www.themontgomerysun.

com
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
FREE
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
The Veterans Memorial in Montgomery Park was officially dedicated on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. The
Montgomery Veterans Memorial Committee had been preparing for this day for nearly a decade.
See additional photos on page 10.
Veterans Memorial dedicated
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Fiscally sound board
Auditor OKs school board’s
business practices. PAGE 5.
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE
PAID
BELLMAWR, NJ
PERMIT NO. 1239
Kim resigns as
superintendent
of schools
Earl Kim, the superintendent of
the Montgomery Township School
District since 2008, has notified the
board of education that he intends
to resign as of June 30, to become
head of school for the Kamehame-
ha Schools-Kapalama in Hawaii.
Kim, who is originally from
Hawaii, shared his news with the
district's staff on Nov. 9.
Kim was named a finalist for
the position in September, accord-
ing to the West Hawaii Today
newspaper.
The superintendent, whose con-
tract with Montgomery runs until
June 30, 2013, was quoted in a
Kamehameha Schools release in
September as saying “I had the
good fortune of studying at great
universities with wonderful teach-
ers and fellow sojourners. I am
eager now to apply my learning in
the service of the people and the
islands that I love and call home. I
can think of no nobler pursuit, no
better use for my education and
experience than the making of the
archetypical ‘Hawaiian School.’
Our keiki deserve no less.
“Moreover, my commitment to
the children of Hawaii – that they
grow to become confident, caring
and successful adults; and in
doing so ensure the preservation
of our distinctively Hawaiian cul-
ture, is undying. It is the kind of
devotion that my teachers and
coaches gave to me and it is what I
will give to every child whom I
serve.”
The board of education, in a
statement, said it recognizes that
the transition to a new superin-
tendent can be an uncertain time,
but wants to assure the communi-
ty that it has already begun defin-
ing the process for seeking Kim’s
replacement.
The details of the superintend-
ent search will be explained more
fully in the near future, but all
stakeholders can expect to have an
opportunity to share their
thoughts.
In the meantime, the board
strongly supports the work of
Montgomery's leadership team in
driving educational excellence for
all of Montgomery's children.
Kim’s work in developing a
board-approved strategic plan – re-
aligning K-12 curriculum guides,
developing K-12 common assess-
ments, building consensus around
standards for professional prac-
tice, using quantitative and quali-
tative feedback and implementing
teacher learning teams – are im-
portant for deepening the dis-
trict’s educational successes, and
the board expects that work to con-
tinue.
The board says it deeply appre-
ciates Kim's service and wishes
him much success in his new posi-
tion.
Before joining Montgomery,
Kim served as superintendent of
schools in Verona and has also
served as principal of Emerson
Junior-Senior High School, assis-
tant principal at Cherry Hill High
School West and a teacher at Tren-
ton Central High School.
By JIM WRIGHT
The Montgomery Sun
He accepts head of school
position in Hawaii
Smith beats Petraske for committee seat
Republican Rich Smith nar-
rowly beat Democrat Mark Pe-
traske for a seat on the township
committee Nov. 8 with 1,957 votes
to Petraske’s 1,833.
The victory maintains a 5-0 Re-
publican majority on the govern-
ing body.
“I am very proud of Rich and
our entire team,” said Commit-
teeman Edward Trzaska of the
Montgomery Republican Organi-
zation. “We ran a race on the is-
sues important to Montgomery
and won for the fourth time in a
row. Our vision of ‘Better,
Smarter, Government’ is working
and the residents are positively
responding to it.”
Petraske, meanwhile, felt he
accomplished his mission of
raising issues important to town-
ship voters.
“This town is very evenly split
on what they feel should be done,
and I just wanted to give a voice
to the other half,” he said. “If you
look at the election as a whole, I
garnered more votes than the
other Democrats in the county.”
Petraske said he is not sure if
he will seek a seat on the commit-
tee next year, but he will continue
to be involved.
“I am passionate about the is-
sues in this town, and about prop-
erly representing the people in
our community,” he said. “There
are many significant issues com-
ing up in this town in the coming
year, and I think they need two
sets of eyes on them.”
Trzaska said Smith’s narrow
victory was not a surprise.
“Last year, I won by a similar
proportion, about 3 percent of
the vote,” he said. However, since
the turnout was very low this
year, the actual vote difference
was smaller.”
Montgomery elections, he said
are always close.
“I believe that the margin of
victory in 2003 and 2005 were
both under 30 votes,” he said.
With win, Republicans retain 5-0 majority
By JIM WRIGHT
The Montgomery Sun
please see SMITH, page 2
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“Montgomery residents are inde-
pendent minded and knowledge-
able on local issues. In order to
win, you have to focus on the is-
sues that matter and work ex-
tremely hard to speak to as many
folks as possible.”
Petraske agreed that there are
no landslide victories in Mont-
gomery.
“It’s not the smallest margin
we’ve ever seen,” he said. “We’re
used to close elections in Mont-
gomery.”
Smith will replace Deputy
Mayor Kacey Dyer, a member of
the committee since 2009, who
did not seek re-election this year.
“I am disappointed to lose
Deputy Mayor Kacey Dyer, who
was the first of us to really push
the Skillman Park idea, but Rich
is going to be a tremendous addi-
tion,” Trzaska said. “He is a suc-
cessful business professional and
a fellow engineer, and will bring a
fresh perspective to the township
committee. I look forward to
working with him next year.”
Smith and his wife, Valerie,
are 15-year residents of Mont-
gomery and have two children,
one a recent graduate of Mont-
gomery High School and one cur-
rently attending Montgomery
High School.
He is a vice president and re-
gional manager with DPR Con-
struction, a national construc-
tion company specializing in
multimillion dollar advanced
technology buildings. He holds a
bachelor’s degree in construction
engineering from Arizona State
University. He has worked for
three of the world’s largest con-
struction and engineering firms
during his 30-year career and
brings a vast amount of relevant
experience to the township com-
mittee.
He currently serves on the
township’s zoning board of ad-
justment and served for a year on
the township’s transportation
committee.
Active in the community,
Smith coached Montgomery girls
basketball from 2000-2004 and the
girls softball league from 1998 to
2006.
In 2005, he was one of the origi-
nal board members of the Mont-
gomery Township Education
Foundation and served on that
board until 2009. He co-chaired
the North Princeton Develop-
ment Center Citizens Committee
in 2004. He was also one of the or-
ganizers of “Operation Friends,”
the Hurricane Katrina Relief-As-
sistance effort in 2005 and was
one of the Montgomery citizens
who drove to Biloxi, Miss., to de-
liver a truckload of donations
collected in the township.
Smith wins seat on committee
SMITH
Continued from page 1
4 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
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The following items were
taken from reports on file with
the Montgomery Township Po-
lice Department.
On Nov. 8 at 5:36 p.m. police
responded to a three-car acci-
dent on River Road near the
Causeway.
A 49-year-old Titusville man
is alleged to have struck the
rear of a vehicle driven by a 30-
year-old Princeton man.
The impact pushed a vehicle
into another driven by a 35-
year-old Philadelphia man. Po-
lice said one driver received a
summons for careless driving.
The owner of a business on
Executive Drive reported that
someone used the company
credit card number to charge
various items, including an air-
line ticket to Panama, Nov. 8.
The suspicious charges to-
taled $763.36.
POLICE REPORT
Car crash leads to
careless-driving
summons
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 5
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Board of education given
clean fiscal bill of health
The Montgomery Board of Ed-
ucation has received a clean bill
of fiscal health. Warren Korecky,
of board auditor Suplee Clooney
and Co., told board members that
the audit for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 2011, was unqualified,
meaning the board does not have
to make any modifications to its
business practices.
Board Administrator Thomas
Vananzi said that is a credit to
the board business office.
“This is a tremendous accom-
plishment,” he said. “We look at
this as our report card.”
The goals of the business office
in an audit, he said, are an un-
qualified audit, meaning that, in
the opinion of the auditor, the fi-
nancial reports reflect the busi-
ness of the board, and a clean
audit, with no areas requiring
corrective action, both of which
were achieved.
“Their attention to detail is in-
credible,” Vananzi said of his
staff in the business office.
“Their commitment is second to
none. They know what their re-
sponsibilities are and they work
well as a team.”
He pointed out that the state
has many compliance regulations
for accuracy, timelinesss and rec-
onciliation of all accounts. The
minutes of board meetings are re-
viewed to make sure that busi-
ness is done properly and that the
business office is indeed carrying
out what the board has approved.
“There are purchasing and
payroll laws,” he said. “There are
proper coding of expenditures;
and the various grants we receive
have regulations. Our food-serv-
ice program has regulations, and
there are various internal con-
trols for timely deposits of re-
ceipts.”
Vananzi also praised the of-
fice’s efficiency, which he said
helps keep costs per pupil in the
district among the lowest in the
state.
“We pay our bills on time, so
vendors like to deal with us, and
our classrooms get their supplies
in a timely manner,” he said,
adding that keeping up to date on
bills has resulted in excellent
credit for the district.
Korecky also praised the coop-
eration of the business office dur-
ing the audit.
“The information we have
needed is always there, and that
reflects that the business office is
doing its job,” he said.
According to the audit report,
the district budget had a surplus
of $1,881,735.12 for the 2011 fiscal
year, but Korecky pointed out that
state law requires $ 1.6 million of
that be included in the 2012 budg-
et.
Board member Humberto
Goldoni stressed that as much as
possible of the surplus would be
returned to the taxpayers in the
form of property tax relief.
By JIM WRIGHT
The Montgomery Sun
Business practices won’t have
to be changed, auditor says
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, N.J. 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Associate Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Montgomery Sun is published weekly by
Elauwit Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. It is
mailed weekly to select addresses in the
08502 ZIP code. If you are not on the mailing
list, six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99. PDFs of the print publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please send an
email news@themontgomerysun.com. For
advertising information, call 609-751-
0245 or email advertising@themont-
gomerysun.com. The Sun welcomes sugges-
tions and comments from readers – includ-
ing information about errors that may call
for a correction. Send your comments to
news@themontgomerysun.com, or call the
newsroom at 609-751-0245.
SPEAK UP
The Montgomery Sun welcomes letters from
readers. Brief and to the point is best, so we
look for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Be sure to include your name, address and
phone number with your letter, and know
that we will print your name and hometown
with the letter. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters via e-mail to news@the-
montgomerysun.com, via fax at 856-427-
0934, or via the mail at 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. The
Montgomery Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
in our opinion
T
hat Gov. Christie and the New
Jersey Education Association
don’t see eye-to-eye on much of
anything is no secret. But, last week,
there was an encouraging sign from
the union.
The Associated Press reported that,
on the eve of the union’s convention in
Atlantic City, it tossed out a few ideas
for reform. That’s a promising sign, as,
in the past, the union either has en-
trenched itself as an opponent to re-
form and change or has done a really
awful job of getting the word out about
what proposals it would support.
The result is that, for many, the per-
ception of the union is that it clings to
tenure to protect incompetent teach-
ers, is out of touch with today’s eco-
nomic realities and is dedicated to pro-
tecting a status quo that no longer is
acceptable. We’re not saying that per-
ception is right, but it’s a perception
that the NJEA really should address.
And last week, it did. Sort of.
According to the AP, the union fa-
vors making teachers eligible for
tenure after four years, instead of the
current three years. In the general
scope of things, that’s a small conces-
sion, but a concession nonetheless,
and perhaps something that can be
used as a building block.
The group also called for requiring
full-day kindergarten and, no surprise
here, opposed using public funds to
pay for private education.
The NJEA would be well served to
acknowledge and then remedy the be-
lief of many that it has been tone-deaf
to the economic devastation that has
decimated many in the private sector.
It should do more to become a partner,
or to show that it is a partner, with tax-
payers and the communities they
serve.
Last week’s plans are a step in that
direction.
Here’s a thought...
Teachers union offers some ideas of its own
NJEA ideas
Do you think that last week’s ideas
released by the NJEA will have an
impact on education?
Posted on sun news
Princeton, Paterno and Tony Mack
The two Princetons
have finally reunited
So now, it’s just one Princeton.
The wall has come down between
Princeton Township and Princeton Bor-
ough, after a solid majority of voters in
each town elected to merge the two munici-
palities, according to Bloomberg News.
And why would a business news compa-
ny like Bloomberg be interested? Because
this move is designed to save money. A 10-
member commission of residents and
elected officials from the borough and
township calculated that merging these
two places should eventually save their
combined budgets $3.2 million a year.
If the towns had already consolidated by
now, borough property owners would have
saved $201 in taxes this year, on average,
and township members would have saved
$240, NJ.com has said.
Princeton Township, which has long fa-
vored the merger, voted for it 3,542 to 604.
The borough, which had been against it
the last time such a measure arose in 1996,
seems to have passed it 1,238 to 828. Both
votes have some absentee ballots still to
come, but the outcome seems clear.
Gov. Christie has encouraged this merg-
er, to the point where he’s offered to pay 20
percent of the $1.7 million cost, Bloomberg
said. He’s also urging the other 566 munici-
palities to consider consolidations as well.
NJ.com noted the state has 21 other sets
of towns where, like Princeton Township
and Borough respectively, one completely
surrounds the other.
The two Princetons originally split in
1894, when a dispute over school funding
led residents in the borough area to secede.
3 college students are accused
of trying to steal 35 pumpkins
Three Rider University students alleged-
ly tried to steal 35 pumpkins and a gourd
on Halloween night from a pumpkin patch
in Lawrence Township, according to
Lawrenceville Patch.
The suspects’ car reportedly was so
loaded down with pumpkins that one of
the students had to slam the trunk down
several times before it finally closed, a wit-
ness told Patch.
The pumpkins were owned by the
Church of Saint Ann, which is located
right across the street from the patch on
Route 206. Township police said officers
found the suspects there just as they were
about to leave.
Officers had the students – one man and
two women – unload the pumpkins and
gourd, which were then photographed into
evidence, and returned to the patch.
The students were released that night.
Police said criminal charges against them
will depend, among other things, on what
value church officials place on the mer-
chandise – particularly given that it was
Halloween night already, and jack-o-
lantern sales were probably done for the
season anyway.
‘I dedicate this
scandalized batting cage’
Trenton Mayor Tony Mack helped open
and dedicate a new indoor Little League
batting cage facility recently – a facility
that was cited in a recent lawsuit as just
one example of alleged City Hall malfea-
sance, The Times of Trenton said.
In a suit filed against the mayor, the city
and the acting public works director, for-
mer recreation department employee
Maria Richardson said she was pressured
not to put the project up for competitive
bidding, though the law required it.
Don’t miss a thing!
These stories are a sampling of the
posts you can find every day on The
Central Jersey Sun – an online
conglomeration of profiles, features
and opinions from around the region.
Check out these stories and more at
http://cj.sunne.ws.
Will we remember Joe Paterno like we see
him here, riding high, celebrating another
victory? In light of the recent Penn State
scandal, and the coach’s firing, the an-
swer might be ‘no.’ If he had known when
to quit, he wouldn’t be lumped in with
these other Central Jersey guys…
The Hugs for Brady Founda-
tion will be hosting a blood drive,
food drive and toy drive Nov. 19
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Confec-
tionately Yours, 3391 Route 27 in
the Franklin Town Center.
Those scheduling an appoint-
ment to give blood will get free ice
cream from Confectionately
Yours. Call Jessica at 732-740-1767
or sign up at www.chbcblood.org.
Most needed in the food drive
are gift cards, coffee, corn muffin
mix, rice, gravy, stuffing, cranber-
ry sauce, boxed baked goods, Par-
malot milk, sugar, flour, canned
sweet potatoes and toiletries.
The event will also feature a
toy drive to benefit local children
with cancer at the Bristol Myers
Squibb Hospital in New
Brunswick. New, unwrapped toys
will be accepted for children new-
born to 23 months old. Toys
should be easy to clean, and may
include electronics items, arts
and crafts items or gift cards.
Every blood, food or toy dona-
tion gets a raffle ticket for a
chance to win prizes, and a craft
table will be available for children
to make cards for kids with can-
cer.
Free gift-wrapping will be
available.
The Hugs for Brady Founda-
tion, a nonprofit organization,
was established to help the Can-
cer Institute of New Jersey and
the Bristol-Myers Squibb Chil-
dren's Hospital fight the ongoing
battle against pediatric cancer.
The immediate goal is to fund a
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Fellowship program at BMSCH.
It is named for Brady Michael
Wells, who passed away of Non-
Differentiated Acute Leukemia in
2010 less than a month from his
second birthday.
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
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Blood drive is Nov. 19
Kids’ turkey trot is
Nov. 20 at UMS
The Montgomery Recreation
Department’s Turkey Trot for
ages 3 and older will be held Nov.
20 at 1 p.m. on the Upper Middle
School Track.
The Turkey Trot is a series of
running events for different age
groups.
Ribbons are awarded to all par-
ticipants and 1st place winners
take home a Thanksgiving turkey.
No pre-registration is required.
Events/prizes are divided into
age groups for girls, boys, women
and men.
Events begin at 1 p.m. Youngest
runners race first.
For more information, call
Montgomery Recreation at 609-
466-3023.
Montgomery Township is
again working with ShopRite of
Montgomery on a turkey dona-
tion program for Thanksgiving
2011.
Residents may sign up to do-
nate their free ShopRite turkey
during store hours through Nov.
20 by visiting the ShopRite serv-
ice desk.
Shoppers will need to present
their ShopRite Price Plus Card at
customer service. The earned
free turkey points will be deduct-
ed from their account and a
turkey will be donated to the
Montgomery Township Food
Pantry Program.
The township gratefully ac-
cepts all non-expired, nonperish-
able food and nonfood grocery
and toiletry items, but cannot ac-
cept such perishable items as the
turkeys.
The turkeys are delivered
through a separate arrangement
with ShopRite.
Items on the donation wish list
for November include: canned
tuna and canned chicken, meat
stews, hearty soups, canned
pineapple, canned pears, boxed
pasta and jars of pasta sauce,
mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard,
boxed cereal, laundry detergent,
shampoo, dish soap, tissues, nap-
kins and paper towels.
The food pantry schedules ap-
pointments for donation deliver-
ies and client visits to ensure the
privacy and confidentiality of its
clients.
It does offer open-donation
time Mondays between 8:30 a.m.
and 9:30 a.m. and between 1:30
and 4:30 p.m. and schedules dona-
tion appointments on other days
and times.
On Mondays, the pantry has a
shopping cart in the vestibule of
the senior center where donors
can deliver non-expired, non-per-
ishable food or non-food grocery
items and sign in on the pantry
donation log.
This ensures that donors and
clients are not there at the same
time.
WEDNESDAY
November 16
FOR ALL
Grateful Graphing: Early learning
adventures for ages 3-6. 1:30-2:15
p.m. at Mary Jacobs Library.
Book Bites: For grades 6 and up (up
to 18 years-old). 4:30 p.m. at Mary
Jacobs Library.
THURSDAY
November 17
FOR ALL
Story Time: Ages 2-6 at Mary
Jacobs Library 10 and 11 a.m.
FRIDAY
November 18
FOR ALL
Rhyme Time: Ages newborn to 2 at
10 a.m. at the Mary Jacobs Library.
SATURDAY
November 19
FOR ALL
Container Facility Open: 8 a.m. to
noon at the Public Works Yard, 12
Harlingen Road. Call 908-874-3144
for more info.
Grateful Graphing Early Learning:
Math Counts ages 3-6 at 10:30 a.m.
at Mary Jacobs Library.
Volunteer to be a Lego Building
Buddy: Grades 7 and up. At the
Mary Jacobs Library 1:30-3 p.m.
Lego Club: 2-3 p.m. at the Mary
Jacobs Library for grades 1-5.
MONDAY
November 21
FOR ALL
Crafts for Little Hands: Ages 2-6 at
the Mary Jacobs Library. Classes at
10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
TUESDAY
November 22
FOR ALL
“Bag-It!”, The Movie: Screening at
7 p.m. at the Mary Jacobs Library.
Toddler Sing with Pat: 10:30 a.m.
for ages 1-3 at Mary Jacobs Library.
Mah Jongg Open Play: 1-4 p.m. at
the Mary Jacobs Library.
Jewelry Making: 5 p.m. for grades
K-2 at the Mary Jacobs Library.
calendar PAGE 8 NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Montgomery meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Montgomery Sun, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email: calendar@themontgomerysun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website (www.themontgomerysun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all organizations.
Tony
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combined with other offers.
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Valid Mon. - Fri.
$3 OFF
Any $20 delivery
With this coupon.
Valid Mon. - Sat.
ShopRite, township, team up for
annual turkey-donation program
Send us your
Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos? -
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at news@the-
montgomerysun.com. Fax us at
856-427-0934. Call the editor
at 609-751-0245.
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 9
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to a person or thing that is perfect or excellent
Picture Frames, Mats & Fine Art
The Montgomery Township
Environmental Commission and
Sustainable Montgomery, in part-
nership with the New Jersey En-
vironmental Lobby and Kayman
Green Media, will host a BYOBag
(Bring Your Own Bag) seminar
Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. at the Mary Ja-
cobs Library, 64 Washington St.,
Rocky Hill. This public event is
sponsored by the Montgomery
Township Environmental Com-
mission.
The multi-award-winning film
“Bag It” will be featured, followed
by a discussion led by Professor
Daniel A. Harris, a member of
the NJ environmental lobby,
Princeton BYOBag campaign and
other state and local plastic-
waste-reduction campaigns.
“Why do we use a material that
is basically going to last forever
for a task that takes a few min-
utes?” Environmental Commis-
sion Chairwoman Mary Reece
said. “I don’t think people have
any idea how huge a pollution
problem plastics have become in
our waters, as well as cluttering
up our streets and land.”
The film follows Jeb Berrier, an
average American, when he de-
cides to take a closer look at our
cultural love affair with plastic.
It then delves into a wholesale in-
vestigation about plastic and its
effect on our waterways, oceans
and even our own bodies. Learn
more at
www.njenvironment.org/bagit.html.
The Montgomery Environmen-
tal Commission hopes the BY-
OBag campaign will raise the
awareness of Montgomery busi-
ness owners and consumers on
the issue and inspire our commu-
nity to reduce our reliance upon
plastic bag use. Attendees will get
a free reusable “Shop Local”
shopping bag, courtesy of the En-
vironmental Commission, Sus-
tainable Montgomery and the
Montgomery Business Associa-
tion.
For more information and op-
tional rsvp, contact Montgomery
Twp. Open Space Coordinator
Lauren Wasilauski at (908) 359-
8211, ext. 343.
Sustainable Montgomery to host
‘Bag It’ film and talk on plastic bags
DEA workshop is
Nov. 18 in Somerville
A workshop titled “New Highs
that Might Surprise You,” for
youth-service professionals, will
highlight current substance
abuse trends.
The program will be held from
9 to 11:30 a.m. Nov. 18 in the first-
floor conference room at 40 North
Bridge St.
A light breakfast will be avail-
able at 8:30 a.m.
Special Agent Douglas Collier,
public information officer with
the U.S. Department of Justice
D.E.A., will talk about prescrip-
tion drug abuse, “bath salts,” and
synthetic marijuana (Spice/K2).
He also will provide information
about illicit and retail drug sales
and discuss how substances are
being used, including the effects
and consequences, and legal is-
sues.
Throughout his 20-year career
with the Drug Enforcement Ad-
ministration, Collier has conduct-
ed many investigations targeting
international heroin and cocaine
networks, money launderers and
organizations involved in traf-
ficking steroids and other danger-
ous drugs.
The workshop fee is $20.
Payment will be accepted at the
door, or it can be mailed in ad-
vance to Cindy Britt, Somerset
County Office of Youth Services,
P.O. Box 3000, Somerville, 08876.
Payments by check should be
made out to Friends of Somerset
County Youth.
The program is cosponsored by
Somerset County Office of Youth
Services, EmPoWER Somerset
and the U.S. Department of Jus-
tice.
For more information or to reg-
ister, contact Cindy Britt, Somer-
set County Office of Youth Servic-
es, at 908-704-6352 or britt@co.som-
erset.nj.us.
10 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011
W
h
a
t w
o
u
ld

yo
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r
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w
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Buy and sell anything for $10
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The increase in 9-1-1 call vol-
ume that the Montgomery EMS
has seen so far in 2011 continued
through October.
The squad responded to 119
calls, which puts it on a pace to re-
spond to almost 15 percent more
calls this year than last year.
Members also participated in a
number of community events
this month, including the Mont-
gomery Fall Festival at the High
School, a standby for Blood Pres-
sure checks at the Flu Clinic, Fire
Station 45's Open House and
Montgomery Varsity, Skylands
and Pop Warner football games.
MEMS responded to all 9-1-1 re-
quests for service in October,
bringing its yearly response rate
to 99.5 percent. The squad also
provided mutual aid to neighbor-
ing municipalities seven times in
October; including three into
Princeton, two into Hillsborough
and one each into Rocky Hill and
Kingston/Franklin.
Montgomery EMS is an all-vol-
unteer organization; the duty
crew is on call, 24 hours a day,
seven days a week.
“We respond to 100 percent of
all of our first calls,” said squad
president John Connacher.
“When our duty crew is unavail-
able, and another request is made
for 9-1-1, we rely on our backup
crew. Our backup crew consists of
any of the remaining 80 volun-
teer members who are available
to respond to a call, regardless of
day or time. “
The squad responds without
charge, relying solely on its vol-
unteers and the donations it re-
ceives. It is not affiliated with any
hospital nor is it a municipal enti-
ty.
“We are always looking for the
next driver or EMT,” Connacher
said. “ If you have some hours to
help us during the day we’d love
to hear from you. For more infor-
mation, call 908-359-4112, log on to
www.mems47.org, or find the
squad on Facebook. The squad’s
email address is
info@mems47.org.
“We are neighbors helping
neighbors,” Connacher said.
EMS sees increase
in 9-1-1 calls
Jump translates into 15 percent
more responses this year over last
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
The Montgomery Veterans Memorial in Montgomery Park was officially dedicated on Nov. 11, Veterans
Day. The Montgomery Veterans Memorial Committee has been at work for nearly 10 years preparing the
memorial in honor of those from the township whose lives were lost while serving in the military.
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
NOVEMBER 16-22, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. • All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all of The Sun Newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
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80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
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Absolutely all concrete problems solved
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Residential and Commercial Services
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New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
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Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK HOME REPAIR
Any repair you can
think of, we can do.
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Home Improvement
Roofing
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
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UP TO
Any new
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Call Ed Lynes 609-751-0245 or
email resume to elynes@elauwit.com
• Opens new business relationships
• Must be outgoing, driven and confident
• Full time
ACCOUNT MANAGER
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Join the Elauwit Team today!
.And so con you.
Email resume to tengle@elauwit.com or tronaldson@elauwit.com
The combination Front End Developer/Graphic Artist position will
work closely with the Digital Media Manager and Art Director.
The Front End Developer will be needed to enhance existing websites, build
new websites and any other work associated with the building of the Elauwit
brand. Tasks can be day to day or based solely upon projects, which will mainly
include the following:
· WordPress Theming/Development
· Deployment of new Wordpress sites
· Improving existing Wordpress sites
· Ability to create/implement design with/without direction
DESIRED SKILLS:
Front End Developer/Graphic Artist
· HTML/CSS (by-hand, standards-
compliant, with strong under-
standing of cross-browser /
cross-platform issues)
· Good knowledge of JavaScript,
PHP, MySQL
· Experience with frameworks like
jQuery
· Experience with Quark XPress,
Photoshop (Illustrator, a plus)
· Good communication skills
· Strong time management skills –
able to meet deadlines
· Works well together
The Graphic Artist will be needed to build and manipulate ads for the
newspapers, along with other small projects.
Handyman Services
• Large or Small Repairs
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Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
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