaohua; Qu, Xun; Hu, Yingwei; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Tao; W ei, Fengcai BMP2 and VEGF promote angiogenesis but retard terminal d ifferentiation of osteoblasts in bone regeneration by up-regulating Id1 ACTA BIO CHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA SINICA English Article bone tissue engineering; BMP2; VEGF; angiogenesis; Id1 MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS; ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS; GROWTH-FACTOR; IN-VITRO; MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN-2; VASCULAR REGENERATION; GENE-TRANSFER; TISSUE; REPAIR; TRANSPLANTATION Inadequa te vascularization limits the repair of bone defects. In order to improve angiog enesis and accelerate osteogenesis, the synergism of co-cultured cells with gene tic modification in bone regeneration was investigated in this study. Endothelia l progenitor cells (EPCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected wi th the genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) by adenovirus, respectively. The co-cultured cells, designated as four groups including BMSC + EPC, Ad-BMP2-BMSC + EPC, BMSC + Ad-VEGF-EPC, an d Ad-BMP2-BMSC + Ad-VEGF-EPC groups, were seeded on an alginate gel and then imp lanted into rat intramuscularly to evaluate the effects on angiogenesis and oste ogenesis. Both VEGF and BMP2 could induce the overexpression of inhibitor of DNA -binding 1(Id1) gene which significantly promoted tube formation in vitro and in crease the amount of blood vessels in the Ad-BMP2-BMSC + Ad-VEGF-EPC group after implantation. Nevertheless, overexpression of Id1 retarded the terminal differe ntiation of osteoblasts and the bone formation. Later, osteogenic gene expressio n at transcriptional level, calcium nodules, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) acti vity showed a gradual decrease and the amount of newly formed osteogenesis area exhibited a small increase in the Ad-BMP2-BMSC + Ad-VEGF-EPC group. This finding suggests that a balanced regulation of Id1 expression in VEGF-EPCs and BMP2-BMS Cs may be critical to cell-based and gene-based approaches for bone regeneration . [Song, XB; Liu, SH; Hu, YW; Zhang, XY; Wang, T; Wei, FC] Shandong Univ, Inst Dent Med, Jinan 250012, Peoples R China; [Liu, SH; Hu, YW; Zhang, XY; Wang, T; Wei, FC] Shandong Univ, Dept Oral & Maxillofacial Surg, Qilu Hosp, Jinan 250 012, Peoples R China; [Qu, X] Shandong Univ, Inst Basic Med Sci, Qilu Hosp, Jina n 250012, Peoples R China Wei, FC (reprint author), Shandong Univ, Inst De nt Med, Jinan 250012, Peoples R China weifengcai@yahoo.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[30772269] This work was supported by a grant from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30772269). 35 0 0 OXFORD UNIV PRESS OXFORD GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6 DP, ENGLAND 1672-9145 ACTA BIOCH BIOPH SIN Acta Biochim. Bi ophys. Sin. OCT 2011 43 10 796 804 10.1093/abbs/gmr074 9 Biochemistry & M olecular Biology; Biophysics Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics 827EU WOS:000295411300007 J Onat, A Onat, Altan A quantitative a ppraisal of the genuine contribution of Turkey and Turkish universities to scien ce TURKISH JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES English Article Contribution to science; fields of science; Turkish universities IMPACT Aim: To assess quantitatively the cumulative and genuine contribution of Turkish universities to science in the main fields over the past 30 years. Materials an d methods: In the Citation Reports section of the Web of Science, over 70 main s cientific institutions were searched; and publications that received 60 or more citations by May 2010 were selected. Papers having more than a minor share by in ternational authors were excluded. Results: Only 47 universities and 6 instituti ons generated articles that were cited >= 60 times. These publications, numberin g 541, received a total of 51.215 citations. Eight universities (Istanbul Univer sity, Istanbul Technical University, Hacettepe University, Bilkent University, M iddle-East Technical University, Bogazici University, Ankara University, and Ege University) acquired 62% of these citations. Primary authors were 335 individua ls among whom 121 generated 70% of these citations. It is estimated that Turkish scientists produce about 1 per mil of the global scientific output, which indic ates that about 40 such papers are produced annually in Turkey. A substantial va

riance was recorded across major universities in terms of the ratio of citations to highly-cited papers to the total citations. Engineering and geology had high er relative contributions, followed by agricultural sciences, ecology, pharmacy, chemistry and medicine, while physics, mathematics, and biology had less contri butions. Conclusion: Along with research in general, research potentially to con tribute to science needs specifically to be supported with a coherence, milieu c reation and consistent long-term policy. [Onat, A] Istanbul Univ, Dept Ca rdiol, Cerrahpasa Fac Med, Istanbul, Turkey Onat, A (reprint author), Nisbet iye Caddesi 59-24, TR-34335 Istanbul, Turkey alt_onat@yahoo.com.tr 5 0 0 TUBITAK SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL TURKEY ANKARA ATATURK BULVARI NO 221, KAVAKLIDERE, ANKARA, 00000, TURKEY 1300-014 4 TURK J MED SCI Turk. J. Med. Sci. OCT 2011 41 5 909 917 10.3906/sag-1006-885 9 Medicine, General & Internal General & Internal Medicine 828JW WOS:000295498300021 J Safarzadeh, O; Zolfaghari, A; Norouzi, A; Minuchehr, H Safarzadeh, O.; Zolfaghari, A.; Norouzi, A.; Minuchehr, H. Loading pattern optimization of PWR reactors using Artificial Bee Colony ANNALS O F NUCLEAR ENERGY English Article Artificial Bee Colony; Genetic Algorithm; Particle Swarm Optimization; VVER-1000 ; Fuel management FUEL-MANAGEMENT OPTIMIZATION; CODED GENETIC ALGORITHM; C ORE RELOAD DESIGN; SWARM INTELLIGENCE; NEURAL-NETWORK In this paper a core rel oading technique using Artificial Bee Colony algorithm, ABC, is presented in the context of finding an optimal configuration of fuel assemblies. The proposed me thod can be used for in-core fuel management optimization problems in pressurize d water reactors. To evaluate the proposed technique, the power flattening of a VVER-1000 core is considered as an objective function although other variables s uch as K(eff), power peaking factor, burn up and cycle length can also be taken into account. The proposed optimization method is applied to a core design optim ization problem previously solved with Genetic and Particle Swarm Intelligence A lgorithm. The results, convergence rate and reliability of the new method are qu ite promising and show that the ABC algorithm performs very well and is comparab le to the canonical Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Intelligence, hence dem onstrating its potential for other optimization applications in nuclear engineer ing field as, for instance, the cascade problems. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rig hts reserved. [Safarzadeh, O; Zolfaghari, A; Norouzi, A; Minuchehr, H] Shahid Beheshti Univ, Dept Engn, GC, Tehran, Iran Zolfaghari, A (reprint author), Shahid Beheshti Univ, Dept Engn, GC, POB 1983963113, Tehran, Iran a-zolfag hari@sbu.ac.ir 50 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIE R SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB , ENGLAND 0306-4549 ANN NUCL ENERGY Ann. Nucl. Energy OCT 2011 38 10 2218 2226 10.1016/j.anucene.2011.06.008 9 Nuclear Science & Techno logy Nuclear Science & Technology 826HX WOS:000295346300015 J Clark, BY Clark, Benjamin Y. Influences and conflicts of federal policies in academic-industrial scientific c ollaboration JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER English Article Collaboration; Academic scientific collaboration; Academic-industrial collaborat ion; Federal research funding RESEARCH-AND-DEVELOPMENT; MULTIPLE AUTHORSHIP; T ECHNOLOGY-TRANSFER; LIFE SCIENCES; VERTICAL INTEGRATION; RESEARCH UNIVERSITY; RE SEARCH CENTERS; UNITED-STATES; ECONOMICS; FACULTY This paper examines the role of the federal government in shaping the relationship between academics sci entists and industry. There exists a potential conflict between government polic ies encouraging collaboration within academia and the policies encouraging colla boration between academia and industry. To test and model these potential confli cts, this paper uses data collected in a 2004-2005 survey by the Research Valuin g Mapping Project (a project based at Georgia Tech and led by Barry Bozeman) of more than 2000 academically based research scientists and engineers. The major f inding in this paper shows that academic scientists working with industry collab orate more (with all types of collaborators) than those that do not collaborate

with industry. However, when examining only those scientist that collaborate wit h industry, the results reveal a negative relationship between the amount of tim e spent collaborating with industry and the number of collaborators; implying th at increasing collaboration with industry leads to less academic-academic collab oration. Univ Georgia, Dept Publ Adm & Policy, Athens, GA 30602 USA Clark, BY (reprint author), Univ Georgia, Dept Publ Adm & Policy, 204 Baldwin Ha ll, Athens, GA 30602 USA ben.clark@alumni.iu.edu 120 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0892-9912 J TECHNOL TRANSFER J. Technol. Tran sf. OCT 2011 36 5 514 545 10.1007/s10961-010-9161-z 32 Engineering, Industrial; Management Engineering; Business & Economics 824AR WOS:000295171600 002 J Schultz, LI Schultz, Laura I. Nanotechnology's triple helix: a case study of the University at Albany's Colleg e of Nanoscale Science and Engineering JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER English Article Nanotechnology; Universi ty-industry collaboration; Triple helix; Research center; Regional development EVOLUTION; INDUSTRY In 2001, New York State teamed with IBM to create a rese arch center for nanoelectronics at the University at Albany. Since then, the Col lege of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) has been expanded with over $6 billion in investment, attracted over 250 industrial collaborators, and awarded 72 graduate degrees. This paper discusses the formation of the triple helix cent er in Albany, NY. It then examines the impact of the CNSE on the regional econom y and compares it with three other nanotechnology triple helix centers. The anal ysis finds that the CNSE is more successful at generating nanoknowledge as measu red by publications and patents. Much of the research conducted at CNSE has been collaborative effort between university and industrial partners and often resul ted in patents assigned to industrial partners. Since 2001, there has been quali tative and quantitative evidence of the emergence of a nanotechnology cluster in the Capital Region of NY. Upstate NY has become home to multiple nanotechnology firms and experienced growth in the employment in nanotechnology related indust ries. Potential explanations for the success of the CNSE are explored including the anchor tenant hypothesis and the entrepreneurial university. Coll Nan oscale Sci & Engn, Albany, NY 12203 USA Schultz, LI (reprint author), Coll Nanos cale Sci & Engn, 257 Fuller Rd, Albany, NY 12203 USA LSchultz@uamail.albany.e du 40 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 0892-9912 J TECHNOL TRANSF ER J. Technol. Transf. OCT 2011 36 5 546 564 10.1007/s10961-010-9201-8 19 Engineering, Industrial; Management Engineering; Business & Economics 824AR WOS:000295171600003 J See, EYS; Toh, SL; Goh, JCH See, Eugene Yong -Shun; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho-Hong Effects of Radial Compre ssion on a Novel Simulated Intervertebral Disc-Like Assembly Using Bone Marrow-D erived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cell-Sheets for Annulus Fibrosus Regeneration SPINE English Article bone mar row-derived mesenchymal stem cell; cell-sheet; bioreactor; annulus fibrosus; tis sue engineering EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX SYNTHESIS; NUCLEUS PULPOSUS CELLS; STROMAL CELLS; IN-VITRO; HYDROSTATIC-PRESSURE; SILK SCAFFOLDS; DIFFERENTIATION; STIMULAT ION; PROLIFERATION; PROTEOGLYCAN Study Design. The aim of this study was to develop a tissue engineering approach in regenerating the annulus fibrosus (A F) as part of an overall strategy to produce a tissue-engineered intervertebral disc (IVD) replacement. Objective. To determine whether a rehabilitative simulat ion regime on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell cell-sheet is able to ai d the regeneration of the AF. Summary of Background Data. No previous study has used bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell cell-sheets simulated by a rehabi litative regime to regenerate the AF. Methods. The approach was to use bone marr ow-derived stem cells to form cell-sheets and incorporating them onto silk scaff olds to simulate the native lamellae of the AF. The in vitro experimental model

used to study the efficacy of such a system was made up of the tissue engineerin g AF construct wrapped around a silicone disc to form a simulated IVD-like assem bly. The assembly was cultured within a custom-designed bioreactor that provided a compressive mechanical stimulation onto the silicone disc. The silicone nucle us pulposus would bulge radially and compress the simulated AF to mimic the phys iological conditions. The simulated IVD-like assembly was compressed using a reh abilitative regime that lasted for 4 weeks at 0.25 Hz, for 15 minutes each day. Results. With the rehabilitative regime, the cell-sheets remained viable but sho wed a decrease in cell numbers and viability. Gene expression analysis showed si gnificant upregulation of IVD-related genes and there was an increased ratio of collagen type II to collagen type I found within the extracellular matrix. Concl usion. The results suggested that a rehabilitative regime caused extensive remod eling to take place within the simulated IVD-like assembly, producing extracellu lar matrix similar to that found in the inner AF. [See, EYS; Toh, SL; Goh, JCH] Natl Univ Singapore, Div Bioengn, Singapore 117576, Singapore See, EYS (reprint author), Natl Univ Singapore, Div Bioengn, 9 Engn Dr 1,Block EA 03-12, Singapore 117576, Singapore biesyse@nus.edu.sg 47 0 0 LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS PHILADELPHIA 530 WALN UT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA 0362-2436 SPINE SPINE OCT 1 2011 36 21 1744 1751 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31821986b3 8 Clinical Neurology; Orth opedics Neurosciences & Neurology; Orthopedics 825YK WOS:000295318000014 J Jovanovic, J; Hengeveld, W; Rebrov, EV; Nijhuis, TA; Hessel, V; Schouten , JC Jovanovic, Jovan; Hengeveld, Wessel; Rebrov, Evg eny V.; Nijhuis, T. A.; Hessel, Volker; Schouten, Jaap C. Redisper sion Microreactor System for Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Esterification CHEMICAL ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY English Article Coalescence; Interdigital mixer; Microprocess engineering; Microreactor; Novel p rocess windows; Phase transfer catalysis; Process intensification DROP SIZ E DISTRIBUTION; INTERDIGITAL MICROMIXERS; CAPILLARY-MICROREACTOR; EXTRACTION PRO CESSES; BENZYL BENZOATE; MICROCHANNEL; FLOW; INTENSIFICATION; DISPERSION; KINETI CS An interdigital mixer-redispersion capillary assembly was applied to pre vent the liquid-liquid bubbly flow coalescence in microreactors. The redispersio n capillary consisted of 1-mm-long 0.25 mm inner-diameter constrictions, placed every 0.50 m along the channel length. The system was tested on the phase transf er-catalyzed esterification to produce benzyl benzoate. The application of const rictions to prevent coalescence resulted in a better reproducibility and higher conversion compared to a capillary without constrictions. The bubbly flow genera ted by the interdigital mixer-redispersion capillary assembly was found to be in dependent of the redispersion capillary inner diameters (0.50 and 0.75 mm) while being highly dependent on the flow rates. By controlling the total flow rate an d the aqueous-to-organic ratio, the bubbly flow surface-to-volume ratio could be increased up to 230 700 m(2)m(-3). Compared to the conventional phase transfercatalyzed esterification, the continuous operation in the interdigital mixer-red ispersion capillary assembly eliminated the use of solvents and bases, removing an energy-intensive step of distillation while increasing process safety. [Jovanovic, J; Rebrov, EV; Nijhuis, TA; Hessel, V; Schouten, JC] Eindhoven Univ Technol, Dept Chem Engn & Chem, Lab Chem Reactor Engn, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Net herlands; [Hengeveld, W] Flowid BV, Eindhoven, Netherlands Schouten, JC (re print author), Eindhoven Univ Technol, Dept Chem Engn & Chem, Lab Chem Reactor E ngn, POB 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands j.c.schouten@tue.nl 44 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0930-7516 CHEM ENG TECHNOL Chem. En g. Technol. OCT 2011 34 10 1691 1699 10.1002/ceat.201100118 9 Engineering, Che mical Engineering 825OA WOS:000295287400012 J Suzuki, Y Suzuki, Yoshiyuki Molecular basis of neurogenetic diseases BRAIN & DEVELOPMENT English Article; Proceedings Paper 13th Annual Meeting of the Infantile-Sei zure-Society/International Symposium on Epilepsy in Neurometabolic Diseases (ISE

NMD) MAR 26-28, 2010 Taipei, TAIWAN Infantile Seizure Soc Epilepsy ; Neurogenetic disease; Neurometabolic disease; Genetic analysis; Gene mutation; Genetic engineering CHEMICAL CHAPERONE THERAPY; DEPENDENT DNA POLYMERASE; AL PHA-GALACTOSIDASE; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; NON-DISCOVERER; FABRY DISEASE; MENDELISM; R NA; G(M1)-GANGLIOSIDOSIS; TSCHERMAK Molecular background of neurogenetic dis ease is briefly reviewed. Importance and usefulness of genetic testing are empha sized. Molecular genetics is a powerful tool for investigation of epileptic synd romes. Diagnosis based on gene analysis will give a new insight for pathophysiol oay and clinical outcome of the patient, and there is a hope to develop a new th erapeutic approach in the near future. Among them a new molecular therapeutic tr ial for lysosomal diseases is being developed: chemical chaperone therapy. It wi ll become a new approach to brain damage causing epilepsy and other phenotypic e xpressions of a large number of genetic diseases in the near future. (C) 2011 Th e Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights res erved. Int Univ Hlth & Welf, Grad Sch, Otawara, Tochigi 3248501, Japan Suzuki, Y (reprint author), Int Univ Hlth & Welf, Grad Sch, 2600-1 Kita Kanemaru, Otawar a, Tochigi 3248501, Japan suzukiy@iuhw.ac.jp 39 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0387-7604 BRAIN DEV-JPN Brain De v. OCT 2011 33 9 719 725 10.1016/j.braindev.2011.01.007 7 Clinical Neurology Neurosciences & Neurology 827QN WOS:000295443100003 J Mohammadi, H; Herzog, W Mohammadi, Hadi; Herzog, Walter A novel model for diffusion based release kinetics using an inve rse numerical method MEDICAL ENGINEERING & PHYSICS English Article Finite element method; Finite difference method; Least square algorithm; Continu um model; Computational mechanics; Numerical scheme; Diffusion; Release kinetics POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL) HYDROGELS; SMALL-ANGLE NEUTRON; DRUG-RELEASE; THAWING TECHNI QUES; DELIVERY; SIMULATION; MEMBRANES; MATRICES; MECHANISMS; SCATTERING We devel oped and analyzed an inverse numerical model based on Fick's second law on the d ynamics of drug release. In contrast to previous models which required two state descriptions of diffusion for long- and short-term release processes, our model is valid for the entire release process. The proposed model may be used for ide ntifying and reducing experimental errors associated with measurements of diffus ion based release kinetics. Knowing the initial and boundary conditions, and ass uming Fick's second law to be appropriate, we use the methods of Lagrange multip lier along with least-square algorithms to define a cost function which is discr etized using finite difference methods and is optimized so as to minimize errors . Our model can describe diffusion based release kinetics for static and dynamic conditions as accurately as finite element methods, but results are obtained in a fraction of CPU time. Our method can be widely used for drug release procedur es and for tissue engineering/repair applications where oxygenation of cells res iding within a matrix is important. (C) 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Al l rights reserved. [Mohammadi, H; Herzog, W] Univ Calgary, Fac Kinesiol, Hu man Performance Lab, Calgary, AB, Canada Mohammadi, H (reprint author), U niv Calgary, Fac Kinesiol, Human Performance Lab, Calgary, AB, Canada hadim74@ gmail.com Canada Research Chair Programme; Alberta Innovates-Health Soluti ons The authors acknowledge the Canada Research Chair Programme and Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions for financially supporting this project. 36 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0951-8320 MED ENG PHYS Med. Eng. Phys. OCT 2011 33 8 893 899 10.1016/j.medengphy.2011.02.003 7 Engineering, Biomedical Engineering 823FL WOS:000295107800001 J Smith, JT; Das, S; Appenzeller, J Smith, J oshua T.; Das, Saptarshi; Appenzeller, Joerg Broken-Gap Tunnel MOSFET : A Constant-Slope Sub-60-mV/decade Transistor IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS English Article Broken gap; constant slo pe; heterostructure; low power; steep-slope transistor PERFORMANCE; DEVICES; FE TS We propose a novel low-power transistor device, called the broken-gap tu

nnel MOSFET (BG-TMOS), which is capable of achieving constant sub-60-mV/decade i nverse subthreshold slopes S at room temperature. Structurally, the device resem bles an ungated broken-gap heterostructure Esaki region in series with a convent ional MOSFET. The gate voltage independence of the energy spacing between the co nduction and valence bands at the heterojunction is the key to producing a const ant S < 60 mV/decade, which can be tuned by properly engineering the material co mposition at this interface. In contrast to the tunneling field-effect transisto r, the tunnel junction in the BG-TMOS is independent of the electrostatics in th e channel region, enabling the use of 2-D architectures for improved current dri ve without degradation of S-attractive features from a circuit design perspectiv e. Simulations show that the BG-TMOS can exceed MOSFET performance at low supply voltages. [Smith, JT; Das, S; Appenzeller, J] Purdue Univ, Sch Elect & Com p Engn, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA Smith, JT (reprint author), Purdue Univ, Sch Elect & Comp Engn, W Lafayette, IN 47907 USA jtsmith@purdue.edu; sdas @purdue.edu; appenzeller@purdue.edu Center for Functional Engineered Nano Ar chitectonics[104295] This work was supported in part by the Center for Functi onal Engineered Nano Architectonics under Grant 104295. The review of this lette r was arranged by Editor M. Passlack. 16 0 0 IEEE-INS T ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWA Y, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0741-3106 IEEE ELECTR DEVICE L IEEE Ele ctron Device Lett. OCT 2011 32 10 1367 1369 10.1109/LED.2011.2162220 3 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 826GH WOS:000295340300 017 J Yu, JH; Jiang, PK; Wu, C; Wang, LC; Wu, XF Yu, Jinhong; Jiang, Pingkai; Wu, Chao; Wang, Lichun; Wu, Xinfeng Graphene Nanocomposites Based on Poly(vinylidene fluoride): Structure and Proper ties POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article FUNCTIONALIZED GRAPHENE; THERMAL-STABILITY; SUPERCAPACITOR ELECTRODES; CARBON NA NOTUBES; COMPOSITE; FILMS; GRAPHITE; POLYMERS; SHEETS; OXIDE A nanocomposite of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) was prepared with graphene sheets (GSs), whi ch are a novel filler by a solution method. The structure-properties relationshi ps of PVDF/GSs nanocomposites were studied. The results of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction show that addition of GSs to the PVDF matrix promotes an alpha phase to beta phase transformation of the polymer crystal. The nanocomposites exhibit significant increases in dynamic mechanical properties a nd thermal stability compared to the neat PVDF. In addition, the incorporation o f GSs in PVDF indicated excellent optical transparency at the lowest weight frac tions of GSs and modified wettability of PVDF. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1483-1491, 201 1. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Yu, JH; Jiang, PK; Wu, C; Wang, LC; Wu, XF] Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Dept Polymer Sci & Engn, Shanghai Key Lab Elect Insulat & Thermal Aging, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China Jiang, PK (repri nt author), Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Dept Polymer Sci & Engn, Shanghai Key Lab E lect Insulat & Thermal Aging, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China pkjiang@sjtu.edu .cn 35 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1483 1491 10.1002/pc.21106 9 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700001 J Gong, G; Mathew, AP; Oksman, K Gong, Guan; Math ew, Aji P.; Oksman, Kristiina Toughening Effect of Cellulose Nanowhisk ers on Polyvinyl Acetate: Fracture Toughness and Viscoelastic Analysis POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE; NANOCOMPOSITE MATERIALS; WHISKER NANOCOMPOSITES; POL YMER NANOCOMPOSITES; STRESS-TRANSFER; ALCOHOL The toughening effect of cellulo se nanowhiskers (CNWs) on modified polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) was analyzed with th e help of morphology, relaxation, and creep behavior. The CNWs together with bou nd moisture at the matrix/whisker interfaces resulted in significant improvement in resistance to crack initiation and propagation. The magnitude of plastic def

ormation of the nanocomposites was higher than that of the neat PVAc. The relaxa tion temperature decreased, while the width of the damping peak increased with i ncreasing CNW and moisture contents. The results from creep modeling showed that the instantaneous elastic modulus first increased and then decreased with the a ddition of CNWs, while the time-dependent elasticity and viscosity decreased. Th e results suggested that the reinforcing effect of the CNWs was overwhelmed by t he plasticizing effect of the bound moisture. Furthermore, low concentrations of CNWs significantly improved the fracture toughness of PVAc at the minor cost of strength, stiffness, and creep resistance. In this article, we present a novel approach to studying the toughening effect of CNWs on polymers using fracture te sts and viscoelastic modeling. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1492-1498, 2011. (C) 2011 Soci ety of Plastics Engineers [Gong, G; Mathew, AP; Oksman, K] Lulea Univ Tech nol, Div Mfg & Design Wood & Bionanocomposites, S-97187 Lulea, Sweden Oksman, K (reprint author), Lulea Univ Technol, Div Mfg & Design Wood & Bionanocomposite s, S-97187 Lulea, Sweden kristiina.oksman@ltu.se Kempe Foundation Contract grant sponsor: Kempe Foundation. 34 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1492 1498 10.1002/pc.21170 7 Materials Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Scienc e; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700002 J Thelakkadan, AS; Coletti, G; Guastavino, F; Fina, A Thelakkadan, A. S.; Coletti, G.; Guastavino, F.; Fina, A. Effect o f the Nature of Clay on the Thermo-Mechanodynamical and Electrical Properties of Epoxy/Clay Nanocomposites POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article COMBUSTION PERFORMANCE; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; AMINOPHENYLMETHYLPHOSPHINE OXIDE; CLAY/EPOXY NANOCOMPOSITES; POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITES; CARBON NANOTUBES; RESINS; MO NTMORILLONITE; BEHAVIOR; COMPOSITES The effect of nature of clay on the ther mo-mechanodynamical and electrical properties of epoxy/clay nanocomposites prepa red from bisphenolic epoxy resins and different nanoclays are presented. The the rmal-mechanodynamical properties of the nanocomposites were studied by DMTA, sho wing significant increase in both elastic modulus and glass transition temperatu re. Short time AC dielectric breakdown strength measurements carried out on the nanocomposites showed an increase in dielectric breakdown strength for the nanoc omposites prepared with organically modified clays. The space charges accumulate d in the materials as studied by pulsed electroacoustics method showed a signifi cant decrease in the space charge accumulation in the nanocomposites with organo clays as the nanofiller. Similarly the space charge decays almost completely in the nanocomposites prepared with organoclays as nanofiller. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1 499-1504, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Thelakkadan, AS; Colett i, G; Guastavino, F] Univ Genoa, Dept Naval & Elect Engn, I-16145 Genoa, Italy; [Fina, A] Politecn Torino, Dept Mat Sci & Chem Engn, I-15100 Alessandria, Italy Thelakkadan, AS (reprint author), Univ Genoa, Dept Naval & Elect Engn, Via Opera Pia 11A, I-16145 Genoa, Italy asthelakkadan@yahoo.com Politecnico do Torino; U niversity of Genova The authors would like express their gratitude to Prof. Giovanni Camino at Politecnico do Torino, Dr. Andrea Dardano, Dr. Alessandro Rat to, and Dr. Eugenia Torello at University of Genova for discussion and support d uring the preparation of this work. 39 0 0 WILEY-BL ACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-839 7 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1499 1504 10.1002/pc.21176 6 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700003 J Chen, YK; Xu, CH Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhu i Crosslink Network Evolution of Nature Rubber/Zinc Dimethacrylate Composite During Peroxide Vulcanization POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article IN-SITU POLYMERI ZATION; MAGNESIUM METHACRYLATE; ZINC DIMETHACRYLATE; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; MORP HOLOGY In this article, we investigated the evolution of the crosslink networks in nature rubber (NR) which is filled with in situ zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) d

uring vulcanization. The results revealed that a primary network dominated by th e ionic bond could be formed in the first 1 min, while the backbone of the coval ent crosslink network was not formed. The ionic crosslinks, cooperating with som e other physical crosslinks and some primary covalent crosslink points, play an important role in supporting the crosslink backbone of the composite in this per iod. This primary network was strong enough to bear the force exerted by the mov ing die of the Rheometer and to enable the composite that do not dissolve in tol uene. After that, both the covalent crosslinking of NR molecules and polymerizat ion of ZDMA react rapidly to give a birth to the fundamental network of the comp osites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calori meter were also used to investigate the curing reaction of the NR/ZDMA compounds . After ZDMA reaching a considerable conversion, the substantial covalent crossl inking reaction starts to be initiated. These results support the primary networ k dominated by the ionic bond formed in the first 1 min. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1505 -1514, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Chen, YK] S China Univ Technol, Sch Mech & Automot Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China; [Xu, CH] S China Univ Technol, Coll Mat Sci & Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China Chen, YK (reprint author), S China Univ Technol, Sch Mec h & Automot Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China cyk@scut.edu.cn 25 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1505 1514 10.1002/pc.21179 10 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 004 J Lee, KE; Khan, I; Morad, N; Teng, TT; Poh, BT Lee, Khai Ern; Khan, Imran; Morad, Norhashimah; Teng, Tjoon Tow; Poh, Beng Teik Thermal Behavior and Morphological Properties of Novel Magnesium Salt-Polyacryla mide Composite Polymers POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article HYBRID POLYMER; DEGRADATION; CHLORIDE; COAGULANT; FLOCCULATION; ACRYLAMIDE; WATE R Magnesium salt-polyacrylamide composite polymers have been prepared by b lending magnesium chloride and magnesium hydroxide, respectively, with polyacryl amide aqueous solution. The thermal behavior of the dried magnesium salt-polyacr ylamide composite polymers has been studied. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were carried out to invest igate the changes of the composite polymers' behavior with temperature. The kine tics of the thermal decomposition of magnesium salt-polyacrylamide composite pol ymers was investigated over temperature range of 35-800 degrees C with three hea ting rates of 10, 20, and 40 degrees C/min under nitrogen atmosphere. Flynn and Wall's model was used to determine the activation energies of thermal decomposit ion for magnesium salt-polyacrylamide composite polymers. The activation energie s needed to decompose 50 wt% of magnesium hydroxide-polyacrylamide (MHPAM) compo site polymer ranged from of 28.993-174.307 kJ/mol which are higher than the valu es for magnesium chloride-polyacrylamide (MCPAM) composite polymer (21.069-39.41 2 kJ/mol). Therefore, MHPAM composite polymer has a better thermal stability com pared with MCPAM composite polymer. The morphological properties of magnesium sa lt-polyacrylamide composite polymers were studied using scanning electron micros copy (SEM). Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of the chemical elements. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1515-1522, 2011. (C) 2 011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Lee, KE; Khan, I; Morad, N; Teng, TT; P oh, BT] Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Ind Technol, George Town 11800, Malaysia Morad, N (reprint author), Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Ind Technol, George Town 118 00, Malaysia nhashima@usm.my Universiti Sains Malaysia Contract grant s ponsor: Research University Grant and Post Graduate Fellowship from Universiti S ains Malaysia. 23 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM CO MPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1515 1522 10.1002/pc.21180 8 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700005

J .

Wang, JH; Zhang, BY Wang, J. H.; Zhang, B. Y The Kinetics and Morphology of Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals by Doped Crylic Acid POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article INDUCED PHASE-SEPARATION; UV-CURABLE POLYMER; SPINODAL DECOMPOSITION; FTIR SPECT ROSCOPY; BINARY-MIXTURES; SYSTEMS; GRATINGS It is widely appreciated that el ectro-optical activity in polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) depends on p hase separation of polymer and liquid crystals (LCs). The morphology of the LCs domains depends on the detail of the chemical and physical processes active duri ng the formation of domains. This work discusses two-phase morphology in an acry late-based system that developed during polymerization induced phase separation. UV/VIS spectrometer is used for monitoring the polymerization of the PDLCs by r eal-time scattering. The doped crylic acid accelerated the speed of polymerizati on. The electro-optical properties of PDLCs films are measured by Polarimeter (P erkinElmer Model 341). The lower threshold voltage was obtained by doped crylic acid at suitable ratio. The polarizing optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared image system are used for depicting the morphology of LC droplets in po lymer matrix. The sizes and dispersion of LC droplets were influenced by doped c rylic acid which accelerated the speed of polymerization. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:152 3-1531, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Wang, JH] Shenyang Univ , Coll Sci, Shenyang 110004, Peoples R China; [Zhang, BY] Northeastern Univ, Ctr Mol Sci & Engn, Shenyang 110004, Peoples R China Wang, JH (reprint author ), Shenyang Univ, Coll Sci, Shenyang 110004, Peoples R China jhwang1228@yahoo .com.cn National Science Fundamental Committee of China; HI-Tech Research and de velopment program[863]; Commission for science, technology, and industry for nat ional defence of China[DBDX2008038] Contract grant sponsor: National Science Fundamental Committee of China, HI-Tech Research and development program; contr act grant number: 863. Contract grant sponsor: Commission for science, technolog y, and industry for national defence of China; contract grant number: DBDX200803 8. 35 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1523 1531 10.1002/pc.21181 9 Materials Scienc e, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700006 J Khattab, A; Khattak, MJ; Fadhil, IM Khattab, Ahmed; Khattak, Mohammad J.; Fadhil, Imran M. Micromechanical Discrete Element Modeling of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites POLYMER COMPOSIT ES English Article An analytical model of mechanical behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer co mposites using an advanced discrete element model (DEM) coupled with imaging tec hniques is presented in this article. The analysis focuses on composite material s molded by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding. The molded composite structu re consists of eight-harness carbon fiber fabrics and a high-temperature polymer . The actual structure of the molded material was captured in digital images usi ng optical microscopy. DEM was developed using the image-based-shape structural model to predict the composite elastic modulus, stress-strain response, and comp ressive strength. An experimental case study is presented to evaluate the accura cy of the developed analytical model. The results indicate that the image-based DEM micromechanical model showed fairly accurate predictions for the elastic mod ulus and compressive strength. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1532-1540, 2011. (C) 2011 Soci ety of Plastics Engineers [Khattab, A] Univ Louisiana Lafayette, Coll Engn , Dept Ind Technol, Lafayette, LA 70504 USA; [Khattak, MJ] Univ Louisiana Lafaye tte, Dept Civil Engn, Lafayette, LA 70504 USA; [Fadhil, IM] Univ Louisiana Lafay ette, Dept Petr Engn, Lafayette, LA 70504 USA Khattab, A (reprint author), Uni v Louisiana Lafayette, Coll Engn, Dept Ind Technol, Lafayette, LA 70504 USA khattab@louisiana.edu University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Airtech Advanced M aterials Group; Hexcel Corporation; Cytec Engineered Materials The authors ackn owledge the support of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Also, the autho rs acknowledge the support of the Airtech Advanced Materials Group, Hexcel Corpo ration, and Cytec Engineered Materials. 14 0 0 WILEY-BL

ACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-839 7 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1532 1540 10.1002/pc.21182 9 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700007 J Doddamani, MR; Kulkarni, SM; Kishore Doddaman i, M. R.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Kishore Behavior of Sandwich Beams With Functionally Graded Rubber Core in Three Point Bending POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article REINFORCED SYNTA CTIC FOAMS; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; FLY-ASH; STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS; COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES; FLEXURAL BEHAVIOR; COMPOSITES; JUTE; STRENGTH; TENSILE The thre e-point bending behavior of sandwich beams made up of jute epoxy skins and piece wise linear functionally graded (FG) rubber core reinforced with fly ash filler is investigated. This work studies the influence of the parameters such as weigh t fraction of fly ash, core to thickness ratio, and orientation of jute on speci fic bending modulus and strength. The load displacement response of the sandwich is traced to evaluate the specific modulus and strength. FG core samples are pr epared by using conventional casting technique and sandwich by hand layup. Prese nce of gradation is quantified experimentally. Results of bending test indicate that specific modulus and strength are primarily governed by filler content and core to sandwich thickness ratio. FG sandwiches with different gradation configu rations (uniform, linear, and piecewise linear) are modeled using finite element analysis (ANSYS 5.4) to evaluate specific strength which is subsequently compar ed with the experimental results and the best gradation configuration is present ed. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1541-1551, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Doddamani, MR; Kulkarni, SM] Natl Inst Technol Karnataka, Dept Mech Engn, Surat hkal 575025, India; [Kishore] Indian Inst Sci, Dept Mat Engn, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka, India Doddamani, MR (reprint author), Natl Inst Technol Karnat aka, Dept Mech Engn, Surathkal 575025, India mrd_phd@rediffmail.com 63 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1541 1551 10.1002/pc.21173 11 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 008 J Zaman, HU; Khan, MA; Khan, RA Zaman, Haydar U. ; Khan, Mubarak A.; Khan, Ruhul A. A Comparative Study on the Mecha nical and Degradation Properties of Plant Fibers Reinforced Polyethylene Composi tes POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article Coir; abaca; linear low density polyethylene; composite; starch and mechanical p roperties LINKED POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL); NATURAL-RUBBER COMPOSITES; POLYPROPY LENE COMPOSITES; ELECTRICAL-PROPERTIES; SURFACE MODIFICATION; JUTE; COIR; UV; ST ARCH; PERFORMANCE Coir and abaca fiber-reinforced linear low density polye thylene (LLDPE) composites (30 wt% fiber) were prepared by compression molding. Coir and abaca fibers were treated with methyl methacrylate (MMA) using ultravio let radiation to improve the mechanical properties of the composites. Concentrat ion of MMA and radiation dose was optimized. It was found that 30% MMA in methan ol along with photoinitiator Darocur-1173 (2%) and 15th pass of radiation render ed better performance. Chemically treated fiber-reinforced specimens yielded bet ter mechanical properties compared to the untreated composites, whereas coir fib er composites had better mechanical properties than abaca fiber reinforced ones. For the improvement of the properties, optimized coir (coir fiber treated with 30% MMA) and abaca (abaca fiber treated with 40% MMA) fibers were again treated with aqueous starch solution (2%-8%, w/w) for 2-7 min. Composites made of 3%-sta rch-treated coir fiber (5 min soaking time) showed the best mechanical propertie s than that of abaca-fiber-based composites. Water uptake and soil degradation t ests of the composites were also performed. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1552-1560, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Zaman, HU; Khan, MA; Khan, RA] Banglade sh Atom Energy Commiss, Inst Nucl Sci & Technol, Radiat & Polymer Chem Lab, Dhak a, Bangladesh Zaman, HU (reprint author), Bangladesh Atom Energy Commiss, Inst

Nucl Sci & Technol, Radiat & Polymer Chem Lab, POB 3787, Dhaka, Bangladesh haydar_zaman@yahoo.com 36 0 0 WILEY-BL ACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-839 7 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1552 1560 10.1002/pc.21168 9 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700009 J Ye, Q; Chen, PH Ye, Qiang; Chen, Puhui Prediction of the Strength Parameter of Cohesive Zone Model for Simulating Compo site Delamination by the Equivalent Inclusion Method POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article PROGRESSIVE DELA MINATION; NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS; INTERFACE ELEMENTS; FRACTURE; TOUGHNESS; GROWTH The cohesive strength is an important parameter in numerically modeling composit e delamination via cohesive zone model-based FEM. A micromechanical model is pro posed to predict the cohesive strength based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion m ethod (EIM). In this model, it is considered that the cohesive strength depends heavily on the stress concentrations at the microscopic level. The cohesive stre ngths of T700/QY8911 and AS4/PEEK laminates at various cross-angles of the bidir ectional fibers are computed using EIM with constant eigenstrains. With the pred icted cohesive strengths the FEM simulations on mixed-mode bending and six-point bending test are presented, and the results are in fair agreement with experime ntal observation. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1561-1567, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plasti cs Engineers [Ye, Q; Chen, PH] Nanjing Univ Aeronaut & Astronaut, Sch Aerosp Engn, Nanjing 210016, Peoples R China Ye, Q (reprint author), Nanjing Univ Aer onaut & Astronaut, Sch Aerosp Engn, Nanjing 210016, Peoples R China yeqiang1 0258308@163.com Chinese National Science Fund[10872091]; Jiangsu Innovation Prog ram for Graduate Education[CX098-084Z]; Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in NUA A[BCXJ09-02] Contract grant sponsor: Chinese National Science Fund; contract grant number: 10872091; contract grant sponsor: Jiangsu Innovation Program for G raduate Education; contract grant number: CX098-084Z; contract grant sponsor: Ou tstanding Doctoral Dissertation in NUAA; contract grant number: BCXJ09-02. 30 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1561 1567 10.1002/pc.21189 7 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 010 J Lin, OH; Akil, HM; Ishak, ZAM Lin, Ong Hui; Ak il, Hazizan Md; Ishak, Z. A. Mohd Surface-Activated Nanosilica Tre ated With Silane Coupling Agents/Polypropylene Composites: Mechanical, Morpholog ical, and Thermal Studies POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article NANOPARTICLES FILLED-POLYPROPYLENE; RAY PHOTOELECTRON-SPECTROSCOPY; STYRENE-BUTA DIENE RUBBER; GRAFTED POLYPROPYLENE; SILICA NANOPARTICLES; NANOCOMPOSITES; PERFO RMANCE; PARTICLES; POLYMERS; CRYSTALLIZATION This work reports the mechanical , morphological, and thermal properties of the polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing nanosilica (nano-SiO(2)) which were treated by different functional group silane coupling agents. Four types of silane coupling agents namely aminop ropyltriethoxy silane (APTES), glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS), trime thoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMPM), and dichlorodimethyl silane (DCMS) were us ed to modify the surface-activated nanosilica. To enhance the effectiveness of t he coupling, nanosilica was chemically activated and analyzed through FTIR and X -ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). The highest tensile strength was recorde d by the activated nanocomposites treated with APTES followed by nanocomposite t reated with GPTMS, TMPM, and DCMS, respectively. The addition of silane coupling agents into nano-SiO(2)/PP system further improved the tensile modulus of the P P nanocomposites. From the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, acti vated nanosilica treated with APTES showed better nanosilica dispersion in the P P matrix and lesser agglomeration occurred when compared with the other silane c oupling agents which were used in this study. Surface activation process does no t effectively increase the degree of crystallinity and thermal stability on the

PP nanocomposites. However, with the assistance of the surface treatment, it was found that the thermal behavior of the PP nanocomposites had been enhanced. POL YM. COMPOS., 32:1568-1583, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Lin, OH ] Univ Malaysia Perlis, Sch Mat Engn, Arau 02600, Perlis, Malaysia; [Akil, HM; I shak, ZAM] Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Mat & Mineral Resources Engn, Nibong Tebal 1 4300, Penang, Malaysia Lin, OH (reprint author), Univ Malaysia Perlis, Sch Mat Engn, Kompleks Pusat Pengajian Jejawi 2, Arau 02600, Perlis, Malaysia hlong@un imap.edu.my; hazizan@eng.usm.my School of Materials Engineering & Mineral Resour ces, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia Contract grant sponsor: School of Materials Engineering & Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia. 41 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1568 1583 10.1002/pc.21190 16 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700011 J Ramirez, NV; Sanchez-Soto, M; Illescas, S Vila Ramirez, Narciso; Sanchez-Soto, Miguel; Illescas, Silvia Enhancem ent of POM Thermooxidation Resistance Through POSS Nanoparticles POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article POLYHEDRAL OLIGOMERIC SILSESQUIOXANE; DEGRADATION BEHAVIOR; THERMAL-DEGRADATION; THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES; POLYOXYMETHYLENE; COPOLYMER; NANOCOMPOSITES; STABI LIZATION; MORPHOLOGY Thermooxidative degradation at and beyond processing tem peratures has been carried out on polyoxymethylene (POM) enhanced with four diff erent types of POSS, being Glycidyl, GlycidylIsobutyl, Aminopropylisobutyl, and Poly(ethylene glycol). The quantification of such degradation was carried out th rough FTIR spectrography, color spectrophotometry, and thermogravimetric analysi s methods. The results showed that the presence of POSS in the blend improves dr amatically the thermal stability of the POM matrix. The best performance was fou nd with Aminopropylisobutyl, whereby the onset of degradation temperature increa sed by more than 50 degrees C. Said improvement is referred to the conditions wh ere the nanocomposite developed only 2% of carbonyl yield and 8% of yellowing of the 100% deterioration suffered by the standard POM copolymer. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1584-1592, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Ramirez, NV] PP T, Pol Salvatella 08210, Barbera Del Val, Spain; [Ramirez, NV; Sanchez-Soto, M; Illescas, S] Univ Politecn Cataluna, Ctr Catala Plast, Barcelona 08222, Spain Ramirez, NV (reprint author), PPT, Av Salvatella 122, Pol Salvatella 08210, Barb era Del Val, Spain sinvila@yahoo.com "Ministerio de Educacion y Cienc ia" of the Spanish Government[IDI-20100104]; Universitat Politecnica de Cataluny a Contract grant sponsor: "Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia" of the Spani sh Government (Evaluacion de la Degradacion Termica de Polimeros); contract gran t number: IDI-20100104; contract grant sponsor: Eix C program of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya. 23 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1584 1592 10.1002/pc.21191 9 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700012 J Chen, YK; Xu, CH Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhu i Specific Nonlinear Viscoelasticity Behaviors of Natural Rubber a nd Zinc Dimethacrylate Composites Due to Multi-Crosslinking Bond Interaction by Using Rubber Process Analyzer 2000 POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article IN-SITU POLYMERIZATION; MAGNESIUM METHACRYLATE; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; MORPHOLOGY; ELASTOMERS; REINFORCE MENT In this paper, the dynamic mechanical properties of the natural rubber ( NR) which was filled with in situ zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) were investigated u sing a Rubber Process Analyzer (RPA2000). A weak rigid filler-filler network was formed in the uncured NR/ZDMA compounds. Pronounced Payne effect and stress-sof tening behavior were observed in the vulcanizates, which indicated that a strong and special filler structure was formed after vulcanization. However, an ionic

network might be formed with a high ZDMA loading, which was not favorable to reb uild the poly-ZDMA network. Finally, two tentative regions of networks deformati on during the dynamic strain sweep were discussed: filler-filler and ionic bonds dominating region and rubber network dominating region. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1593 -1600, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Chen, YK] S China Univ Technol, Sch Mech & Automot Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China; [Xu, CH] S China Univ Technol, Coll Mat Sci & Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China Chen, YK (reprint author), S China Univ Technol, Sch Mec h & Automot Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China cyk@scut.edu.cn 25 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1593 1600 10.1002/pc.21195 8 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 013 J Velasquez-Martinez, A; Diaz-Diaz, A; Hernandez-Escobar, CA; Zaragoza-Con treras, EA Velasquez-Martinez, Anibal; Diaz-Diaz, A lberto; Alejandra Hernandez-Escobar, Claudia; Armando Zaragoza-Contreras, Erasto Agave lechuguilla Torrey Fiber as Reinforcement of Polyester Resin POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article NATURAL-FIBER; CHEMICAL-MODIFICATION; COUPLING AGENTS; COMPOSITES; LECHEGUILLA; BIOCOMPOSITES; MATRIX; MEXICO This study was aimed to evaluate the application of lechuguilla fiber (Agave lechuguilla Torrey), with no treatment, as reinforc ement of polyester resin. Mechanical assays and pull-out tests were performed on specimens of one fiber and strands of 10 fibers and on lechuguilla fiber/polyes ter composites and polyester matrix alone. The results indicated that there was no important improvement in composite rigidity, as the Young's modulus in both t he fiber and the polyester resin were similar; however, an important improvement in composite resistance, in respect to the matrix alone, attributed to a good i nterfacial adherence fiber-matrix, was observed. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1601-1606, 2 011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Velasquez-Martinez, A; Diaz-Dia z, A; Hernandez-Escobar, CA; Zaragoza-Contreras, EA] Ctr Invest Mat Avanzados, C hihuahua 31109, Chih, Mexico Zaragoza-Contreras, EA (reprint author), Ctr Inv est Mat Avanzados, SC Miguel Cervantes 120, Chihuahua 31109, Chih, Mexico armando.zaragoza@-cimav.edu.mx National Council for Science and Technology of M exico (CONACYT) Contract grant sponsor: National Council for Science and Technol ogy of Mexico (CONACYT). 25 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1601 1606 10.1002/pc.21202 6 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700014 J Weng, CJ; Hsu, SC; Chang, CH; Huang, TC; Yeh, WT; Yeh, JM; Chou, YC Weng, Chang-Jian; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chang, Chi-Hao; Huang, Tsao-Cheng; Yeh, WeiTing; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Chou, Yi-Chen A Comparative Study on the Prepa ration and Physical Properties of Environmental Friendly PMMA-Silica Nano/Sub-Mi cron-Scale Hybrid Latexes Controlled by Chelating Agent POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article CLAY NANOCOMPOSI TE MATERIALS; PERFORMANCE; COMPOSITES; REINFORCEMENT; EPOXY; POLYMERIZATION; NAN OPARTICLES; ENHANCEMENT; PARTICLES; RESIN In this article, a comparative s tudy of the preparation and physical properties of as-prepared PMMA-silica nanohybrid (PSN) and sub-micro-hybrid (PSM) latexes is successfully presented. Vinyl -modified silica spheres were prepared using the Stober process with/without a c helating agent to control particle size. The as-prepared vinyl-modified silica s pheres with different particle sizes were subsequently characterized by SEM, (13 )C-solid-state NMR, and (29)Si-solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A certain feeding a mount of silica spheres was reacted with MMA monomers by emulsion polymerization to yield a series of PSN and corresponding PSM. Both as-prepared nano/sub-micro nscale hybrid materials were further characterized by FTIR, SEM-EDX mapping, and TEM studies. The comparative study on the physical properties of both as-prepar

ed nano/submicron-scale hybrid materials was done systematically based on a seri es of instrumentation evaluations performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer, electrochemical corrosion measurements, salt spray test, and gas permeability a nalysis. Results indicated that PSN has more effectively enhanced mechanical pro perties, corrosion protection properties, as well as gas barrier compared to PSM . POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1607-1616, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Weng, CJ; Hsu, SC; Chang, CH; Huang, TC; Yeh, WT; Yeh, JM] Chung Yuan Christian Univ, Dept Chem, Chungli 32023, Taiwan; [Weng, CJ; Hsu, SC; Chang, CH; Huang, T C; Yeh, WT; Yeh, JM] Chung Yuan Christian Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol, Chungli 32023, Taiwan; [Chou, YC] Hung Kuang Univ, Dept Appl Cosmetol, Taichung 43302, Taiwan; [Chou, YC] Hung Kuang Univ, Grad Inst Cosmet Sci, Taichung 43302, Taiwan Yeh, JM (reprint author), Chung Yuan Christian Univ, Dept Chem, Chungli 32023, T aiwan juiming@cycu.edu.tw Ministry of Education, Taiwan, Republic of China [NSC 98-2113-M-033-001-MY3]; Department of Chemistry, CYCU[CYCU-98-CR-CH] Contract grant sponsor: Ministry of Education, Taiwan, Republic of China; contra ct grant number: NSC 98-2113-M-033-001-MY3; contract grant sponsor: Department o f Chemistry, CYCU; contract grant number: CYCU-98-CR-CH. 31 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214 8, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1607 1616 10.1002/ pc.21201 10 Materials Science, Composites; Polymer S cience Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700015 J Ichinose, N; Ishikawa, M; Morimoto, K Ichinose , Noriyo; Ishikawa, Masaru; Morimoto, Kiyoshi Effect of stress transfe r between fiber and matrix on toughness of polymer composite POLYMER COMPOSIT ES English Article NANOTUBE COMPOSITES; FINITE-ELEMENT; IMPACT; BEHAVIOR Thanks to their lightwei ght properties, formability and low cost, polymers have become an essential mate rial for manufactured products. To improve the mechanical properties, almost all polymers are blended with some kind of fiber made from glass, carbon, organic o r natural material. The importance of interfacial strength between matrix and fi ber is a well known requirement for effective mechanical properties and some exp erimental results indicate that low interfacial strength helps increase the toug hness of composites. In this paper, models of composite reinforced by fiber alig ned with maximum principal stress under uni-tensile loading are simulated. Based on the simulation result, we discuss the effect of interfacial strength, aspect ratio of fiber and friction force between matrix and fiber on stable deformatio n and provide the guidelines for establishing composites with high modulus and t oughness. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1617-1624, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engin eers [Ichinose, N] JSOL Corp, Engn Technol Div, Naka Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 460000 2, Japan; [Ishikawa, M] Yamagata Univ, Dept Polymer Sci & Engn, Yamagata 9928510 , Japan; [Morimoto, K] Sekisui Seikei Ltd, Chiba 2892131, Japan Ichinose, N (rep rint author), JSOL Corp, Engn Technol Div, Naka Ku, 2-18-25 Marunouchi, Nagoya, Aichi 4600002, Japan ichinose.noriyo@jsol.co.jp 19 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1617 1624 10.1002/pc.21200 8 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 016 J Boroglu, MS; Celik, SU; Bozkurt, A; Boz, I Boroglu, Mehtap Safak; Celik, Sevim Unugur; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Boz, Ismail Synthesis and Proton Conductivity Studies of 5-Aminotetrazole-Doped Sulfonated P olymer Electrolyte Membranes POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article METHANOL FUEL-CELLS; PHOSPHORIC-ACID; EXCHANGE MEMBRANES; BLEND MEMBRANES; PERFO RMANCE; IMIDAZOLE; TRANSPORT; PBI; POLYBENZIMIDAZOLES; SOLVENTS This work report s the preparation and characterization of a new anhydrous proton conducting memb rane based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sulfosuccinic acid (SSA), and 5-aminote trazole (ATet) at various stoichiometric ratios. The proton conductivities of me mbranes were investigated as a function of ATet composition, SSA composition, an

d temperature. New anhydrous proton conducting membranes were characterized by i nfrared spectra, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorim etry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), methanol permeability, and impeda nce measurements for proton conductivity. TGA showed that the samples were therm ally stable up to 150 degrees C. DSC results illustrated the homogeneity of the materials. Mechanical analysis showed that the storage modulus of the PVA-SSA-AT et blend polymer membranes decreased with increasing ATet content. The membranes with higher tetrazole content, or higher acid doping level presented the higher proton conductivity. PVA-SSA-ATet4 can exhibit an anhydrous proton conductivity of 1.7 x 10(-3) S/cm at 130 degrees C and the proton conductivity increased wit h increasing temperature and acid doping level. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1625-1632, 20 11. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Boroglu, MS; Boz, I] Istanbul U niv, Fac Engn, Dept Chem Engn, TR-34320 Istanbul, Turkey; [Celik, SU; Bozkurt, A ] Fatih Univ, Dept Chem, TR-34500 Istanbul, Turkey Boroglu, MS (reprint aut hor), Istanbul Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Chem Engn, TR-34320 Istanbul, Turkey mehtap@istanbul.edu.tr 41 0 0 WILEY-BL ACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-839 7 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1625 1632 10.1002/pc.21178 8 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700017 J Zhang, J; Wu, JL; Mo, H; Ma, ZM; Zhou, NL; Yuan, J; Shen, J Zhang, Jun; Wu, Jun-Li; Mo, Hong; Ma, Zhen-Mao; Zhou, Ning-lin; Yuan, Jiang; She n, Jian Rheology and Processability of Polyamide66 Filled With Different -Sized and Size-Distributed Calcium Carbonate POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article PA66/PPS BLEND; TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES; THERMOPLASTIC STARCH; WEAR MECHANISMS; POLYETHYLENE; CO MPOSITES; CRYSTALLIZATION; MORPHOLOGY; BEHAVIOR; FIBER Two-sized calcium carbon ates (CaCO(3)) were blended and filled into polyamide66 (PA66). The shear viscos ity of PA66/CaCO(3) composites was measured with a capillary extrusion rheometer . The results showed that the shear viscosity of the efficient size distribution samples (PA66 was filled with 600/2500 mesh CaCO(3) blending) obviously decreas ed compared with that of the single-size distribution samples (PA66 was filled w ith 600 or 2500 mesh CaCO(3)). The shear viscosity of PA66/CaCO(3) composites at different temperatures was also studied. The results showed that the flow activ ation energy and flow activation entropy of the efficient size distribution samp les obviously increased compared with those of the single-size distribution samp les. The change in flow activation entropy was used to explain the experimental results of shear viscosity. The processability of PA66/CaCO(3) composites was ev aluated with a HAAKE torque rheometer. The results showed that the processabilit y of the efficient size distribution samples was obviously improved and the best efficiency of processability improvement appeared in the 30 wt% CaCO(3) content . POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1633-1639, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Zhang, J; Mo, H; Ma, ZM; Zhou, NL; Yuan, J; Shen, J] Nanjing Normal Univ, Coll Chem & Environm Sci, Jiangsu Engn Res Ctr Biomed Funct Mat, Nanjing 210097, Peop les R China; [Wu, JL] Nanjing Med Univ, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Gen Surg, Nanjin g 210029, Peoples R China Zhou, NL (reprint author), Nanjing Normal Univ, Coll Chem & Environm Sci, Jiangsu Engn Res Ctr Biomed Funct Mat, Nanjing 210097, Peoples R China bnj6203406@gmail.com; 07216@njnu.edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China[20874047]; Jiangsu Province Science and Technology Program[BK2009408]; Natural Science Foundation of the Jiangsu Higher Education I nstitutions of China[08KJB150010, 08KJA430003]; Priority Academic Program Develo pment of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD) Contract grant sponsor: National Natural Science Foundation of China; contract grant number: 20874047; c ontract grant sponsor: Jiangsu Province Science and Technology Program; contract grant number: BK2009408; contract grant sponsor: Natural Science Foundation of the Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions of China; contract grant numbers: 08KJ B150010, 08KJA430003; contract grant sponsor: the Priority Academic Program Deve lopment of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD). 33 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 0214

8, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1633 1639 10.1002/ pc.21186 7 Materials Science, Composites; Polymer S cience Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700018 J Chaos-Moran, R; Salazar, A; Urena, A Chaos-Mo ran, R.; Salazar, A.; Urena, A. Mechanical Analysis of Carbon Nanofiber/ Epoxy Resin Composites POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article REINFORCED SC-15 EPOXY; PHYSICAL-PROPERTIES; POLYMER COMPOSITES; NANOCOMPOSITES; FUNCTIONALIZATION; NANOFIBER/POLYMER; DISPERSION; NANOTUBES; FIBERS; MODEL The mechanical response of epoxy resins filled without treated carbon nanofibers and carboxylated ones has been evaluated through tensile tests. The elastic pro perties did not improve compared to the neat epoxy resin regardless of filler co ntent or functionalization treatment, while the tensile strength and the elongat ion at break were reduced for the highest filler content (1 wt%). Fractographic analysis showed that composites reinforced with carboxylated nanofibers showed b etter filler dispersion than those without treatment. However, in both cases, th e fibers tended to agglomerate and the formation of porosity was favored. The si ze of bundles of nanofibers rose with the content of nanofiller and for the same addition of carbon nanofibers, the size and distribution was respectively bigge r and wider for the untreated carbon nanofibers-reinforced composites than for t he carboxylated carbon nanofiber-reinforced composites. These defects degraded t he mechanical response. The dilute suspension of clusters model was applied to e stimate the elastic properties, showing agreement with the experimental results. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1640-1651, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Salazar, A] Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Super Ciencias Expt & Tecnol, Dept Te cnol Mecan, Madrid 28933, Spain; [Chaos-Moran, R; Urena, A] Univ Rey Juan Carlos , Escuela Super Ciencias Expt & Tecnol, Dept Ciencia & Ingn Mat, Madrid 28933, S pain Salazar, A (reprint author), Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Escuela Super Ciencia s Expt & Tecnol, Dept Tecnol Mecan, C Tulipan S-N, Madrid 28933, Spain alicia.s alazar@urjc.es Universidad Rey Juan Carlos; Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid[URJC-C M-2008-CET-3551]; Ministerio de Educacion of Spain[MAT2010-20724-C02-01]; Consej eria de Educacion de Madrid[S2009MAT-1585] Contract grant sponsors: Univers idad Rey Juan Carlos and Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid; contract grant number: UR JC-CM-2008-CET-3551; contract grant sponsor: Ministerio de Educacion of Spain; c ontract grant number: MAT2010-20724-C02-01; contract grant sponsor: Consejeria d e Educacion de Madrid through Programa de Actividades de I+D: Materiales Estruct urales Avanzados ESTRUMAT; contract grant number: S2009MAT-1585. 36 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1640 1651 10.1002/pc.21187 12 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 019 J Ogi, K; Takahashi, M; Yashiro, S Ogi, Kei ji; Takahashi, Manabu; Yashiro, Shigeki Empirical Models for Matrix Crac king in a CFRP Cross-Ply Laminate Under Static- and Cyclic-Fatigue Loadings POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article TRANSVERSE CRACKING; STRESS RATIO; GROWTH; BEHAVIOR; COMPOSITES; PROPAGATION; DI RECTION; DAMAGE This paper presents empirical models for predicting matrix crack density in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminate under st atic-fatigue and cyclic-fatigue loadings. First, a modified slow crack growth (S CG) law, that covers the whole range of stress ratio R of tension-tension fatigu e (0 <= R <= 1), was proposed. The modified SCG law and three conventional SCG l aws were then combined with Weibull's probabilistic failure concept for predicti ng fatigue matrix crack density in a cross-ply laminate. Matrix crack density wa s expressed as a function of R, the maximum stress in the transverse ply and the number of cycles. Next, fatigue tests were performed for R of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 1 to determine the applicability of these four models. Finally, constant fa tigue life (CFL) diagrams were investigated based on the modified model. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1652-1660, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Ogi, K;

Takahashi, M] Ehime Univ, Grad Sch Sci & Engn, Matsuyama, Ehime 7908577, Japan; [Yashiro, S] Shizuoka Univ, Fac Engn, Naka Ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 4328561, Jap an Ogi, K (reprint author), Ehime Univ, Grad Sch Sci & Engn, 3 Bunkyo Cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 7908577, Japan ogi.keiji.mu@ehime-u.ac.jp 28 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1652 1660 10.1002/pc.21192 9 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 020 J Albu, RM; Avram, E; Stoica, I; Ioanid, EG; Ioan, S Albu, Raluca Marinica; Avram, Ecaterina; Stoica, Iuliana; Ioanid, Emil Ghiocel; Ioan, Silvia Miscibility and Morphological Properties of Quaternized Polysulfone Blends with Polystyrene and Poly(4-vinylpyridine) POLYMER COMPOSIT ES English Article MEMBRANES; VISCOSITY; POLYMERS; SYSTEMS; FILMS Quaternized polysulfones were sy nthesized by the quaternization reaction of chloromethylated polysulfone with di fferent tertiary amines -N, N-dimethylethylamine (DMEA) and N, N-dimethyloctylam ine (DMOA), respectively. New blends from these quaternized polysulfones (PSF-DM EA or PSF-DMOA) with polystyrene (PS) or poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) were prepa red by the solution casting method. Pure quaternized polysulfones, in N, N-dimet hylformamide (DMF)/methanol (MeOH) and DMF/water solvent/nonsolvent mixtures, an d their blends with PS and P4VP, as well, were investigated by shear viscometry and viscoelasticity, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and surface properties. The results obtained revealed that the blends have good miscibility. Surface morphology is characterized by roughness and nodules forma tions, depending on the alkyl radical lengths, composition of the polymer mixtur es, including specific electron-donor or electron-acceptor characteristics of po lymers. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1661-1670, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Enginee rs [Albu, RM; Avram, E; Stoica, I; Ioanid, EG; Ioan, S] Petru Poni Inst Mac romol Chem, Iasi 700487, Romania Ioan, S (reprint author), Petru Poni Ins t Macromol Chem, Iasi 700487, Romania ioan_silvia@yahoo.com 25 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1661 1670 10.1002/pc.21198 10 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 021 J Zhuang, QX; Xue, ZJ; Liu, XY; Yuan, YL; Han, ZW Zhuang, Qixin; Xue, Zhaojun; Liu, Xiaoyun; Yuan, Yongliang; Han, Zhewen Molecular Simulation of Miscibility of Poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether)/Po ly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) Blend With the Compatibilizer Triblock Terpolymer S BM POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article BLOCK-COPOLYMERS; FORCE-FIELD; MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES; DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS; POLY (VINYL ALCOHOL); KNITTING PATTERN; PPE/SAN BLENDS; POLYMER BLENDS; MORPHOLOGY; O XIDE) Polymer blend of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether) (PPE) and poly(s tyrene-co-acrylonitrile) (SAN), which has broad commercial interest, has limited miscibility. A triblock terpolymer, polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-poly( methyl methacrylate) (SBM), is often used as compatibilizer to improve the misci bility of PPE/SAN. In this work, dissipative particle dynamics and molecular dyn amics of Material Studio were used to study the essentials that influence miscib ility of the blend systems, and then Flory-Huggins parameter chi, radial distrib ution function (RDF) and morphologies are analyzed. It shows that the blends wit h more content of styrene in SAN (above 90 wt%), whose mass percentage is 60%, a re best miscible. For the systems of PPE/SAN added with SBM, the miscibility inc reases and then decreases with the increase of SBM content. A longer chain of st yrene (S) in SBM leads to wrapped structure of PMMA by PB, wrapped by PS, result ing in decrease of the miscibility. From studies and simulation of chi and RDF, the best blend system for commercial and industrial use is the one with mass rat io of PPE/SAN/SBM 36/54/10, in which S content in SAN is above 90 wt%. For SBM,

the ratio of chain length styrene (S)/butadiene (B) is less than 1, while B and M are the same in chain length. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1671-1680, 2011. (C) 2011 Soc iety of Plastics Engineers [Zhuang, QX; Xue, ZJ; Liu, XY; Yuan, YL; Han, ZW ] E China Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Minist Educ, Key Lab Specially Funct Polymers & Related Techno, Shanghai 200237, Peoples R China Liu, XY (reprint author), E China Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Minist Educ, K ey Lab Specially Funct Polymers & Related Techno, Shanghai 200237, Peoples R Chi na liuxiaoyun@ecust.edu.cn National Natural Science Foundation of China (NS FC)[50973028, 50703010]; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities , Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project[B502] Contract grant sponsor: National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC); contract grant numbers: 509 73028, 50703010; Contract grant sponsors: Fundamental Research Funds for the Cen tral Universities, Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (B502). 46 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1671 1680 10.1002/pc.21203 10 Materials Science, Composites; P olymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700 022 J Saritha, A; Joseph, K; Boudenne, A; Thomas, S Saritha, A.; Joseph, K.; Boudenne, A.; Thomas, S. Mechanical, Ther mophysical, and Diffusion Properties of TiO(2)-Filled Chlorobutyl Rubber Composi tes POLYMER COMPOSITES English Article POLYMER COMPOSITES; CARBON-BLACK; NANOCOMPOSITES; BEHAVIOR; NANOPARTICLES; CONDU CTIVITY; SOLVENTS; BUTYL The mechanical and thermophysical properties of TiO(2)-filled chlorobutyl rubber composites were investigated. These materials e xhibited enhanced mechanical properties such as increased modulus, tensile stren gth, and hardness. The morphology of filler dispersion in the matrix was analyze d by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Moreover, the eff ect of TiO(2) content on the molecular transport of solvents was examined by mea ns of degree of swelling, volume fraction of rubber, penetration rate of solvent , mean diffusion coefficient, etc. A periodic method was used to estimate the th ermophysical behavior of samples. It was shown that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of composites increase with increasing of TiO(2) filler content. Fi nally, the utilization of the material as effective chemical protective clothing against volatile organic chemicals was analyzed. POLYM. COMPOS., 32:1681-1687, 2011. (C) 2011 Society of Plastics Engineers [Joseph, K] ISRO, Indian Inst Sp ace Sci & Technol, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India; [Saritha, A] Amrita Vishwa vidyapeetham Univ, Kollam, Kerala, India; [Boudenne, A] Univ Paris Est Creteil, CERTES, F-94010 Creteil, France; [Thomas, S] Mahatma Gandhi Univ, Ctr Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Kottayam 686560, Kerala, India Joseph, K (reprint author), ISRO , Indian Inst Space Sci & Technol, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India kjoseph. iist@gmail.com 24 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0272-8397 POLYM COMPOSITE Polym. Compos. OCT 2011 32 10 1681 1687 10.1002/pc.21205 7 Material s Science, Composites; Polymer Science Materials Science; Polymer Science 827UH WOS:000295453700023 J Ariawan, I; Agustini, M; Seamans, Y; Tsu, V; Kosim, MS Ariawan, I.; Agustini, M.; Seamans, Y.; Tsu, V.; Kosim, M. S. Choosing the appropriate neonatal resuscitation device for village midwives JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY English Article birth asphyxia; technology assessment; low-resource settings Objectiv e: An appropriate neonatal resuscitation device for village midwives in Indonesi a is chosen. Study Design: The study compared four neonatal resuscitation device s: Ambu neonate bag and mask, Topster bag and mask, Laerdal pediatric pocket mas k and Tekno tube and mask. Functionality was tested by 40 village midwives who w ere also interviewed about ease of use. Ventilation volume was tested using a ma nnequin and computer interface. Other features were assessed by PATH engineers. Result: There was no significant difference in the ventilation volumes among the

four devices or any difference in acceptability to midwives or infection preven tion ability, but the tube and mask devices were considered easier to clean. Con clusion: Given the similarity in functionality, ease of use, infection preventio n, and portability and the significant difference in price, public health expert s and neonatologists chose the local tube and mask device for use by village mid wives. Journal of Perinatology (2011) 31, 664-670; doi:10.1038/jp.2011.7; publis hed online 17 February 2011 [Seamans, Y; Tsu, V] PATH, Seattle, WA 98109 USA ; [Ariawan, I] Univ Indonesia, Ctr Hlth Res, Depok, Indonesia; [Agustini, M] Gra nd Depok City Sektor, Depok, Indonesia; [Kosim, MS] Diponegoro Univ, Dr Kariadi Hosp, Dept Pediat, Semarang, Indonesia Tsu, V (reprint author), PATH, POB 90092 2, Seattle, WA 98109 USA vtsu@path.org Save the Children USA; Bill & Me linda Gates Foundation We thank Steve Wall from the Saving Newborn Lives for hi s technical support and encouragement; Ina Hernawati from the Republic of Indone sia Ministry of Health; Triyani from the Cirebon District Health Office for thei r field support; and Anna Alisyahbana and Nani Walandouw from the Indonesia Pedi atric Association for their technical advice. This journal article was supported with funds provided by Save the Children USA through a grant from the Bill & Me linda Gates Foundation. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the author s and do not necessarily reflect the views of Save the Children USA or the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. 14 0 0 NATURE PUBLISHIN G GROUP NEW YORK 75 VARICK ST, 9TH FLR, NEW YORK, NY 10013-1917 USA 0743-8346 J PERINATOL J. Perinatol. OCT 2011 31 10 664 670 10.1038/jp.2011.7 7 Obstetrics & Gynecology; Pediatrics Obstetrics & Gynecology; Pediatrics 826LX WOS:000295356700006 J Choi, CQ Choi, Charles Q. ENGINEERING Instant Health Checks for Buildings and Bridges Sensors can detect d amage that may be invisible to the naked eye SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN English Editorial Material 0 0 0 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP NEW YORK 75 VARICK ST, 9T H FLR, NEW YORK, NY 10013-1917 USA 0036-8733 SCI AM Sci.Am. OCT 2011 305 4 24 24 10.1038/scientificamerican1011-24a 1 Multidisciplinar y Sciences Science & Technology - Other Topics 826AI WOS:000295323300 017 J Cheng, DA Cheng, Dorothy A. Effects of class size on alternative educational outcomes across disciplines ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION REVIEW English Article Class size; Student evaluations; Student learning; College quality; Student sati sfaction STUDENT-EVALUATIONS; GRADES; SATISFACTION; PERFORMANCE; UNIVERSI TY This is the first study to use self-reported ratings of student learning , instructor recommendations, and course recommendations as the outcome measure to estimate class size effects, doing so across 24 disciplines. Fixed-effects mo dels controlling for heterogeneous courses and instructors reveal that increasin g enrollment has negative and significant effects on student satisfaction in Soc iology. Political Science, Computer Science and Engineering, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Educational outcomes in Linguistics, Psychology, Biologic al Sciences, Chemistry, Math, Physics, Cognitive Sciences, Visual Arts, History, and Philosophy are unaffected by class size. Other disciplines, including Econo mics, have inconclusive findings. No discipline benefits from increasing enrollm ent. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Econ, Irvine, CA 92697 USA Cheng, DA (reprint author), Univ Calif Irvine, D ept Econ, Irvine, CA 92697 USA dacheng@uci.edu 19 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0272-7757 ECON EDU C REV Econ. Educ. Rev. OCT 2011 30 5 980 990 10.1016/j.econedurev.2011.04.009 11 Economics; Education & Educational Research Business & Economics; Education & Educational Research 823TF WOS:000295148700017 J Rios-Solis, L; Halim, M; Cazares, A; Morris, P; Ward, JM; Hailes, HC; Da

lby, PA; Baganz, F; Lye, GJ Rios-Solis, L.; Halim, M .; Cazares, A.; Morris, P.; Ward, J. M.; Hailes, H. C.; Dalby, P. A.; Baganz, F. ; Lye, G. J. A toolbox approach for the rapid evaluation of multi-ste p enzymatic syntheses comprising a 'mix and match' E. coli expression system wit h microscale experimentation BIOCATALYSIS AND BIOTRANSFORMATION English Article transketolase; transamin ase; biocatalyst; multi-step enzymatic synthesis; chiral amino alcohols; de novo pathway OMEGA-TRANSAMINASE; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; KINETIC RESOLUTION; ALPHAMETHYLBENZYLAMINE; TRANSKETOLASE ACTIVITY; DIRECTED EVOLUTION; ORGANIC-SYNTHESIS ; AMINO-ALCOHOLS; CHIRAL AMINES; BIOCATALYSIS This work describes an experimen tal 'toolbox' for the rapid evaluation and optimisation of multi-step enzymatic syntheses comprising a 'mix and match' E. coli-based expression system and autom ated microwell scale experimentation. The approach is illustrated with a de novo designed pathway for the synthesis of optically pure amino alcohols using the e nzymes transketolase (TK) and transaminase (TAm) to catalyze asymmetric carbon-c arbon bond formation and selective chiral amine group addition respectively. The E. coli expression system, based on two compatible plasmids, enables pairs of e nzymes from previously engineered and cloned TK and TAm libraries to be evaluate d for the sequential conversion of different initial substrates. This is complem ented by the microwell experimentation which enables efficient investigation of different biocatalyst forms, use of different amine donors and substrate feeding strategies. Using this experimental 'toolbox', one-pot syntheses of the diaster eoisomers (2S,3S)-2-aminopentane-1,3-diol (APD) and (2S,3R)-2-amino-1,3,4-butane triol (ABT) were designed and performed, which gave final product yields of 90% mol/mol for APD and 87% mol/mol for ABT (relative to the initial TK substrates) within 25 hours. For the synthesis of APD, the E coli TK mutant D469E was paired with the TAm from Chromobacterium violaceum 2025 while for ABT synthesis the wi ld-type E. coli TK exhibited the highest specific activity and ee(enantiomeric e xcess) of >95%. For both reactions, whole-cell forms of the TK-TAm biocatalyst p erformed better than cell lysates while isopropylamine (IPA) was a preferable am ine donor than methylbenzylamine (MBA) since side reactions with the initial TK substrates were avoided. The available libraries of TK and TAm enzymes and scala ble nature of the microwell data suggest this 'toolbox' provides an efficient ap proach to early stage bioconversion process design in the chemical and pharmaceu tical sectors. [Rios-Solis, L; Halim, M; Morris, P; Dalby, PA; Baganz, F; Lye, GJ] UCL, Dept Biochem Engn, London WC1E 7JE, England; [Cazares, A; Hailes, HC] U CL, Dept Chem, London WC1H 0AJ, England; [Ward, JM] UCL, Inst Struct & Mol Biol, London WC1E 6BT, England Lye, GJ (reprint author), UCL, Dept Biochem Engn , Torrington Pl, London WC1E 7JE, England g.lye@ucl.ac.uk Mexican National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT); Mexican Ministry of Public Educat ion (SEP); Ministry of Higher Education of Malaysia (MOHE); Royal Thai Governmen t; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) at University Coll ege London (London, UK)[GR/S62505/01] The Mexican National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT), The Mexican Ministry of Public Education (SEP), The M inistry of Higher Education of Malaysia (MOHE) and The Royal Thai Government are acknowledged for the support to the authors of this work. The UK Engineering an d Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) is thanked for the support of the m ultidisciplinary Bio-catalysis Integrated with Chemistry and Engineering (BiCE) programme (GR/S62505/01) at University College London (London, UK). The help fro m the thirteen industrial partners supporting the BiCE programme is also acknowl edged. 38 0 0 INFORMA HEALTHCARE LONDON TELEPHON E HOUSE, 69-77 PAUL STREET, LONDON EC2A 4LQ, ENGLAND 1024-2422 BIOCATAL BIOTRANSFOR Biocatal. Biotransform. OCT 2011 29 5 192 203 10.3109/10242422.2011.609589 12 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 824SY WOS:0002 95223600005 J Lambert, S; Nicot, F; Gotteland, P Lambert, Stephane; Nicot, Francois; Gotteland, Philippe Uniaxial compressive beh avior of scrapped tire and sand-filled wire netted geocell with a geotextile env

elope GEOTEXTILES AND GEOMEMBRANES English Article Gabion; Uniaxial compression; Scrapped tires; Geocell; Hexagonal wire mesh MODEL; SOIL Cellular structures are widely used in civil engineering. Their design is based on the understanding of the mechanical behavior of geocells. Thi s paper investigates the response of a single geocell to a uniaxial compression test. The geocells were cubic, either 500 mm or 300 mm on a side. The fill mater ials were sand and scrapped tire and sand mixtures in different mass ratios. The envelope of the geocell was made up of a hexagonal wire netting cage and a cont ainment geotextile. The response of the geocell is discussed based on the axial load and displacement measurements as well as the change in geocell volume. The axial load was found to be globally governed by the interaction between the fill material and the envelope, which depends on the shape of the wire mesh and the volumetric behavior of the fill material. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights rese rved. [Lambert, S; Nicot, F] Cemagref, UR ETGR, F-38402 St Martin Dheres, Fran ce; [Gotteland, P] DU Grenoble Univ, UJF INPG CNRS UMR5521, 3SR, F-38041 Grenobl e 9, France Lambert, S (reprint author), Cemagref, UR ETGR, F-38402 St Marti n Dheres, France stephane.lambert@cemagref.fr French National Research Agency (ANR) This research was completed within the REMPARe project, funded b y the French National Research Agency (ANR). The authors would like to thank the Technological University Institute of Grenoble (A. Petronne) for technical assi stance. 23 0 0 ELSEVIER SCI LTD OXFORD THE BOUL EVARD, LANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, OXON, ENGLAND 0266-1144 GEOTEXT GEOMEMBRANES Geotext. Geomembr. OCT 2011 29 5 483 490 10.1016/j.geotexmem.2011.04.001 8 Engineering, Geological; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Engineering; Geology 825TJ WOS:000295304700005 J Hard, T Hard, Torleif Protein engineer ing to stabilize soluble amyloid beta-protein aggregates for structural and func tional studies FEBS JOURNAL English Review Alzheimer's disease; amyloid; amyloid beta-protein; cysteine; disulfide engineer ing; neurotoxicity; oligomer; protein engineering; protein structure; protofibri l ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE; DISULFIDE BONDS; FIBRIL FORMATION; BINDING-PROTEIN; PEPTIDE; OLIGOMERS; PROTOFIBRILS; NUCLEATION; NEUROTOXICITY; A-BETA(1-42) The molecular biology underlying protein aggregation and neuronal death in Alzhe imer's disease is not yet completely understood, but small soluble nonamyloid ag gregates of the amyloid beta-protein (A beta) have been shown to play a fundamen tal neurotoxic role. The composition and biological action of such aggregates, k nown as oligomers and protofibrils, are therefore areas of intense study. Howeve r, research is complicated by the multitude of different interconverting aggrega tes that A beta can form in vitro and in vivo, and by the inhomogeneity and inst ability of in vitro preparations. Here we review recent studies in which protein engineering, and in particular disulfide engineering, has been applied to stabi lize different A beta aggregates. For example, several techniques now exist to o btain stable and neurotoxic protofibrillar forms of A beta, and engineered A bet a dimers, or larger aggregates formed by these, have been shown to specifically induce neuronal damage in a way that mimics Alzheimer's disease pathology. Disul fide engineering has also revealed structural properties of neurotoxic aggregate s, for instance that A beta in protofibrils and globular oligomers adopts a beta -hairpin conformation that is similar to, but topologically distinct from, the c onformation of A beta in mature amyloid fibrils. Protein engineering is therefor e a workable strategy to address many of the outstanding questions relating to t he structure, interconversion and biological effects of oligomers and protofibri ls of A beta. Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Biol, SE-75124 Uppsala, Swede n Hard, T (reprint author), Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Dept Mol Biol, Box 5 90, SE-75124 Uppsala, Sweden torleif.hard@slu.se 62 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 1742-464X FEBS J FEBS J. OCT 2011 278 20 SI 3884 3892 10.1111/j.1742-4 658.2011.08295.x 9 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 826EW WOS:000295335500010

J Li, Z; Li, P; Krishnan, A; Liu, JD Li, Zhen g; Li, Ping; Krishnan, Arun; Liu, Jingdong Large-scale dynamic gene regulatory network inference combining differential equation models with local dynamic Bayesian network analysis BIOINFORMATICS English Article CELL-CYCLE; COMPOUND-MODE; EXPRESSION; BRCA1; IDENTIFICATION; PATHWAY Motivati on: Reverse engineering gene regulatory networks, especially large size networks from time series gene expression data, remain a challenge to the systems biolog y community. In this article, a new hybrid algorithm integrating ordinary differ ential equation models with dynamic Bayesian network analysis, called Differenti al Equation-based Local Dynamic Bayesian Network (DELDBN), was proposed and impl emented for gene regulatory network inference. Results: The performance of DELDB N was benchmarked with an in vivo dataset from yeast. DELDBN significantly impro ved the accuracy and sensitivity of network inference compared with other approa ches. The local causal discovery algorithm implemented in DELDBN also reduced th e complexity of the network inference algorithm and improved its scalability to infer larger networks. We have demonstrated the applicability of the approach to a network containing thousands of genes with a dataset from human HeLa cell tim e series experiments. The local network around BRCA1 was particularly investigat ed and validated with independent published studies. BRAC1 network was significa ntly enriched with the known BRCA1-relevant interactions, indicating that DELDBN can effectively infer large size gene regulatory network from time series data. [Li, Z; Li, P; Liu, JD] Monsanto Co, Chesterfield, MO 63017 USA; [Krishnan, A] M onsanto Res Ctr, Bangalore 560092, Karnataka, India Li, Z (reprint author), Monsanto Co, Mail Zone CC1A, Chesterfield, MO 63017 USA 26 0 0 OXFORD UNIV PRESS OXFORD GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFO RD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND 1367-4803 BIOINFORMATICS Bioinformatics OCT 1 2011 27 19 2686 2691 10.1093/bioinformatics/btr454 6 Biochemical Research Met hods; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applications; Mathematical & Computational Biology; Statistics & Probability Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Computer Science; Mathematical & Computational Biology; Mathematics 827FC WOS:0002 95412200010 J Wu, CH; Lee, HC; Chen, BS Wu, Chih-Hung; L ee, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Bor-Sen Robust synthetic gene network design via library-based search method BIOINFORMATICS English Article ESCHERICHIA-COLI; DIRECTED EVOLUTION; MAMMALIAN-CELLS; TOGGLE SWITCH; EXPRESSION ; CONSTRUCTION; OPTIMIZATION; OSCILLATOR; ALGORITHMS; PROMOTER Motivation: Synt hetic biology aims to develop the artificial gene networks with desirable behavi ors using systematic method. These networks with desired behaviors could be cons tructed using diverse biological parts, which may limit the development to compl ex synthetic gene networks. Fortunately, some well-characterized promoter librar ies for engineering gene networks are widely available. Thus, a synthetic gene n etwork can be constructed by selecting adequate promoters from promoter librarie s to achieve the desired behaviors. However, the present promoter libraries cann ot be directly applied to engineer a synthetic gene network. In order to efficie ntly select adequate promoters from promoter libraries for a synthetic gene netw ork, promoter libraries are needed to be redefined based on the dynamic gene reg ulation. Results: Based on four design specifications, a library-based search me thod is proposed to efficiently select the most adequate promoter set from the r edefined promoter libraries by a genetic algorithm (GA) to achieve optimal refer ence tracking design. As the number and size of promoter libraries increase, the proposed method can play an important role in the systematic design of syntheti c biology. [Wu, CH; Chen, BS] Natl Tsing Hua Univ, Dept Elect Engn, Lab Sys t Biol, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan; [Lee, HC] Natl Chiao Tung Univ, Dept Biol Sci & T echnol, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan Wu, CH (reprint author), Natl Tsing Hua Univ, De pt Elect Engn, Lab Syst Biol, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan National Science Council of Taiwan[NSC 99-2745-E-007-001-ASP, 100-2745-E-007-001-ASP] Funding: This work was supported by the National Science Council of Taiwan under grant N o. NSC 99-2745-E-007-001-ASP and No. 100-2745-E-007-001-ASP. 44

0 0 OXFORD UNIV PRESS OXFORD GREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6 DP, ENGLAND 1367-4803 BIOINFORMATICS Bioinformatics OCT 1 2011 27 19 2700 2706 10.1093/ bioinformatics/btr465 7 Biochemical Research Methods; Bi otechnology & Applied Microbiology; Computer Science, Interdisciplinary Applicat ions; Mathematical & Computational Biology; Statistics & Probability Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Computer Science ; Mathematical & Computational Biology; Mathematics 827FC WOS:000295412200 012 J Mendelson, A; Frank, E; Allred, C; Jones, E; Chen, M; Zhao, WL; Mao, JJ Mendelson, Avital; Frank, Eric; Allred, Chad; Jones, Elena; Chen, Mo; Zhao, Wenl i; Mao, Jeremy J. Chondrogenesis by chemotactic homing of synovium , bone marrow, and adipose stem cells in vitro FASEB JOURNAL English Article tissue engineering; TGF-beta 3; SDF-1; chondrocytes GROWTH-FACTOR; ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE; PROGENITOR CELLS; ST ROMAL CELLS; TISSUE; DIFFERENTIATION; REGENERATION; SCAFFOLDS; REPAIR; MICROSPHE RES Cell transplantation has been well explored for cartilage regeneration. We recently showed that the entire articular surface of a synovial joint can reg enerate by endogenous cell homing and without cell transplantation. However, the sources of endogenous cells that regenerate articular cartilage remain elusive. Here, we studied whether cytokines not only chemotactically recruit adipose ste m cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and synovium stem cells (SSCs) bu t also induce chondrogenesis of the recruited cells. Recombinant human transform ing growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3; 100 ng) and/or recombinant human stromal d erived factor-1 beta (SDF-1 beta; 100 ng) was control released into an acellular collagen sponge cube with underlying ASCs, MSCs, or SSCs in monolayer culture. Although all cell types randomly migrated into the acellular collagen sponge cub e, TGF-beta 3 and/or SDF-1 beta recruited significantly more cells than the cyto kine-free control group. In 6 wk, TGF-beta 3 alone recruited substantial numbers of ASCs (558 +/- 65) and MSCs (302 +/- 52), whereas codelivery of TGF-beta 3 an d SDF-1 beta was particularly chemotactic to SSCs (400 +/- 120). Proliferation o f the recruited cells accounted for some, but far from all, of the observed cell ularity. TGF-beta 3 and SDF-1 beta codelivery induced significantly higher aggre can gene expression than the cytokine-free group for ASCs, MSCs, and SSCs. Type II collagen gene expression was also significantly higher for ASCs and SSCs by S DF-1 and TGF-beta 3 codelivery. Remarkably, the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was detected among all cell types. Thus, homing of multiple stem/pro genitor cell populations may potentially serve as an alternative or adjunctive a pproach to cell transplantation for cartilage regeneration.-Mendelson, A., Frank , E., Allred, C., Jones, E., Chen, M., Zhao, W., Mao, J. J. Chondrogenesis by ch emotactic homing of synovium, bone marrow, and adipose stem cells in vitro. FASE B J. 25, 3496-3504 (2011). www.fasebj.org [Mendelson, A; Frank, E; Allred, C; Chen, M; Zhao, WL; Mao, JJ] Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Tissue Engn & Regenerat Med Lab, New York, NY 10032 USA; [Mendelson, A; Mao, JJ] Columbia Univ, Dept Bio med Engn, New York, NY 10032 USA; [Jones, E] Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Mol Med, Lee ds, W Yorkshire, England Mao, JJ (reprint author), Columbia Univ, Med Ctr , Tissue Engn & Regenerat Med Lab, 630 W 168 St,PH7E-CDM, New York, NY 10032 USA jmao@columbia.edu U.S. National Institutes of Health[RC2-D-E020767, R01-EB -0062621] The authors thank Ryan V. Maneevese, Brian H. Sybo, Brandon R. K napp, Stephanie Bohaczuk, and Andrew Chang for technical assistance. Adipose ste m cells were a generous gift from Dr. Jeffrey M. Gimble (Pennington Biomedical R esearch Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rogue, LA, USA). The present s tudy is funded in part by U.S. National Institutes of Health grants RC2-D-E02076 7 and R01-EB-0062621. 49 0 0 FEDERATION AMER SOC EXP BIOL BETHESDA 9650 ROCKVILLE PIKE, BETHESDA, MD 20814-3998 USA 0892-6638 FASEB J Faseb J. OCT 2011 25 10 3496 3504 10.1096/fj.10-176305 9 Biochemi stry & Molecular Biology; Biology; Cell Biology Biochemistry & Molecular Biology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Cell Biology 826LU WOS:0002 95356400020

J Kisi, O; Shiri, J Kisi, Ozgur; Shiri, Jala l Precipitation Forecasting Using Wavelet-Genetic Programming and Wavelet-Neuro-Fuzzy Conjunction Models WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT English Article Precipitation; Genetic p rogramming; Neuro-fuzzy; Wavelet; Modeling COMPUTING TECHNIQUE; INFERENCE S YSTEM; WATER-LEVEL; NETWORKS; DECOMPOSITION; PREDICTION; TERM Forecasting prec ipitation as a major component of the hydrological cycle is of primary importanc e in water resources engineering, planning and management as well as in scheduli ng irrigation practices. In the present study the abilities of hybrid wavelet-ge netic programming [i.e. wavelet-gene-expression programming, WGEP] and wavelet-n euro-fuzzy (WNF) models for daily precipitation forecasting are investigated. In the first step, the single genetic programming (GEP) and neuro-fuzzy (NF) model s are applied to forecast daily precipitation amounts based on previously record ed values, but the results are very weak. In the next step the hybrid WGEP and W NF models are used by introducing the wavelet coefficients as GEP and NF inputs, but no satisfactory results are produced, even though the accuracies increased to a great extent. In the third step, the new WGEP and WNF models are built; by merging the best single and hybrid models' inputs and introducing them as the mo dels inputs. The results show the new hybrid WGEP models are effective in foreca sting daily precipitation, while the new WNF models are unable to learn the non linear process of precipitation very well. [Shiri, J] Univ Tabriz, Water En gn Dept, Fac Agr, Tabriz 51664, Iran; [Kisi, O] Erciyes Univ, Hydraul Div, Dept Civil Engn, Fac Engn, Kayseri, Turkey Shiri, J (reprint author), Univ Tabriz, Water Engn Dept, Fac Agr, Tabriz 51664, Iran j_shiri2005@yahoo.com 48 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0920-4741 WATER RESOUR MANAG Water Resour. Manag. OCT 2011 25 13 3135 3152 10.1007/s11269-011-9849-3 18 Engineering, Civil; Water Resources Engineering; Water Resources 828QW WOS:000295518500004 J Monteiro, LFS; de Oliveira, KM Salin Monteiro, Luis Felipe; de Oliveira, Kathia Marcal Defining a catalog of indicators to support process performance analysis JOURNAL OF SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE AND EVOLUTION-RESEARCH AND PRACTICE English Article software measures; process performance analysis; indicators SOFTWARE METRICS PROGRAMS To achieve high-level maturity in software process improvement, organizations must change the project management focus from the empirical assess ment of process performance to quantitative management of the software process b ased on performance measures and statistical techniques. To this purpose, manage rs need to work with years of measurement data to establish control limits and c onduct performance analyses. In this context, some difficulties are encountered: Which measures should be used, considering that early definition is important? Which statistical technique is more adequate in each case? How should we work wi th the data? We found more than 500 different measures in the literature applica ble to software process performance and a number of different statistical techni ques to analyze and choose from. This article aims at defining a catalog of indi cators with their related measures in answer to the above questions, in a way th at can help managers perform process performance analysis of the Capability Matu rity Model Integration for Development (CMMI-DEV) engineering processes. This ar ticle presents how we define and use this catalog and the complete specification of two indicators. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [Monteiro, LFS; de Oliveira, KM] Univ Catolica Brasilia, BR-70790160 Brasilia, DF, Brazil de Oliveira, KM (reprint author), Univ Catolica Brasilia, SGAN 916,Norte AV W5, BR-70790160 Brasilia, DF, Brazil kathiamoliveira@gmail.com 47 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MAL DEN 02148, MA USA 1532-060X J SOFTW MAINT EVOL-R J. Softw . Maint. Evol.-Res. Pract. OCT 2011 23 6 395 422 10.1002/smr.482 28 Computer Science , Software Engineering Computer Science 829AI WOS:000295546400001 J Ahlroos, T; Hakala, TJ; Helle, A; Linder, MB; Holmberg, K; Mahlberg, R;

Laaksonen, P; Varjus, S Ahlroos, T.; Hakala, T. J.; Hell e, A.; Linder, M. B.; Holmberg, K.; Mahlberg, R.; Laaksonen, P.; Varjus, S. Biomimetic approach to water lubrication with biomolecular additives PROCEEDI NGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART J-JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING TRI BOLOGY English Article biomimet ics; boundary lubrication; biomolecules; hydrophobins HUMAN SERUM-ALBUMIN; BOU NDARY LUBRICATION; SOLID-SURFACES; ADSORPTION; PROTEIN; HYDROPHOBIN; BEHAVIOR; L UBRICIN; TIME; PH The aim of this study is to find a connection between me chanical engineering and biotechnology by utilizing biomimetics in lubrication. The objective is to improve boundary lubrication by biomolecules in water-based systems. Proteins were used because they can form films and multilayers on the s urfaces and thus prevent direct contact between them. In this study, hydrophobin and albumin proteins are studied as additives to enable water lubrication. [Ahlroos, T; Hakala, TJ; Helle, A; Linder, MB; Holmberg, K; Mahlberg, R; Laakson en, P; Varjus, S] VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, FI-02044 Espoo, Finland Holmberg , K (reprint author), VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, POB 1000, FI-02044 Espoo, Finlan d Kenneth.Holmberg@vtt.fi Academy of Finland; Tekes, the Finnish Funding A gency for Technology and Innovation The study was supported by the Academy o f Finland (project Biomimetic water lubrication) and Tekes, the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (project New bioinspired and bio-based solu tions for lubrication). 28 0 0 SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD LONDON 1 OLIVERS YARD, 55 CITY ROAD, LONDON EC1Y 1SP, ENGLAND 1350-6501 P I MECH ENG J-J ENG Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. Part J.-J. Eng. Tribol. OCT 2011 225 J10 SI 1013 1022 10.1177/ 1350650111406635 10 Engineering, Mechanical Engineer ing 825NI WOS:000295284900005 J Jagtap, S; Johnson, A Jagtap, Santosh; Johnson , Aylmer In-service information required by engineering designers RESEARCH IN ENGINEERING DESIGN English Article In-service information; Engineering design; Design for service; Aerospace engine ering; Knowledge management RELIABILITY; KNOWLEDGE; PRODUCTS This pap er describes some research stimulated by a fundamental shift that is occurring i n the manufacture and marketing of aero engines for commercial and defence purpo ses, away from the selling of products to the provision of services. The collabo rating aerospace company offers contracts under which it remains responsible for the maintenance of engines which have been purchased by airlines through these contracts based on payment for usage. This has triggered a major re-assessment o f the design of aero engines to reduce their overall life cycle costs, while mai ntaining performance efficiency. In this context, the use of in-service experien ce of existing engines is important in the design of components and systems of a new engine, to tackle in-service issues through design and thus to reduce maint enance costs and increase reliability. This paper aims at identifying designers' requirements regarding in-service information. Semi-structured interviews with designers from an aerospace company were conducted; after these interviews, the designers were requested to comment on a set of questions regarding in-service i nformation, indicating how frequently they might ask each of them when designing a new component or system. In addition, some documents containing the in-servic e information considered by the designers in designing components and systems of a new engine were analysed. The results indicate what in-service information is required by designers for this new task. [Jagtap, S; Johnson, A] Univ Cam bridge, Dept Engn, Engn Design Ctr, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Jagtap, S (repri nt author), Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Engn Design Ctr, Trumpington St, Cambridg e CB2 1PZ, England snjagtap22@gmail.com; alj3@cam.ac.uk DTI; Rolls-Royce plc The authors acknowledge the support of the DTI and Rolls-Royce plc throu gh the UTP for Design and would particularly like to thank Colin Cadas, David Kn ott, Andy Harrison, and the participating designers and service engineers. 38 0 0 SPRINGER HEIDELBERG HEIDELBERG TIERGARTENSTRASS E 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG, GERMANY 0934-9839 RES ENG DES Res. Eng. Design OCT 2011 22 4 207 221 10.1007/s00163-011-0107-8 15

Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Engineering, Industrial; Engineering, Manufactur ing Engineering 824AV WOS:000295172000001 J Curtis, SK; Harston, SP; Mattson, CA Curtis, Shane K.; Harston, Stephen P.; Mattson, Christopher A. The fundamentals of barriers to reverse engineering and their implementation into mechanical com ponents RESEARCH IN ENGINEERING DESIGN English Article Reverse engineering; Barrier to reverse engineering; Product imitation DESIGN I NTENT; ECONOMICS; MODELS; PARTS Reverse engineering is a common design strategy in industry. It is a term that has come to encompass a large array of engineerin g and design activities in the literature; however, in its basic form, reverse e ngineering is simply the process of extracting information about a product from the product itself. Depending on its use, it may or may not be advantageous to u tilize a reverse engineering strategy. As with any rational decision, reverse en gineering is only favorable when the benefits from its use outweigh the investme nt. Therefore, a general understanding of the principles that increase the diffi culty or investment required to reverse engineer mechanical products would be he lpful for everyone affected by reverse engineering activities. In this paper, we articulate and explore these fundamental principles after reviewing examples fr om the literature and from our own experience. We then use the principles as a b asis for the development of a methodology to build barriers to reverse engineeri ng into new products. [Curtis, SK; Harston, SP; Mattson, CA] Brigham Young Uni v, Dept Mech Engn, Provo, UT 84602 USA Mattson, CA (reprint author), Brigham Yo ung Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Provo, UT 84602 USA shanekcurtis@gmail.com; sharston @gmail.com; mattson@byu.edu National Science Foundation[CMMI-0800904] This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CMMI-0800904 fo r Christopher A. Mattson and Brent L. Adams. 64 0 0 SPRINGER HEIDELBERG HEIDELBERG TIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG , GERMANY 0934-9839 RES ENG DES Res. Eng. Design OCT 2011 22 4 245 261 10.1007/s00163-011-0109-6 17 Engineering, Multidiscip linary; Engineering, Industrial; Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering 824AV WOS:000295172000003 J Seki, K; Nishimura, H Seki, Kenichi; Nishimura , Hidekazu A module-based thermal design approach for distributed p roduct development RESEARCH IN ENGINEERING DESIGN English Article Global engineering; Thermal design; Consumer electronics; Product development pr ocess; Design structure matrix; Multiple-domain matrix Today, market de mand for smaller, more powerful consumer electronics is rapidly posing a major c hallenge to product design. Several issues have been identified as major factors that affect the quality, cost, and delivery of product design in the so-called distributed design project. To address these concerns, a structured design metho d is needed. This paper proposes a design framework that can moderate inconsiste nt performance of system components (modules) resulting from a lack of communica tion between design sites. Module interconnection parameters at a system level a re determined using the behavior-coupling matrix and work distribution matrix; i nitial design target values (ITVs) for system boundary conditions are provided f or each module design. Our results show that system decomposition using ITVs off ers a suitable framework for designing a product, considering the overall system behavior where each module is independently designed at different locations. [Seki, K; Nishimura, H] Keio Univ, Grad Sch Syst Design & Management, Kohoku Ku, Kanagawa 2238526, Japan Seki, K (reprint author), Keio Univ, Grad Sch Sy st Design & Management, Kohoku Ku, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kanagawa 2238526, Japan Kenichi.Seki@a7.keio.jp Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, and Technology in Japan This work was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid from the Global Center of Excellence Program for the "Center for Education and Research of Symbiotic, Safe, and Secure System Design" from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, and Technology in Japan. We also gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Prof. Kos Ishii, Stanford University. Prof. Ishii reviewed the initial manuscript of t his paper and decided to submit it to Research in Engineering Design, but unfort unately, he passed away before the actual submission. We are thankful to Prof. I

shii for his advice and unconventional and inclusive way of thinking for design research. We would also like to thank Dr. Laurent Balmelli of IBM Software Group for his kind help and instruction. We also acknowledge Dr. Sun Kim and the Manu facturing Modeling Laboratory at Stanford University for their continuous suppor t and discussions in this research. 19 0 0 SPRINGER HEIDELBERG HEIDELBERG TIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG, GERMAN Y 0934-9839 RES ENG DES Res. Eng. Design OCT 2011 22 4 279 295 10.1007/ s00163-011-0113-x 17 Engineering, Multidisciplinary; Engineering, Industrial; Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering 824AV WOS:000295172000005 J Landau, D; Biada, J; Chen, Y; Sood, S; Yakar, S; LeRoith, D; Segev, Y; R abkin, R Landau, Daniel; Biada, Jaclyn; Chen, Yu; Sood, Sumita; Yakar, Shoshanah; LeRoith, Derek; Segev, Yael; Rabkin, Ralph A marked deficiency in circulating and renal IGF-I peptide does not inhibit comp ensatory renal enlargement in uninephrectomized mice GROWTH HORMONE & IGF RES EARCH English Article Insulinlike growth factor I; Mice; Gene disruption; Knockout; Renal hypertrophy; Uninep hrectomy; Models; Animal GROWTH-FACTOR-I; UNILATERAL NEPHRECTOMY; TUBULOG LOMERULAR FEEDBACK; HYPERTROPHY; RATS; INCREASE; HORMONE; KIDNEY; MOUSE Objectiv e: Increase in kidney IGF-I levels due to its increased trapping from the circul ation was hypothesized to be a key mediator of compensatory renal enlargement. W e tested this hypothesis using genetically engineered mice with extremely low ci rculating IGF-I levels. Design: Both IGF-I deficient (ID) and normal (N) mice un derwent a uninephrectomy (UNx) and sacrificed 2 or 9 days later. Results: Initia l body weight (BW) and kidney weight (KW) were significantly reduced in ID vs. N mice, while KW/BW ratios were similar. MW increased post-UNx to a comparable ex tent in ID and N mice (125 +/- 4 and 118 +/- 6% of pre-UNx KW, p < 0.05 vs. C). Kidney IGF-I mRNA levels were similar in the ID and N mice and did not change po st-UNx. Kidney IGF-I peptide levels pre-UNx were significantly lower in ID vs. N mice (25 +/- 5 vs. 305 +/- 39 ng/g) and increased in both groups after UNx, rem aining low in ID mice (45 +/- 4 in ID vs 561 +/- 64 ng/g in N). IGF type 1 recep tor phosphoiylation was unchanged. Conclusion: While a severe deficiency of circ ulating IGF-I impairs body growth, UNx induces a significant and proportional in crease in renal mass in ID mice despite markedly decreased kidney IGF-I levels ( >90% reduction) and no significant change in receptor phosphorylation. This all suggests that factors other than circulating and locally produced IGF-I are resp onsible for compensatory renal enlargement (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights res erved. [Landau, D] Soroka Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, IL-84101 Beer Sheva, Israel; [S egev, Y] Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Fac Hlth Sci, Shraga Segal Dept Microbiol & Immu nol, Beer Sheva, Israel; [Chen, Y; Sood, S; Rabkin, R] Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Div Nephrol, Stanford, CA 94305 USA; [Biada, J; Rabkin, R] Vet Affairs Hlth Care Syst, Res Serv, Palo Alto, CA USA; [Yakar, S; LeRoith, D] Mt Sinai Sch Med, Dia bet & Bone Dis Dept, Div Endocrinol, New York, NY USA Landau, D (reprint autho r), Soroka Univ, Med Ctr, POB 151, IL-84101 Beer Sheva, Israel ldaniel@bgu.ac.i l US-Israel Binational Science Foundation[2003055]; Research Service of th e USA Department Veterans Affairs This study was supported by a Grant-in-a id of the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (no. 2003055) to DL, RR and YS and a Merit Review Grant from the Research Service of the USA Department Vetera ns Affairs to RR. 25 0 0 CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE EDINBURGH JOURNAL PRODUCTION DEPT, ROBERT STEVENSON HOUSE, 1-3 BAXTERS PLA CE, LEITH WALK, EDINBURGH EH1 3AF, MIDLOTHIAN, SCOTLAND 1096-6374 GROWTH HORM IGF RES Growth Horm. IGF Res. OCT 2011 21 5 279 284 10.1016/j.ghir.2011.07.008 6 Cell Biology; Endocrinology & Metabolism Cell Biology; Endocrinology & Me tabolism 827QZ WOS:000295444300007 J Macedo, RM; Lacerda, SA; Brentegani, LG; Bombonato-Prado, KF; Prata, CA Macedo, Rander Moreira; Lacerda, Suzie Aparecida; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; Bo mbonato-Prado, Karina Fittipaldi; Prata, Celina Antonio Osteointegration of Autogenous Bone Graft Associated With Osteoblastic Cells Under Treatment Wit

h Caffeine IMPLANT DENTISTRY English Article bony repair; calvaria graft; bone defects TISSUE-ENGINEERED BONE; MESENCHY MAL STEM-CELLS; PERIODONTAL REGENERATION; IN-VITRO; MARROW; RECONSTRUCTION; DEFE CTS; INVITRO; GROWTH; RATS Purpose: The present study investigated osteoint egration of autogenous bone (AB) from calvaria graft associated with osteoblasti c cells (OC) in bone defects in rats subjected to daily administration of caffei ne. Materials and Methods: Male rats received daily intraperitoneal injection of 1.5% caffeine (0.2 mL/100 g body weight) or saline solution for 30 days. Then t hey were anesthetized, submitted to the extraction of the upper right incisor, a nd implanted with AB only and AB + OC. The animals were killed on 7th, 21st, and 42nd days after surgery, and their maxilla were processed for obtaining semiser ial sections (5 mu m) stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Through image analysis system, the bone volume and the quality of graft in adjacent areas were estimat ed. Results: The results showed that in caffeine treatment, the AB + OC graft sh owed no foreign body and acute inflammatory reactions inside the defect when com pared to AB. The histometric results revealed that the association AB + OC produ ced significant increase (10%-15%) in bone volume in later experimental period ( 42 days) when compared with saline solution group (P <= 0.01). Conclusions: It w as concluded that the association of AB from calvaria + OC demonstrated progress ive osteointegration and accelerated the repair of bone defects in animals treat ed with daily caffeine. (Implant Dent 2011;20:369-373) [Lacerda, SA] Univ Sao P aulo, Fac Odontol Ribeirao Preto, Dept Morphol Stomatol & Physiol, Sch Dent, BR14040904 Sao Paulo, Brazil Lacerda, SA (reprint author), Univ Sao Paulo, Fa c Odontol Ribeirao Preto, Dept Morphol Stomatol & Physiol, Sch Dent, Ave Cafe SN, BR-14040904 Sao Paulo, Brazil suzie@forp.usp.br 43 0 0 LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS PHILADELPHIA 530 WALN UT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA 1056-6163 IMPLANT DENT Implant Dent. OCT 2011 20 5 369 373 10.1097/ID.0b013e31822b9b53 5 Dentistr y, Oral Surgery & Medicine Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine 822XP WOS:000295084200011 J Samarao, AK; Ayazi, F Samarao, Ashwin K.; Ayaz i, Farrokh Postfabrication Electrical Trimming of Silicon Micromech anical Resonators via Joule Heating JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM S English Article Electric al trimming; Joule heating; postfabrication; thermomigration EUTECTIC ALLOYS; AU; SI; THERMOMIGRATION; FABRICATION This paper presents a method to electric ally trim the resonance frequency of a silicon bulk acoustic resonator (SiBAR) a fter its fabrication is completed. The small volume of the microresonator can be Joule heated to a sufficiently high temperature to allow for diffusion of depos ited metals from its surface onto its bulk. Such high temperatures also facilita te the formation of silicon-metal bonds which, depending on the metal, are eithe r stronger or weaker compared to the existing silicon-silicon bonds. The former leads to an overall increased stiffness of the resonating element thereby trimmi ng up its resonance frequency, while the latter does the opposite. Both trimming -up and trimming-down by similar to 400 kHz have been demonstrated at a resonanc e frequency of 100 MHz (i.e., trimming range of 4000 ppm) using gold and aluminu m, respectively. The possibility of increasing the trimming range to similar to 4 MHz (i.e., 40 000 ppm) by engineering the resonator geometry is also discussed and demonstrated. [2010-0360] [Samarao, AK] Integrated Device Technol Inc, San Jose, CA 95138 USA; [Ayazi, F] Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Elect & Comp Engn, Atl anta, GA 30332 USA Samarao, AK (reprint author), Integrated Device Technol Inc, San Jose, CA 95138 USA ashwinkumar@gmail.com; ayazi@boulder.nist.gov U.S. Department of Commerce[BS123456]; Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Commer ce under Grant BS123456 and in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Ag ency (DARPA) under the Analog Spectral Processors program. 19 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 1057-7157 J MICROE LECTROMECH S J. Microelectromech. Syst. OCT 2011 20 5

1081 1088 10.1109/JMEMS.2011.2162489 8 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic; Engineering, Mechanical Engineering 828UT WOS:000295529500005 J Dangaria, SJ; Ito, Y; Luan, XH; Diekwisch, TGH Dangaria, Smit Jayant; Ito, Yoshihiro; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H. Successful Periodontal Ligament Regeneration by Periodontal Progenitor Preseedin g on Natural Tooth Root Surfaces STEM CELLS AND DEVELOPMENT English Article HEALING FOLLOWIN G IMPLANTATION; PULP STEM-CELLS; TISSUE; ADHESION; DIFFERENTIATION; TOPOGRAPHY; CULTURES; DEFECTS; MATRIX; REPAIR The regeneration of lost periodontal lig ament (PDL) and alveolar bone is the purpose of periodontal tissue engineering. The goal of the present study was to assess the suitability of 3 odontogenic pro genitor populations from dental pulp, PDL, and dental follicle for periodontal r egeneration when exposed to natural and synthetic apatite surface topographies. We demonstrated that PDL progenitors featured higher levels of periostin and scl eraxis expression, increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential , and pronounced elongated cell shapes on barren root chips when compared with d ental pulp and dental follicle cells. When evaluating the effect of surface char acteristics on PDL progenitors, natural root surfaces resulted in elongated PDL cell shapes, whereas PDL progenitors on synthetic apatite surfaces were rounded or polygonal. In addition, surface coatings affected PDL progenitor gene express ion profiles: collagen I coatings enhanced alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression levels and laminin-1 coatings increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) , nestin, cadherin 1, and keratin 8 expression. PDL progenitors seeded on natura l tooth root surfaces in organ culture formed new periodontal fibers after 3 wee ks of culture. Finally, replantation of PDL progenitor-seeded tooth roots into r at alveolar bone sockets resulted in the complete formation of a new PDL and sta ble reattachment of teeth over a 6-month period. Together, these findings indica te that periodontal progenitor cell type as well as mineral surface topography a nd molecular environment play crucial roles in the regeneration of true periodon tal anchorage. [Diekwisch, TGH] Univ Illinois, Coll Dent, Brodie Lab Craniofaci al Genet, Dept Oral Biol, Chicago, IL 60612 USA; [Luan, XH; Diekwisch, TGH] Univ Illinois, Coll Dent, Brodie Lab Craniofacial Genet, Dept Orthodont, Chicago, IL 60612 USA; [Dangaria, SJ; Diekwisch, TGH] Univ Illinois, Coll Engn, Dept Bioeng n, Chicago, IL 60612 USA Diekwisch, TGH (reprint author), Univ Illinois, Coll Dent, Brodie Lab Craniofacial Genet, Dept Oral Biol, 801 S Paulina St,MC 69 0, Chicago, IL 60612 USA tomdkw@uic.edu National Institute for Dental Re search[DE15425, DE019463] This study was generously supported by the Natio nal Institute for Dental Research Grants DE15425 (to T.G.H.D.) and DE019463 (to X.L.). T.G.H.D. expresses his gratitude for the mentorship of Dr. Lavin Flores-d e-Jacoby, Philipps-University of Marburg, Germany, who first introduced him to t he concept of periodontal progenitors and periodontal regeneration. 36 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STR EET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELLE, NY 10801 USA 1547-3287 STEM CELLS DEV Stem Cells Dev. OCT 2011 20 10 1659 1668 10.1089/scd.2010.0431 10 Cell & Tissue En gineering; Hematology; Medicine, Research & Experimental; Transplantation Cell Biology; Hematology; Research & Experimental Medicine; Transplantation 826AX WOS:000295324900002 J Baer, PC Baer, Patrick C. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Their Potential to Differentiate into the Epithel ial Lineage STEM CELLS AND DEVELOPMENT English Review MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS; IN-VITRO DIFFERENTIATION; PROCESSED LIPOASPIRATE CELL S; IMPROVE POSTNATAL NEOVASCULARIZATION; SERUM-FREE CULTURE; BONE-MARROW; HEPATO CYTE DIFFERENTIATION; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; HEPATIC LINEAGE; HUMAN ORGANS Adiposederived stem cells (ASCs) possess a multilineage differentiation potential, can be used from an autologous origin, and are, therefore, attractive candidates for clinical applications to repair or regenerate damaged tissues and organs. Adipo se tissue as a stem cell source is ubiquitously available and has several advant ages compared with other sources. It is easily accessible in large quantities wi

th a minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and the isolation of ASCs yields a h igh amount of stem cells, which is essential for stem cell-based therapies and t issue engineering. Differentiation of ASCs into cell types of mesodermal origin has been shown in a variety of studies. The plasticity of ASCs toward cells of t he mesodermal lineage has been shown by their differentiation into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and myocytes. Their potential to differentiate into li neages with nonmesodermal origin is even more exciting: ASCs are also able to di fferentiate into cells of ecto- and endodermal origin. Various in vitro and in v ivo studies documented the induced differentiation into neural cells, hepatocyte s, pancreatic islet cells, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells. Epithelial c ells can embryologically arise from each of the 3 germ layers. This article summ arizes and discusses the current knowledge of the potential of ASCs to different iate into the epithelial lineage. The differentiation of ASCs into different typ es of epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, pancreatic cells, and endothelial cells, is highlighted together with a view on current clinical trials and futur e options. Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Div Nephrol, Dept Internal Med 3, D-60590 Frankfurt, Germany Baer, PC (reprint author), Goethe Univ Frankfurt, Div Ne phrol, Dept Internal Med 3, Theodor Stern Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt, Germany p.baer@em.uni-frankfurt.de 129 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELL E, NY 10801 USA 1547-3287 STEM CELLS DEV Stem Cells Dev. OCT 2011 20 10 1805 1816 10.1089/ scd.2011.0086 12 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Hematology; M edicine, Research & Experimental; Transplantation Cell Biology; Hematology ; Research & Experimental Medicine; Transplantation 826AX WOS:000295324900 016 J Kreitz, S; Dohmen, G; Hasken, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Mela, P; Jockenhoevel, S Kreitz, Sebastian; Dohmen, Guido; Hasken, Stefan ; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mela, Petra; Jockenhoevel, Stefan Nondestr uctive Method to Evaluate the Collagen Content of Fibrin-Based Tissue Engineered Structures Via Ultrasound TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS English Article 3-DIMENSIONAL MA TRIX; ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE; HYDROGELS; CONSTRUCTS; CELLS In the field of tissue e ngineering, there is a growing need for quantitative methods to analyze in situ and in real time the tissue development in three-dimensional scaffolds. To evalu ate the performance of cell-gel constructs in terms of extracellular matrix synt hesis, we are still restricted to time-consuming histological and biochemical as says that are not able, as a destructive method, to monitor the tissue formation online. Ultrasound is a well-known noninvasive and nondestructive imaging metho d. Therefore, the potential of ultrasound for the quantitative in vitro evaluati on of tissue development in fibrin-based tissue-engineered structures was evalua ted in this study. As simplified parameter, the gray-scale values of ultrasound scans of cell-embedded fibrin gels were correlated with the hydroxyproline conte nt and the histological and immunohistological images of the same gels at differ ent culturing time points. The gray-scale value of the ultrasound demonstrated a good correlation with the hydroxyproline content (Pearson correlation coefficie nt of 0.98) as marker of collagen formation and with the histological findings. In conclusion, the described simple ultrasound method is a good tool to evaluate the collagen formation of fibrin-based tissue-engineered constructs and facilit ates the broad use to monitor tissue development and remodeling in bioreactor sy stems. [Kreitz, S; Hasken, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Mela, P; Jockenhoevel, S] Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Helmholtz Inst, Inst Appl Med Engn, Dept Tissue Engn & Biomat , D-52074 Aachen, Germany; [Dohmen, G] Univ Hosp Aachen, Dept Thorac & Cardiovas c Surg, Aachen, Germany Jockenhoevel, S (reprint author), Rhein Westfal TH Aache n, Helmholtz Inst, Inst Appl Med Engn, Dept Tissue Engn & Biomat, Pauwelsstr 20, D-52074 Aachen, Germany jockenhoevel@hia.rwth-aachen.de Fordergemeinscha ft Deutsche Kinderherzzentren e.V.; Medical Faculty of the RWTH Aachen Universit y The authors thank the Fordergemeinschaft Deutsche Kinderherzzentren e.V. and the Medical Faculty of the RWTH Aachen University for financial support. 29 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STR

EET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELLE, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 1021 1026 10.1089/ten.tec.2010.0669 6 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 826BA WOS:000295325200 007 J Pudlas, M; Koch, S; Bolwien, C; Thude, S; Jenne, N; Hirth, T; Walles, H; Schenke-Layland, K Pudlas, Marieke; Koch, Steffen; Bolwien, Carsten; Thude, Sibylle; Jenne, Nele; Hirth, Thomas; Walles, Heike; Sch enke-Layland, Katja Raman Spectroscopy: A Noninvasive Analysis Tool for the Discrimination of Human Skin Cells TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHOD S English Article CULTURED HUMAN KERATINOCYTES; IN-VITRO; STRATUM-CORNEUM; TISSUE; MICROSPECTROSCO PY; COLLAGEN; MODEL; FIBROBLASTS; CARCINOMA; MATRIX Noninvasive monitoring o f tissue-engineered (TE) constructs during their in vitro maturation or postimpl antation in vivo is highly relevant for graft evaluation. However, traditional m ethods for studying cell and matrix components in engineered tissues such as his tology, immunohistochemistry, or biochemistry require invasive tissue processing , resulting in the need to sacrifice of TE constructs. Raman spectroscopy offers the unique possibility to analyze living cells label-free in situ and in vivo s olely based on their phenotype-specific biochemical fingerprint. In this study, we aimed to determine the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the noninvasiv e identification and spectral separation of primary human skin fibroblasts, kera tinocytes, and melanocytes, as well as immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Multivariate analysis of cell-type-specific Raman spectra enabled the discrimin ation between living primary and immortalized keratinocytes. We further noninvas ively distinguished between fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and melanocytes. Our fin dings are especially relevant for the engineering of in vitro skin models and fo r the production of artificial skin, where both the biopsy and the transplant co nsist of several cell types. To realize a reproducible quality of TE skin, the d etermination of the purity of the cell populations as well as the detection of p otential molecular changes are important. We conclude therefore that Raman spect roscopy is a suitable tool for the noninvasive in situ quality control of cells used in skin tissue engineering applications. [Pudlas, M; Koch, S; Thude, S; J enne, N; Hirth, T; Walles, H; Schenke-Layland, K] Fraunhofer Inst Interfacial En gn & Biotechnol IGB, Dept Cell & Tissue Engn, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany; [Pudla s, M; Hirth, T] Univ Stuttgart, Inst Interfacial Engn IGVT, Stuttgart, Germany; [Bolwien, C] Fraunhofer Inst Phys Measurement Tech IPM, Freiburg, Germany; [Wall es, H] Univ Wurzburg, Inst Tissue Engn & Regenerat Med, Wurzburg, Germany; [Sche nke-Layland, K] Univ Tubingen, Interuniv Ctr Med Technol Stuttgart Tubingen IZST , Tubingen, Germany Schenke-Layland, K (reprint author), Fraunhofer Inst Int erfacial Engn & Biotechnol IGB, Dept Cell & Tissue Engn, Nobelstr 12, D-70569 St uttgart, Germany katja.schenke-layland@igb.fraunhofer.de Fraunhofer-Gesel lschaft Internal Programs[Attract 692263] The authors would like to thank PD Dr. Thorsten Walles for providing the human tissue samples and Shannon Lee La yland for his helpful comments. The authors are grateful for the financial suppo rt from the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Internal Programs (Grant No. Attract 692263 [to K.S.-L.]). 65 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCH ELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELLE, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 1027 1040 10.1089/ten.tec.2011.008 2 14 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Biotechnology & Appli ed Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiolo gy 826BA WOS:000295325200008 J Pereira, DR; Silva-Correia, J; Caridade, SG; Oliveira, JT; Sousa, RA; Sa lgado, AJ; Oliveira, JM; Mano, JF; Sousa, N; Reis, RL Pereira, Diana Ribeiro; Silva-Correia, Joana; Caridade, Sofia Gloria; Oliveira, Joao T.; Sousa, Rui A.; Salgado, Antonio J.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Mano, Joao F. ; Sousa, Nuno; Reis, Rui L. Development of Gellan Gum-Based Micropar ticles/Hydrogel Matrices for Application in the Intervertebral Disc Regeneration

TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS English Article LOW-BACK-PAIN; NUCLEUS PULPOSUS; HYDROGELS; MICROSPHERES; DEGENERATION; EXPRESSI ON; CHALLENGES; DELIVERY; SCAFFOLD; CULTURE Low back pain is one of the most reported medical conditions associated to intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneratio n. Nucleus pulposus (NP) is often regarded as the structure where IVD degenerati on begins. Gellan gum (GG)-based hydrogels for acellular and cellular tissue eng ineering strategies have been developed for finding applications as NP substitut es. The innovative strategy is based on the reinforcement of the hydrogel matrix with biocompatible and biodegradable GG microparticles (MPs), which are expecte d to improve the mechanical properties, while allowing to tailor its degradation rate. In this study, several GG MP/hydrogel disc formulations were prepared by means of mixing high acyl GG (0.75% (w/v)) and low acyl GG (2% (w/v)) GG aqueous solutions at different ratios, namely, 75%: 25% (v/v), 50%: 50% (v/v), and 25%: 75% (v/v), respectively. The GG MP size was measured using a stereo microscope, and their dispersion within the hydrogel matrix was evaluated by means of stain ing the MPs with Toluidine Blue-O. The developed GG MPs/hydrogel discs were phys icochemically characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)Hnuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The swelling behavior and degradation r ate were assessed by immersion in a phosphate buffer saline for 14 days. The mor phology and mechanical behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscop y and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. The mechanical properties of th e hydrogel disc were improved by mixing the gels with the MPs. In addition, the possible cytotoxicity of the leachables released by MPs/hydrogel discs was scree ned in vitro, using a mouse lung fibroblast cell line (L929 cells). To investiga te the encapsulation efficacy of L929 cells into the GG MPs/hydrogel discs, cell s were stained with DAPI blue/Texas Red-Phalloidin and observed by confocal micr oscopy, after 24, 48, and 72 h of culturing. A cell viability assay was also per formed using Calcein AM staining. The cell culture studies demonstrated that MPs /hydrogel discs are noncytotoxic over L929 cells. It was also demonstrated that L929 cells can be successfully encapsulated into the GG MPs of different formula tions, remaining viable after 72 h of culturing. This study showed that GG hydro gel matrices reinforced with cell-loaded MPs could be a candidate strategy for N P regeneration. [Pereira, DR; Silva-Correia, J; Caridade, SG; Oliveira, JT; Sous a, RA; Oliveira, JM; Mano, JF; Reis, RL] Univ Minho, Headquarters European Inst Excellence Tissue Engn, Res Grp Biomat Biodegradables & Biomimet 3Bs, P-4806909 S Claudio De Barco, Guimaraes, Portugal; [Pereira, DR; Silva-Correia, J; Caridad e, SG; Oliveira, JT; Sousa, RA; Salgado, AJ; Oliveira, JM; Mano, JF; Reis, RL] I CVS 3Bs PT Govt Associate Lab, Guimaraes, Portugal; [Sousa, N] Univ Minho, Sch H lth Sci, Life & Hlth Sci Res Inst, Braga, Portugal Pereira, DR (reprint aut hor), Univ Minho, Headquarters European Inst Excellence Tissue Engn, Res Grp Bio mat Biodegradables & Biomimet 3Bs, AvePk, P-4806909 S Claudio De Barco, Guimarae s, Portugal drppimenta@gmail.com Portuguese Foundation for Science and Te chnology (FCT)[PTDC/FIS/68517/2006]; European Union[NMP3-LA-2008-213904] The authors would like to acknowledge the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) through the POCTI and FEDER programs, including Project ProteoL ight (Grant No. PTDC/FIS/68517/2006) for the provided funds. This work was also carried out under the scope of European Union-funded Collaborative Project Disc Regeneration (Grant No. NMP3-LA-2008-213904). 47 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELL E, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 961 972 10.1089/ten.tec.2011.0115 12 Cell & T issue Engineering; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Bio logy; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 826BA WOS:000295325200001 J van Vlimmeren, MAA; Driessen-Mol, A; Oomens, CWJ; Baaijens, FPT van Vlimmeren, Marijke A. A.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Oomens, Cees W. J.; Baaijens, Frank P. T. An In Vitro Model System to Quantify Stress Generation, Compaction, and Retraction in Engineered Heart Valve Tissue TISSUE ENGINEERI NG PART C-METHODS English Article COMMISSURAL ALIGNMENT; DERMAL FIBROBLASTS; COLLAGEN; REORGANIZATION; SHRINKAGE

Autologous heart valve tissue engineering relies on extracellular matrix product ion by cells seeded into a degrading scaffold material. The cells naturally exer t traction forces to their surroundings, and due to an imbalance between scaffol d, tissue, and these traction forces, stress is generated within the tissue. Thi s stress results in compaction during culture and retraction of the leaflets at release of constraints, causing shape loss of the heart valve leaflets. In the p resent study, an in vitro model system has been developed to quantify stress gen eration, compaction, and retraction during culture and after release of constrai nts. Tissue-engineered (TE) constructs based on polyglycolic acid/poly-4-hydroxy butyrate scaffolds seeded with human vascular-derived cells were cultured for 4 weeks. Compaction in width was measured during culture, stress generation was me asured during culture and after release of constraints at week 4, and contractio n was measured after release of constraints at week 4. Both compaction and stres s generation started after 2 weeks of culture and continued up to week 4. TE con structs compacted up to half of their original width and reached an internal str ess of 6-8 kPa at week 4, which resulted in a retraction of 36%. The model syste m has provided a useful tool to unravel and optimize the balance between the dif ferent aspects of TE constructs to develop functional TE leaflets. [van Vli mmeren, MAA; Driessen-Mol, A; Oomens, CWJ; Baaijens, FPT] Eindhoven Univ Technol , Dept Biomed Engn, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands van Vlimmeren, MAA (repr int author), Eindhoven Univ Technol, Dept Biomed Engn, WH 4-12,POB 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands m.a.a.v.vlimmeren@tue.nl Netherlands Mini stry of Economic Affairs; Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Smart Mix Program of The Netherlands Ministry of Economic Affairs and The Netherlands Ministry of Educat ion, Culture and Science. The authors would like to thank Rob van den Berg for h is contributions to the development of the model system. 24 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELLE, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 983 991 10.1089/ten.tec.2011.0070 9 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 826BA WOS:000295325200 003 J Hibino, N; Nalbandian, A; Devine, L; Martinez, RS; McGillicuddy, E; Yi, T; Karandish, S; Ortolano, GA; Shin'oka, T; Snyder, E; Breuer, CK Hibino, Narutoshi; Nalbandian, Ani; Devine, Lesley; Martinez, Rajendra Sawh; McG illicuddy, Edward; Yi, Tai; Karandish, Safa; Ortolano, Girolamo A.; Shin'oka, To shiharu; Snyder, Edward; Breuer, Christopher K. Comparison of Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Isolation Methods for Creating Tissue-Engineered Vascul ar Grafts: Novel Filter System Versus Traditional Density Centrifugation Method TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS English Article ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION; PROGENITOR CELLS; BUFFY COATS; BLOOD; MODEL; AUTOGR AFTS; THERAPY Introduction: We created the first tissue-engineered vascular gr aft (TEVG) to be successfully used in humans. The TEVG is made by seeding autolo gous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) onto a biodegradable tubula r scaffold fabricated from polyglycolic-acid mesh coated with a 50: 50 copolymer of poly-L-lactide and-epsilon-caprolactone. In the initial clinical study, the BM-MNCs were isolated using a Ficoll density centrifugation method. Use of this cell isolation technique is problematic in that it is performed using an open sy stem and therefore is susceptible to contamination. As a first step toward creat ing a closed system for assembling a TEVG, we evaluated the use of a filter-base d method for isolating BM-MNCs and compared it to density centrifugation in Fico ll. Methods: BM-MNCs were isolated from human BM using density centrifugation in Ficoll or a filter-based method. BM-MNCs were seeded onto biodegradable tubular scaffold and incubated for 24 h before implantation. The TEVG were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition grafts in SCID/bg mice (n=24) using microsurgi cal technique. Grafts were followed with ultrasonography and computed tomography -angiography. Ten weeks after implantation the TEVG were explanted and examined using histology and immunohistochemistry. Results: Both methods isolated similar

number of cells (Ficoll: 8.5 +/- 6.6x10(6)/mL, Filter: 6.6 +/- 3.5x10(6)/mL; p= 0.686) with similar viability as assayed using fluorescence-activated cell sorti ng (FACS) (Ficoll: 97.0%+/- 1.5%, Filter: 95.9%+/- 3.0%; p=0.339). FACS analysis demonstrated that the fraction of lymphocytes and monocytes to total cells was lower in the filter group (CD4 in Ficoll: 8.9%+/- 1.1%, CD4 in Filter: 3.5%+/- 0 .8%; p=0.002, CD8 in Ficoll: 9.4%+/- 2.1%, CD8 in Filter: 3.9%+/- 1.4%; p=0.021, Monocyte in Ficoll: 6.9%+/- 1.0%, Monocyte in Filter: 2.7%+/- 1.0%; p=0.008), c onsistent with granulocyte contamination (Ficoll: 46.6 +/- 2.7x10(6)/mL, Filter: 58.1 +/- 5.2x10(6)/mL; p<0.001). The ratio of stem cells to BM-MNCs was compara ble between groups. There were no statistically significant differences with reg ard to TEVG patency and morphology between groups. Both methods of cell isolatio n produced neovessels with similar histology. Conclusion: Filter-based BM-MNC is olation is comparable to BM-MNC isolation using density centrifugation in Ficoll for TEVG assembly. The filter-based cell isolation technique has the added adva ntage of the potential to create a closed disposable system. [Hibino, N; Nalb andian, A; Devine, L; Martinez, RS; McGillicuddy, E; Yi, T; Shin'oka, T; Snyder, E; Breuer, CK] Yale Univ, Sch Med, Interdept Program Vasc Biol & Therapeut, New Haven, CT 06510 USA; [Karandish, S; Ortolano, GA] Pall Corp, E Hills, NY USA Breuer, CK (reprint author), Yale Univ, Sch Med, Interdept Program Vasc Biol & T herapeut, 10 Amistad St,Amistad Bldg,Room 301 C, New Haven, CT 06510 USA christopher.breuer@yale.edu Pall Corp. Edward Snyder and Christopher K. Breuer have grant support from Pall Corp. 17 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELL E, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 993 998 10.1089/ten.tec.2011.0110 6 Cell & T issue Engineering; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Bio logy; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology 826BA WOS:000295325200004 J Mills, RJ; Frith, JE; Hudson, JE; Cooper-White, JJ Mills, Richard J.; Frith, Jessica E.; Hudson, James E.; Cooper-White, Justin J. Effect of Geometric Challenges on Cell Migration TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS English Article TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLDS; PORE-SIZE; IN-VITRO; N-CADHERIN; ARCHITECTURE; CAR TILAGE; ADHESION; MATRIX; VIVO; HYDROXYAPATITE Cellular infiltration and coloni zation of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds is influenced by many factors. One of the major factors is the internal architecture presented to the cells. I n this work, we have developed and validated a microfluidic device that presents a multitude of geometric challenges to cells, mimicking the architectural aspec ts and characteristics of 3D porous scaffolds in a two-dimensional arrangement. This device has been utilized to investigate the influence of varying channel wi dths, degrees of channel tortuosity, the presence of contractions or expansions, and channel junctions on the migration of NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and human b one marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSCs). These two cell types were o bserved to have vastly different migration characteristics; 3T3 fibroblasts migr ate as a collective cell front, whereas hMSCs migrate as single cells. This resu lted in 3T3 fibroblasts displaying significant differences in migration dependin g on the type of geometrical constraint, whereas hMSCs were only influenced by c hannel width when it approached that of the length scale of a single cell. The d ifferences in migration characteristics were shown to be related to the expressi on of the intercellular junction protein N-cadherin. We observed that 3T3 fibrob lasts express higher levels of N-cadherin than hMSCs and that N-cadherin inhibit ion modified the migration characteristics of the 3T3 fibroblasts, so that they were then similar to that of hMSCs. The results of this study both confirm the u tility of the device and highlight that differences in migration characteristics of different cell types can be deterministic of how they may respond to geometr ic constraints within porous tissue engineering constructs. [Mills, RJ; Frit h, JE; Hudson, JE; Cooper-White, JJ] Univ Queensland, Australian Inst Bioengn & Nanotechnol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Cooper-White, JJ] Univ Queensland, Sch C hem Engn, Brisbane, Qld, Australia Cooper-White, JJ (reprint author), Univ Queensland, Australian Inst Bioengn & Nanotechnol, Old Cooper Rd, St Lucia, Qld

4072, Australia j.cooperwhite@uq.edu.au Australian Research Council[DP0986619]; Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology; University of Queens land The authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Gary Brooke, (formerly of the Mater Medical Research Institute [MMRI], Brisbane, Australia) for initially isol ating and expanding the hMSCs. This work was performed in part at the Queensland node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility, a company established und er the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy to provide nanoand microfabrication facilities for Australia's researchers. Finally, the author s would like to acknowledge the financial support of the Australian Research Cou ncil Discovery Grants Scheme (DP0986619), Australian Institute for Bioengineerin g and Nanotechnology, and the University of Queensland Joint Research Scholarshi p. 37 0 0 MARY ANN LIEBERT INC NEW ROCHELLE 140 HUGUENOT STREET, 3RD FL, NEW ROCHELLE, NY 10801 USA 1937-3384 TISSUE ENG PART C-ME Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods OCT 2011 17 10 999 1010 10.1089/ten.tec.2011.013 8 12 Cell & Tissue Engineering; Biotechnology & Appli ed Microbiology; Cell Biology Cell Biology; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiolo gy 826BA WOS:000295325200005 J Kudo, T; Ueda, M; Konishi, H; Kawashima, H; Kuge, Y; Mukai, T; Miyano, A ; Tanaka, S; Kizaka-Kondoh, S; Hiraoka, M; Saji, H Kudo, Takashi; Ueda, Masashi; Konishi, Hiroaki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Kuge, Yuji; Mukai, Takahiro; Miyano, Azusa; Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka , Masahiro; Saji, Hideo PET Imaging of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1-Active Tumor Cells with Pretargeted Oxygen-Dependent Degradable Streptavidin and a Nov el (18)F-Labeled Biotin Derivative MOLECULAR IMAGING AND BIOLOGY English Article Tumor hypoxia; Hypoxia-i nducible factor-1 (HIF-1); Oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD); Pretargeti ng; (18)F-labeled biotin derivative N-SUCCINIMIDYL; IN-VIVO; MOUSE MODEL; AN GIOGENESIS; THERAPY; CANCER; F-18; BIODISTRIBUTION; FLUOROBENZOATE; FLOW We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using streptavidin-biotin-based pretarge ting for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1-active tumors. We used POS, a genetically engineered form of streptavidi n that selectively stabilizes in HIF-1-active cells, and (4-(18)F-fluorobenzoyl) norbiotinamide ((18)F-FBB), a radiolabeled biotin derivative, for performing a b iodistribution study and for PET imaging. The tumoral (18)F-FBB accumulation was compared to the HIF-1-dependent luciferase bioluminescence and HIF-1 alpha immu nohistochemical signal. (18)F-FBB accumulation was observed in POS-pretargeted t umors in mice (2.85 +/- 0.55% injected dose per gram at 3 h), and clear PET imag es were obtained at the same time point. The tumoral (18)F-FBB accumulation posi tively correlated with luciferase bioluminescence (R = 0.72, P < 0.05), and most of the area showing (18)F-FBB accumulation corresponded to HIF-1 alpha-positive areas. Pretargeting with POS and (18)F-FBB is an effective approach for PET ima ging of HIF-1-active areas in tumors. [Kudo, T; Ueda, M; Konishi, H; Kawashima , H; Kuge, Y; Miyano, A; Saji, H] Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Dept Path ofunct Bioanal, Sakyo Ku, Kyoto 6068501, Japan; [Ueda, M] Kyoto Univ, Fac Med, K yoto Univ Hosp, Radioisotopes Res Lab, Kyoto 6068507, Japan; [Kawashima, H] Kyot o Univ, Dept Nucl Med & Diagnost Imaging, Grad Sch Med, Kyoto 6068507, Japan; [K uge, Y] Hokkaido Univ, Cent Inst Isotope Sci, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0600815, Japan; [Mukai, T] Kyushu Univ, Grad Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Dept Biomol Recognit Chem, Fuku oka 8128582, Japan; [Tanaka, S; Kizaka-Kondoh, S; Hiraoka, M] Kyoto Univ, Grad S ch Med, Dept Radiat Oncol & Image Appl Therapy, Kyoto 6068507, Japan Saji, H (reprint author), Kyoto Univ, Grad Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Dept Pathofunct Bioanal, Sakyo Ku, 46-29 Yoshida Shimoadachi Cho, Kyoto 6068501, Japan hsaji@pharm.kyot o-u.ac.jp Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan; New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan; Ministry of Educat ion, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan[17659010, 21791187] This study was supported in part by Health Labour Sciences Research Grant for Re search on Advanced Medical Technology from the Ministry of Health, Labour and We lfare of Japan; "R&D of Molecular Imaging Equipment for Malignant Tumor Therapy Support" by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (N

EDO), Japan; and a Grant-in-Aid for Exploratory Research (17659010) and a Grantin-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (21791187) from the Ministry of Education, Cultu re, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. 37 0 0 SPRINGER NEW YORK 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA 1536-163 2 MOL IMAGING BIOL Mol. Imaging. Biol. OCT 2011 13 5 1003 1010 10.1007/s11307-0 10-0418-6 8 Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Im aging Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging 824BX WOS:000295176200 021 J Gale, AJ; Elias, DJ; Averell, PM; Teirstein, PS; Buck, M; Brown, SD; Pol onskaya, Z; Udit, AK; Finn, MG Gale, Andrew J.; Elias, Darlene J.; Averell, Patricia M.; Teirstein, Paul S.; Buck, Mitchell; Brown, Ste ven D.; Polonskaya, Zinaida; Udit, Andrew K.; Finn, M. G. Engineer ed virus-like nanoparticles reverse heparin anticoagulation more consistently th an protamine in plasma from heparin-treated patients THROMBOSIS RESEARCH English Article Heparin; Anticoagulation ; Bacteriophage Q beta; Protamine; Coronary intervention; Venous thrombosis MOLECULAR-WEIGHT PROTAMINE; CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS; ADVERSE EVENTS; IN-VIVO; PAR TICLES; TOXICITY; EFFICACY; COAGULATION; ANTAGONIST; MORTALITY Heparin is widel y used for anticoagulation, often requiring the subsequent administration of a r eversal agent. The only approved reversal agent for heparin is protamine sulfate , which induces well described adverse reactions in patients. Previously we repo rted a novel class of heparin antagonists based on the bacteriophage Q beta plat form, displaying polyvalent cationic motifs which bind with high affinity to hep arin. Here we report heparin reversal by the most effective of these virus-like particles (VLP) in samples from patients who were administered heparin during ca rdiac procedures or therapeutically for treatment of various thrombotic conditio ns. The VLP consistently reversed heparin in these samples, including those from patients that received high doses of heparin, with greater efficiency than a ne gative control VLP and with significantly less variability than protamine sulfat e. These results provide the first step towards validation of heparin antagonist VLPs as viable alternatives to protamine. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights res erved. [Gale, AJ; Elias, DJ; Buck, M] Scripps Res Inst, Dept Mol & Expt Med, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA; [Elias, DJ; Averell, PM] Div Pulm & Crit Care Med, La Joll a, CA USA; [Teirstein, PS] Scripps Clin, Div Cardiol, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA; [T eirstein, PS] Scripps Green Hosp, La Jolla, CA USA; [Brown, SD; Polonskaya, Z; F inn, MG] Scripps Res Inst, Dept Chem, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA; [Udit, AK] Occiden tal Coll, Dept Chem, Los Angeles, CA 90041 USA Gale, AJ (reprint author), Scrip ps Res Inst, Dept Mol & Expt Med, MEM-286,10550 N Torrey Pines Rd, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA agale@scripps.edu NIH/NCRR[UL1 RR025774]; Stein Endowment Fund; NIH[R01 CA112075] This manuscript was supported by NIH/NCRR UL1 RR025774 ( Pilot-Gale), The Stein Endowment Fund (Gale) and by NIH R01 CA112075 ( Finn). 32 0 0 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD OXFORD THE BOULEVARD, L ANGFORD LANE, KIDLINGTON, OXFORD OX5 1GB, ENGLAND 0049-3848 THROMB RES Thromb. Res. OCT 2011 128 4 E9 E13 10.1016/j.thromres.2011.03.021 5 Hematology; Peripheral Vascular Disease Hematology; Cardiovascular System & Card iology 824OS WOS:000295212200002 J Okabayashi, T; Cameron, AM; Hisada, M; Montgomery, RA; Williams, GM; Sun , Z Okabayashi, T.; Cameron, A. M.; Hisada, M.; Mont gomery, R. A.; Williams, G. M.; Sun, Z. Mobilization of Host Stem Cells Enables Long-Term Liver Transplant Acceptance in a Strongly Rejecting Rat Strain Combination AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION English Article CD133; CXCR4; plerixafor; regulatory T cells; tacrolimus RECIPIENT-DERIVE D HEPATOCYTES; RENAL-TRANSPLANTATION; PROGENITOR CELLS; HIGH-FREQUENCY; CHIMERIS M; TOLERANCE; PROLIFERATION; REPOPULATION; ENDOTHELIUM; ACTIVATION Careful examination of liver, kidney and heart transplants in human recipients has revea led small numbers of host bone marrow derived stem cells in the graft. If the li mited recipient repopulation of a donor graft that is currently observed could b e facilitated, it is possible that conversion to a predominantly host phenotype

would permit long-term graft function without immunosuppression. We proposed to "engineer" repopulation after transplant in a strain combination (dark agouti [D A] to Lewis green fluorescent protein+ [LEW GFP+]) which rejects liver grafts st rongly, a model that more closely resembles the situation in humans. Treatment o n days 0, 1, 2, 3 and 7 after transplantation with low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) tacrolim us (T) designed to blunt rejection combined with plerixafor (P) to mobilize host stem cells resulted in greater than 180 days graft survival with extensive albe it spotty conversion of a small (50%) DA graft to the recipient LEW GFP+ genotyp e. Subsequent skin grafting revealed donor-specific graft prolongation. The T pl us P treatment resulted in higher levels of Lin-Thy1+CD34+CD133+ stem cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the blood and liver at day 7. Thus, pharmacological mobilization of host stem cells sustains liver allografts by two mechanisms: re population of injured donor cells and regulation of the immune response. [Okabayashi, T; Cameron, AM; Hisada, M; Montgomery, RA; Williams, GM; Sun, Z] Jo hns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Surg, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Sun, Z (reprint author), Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Surg, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA zsun2@jhmi.edu US National Institutes of Health[R21AI065488, UO1 AA018113]; dep artmental start-up fund; Genzyme Inc. This work was supported by US National I nstitutes of Health (R21AI065488 and UO1 AA018113 to Z.S.) and departmental star t-up fund (Z.S.) and a grant from Genzyme Inc. (Z.S.). 28 1 1 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA US A 1600-6135 AM J TRANSPLANT Am. J. Transplant. OCT 2011 11 10 2046 2056 10.1111/ j.1600-6143.2011.03698.x 11 Surgery; Transplantation Surgery; Transplantation 826SO WOS:000295375000011 J Esposito, S; Iervolino, I Esposito, Simona ; Iervolino, Iunio PGA and PGV Spatial Correlation Models Based on European Multievent Datasets BULLETIN OF THE SEISMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA English Article ESTIMATED GROUND -MOTION; EARTHQUAKE LOSS MODELS; SPECTRAL ACCELERATION; RESPONSE SPECTRA; HAZARD ANALYSES; SEISMIC-HAZARD; MIDDLE-EAST; EQUATIONS; PREDICTION; VARIOGRAM Spatial modeling of ground motion intensity measures (IMs) is required for risk assessment of spatially distributed engineering systems. For example, when a lif eline system is of concern, classical site-specific hazard tools, which treat IM s at different locations independently, may not be adequate to accurately assess the seismic risk. In fact, in this case, modeling of ground motion as a random field is required; it basically consists of assigning a correlation structure to the IM of interest. This work focuses on semiempirical estimation of the correl ation coefficient, as a function of intersite separation distance, between resid uals with respect to ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) of horizontal pe ak ground acceleration (PGA) and peak ground velocity (PGV). In particular, subs ets of the European Strong-Motion Database (ESD) and the Italian Accelerometric Archive (ITACA) were employed to evaluate the intraevent residual correlation ba sed on multiple earthquakes, considering different GMPEs fitted to the same reco rds. The analyses were carried out through geostatistical tools, which enabled r esults to be found that are generally consistent between the two datasets. Corre lation for PGV appears to attenuate more gradually with respect to PGA. In order to better understand the dependency of the results on the adopted estimation ap proach and dataset, some aspects related to the working hypotheses are criticall y discussed. Finally, estimated correlation models are used to develop illustrat ive applications of regional probabilistic seismic-hazard analysis. [Esposit o, S; Iervolino, I] Univ Naples Federico 2, Dipartimento Ingn Strutturale, I-801 25 Naples, Italy Esposito, S (reprint author), Univ Naples Federico 2, Di partimento Ingn Strutturale, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Naples, Italy iunio.ie rvolino@unina.it AMRA under European Community[244061] This work was su pported by AMRA scarl (http://www.amracenter.com) under the frame of SYNER-G (se venth framework program of the European Community for research, technological de velopment, and demonstration activities; project contract number 244061). We wan t to thank Sinan Akkar (Middle East Technical University, Turkey), Dino Bindi (D eutsches GeoForschungsZentrum, Germany), and Francesca Pacor (Istituto Nazionale

di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Italy) for kindly providing us with the datasets u sed in this study. Moreover , we want to thank the associate editor of BSSA, Zhi gang Peng, the two reviewers, Katsuichiro Goda (University of Bristol, United Ki ngdom) and Julian J. Bommer (Imperial College London, United Kingdom) for their comments, which improved the quality and readability of the paper, as well as Ra cquel K. Hagen (Stanford University, United States) for proofreading the manuscr ipt. Finally, discussions with Massimiliano Giorgio (Seconda Universita di Napol i, Italy) are gratefully acknowledged. 32 0 0 SEISMOLO GICAL SOC AMER EL CERRITO PLAZA PROFESSIONAL BLDG, SUITE 201, EL CERRITO, CA 94530 USA 0037-1106 B SEISMOL SOC AM Bull. Seismol. S oc. Amer. OCT 2011 101 5 2532 2541 10.1785/0120110117 10 Geochemistry & G eophysics Geochemistry & Geophysics 824PJ WOS:000295214100039 J Cockell, CS Cockell, Charles S. Synthetic geomicrobiology: engineering microbe-mineral interactions for space ex ploration and settlement INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ASTROBIOLOGY English Article synthetic geomicrobiolog y; biomining; soil formation; regolith; Mars; moon DISSOLUTION RATES; ACIDO PHILIC BACTERIA; ALGAL CRUSTS; CYANOBACTERIUM; EARTH; LUNAR; IRON; PH; CHROOCOCC IDIOPSIS; MICROORGANISMS Synthetic geomicrobiology is a potentially new b ranch of synthetic biology that seeks to achieve improvements in microbe-mineral interactions for practical applications. In this paper, laboratory and field da ta are provided on three geomicrobiology challenges in space: (1) soil formation from extraterrestrial regolith by biological rock weathering and/or the use of regolith as life support system feedstock, (2) biological extraction of economic ally important elements from rocks (biomining) and (3) biological solidification of surfaces and dust control on other planetary surfaces. The use of synthetic or engineered organisms in these three applications is discussed. These three ex amples are used to extract general common principles that might be applied to th e design of organisms used in synthetic geomicrobiology. Received 18 February 20 11, accepted 14 April 2011, first published online 27 May 2011 Open Univ, Milto n Keynes MK7 6AA, Bucks, England Cockell, CS (reprint author), Open Univ, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, Bucks, England c.s.cockell@open.ac.uk 66 0 0 CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS NEW YORK 32 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY 10013-2473 USA 1473-5504 INT J ASTROBIOL Int. J. Astrobiol. OCT 2011 10 4 315 324 10.1017/S1473550411000164 10 Astronomy & Astrophysics; Biology; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Astronom y & Astrophysics; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Geology 825ZT WOS:000295321600002 J Way, JC; Silver, PA; Howard, RJ Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.; Howard, Russell J. Sun-driven microbial synthesis o f chemicals in space INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ASTROBIOLOGY English Article Photosynthesis; cyanobacteria; e lectrofuels BIOFUEL PRODUCTION; METABOLISM; CYANOBACTERIA; BIOSYNTHESIS; RED UCTION; SYNTHASE; CO2 Long space flights and planetary settlement will require sources of nutrition and chemicals that must be generated in space. This will i nclude not only amino acids and vitamins but also oxygen, all of which can be ge nerated by means of biosynthesis. Synthetic biology has the potential to generat e organisms designed for supplying human nutritional needs in space. Photosynthe tic microbes may be ideal for this purpose, as they are more efficient per volum e cultivated than green plants at conversion of light to chemical energy, biomas s and nutritional molecules. In addition, microbes are easier and faster to gene tically engineer, facilitating not only design and terrestrial manufacture of or ganisms optimized for growth and nutrient production in the artificial condition s of space, but superior ability in space to develop organisms suited to newly d iscovered environments. The rapid ability to adapt and create new microbes to su it new circumstances when in space offers significant potential for risk reducti on. Development of sun-driven microbial production of nutritional chemicals woul d also have terrestrial benefits in commerce and sustainability. A synthetic bio

logy approach to chemical production would not be based on fossil fuels as such fuels do not exist on other planets. This approach would highlight a synergistic relationship between outer space and 'spaceship earth', illustrating NASA's rol e in stimulating technology development with terrestrial application. Two specif ic approaches deserve consideration: production by traditional photosynthetic mi crobes, or by the newly appreciated capacity of some bacteria to absorb electric current (e. g. solar panels) to drive metabolism. Palatability and sensory stim ulation are a key part of food consumption and could be engineered into microbes . As a first step, NASA should test a bioreactor in which genetically engineered , nutrient-producing photosynthetic bacteria are grown and harvested in space. R eceived 5 March 2011, accepted 11 May 2011, first published online 8 June 2011 [Way, JC; Silver, PA] Harvard Univ, Wyss Inst Biologically Inspired Engn, Boston , MA 02115 USA; [Silver, PA] Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Dept Syst Biol, Boston, MA 0 2115 USA; [Howard, RJ] Oakbio Inc, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 USA Way, JC (reprint author), Harvard Univ, Wyss Inst Biologically Inspired Engn, 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 USA jeff.way@wyss.harvard.edu 34 0 0 CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS NEW YORK 32 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY 10013-2473 USA 1473-5504 INT J ASTROBIOL Int. J. Astrobiol. OCT 2011 10 4 359 364 10.1017/S1473550411000218 6 Astronomy & Astrophysics; Biology; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Astronom y & Astrophysics; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Geology 825ZT WOS:000295321600007 J Maoz, S; Harel, D Maoz, Shahar; Harel, Dav id On tracing reactive systems SOFTWARE AND SYSTEMS MODELING English Article Software visualization; UML interactions; Sequence diagrams; Live sequence charts; Model-based traces; D ynamic analysis UML SEQUENCE DIAGRAMS; TEMPORAL LOGIC; STATECHARTS; SEMANTICS; C HARTS; LSCS; S2A We present a rich and highly dynamic technique for analy zing, visualizing, and exploring the execution traces of reactive systems. The t wo inputs are a designer's inter-object scenario-based behavioral model, visuall y described using a UML2-compliant dialect of live sequence charts (LSC), and an execution trace of the system. Our method allows one to visualize, navigate thr ough, and explore, the activation and progress of the scenarios as they "come to life" during execution. Thus, a concrete system's runtime is recorded and viewe d through abstractions provided by behavioral models used for its design, tying the visualization and exploration of system execution traces to model-driven eng ineering. We support both event-based and real-time-based tracing, and use detai ls-on-demand mechanisms, multi-scaling grids, and gradient coloring methods. Nov el model exploration techniques include semantics-based navigation, filtering, a nd trace comparison. The ideas are implemented and tested in a prototype tool ca lled the Tracer. [Maoz, S; Harel, D] Weizmann Inst Sci, IL-76100 Rehovot, Israel Maoz, S (reprint author), Weizmann Inst Sci, IL-76100 Rehovot, Israel shahar.maoz@weizmann.ac.il; dharel@weizmann.ac.il John von Neumann Minerva Center for the Development of Reactive Systems at the Weizmann Institute of Sci ence; European Research Council (ERC) under the European Community Prelimin ary version appeared in VL/HCC '07: Proc. IEEE Symp. on Visual Languages and Hum an-Centric Computing (September 2007) [46]. This research was supported in part by the John von Neumann Minerva Center for the Development of Reactive Systems a t the Weizmann Institute of Science, and by an Advanced Research Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013). 52 0 0 SPRINGER HEIDELB ERG HEIDELBERG TIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG, GERMANY 1619-1366 SOFTW SYST MODEL Softw. Syst. Model. OCT 2011 10 4 447 468 10.1007/ s10270-010-0151-2 22 Computer Science, Software Engin eering Computer Science 825KI WOS:000295272200003 J Paige, RF; Drivalos, N; Kolovos, DS; Fernandes, KJ; Power, C; Olsen, GK; Zschaler, S Paige, Richard F.; Drivalos, Nikolaos; K olovos, Dimitrios S.; Fernandes, Kiran J.; Power, Christopher; Olsen, Goran K.;

Zschaler, Steffen Rigorous identification and encoding of trace-li nks in model-driven engineering SOFTWARE AND SYSTEMS MODELING English Article Traceability; Semantics; Classif ications; Identification TRACEABILITY Model-driven engineering (MDE) i nvolves the construction and manipulation of many models of different kinds in a n engineering process. In principle, models can be used in the product engineeri ng lifecycle in an end-to-end manner for representing requirements, designs and implementations, and assisting in deployment and maintenance. The manipulations applied to models may be manual, but they can also be automated-for example, usi ng model transformations, code generation, and validation. To enhance automated analysis, consistency and coherence of models used in an MDE process, it is usef ul to identify, establish and maintain trace-links between models. However, the breadth and scope of trace-links that can be used in MDE is substantial, and man aging trace-link information can be very complex. In this paper, we contribute t o managing the complexity of traceability information in MDE in two ways: firstl y, we demonstrate how to identify the different kinds of trace-links that may ap pear in an end-to-end MDE process; secondly, we describe a rigorous approach to defining semantically rich trace-links between models, where the models themselv es may be constructed using diverse modelling languages. The definition of rich trace-links allows us to use tools to maintain and analyse traceability relation ships. [Paige, RF; Drivalos, N] Univ York, Enterprise Syst Res Grp, Dept Comp S ci, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; [Olsen, GK] SINTEF, Oslo, Norway; [Zsch aler, S] Univ Lancaster, Dept Comp, Lancaster, England; [Fernandes, KJ] Univ Yor k, Sch Management, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; [Power, C] Univ York, EU 4All Project, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England Paige, RF (reprint autho r), Univ York, Enterprise Syst Res Grp, Dept Comp Sci, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshir e, England paige@cs.york.ac.uk European Commission; European Commission under the "Information Society Technologies" The work in this paper was suppo rted by the European Commission via the MODELPLEX project and the AMPLE project, co-funded by the European Commission under the "Information Society Technologie s" Sixth Framework Programme (2006-2009). 54 0 0 SPRINGER HEIDELBERG HEIDELBERG TIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG , GERMANY 1619-1366 SOFTW SYST MODEL Softw. Syst. Mod el. OCT 2011 10 4 469 487 10.1007/s10270-010-0158-8 19 Computer Science, Softwa re Engineering Computer Science 825KI WOS:000295272200004 J Caloz, C Caloz, Christophe Metamaterial Dispersion Engineering Concepts and Applications PROCEEDINGS OF T HE IEEE English Article Dispersi on engineering; ferromagnetic nanowires (FMNWs); group velocity (GV) and group v elocity dispersion (GVD) parameters; metamaterials; multiscale metamaterials; ph ase velocity (PV); transmission line (TL) and composite right/left-handed (CRLH) structures Metamaterial dispersion engineering is presented as a ge neral concept for engineering the phase versus frequency response of microwave m aterials and devices. Two categories of metamaterials are considered, composite right/left-handed (CRLH) transmission line and multiscale ferromagnetic nanowire (FMNW) metamaterials. The dispersive Drude properties of CRLH metamaterials are derived and corresponding application examples are described in terms of CRLH d ominant Taylor dispersive parameters: a tight broadband coupled-line coupler (ph ase velocity parameter), an ultra-wideband pulse position modulator transmitter (group velocity parameter), and a leaky-wave antenna based real-time spectrum an alyzer (group velocity dispersion parameter). FMNW metamaterials are discussed a s a double-Lorentz example of a multiscale metamaterial with unique properties, and their applications are illustrated with the example of a dual-band edge-mode isolator based on the recently discovered double ferromagnetic resonance. Ecole Polytech, Dept Elect Engn, Montreal, PQ H3T 1J4, Canada Caloz, C (reprin t author), Ecole Polytech, Dept Elect Engn, Montreal, PQ H3T 1J4, Canada 22 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAW AY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9219 P IEEE Proc. IEEE OCT 2011 99 10 SI

1711 1719 10.1109/JPROC.2011.2114631 9 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 823DB WOS:000295101300 011 J Ziolkowski, RW; Jin, P; Lin, CC Ziolkowski, Rich ard W.; Jin, Peng; Lin, Chia-Ching Metamaterial-Inspired Engineerin g of Antennas PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE English Article Antenna efficiency; antenna theory; electrically small antennas; metamaterials ( MTMs); parasitics; quality factors ELECTRICALLY SMALL ANTENNAS; DOUBLE-NEGA TIVE METAMATERIALS; SPLIT-RING-RESONATOR; MAGNETIC EZ ANTENNA; PATCH ANTENNAS; E XPERIMENTAL-VERIFICATION; EFFICIENT; COMPACT; BAND; BANDWIDTH A variety of ant ennas have been engineered with metamaterials (MTMs) and metamaterial-inspired c onstructs to improve their performance characteristics. Examples include electri cally small, near-field resonant parasitic (NFRP) antennas that require no match ing network and have high radiation efficiencies. Experimental verification of t heir predicted behaviors has been obtained. Recent developments with this NFRP e lectrically small paradigm will be reviewed. They include considerations of incr eased bandwidths, as well as multiband and multifunctional extensions. [Ziolkow ski, RW; Lin, CC] Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Tucson, AZ 85721 USA Ziolkowski, RW (reprint author), Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Tucson, A Z 85721 USA ziolkowski@ece.arizona.edu; pengjin@broadcom.com Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)[HR0011-05-C-0068]; Office of Naval Res earch (ONR)[H940030920902] This work was supported in part by the Defense A dvanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) under Contract HR0011-05-C-0068 and by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) under Contract H940030920902. 68 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAW AY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9219 P IEEE Proc. IEEE OCT 2011 99 10 SI 1720 1731 10.1109/JPROC.2010.2091610 12 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 823DB WOS:000295101300 012 J Volakis, JL; Sertel, K Volakis, John L.; Sertel , Kubilay Narrowband and Wideband Metamaterial Antennas Based on D egenerate Band Edge and Magnetic Photonic Crystals PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE English Article Antenna miniaturization; degenerate band edge; emulated anisotropy; magnetic photonic crystals; metamate rials; small antennas; ultrawideband arrays; wave slow-down ELECTRICALLY SMA LL ANTENNAS; COUPLED MICROSTRIP LINES; GROUND PLANE; BANDWIDTH; COMPACT; DESIGN; POLARIZATION; PROPAGATION; THICKNESS; IMPEDANCE Historically, antennas a nd microwave devices relied on isotropic media. This provided for limited degree s of freedom (one for dielectric and another for magnetic) in the design process . In contrast, anisotropic media introduce several more degrees of freedom (at l east three more for dielectrics and three additional ones for magnetic) opening a new direction in designing radio-frequency (RF) communication devices and wire less systems. A focus of the paper is the introduction of anisotropic media para meters emulated using simple printed, but highly coupled, transmission lines (TR Ls). The paper begins by introducing the equivalence between in-plane anisotropy and coupled TRLs to realize degenerate band edge (DBE) and magnetic photonic cr ystal (MPC) modes. This is followed by the design of miniature antenna elements via dispersion engineering, demonstrating their performance on small finite subs trates. The second part of the paper is focused on concatenating DBE and MPC ant enna elements to realize smaller size wideband arrays. Such arrays exploit the c urrent sheet antenna (CSA) concept to achieve the coveted goal of small wideband metamaterial arrays. For example, by constructing an array of antenna elements similar to lambda/10 x lambda/10 in size, highly conformal (very thin) apertures delivering 5 : 1 bandwidth are demonstrated while avoiding grating lobes. In co ntrast to transitional approaches, the proposed method exploits (rather than sup pressing) the metallic ground plane inductance. Instead, the capacitance of the tightly coupled antenna elements is used to cancel the inductance over wide band widths. By further employing small size array elements, large bandwidths can be achieved using a smaller footprint. [Volakis, JL; Sertel, K] Ohio State Univ

, Electrosci Lab, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Columbus, OH 43212 USA Volakis, JL (reprint author), Ohio State Univ, Electrosci Lab, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, C olumbus, OH 43212 USA Air Force Office of Scientific Research[FA9950-0 4-1-0359]; Lockheed Martin Corporation[10010042]; Ohio State University Research Foundation This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Re search under Grant FA9950-04-1-0359, by the Lockheed Martin Corporation Strategi c Threads Program (10010042), and by The Ohio State University Research Foundati on. 52 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEE RS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-921 9 P IEEE Proc. IEEE OCT 2011 99 10 SI 1732 1745 10.1109/JPROC.2011.2115230 14 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineering 823DB WOS:000295101300 013 J Hashemi, MRM; Itoh, T Hashemi, Mohammed Reza M .; Itoh, Tatsuo Evolution of Composite Right/Left-Handed Leaky-Wave Ante nnas PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE English Article Composite right/left-handed (CRLH) transmission line (TL); leaky-wave antenna (L WA); metamaterials TRANSMISSION-LINE; INDEX In this paper, the evolu tion of the composite right/left-handed (CRLH) leaky-wave antennas (LWAs) yieldi ng several novel CRLH LWA is reviewed. Starting with the concept of CRLH LWAs, t he concave and convex passive CRLH LWAs are discussed along with the conformatio n effects in each case and a dispersion engineering method is introduced to comp ensate for the conformation effect to refocus the main radiation beam. Next, pla nar and conformal varactor-based electronically controlled CRLH LWAs are reviewe d. In the planar case electronic beam steering and beamwidth controlling are dis cussed while in the case of conformal version electronic radiation aperture sele ctivity as well as electronic beam focusing is discussed. Finally, a dual polari zed CRLH LWA is presented which is a balanced four-port coupled CRLH LW-TL that conserves its CRLH nature under both common-mode and differential-mode excitatio ns but with two orthogonal E-planes resulting in two orthogonal polarizations fo r the radiated fields. [Hashemi, MRM; Itoh, T] Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Ele ct Engn, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA Hashemi, MRM (reprint author), Univ Cali f Los Angeles, Dept Elect Engn, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA mreza@ee.ucla.ed u Honeywell through UC This work was supported by Honeywell through UC Discovery program. 15 0 0 IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELE CTRONICS ENGINEERS INC PISCATAWAY 445 HOES LANE, PISCATAWAY, NJ 08855-4141 USA 0018-9219 P IEEE Proc. IEEE OCT 2011 99 10 SI 1746 1754 10.1109/JPROC.2011.21577 97 9 Engineering, Electrical & Electronic Engineer ing 823DB WOS:000295101300014 J Pinto, JC Pinto, Jose Carlos SPECIAL SERIES-HIGHLIGHTS ON CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH IN LATIN AMERICA CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING English Editorial Materi al Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Programa Engn Quim, BR-21945970 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Pinto, JC (reprint author), Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Programa Engn Quim, Cidade Univ CP 68502, BR-21945970 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil pinto@peq.coppe. ufrj.br 0 0 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL MALDEN COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA 0008-4034 CAN J CHEM ENG Can. J. Chem. Eng. OCT 2011 89 5 SI 1165 1165 10.1002/cjce.20633 1 Engineering, Chemical Engineering 824TA WOS:000295223800020 J Sriperumbudur, BK; Torres, DA; Lanckriet, GRG Sriperumbudur, Bharath K.; Torres, David A.; Lanckriet, Gert R. G. A majorization-minimization approach to the sparse generalized eigenvalue proble m MACHINE LEARNING English Article Generalized eigenvalue problem; Principal component analysis; Canonical correlat ion analysis; Fisher discriminant analysis; Sparsity; D.c. program; Majorization -minimization; Zangwill's theory of global convergence; Music annotation; Crosslanguage document retrieval PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS; SURROGATE OBJECTIV

E FUNCTIONS; VARIABLE SELECTION; MM ALGORITHMS; REGRESSION; CANCER; LASSO; TUMOR Generalized eigenvalue (GEV) problems have applications in many areas of science and engineering. For example, principal component analysis (PCA), canonical cor relation analysis (CCA) and Fisher discriminant analysis (FDA) are specific inst ances of GEV problems, that are widely used in statistical data analysis. The ma in contribution of this work is to formulate a general, efficient algorithm to o btain sparse solutions to a GEV problem. Specific instances of sparse GEV proble ms can then be solved by specific instances of this algorithm. We achieve this b y solving the GEV problem while constraining the cardinality of the solution. In stead of relaxing the cardinality constraint using a a"" (1)-norm approximation, we consider a tighter approximation that is related to the negative log-likelih ood of a Student's t-distribution. The problem is then framed as a d.c. (differe nce of convex functions) program and is solved as a sequence of convex programs by invoking the majorization-minimization method. The resulting algorithm is pro ved to exhibit global convergence behavior, i.e., for any random initialization, the sequence (subsequence) of iterates generated by the algorithm converges to a stationary point of the d.c. program. Finally, we illustrate the merits of thi s general sparse GEV algorithm with three specific examples of sparse GEV proble ms: sparse PCA, sparse CCA and sparse FDA. Empirical evidence for these examples suggests that the proposed sparse GEV algorithm, which offers a general framewo rk to solve any sparse GEV problem, will give rise to competitive algorithms for a variety of applications where specific instances of GEV problems arise. [Sriperumbudur, BK; Lanckriet, GRG] Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Elect & Comp Engn , San Diego, CA 92093 USA; [Torres, DA; Lanckriet, GRG] Univ Calif San Diego, De pt Comp Sci & Engn, San Diego, CA 92093 USA Sriperumbudur, BK (reprint autho r), Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, San Diego, CA 92093 USA bharathsv@ucsd.edu; gert@ece.ucsd.edu; datorres@cs.ucsd.edu National Science Foundation[DMS-MSPA 0625409]; Fair Isaac Corporation; University of California The authors thank the editors and reviewers for their constructive comments. B.K .S. thanks Suvrit Sra for helpful discussions while the former was an intern at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tubingen. The authors wish to acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (grant DMS-MSPA 0625 409), the Fair Isaac Corporation and the University of California MICRO program. 63 0 0 SPRINGER DORDRECHT VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS 0885-6125 MACH LEARN Mach. Le arn. OCT 2011 85 1-2 SI 3 39 10.1007/s10994-010-5226-3 37 Computer Science, Artifi cial Intelligence Computer Science 822YZ WOS:000295088000002 J Doze, VA; Papay, RS; Goldenstein, BL; Gupta, MK; Collette, KM; Nelson, B W; Lyons, MJ; Davis, BA; Luger, EJ; Wood, SG; Haselton, JR; Simpson, PC; Perez, DM Doze, Van A.; Papay, Robert S.; Goldenstein, Bri anna L.; Gupta, Manveen K.; Collette, Katie M.; Nelson, Brian W.; Lyons, Mariaha J.; Davis, Bethany A.; Luger, Elizabeth J.; Wood, Sarah G.; Haselton, James R.; Simpson, Paul C.; Perez, Dianne M. Long-Term alpha(1A)-Adrenergic R eceptor Stimulation Improves Synaptic Plasticity, Cognitive Function, Mood, and Longevity MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY English Article HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS; ALPHA-1-ADRENERGIC AGONIST; PREFRONTAL CORTEX; SIGNALI NG PATHWAY; MEMORY; RATS; ANTIDEPRESSANT; VENLAFAXINE; BEHAVIOR; MOUSE The role of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)ARs) in cognition and mood is controv ersial, probably as a result of past use of nonselective agents. alpha(1A)AR act ivation was recently shown to increase neurogenesis, which is linked to cognitio n and mood. We studied the effects of long-term alpha(1A)AR stimulation using tr ansgenic mice engineered to express a constitutively active mutant (CAM) form of the alpha(1A)AR. CAM-alpha(1A)AR mice showed enhancements in several behavioral models of learning and memory. In contrast, mice that have the alpha(1A)AR gene knocked out displayed poor cognitive function. Hippocampal brain slices from CA M-alpha(1A)AR mice demonstrated increased basal synaptic transmission, paired-pu lse facilitation, and long-term potentiation compared with wild-type (WT) mice. WT mice treated with the alpha(1A)AR-selective agonist cirazoline also showed en hanced cognitive functions. In addition, CAM-alpha(1A)AR mice exhibited antidepr

essant and less anxious phenotypes in several behavioral tests compared with WT mice. Furthermore, the lifespan of CAM-alpha(1A)AR mice was 10% longer than that of WT mice. Our results suggest that long-term alpha(1A)AR stimulation improves synaptic plasticity, cognitive function, mood, and longevity. This may afford a potential therapeutic target for counteracting the decline in cognitive functio n and mood associated with aging and neurological disorders. [Papay, RS; Gupt a, MK; Perez, DM] Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Mol Cardiol, Lerner Res Inst, Clevela nd, OH 44195 USA; [Doze, VA; Goldenstein, BL; Collette, KM; Nelson, BW; Lyons, M J; Davis, BA; Luger, EJ; Wood, SG; Haselton, JR] Univ N Dakota, Sch Med & Hlth S ci, Dept Pharmacol Physiol & Therapeut, Grand Forks, ND 58201 USA; Univ Calif Sa n Francisco, Div Cardiol, VA Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Res Inst, San Francisco, CA 941 43 USA; Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA Perez, D M (reprint author), Cleveland Clin Fdn, Dept Mol Cardiol, Lerner Res Inst, NB50, 9500 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44195 USA perezd@ccf.org National Institu tes of Health National Center for Research Resources[P20-RR016741, P20-RR017699] ; National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute[R01-HL61438, R01-HL098279]; National Science Foundation (NSF) North Dakota[EPS-0814442]; NSF[0347259, 0639227, 085186 9] This work was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health Nat ional Center for Research Resources [Grants P20-RR016741, P20-RR017699]; and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute [Grants R01-HL61438 (to D.M.P.) and R0 1-HL098279 (to P.C.S.)]; the National Science Foundation (NSF) North Dakota EPSC oR IIP Seed Award [Grant EPS-0814442] (to V.A.D.), an NSF Faculty Early Career D evelopment Award [Grant 0347259] (to V. A. D.), an NSF Research Experience for U ndergraduates Site [Grants 0639227, 0851869] (to V.A.D.), NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Awards (to B.L.G. and K.M.C.); respectively. 41 0 0 AMER SOC PHARMACOLOGY EXPERIMENTAL THERAPEUTICS BETHESDA 9650 ROCKVILLE PIKE, BETHESDA, MD 20814-3995 USA 0026-895X MOL PHARMACOL Mol. Pharmacol. OCT 2011 80 4 747 758 10.1124/mol.111.073734 12 Pharmaco logy & Pharmacy Pharmacology & Pharmacy 822XQ WOS:000295084300021 J Poli, R; Salvaris, M Poli, Riccardo; Salvaris , Mathew Comment on 'Fast attainment of computer cursor control w ith noninvasively acquired brain signals' JOURNAL OF NEURAL ENGINEERING English Editorial Material In a recent paper by Bradberry, Gentili and Contreras-Vidal published in Journal of Neural Engineering (2011, 8 036010), an interesting method for the control o f a two-dimensional mouse cursor was proposed, which apparently attained excelle nt control and good speed with relatively simple techniques. We believe some of the results in the paper have been misinterpreted due to a failure in appreciati ng the self-fulfilling nature of the success criteria adopted. In this comment, we explain the nature of the problem and attempt to assess its influence on the results reported in the aforementioned paper. [Poli, R; Salvaris, M] Univ Esse x, Sch Comp Sci & Elect Engn, Brain Comp Interfaces Lab, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Ess ex, England Poli, R (reprint author), Univ Essex, Sch Comp Sci & Elect Engn, Brain Comp Interfaces Lab, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Essex, England rpoli@essex.ac.u k; mssalv@essex.ac.uk 1 1 1 IOP PUBL ISHING LTD BRISTOL TEMPLE CIRCUS, TEMPLE WAY, BRISTOL BS1 6BE, ENGLAND 1741-2560 J NEURAL ENG J. Neural Eng. OCT 2011 8 5 058001 10.1088/1741-2560/8/5/05 8001 3 Engineering, Biomedical; Neurosciences Engineer ing; Neurosciences & Neurology 822VV WOS:000295079200019 J Gaspar, P; Neves, AR; Gasson, MJ; Shearman, CA; Santos, H Gaspar, Paula; Neves, Ana Rute; Gasson, Michael J.; Shearman, Claire A.; Santos, Helena High Yields of 2,3-Butanediol and Mannitol in Lactococcus lactis through Engineering of NAD(+) Cofactor Recycling APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTA L MICROBIOLOGY English Article COMPLETE GENOME SEQUENCE; CONTROLLED GENE-EXPRESSION; LACTATE-DEHYDROGENASE; ACI D BACTERIA; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; MESO-2,3-BUTANEDIOL DEHYDROGENASE; STREPTOCOCCUS-L ACTIS; STRAINS DEFICIENT; SUBSP CREMORIS; IN-VIVO Manipulation of NADH-dep endent steps, and particularly disruption of the las-located lactate dehydrogena

se (ldh) gene in Lactococcus lactis, is common to engineering strategies envisag ing the accumulation of reduced end products other than lactate. Reverse transcr iption-PCR experiments revealed that three out of the four genes assigned to lac tate dehydrogenase in the genome of L. lactis, i.e., the ldh, ldhB, and ldhX gen es, were expressed in the parental strain MG1363. Given that genetic redundancy is often a major cause of metabolic instability in engineered strains, we set ou t to develop a genetically stable lactococcal host tuned for the production of r educed compounds. Therefore, the ldhB and ldhX genes were sequentially deleted i n L. lactis FI10089, a strain with a deletion of the ldh gene. The single, doubl e, and triple mutants, FI10089, FI10089 Delta ldhB, and FI10089 Delta ldhB Delta ldhX, showed similar growth profiles and displayed mixed-acid fermentation, eth anol being the main reduced end product. Hence, the alcohol dehydrogenase-encodi ng gene, the adhE gene, was inactivated in FI10089, but the resulting strain rev erted to homolactic fermentation due to induction of the ldhB gene. The three la ctate dehydrogenase-deficient mutants were selected as a background for the prod uction of mannitol and 2,3-butanediol. Pathways for the biosynthesis of these co mpounds were overexpressed under the control of a nisin promoter, and the constr ucts were analyzed with respect to growth parameters and product yields under an aerobiosis. Glucose was efficiently channeled to mannitol (maximal yield, 42%) o r to 2,3-butanediol (maximal yield, 67%). The theoretical yield for 2,3-butanedi ol was achieved. We show that FI10089 Delta ldhB is a valuable basis for enginee ring strategies aiming at the production of reduced compounds. [Gaspar, P; Neve s, AR; Santos, H] Univ Nova Lisboa, Inst Tecnol Quim & Biol, P-2780157 Oeiras, P ortugal; [Gasson, MJ; Shearman, CA] Inst Food Res, Norwich NR4 7UA, Norfolk, Eng land Neves, AR (reprint author), Univ Nova Lisboa, Inst Tecnol Quim & Biol, A v Republ EAN, P-2780157 Oeiras, Portugal arn@itqb.unl.pt Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT)[PTDC/EEA-ACR/69530/2006, PTDC/EBB-EBI/113727/2009]; FCT[SFRH/BPD/31251/2006] This work was supported by the Fundacao para a C iencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), contracts PTDC/EEA-ACR/69530/2006 and PTDC/EBB-EBI/ 113727/2009. Paula Gaspar acknowledges FCT for the award of a postdoctoral grant (SFRH/BPD/31251/2006). 62 0 0 AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY WASHINGTON 1752 N ST NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036-2904 USA 0099-2240 APPL ENVIRON MICROB Appl. Environ. Microbiol. OCT 2011 77 19 6826 6835 10.1128/AEM.05544-11 10 Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology Biotechn ology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology 823LH WOS:000295123300012 J Fujii, M; Rose, AL; Waite, TD Fujii, Manabu; R ose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David Iron Uptake by Toxic and Nontoxic Strain s of Microcystis aeruginosa APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY English Article COASTAL WATERS; KINETICS; FE(III); COMPLEXATION; TRANSPORTER; MEMBRANE; PCC7806; GROWTH; GENE Iron uptake by microcystin-producing and non-microcystin-producing strains of Mi crocystis aeruginosa was investigated through short-term uptake assays. Although strain-specific differences were observed, the siderophore-independent Fe uptak e kinetics were essentially similar (e.g., maximum uptake rates of 2.0 to 3.3 am ol . cell(-1) . h(-1)) for the wild-type toxic strain PCC7806 and a genetically engineered mutant unable to produce microcystin. [Fujii, M] Tokyo Inst Te chnol, Dept Civil Engn, Tokyo 1528552, Japan; [Rose, AL] So Cross Univ, So Cross GeoSci, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia; [Rose, AL; Waite, TD] Univ New S Wales, S ch Civil & Environm Engn, Sydney, NSW 2032, Australia Fujii, M (reprint author ), Tokyo Inst Technol, Dept Civil Engn, 2-12-1-M1-4 Ookayama, Tokyo 1528552, Jap an fujii.m.ah@m.titech.ac.jp Japan Society for the Promotion of Scien ce; Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad[22-731]; Australian Research Cou ncil[LP0883561] This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion o f Science with a Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad for M.F. (22-731). Support from the Australian Research Council through Linkage grant LP0883561 is also gratefully acknowledged. 22 0 0 AMER SOC MICROBI OLOGY WASHINGTON 1752 N ST NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20036-2904 USA 0099-224 0 APPL ENVIRON MICROB Appl. Environ. Microbiol. OCT 2011 77 19 7068 7071 10.1128/

AEM.05270-11 4 Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Mi crobiology Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Microbiology 823LH WOS:000295123300042 J Raval, K; Grimes, A; de Lange, WJ; Kamp, TJ; Ralphe, JC Raval, K.; Grimes, A.; de Lange, W. J.; Kamp, T. J.; Ralphe, J. C. HUMAN ENGINEERED CARDIAC TISSUE MODEL OF POMPE'S DISEASE PEDIATRIC RESEAR CH English Meeting Abstract 52nd Annual Scientific Meeting o f the Midwest-Society-for-Pediatric-Research OCT 06-07, 2011 Madison, WI Midwest Soc Pediat Res [Raval, K; Grimes, A; de Lange, WJ; Kamp, TJ; Ralphe, JC] Univ Wisconsin, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Madison, WI USA 0 0 0 INT PEDI ATRIC RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC BALTIMORE 351 W CAMDEN ST, BALTIMORE, MD 2 1201-2436 USA 0031-3998 PEDIATR RES Pediatr. Res. OCT 2011 70 4 430 430 1 Pediatrics Pediatrics 823GQ WOS:000295110900043 J Sun, EW; Cao, WW; Han, PD Sun, Enwei; Cao, Wenwu; Han, Pengdi Complete set of material properties of [011](c) poled 0.24Pb(In(1/2)Nb(1/2))O(3)-0.46Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-0.30PbTiO(3) single crystal MATERIALS LETTERS English Article Piezoelectric single crystal; PIN-PMN-PT; Domain engineering; Material constants ; Dielectrics A complete set of elastic, piezoelectric, and dielectric constants of [011](c) poled multidomain 0.24Pb (In(1/2)Nb(1/2))O(3)-0.46Pb(Mg(1 /3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-0.30PbTiO(3) ternary single crystal has been determined using re sonance and ultrasonic methods and the temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity has been measured at 3 different frequencies. The experimental resu lts revealed that this [011], poled ternary single crystal has very large transv erse piezoelectric coefficient d(32) = -1693 pC/N, transverse dielectric constan t epsilon(11)/epsilon(0) similar to 7400 and a high electromechanical coupling f actor k(32) similar to 90%. In addition, its coercive field is 2 times of that o f the corresponding binary 0.69Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-0.31PbTiO(3) single system with much better temperature stability. Therefore, the crystal is an excellent candidate for transverse mode electromechanical devices. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [Cao, WW] Penn State Univ, Mat Res Lab 164, Mat Res Inst , University Pk, PA 16802 USA; [Sun, EW; Cao, WW] Harbin Inst Technol, Dept Phys , Harbin 150080, Peoples R China; [Han, PD] HC Mat Corp, Urbana, IL 60440 USA Cao, WW (reprint author), Penn State Univ, Mat Res Lab 164, Mat Res Inst, Univer sity Pk, PA 16802 USA dzk@psu.edu NIH[P41-EB21820]; H. C. Materials Inc. This research was supported by the NIH under grant no. P41-EB21820 and by the H. C. Materials Inc. 12 0 0 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV AMSTERDAM PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 0167-577X MATER LETT Mater. Lett. OCT 2011 65 19-20 2855 2857 10.1016/j.matlet.2011.06.013 3 Materials Science, Multidisciplinary; Physics, Applied Materials Science; Physi cs 822RW WOS:000295068300003 J Baloglu, E; Karavana, SY; Senyigit, ZA; Hilmioglu-Polat, S; Metin, DY; Z ekioglu, O; Guneri, T; Jones, DS Baloglu, Esra; K aravana, Sinem Yaprak; Senyigit, Zeynep Ay; Hilmioglu-Polat, Suleyha; Metin, Dil ek Yesim; Zekioglu, Osman; Guneri, Tamer; Jones, David S. In-situ gel formulations of econazole nitrate: preparation and in-vitro and in-vivo eval uation JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY English Article Econazole nitrate; in-situ gel; poloxamer; rheology; texture profile analysis DRUG-DELIVERY; CANDIDA-ALBICANS; POLY(METHYLVINYLETHER-CO-MALEIC ANHYDRIDE); RHE OLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION; MUCOADHESIVE PROPERTIES; AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS; SYSTEMS; RELEASE; PLATFORMS; POLYMERS Objectives This study describes the in-situ gell ing of econazole nitrate containing thermosensitive polymers composed of poloxam er 407 and 188 as a novel treatment platform for vaginal candidiasis. Methods Aq ueous thermosensitive formulations containing 1% of econazole nitrate and poloxa mer 407 and/or 188 were prepared and their rheological, mechanical and drug-rele ase properties determined at 20 +/- 0.1 degrees C and/or 37 +/- 0.1 degrees C. B ased on their biologically suitable thermorheological properties, formulations c

ontaining the mixtures of poloxamer 407 and 188 in ratios of 15: 15 (F1), 15:20 (F2) and 20:10 (F3) were chosen for comprehensive analysis. Key findings Formula tions based on F3 exhibited typical gel-type mechanical spectra (G' > G '') at 3 7 C whereas formulations based on F1 and F2 exhibited properties akin to weakly cross-linked gels. Texture profile analysis demonstrated that F3 showed the high est cohesiveness, adhesiveness, hardness and compressibility. No statistically s ignificant differences (P > 0.5) were observed in the release of econazole nitra te from the formulations at pH 4.5, which in all cases followed anomalous diffus ion kinetics. Formulations based on 20% poloxamer 407:10% poloxamer 188 were cho sen for in-vivo studies and were shown to be effective for the treatment of the vaginal candidiasis. Histopathologic evaluation also supported the effectiveness of the thermosensitive formulation administered intravaginally. Conclusion By c areful engineering of the rheological properties, in-situ thermosensitive gel fo rmulations of econazole nitrate were prepared and were shown to be efficacious i n the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. [Baloglu, E; Karavana, SY; Senyigit, ZA; Guneri, T] Ege Univ, Fac Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Technol, TR-35100 Izmir, Turkey ; [Hilmioglu-Polat, S; Metin, DY] Ege Univ, Fac Med, Dept Microbiol & Clin Micro biol, TR-35100 Izmir, Turkey; [Zekioglu, O] Ege Univ, Fac Med, Dept Pathol, TR-3 5100 Izmir, Turkey; [Jones, DS] Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Med Biol, Sch Pharm, Be lfast BT9 7BL, Antrim, North Ireland Baloglu, E (reprint author), Ege Univ, F ac Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Technol, TR-35100 Izmir, Turkey esra.baloglu