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NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
FREE
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
Josh Harrison, owner of Martial Arts Plus, leads his students in a demonstration at the Hopewell
Harvest Fair Nov. 5 at Hopewell Elementary School. See story on the left.
Martial arts at the Harvest Fair
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
New hospital opens
Capital Health Medical Center
welcomes patients. PAGE 4
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BELLMAWR, NJ
PERMIT NO. 1239
Welcome to The Hopewell Sun
Welcome to the first edition
of your new hometown newspa-
per. And when I say your
newspaper, I mean it.
The Hopewell Sun will be
mailed to you every week.
Inside, you will find, to a
great degree, what you want to
read about. We will cover the
basics government, the
schools, etc. but, throughout
our history, weve found that
giving our readers the opportu-
nity to shape the content of
their paper works well for all.
What you wont find is na-
tional and international news
that is already available on the
Internet. The Hopewell Sun is
all about Hopewell.
The Sun is published by
Elauwit Media. We started our
South Jersey business by
launching The Haddonfield
Sun, a free community newspa-
per, in August 2004.
Since then, we have added
newspapers in Moorestown,
Cherry Hill, Voorhees, Med-
ford, Marlton, Mt. Laurel,
Washington Township, Taber-
nacle, Shamong, Lawrence and
Montgomery.
The Hopewell Sun is No. 13.
Theres another story in this
edition about how you can sub-
mit articles, letters, photos and
the like for publication.
Here, though, Id like to ex-
plain a bit about our philosophy
and what kinds of submissions
we really appreciate.
Our goal as a newspaper pub-
lisher always has been to not
only cover the traditional news,
but to also allow communities
to celebrate their individual
and collective achievements.
Thats why, inside of our
newspapers, youll often read
stories about students collect-
ing items for the needy, local
businesspeople who have
By ALAN BAUER
The Hopewell Sun
Well be in your mailbox every week
with the best in local news
please see SUN, page 2
The 25th renewal of the
Hopewell Harvest Fair had a
near-perfect Fall day Nov. 5 as
businesses and civic organiza-
tions alike gathered for the tradi-
tional event on the grounds of
Hopewell Elementary School.
Songs from Miss Amy, the
First Lady of Musical Fitness,
could be heard across the
grounds as children to adults
strolled among the tents and ta-
bles set up.
The annual event is run com-
pletely by volunteers and in-
cludes inflatable rides, sack
races, a petting zoo and cake and
pie-eating contests, to go along
with the tables of local business-
es from banks to craft jewelry to
a Lego-building contest featuring
everything from monsters to ve-
hicles.
One of those local businesses,
Martial Arts Plus, presented a
demonstration of karate tech-
niques as owner Josh Harrison
led his students through their
paces.
Money raised from the fair is
used to fund community organi-
zations.
The food tents included every-
thing from marinara pizza to
meatball sandwiches to pumpkin
muffins.
Families could enjoy a hayride
together and have a peek at
homegrown vegetables or have
early Christmas gifts crafted by
local artisans.
Organizers of the fair said it is
a volunteer event designed to
bring together businesses and
families in the Hopewell Valley
for a day of fun.
Sponsors for the event includ-
ed Capital Health System, 1st
Constitution Bank, Francos
Pizza, Hopewell Valley Commu-
nity Bank, Pennington Quality
Market, Trap Rock
Industries, Union Line Garage,
A&E Construction, Connolly Ar-
chitecture, LLC Destiny Arts,
Boro Bean, Daniel Saporito
DMD, Hopewell Boro Auto Re-
pair, Hopewell Museum,
Muentener Builders, Rosedale
Mills, Stellitano Heating & Air
Conditioning, Weidel Realtors,
the Waldorf School, Brothers
Moon, Dentz Designs, County
Executive, Brian Hughes, DeSi-
mone DDS Henderson
Sotheby, Historic Hopewell
House, Hopewell Challenge
Run/Walk- Hopewell Family
Practice, Hopewell Lambertville
Eyes, Hopewell Pharmacy, Ken
Daniels, OD, Hopewell Eye, L&A
Tents, Lewis School of Prince-
ton, Daniel J. Lyons Jr., Mark
McDonough, DMD Music, To-
gether Purple,Circle Photogra-
phy, Radiology Affiliates Imag-
ing, Regent Floor
Covering, Saporito, Lori Sowsian
Landscapes, Stony Brook Assist-
ed Living, Stony Brook Millstone
Association, Westminster Con-
servatory of Music and Window
Dressings by Barbara.
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Harvest Fair
draws
hundreds
25th-annual affair features
music, food and much more
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
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Welcome to the first edition
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Send us your
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achieved recognition, and
more.
The news, as we all know,
isnt always good.
But when someone does
something special, he or she de-
serves time in the spotlight.
Youll see letters to the editor,
calendar listings, obituaries
and other regular items.
In general, what you find in
your newspaper is what you tell
us to print and/or send us to
print.
Over time, well (hopefully)
do most things right, but occa-
sionally make mistakes or miss
a story. When that happens, feel
free to contact us.
We know we cant make
everyone happy all of the time,
but we will remain true to our
commitment to having our
readers shape their newspaper.
I hope that you enjoy this
newspaper, and take an active
role in helping us publish the
important news about the peo-
ple, places and events that make
Hopewell a special place to live.
Working together, well have
a publication that is true to the
culture and spirit of this com-
munity.
Alan Bauer is general manag-
er and editor of Elauwit Media.
SUN
Continued from page 1
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Capital Health Med Center opens
Capital Health Medical Center-
Hopewell has officially opened its
doors to patients. The 223-bed hos-
pital sits on 165-acres of property
in Hopewell Township, and will
offer a wide range of medical
services to patients from through-
out the region.
The new Capital Health Med-
ical Center-Hopewell, located di-
rectly off Interstate 95 at the
Scotch Road exit, replaces the
health-care systems Mercer Hos-
pital, Trenton.
Capital Health Regional Med-
ical Center, also located in Tren-
ton, remains open featuring $100
million in renovations also being
completed this year.
Capital Health Medical Center-
Hopewell features high-level, spe-
cialized medical services such as
neurosciences, digestive health,
advanced orthopedic services,
cancer, CyberKnife radiosurgery,
daVinci robotic surgery, recon-
structive surgery and specialized
pediatric-emergency care.
These advanced medical serv-
ices are delivered in a non-tradi-
tional hospital setting that incor-
porates patient-friendly design
with unique, environmentally
conscious features. Amenities in-
clude an on-site spa, coffee kiosk,
cyber caf, bistro and boutique
gift shops.
A total of 67 patients from Cap-
ital Health-Mercer were trans-
ferred by 24 ambulances to Capi-
tal Health Medical Center-
Hopewell. Mercer has since
ceased admitting inpatients and
will only offer emergency servic-
es at its satellite emergency de-
partment.
In addition to the SED, Capital
Health-Mercer will house a wide
variety of administrative offices,
including human resources, clini-
cal and community education
and offices of the countywide mo-
bile intensive-care unit.
The first patient to be trans-
ferred from Mercer was expec-
tant mother Dava Rogers, of
Trenton. Rogers, who was trans-
ferred to the Josephine Plumeri
Birthing Center at Capital Health
Medical Center-Hopewell, is ex-
pecting her third child, her first
girl.
Hamilton resident Elizabeth
Fields delivered the last baby to
be born at Mercer hospital just
before its closing.
Fields and her son, Thomas,
were later transferred to the
Hopewell facility.
Today marks an important
milestone for Capital Health.
From two hospitals that merged
to stay viable, a new Capital
Health has emerged and with it
the finest medical facility avail-
able.
This new medical center fea-
tures sophisticated technology
and medical services, highly
skilled physicians and clinicians,
and amenities that completely
alter the experience of being in,
or visiting, a hospital, said Al
Maghazehe, president and CEO of
Capital Health. I congratulate
the entire team who coordinated
and participated in todays move
and opening day. Everything went
smoothly and as planned.
The opening today of Capital
Health Medical Center-Hopewell
is a significant advancement in
our commitment to provide pa-
tients in this region a level of
healthcare that they previously
had to seek in major cities like
Philadelphia and New York, said
Samuel J. Plumeri Jr., chairman
of the Capital Health Board of Di-
rectors. Not only do they now
have access to some of most
skilled specialists and surgeons
in a number of specialties, but pa-
tients can access these services in
an environment that promotes
healing and offers comfort unlike
any other facility in the region.
The new hospital and attached
medical-office building feature
environmentally friendly design
based on the U.S. Green Building
Councils Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design Green
Building Rating System TM
(LEED).
These features include roof
gardens that recycle rainwater,
technologies that reduce heating
and cooling requirements and pa-
tient rooms with ample sunlight
and beautiful views.
In addition to operating the
SED at the Mercer Campus, pri-
mary-care services will be offered
by Capital Health at the newly
opened Capital Health Family
Medicine-Trenton located at the
Capital Health Family Health
Center at 433 Bellevue Ave.
(across the street from Mercer) in
Trenton.
Free shuttle service will be pro-
vided for employees, mobile pa-
tients and visitors who do not
have their own transportation to
the Hopewell campus.
These shuttles will depart from
the front of Capital Healths Fam-
ily Health Center to the main en-
trance at Hopewell.
The shuttle will leave the Fami-
ly Health Center every hour, on
the hour, between 8 a.m. and 8
p.m. daily.
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
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Send us your
Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@hopewellsun.com. Fax
us at 856-427-0934. Call the
editor at 609-751-0245.
Water is available for drink-
ing and/or sanitary use at the
front of the Hopewell Town-
ship public works building, 203
Washington Crossing Penning-
ton Road Titusville, and at the
Hopewell Elementary School,
parking lot side, 35 Princeton
Ave., Hopewell.
Residents must bring their
own containers for filling.
Fresh water is available
at public works building
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, N.J. 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Associate Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Hopewell Sun is published weekly by
Elauwit Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. It is
mailed weekly to select addresses in the
08560, 08525 and 08534 ZIP codes. If you
are not on the mailing list, six-month sub-
scriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs of
the print publication are online, free of
charge. For information, call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please send an
email news@hopewellsun.com. For adver-
tising information, call 609-751-0245 or
email advertising@hopewellsun.com. The
Sun welcomes suggestions and comments
from readers including information about
errors that may call for a correction. Send
your comments to news@hopewellsun.com,
or call the newsroom at 609-751-0245.
SPEAK UP
The Hopewell Sun welcomes letters from
readers. Brief and to the point is best, so we
look for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Be sure to include your name, address and
phone number with your letter, and know
that we will print your name and hometown
with the letter. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters via e-mail to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 856-427-
0934, or via the mail at 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
T
hat Gov. Christie and the New
Jersey Education Association
dont see eye-to-eye on much of
anything is no secret. But, last week,
there was an encouraging sign from
the union.
The Associated Press reported that,
on the eve of the unions convention in
Atlantic City, it tossed out a few ideas
for reform. Thats a promising sign, as,
in the past, the union either has en-
trenched itself as an opponent to re-
form and change or has done a really
awful job of getting the word out about
what proposals it would support.
The result is that, for many, the per-
ception of the union is that it clings to
tenure to protect incompetent teach-
ers, is out of touch with todays eco-
nomic realities and is dedicated to pro-
tecting a status quo that no longer is
acceptable. Were not saying that per-
ception is right, but its a perception
that the NJEA really should address.
And last week, it did. Sort of.
According to the AP, the union fa-
vors making teachers eligible for
tenure after four years, instead of the
current three years. In the general
scope of things, thats a small conces-
sion, but a concession nonetheless,
and perhaps something that can be
used as a building block.
The group also called for requiring
full-day kindergarten and, no surprise
here, opposed using public funds to
pay for private education.
The NJEA would be well served to
acknowledge and then remedy the be-
lief of many that it has been tone-deaf
to the economic devastation that has
decimated many in the private sector.
It should do more to become a partner,
or to show that it is a partner, with tax-
payers and the communities they
serve.
Last weeks plans are a step in that
direction.
Heres a thought...
Teachers union offers some ideas of its own
NJEA ideas
Do you think that last weeks ideas
released by the NJEA will have an
impact on education?
Posted on sun news
Princeton, Paterno and Tony Mack
The two Princetons
have finally reunited
So now, its just one Princeton.
The wall has come down between
Princeton Township and Princeton Bor-
ough, after a solid majority of voters in
each town elected to merge the two munici-
palities, according to Bloomberg News.
And why would a business news compa-
ny like Bloomberg be interested? Because
this move is designed to save money. A 10-
member commission of residents and
elected officials from the borough and
township calculated that merging these
two places should eventually save their
combined budgets $3.2 million a year.
If the towns had already consolidated by
now, borough property owners would have
saved $201 in taxes this year, on average,
and township members would have saved
$240, NJ.com has said.
Princeton Township, which has long fa-
vored the merger, voted for it 3,542 to 604.
The borough, which had been against it
the last time such a measure arose in 1996,
seems to have passed it 1,238 to 828. Both
votes have some absentee ballots still to
come, but the outcome seems clear.
Gov. Christie has encouraged this merg-
er, to the point where hes offered to pay 20
percent of the $1.7 million cost, Bloomberg
said. Hes also urging the other 566 munici-
palities to consider consolidations as well.
NJ.com noted the state has 21 other sets
of towns where, like Princeton Township
and Borough respectively, one completely
surrounds the other.
The two Princetons originally split in
1894, when a dispute over school funding
led residents in the borough area to secede.
3 college students are accused
of trying to steal 35 pumpkins
Three Rider University students alleged-
ly tried to steal 35 pumpkins and a gourd
on Halloween night from a pumpkin patch
in Lawrence Township, according to
Lawrenceville Patch.
The suspects car reportedly was so
loaded down with pumpkins that one of
the students had to slam the trunk down
several times before it finally closed, a wit-
ness told Patch.
The pumpkins were owned by the
Church of Saint Ann, which is located
right across the street from the patch on
Route 206. Township police said officers
found the suspects there just as they were
about to leave.
Officers had the students one man and
two women unload the pumpkins and
gourd, which were then photographed into
evidence, and returned to the patch.
The students were released that night.
Police said criminal charges against them
will depend, among other things, on what
value church officials place on the mer-
chandise particularly given that it was
Halloween night already, and jack-o-
lantern sales were probably done for the
season anyway.
I dedicate this
scandalized batting cage
Trenton Mayor Tony Mack helped open
and dedicate a new indoor Little League
batting cage facility recently a facility
that was cited in a recent lawsuit as just
one example of alleged City Hall malfea-
sance, The Times of Trenton said.
In a suit filed against the mayor, the city
and the acting public works director, for-
mer recreation department employee
Maria Richardson said she was pressured
not to put the project up for competitive
bidding, though the law required it.
Dont miss a thing!
These stories are a sampling of the
posts you can find every day on The
Central Jersey Sun an online
conglomeration of profiles, features
and opinions from around the region.
Check out these stories and more at
http://cj.sunne.ws.
Will we remember Joe Paterno like we see
him here, riding high, celebrating another
victory? In light of the recent Penn State
scandal, and the coachs firing, the an-
swer might be no. If he had known when
to quit, he wouldnt be lumped in with
these other Central Jersey guys
Turf s Up! is an exciting, pio-
neering program to install Astro-
turf on a field at Hopewell Valley
Central High School.
Its exciting because it will
tremendously improve the high
school teams ability to practice
and compete in inclement weath-
er by providing a world-class
sports surface thats guaranteed
for a minimum of 10 years.
Its pioneering since its a three-
way partnership between
Hopewell Valley School District,
Hopewell Valley Recreation Foun-
dation and Astroturf, the premier
provider of artificial turf.
The recreation foundation has
made tremendous progress in the
fund-raising program and, with
continued community support,
the Astroturf field could be a real-
ity by next spring.
Installing Astroturf will do
four things immediately: 1) make
more practices more productive
since they wont be regularly can-
celled or held indoors due to
weather; 2) allow more games to
take place when scheduled rather
than have them moved, cancelled
or re-scheduled due to weather, 3)
provide the high school teams
with an equal basis of competi-
tion since all postseason playoffs
and championships are played on
artificial-turf fields, and 4) pro-
vide increased economic benefit
to our community.
Currently, the high school fall
and spring athletic teams lose an
enormous amount of practice
time due to weather issues with
the schools fields.
During the 2010-2011 school
year, among other years, the varsi-
ty football team had to play their
home opener away because their
field was unusable due to drought.
Conversely, the boys varsity
lacrosse team could only have one
practice on its field before their
first scrimmage due to rain and
wet fields.
Numerous times, including the
week of Oct. 31-Nov. 4, the high
school had to pay to rent a turf
field and provide buses to enable
its teams to practice for playoff
games.
Earlier this fall, the varsity soc-
cer field was closed for several
days due to a sinkhole.
All too often, home games for
Hopewell Valley High School ath-
letes must be re-scheduled or relo-
cated to the opponents fields be-
cause of rain.
Unfortunately, due to the high
clay content, the school fields
drain and dry very slowly, which
creates regular scheduling and lo-
cation challenges.
An overwhelming majority of
high schools in our region have at
least one artificial turf field,
which provides them more pro-
ductive practice times, and, since
regional and sectional playoffs are
almost all played on artificial-turf
fields, our athletes compete at a
disadvantage, since the playing
qualities of grass vs. artificial turf
are significantly different.
Finally, an artificial-turf field
will bring substantial economic
benefit to our community.
Hopewell Valley Soccers Tourna-
ment, both the girls and boys
Hopewell Valley Lacrosse Tourna-
ments, and, probably, a marching-
band competition, all possible
with the implementation of the
Astroturf field will provide ap-
proximately $185,000 in annual
local economic impact. Parents
and athletes participating in these
events spend money when theyre
here by purchasing food, bever-
ages, gas, etc.
The only costs for the school
district are the design and testing
fees, since the recreation founda-
tion is providing all material and
installation funding to the dis-
trict.
The district also will benefit
due to greatly reduced mainte-
nance costs on that field no grass
cutting, lining or fertilizing.
Our local student-athletes and
band members deserve the same
advantages currently held by
their competition.
Our local businesses ought to
have the increased revenue avail-
able through events currently
being held at other venues due to
our lack of an artificial-turf field.
Several thousand youth and
high school athletes and a number
of local businesses will benefit for
many years through this initia-
tive.
Those beneficiaries, youth and
adult, are a large majority of our
Hopewell Valley community.
Lets all pitch in to finalize
Turf s Up! and build our field of
dreams for our students. For more
information, go to the recreation
foundations website, www.hvrec-
foundation.org.
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
By JON BUTLER
Special to The Sun
Bear Tavern Road School in
Hopewell is one of seven schools
chosen in Mercer County for the
installation of school flashers
and centerline rumble strips.
The county has received more
than $500,000 in federal trans-
portation funds for the projects.
The replacement of school
flashers project includes upgrad-
ing existing outdated school
flashers with highly visible over-
head devices.
This project also includes in-
stallation of driver-speed feed-
back signs. In an effort to use
greener technologies, the up-
grades would use solar power in-
stead of conventional electrical
service.
Installation of centerline rum-
ble stripes seeks to improve safe-
ty on roadway curves. Several
roadway segments have been
identified that experience a high
number of cross-over type crash-
es.
This condition is particularly
problematic on horizontal
curves. Installation of centerline
rumble stripes has been shown to
reduce these types of crashes.
The Federal Highway Adminis-
tration has identified installation
of centerline rumble stripes as
one of nine low-cost safety coun-
termeasures for which federal
funding has been made available.
Mercer County conducted a
countywide screening of cross-
over crash types and identified 18
segments of roadways that would
benefit from this treatment.
Improvements would include
removal of existing centerline
striping within the limits of the
rumble stripes as needed, instal-
lation of centerline rumble
stripes and then restriping of the
centerline.
Both projects are funded
through federal transportation
safety grants, which are adminis-
tered through the New Jersey De-
partment of Transportations Of-
fice of Local Aid and Economic
Development.
Other schools scheduled to
have the improvements installed
are General Johnson School in
Princeton Township, Maurice
Hawk School in West Windsor;
Parkway Avenue School in
Ewing; St. Gregory the Great in
Hamilton, Sayen School in
Hamilton and Antheil School in
Ewing.
THURSDAY
November 17
FOR ALL
Open Space Advisory Committee
Meeting: 7:30 p.m. at the Municipal
Building.
Planning Board Meeting: 7:30 p.m.
at the Municipal Building.
FRIDAY
November 18
FOR ALL
The Skin of Our Teeth: Hopewell
Valley Central High School will pres-
ent this play at 7:30 p.m. at the Per-
forming Arts Center at Hopewell
Valley. Tickets are for adults $10
and $5 for students and seniors.
SATURDAY
November 19
FOR ALL
The Skin of Our Teeth: Hopewell
Valley Central High School will pres-
ent this play at 7:30 p.m. at the Per-
forming Arts Center at Hopewell
Valley. Tickets are for adults $10 and
$5 for students and seniors.
MONDAY
November 21
FOR ALL
Recreation Advisory Board Meet-
ing: 7 p.m. at the Municipal Building.
TUESDAY
November 22
FOR ALL
HPL Knitting Group: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Public Library.
calendar PAGE 8 NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email: calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all organizations.
Bear Tavern Road School getting safety upgrades
School is 1 of only 7 in county to get new rumble strips and flashers
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
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wwwItsJust10com
Buy and sell anything for $10
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$
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Heres a quick list of ways you
can participate in your new
hometown newspaper, The
Hopewell Sun:
We love to hear about local
achievements, from township ath-
letic scores to Scouting awards,
calendar items and much more.
The best way to send stories
and photos to us is via e-mail at
news@hopewellsun.com. There is
no charge for these announce-
ments.
We publish every Wednesday,
so we need to receive your items
at least one week prior to make
deadline. If you have a time-sensi-
tive event, we ask that you submit
it at least two weeks in advance to
ensure we have time to publish it
before the event.
We also have a robust and ac-
tive website. Visit www.hopewell-
sun.comfor details.
So what should you send to us?
Stick to the basics of who, what,
when, where and how. Be sure to
include a phone number or e-mail
address if you want readers to
contact you about an event. Also
be sure to include a phone num-
ber marked not for publication
just in case we have any ques-
tions and need to reach you be-
fore your item is published. And
double-check the spelling of any
names.
Photos from a quality digital
camera will work well. Just at-
tach them as jpegs to an e-mail.
Wondering if what you have in
mind is something wed publish?
Feel free to contact us with any
questions.
But dont be shy.
If you or your kids have done
something noteworthy, send it in.
Chances are its a perfect fit for
The Sun.
If youre not able to send items
electronically, our regular mail
address is 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Our fax number is (856) 427-
0934.
Have news to share? Dont be shy send it to us
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
At left, various booths and tables at the Harvest Fair. At right, the Green Team of Angela Clerico, Jim Gambino and Denise Moser at Harvest Fair.
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all of The Sun Newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
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SHERMAN SMITH
PIumbing, Heating & Air Inc.
Sherman Smith Wishes
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About Our Business
First Things First - Customer Service
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