Landmark Towns

Strategic Wayfinding Plan
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Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC
WI T H
H I S T O R I C B R I S T OL B O R OU G H
MO R R I S V I L L E
N E W H OP E
P R E PA R E D BY
september 2009
Wallace Roberts & Todd with
Landmark Towns
St rat egi c Wayf i ndi ng Pl an
Prepared by:
Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC
Nando Micale, Principal
Adam Krom, Associate
Andee Mazzocco, Associate
Kelly Ream, Planner
Jacqueline Marion, Graphic Designer
with Cloud Gehshan Associates
Jerome Cloud, Principal
Barbara Schwarzenbach, Associate
Stephen Ricci, Junior Designer
Prepared for:
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Inc
Landmark Towns of Bucks County
Historic Bristol Borough
Morrisville Borough
Yardley Borough
New Hope Borough
S e p t e mb e r 2 0 0 9
Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
The Landmark Towns Strategic Wayfinding Plan could
not have been completed without funding, support and
cooperation from the following:
Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission
Transportation Community Development Initiative
U.S. Department of Interior
National Park Service
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation
& Natural Resources
PA Heritage Area Program
Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Inc.
C. Allen Sachse, President
Bucks County Conference & Visitors Bureau
Jerry Lepping, Director
Landmark Towns of Bucks County:
Bristol Borough • Morrisville • New Hope • Yardley
Donna Boone, Regional Coordinator
Landmark Towns Executive Committee
Margaret Bork, Jane Burger, John Burke, William Salerno, Esq.,
Susan Taylor, Elissa G. Thorne
Historic Bristol Borough
Ralph DiGuiseppe, Council President
James Dillon, Borough Manager
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Planning Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Existing Signage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Proposed Scenic Byway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Marketing to Visitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Highway Wayfnding Signs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Access Routes & Destinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Bicycle Wayfnding Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Public Transportation Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Sample Journeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Landmark Towns Wayfnding Sign System. . . . . . . 54
Signage Fabrication Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
n e w h op e
ya r d l e y
mor r i s v i l l e
b r i s t ol b or ou g h
TabLe of ConTenTs
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What is a Landmark Town?
A “Landmark Town” is a special community. A town becomes
a “landmark”by virtue of its history, culture, and public esteem.
Landmark Towns is a cooperative venture between Bristol
Borough, Yardley, Morrisville, and New Hope, and the
Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. The goal
is to increase economic development and tourism in the
historic downtown business districts. These four towns
are prominent communities on the Delaware River, with
incredible character developed through a proud history.
The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor
These four towns are within the Delaware & Lehigh
National Heritage Corridor (hereafter referred to as the
D&L Corridor), which stretches for 165 miles through
Pennsylvania along the Delaware Canal and the Lehigh
Canal. Working with the towns and other partners, the D&L
commissioned a wayfinding plan for the Landmark Towns.
What is the goal of the Strategic Wayfnding Plan?
The goal of the wayfinding planning project is to make
it easier to navigate to, from, and through the Landmark
Towns, thereby improving the vitality, local economy, and
quality of life in the towns.
The riverfront in Historic Bristol Borough.
Main Street in Yardley.
I nTroduCTI on
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New Hope
Bristol BorougH
Morrisville
YardleY
Location map of Four Landmark towns of bucks County
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map of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor
Slate Heritage
Trail
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84 81
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81
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95
95
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76 95
80
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295
276
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476
380
380
476
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BRADFORD
COUNTY
WAYNE COUNTY
WYOMING COUNTY
LACKAWANNA
COUNTY
PIKE COUNTY
SULLIVAN
COUNTY
COLUMBIA
COUNTY
MONROE COUNTY
SCHUYLKILL
COUNTY
BERKS COUNTY
MONTGOMERY
COUNTY
LANCASTER
COUNTY
CHESTER COUNTY
PHILADELPHIA COUNTY
NEW
JERSEY
PENNSYLVANIA
LUZERNE
COUNTY
CARBON
COUNTY
NORTHAMPTON
COUNTY
LEHIGH
COUNTY
BUCKS COUNTY
Ashley
Laurel
Run
Phillipsburg
Washington Crossing
Riegelsville
Centre Bridge
Lumberville
Point Pleasant
Erwinna
Upper Black Eddy
Raubsville
Weissport
Lehighton
Palmerton
Slatington
Northampton
Catasauqua
White
Haven
Rockport
Jim Thorpe
Walnutport
New Hope
Bristol
Morrisville
Yardley
Wilkes-
Barre
Easton
Allentown
Trenton
Philadelphia
Bethlehem
New Jersey Turnpike
Delaware Canal
State Park
Washington Crossing
State Historic Park
Delaware Canal
State Park
Delaware Canal
State Park
Delaware Canal
State Park
Frances Slocum
State Park
Hickory Run
State Park
Beltzville
State Park
Jacobsburg
State Park
Lehigh Gorge
State Park
Lehigh Gorge
State Park
Nescopeck
State Park
Nockamixon
State Park
Ralph Stover
State Park
Tyler
State Park
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alachian Trail
D
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Trail
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D & L Trail
Nor-Bath
Trail
Ironton
Rail-Trail
Palmer
Rail-Trail
Plaineld
TownshipTrail
Switchback
Trail
Greater Hazleton
Rail-Trail
Lake Nockamixon
Dela
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Beltzville
Lake
Lake
Wallenpaupack
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Boulder Field
Natural Area
Glens Natural Area
Lacakawanna
State Forest
Mauch Chunk
Lake Park
Moon Lake
Park
Mud Run
Natural Area
Nockamixon Cliffs
Natural Area
Peace Valley
Prahls Island
Ricketts Glen
State Park
Seven Tubbs
Nature Area
State Game
Land 119
State Game Land
119/187
State Game
Land 129
State Game
Land 139
State Game
Land 141
State Game
Land 149
State Game
Land 157
State Game
Land 168
State Game
Land 187
State Game
Land 196
State Game
Land 205
State Game
Land 206
State Game
Land 207
State Game
Land 217
State Game
Land 224
State Game
Land 260
State Game
Land 292
State Game
Land 40
State Game
Land 56
State Game
Land 91
Tinicum Park
Trexler Game
Preserve
Legend
Delaware & Lehigh Trail
Appalachian Trail
Other trail
Interstate highway
County border
River
City
State park
Public land
Hazleton
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The Committee issued a Request for Proposals and selected
the consultant team.
Bristol Borough agreed to be the project sponsor for the
purposes of receiving a planning grant from the Delaware
Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC).
The Landmark Towns Executive Committee provided project
oversight and served as the stakeholder group with repre-
sentatives from each town.
During the development of the plan, two public meetings
were held. The first meeting was convened January 15, 2009,
in Bristol Borough, and the second meeting was held
February 10, 2009, in Morrisville. The public was invited to
review and comment on the initial sign concepts and the
framework plan for the wayfinding system. Efforts were
made on behalf of the Landmark Towns of Bucks County,
the Delaware, & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Inc.
Public Reaction
Attendees at the public meetings were generally positive
about the plan and the sign designs. Specific items of concern
included:
Will the signs be resistant to graffiti? •
Is long-term maintenance provided for? •
Will more signs worsen sign clutter? •
What locations within the boroughs should be signed? •
Should the signs be illuminated? •
Should the signs be created by local artists? •
Presentation of concepts to the Landmark Towns Committee.
Presentation of concepts to the Landmark Towns Committee.
PLannI ng ProCess
6 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
A field survey of existing signs was undertaken in the towns
and along major connecting routes. This survey identified
the following sign types:
PennDOT signs to guide travelers. •
Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor signs •
to identify attractions.
State and County Parks signs to identify park entrances. •
SEPTA signs to identify train stations and transit centers. •
Local municipal signs, such as gateway signs. •
Private signs, such as billboards, that display advertising •
and commercial messages.
Billboard (at I-95 and Route 413). Historical Marker. Park Directional Sign.
exI sTI ng sI gnage
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Highway Directional Sign. D&L Interpretative Sign. State Park Sign.
Borough Gateway Sign. SEPTA Station Identification Sign. SEPTA Station Directional Marker.
8 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
PennDOT
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT)
signs provide information and navigational directions
to travelers. From PennDOT’s Traffic Engineering Manual
(Publication 46):
“Guide signs are necessary to inform motorists of inter-
secting routes; to direct them to cities, towns, villages, or
other important destinations; to identify nearby rivers,
streams, parks, forests, and historical sites; and generally
to give such information as will help them along their
way in the most simple, direct manner possible.”
Guide signs include:
Route markers showing the numbered state highways •
and their cardinal direction (i.e. North, South, East, West).
Directional signs pointing to municipalities on the state •
highway map.
Tourist Oriented Directional Signs (generally with a blue
background) are:
“…Signs within State highway right-of-way to guide
travelers to businesses, services, and attractions in
which the traveling public would have reasonable
interest.”
(Right top) Highway exit sign on I-95.
(Right bottom) Sign Clutter: In some locations, sign clutter is a problem. For
example, the intersection of State Routes 179 and 32 in New Hope has a
proliferation of signage, including route markers, bridge weight limits, turn
restrictions, parking regulations, warning signs, regulatory signs, and destination
signs among others. It it is highly unlikely that motorists are able to read
and understand so many signs while driving, and the views of signs are
often blocked by other signs. The signs also have the effect of cluttering the
streetscape of the historic town.
Key Issues
Cardinal directions (i.e. North, South, East, West) may •
confuse tourists, so supplementary signs pointing to the
towns are necessary.
Some intersections require additional signs pointing to •
the nearby Landmark Towns.
A proliferation of signs can lead to sign clutter, especially •
in historic urban downtowns. (see example to the right)
Many intersections have adequate directional signs. •
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This is an “assemblage” of smaller individual sign pieces. This sign at a
highway junction identifies the intersecting highway as Route 32, and
indicates which direction is north and which is south. The green sign at the
top indicates the direction to the nearest towns on the State Highway Map.
Exits on interstate highways are sometimes marked with the
nearest town. In this case, the off ramp from northbound I-95 leads
to Taylorsville Road, which leads to New Hope. However, Yardley is
actually closer to the exit than New Hope; therefore, this sign could
be modified to include both Yardley and New Hope.
Tourist oriented destination signs also appear along highways. This sign points to the
Starbucks coffee shop in Yardley and a local winery. These businesses have paid to
have this sign created. PennDOT has assigned the management of these signs to a
new Pennsylvania Tourist Signing Trust.
Building larger signs from smaller components can result in a cluttered affect,
reducing clarity and information transfer, while also taking up precious space on
urban sidewalks.
10 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
D&L trail map with brochure holder. D&L blade directional sign and map. Note damage
at base from bending.
New Hope building-mounted sign based on D&L
system.
Park identification sign based on D&L standards. Adjacent regulator signs provide information on park rules. Pole-mounted directional sign in New Hope based
on D&L system.
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Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor
Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor (D&L) signs
direct visitors to various attractions and destinations,
including the Delaware Canal State Park. Signs are in use
along the Delaware Canal, as well as in several boroughs,
including New Hope, which has directional signs based
on the D&L system.
The original sign system includes pole-mounted vehicu-
lar directional signs, building-mounted directional signs,
trailblazers, monument signs, pedestrian blade signs, and
interpretative signs.
It was decided that the signs for the Landmark Towns
should be related to the D&L family of signs, in order to
build on the identity of the existing corridor. However, sign
production technology has improved since the original
D&L signs were made. This offers the potential to retool
the signs for a richer content, such as inclusion of historic
photographs.
Fabrication criteria are an issue. Recently, sign fabricators
have resisted creating the cut-out shape of the D&L disc at
the top of the sign, instead recommending a sign with a
straight top. This change diminishes the visual identity and
impact of the original sign design.
Switchback
Railroad
National
Recreation
Trail
Partner’s
Symbol
The first discovery of anthracite (hard coal) in America occurred at Summit Hill, two mountains west of Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania (renamed Ji m Thorpe to honor the famous athlete). Overland travel made the price of transporting hard coal too expensive, so new railroad technology was used to transport coal to the nearest river, the Lehigh. The rst U.S. railroad over five miles long linked the canal at Mauch Chunk with Panther Valley coal pockets. Mules strained to pull the coal- laden cars uphill, enjoying a free ride back down, complements of gravity.
Eventually, as steam powered railroads assumed the task of delivering coal, and as word spread about the rst roller coaster ride in the country, vacationers replaced coal as the aging gravity lines primary cargo.
Easy
Trail Grade 5% Ave - 8% Max
Cross Slope 3% Max Trail Width 48ß Min
The B & B, or B reinig & B achman Building was a men ’s
clothing store that occupied the gr ound floor for many
years. No one can say for sur e why the gar goyle animal
heads were added. P erhaps it was to please one of the
building’s original long-time tenants, the wholesale grain
and animal feed dealer G eorge W. E ckert. B uilt in 1894,
this yellow bricked structure replaced a building of a similar
name built three years before. The first B & B building was
destroyed, along with the rest of the southeast side of the
street, in a fir e on the night of O ctober 13, 1893.
Breinig & Bachman
Building
END
Weatherly
Historic
Site
Trout Hall
Lehigh County
Museum
Frank B uckman
House
Mon–Sat 9am– 5pm
Sun 12am– 5pm
Closed holidays, ex cept Memorial Day,
July 4 and Labor D ay
Eckley Miners’
V illage
Key Issues
The existing D&L system serves as a reference frame for a •
new signage system for the Landmark Towns.
The D&L sign system could be updated to take advantage •
of new sign production technology and a more complete
family of sign products.
12 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
State and County Parks
Many State and County Parks signs line the roads that link
the towns. The parks and recreation areas are one of the draws
for visitors to the area, who may make a visit to the towns
a part of their itinerary.
Existing park signs are brown, usually made from wood.
Some are similar in appearance to signs used by federal
agencies such as the National Park Service and US Forest
Service for parks and recreation areas. In some cases,
however, the park signs are of a custom format.
A park entrance sign for Washington Crossing State Park is barely visible on the
right side of the road.
Existing park signs have small lettering that is difficult to read from a car. The
brown color can be difficult to see against the natural background.
Key Issues
A wide range of sign designs exist, instead of a family of •
sign types.
Wooden signs require frequent maintenance, and have •
limited visibility at night or under low light because they
are not retro-reflective.
Many of the park signs are too small to be seen or read •
from a distance or a moving car.
Standard state historic markers offer a limited amount of •
interpretative information and are often placed where
motorists and pedestrians cannot read them.
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A sign in Delaware Canal State Park for the New Hope Mule Barge National
Landmark—administered by the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
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Conventional historical markers within the Landmark Towns offer limited
formats for interpretation. The location next to the road suggests an orientation to
motorists, but the speed of travel would prevent anyone reading the sign.
An adjacent real estate sign competes for attention.
Park entrance sign for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve. Larger lettering
increases visibility.
A directional sign pointing to Bowman’s Hill Tower is barely visible in this
photograph. Small signs such as this, particularly those painted in earth tones,
are difficult for motorists to see.
A sign for the boat launch in Yardley uses bright colors. The lettering on this
particular sign is peeling off and should be replaced.
14 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Existing Transit
Two of the Landmark Towns, Yardley and Bristol, have rail
stations, and two, Morrisville and Bristol, have local bus
services.
Passengers arrive at Bristol Borough’s regional rail station.
Existing information signage at rail stations is often minimal. This board on the
platform at the Bristol rail station has a paper version of the schedule (in one
direction), but no information on the local town or connecting transit services
for arriving passengers.
Key Issues
Stations have little or no information about the local •
town or nearby tourist activities.
Pedestrian maps and signs for navigating upon arrival •
are absent.
Schedule information could be enhanced. •
Additional signs leading travelers to the station are needed. •
Stations could express a greater “theme” of the local town. •
In some cases, pedestrian infrastructure, such as sidewalk •
connections, are needed.
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An attractive mural at the Yardley train station improves the perception of the
pedestrian underpass. A directional sign points travelers to the correct platform.
However, the station lacks adequate sidewalks and signage to reach the tunnel
from the outbound platform. This location should also have signs for visitors
directing them to downtown.
Sign for the Yardley SEPTA Regional
Rail station. Signs are needed to
direct visitors to the downtown from
the station.
A limited number of directional signs
such as this one in Yardley guide
motorists and pedestrians to regional
rail stations.
Platform sign in Yardley. The platform at the Bristol Borough train station offers an excellent view of the
adjacent park and historic mill.
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Municipal Signs and Gateways
Municipal Signs are installed by a local community and
include entry signs and monuments that provide direction
to motorists and pedestrians.
Each municipality has individual gateway signs. There are
two types of markers—the standard highway signs that
mark the municipal limits, and custom signs designed and
installed by each borough.
Generally, the location of gateway signs is at the edge of
town as opposed to a location that marks a clear boundary
or threshold to the historic downtown area.
Key Issues
Each town currently has a unique sign style for gateways. •
New Hope’s signs reflect a preference for local artisanship. •
Most of the towns have a wide variety of sign styles •
within the same town, reflecting the wide range of
dates of installation.
Existing gateway signage is usually located near the •
municipal boundary, but there are often few other visual
cues in these locations to create a sense of arrival for
travelers. A stronger gateway is needed to mark the
downtown district at the actual urban threshold.
Gateways from US 13 and US 1 in Bristol and Morrisville •
need enhancement, due to the presence of billboards
and a variety of competing sign messages and
complicated navigation.
The adjacency of Bristol Township and Bristol Borough •
can lead to confusion for travelers and is a challenge to
address.
Useful signs, such as parking identification, could be •
standardized throughout the towns.
New Hope gateway signs were made by a local artisan.
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Gateway signs have been installed in selected locations in Bristol Borough. It is recommended that additional signs mark the thresholds of the downtown, in order to
signal to visitors that they have arrived.
The railroad underpass has gateway signage; however, this may not create the
desired impression for visitors. It is recommended that wayfinding signs be
used in this location, and the aesthetics of the underpass improved, but the
primary gateway signage should be closer to downtown.
The presence of prominent gateway signage in Bristol Township could create
confusion for visitors. Wayfinding signage pointing to downtown Bristol Borough
and the Delaware riverfront is needed at intersections along US Highway 13.
Bristol Borough
18 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Morrisville
Monument signs in Morrisville should be replaced with newer and more
attractive signs.
Morrisville is installing new gateway signs.
Yardley
Existing gateway signage in Yardley is inconsistent. Here, two signs are installed
close together, and vines obscure the PennDOT sign.
An existing gateway sign in Yardley.
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New Hope
Existing New Hope gateway signs are attractive and were carved by a local artist. Existing PennDOT signage in New Hope.
This parking lot in New Hope has an eye-catching sign and uses multi-space meters. Use of multi-space meters would reduce sidewalk clutter.
Note: pennDOt has not approved multi-space meters for on-street parking.
20 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
byway map
With assistance from the Heritage Conservancy, the
Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor has been
leading an effort to create a new Pennsylvania Scenic
Byway that would connect the Landmark Towns. The
byway will follow Pennsylvania Route 611 & 32, which con-
nects New Hope, Yardley, and Morrisville, and also extend
down local roads to Bristol Borough. In order to establish
the byway:
The route must have intrinsic scenic, cultural, and historic •
properties.
Each municipality along the byway must have a sign control •
ordinance.
Once established, the byway will be marked by the official
state signs and shown on state byway maps.
ProPosed sCenI C byway
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(Above) Yardley railroad bridge over the Delaware River, south of Yardley Borough. The proposed scenic byway would connect the historical and cultural sites along
the Delaware River.
(Right) The Federal Intermodal Surface Transportation
Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) created the National
Scenic Byways Program. The goal of this program
is to recognize and promote outstanding corridors
throughout the United States, promote tourism,
and protect the resources that make these hidden
treasures outstanding.
22 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Sample Itineraries
An itinerary is a sequence of events and activities for a
visitor. An excellent case study is the “Three Perfect Days”
series offered by the United Airlines in-flight magazine,
Hemispheres. These types of travel articles whet the
appetite for a visit, while providing a starting point for
planning an interesting trip. It is recommended that the
Landmark Towns create itineraries to suggest what visitors
can experience. For example:
Recreation: • Provide a wide variety of recreation suggestions,
such as bicycling, boating, horseback riding, etc. Offer
specifics for where to rent equipment and get service.
Eating: • Provide suggestions for where to eat for a variety
of cuisines. Also market restaurants that offer good people
watching or scenery.
Lodging: • Where can people stay to get the Landmark
Towns experience?
Architecture: • Provide descriptions of the architectural
highlights of the towns, and back this up with collateral
materials upon arrival. Link sites that are outside of town
(such as covered bridges) to an overall itinerary that
includes both urban and rural sites.
Countryside: • The countryside of the towns offers the
chance to explore, and then return downtown for eating
and relaxing.
Shopping: • Where can visitors find great gifts or unique
shopping experiences?
Web Strategy
Many visitors will begin their travel research on the Internet.
Therefore, a comprehensive/Internet strategy will help with
encouraging people to visit and with wayfinding. Steps
could include:
Working with partners to ensure the Landmark Towns are •
represented on larger tourism-related sites in the region.
Creating a web site tailored to visitors with rich media •
content and suggested activities.
Providing directions and maps on the website. •
Working with third party web applications such as Google •
Maps and Panoramio to spatially locate attractions on
web map services.
According to market research commissioned by the Bucks
County Conference and Visitors Bureau (BCCVB), New York
City and North Jersey offers a prime market for attracting
tourists. The BCCVB has placed award-winning ads within
trains and stations in New York.
markeTI ng To VI sI Tors
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 23
BUCKS ON YOUR MIND?
Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY.COM
to plan your storybook getaway today!
Fonthill Museum
B
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C
K
S O
N
Y
O
U
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M
IN
D
?
Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY.COM
to plan your weekend escape today!
Bowman’s Hill
Wildflower Preserve
BUCKS ON YOUR MIND?
Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY.COM
to plan your family getaway today!
Tubing on the
Delaware River
Award winning ads produced for the New York tourist market by the
Bucks County Conference and Visitors Bureau.
B
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s

C
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24 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
PennDOT Sign Strategy
The overall recommendation for PennDOT signage is to ensure
that key intersections on the way to the towns are marked
with destination arrows and information. Signs should fol-
low PennDOT standards, but should use the available sign
types to communicate directions to the towns. In some
cases, it may also be desirable to apply for “experimental” sta-
tus under the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices
to test alternative sign configurations.
It is recommended that intersections along primary routes
to the Landmark Towns should be marked with destination
signs and distance signs to improve navigation. At intersec-
tions where destination signs are not present, they could
be added, and existing signs could be consolidated. An
example is shown on the facing page at the intersection of
State Route 532 with 32.
(Right) The existing signs at the intersection of State Routes 532 and 32 indicate
cardinal directions (e.g. North and South) but don’t point to the Landmark Towns.
The addition of directional signage pointing to Yardley and New Hope will help
motorists navigate—especially tourists who may not have a sense of whether
to head north or south.
When State Route 32 is designated a scenic byway, appropriate signage should
be added to trailblazers and route markers.
hI ghway wayfI ndI ng sI gns
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 25
New Hope
Yardley
Morrisville
New Hope 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Bristol Boro. 19
New Hope 8
Easton 43
Yardley
New Hope 8
4
New Hope
Yardley
Morrisville
New Hope 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Bristol Boro. 19
New Hope 8
Easton 43
Yardley
New Hope 8
4
Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC
Landmark Towns of Bucks County
Wayfinding Signage
February 2009
Lumberville
Washington Crossing
6
6
Existing signs at the intersection of PA 532 and PA 32
Conceptual sign designs that provide directions to the
Landmark Towns in addition to route markers.
New Hope
Yardley
Morrisville
New Hope 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
Bristol Boro. 19
New Hope 8
Easton 43
Typical directional signs and distance signs for Landmark Towns
Yardley
New Hope 8
4
This sheet provides example draft sign concepts for
augmenting or enhancing existing PennDOT signage. The
overall goal is to use MUTCD-compliant signage to provide
directions to travelers seeking to reach the Landmark Towns,
which may soon be connected by a proposed Pennsylvania
Byway (which runs partly along State Highway 32). Sign
types include directional indicators and distance plaques.
Route marker assemblages could be consolidated on single
sign boards for legibility and reduction in sign clutter.
New Hope 8
Yardley 4
Morrisville 8
32
NORTH SOUTH
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
WEST
Bicycle PA
S
Route
WEST
Bicycle PA
S
Route
Yardley
32
32
NORTH
SOUTH
New Hope
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
WEST
Bicycle PA
S
Route
Yardley
32
NORTH
SOUTH
New Hope
These diagrams represent potential
options for consolidating existing signs
and adding directions to the Landmark
Towns. Any and all changes would be
subject to PennDOT approval.
26 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
motorist Decision points map
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 27
Key Intersections and Decision Points
“Decision points” are locations where travelers make turns
on the way to and from the Landmark Towns. A map of key
intersections on the regional arterial and highway system
is shown on the facing page. Some key intersections are
located in New Jersey and would require coordination with
New Jersey Department of Transportation. These locations
are important for wayfinding information.
# Intersection Recommendations
1 US 202/PA 32 Existing signage points to town.
2 US 202/PA 179
(Lower York Road/W Bridge St.)
Existing signage points to town.
3 PA 179/PA 32
(Bridge St./Main St.)
Attempt to reduce sign clutter in this location through design treatments and removal of
extraneous signs.
4 NJ 179/NJ 29
(Bridge St./Main St.)
Existing signage points to town.
5 PA 232/PA 32
(Windy Bush Rd./S Main St.)
Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope, Yardley, Washington Crossing.
Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32.
6 PA 32 Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope, Yardley, Washington Crossing.
Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32.
7 PA 532/Taylorsville Rd.
(Washington Crossing Rd. /Taylorsville
Rd.
Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to Washington Crossing, I-95,
Delaware Canal Path.
8 PA 532/ PA 32
(General Washington Memorial Blvd./
River Rd.
Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope, Yardley, Morrisville.
Consolidate signage.
Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32.
9 Mercer County 536/NJ 29 Existing signage points to town.
10 I-95/Taylorsville Rd. Include Yardley on PennDOT exit signage for Exit 51 Northbound
(currently only lists New Hope).
Install distance plaques on Taylorsville Rd. listing distance to Landmark Towns.
Install directional guide signs leading to PA 32 via Woodside Rd.
Consider using the park and ride as a trailhead for the Delaware Canal Towpath.
11 PA 32/Woodside Rd. Install directional signs on PA 32 to I-95 and Delaware Canal Towpath.
12 I-95/NJ 29 This interchange is highly complicated. If the opportunity emerges, it would be beneficial
to simplify the interchange design to a double roundabout on NJ 29.
Ensure that the new pedestrian bridge, when constructed, has guide signs to the canal
towpaths.
General Recommendation:
Along Pennsylvania Route 32 and the proposed scenic
byway, directional signs should be installed at each inter-
section pointing in the direction of the nearest Landmark
Towns.
H i g H way way F i N D i N g S i g N S
28 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
# Intersection Recommendations
13 PA 32/E Afton Ave. Install stop sign on PA 32.
Install directional signs pointing to downtown Yardley and Canal Towpath.
Install directional signs pointing to New Hope and Morrisville.
Install distance plaques to New Hope and Morrisville.
14 Main St./Afton Ave. Compact trailblazer signs to PA 32.
Directional signs to Delaware Canal Towpath.
Compact trailblazer signs to I-95.
15 PA 332/Schuyler Rd.
(W Afton Ave./Yardley Newtown Rd.)
Install directional sign to Yardley.
Install trailblazer to I-95.
16 I-95/PA 332 (Exit 49) Existing signage points to town.
17 I-95/US 1 Existing signage points to town.
18 US 1/US 13 Existing signs point to Yardley, Bristol, and Morrisville.
Install distance plaque to Yardley on Pine Grove Road.
Install distance plaque to Levittown, Tullytown, and Bristol on Southbound US 13.
Consider directional sign on US 13 Northbound pointing to Yardley
(i.e. Yardley – straight ahead)
Existing interchange design is overly complicated and could be a candidate for rebuilding
with roundabouts (if the opportunity ever emerged).
19 Pine Grove Rd./W Trenton Ave. Directional signs to Morrisville, Bristol, Yardley.
20 Pine Grove Rd./Yardley Morrisville Rd. Directional signs to Yardley/New Hope, and Downtown Morrisville (Southbound via
Yardley Morrisville Road).
21 US 1/PA 32 Existing directional signs on NB US 1 point towards Morrisville via PA 32.
22 US 1/Pennsylvania Ave. Mark Northbound US 1 exit for Pennsylvania Ave. as an exit for Morrisville-Pennsylvania Avenue.
It is currently signed as Pennsylvania Avenue.
23 PA 32/Pennsylvania Ave. (Morrisville) Directional signs to follow byway (when established).
24 E Bridge St./N Delmorr Ave. (PA 32) Directional sign pointing to Yardley and New Hope.
Byway directional signs in the future.
Potential location for a roundabout which would establish a gateway.
25 PA 32/E Trenton Ave./Calhoun St.
Bridge
Install directional signs to Yardley, New Hope, Morrisville.
Investigate building a roundabout (which might also reduce traffic congestion).
26 NJ 29/Calhoun St. Existing exit signage on NJ 29 points towards Morrisville.
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 29
# Intersection Recommendations
27 S Pennsylvania Ave./Tyburn Rd. Install directional signs to Morrisville, Bristol Borough, and Yardley.
28 Tyburn Rd./New Ford Mill Rd. Install directional signs to Bristol Borough and Morrisville.
Install distance plaques.
Investigate building a roundabout.
29 New Ford Mill Rd./Bordentown Rd. Install directional signs to Bristol Borough and Morrisville.
30 I-95 Southbound/PA 413 Existing signage points to town.
31 I-95 Northbound/PA 413 Existing signage points to town.
32 I-95 Ramps/PA 413 Existing signage points to town.
33 PA 413/US 13 (Bristol Bypass/New
Rodgers Rd.)
Study redesigning and simplifying this very confusing intersection, which has no
left-turns on US 13 and complicated, non-intuitive “jug-handles.”
On US 13 Southbound, install a directional sign to Bristol Borough indicating that
motorists must proceed through the intersection.
On PA 413 Southbound, change overhead signage to indicate Bristol Borough
is center lane.
Remove most of the signage on the Amtrak/SEPTA railroad overpass.
Remove billboards on both sides of the railroad overpass which greatly detract from
directional signage and make navigation difficult.
In the place of existing commercial billboards and gateway signage, commission a new
art “portal” at the overpass (potentially working with the Burlington-Bristol Bridge
Commission).
Install lighting under the railroad bridge.
Install pavement markings on PA 413 pointing to Bristol Borough from left lane.
34 PA 413/Otter St. Directional sign to Bristol Borough.
35 Otter St./Old Bristol Pike Assuming streetscape project on Bristol Pike is completed, provide directional signage to
Downtown Bristol Borough guiding motorists from Otter St. onto Old Bristol Pike.
36 Old Bristol Pike/Main Street Install compact trailblazers to I-95
37 US 13/Bath Rd. On US 13 Southbound, direct motorists to downtown Bristol via Bath Street, using the
jug-handle.
Consider simplifying this intersection (removing jug-handles).
38 Turnpike exit 358 Existing signage points to town.
39 Turnpike off-ramp/US 13 Existing signage points to town.
40 US 130/PA 413 Improve directional signs to Bristol at intersection and through the traffic circle leading to
the bridge.
30 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Sign Plans for Intersections
At a typical intersection on a major road leading to the
Landmark Towns, the following sings would be used to aid
navigation (a typical diagram in on the next page):
As the driver approaches the intersection, directional •
signs are located at about 400 feet in advance of the
turn. Route markers should be used for state routes,
or name signs for other routes. These signs help the
motorist prepare to select the right direction and
prepare to turn when necessary.
At a distance of about 200 feet from the intersection, a •
directional sign should indicate which direction to turn
in order to reach the nearest towns.
If the intersection configuration allows for it, another •
sign with directions can be placed at the intersection, on
the far side. In urban areas, compact formats may be an
option. See the report section on reducing sign clutter
for further discussion on compact sign forms.
After the driver passes the intersection, a trailblazer sign •
with the name and direction of the route should be
placed within 200 feet. This helps the drivers confirm
that they are on the right route.
A distance sign indicating the distance to up to three •
towns should be installed within 300 feet to help drivers
confirm that they are traveling in the right direction
and help them estimate the time until they reach the
destination.
When possible, the signs described above can be •
combined into assemblies or consolidated sign faces
to reduce clutter.
Sign at the intersection of PA 232 and PA 32.
H i g H way way F i N D i N g S i g N S
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 31
32 232
JCT
END
LAMBERTVILLE STATION
MONDAY 6:30 PM
NOISE
ORDINANCE
STRICTLY
ENFORCED
PROHIBITED
102” TWINS
102” TRAILERS
OVER 28
½
FT
NORTH ON
RTE 32
SOUTH
232
232
SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
RICHBORO
6
7
32
SOUTH
32 32
NORTH SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
WASHINGTON CROSSING
6
6
32 232
JCT
END
LAMBERTVILLE STATION
MONDAY 6:30 PM
NOISE
ORDINANCE
STRICTLY
ENFORCED
PROHIBITED
102” TWINS
102” TRAILERS
OVER 28
½
FT
NORTH ON
RTE 32
NEW HOPE
LUMBERVILLE
WASHINGTON CROSSING
1
6
6
SOUTH
232
232
SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
RICHBORO
6
7
32
SOUTH
WASHINGTON CROSSING 7
YARDLEY 11
MORRISVILLE 15
32
NORTH
SOUTH
32
NORTH
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
32 32
NORTH SOUTH
YIELD TO
PEDS IN
CROSSWALK
NEW HOPE 1
EASTON 36
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
Yardley
32
SOUTH
NORTH
New Hope
232
SOUTH
232
SOUTH
RICHBORO
YARDLEY 11
7
SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD
SR 32
RIVER ROAD
SR 32
N MAIN ST
SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD
SR 32
RIVER ROAD
SR 32
N MAIN ST
NOT TO SCALE NOT TO SCALE
Typical Existing Sign Plan Typical Revised Sign Plan
32 232
JCT
END
LAMBERTVILLE STATION
MONDAY 6:30 PM
NOISE
ORDINANCE
STRICTLY
ENFORCED
PROHIBITED
102” TWINS
102” TRAILERS
OVER 28
½
FT
NORTH ON
RTE 32
SOUTH
232
232
SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
RICHBORO
6
7
32
SOUTH
32 32
NORTH SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
WASHINGTON CROSSING
6
6
32 232
JCT
END
LAMBERTVILLE STATION
MONDAY 6:30 PM
NOISE
ORDINANCE
STRICTLY
ENFORCED
PROHIBITED
102” TWINS
102” TRAILERS
OVER 28
½
FT
NORTH ON
RTE 32
NEW HOPE
LUMBERVILLE
WASHINGTON CROSSING
1
6
6
SOUTH
232
232
SOUTH
LUMBERVILLE
RICHBORO
6
7
32
SOUTH
WASHINGTON CROSSING 7
YARDLEY 11
MORRISVILLE 15
32
NORTH
SOUTH
32
NORTH
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
32 32
NORTH SOUTH
YIELD TO
PEDS IN
CROSSWALK
NEW HOPE 1
EASTON 36
Pennsylvania
BYWAY
Yardley
32
SOUTH
NORTH
New Hope
232
SOUTH
232
SOUTH
RICHBORO
YARDLEY 11
7
SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD
SR 32
RIVER ROAD
SR 32
N MAIN ST
SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD
SR 32
RIVER ROAD
SR 32
N MAIN ST
NOT TO SCALE NOT TO SCALE
Typical Existing Sign Plan Typical Revised Sign Plan
Optional
typical existing Sign plan
Typical Existing Sign Plan
typical revised Sign plan
Typical Revised Sign Plan
Sign at the intersection of PA 232 and PA 32.
32 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Reducing Sign Clutter
Sign clutter is the proliferation of signs (both public and private).
Having too many signs reduces the transfer of information
and creates an unattractive public realm.
Recommendations for reducing sign clutter:
Audit the signage in towns to identify signs which are •
obsolete, not effective, and which can be consolidated
or removed.
Consolidate signs to reduce the total number on the street. •
Use smaller and more compact versions of signs when •
possible.
Consider annotating street signs with highway designations •
for clarity and compactness.
(Above) Philadelphia uses compact
trailblazers and routemarkers on some
street signs on arterial roads. This method
is worth exploring for the urban areas of
the Landmark Towns, in order to reduce
sign clutter.
(Above) In some locations it is worth looking at alternative sign types. State Route 179
is only one mile long, connecting US 202 to the New Hope/Lambertville Bridge. Compact
signs may be appropriate for tight urban intersections.
SOUTH
179
NORTH
179
S N 179
BRIDGE ST
1 1 N S
SOUTH
179
NORTH
179
S N 179
BRIDGE ST
1 1 N S
H i g H way way F i N D i N g S i g N S
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 33
(Above) Sign clutter is the proliferation of signs. Too many signs decreases the usefulness of each sign, as the viewer will have trouble sorting out the information.
Sign clutter can be caused by both official and commercial signs. This photo from New Hope is typical of the sign clutter present at the intersection of Routes 179 and 32.
A sign audit may allow for removing redundant or confusing signs and installing more compact wayfinding signs.
34 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Potential Destination Signs for Bristol Borough
(Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right):
Basin Park/Canal’s End
Borough Hall
Bristol Cultural and Historical Foundation
Delaware Canal State Park
Downtown Shops
Grundy Ice Rink
Grundy Library & Museum
Municipal Recreation Fields
Police Station
Public Parking Lots
Public Restrooms
Riverboat Dock
Riverside Theater
SEPTA Station
Waterfront
b r i S t OL
b O r Ou g H
A view down Mill Street, which leads to all of Bristol Borough’s destinations and
attractions along the Delaware riverfront.
A gateway is proposed at this intersection of Radcliffe Street and Green Lane.
Vehicular traffic from Interstate 276 (PA Turnpike) would be directed to Bristol
Borough’s waterfront attractions through this gateway.
Bristol Borough
aCCess rouTes & desTI naTI ons
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 35
bristol borough access routes
36 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Potential Destination Signs for Morrisville
(Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right):
(Future Train Station if constructed)
Borough Hall
Delaware Canal Towpath
Downtown Shopping
Falls of the Delaware
Morrisville Free Library
Graystone Preserve
Heritage Center Theater
Police Station
Public Parking
Summerseat House
The Levy Walk
Trenton Makes Bridge
Williamson Park
mO r r i S v i L L e
The downtown shopping district of Morrisville offers tree-lined streets with
streetside metered parking, and buildings representing generations of
development. Wayfinding signage will increase the visibilty and cohesion
of this district along this well-travelled road.
A significant amount of vehicular traffic driving to and through Morrisville
converges at this intersection at Pennsylvania and Bridge Street, in the heart
of the downtown shopping district. Also, the East Coast Greenway along the
Delaware Canal passes through nearby. Here, a plaza commemorates Robert
Morris, after whom the town was named. Wayfinding and orientation elements
here would serve a diverse audience.
Morrisville
a C C e S S r Ou t e S & D e S t i N at i ON S
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 37
morrisville access routes
B
rid
g
e
S
t
38 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Potential Destination Signs for Yardley
(Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right):
Borough Hall
Buttonwood Park/Tot Lot
Delaware Canal Towpath
Downtown Shopping
Lake Afton
Old Library by Lake Afton
Police Station
Public Parking
SEPTA Station
Underground Railroad sites
y a r D L e y
Approaching the northern end of the downtown district at West Afton Avenue
as viewed from Main Street. Wayfinding elements in this area will not only help
visitors navigate, but also identify and unify this charming town center.
Existing streetscape elements in Yardley’s downtown shopping district on Main Street.
Yardley
a C C e S S r Ou t e S & D e S t i N at i ON S
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 39
yardley access routes
40 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Potential Destination Signs for New Hope
(Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right):
Borough Hall
Bucks County Playhouse
Delaware Canal Boat Co./Friends of the Delaware Canal
Delaware Canal Towpath
Downtown Shopping
Ferry Landing Park
Lenape Park
Library
Mill Pond
New Hope & Ivyland Railroad
New Hope Arts Center
Parry Mansion Museum
Police Station/Borough Hall
Public Parking
Visitors’ Center
N e w H Op e
Approaching New Hope Station, a regional destination at the end of the line of
the New Hope/Ivyland Railroad. Wayfinding elements would enhance the identity
of this historic site as it relates to New Hope’s other attractions.
Sign clutter caused by directional and commercial signage in the downtown
shopping district of New Hope.
New Hope
a C C e S S r Ou t e S & D e S t i N at i ON S
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 41
New Hope access routes
42 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
The Delaware Canal towpath offers a very strong potential
bicycle connection among the four Landmark Towns. In
addition, the East Coast Greenway will pass through Bristol
Borough and Morrisville. The Landmark Towns are also on
state bicycle routes E and S.
Key recommendations for the bicycle system include:
Trailheads should be established for the Delaware Canal •
towpath in each town at strategic locations offering
good access to the business district. In some locations,
these trailheads may already exist, but even existing trail-
heads can be enhanced. Each trailhead should provide:
A map board of the town with locations of interest, -
such as the visitor center, bicycle shops, etc.
Relevant telephone numbers (e.g. emergency services, -
town information, taxis, museums and attractions, etc.).
Racks for brochures and maps. -
Bicycle parking. -
Distance information to destinations along the path. -
Create strong bicycle and pedestrian access routes to the •
towpath.
Use a mileage system on the towpath to identify distances •
between towns. Improve the visibility of mile markers
to help travelers gauge distances and to help with trip
planning.
At trailheads and road crossings the towpath should •
have directional signage pointing to the towns, with
distance markers.
Work with SEPTA to improve bicycle access on Regional Rail. •
Investigate sponsoring one-way bicycle rental capabilities •
(through vendors) with shuttle-back systems (similar to
canoe rentals).
Market the canal path as a reason to visit the towns. Reach •
out to the bicycling community and through outlets
targeted at families and recreational riders. Suggested
itineraries should include stopovers for lunch or
shopping.
The East Coast Greenway should figure prominently into •
plans for Bristol Borough and Morrisville, to provide an
attraction along this national trail.
The towns should make plans for “complete streets” policies •
to build out the local bicycle infrastructure.
Events and programming, such as organized rides and •
festivals, provide an opportunity to encourage tourism
and celebrate bicycling.
bI CyCLe wayfI ndI ng sTraTegy
Bicyclist on the Delaware Canal Towpath. A sign along the towpath in New Hope directs travelers to a local restaurant.
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 43
Public transportation can help to increase visitation, reduce
parking demand, and improve access for residents and
employees.
Three of the towns are served by SEPTA (Bristol Borough,
Yardley, and Morrisville). New Hope is served by intercity
buses (Trans-Bridge Lines).
Signing for Rail and Bus Stations
The general strategy for public transportation is to improve
wayfinding for travelers arriving by train or bus. Basic steps
include the following:
Each rail station should have a map board of the town on •
the platform. The map should show the relationship of the
station to the destinations within the town.
The map board should also provide key telephone •
numbers, such as taxis, police, borough services, etc.
Each station should have a map showing the location of •
bus stops and a route map showing key destinations.
Each bus stop should have the schedule for the bus line •
posted, and a map of the route.
Wayfinding directional signs should be installed on •
streets leading from the rail station, wherever a change
of direction is required (e.g. at an intersection) and at a
distance of approximately every 300 feet.
Signs within the town should direct motorists and pedes- •
trians to the rail station, out to a radius of approximately
mile.
PubLI C TransPorTaTI on sTraTegy
Should the Landmark Towns be Connected by
Shuttle Bus?
The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission stud-
ied the potential of new transit services to the Landmark
Towns in a 2008 report, Seamless Regional Transit Access:
an Evaluation of New Intersate Links and Connectors. DVRPC
recommends the following:
The estimated costs and ridership of providing bus service •
between Trenton and New Hope/Lambertville are not
favorable as compared to existing subsidy rates for
transit in the region. Based on those estimates, the
service is probably not financially feasible.
Burlington, New Jersey, and Bristol Borough should •
explore the potential for a seasonal shuttle bus con-
necting the towns to promote waterfront tourism.
The Burlington-Bristol Bridge Commission could be a
partner. Extending existing New Jersey Transit service
across the bridge is unlikely to be feasible because of
the required subsidies.
A typical station-area map in the Tokyo subway provides information about the
local area and directional signs.
The SEPTA R7 Regional Rail train stops at Bristol Borough.
44 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
existing transit routes
This map shows existing bus routes in Bristol Borough. Each route offers limited service
(most routes running every hour or less). Modifying the existing routes to create an
overlapping circulator pattern that runs more frequently should be studied.
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 45
Bristol Transit Strategy
Bristol is served by four bus routes: SEPTA 128, 129, 304, •
and TMA Bucks Rush Bus. Each route uses different
streets in Bristol, with only a few short stretches of over-
lap. All the routes serve the train station except Route 128.
Instead of following different street routings, the lines •
could be combined onto one alignment through Bristol
(where possible), with schedules staggered to pro-
duce more frequent service between the train station,
downtown, and the waterfront.
Bristol could also apply for supplemental funding to •
transform the Rush Bus into an all-day circulator line.
As described above, signage at the station and leading •
to and from the train station should be improved,
including installation of maps at the rail station.
Information on train access can be provided through the •
Landmark Towns website and coordinated marketing efforts.
(Top) The RUSH bus is a service of TMA Bucks and offers a shuttle to major
employers in Bristol Borough during commuting hours.
(Center) The tunnel at Bristol regional rail station should be improved to appear
more attractive to visitors. Artistic lighting and murals would be one approach.
(Bottom) The connection between the regional rail station and downtown Bristol
should be strengthened.
p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i ON S t r at e g y
46 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Morrisville Transit Strategy
Morrisville should seek to have a rail station constructed •
that would serve downtown and provide access to both
SEPTA and New Jersey Transit trains. A first step is a fea-
sibility study. It is possible that the track switches along
Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor (in railroad terminology,
known as “the interlocking”) in Morrisville would need to
be reconfigured.
Morrisville bus service could be improved through •
operation of a shuttle from Trenton to make a stronger
connection to office workers across the river and to the
intermodal train station.
h
t
t
p
:
/
/
l
o
c
a
l
.
l
i
v
e
.
c
o
m
Potential location for Morrisville station.
p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i ON S t r at e g y
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 47
Yardley Transit Strategy
As described above, signage at the train should be •
improved, including a new map board, as well as signs
leading to and from the train station.
Yardley should work with SEPTA to construct improved •
sidewalk connections to the pedestrian underpass, in
particular to connect to the northbound (outbound)
platform.
Yardley should seek to build a sidewalk connection from •
the train station to the Delaware Canal State Park and to
the riverfront at the Yardley Bridge.
Yardley should work with SEPTA to plan development at •
the train station, which could include elements such as a
station building with retail amenities (e.g. a coffee shop)
and possibly new development with structured parking.
This will help to improve the arrival experience in the
town.
Yardley should pursue enhancements to the sidewalks •
leading to the train station.
Yardley station. A dirt path is worn through the grass at Yardley station, indicating the need for a new pedestrian sidewalk to the underpass.
p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i ON S t r at e g y
The SEPTA R3 Regional Rail train stops at Yardley.
48 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
New Hope Transit Strategy
While New Hope does not have much public transporta-
tion today, improvements are possible. Recommendations
include:
Seek to build a high quality bus facility for intercity coach •
service. This will allow for marketing New Hope as a
destination for urban residents (e.g. New York) who may
not own a car. It may also help to facilitate charter bus
operations.
Locate the intercity bus/charter bus facility in proximity •
to the rail station to create potential intermodal connec-
tions in the future.
Seek to implement a public transit connection to •
Doylestown to connect to the SEPTA network.
Explore the potential for rail service connecting to •
SEPTA in Warminster based on successful models and
precedents for low cost diesel shuttles.
In Germany, some rural rail lines that had been abandoned are being reopened
using low-cost diesel trains. At left is a rural line in 1990, and the same line in
2005. Fourteen miles of track were reclaimed from nature. The total cost of the
project, including stations and crossings, was less than 23 million dollars.
Diesel light rail has also been developed in North America, including in New
Jersey. The River Line runs 34 miles between Camden and Trenton, with an
average daily ridership greater than 9,000. The cost of this line, however, was
relatively high, due to a large amount of infrastructure investment.
Could the New Hope train station one day be an intermodal facility serving
intercity buses and regional trains?
p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i ON S t r at e g y
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 49
Rail Service to the Landmark Towns
All of the Landmark Towns are on the border with New
Jersey. In many cases, bi-state cooperation will be required
to improve public transportation and rail access. The
Landmark Towns would benefit from the following “big
picture” strategies to improve access to the regional rail
network:
Joint ticketing among rail carriers (Amtrak, SEPTA, New •
Jersey Transit) to facilitate access to the Landmark Towns).
Joint marketing and mapping among carriers, with a common •
website for trip planning to facilitate accessing the towns.
Shuttle bus connections from rail stations to downtowns. •
Coordination of planning on the Northeast Corridor to •
serve new travel markets.
At the present time, none of the towns enjoys direct (one-
seat ride) rail service from New York and the Northern
New Jersey markets. However, several possibilities exist
for future service:
The R3 (West Trenton) line could be extended to Newark/ •
Hoboken, restoring a route that was terminated in the 1980s.
Morrisville could be served by a new station, which could •
host both SEPTA and New Jersey Transit trains, offering a
one seat ride to New York.
Bristol Borough could be served by an extension of •
New Jersey Transit service to Philadelphia on the R7 line,
which was considered when New Jersey Transit took
over Amtrak’s “Clocker” commuter runs or by a coordi-
nated connection between Amtrak, New Jersey Transit,
and SEPTA at Trenton.
As mentioned previously, New Hope has a rail track con-
nection to the SEPTA network. This rail line could be used
for a shuttle connection, following a low-cost approach
used in other locations.
p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i ON S t r at e g y
50 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
samPLe J ourneys
1
3 2 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 51
Vehicular Journey in Yardley
This diagram and sign description table lists the signs that
a visitor arriving by car would encounter on the way to
downtown Yardley.
Item # Description
1
Welcome to Yardley
2
<
<
Old Library
Lake Afton
3
>
>
Delaware River
Canal Path
Shopping
Train Station
4
>
>
Police
Playground
5
<
<
Borough Hall
Parking
6
To I-95
7
<
<
Delaware River
Canal Path
Train Station
8
<
<
Shopping
Train Station
9
Delaware Canal
10
<
<
Lake Afton
Old Library
11
<
<
Police
Playground
>
>
>
>
>
52 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
S a mp L e j Ou r N e y S
To Downtown Yardley
To Delaware Canal Towpath/
Delaware River
SEPTA
Station
1
3
2
4
5
9
10
6
7
8
New Sidewalk Needed
New
Sidewalk
Needed
New Sidewalk Needed
Proposed Trail
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 53
Transit/Bicycle Sample Journey
This diagram and sign description table lists the signs that
a visitor arriving by train with or without a bicycle would
encounter on the way to downtown Yardley.
Item # Description
1
<
<
<
<
Local Area Map
Train Schedule Board
Cross-under to Outbound Trains
Downtown Yardley
Delaware Canal Towpath
Delaware River
2
<
<
<
<
Cross-under to inbound trains
Downtown Yardley
Delaware Canal Towpath
Delaware River
3
>
>
Delaware Canal Towpath
Delaware River
4
>
>
Downtown
Delaware Canal Towpath
Delaware River
5
Delaware Canal Towpath
Delaware River
6
>
SEPTA station
Downtown Yardley
7
>
Station Identification Sign
Trains to Philadelphia
Trains to West Trenton
8
<
>
Downtown
Delaware Canal Towpath
9
>
<
Trains to Philadelphia
Trains to West Trenton
10
>
>
>
Local Area Map
Train Schedule Board
Crossover to Outbound Trains
Downtown
Delaware Canal Towpath
>
>
>
>
>
(requires proposed trail connection)
(requires proposed trail connection)
(requires proposed trail connection)
54 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Landmark Towns wayfI ndI ng sI gn sysTem
A double post gateway sign is shown within a planting bed at a location that visitors perceive as the edge of town.
N
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H I S T O R I C
New Hope
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The Sign Plan
People are natural pathfinders; if you can provide them
with simple, clear and consistent information to assist them
in their journey they will regard that place as enlightened
and truly welcoming. The signage plan provides for visitor
information through vehicular and pedestrian direction,
site and destination identification, auto-tour pathfinders,
transit identification and information, orientation maps and
hiking and bicycling trail signs. Included are some inter-
pretive recommendations that supplement the existing
Delaware & Lehigh system. These recommendations should
form the basis for the development of a comprehensive set
of design guidelines.
The signage system should play an important role in rais-
ing public awareness about the Landmark Towns of Bucks
County and the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage
Corridor. A consistent graphic language that establishes
visual continuity throughout the system should be devel-
oped. In general a strong but understated look is recom-
mended, balancing clarity and effectiveness with brand/
identity.
The sign drawings presented in this plan are at a sche-
matic level of development. Phase II of this project will
involve further design development and specifications of
these products.
A Comprehensive System
The comprehensive wayfinding and sign system that fol-
lows has emerged from a user scenario approach. Whether
directional, identification or interpretive signage, this
approach imagines a series of typical users and their needs.
In the case of motorists, we had to imagine their destina-
tions, directions and critical decision points. Of course, the
actual trajectories of visitors, residents and workers are as
varied as the individuals, but by imagining a few of the
most common sequences of movement, it is possible to
develop a system that will serve many people efficiently and
conveniently. This system also includes orientation/informa-
tion kiosks with maps and interpretive content. These are
intended to introduce visitors to the The Landmark Towns
of Bucks County and convey a richer level of information
about destinations and services.
This plan presents a framework for a comprehensive sys-
tem of tools that each town can utilize within its own town
limits while connecting to the greater D&L system and net-
work. It is intended as a toolbox to draw from as each part-
ner defines individual goals and objectives. These tools
are intended to assist and enhance the towns; tighten the
connections between towns and the Delaware & Lehigh
experience; and elevate the entire region as a vital and
exciting place for people to live, work and play.
Goals & Recommendations
Create an expanded set of identity standards for the con- •
sistent use and application of the D&L logotype, Landmark
Towns of Bucks County name and four town names:
Morrisville, Yardley, Bristol Borough and New Hope.
Build on the existing Delaware & Lehigh system, includ- •
ing logotype, supporting typefonts and color as specified
in the “Visually Speaking” guidelines.
Review and define branding recommendations for the •
expanded signage & wayfinding system.
Develop schematic signage recommendations for an •
expanded D&L system that embraces and supports the
goals of the Landmark Towns Initiative.
56 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Identity, Branding and Color
This is a limited planning survey of identity standards
required for the successful design and implementation of
a signage and wayfinding system for the four Landmark
Towns of Bucks County. It is understood that the Delaware
& Lehigh National Heritage Corridor and the Landmark
Towns Initiative have a much broader array of marketing,
promotional and educational message needs that are not
currently part of the scope of this project.
Analysis
The study began with an analysis of the existing identi-
ties, medallions & seals in use for the Delaware & Lehigh
National Heritage Corridor and Landmark Towns of Buck
County. It quickly became clear that the existing circular
identities for the D&L and Landmark Towns were similar
in color, shape and design and using the two together
throughout the new system would result in lowered brand
recognition for each organization. The existing D&L identity
was selected as the umbrella identity or overbrand to be
used throughout the system and a new typographic treat-
ment for Landmark Towns was developed to identify and
distinguish it from the D&L. In addition, individual town
seals, mostly circular in format and design, are being consid-
ered for use on select signs located within each town.
The goal is to provide the appropriate level of recognition for
each of these entities in a location, sequence and hierarchy
that provides understanding, clarity and connection for the
visitor.
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE&SPH
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE0MKLX
%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>
8]TIJEGI1IXE2SVQEP'ETW
1IXE2SVQEP
'ETW
EFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^
8]TIJEGI%HSFI'EWPSR4VS6IKYPEV
Morrisville
New Hope
Bristol Borough
Yardley
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE&SPH
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE0MKLX
%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>
8]TIJEGI1IXE2SVQEP'ETW
1IXE2SVQEP
'ETW
EFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^
8]TIJEGI%HSFI'EWPSR4VS6IKYPEV
Morrisville
New Hope
Bristol Borough
Yardley
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 57
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE&SPH
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE0MKLX
%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>
8]TIJEGI1IXE2SVQEP'ETW
1IXE2SVQEP
'ETW
EFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^
8]TIJEGI%HSFI'EWPSR4VS6IKYPEV
Morrisville
New Hope
Bristol Borough
Yardley
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE&SPH
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
7IVMJE0MKLX
%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>
8]TIJEGI1IXE2SVQEP'ETW
1IXE2SVQEP
'ETW
EFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^
8]TIJEGI%HSFI'EWPSR4VS6IKYPEV
Morrisville
New Hope
Bristol Borough
Yardley
58 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Primary Brand
The overbrand or primary brand functions as an umbrella
for multiple destinations, activities and events throughout
the region. In this function the chosen identity is featured
prominently at the top or bottom of the signage and serves
to let people know that this destination, activity or event
falls within or is part of the Delaware & Lehigh National
Heritage Corridor experience. The only time the D&L sym-
bol is not featured is for signs that identify town facilities
and functions. These signs will replace the D&L symbol with
the individual town identity or seal.
Secondary Brand
The role of the secondary brand is one of supporting con-
nection and association between the Landmark Towns
wordmark and a business, institution, organization or
activity. In this application the wordmark (a logo made up
of typography) is subordinate to the primary identity and
message of the partner (town) or site. It gains resonance
by association and partnership with other experiences the
visitor values. The Landmark Towns wordmark is recom-
mended for use throughout the entire signage and way-
finding system.
Other Applications
There are many other applications and formats that cross
a wide range of media that are not currently described in
this plan. It should be noted that in some of these other
applications the “Landmark Towns” wordmark and existing
circular symbol may become the primary brand message.
In these applications individual town seal(s) as well as the
D&L symbol would become underbrands or secondary
brands and may be subordinate to the Landmark Towns
message and identity.
Color
A family of complementary colors has been developed
for use throughout the signage system with community
input. The colors chosen grow from existing uses and/or
preferences shared or expressed by each community. The
Landmark Towns palette should be composed of harmoni-
ous colors and complement the Delaware & Lehigh burgun-
dy. These colors will also need to be equal in value and
chroma so that no one color stands out from another
and to meet important legibility requirements.
These colors are recommended for the widest possible
use and implementation across all media throughout the
Landmark Towns network.
Typefont
The identity guidelines of the Delaware & Lehigh National
Heritage Corridor specify two families of typefonts, Serifa, a
serif font, and Meta, a sans serif font, that are used through-
out their signage and identity programs. These typefonts
are strongly associated with the brand of the D&L. Meta
Bold Capitals was pulled from the Visually Speaking
design guidelines for the town names. To distinguish the
Landmarks Towns from its parent, the Delaware & Lehigh
National Heritage Corridor, an additional serif typefont,
Adobe Caslon Regular, has been introduced.
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 59
Brand Architecture
This diagram catalogues the essential identity elements for the signage and wayfinding system presented in this plan.
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Morrisville
New Hope
Bristol Borough
Yardley
Primary Brand
Logomark for print
Town seals that may be
developed for town
signage
Symbols Typography and Colors
Typography and Color for Individual Towns
Secondary Brand
D&L
Landmark Towns
of Bucks County
Towns
60 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Sign System Recommendations
Overview
This is the recommended signage and wayfinding sys-
tem for the Landmark Towns Initiative. It is intended for
application to the widest possible range of informational,
directional and interpretive uses within each of the four
Landmark Towns: New Hope, Yardley, Morrisville and Bristol
Borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
The system presented is schematic in nature and was cho-
sen from several design options presented to the Landmark
Towns executive committee and stakeholders from each
community. It is intended for conceptual review, input and
approval. To complete the system will require design devel-
opment, documentation and specification steps. During
design development additional design details and content
issues will be resolved. The documentation and specifica-
tion steps should be abbreviated because of the reuse of
existing drawings and specifications from the Delaware &
Lehigh National Heritage Corridor sign system guidelines. A
more detailed sign location plan and message schedule for
each town will be required to complete the package.
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Banner on
Existing Pole
Free-standing
Banner Gateway
Large Free-standing Gateway Free-standing Image Gateway Gateway – Single-faced Double Post Vehicular Directional Sign – Town Specific
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
H I S T O R I C
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
New Hope
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R7
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Bristol
Large Building Identification Small Building Identification Transportation Maps Information Kiosk Interpretive Window Panels
Regional Rail Identification Signs
Morrisville
Municipal
Building
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
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LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
–Robert Morris and George Clymer
Fun Facts
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Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
(Robert Morris and George Clymer)
Can you find their signatures?
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Fun Facts
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
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Existing Pole
Free-standing
Banner Gateway
Large Free-standing Gateway Free-standing Image Gateway Gateway – Single-faced Double Post Vehicular Directional Sign – Town Specific
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
H I S T O R I C
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
New Hope
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R3
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R7
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Bristol
Large Building Identification Small Building Identification Transportation Maps Information Kiosk Interpretive Window Panels
Regional Rail Identification Signs
Morrisville
Municipal
Building
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
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Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
–Robert Morris and George Clymer
Fun Facts
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Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
(Robert Morris and George Clymer)
Can you find their signatures?
M
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Fun Facts
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
System Components
PennDOT—Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices •
(MUTCD) signs on interstate and state highways
Gateways—primary and secondary identification signs •
Vehicular directional blazes for the Scenic Byway (state •
byway signs)
Vehicular directional signs •
Parking blazes directing visitors to specific destinations •
Building and facility identification signs •
Pedestrian orientation kiosks •
Public transportation identification and route maps •
Interpretive information •
Goals & Recommendations
Create an integrated and unified signage, wayfinding 1.
and interpretive system to orient residents and visitors
to the resources, amenities and history of the Landmark
Towns communities.
Build identity and create a strong sense of place. To 2.
accomplish this will take more than “You are entering”
and “You are leaving” signs. The regional and interior
roads that connect these towns should receive an over-
lay of elements that creates a continual sense of being
in a “Landmark Town of Bucks County.”
Create support and enthusiasm for the project. If you 3.
live and work in the area, your viewpoint is going to be
different than that of a visitor. Residents have a “non-
physical sense of place” that visitors do not have. This
system should communicate pride, welcome and con-
nection with the places, values and history within the
community. The business community has a major stake
in how Landmark Towns are marketed and presented. If
they are going to support the project, they will be more
interested if it somehow supports their interests.
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Existing Pole
Free-standing
Banner Gateway
Large Free-standing Gateway Free-standing Image Gateway Gateway – Single-faced Double Post Vehicular Directional Sign – Town Specific
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
H I S T O R I C
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
New Hope
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R3
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R7
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Bristol
Large Building Identification Small Building Identification Transportation Maps Information Kiosk Interpretive Window Panels
Regional Rail Identification Signs
Morrisville
Municipal
Building
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
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Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
–Robert Morris and George Clymer
Fun Facts
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Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
(Robert Morris and George Clymer)
Can you find their signatures?
M
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Fun Facts
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
62 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Overview
The Delaware & Lehigh system standards “ Visually
Speaking” form the basis and foundation for the develop-
ment of additional signage, wayfinding and interpretive
elements for the Landmark Towns initiative. Every attempt
has been made to develop these new products as part of
an integrated regional system. As such the D&L system pre-
sented here will remain in use throughout the region.
Main Entrance Identification
Main Entrance
Identification – Large
Main Entrance
Identification – Small
Tour Guide Sign Auto Trail
Stop
Tour Guide Sign Auto Trail
Stop
Pedestrian
Historical
Marker
Pedestrian
Historical
Marker
Pedestrian
Trail Entrance
Pedestrian
Trail Entrance
Vehicular Directionals
Vehicular Directionals
Mcn-Sat çam- çpm
Sun 1zpm- çam
Clcsed hclldays, except Memcrlal uay,
}uly µ and Labcr uay
Eckley
Miners’
Village
)2(
NPS Interpretive and Wayside Displays
Mcn-Sat çam- çpm
Sun 1zpm- çam
Clcsed hclldays, except Memcrlal uay,
}uly µ and Labcr uay
Eckley
Miners’
Village
)2(
Goals & Recommendations
Expand and upgrade the existing D&L system. System
enhancements could include:
Overall upgrades to materials and finishes to reflect 1.
current changes in technology, finishes and related
warranties.
Addition of break-away-footer to bring signs up to DOT 2.
safety standards.
Larger type size on vehicular directional signs. 3.
Upgrades to the interpretive signs to introduce new 4.
National Park Service standards and features.
Changes to the design and layout of the interpretive 5.
panel system to provide greater range of content, image
and color options.
Addition of land and water emergency response system 6.
that uses codes and other relevant information so that
emergency teams, police and fire departments can
respond more quickly.
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Delaware & Lehigh System Overview
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 63
Main Entrance Identification
Main Entrance
Identification – Large
Main Entrance
Identification – Small
Tour Guide Sign Auto Trail
Stop
Tour Guide Sign Auto Trail
Stop
Pedestrian
Historical
Marker
Pedestrian
Historical
Marker
Pedestrian
Trail Entrance
Pedestrian
Trail Entrance
Vehicular Directionals
Vehicular Directionals
Mcn-Sat çam- çpm
Sun 1zpm- çam
Clcsed hclldays, except Memcrlal uay,
}uly µ and Labcr uay
Eckley
Miners’
Village
)2(
NPS Interpretive and Wayside Displays
Mcn-Sat çam- çpm
Sun 1zpm- çam
Clcsed hclldays, except Memcrlal uay,
}uly µ and Labcr uay
Eckley
Miners’
Village
)2(
64 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
º lncreased message slze
º lncreased panel slze and helght
º 8reak-away footer
Revised Vehicular Directional Sign
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Lehigh County
Museum
Tour Guide Sign Vehicular Directionals
)2(
3 1/2"
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Vehicular visibility •
Night visibility •
Located perpendicular to main •
thoroughfares
Located 100-150 feet in advance of •
decision points
Directional arrows •
Destinations •
Parking symbols •
Delaware & Lehigh logo •
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
D&L Revised Vehicular Directional Signs
Increased message size (Shown) •
Increased panel size and height •
Break-away footer •
Single-faced post and panel sign provide
timely information to help the traveler
make decisions. Directional information
signs direct visitors from interstates and
neighboring areas to primary and essential
destinations.
The D&L system is used in the interstitial
spaces between the Landmark Towns.
Once the motorist enters the town the
town color is used for the vehicular
directional background color helping the
motorist identify that they are within the
town proper.
Destinations should be listed by order of
movement: left, right, ahead.
Vehicular Directional
Delaware & Lehigh Signage
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 65
To create continuity, vehicular wayfinding signs within the
communities will use the existing architecture of the D&L
system. Fewer resources will be used by building on the
existing D&L system.
Each town, during design development, will establish a sig-
nature background color that works well with the D&L base
color. This color will be used throughout their sign system.
The color has to be dark enough that when reflective type
is placed on it the signs will meet ADA’s contrast and leg-
ibility requirements.
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
º lncreased message slze
º lncreased panel slze and helght
º 8reak-away footer
Revised Vehicular Directional Sign
Frank Buchman
House
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Lehigh County
Museum
Trout Hall
Lehigh County
Museum
Tour Guide Sign Vehicular Directionals
)2(
3 1/2"
Vehicular Directional
Town Signage
66 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
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Banner Free-standing Banner Gateway
Free-standing Gateway – Large Free-standing Gateway – Small Free-standing Gateway – large with Image Gateway – Low
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
New Hope
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
H I S T O R I C
New Hope
H I S T O R I C
New Hope
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Colors for each town will
be developed during the
design development phase
with stakeholder input.
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 67
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Banner Free-standing Banner Gateway
Free-standing Gateway – Large Free-standing Gateway – Small Free-standing Gateway – large with Image Gateway – Low
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
New Hope
H I S T O R I C
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
H I S T O R I C
New Hope
H I S T O R I C
New Hope
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Banner Gateways—Double-faced perma-
nent banners. Banners are used in loca-
tions where the site lines to smaller post
and panel signs would be blocked.
Freestanding Single–post Gateways—
Four sizes of single-faced post and panel
signs may be used at main and second-
ary entrances to the town. The different
sizes accommodate the different length
names of the towns and different site con-
ditions found at each gateway location.
Locate signs with maximum visibility from
thoroughfares.
Freestanding Double-post Gateway—This
sign may be used at primary entrances to
the town where landscaped locations allow.
Vehicular visibility •
Night visibility •
Located perpendicular to main •
thoroughfares
Located at perceived entrances •
to the center of town
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
Option: Adding period
photographs as an underlay on
the signs can help tell a story
about each town’s rich history.
Banners
Town name •
Historic •
Landmark Towns •
D&L logo •
Post and Panel Signs
Town symbol •
Town name •
Historic •
Landmark Towns Bucks County •
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Vehicular Directional
Gateway Identification
68 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Vehicular visibility •
Night visibility •
Located perpendicular to main •
thoroughfares near entrances, or
Parallel to road in front of building •
Town seal •
Town name •
Building name •
Landmark Towns Bucks County wordmark •
Optional
Street number •
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
Morrisville
Municipal
Building
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
Medium-size single- or double-faced post
and panel sign provides identification for
municipal buildings. Locate at entrances
with maximum vehicular visibility from
thoroughfares.
Municipal Building Identifcation Signs
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
LANDMARK TOWNS
BUCKS COUNT Y
Morrisville
Municipal Building
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 69
Yardley
R3
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
R7
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Bristol
Retrofit Panels for Regional Rail Sign System Town/ Rail Station
Identification Sign
Bus Stop/
Route Map
Signs
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R3
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
R7
L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Bristol
Retrofit Panels for Regional Rail Sign System Town/ Rail Station
Identification Sign
Bus Stop/
Route Map
Signs
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R7
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Bristol
Retrofit Panels for Regional Rail Sign System Town/ Rail Station
Identification Sign
Bus Stop/
Route Map
Signs
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Transportation Identifcation/Information Signs
Bus Stop/Route Map Sign—Double-faced
sign that attaches to existing posts. The
sign identifies bus stops and gives route
information. Local points of interest may
also be indicated on the map.
Rail Station Identification Panels—These
panels are attached to existing Regional
Rail Sign System standards along the train
platform.
Regional Rail Station Identification Banners—
Freestanding banner signs identify Landmark
Towns with the Regional Rail station.
Located along bus routes or train •
platforms
Night visibility for identification signs •
Regional Rail signs are located along •
access roads to stations or at rail station
parking lot entrances.
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
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Town name •
Landmarks Towns •
Bus symbol or regional •
rail number
Route map with •
highlighted
points of interest
(bus stop signs only)
70 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
L A N D M A R K T O W N S L A N D M A R K T O W N S L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Welcome
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Morrisville
Welcome
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Morrisville Bristol Borough
H I S T O R I C
Pedestrian Orientation/Information/Interpretive Kiosk
Pedestrian visibility •
Perpendicular to directed path of travel •
Located at entry points to towpath •
Community name •
Landmarks Town and D&L logo •
Map detail of local area with key map to •
entire D&L area
Pedestrian directional information •
Interpretive information •
Directions for how to get additional •
information about the area
Local safety information and related •
emergency phone numbers
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
As information is
gathered from the
community, the size of the
kiosk may be adjusted.
A double-faced freestanding pedestrian
kiosk provides orientation information at
the towpath trail, town center or train sta-
tion. Located at entry points the marker may
stand alone or be used in combination with
a selection of interpretive components.
The map detail would show access to the
multi-modal journeys, related visitor sites,
trails, towns and neighborhoods. A key map
and legend would accompany the map
detail. Information on where the visitor may
acquire take-away maps and other informa-
tion would also be posted.
In some situations it may be desirable to
have these kiosks illuminated at night or
placed in a well illuminated area. Lighting
can help visitors locate the structure, make it
readable and provide a beacon of welcome
and safety.
While designing such a kiosk is a relatively
simple matter, it is the programming and
management of information that will deter-
mine if it is an effective source of informa-
tion for visitors. The appropriate entities will
need to work closely to develop an effective
management plan for upkeep.
L a N D ma r k t OwN S way F i N D i N g S i g N S y S t e m
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 71
Morrisville is the only town in America
to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
–Robert Morris and George Clymer
Fun Facts
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George Clymer (March 16, 1739 – January 23, 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father. He was one of the first Patriots to advocate complete independence from Britain. As a Pennsylvania representative, Clymer was, along with only five others, a signatory of both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. He attended the Continental Congress and served in political office until the end of his life. Clymer was born in Whiteville orphaned at a young age, and apprenticed to his paternal uncle in preparation for a career as a merchant. He was a patriot and leader in the demonstrations in Philadelphia resulting from the Tea Act and the Stamp Act. He became a member of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety in 1773, and was elected to the Continental Congress 1776-1780. He was a Member of the Pennsylvania Legislature, a Revenue Officer, and a Federal Indian Commissioner from 1781-1796. He was elected to the first U.S. Congress in 1789. Clymer shared the responsibility of being treasurer of the Continental Congress with Michael Hillegas, the first Treasurer of the United States. He was the first president of the Philadelphia Bank, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and vice-president of the Philadelphia Agricultural Society. When Congress passed a bill imposing a duty on spirits distilled in the United States in 1791, V was placed as head of the excise department, in the state of Pennsylvania. He was also one of the commissioners to negotiate a treaty with the Creek Indian confederacy at Coleraine, Georgia on June 29, 1796. He is considered the benefactor of Indiana Borough, as it was he who donated the property for a county seat in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Clymer is buried at the Friends Burying Ground in Trenton, New Jersey.
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Morrisville is the only town in America
to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
(Robert Morris and George Clymer)
Can you find their signatures?
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Fun Facts
Interpretive Signs
Stories and opportunities abound for
engaging visitors and residents. Stories
can be told about the history of the town
or region, notable characters or natural
phenomena and wildlife to name a few.
Interpretive panels can also be used to
activate an area. Illustrated below are
poster size panels with fun facts about the
town that could be displayed in buildings
under renovation.
Located along pedestrian walk ways • Notable story •
Relevant images •
Town name •
Landmark Towns •
Sponsor names •
D e S C r i p t i O N L O C a t i O N C r i t e r i a m e S S a g e C O N t e N t
Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
–Robert Morris and George Clymer
Fun Facts
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George Clymer (March 16, 1739 – January 23, 1813)
was an American politician and Founding Father. He was one of the first
Patriots to advocate complete independence fromBritain. As a
Pennsylvania representative, Clymer was, along with only five others, a
signatory of both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S.
Constitution. He attended the Continental Congress and served in political
office until the end of his life.
Clymer was born in Whiteville orphaned at a young age, and apprenticed
to his paternal uncle in preparation for a career as a merchant. He was a
patriot and leader in the demonstrations in Philadelphia resulting fromthe
Tea Act and the Stamp Act. He became a member of the Philadelphia
Committee of Safety in 1773, and was elected to the Continental Congress
1776-1780. He was a Member of the Pennsylvania Legislature, a Revenue
Officer, and a Federal Indian Commissioner from1781-1796. He was
elected to the first U.S. Congress in 1789. Clymer shared the responsibility
of being treasurer of the Continental Congress with Michael Hillegas, the
first Treasurer of the United States.
He was the first president of the Philadelphia Bank, and the Pennsylvania
Academy of Fine Arts, and vice-president of the Philadelphia Agricultural
Society. When Congress passed a bill imposing a duty on spirits distilled
in the United States in 1791, V was placed as head of the excise
department, in the state of Pennsylvania. He was also one of the
commissioners to negotiate a treaty with the Creek Indian confederacy at
Coleraine, Georgia on June 29, 1796. He is considered the benefactor of
Indiana Borough, as it was he who donated the property for a county seat
in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.
Clymer is buried at the Friends Burying Ground in Trenton, New Jersey.
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Morrisville is the only town in
America to have two signers of
both the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution.
(Robert Morris and George Clymer)
Can you find their signatures?
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L A N D M A R K T O W N S L A N D M A R K T O W N S L A N D M A R K T O W N S
Welcome
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Morrisville
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Morrisville Bristol Borough
H I S T O R I C
72 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan
sI gnage fabrI CaTI on budgeT
2/9/09
Landmark Towns of Bucks County
Bristol Borough, Morrisville, New Hope & Yardley
Signage & Wayfinding System — Fabrication & Installation Estimate
Section A - Basic
est.
qty
unit
price
total
price
unit
install
total
install total
1 Town gateway - major Single-faced 8 6,800 54,400 1,020 8,160 62,560
2 Town gateway - minor Single-faced 12 4,200 50,400 630 7,560 57,960
3 Town gateway - banner- custom pole Double-faced 8 9,200 73,600 1,380 11,040 84,640
4 Vehicular directional - large Double-faced 24 6,120 146,880 918 22,032 168,912
5 Vehicular directional - medium Double-faced 36 4,432 159,552 665 23,933 183,485
6 Vehicular directional - oversized Single-faced 16 6,940 111,040 1,041 16,656 127,696
7 Town vehicular trailblazer Single-faced 40 2,735 109,400 410 16,410 125,810
8 Town banner - existing pole-mnted - lrge Double-faced 8 6,600 52,800 990 7,920 60,720
9 Town banner - existing pole-mnted - med Single-faced 48 4,200 201,600 630 30,240 231,840
10 Tain station banner - existing pole-mnted - smSingle-faced 16 3,600 57,600 540 8,640 66,240
11 Interpretive panels - storefront Single-faced 16 1,600 25,600 240 350 25,950
12 Pedestrian orientation & map Single-faced 24 3,790 90,960 569 13,644 104,604
Sub-total 256 1,133,832 166,585 1,300,417
Contingency - 5% 65,021
General conditions - 5% 65,021
Subtotal cost for 4 towns (approx $360,000 per town) 1,430,458 $
Section B - Optional
13 Main/large building identification Double-faced 4 3,800 15,200 570 250 15,450
14 Medium building identification Double-faced 4 3,110 12,440 467 1,866 14,306
15 Parking trailblazer - small Single-faced 32 525 16,800 79 2,520 19,320
16 Parking trailblazer - post-mounted Single-faced 32 2,135 68,320 320 10,248 78,568
17 Parking lot identification Double-faced 16 2,000 32,000 300 4,800 36,800
Sub-total 88 144,760 19,684 164,444
Contingency - 5% 8,222
General conditions - 5% 8,222
Subtotal cost for 4 towns (approx $45,222 per town) 180,888 $
Estimates are approximate and based on "ballpark" proposals from regional sign contractors. Estimates assume aluminum
construction with Coraflon fluoropolymer paint. Removal of existing signs, payment of performance bonds, sales tax and
consolidation of interstate signs into one simplified format have not been included in this estimate.
Sign quantities are based on the following formula for each town:
Section A - Basic
2 major & 3 minor gateways; 4 large banner (2 towns only) structures each; 6 large, 12 medium and 4 oversized vehicular
directional; 10 veh trailblazers; 4 storefront interpretive displays; 6 pedestrian orientation stations; 4 sm train station banners.
Section B - Optional
1 main building id; 1 medium building id; 8 small parking trailblazers; 8 post-mounted parking id; 4 parking id
Wallace Roberts & Todd with 73
2/9/09
Landmark Towns of Bucks County
Bristol Borough, Morrisville, New Hope & Yardley
Signage & Wayfinding System — Fabrication & Installation Estimate
Section A - Basic
est.
qty
unit
price
total
price
unit
install
total
install total
1 Town gateway - major Single-faced 8 6,800 54,400 1,020 8,160 62,560
2 Town gateway - minor Single-faced 12 4,200 50,400 630 7,560 57,960
3 Town gateway - banner- custom pole Double-faced 8 9,200 73,600 1,380 11,040 84,640
4 Vehicular directional - large Double-faced 24 6,120 146,880 918 22,032 168,912
5 Vehicular directional - medium Double-faced 36 4,432 159,552 665 23,933 183,485
6 Vehicular directional - oversized Single-faced 16 6,940 111,040 1,041 16,656 127,696
7 Town vehicular trailblazer Single-faced 40 2,735 109,400 410 16,410 125,810
8 Town banner - existing pole-mnted - lrge Double-faced 8 6,600 52,800 990 7,920 60,720
9 Town banner - existing pole-mnted - med Single-faced 48 4,200 201,600 630 30,240 231,840
10 Tain station banner - existing pole-mnted - smSingle-faced 16 3,600 57,600 540 8,640 66,240
11 Interpretive panels - storefront Single-faced 16 1,600 25,600 240 350 25,950
12 Pedestrian orientation & map Single-faced 24 3,790 90,960 569 13,644 104,604
Sub-total 256 1,133,832 166,585 1,300,417
Contingency - 5% 65,021
General conditions - 5% 65,021
Subtotal cost for 4 towns (approx $360,000 per town) 1,430,458 $
Section B - Optional
13 Main/large building identification Double-faced 4 3,800 15,200 570 250 15,450
14 Medium building identification Double-faced 4 3,110 12,440 467 1,866 14,306
15 Parking trailblazer - small Single-faced 32 525 16,800 79 2,520 19,320
16 Parking trailblazer - post-mounted Single-faced 32 2,135 68,320 320 10,248 78,568
17 Parking lot identification Double-faced 16 2,000 32,000 300 4,800 36,800
Sub-total 88 144,760 19,684 164,444
Contingency - 5% 8,222
General conditions - 5% 8,222
Subtotal cost for 4 towns (approx $45,222 per town) 180,888 $
Estimates are approximate and based on "ballpark" proposals from regional sign contractors. Estimates assume aluminum
construction with Coraflon fluoropolymer paint. Removal of existing signs, payment of performance bonds, sales tax and
consolidation of interstate signs into one simplified format have not been included in this estimate.
Sign quantities are based on the following formula for each town:
Section A - Basic
2 major & 3 minor gateways; 4 large banner (2 towns only) structures each; 6 large, 12 medium and 4 oversized vehicular
directional; 10 veh trailblazers; 4 storefront interpretive displays; 6 pedestrian orientation stations; 4 sm train station banners.
Section B - Optional
1 main building id; 1 medium building id; 8 small parking trailblazers; 8 post-mounted parking id; 4 parking id
Landmark Towns
Strategic Wayfinding Plan
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Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC
WI T H
H I S T O R I C B R I S T OL B O R OU G H
MO R R I S V I L L E
N E W H OP E
P R E PA R E D BY

L an d m a r k Tow n s
Strat egic Wayfinding Plan
Prepared by:

Wallace Roberts & Todd, LLC

Nando Micale, Principal Adam Krom, Associate Andee Mazzocco, Associate Kelly Ream, Planner Jacqueline Marion, Graphic Designer
with Cloud Gehshan Associates

Jerome Cloud, Principal Barbara Schwarzenbach, Associate Stephen Ricci, Junior Designer
Prepared for:

Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Inc Landmark Towns of Bucks County Historic Bristol Borough Morrisville Borough Yardley Borough New Hope Borough

September 2009

Wallace Roberts & Todd with

William Salerno. Thorne Historic Bristol Borough Ralph DiGuiseppe. President Bucks County Conference & Visitors Bureau Jerry Lepping. C. Regional Coordinator Landmark Towns Executive Committee Margaret Bork. Inc. Council President James Dillon. support and cooperation from the following: Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission Transportation Community Development Initiative U. Borough Manager Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Director Landmark Towns of Bucks County: Bristol Borough • Morrisville • New Hope • Yardley Donna Boone. John Burke. Esq. Allen Sachse. Elissa G..S. Jane Burger.The Landmark Towns Strategic Wayfinding Plan could not have been completed without funding. Department of Interior National Park Service Pennsylvania Department of Conservation & Natural Resources PA Heritage Area Program Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. Susan Taylor.

22 Highway Wayfinding Signs. . 5 Existing Signage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 morrisville bristol borough Wallace Roberts & Todd with 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Planning Process . . . . . . 24 Access Routes & Destinations .Ta b L e o f Co n T e n Ts Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Landmark Towns Wayfinding Sign System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Marketing to Visitors. . . . . 54 ya r d l e y Signage Fabrication Budget . . . . . . . 43 Sample Journeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Public Transportation Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Bicycle Wayfinding Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 new hope Proposed Scenic Byway . . .

Landmark Towns is a cooperative venture between Bristol Borough. The riverfront in Historic Bristol Borough. Working with the towns and other partners. and the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. These four towns are prominent communities on the Delaware River. and public esteem.I nT ro d u CT Ion What is a Landmark Town? A “Landmark Town” is a special community. Morrisville. The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor These four towns are within the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor (hereafter referred to as the D&L Corridor). local economy. culture. What is the goal of the Strategic Wayfinding Plan? The goal of the wayfinding planning project is to make it easier to navigate to. and New Hope. thereby improving the vitality. from. and through the Landmark Towns. Main Street in Yardley. 2 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Yardley. the D&L commissioned a wayfinding plan for the Landmark Towns. A town becomes a “landmark” by virtue of its history. which stretches for 165 miles through Pennsylvania along the Delaware Canal and the Lehigh Canal. The goal is to increase economic development and tourism in the historic downtown business districts. and quality of life in the towns. with incredible character developed through a proud history.

New Hope YardleY Morrisville Bristol BorougH Location map of Four Landmark towns of bucks County Wallace Roberts & Todd with 3 .

BRADFORD COUNTY 81 SULLIVAN COUNTY WYOMING COUNTY WAYNE COUNTY Lake Wallenpaupack PIKE COUNTY 476 81 Ricketts Glen State Park Glens Natural Area 380 84 Frances Slocum State Park State Game Land 206 WilkesBarre Moon Lake Park LACKAWANNA COUNTY 81 Seven Tubbs Nature Area State Game Land 91 Lacakawanna State Forest Ashley State Game Land 224 State Game Land 207 State Game Land 260 Laurel Run State Game Land 292 380 476 & L Trail LUZERNE COUNTY 81 State Game Nescopeck Land 187 State Park State Game Land 119/187 80 L D State Game Land 119 ig eh h Ri v MONROE COUNTY nn uehan Susq White Haven State Game Land 40 80 Boulder Field Natural Area Hickory Run State Park State Game Land 129 Mud Run Natural Area er a River 80 State Game Land 149 COLUMBIA COUNTY Hazleton Greater Hazleton Rail-Trail Rockport Lehigh Gorge State Park 80 476 Lehigh Gorge State Park PENNSYLVANIA Beltzville State Park 80 CARBON COUNTY State Game Land 141 Jim Thorpe Le h Weissport r Rive igh Switchback Trail Mauch Chunk Lake Park 81 Lehighton Beltzville Lake Palmerton State Game Land 168 Jacobsburg State Park Plain eld Township Trail SCHUYLKILL COUNTY A c ala pp ail n Tr hi a Slate Heritage Trail Walnutport D & Slatington 476 State Game Land 217 NORTHAMPTON COUNTY Northampton Catasauqua Nor-Bath Trail LT rail Palmer Rail-Trail Easton h i gh Le e Riv Phillipsburg 78 LEHIGH COUNTY State Game Land 205 Trexler Game Preserve Ironton Rail-Trail r Raubsville Riegelsville Delaware Canal State Park Dela wa re Nockamixon Cliffs Natural Area Bethlehem Allentown 78 78 er Riv Tinicum Park Upper Black Eddy State Game Land 56 476 State Game Land 157 Nockamixon State Park Erwinna D & L Trail Legend Delaware & Lehigh Trail Appalachian Trail Other trail Interstate highway County border River City State park Public land LANCASTER COUNTY CHESTER COUNTY MONTGOMERY COUNTY 476 Lake Nockamixon Ralph Stover State Park Prahls Island BERKS COUNTY State Game Land 196 State Game Land 139 BUCKS COUNTY Peace Valley Delaware Canal Point Pleasant State Park Lumberville Centre Bridge NEW JERSEY New Hope Washington Crossing State Historic Park Washington Crossing 95 Trenton D Tyler State Park & Yardley ail Morrisville 95 Delaware Canal State Park Delaware Canal L T State Park r 276 76 276 Philadelphia 95 76 iver Dela are R w 276 ke 295 Bristol pi urn ey T Jers New 476 PHILADELPHIA COUNTY map of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor 4 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .

the Delaware. two public meetings were held. Attendees at the public meetings were generally positive about the plan and the sign designs. 2009. The public was invited to review and comment on the initial sign concepts and the framework plan for the wayfinding system. & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. Bristol Borough agreed to be the project sponsor for the purposes of receiving a planning grant from the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC). in Morrisville. During the development of the plan. The Landmark Towns Executive Committee provided project oversight and served as the stakeholder group with representatives from each town. Public Reaction Presentation of concepts to the Landmark Towns Committee. and the second meeting was held February 10. 2009. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 5 . Inc. Efforts were made on behalf of the Landmark Towns of Bucks County. Specific items of concern included: • Will the signs be resistant to graffiti? • Is long-term maintenance provided for? • Will more signs worsen sign clutter? • What locations within the boroughs should be signed? • Should the signs be illuminated? • Should the signs be created by local artists? Presentation of concepts to the Landmark Towns Committee. in Bristol Borough.P L a n n I n g Pro Ce s s The Committee issued a Request for Proposals and selected the consultant team. The first meeting was convened January 15.

such as billboards. This survey identified the following sign types: • PennDOT signs to guide travelers. Billboard (at I-95 and Route 413). • Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor signs to identify attractions. 6 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . • Local municipal signs. such as gateway signs. • State and County Parks signs to identify park entrances. • SEPTA signs to identify train stations and transit centers. • Private signs.e x I sT I ng s Ig n ag e A field survey of existing signs was undertaken in the towns and along major connecting routes. Historical Marker. that display advertising and commercial messages. Park Directional Sign.

Highway Directional Sign. D&L Interpretative Sign. SEPTA Station Directional Marker. State Park Sign. Borough Gateway Sign. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 7 . SEPTA Station Identification Sign.

e. to direct them to cities. It it is highly unlikely that motorists are able to read and understand so many signs while driving.” Guide signs include: • Route markers showing the numbered state highways and their cardinal direction (i. warning signs. For example. East. regulatory signs. to identify nearby rivers. proliferation of signs can lead to sign clutter. West) may confuse tourists. (see example to the right) intersections have adequate directional signs. turn restrictions. and the views of signs are often blocked by other signs. East. Tourist Oriented Directional Signs (generally with a blue background) are: “…Signs within State highway right-of-way to guide travelers to businesses. or other important destinations. North. • Some • A • Many (Right top) Highway exit sign on I-95. North.” Key Issues • Cardinal directions (i. the intersection of State Routes 179 and 32 in New Hope has a proliferation of signage.exiStiNg SigNage PennDOT Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) signs provide information and navigational directions to travelers. forests. West). villages. (Right bottom) Sign Clutter: In some locations. services. bridge weight limits. intersections require additional signs pointing to the nearby Landmark Towns. parks. 8 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . including route markers. towns. South. and historical sites. so supplementary signs pointing to the towns are necessary. From PennDOT’s Traffic Engineering Manual (Publication 46): “Guide signs are necessary to inform motorists of intersecting routes. streams. and destination signs among others. South. and generally to give such information as will help them along their way in the most simple. The signs also have the effect of cluttering the streetscape of the historic town. sign clutter is a problem. direct manner possible. and attractions in which the traveling public would have reasonable interest. especially in historic urban downtowns.e. parking regulations. • Directional signs pointing to municipalities on the state highway map.

The green sign at the top indicates the direction to the nearest towns on the State Highway Map.This is an “assemblage” of smaller individual sign pieces. This sign at a highway junction identifies the intersecting highway as Route 32. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 9 . which leads to New Hope. PennDOT has assigned the management of these signs to a new Pennsylvania Tourist Signing Trust. This sign points to the Starbucks coffee shop in Yardley and a local winery. and indicates which direction is north and which is south. In this case. These businesses have paid to have this sign created. Exits on interstate highways are sometimes marked with the nearest town. the off ramp from northbound I-95 leads to Taylorsville Road. while also taking up precious space on urban sidewalks. Yardley is actually closer to the exit than New Hope. this sign could be modified to include both Yardley and New Hope. therefore. Building larger signs from smaller components can result in a cluttered affect. reducing clarity and information transfer. Tourist oriented destination signs also appear along highways. However.

Park identification sign based on D&L standards.exiStiNg SigNage D&L trail map with brochure holder. Note damage at base from bending. D&L blade directional sign and map. 10 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . New Hope building-mounted sign based on D&L system. Pole-mounted directional sign in New Hope based on D&L system. Adjacent regulator signs provide information on park rules.

Pennsylvania (renamed Jim Thorpe to honor the famous athlete). Eckley Miners’ V illage Mon–Sat 9am– 5pm Sun 12am – 5pm Closed holidays.S. this yellow bricked structure replaced a building of a similar name built three years before. sign fabricators have resisted creating the cut-out shape of the D&L disc at the top of the sign.Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor (D&L) signs direct visitors to various attractions and destinations. railroad over five miles long linked the canal at Mauch Chunk with Panther Valley coal pockets. N o one can say for sur e why the gar goyle animal heads w ere added. two mountains west of Mauch Chunk. which has directional signs based on the D&L system. P erhaps it was to please one of the building’s original long-time tenants. Key Issues • The existing D&L system serves as a reference frame for a new signage system for the Landmark Towns. and as word spread about the rst roller coaster ride in the country. This change diminishes the visual identity and impact of the original sign design. The first B & B building was destroyed. Recently. Overland travel made the price of transporting hard coal too expensive. along with the rest of the southeast side of the street. in order to build on the identity of the existing corridor. Signs are in use along the Delaware Canal. or B reinig & B achman Building was a men ’s clothing store that occupied the gr ound floor for many years. E ckert. pedestrian blade signs. Frank B uckman House Weatherly Historic Site Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall END Switchback Railroad National Recreation Trail The first discovery of anthracite (hard coal) in America occurred at Summit Hill. Fabrication criteria are an issue. D&L sign system could be updated to take advantage of new sign production technology and a more complete family of sign products. monument signs. and interpretative signs. Mules strained to pull the coalladen cars uphill. • The Breinig & Bachman Building The B & B. Eventually. building-mounted directional signs. The original sign system includes pole-mounted vehicular directional signs. sign production technology has improved since the original D&L signs were made. as steam powered railroads assumed the task of delivering coal. B uilt in 1894. 1893. the Lehigh. including New Hope. However. This offers the potential to retool the signs for a richer content. instead recommending a sign with a straight top. so new railroad technology was used to transport coal to the nearest river. the wholesale grain and animal feed dealer G eorge W. as well as in several boroughs. including the Delaware Canal State Park. in a fir e on the night of O ctober 13. complements of gravity. vacationers replaced coal as the aging gravity lines primary cargo. enjoying a free ride back down. ex cept Memorial Day. trailblazers. The rst U. such as inclusion of historic photographs. July 4 and Labor D ay Easy Trail Grade 5% Ave 8% Max Cross Slope 3% Max Trail Width 48ß Min Partner’s Symbol Wallace Roberts & Todd with 11 . It was decided that the signs for the Landmark Towns should be related to the D&L family of signs.

and have limited visibility at night or under low light because they are not retro-reflective. • Wooden • Many • Standard A park entrance sign for Washington Crossing State Park is barely visible on the right side of the road. Existing park signs have small lettering that is difficult to read from a car. 12 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Some are similar in appearance to signs used by federal agencies such as the National Park Service and US Forest Service for parks and recreation areas. of the park signs are too small to be seen or read from a distance or a moving car. The parks and recreation areas are one of the draws for visitors to the area. usually made from wood. Existing park signs are brown. In some cases. instead of a family of sign types. who may make a visit to the towns a part of their itinerary. state historic markers offer a limited amount of interpretative information and are often placed where motorists and pedestrians cannot read them.exiStiNg SigNage State and County Parks Many State and County Parks signs line the roads that link the towns. Key Issues • A wide range of sign designs exist. signs require frequent maintenance. however. A sign in Delaware Canal State Park for the New Hope Mule Barge National Landmark—administered by the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. the park signs are of a custom format. The brown color can be difficult to see against the natural background.

particularly those painted in earth tones. The location next to the road suggests an orientation to motorists. The lettering on this particular sign is peeling off and should be replaced. are difficult for motorists to see.Conventional historical markers within the Landmark Towns offer limited formats for interpretation. Park entrance sign for Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve. Larger lettering increases visibility. An adjacent real estate sign competes for attention. A sign for the boat launch in Yardley uses bright colors. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 13 . Small signs such as this. A directional sign pointing to Bowman’s Hill Tower is barely visible in this photograph. but the speed of travel would prevent anyone reading the sign.

This board on the platform at the Bristol rail station has a paper version of the schedule (in one direction). some cases.exiStiNg SigNage Existing Transit Two of the Landmark Towns. Existing information signage at rail stations is often minimal. such as sidewalk connections. Yardley and Bristol. but no information on the local town or connecting transit services for arriving passengers. signs leading travelers to the station are needed. • Additional • Stations • In could express a greater “theme” of the local town. have rail stations. • Pedestrian • Schedule information could be enhanced. Morrisville and Bristol. Key Issues • Stations have little or no information about the local town or nearby tourist activities. 14 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Passengers arrive at Bristol Borough’s regional rail station. and two. pedestrian infrastructure. maps and signs for navigating upon arrival are absent. are needed. have local bus services.

The platform at the Bristol Borough train station offers an excellent view of the adjacent park and historic mill. Sign for the Yardley SEPTA Regional Rail station. A limited number of directional signs such as this one in Yardley guide motorists and pedestrians to regional rail stations. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 15 . However. Platform sign in Yardley. A directional sign points travelers to the correct platform. An attractive mural at the Yardley train station improves the perception of the pedestrian underpass. the station lacks adequate sidewalks and signage to reach the tunnel from the outbound platform. This location should also have signs for visitors directing them to downtown. Signs are needed to direct visitors to the downtown from the station.

due to the presence of billboards and a variety of competing sign messages and complicated navigation. from US 13 and US 1 in Bristol and Morrisville need enhancement. Generally. adjacency of Bristol Township and Bristol Borough can lead to confusion for travelers and is a challenge to address. Each municipality has individual gateway signs. and custom signs designed and installed by each borough. A stronger gateway is needed to mark the downtown district at the actual urban threshold. of the towns have a wide variety of sign styles within the same town. such as parking identification. • Existing • Gateways • The New Hope gateway signs were made by a local artisan. Hope’s signs reflect a preference for local artisanship. Key Issues • Each • New • Most town currently has a unique sign style for gateways. gateway signage is usually located near the municipal boundary. • Useful 16 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .exiStiNg SigNage Municipal Signs and Gateways Municipal Signs are installed by a local community and include entry signs and monuments that provide direction to motorists and pedestrians. could be standardized throughout the towns. signs. but there are often few other visual cues in these locations to create a sense of arrival for travelers. There are two types of markers—the standard highway signs that mark the municipal limits. reflecting the wide range of dates of installation. the location of gateway signs is at the edge of town as opposed to a location that marks a clear boundary or threshold to the historic downtown area.

The presence of prominent gateway signage in Bristol Township could create confusion for visitors. The railroad underpass has gateway signage.Bristol Borough Gateway signs have been installed in selected locations in Bristol Borough. It is recommended that wayfinding signs be used in this location. and the aesthetics of the underpass improved. however. Wayfinding signage pointing to downtown Bristol Borough and the Delaware riverfront is needed at intersections along US Highway 13. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 17 . this may not create the desired impression for visitors. but the primary gateway signage should be closer to downtown. It is recommended that additional signs mark the thresholds of the downtown. in order to signal to visitors that they have arrived.

exiStiNg SigNage Morrisville Yardley Morrisville is installing new gateway signs. Monument signs in Morrisville should be replaced with newer and more attractive signs. two signs are installed close together. Here. and vines obscure the PennDOT sign. Existing gateway signage in Yardley is inconsistent. An existing gateway sign in Yardley. 18 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .

Use of multi-space meters would reduce sidewalk clutter. Existing PennDOT signage in New Hope. This parking lot in New Hope has an eye-catching sign and uses multi-space meters. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 19 . Note: pennDOt has not approved multi-space meters for on-street parking.New Hope Existing New Hope gateway signs are attractive and were carved by a local artist.

the byway will be marked by the official state signs and shown on state byway maps.P roP o s e d s Ce n I C b y w ay With assistance from the Heritage Conservancy. cultural. and also extend down local roads to Bristol Borough. Yardley. which connects New Hope. The byway will follow Pennsylvania Route 611 & 32. the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor has been leading an effort to create a new Pennsylvania Scenic Byway that would connect the Landmark Towns. byway map 20 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Once established. and Morrisville. and historic properties. In order to establish the byway: • The route must have intrinsic scenic. • Each municipality along the byway must have a sign control ordinance.

The proposed scenic byway would connect the historical and cultural sites along the Delaware River. promote tourism. The goal of this program is to recognize and promote outstanding corridors throughout the United States. (Right) The Federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) created the National Scenic Byways Program.(Above) Yardley railroad bridge over the Delaware River. and protect the resources that make these hidden treasures outstanding. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 21 . south of Yardley Borough.

New York City and North Jersey offers a prime market for attracting tourists. According to market research commissioned by the Bucks County Conference and Visitors Bureau (BCCVB). • Countryside: The countryside of the towns offers the chance to explore. etc. horseback riding. • Providing directions and maps on the website. boating. These types of travel articles whet the appetite for a visit. • Shopping: Where can visitors find great gifts or unique shopping experiences? 22 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Also market restaurants that offer good people watching or scenery. An excellent case study is the “Three Perfect Days” series offered by the United Airlines in-flight magazine. Hemispheres. • Working with third party web applications such as Google Maps and Panoramio to spatially locate attractions on web map services. • Eating: Provide suggestions for where to eat for a variety of cuisines. The BCCVB has placed award-winning ads within trains and stations in New York. such as bicycling. Link sites that are outside of town (such as covered bridges) to an overall itinerary that includes both urban and rural sites. a comprehensive/Internet strategy will help with encouraging people to visit and with wayfinding. Sample Itineraries An itinerary is a sequence of events and activities for a visitor. • Lodging: Where can people stay to get the Landmark Towns experience? • Architecture: Provide descriptions of the architectural highlights of the towns. Offer specifics for where to rent equipment and get service. Steps could include: • Working with partners to ensure the Landmark Towns are represented on larger tourism-related sites in the region. and then return downtown for eating and relaxing. • Creating a web site tailored to visitors with rich media content and suggested activities. and back this up with collateral materials upon arrival. It is recommended that the Landmark Towns create itineraries to suggest what visitors can experience.m a rke T I ng To V I s ITo rs Web Strategy Many visitors will begin their travel research on the Internet. Therefore. For example: • Recreation: Provide a wide variety of recreation suggestions. while providing a starting point for planning an interesting trip.

COM to plan your weekend escape today! BUCKS ON YOUR MIND? Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY.COM to plan your family getaway today! Tubing on the Delaware River Award winning ads produced for the New York tourist market by the Bucks County Conference and Visitors Bureau.COM to plan your storybook getaway today! Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY.BUCKS ON YOUR MIND? BUCKS O N Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve YOUR M IND ? Fonthill Museum Go to VISITBUCKSCOUNTY. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 23 Bucks County Conference & Visitors Bureau .

When State Route 32 is designated a scenic byway. but should use the available sign types to communicate directions to the towns. In some cases. and existing signs could be consolidated.h I g h w ay w ayf I n dI n g s Ig n s PennDOT Sign Strategy The overall recommendation for PennDOT signage is to ensure that key intersections on the way to the towns are marked with destination arrows and information. they could be added. 24 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . It is recommended that intersections along primary routes to the Landmark Towns should be marked with destination signs and distance signs to improve navigation. (Right) The existing signs at the intersection of State Routes 532 and 32 indicate cardinal directions (e. At intersections where destination signs are not present. it may also be desirable to apply for “experimental” status under the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices to test alternative sign configurations. An example is shown on the facing page at the intersection of State Route 532 with 32. The addition of directional signage pointing to Yardley and New Hope will help motorists navigate—especially tourists who may not have a sense of whether to head north or south.g. North and South) but don’t point to the Landmark Towns. appropriate signage should be added to trailblazers and route markers. Signs should follow PennDOT standards.

New Hope Easton 8 43 Yardley New Hope 8 4 Yardley Morrisville New Hope Yardley Morrisville New Hope 8 4 8 Pennsylvania BYWAY Pennsylvania BYWAY Pennsylvania SOUTH Yardley New Hope WEST Bicycle PA Yardley 4 SOUTH New Hope NORTH 32 Morrisville 8Yardley Easton 32 Bristol Boro. 19 These diagrams represent potential options for consolidating existing signs and adding directions to the Landmark Towns. 19 4 8 8 8 SOUTH 43 Yardley BYWAY Morrisville 32 WEST Bicycle PA NORTH 32 NORTH New Hope WEST Bicycle PA New Hope Route S Route S Route S and PA 32 Conceptual sign designs that provide directions to the Landmark Towns in addition to route markers. Wallace Roberts & Todd with Landmark Towns of Bucks Wayfinding Signage February 2009 25 . Any and all changes would be subject to PennDOT approval.Yardley 4 Morrisville 8 Bristol Boro.

motorist Decision points map 26 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .

Existing signage points to town. Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32.) 5 PA 232/PA 32 (Windy Bush Rd. Consider using the park and ride as a trailhead for the Delaware Canal Towpath. 3 PA 179/PA 32 (Bridge St. Yardley. # 1 2 Intersection US 202/PA 32 US 202/PA 179 (Lower York Road/W Bridge St.) Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope. it would be beneficial to simplify the interchange design to a double roundabout on NJ 29. I-95/NJ 29 Install directional signs on PA 32 to I-95 and Delaware Canal Towpath. 6 PA 32 7 PA 532/Taylorsville Rd. Include Yardley on PennDOT exit signage for Exit 51 Northbound (currently only lists New Hope). 4 NJ 179/NJ 29 (Bridge St. 9 10 Mercer County 536/NJ 29 I-95/Taylorsville Rd. Consolidate signage. Washington Crossing. Ensure that the new pedestrian bridge. Yardley.) Recommendations Existing signage points to town. This interchange is highly complicated. A map of key intersections on the regional arterial and highway system is shown on the facing page.) Attempt to reduce sign clutter in this location through design treatments and removal of extraneous signs. General Recommendation: Along Pennsylvania Route 32 and the proposed scenic byway. Install directional guide signs leading to PA 32 via Woodside Rd. Some key intersections are located in New Jersey and would require coordination with New Jersey Department of Transportation. Morrisville. /Taylorsville Rd./ River Rd. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 27 . Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope. If the opportunity emerges. Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32. Yardley. (Washington Crossing Rd. Install distance plaques on Taylorsville Rd. when constructed. listing distance to Landmark Towns. Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to Washington Crossing. Delaware Canal Path. Washington Crossing. directional signs should be installed at each intersection pointing in the direction of the nearest Landmark Towns. Existing signage points to town.H ig H way wayF i N Di Ng S ig N S Key Intersections and Decision Points “Decision points” are locations where travelers make turns on the way to and from the Landmark Towns. These locations are important for wayfinding information. Existing signage points to town. Install distance plaques to Landmark Towns on PA 32. has guide signs to the canal towpaths. Install PennDOT directional signs pointing to New Hope./Main St. 11 12 PA 32/Woodside Rd. 8 PA 532/ PA 32 (General Washington Memorial Blvd./Main St. I-95./S Main St.

Install distance plaque to Levittown. It is currently signed as Pennsylvania Avenue. and Downtown Morrisville (Southbound via Yardley Morrisville Road). Install directional signs to Yardley. Compact trailblazer signs to PA 32. (W Afton Ave. Install distance plaque to Yardley on Pine Grove Road. Tullytown. Install directional signs pointing to New Hope and Morrisville. Potential location for a roundabout which would establish a gateway./Yardley Morrisville Rd. Compact trailblazer signs to I-95. Bristol.e. Directional signs to Yardley/New Hope. Install trailblazer to I-95./N Delmorr Ave. Morrisville. Existing signage points to town. 14 Main St. Directional signs to Morrisville./W Trenton Ave. Install directional signs pointing to downtown Yardley and Canal Towpath. Bridge NJ 29/Calhoun St. Existing directional signs on NB US 1 point towards Morrisville via PA 32. Mark Northbound US 1 exit for Pennsylvania Ave. and Bristol on Southbound US 13. Existing signage points to town./Calhoun St./Afton Ave. (PA 32) 25 PA 32/E Trenton Ave. New Hope. as an exit for Morrisville-Pennsylvania Avenue. Bristol. Investigate building a roundabout (which might also reduce traffic congestion). Yardley – straight ahead) Existing interchange design is overly complicated and could be a candidate for rebuilding with roundabouts (if the opportunity ever emerged). 23 24 PA 32/Pennsylvania Ave. Consider directional sign on US 13 Northbound pointing to Yardley (i.) Install directional sign to Yardley. 16 17 18 I-95/PA 332 (Exit 49) I-95/US 1 US 1/US 13 19 20 Pine Grove Rd. Directional signs to Delaware Canal Towpath. Existing exit signage on NJ 29 points towards Morrisville. 15 PA 332/Schuyler Rd. 26 28 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Directional sign pointing to Yardley and New Hope. Pine Grove Rd. (Morrisville) E Bridge St. Recommendations Install stop sign on PA 32. Directional signs to follow byway (when established).# 13 Intersection PA 32/E Afton Ave. Install distance plaques to New Hope and Morrisville./Yardley Newtown Rd. Existing signs point to Yardley. Yardley. 21 22 US 1/PA 32 US 1/Pennsylvania Ave. Byway directional signs in the future. and Morrisville.

change overhead signage to indicate Bristol Borough is center lane. Remove billboards on both sides of the railroad overpass which greatly detract from directional signage and make navigation difficult. Install compact trailblazers to I-95 On US 13 Southbound. Install pavement markings on PA 413 pointing to Bristol Borough from left lane. using the jug-handle. Existing signage points to town. Assuming streetscape project on Bristol Pike is completed.) Install directional signs to Bristol Borough and Morrisville. Tyburn Rd. 36 37 Old Bristol Pike/Main Street US 13/Bath Rd. Existing signage points to town./New Ford Mill Rd. Improve directional signs to Bristol at intersection and through the traffic circle leading to the bridge. Otter St. Bristol Borough. On PA 413 Southbound./Tyburn Rd. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 29 . 29 30 31 32 33 New Ford Mill Rd. Install lighting under the railroad bridge. and Yardley. Investigate building a roundabout. 38 39 40 Turnpike exit 358 Turnpike off-ramp/US 13 US 130/PA 413 Existing signage points to town. direct motorists to downtown Bristol via Bath Street. Consider simplifying this intersection (removing jug-handles). non-intuitive “jug-handles./Old Bristol Pike Directional sign to Bristol Borough. Existing signage points to town. Install distance plaques. install a directional sign to Bristol Borough indicating that motorists must proceed through the intersection. Study redesigning and simplifying this very confusing intersection. Install directional signs to Bristol Borough and Morrisville. I-95 Southbound/PA 413 I-95 Northbound/PA 413 I-95 Ramps/PA 413 PA 413/US 13 (Bristol Bypass/New Rodgers Rd. Remove most of the signage on the Amtrak/SEPTA railroad overpass. In the place of existing commercial billboards and gateway signage. commission a new art “portal” at the overpass (potentially working with the Burlington-Bristol Bridge Commission). provide directional signage to Downtown Bristol Borough guiding motorists from Otter St. which has no left-turns on US 13 and complicated.” On US 13 Southbound. onto Old Bristol Pike./Bordentown Rd.# 27 28 Intersection S Pennsylvania Ave. Existing signage points to town. 34 35 PA 413/Otter St. Recommendations Install directional signs to Morrisville.

• If the intersection configuration allows for it. a directional sign should indicate which direction to turn in order to reach the nearest towns. or name signs for other routes. • When possible. This helps the drivers confirm that they are on the right route. These signs help the motorist prepare to select the right direction and prepare to turn when necessary. another sign with directions can be placed at the intersection. compact formats may be an option. Route markers should be used for state routes. • A distance sign indicating the distance to up to three towns should be installed within 300 feet to help drivers confirm that they are traveling in the right direction and help them estimate the time until they reach the destination. Sign at the intersection of PA 232 and PA 32. See the report section on reducing sign clutter for further discussion on compact sign forms. 30 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . • After the driver passes the intersection.H ig H way wayF i N Di Ng S ig N S Sign Plans for Intersections At a typical intersection on a major road leading to the Landmark Towns. directional signs are located at about 400 feet in advance of the turn. on the far side. the signs described above can be combined into assemblies or consolidated sign faces to reduce clutter. In urban areas. • At a distance of about 200 feet from the intersection. the following sings would be used to aid navigation (a typical diagram in on the next page): • As the driver approaches the intersection. a trailblazer sign with the name and direction of the route should be placed within 200 feet.

Typical Existing Sign Plan Typical Existing Sign Plan typical existing Sign plan SOUTH SR 32 N MAIN ST 232 SOUTH 232 NORTH SOUTH SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD 32 32 YIELD TO PEDS IN CROSSWALK END JCT PROHIBITED 102” TWINS 102” TRAILERS OVER 28 ½ FT NORTH ON RTE 32 NORTH SOUTH 232 32 LAMBERTVILLE STATION MONDAY 6:30 PM 32 32 6 LUMBERVILLE WASHINGTON CROSSING 6 SOUTH 32 LUMBERVILLE 6 RICHBORO 7 NOISE ORDINANCE STRICTLY ENFORCED SOUTH NOT TO SCALE SR 32 RIVER ROAD 232 Typical Revised Sign Plan Typical Revised Sign Plan SOUTH SR 32 N MAIN ST typical revised Sign plan 232 RICHBORO 7 YARDLEY 11 NORTH 32 NEW HOPE 1 EASTON 36 SOUTH 232 SR 232 WINDY BUSH ROAD Pennsylvania BYWAY NORTH New Hope 32 SOUTH Yardley END JCT Pennsylvania 232 32 LAMBERTVILLE STATION MONDAY 6:30 PM NOISE ORDINANCE STRICTLY ENFORCED PROHIBITED 102” TWINS 102” TRAILERS OVER 28 ½ FT NORTH ON RTE 32 BYWAY NORTH SOUTH 32 SOUTH NEW HOPE LUMBERVILLE WASHINGTON CROSSING 6 32 1 6 LUMBERVILLE 6 RICHBORO 7 WASHINGTON CROSSING 7 YARDLEY 11 MORRISVILLE 15 SOUTH NOT TO SCALE Optional SR 32 RIVER ROAD 232 Wallace Roberts & Todd with 31 .

Having too many signs reduces the transfer of information and creates an unattractive public realm. Recommendations for reducing sign clutter: • Audit the signage in towns to identify signs which are obsolete. (Above) Philadelphia uses compact trailblazers and routemarkers on some street signs on arterial roads. SOUTH NORTH SOUTH 179 179 179 N BRIDGE 179 1 N S 1 ST SN BRIDGE 179 1 N S 1 ST S (Above) In some locations it is worth looking at alternative sign types. This method is worth exploring for the urban areas of the Landmark Towns. • Consolidate signs to reduce the total number on the street. connecting US 202 to the New Hope/Lambertville Bridge.H ig H way wayF i N Di Ng S ig N S Reducing Sign Clutter Sign clutter is the proliferation of signs (both public and private). not effective. in order to reduce sign clutter. Compact signs may be appropriate for tight urban intersections. and which can be consolidated or removed. • Consider annotating street signs with highway designations for clarity and compactness. 32 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . State Route 179 is only one mile long. • Use smaller and more compact versions of signs when possible.

Too many signs decreases the usefulness of each sign. This photo from New Hope is typical of the sign clutter present at the intersection of Routes 179 and 32. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 33 . A sign audit may allow for removing redundant or confusing signs and installing more compact wayfinding signs. Sign clutter can be caused by both official and commercial signs. as the viewer will have trouble sorting out the information.(Above) Sign clutter is the proliferation of signs.

which leads to all of Bristol Borough’s destinations and attractions along the Delaware riverfront. A gateway is proposed at this intersection of Radcliffe Street and Green Lane.aCCe s s rouT e s & de sT I n aT I o n s Bristol Borough Potential Destination Signs for Bristol Borough (Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right): Basin Park/Canal’s End Borough Hall Bristol Cultural and Historical Foundation Delaware Canal State Park Downtown Shops Grundy Ice Rink Grundy Library & Museum Municipal Recreation Fields Police Station Public Parking Lots Public Restrooms Riverboat Dock Riverside Theater b r iStOL bOrOugH SEPTA Station Waterfront A view down Mill Street. 34 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Vehicular traffic from Interstate 276 (PA Turnpike) would be directed to Bristol Borough’s waterfront attractions through this gateway.

bristol borough access routes Wallace Roberts & Todd with 35 .

A significant amount of vehicular traffic driving to and through Morrisville converges at this intersection at Pennsylvania and Bridge Street. Wayfinding and orientation elements here would serve a diverse audience. a plaza commemorates Robert Morris. Wayfinding signage will increase the visibilty and cohesion of this district along this well-travelled road. 36 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . in the heart of the downtown shopping district. after whom the town was named. the East Coast Greenway along the Delaware Canal passes through nearby. Also. and buildings representing generations of development. Here.aC C e S S r O u t e S & D e S t i N at i O N S Morrisville Potential Destination Signs for Morrisville (Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right): (Future Train Station if constructed) Borough Hall Delaware Canal Towpath Downtown Shopping Falls of the Delaware Morrisville Free Library Graystone Preserve Heritage Center Theater mOrriSviLLe Police Station Public Parking Summerseat House The Levy Walk Trenton Makes Bridge Williamson Park The downtown shopping district of Morrisville offers tree-lined streets with streetside metered parking.

Br id ge St morrisville access routes Wallace Roberts & Todd with 37 .

but also identify and unify this charming town center.aC C e S S r O u t e S & D e S t i N at i O N S Yardley Potential Destination Signs for Yardley (Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right): Borough Hall Buttonwood Park/Tot Lot Delaware Canal Towpath Downtown Shopping Lake Afton Old Library by Lake Afton Police Station ya r D Ley Public Parking SEPTA Station Underground Railroad sites Approaching the northern end of the downtown district at West Afton Avenue as viewed from Main Street. Wayfinding elements in this area will not only help visitors navigate. 38 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Existing streetscape elements in Yardley’s downtown shopping district on Main Street.

yardley access routes Wallace Roberts & Todd with 39 .

40 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Approaching New Hope Station.aC C e S S r O u t e S & D e S t i N at i O N S New Hope Potential Destination Signs for New Hope (Corresponds to “Points of Interest” in map at right): New HOpe Borough Hall Bucks County Playhouse Delaware Canal Boat Co./Friends of the Delaware Canal Delaware Canal Towpath Downtown Shopping Ferry Landing Park Lenape Park Library Mill Pond New Hope & Ivyland Railroad New Hope Arts Center Parry Mansion Museum Police Station/Borough Hall Public Parking Visitors’ Center Sign clutter caused by directional and commercial signage in the downtown shopping district of New Hope. Wayfinding elements would enhance the identity of this historic site as it relates to New Hope’s other attractions. a regional destination at the end of the line of the New Hope/Ivyland Railroad.

New Hope access routes Wallace Roberts & Todd with 41 .

with distance markers. Improve the visibility of mile markers to help travelers gauge distances and to help with trip planning. Reach out to the bicycling community and through outlets targeted at families and recreational riders. etc. etc.g. In addition. these trailheads may already exist. A map board of the town with locations of interest. • Market the canal path as a reason to visit the towns. such as organized rides and festivals. taxis. 42 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Suggested itineraries should include stopovers for lunch or shopping. • The East Coast Greenway should figure prominently into plans for Bristol Borough and Morrisville. the East Coast Greenway will pass through Bristol Borough and Morrisville. Each trailhead should provide: - • Use a mileage system on the towpath to identify distances between towns. Key recommendations for the bicycle system include: • Trailheads should be established for the Delaware Canal towpath in each town at strategic locations offering good access to the business district.b I C yCLe w ayf I n d I ng sTraT e g y The Delaware Canal towpath offers a very strong potential bicycle connection among the four Landmark Towns. but even existing trailheads can be enhanced. museums and attractions. Racks for brochures and maps. In some locations. Distance information to destinations along the path. • Investigate sponsoring one-way bicycle rental capabilities (through vendors) with shuttle-back systems (similar to canoe rentals). provide an opportunity to encourage tourism and celebrate bicycling. such as the visitor center. • The towns should make plans for “complete streets” policies to build out the local bicycle infrastructure. Bicyclist on the Delaware Canal Towpath. A sign along the towpath in New Hope directs travelers to a local restaurant. • Events and programming.). • At trailheads and road crossings the towpath should have directional signage pointing to the towns. emergency services. town information. bicycle shops. - - • Create strong bicycle and pedestrian access routes to the towpath. The Landmark Towns are also on state bicycle routes E and S. to provide an attraction along this national trail. • Work with SEPTA to improve bicycle access on Regional Rail. Bicycle parking. Relevant telephone numbers (e.

The map should show the relationship of the station to the destinations within the town. and improve access for residents and employees. and Bristol Borough should explore the potential for a seasonal shuttle bus connecting the towns to promote waterfront tourism. A typical station-area map in the Tokyo subway provides information about the local area and directional signs. Seamless Regional Transit Access: an Evaluation of New Intersate Links and Connectors. • Each bus stop should have the schedule for the bus line posted. police. DVRPC recommends the following: • The estimated costs and ridership of providing bus service between Trenton and New Hope/Lambertville are not favorable as compared to existing subsidy rates for transit in the region. and a map of the route. Signing for Rail and Bus Stations The general strategy for public transportation is to improve wayfinding for travelers arriving by train or bus. Should the Landmark Towns be Connected by Shuttle Bus? The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission studied the potential of new transit services to the Landmark Towns in a 2008 report. at an intersection) and at a distance of approximately every 300 feet.Pu b LIC Tran s Po rTaT I o n sT r aT e g y Public transportation can help to increase visitation. New Hope is served by intercity buses (Trans-Bridge Lines). • Signs within the town should direct motorists and pedestrians to the rail station. etc. out to a radius of approximately mile.g. borough services. Yardley. such as taxis. • Burlington. reduce parking demand. Based on those estimates. • The map board should also provide key telephone numbers. Basic steps include the following: • Each rail station should have a map board of the town on the platform. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 43 . and Morrisville). The SEPTA R7 Regional Rail train stops at Bristol Borough. The Burlington-Bristol Bridge Commission could be a partner. the service is probably not financially feasible. • Each station should have a map showing the location of bus stops and a route map showing key destinations. Three of the towns are served by SEPTA (Bristol Borough. wherever a change of direction is required (e. New Jersey. Extending existing New Jersey Transit service across the bridge is unlikely to be feasible because of the required subsidies. • Wayfinding directional signs should be installed on streets leading from the rail station.

Modifying the existing routes to create an overlapping circulator pattern that runs more frequently should be studied. Each route offers limited service (most routes running every hour or less). 44 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .existing transit routes This map shows existing bus routes in Bristol Borough.

downtown. the lines could be combined onto one alignment through Bristol (where possible). Artistic lighting and murals would be one approach. (Bottom) The connection between the regional rail station and downtown Bristol should be strengthened. 304. Each route uses different streets in Bristol. 129. and the waterfront. (Center) The tunnel at Bristol regional rail station should be improved to appear more attractive to visitors. All the routes serve the train station except Route 128. with only a few short stretches of overlap.p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i O N S t r at e g y Bristol Transit Strategy • Bristol is served by four bus routes: SEPTA 128. • Information on train access can be provided through the Landmark Towns website and coordinated marketing efforts. signage at the station and leading to and from the train station should be improved. and TMA Bucks Rush Bus. • Instead of following different street routings. (Top) The RUSH bus is a service of TMA Bucks and offers a shuttle to major employers in Bristol Borough during commuting hours. • As described above. with schedules staggered to produce more frequent service between the train station. • Bristol could also apply for supplemental funding to transform the Rush Bus into an all-day circulator line. including installation of maps at the rail station. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 45 .

• Morrisville bus service could be improved through operation of a shuttle from Trenton to make a stronger connection to office workers across the river and to the intermodal train station. It is possible that the track switches along Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor (in railroad terminology. 46 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan http://local.p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i O N S t r at e g y Morrisville Transit Strategy • Morrisville should seek to have a rail station constructed that would serve downtown and provide access to both SEPTA and New Jersey Transit trains. A first step is a feasibility study. known as “the interlocking”) in Morrisville would need to be reconfigured. Potential location for Morrisville station.live.com .

This will help to improve the arrival experience in the town. • Yardley should work with SEPTA to plan development at the train station. a coffee shop) and possibly new development with structured parking. • Yardley should seek to build a sidewalk connection from the train station to the Delaware Canal State Park and to the riverfront at the Yardley Bridge. signage at the train should be improved. A dirt path is worn through the grass at Yardley station. in particular to connect to the northbound (outbound) platform. Yardley station.g. • Yardley should pursue enhancements to the sidewalks leading to the train station.p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i O N S t r at e g y Yardley Transit Strategy • As described above. The SEPTA R3 Regional Rail train stops at Yardley. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 47 . as well as signs leading to and from the train station. which could include elements such as a station building with retail amenities (e. including a new map board. indicating the need for a new pedestrian sidewalk to the underpass. • Yardley should work with SEPTA to construct improved sidewalk connections to the pedestrian underpass.

• Locate the intercity bus/charter bus facility in proximity to the rail station to create potential intermodal connections in the future.g. It may also help to facilitate charter bus operations. including in New Jersey. improvements are possible. This will allow for marketing New Hope as a destination for urban residents (e. some rural rail lines that had been abandoned are being reopened using low-cost diesel trains.p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i O N S t r at e g y New Hope Transit Strategy While New Hope does not have much public transportation today. The total cost of the project. however. In Germany. 48 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .000. Recommendations include: • Seek to build a high quality bus facility for intercity coach service. • Seek to implement a public transit connection to Doylestown to connect to the SEPTA network. including stations and crossings. was relatively high. and the same line in 2005. New York) who may not own a car. Could the New Hope train station one day be an intermodal facility serving intercity buses and regional trains? Diesel light rail has also been developed in North America. due to a large amount of infrastructure investment. The River Line runs 34 miles between Camden and Trenton. At left is a rural line in 1990. was less than 23 million dollars. with an average daily ridership greater than 9. Fourteen miles of track were reclaimed from nature. • Explore the potential for rail service connecting to SEPTA in Warminster based on successful models and precedents for low cost diesel shuttles. The cost of this line.

offering a one seat ride to New York. However. New Jersey Transit) to facilitate access to the Landmark Towns). • Morrisville could be served by a new station. • Shuttle bus connections from rail stations to downtowns. New Hope has a rail track connection to the SEPTA network. The Landmark Towns would benefit from the following “big picture” strategies to improve access to the regional rail network: • Joint ticketing among rail carriers (Amtrak. At the present time. several possibilities exist for future service: • The R3 (West Trenton) line could be extended to Newark/ Hoboken. As mentioned previously. In many cases. and SEPTA at Trenton. restoring a route that was terminated in the 1980s. with a common website for trip planning to facilitate accessing the towns. which was considered when New Jersey Transit took over Amtrak’s “Clocker” commuter runs or by a coordinated connection between Amtrak. New Jersey Transit.p u b L i C t r a N S p O rtat i O N S t r at e g y Rail Service to the Landmark Towns All of the Landmark Towns are on the border with New Jersey. This rail line could be used for a shuttle connection. following a low-cost approach used in other locations. which could host both SEPTA and New Jersey Transit trains. bi-state cooperation will be required to improve public transportation and rail access. SEPTA. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 49 . none of the towns enjoys direct (oneseat ride) rail service from New York and the Northern New Jersey markets. • Bristol Borough could be served by an extension of New Jersey Transit service to Philadelphia on the R7 line. • Joint marketing and mapping among carriers. • Coordination of planning on the Northeast Corridor to serve new travel markets.

s a m PL e Jou r n eys 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 2 3 4 5 50 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .

Item # 1 2 3 < < > > > > > > < < > < < > < < > < < < < Description Welcome to Yardley Old Library Lake Afton Delaware River Canal Path Shopping Train Station Police Playground Borough Hall Parking To I-95 Delaware River Canal Path Train Station Shopping Train Station Delaware Canal Lake Afton Old Library Police Playground 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Wallace Roberts & Todd with 51 .Vehicular Journey in Yardley This diagram and sign description table lists the signs that a visitor arriving by car would encounter on the way to downtown Yardley.

SampLe jOurNeyS Proposed Trail To Downtown Yardley To Delaware Canal Towpath/ Delaware River 8 7 6 New Sidewalk Needed 9 New Sidewalk Needed 5 4 10 SEPTA Station 3 New Sidewalk Needed 2 1 52 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .

Item # 1 < < < < Description Local Area Map Train Schedule Board Cross-under to Outbound Trains Downtown Yardley Delaware Canal Towpath Delaware River Cross-under to inbound trains Downtown Yardley Delaware Canal Towpath Delaware River Delaware Canal Towpath Delaware River Downtown Delaware Canal Towpath (requires proposed trail connection) Delaware River Delaware Canal Towpath Delaware River SEPTA station Downtown Yardley Station Identification Sign > > Trains to Philadelphia Trains to West Trenton Downtown Delaware Canal Towpath Trains to Philadelphia Trains to West Trenton Local Area Map Train Schedule Board > > > Crossover to Outbound Trains Downtown Delaware Canal Towpath Wallace Roberts & Todd with (requires proposed trail connection) (requires proposed trail connection) 2 < < < < 3 4 > > > > > > < > > < > >> 5 6 7 8 9 10 53 .Transit/Bicycle Sample Journey This diagram and sign description table lists the signs that a visitor arriving by train with or without a bicycle would encounter on the way to downtown Yardley.

54 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .L a n d m ar k Tow n s w ayf I n dI n g s I g n sy sT e m New Hope LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC A double post gateway sign is shown within a planting bed at a location that visitors perceive as the edge of town.

These tools are intended to assist and enhance the towns. supporting typefonts and color as specified in the “Visually Speaking” guidelines. but by imagining a few of the most common sequences of movement. These are intended to introduce visitors to the The Landmark Towns of Bucks County and convey a richer level of information about destinations and services. this approach imagines a series of typical users and their needs. and elevate the entire region as a vital and exciting place for people to live. The signage system should play an important role in raising public awareness about the Landmark Towns of Bucks County and the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. residents and workers are as varied as the individuals. balancing clarity and effectiveness with brand/ identity. Of course. work and play. including logotype. clear and consistent information to assist them in their journey they will regard that place as enlightened and truly welcoming.The Sign Plan People are natural pathfinders. The sign drawings presented in this plan are at a schematic level of development. if you can provide them with simple. This system also includes orientation/information kiosks with maps and interpretive content. Landmark Towns of Bucks County name and four town names: Morrisville. the actual trajectories of visitors. identification or interpretive signage. It is intended as a toolbox to draw from as each partner defines individual goals and objectives. • Review and define branding recommendations for the expanded signage & wayfinding system. Included are some interpretive recommendations that supplement the existing Delaware & Lehigh system. The signage plan provides for visitor information through vehicular and pedestrian direction. tighten the connections between towns and the Delaware & Lehigh experience. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 55 . Bristol Borough and New Hope. Goals & Recommendations • Create an expanded set of identity standards for the consistent use and application of the D&L logotype. it is possible to develop a system that will serve many people efficiently and conveniently. A Comprehensive System The comprehensive wayfinding and sign system that follows has emerged from a user scenario approach. Yardley. site and destination identification. These recommendations should form the basis for the development of a comprehensive set of design guidelines. A consistent graphic language that establishes visual continuity throughout the system should be developed. Whether directional. we had to imagine their destinations. directions and critical decision points. Phase II of this project will involve further design development and specifications of these products. transit identification and information. In the case of motorists. This plan presents a framework for a comprehensive system of tools that each town can utilize within its own town limits while connecting to the greater D&L system and network. • Develop schematic signage recommendations for an expanded D&L system that embraces and supports the goals of the Landmark Towns Initiative. In general a strong but understated look is recommended. auto-tour pathfinders. • Build on the existing Delaware & Lehigh system. orientation maps and hiking and bicycling trail signs.

The goal is to provide the appropriate level of recognition for each of these entities in a location. shape and design and using the two together throughout the new system would result in lowered brand recognition for each organization.L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Identity. medallions & seals in use for the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor and Landmark Towns of Buck County. mostly circular in format and design. clarity and connection for the visitor. promotional and educational message needs that are not currently part of the scope of this project. Analysis The study began with an analysis of the existing identities. are being considered for use on select signs located within each town. Branding and Color This is a limited planning survey of identity standards required for the successful design and implementation of a signage and wayfinding system for the four Landmark Towns of Bucks County. individual town seals. In addition. Bristol Borough Bristol Borough New Hope New Hope 56 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . It is understood that the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor and the Landmark Towns Initiative have a much broader array of marketing. sequence and hierarchy that provides understanding. It quickly became clear that the existing circular identities for the D&L and Landmark Towns were similar in color. The existing D&L identity was selected as the umbrella identity or overbrand to be used throughout the system and a new typographic treatment for Landmark Towns was developed to identify and distinguish it from the D&L.

Bristol Borough Bristol Borough New Hope New Hope Morrisville Morrisville Yardley Yardley Wallace Roberts & Todd with 57 .

Other Applications There are many other applications and formats that cross a wide range of media that are not currently described in this plan. activity or event falls within or is part of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor experience. These colors are recommended for the widest possible use and implementation across all media throughout the Landmark Towns network. The only time the D&L symbol is not featured is for signs that identify town facilities and functions. a sans serif font. It should be noted that in some of these other applications the “Landmark Towns” wordmark and existing circular symbol may become the primary brand message. Meta Bold Capitals was pulled from the Visually Speaking design guidelines for the town names. Adobe Caslon Regular. Secondary Brand A family of complementary colors has been developed for use throughout the signage system with community input. The Landmark Towns palette should be composed of harmonious colors and complement the Delaware & Lehigh burgundy. a serif font. an additional serif typefont. and Meta. These typefonts are strongly associated with the brand of the D&L. In these applications individual town seal(s) as well as the D&L symbol would become underbrands or secondary brands and may be subordinate to the Landmark Towns message and identity.L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Primary Brand Color The overbrand or primary brand functions as an umbrella for multiple destinations. organization or activity. Serifa. The colors chosen grow from existing uses and/or preferences shared or expressed by each community. These signs will replace the D&L symbol with the individual town identity or seal. Typefont The role of the secondary brand is one of supporting connection and association between the Landmark Towns wordmark and a business. In this application the wordmark (a logo made up of typography) is subordinate to the primary identity and message of the partner (town) or site. 58 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . that are used throughout their signage and identity programs. The Landmark Towns wordmark is recommended for use throughout the entire signage and wayfinding system. In this function the chosen identity is featured prominently at the top or bottom of the signage and serves to let people know that this destination. institution. To distinguish the Landmarks Towns from its parent. the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor. has been introduced. The identity guidelines of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor specify two families of typefonts. These colors will also need to be equal in value and chroma so that no one color stands out from another and to meet important legibility requirements. activities and events throughout the region. It gains resonance by association and partnership with other experiences the visitor values.

Brand Architecture Symbols Typography and Colors D&L Primary Brand Landmark Towns of Bucks County LAN D MARK TOWNS Logomark for print Secondary Brand Towns Bristol Borough New Hope Morrisville Yardley Town seals that may be developed for town signage Typography and Color for Individual Towns This diagram catalogues the essential identity elements for the signage and wayfinding system presented in this plan. Wallace Roberts & Todd with 59 .

Pennsylvania. A more detailed sign location plan and message schedule for each town will be required to complete the package. The system presented is schematic in nature and was chosen from several design options presented to the Landmark Towns executive committee and stakeholders from each community. It is intended for application to the widest possible range of informational. The documentation and specification steps should be abbreviated because of the reuse of existing drawings and specifications from the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor sign system guidelines. Morrisville LAN D MA R K H IS TO R I C Morrisville K LAN D MAR TOW N S HISTORIC TOWNS Frank Buchman House Lehigh County Museum Morrisville LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC Trout Hall New Hope LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H I S TORI C Morrisville LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC Banner on Existing Pole Free-standing Banner Gateway Large Free-standing Gateway Free-standing Image Gateway Gateway – Single-faced Double Post Vehicular Directional Sign – Town Specific 60 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . documentation and specification steps. It is intended for conceptual review. During design development additional design details and content issues will be resolved. Morrisville and Bristol Borough in Bucks County. To complete the system will require design development. input and approval.L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Sign System Recommendations Overview This is the recommended signage and wayfinding system for the Landmark Towns Initiative. directional and interpretive uses within each of the four Landmark Towns: New Hope. Yardley.

Goals & Recommendations

System Components

1. Create an integrated and unified signage, wayfinding and interpretive system to orient residents and visitors to the resources, amenities and history of the Landmark Towns communities. 2. Build identity and create a strong sense of place. To accomplish this will take more than “You are entering” and “You are leaving” signs. The regional and interior roads that connect these towns should receive an overlay of elements that creates a continual sense of being in a “Landmark Town of Bucks County.” 3. Create support and enthusiasm for the project. If you live and work in the area, your viewpoint is going to be different than that of a visitor. Residents have a “nonphysical sense of place” that visitors do not have. This system should communicate pride, welcome and connection with the places, values and history within the community. The business community has a major stake in how Landmark Towns are marketed and presented. If they are going to support the project, they will be more interested if it somehow supports their interests.

• PennDOT—Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) signs on interstate and state highways • Gateways—primary and secondary identification signs • Vehicular directional blazes for the Scenic Byway (state byway signs) • Vehicular directional signs • Parking blazes directing visitors to specific destinations • Building and facility identification signs • Pedestrian orientation kiosks • Public transportation identification and route maps • Interpretive information

Bristol

R7

LAN D MARK TOWNS

LAN D MARK TOWNS

Yardley

R3

Bristol

R7
Regional Rail Identification Signs

LAN D MARK TOWNS

LAN D MARK TOWNS

Yardley

R3

Fun Facts

TOW N S

LA N D MA RK

Bus Stop

Morrisville
Municipal Building
LA N D M A R K TOW N S
BUCKS COUNT Y
TOW N S LA N D M A RK

TOW N S

LA N D M A R K TOW N S
BUCKS COUNT Y

Bus Stop

Large Building Identification

Small Building Identification

Transportation Maps

Morrisville Morrisville

Morrisville

Morrisville

LA N D M A R K

LA N D M A R K

Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. –Robert Morris and George Clymer

Municipal Building

Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. (Robert Morris and George Clymer)

Fun Facts

TOW N S

Morrisville Fun Facts

Morrisville

Morrisville
LA N D M A R K TOW N S
BUCKS COUNT Y

Can you find their signatures?

Morrisville

Information Kiosk

Interpretive Window Panels

Morrisville
LA N D M A R K TOW N S
BUCKS COUNT Y

Can you find their signatures?

Wallace Roberts & Todd with

61

Morrisville Morrisville

Morrisville

Regional Rail Identification Signs

Morrisville

LA N D M A R K

LA N D M A R K

Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. –Robert Morris and George Clymer

Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. (Robert Morris and George Clymer)

Fun Facts

Morrisville

TOWN S

TOW N S

Morrisville

L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m

Delaware & Lehigh System Overview
Overview Goals & Recommendations

The Delaware & Lehigh system standards “ Visually Speaking” form the basis and foundation for the development of additional signage, wayfinding and interpretive elements for the Landmark Towns initiative. Every attempt has been made to develop these new products as part of an integrated regional system. As such the D&L system presented here will remain in use throughout the region.

Expand and upgrade the existing D&L system. System enhancements could include: 1. Overall upgrades to materials and finishes to reflect current changes in technology, finishes and related warranties. 2. Addition of break-away-footer to bring signs up to DOT safety standards. 3. Larger type size on vehicular directional signs. 4. Upgrades to the interpretive signs to introduce new National Park Service standards and features. 5. Changes to the design and layout of the interpretive panel system to provide greater range of content, image and color options. 6. Addition of land and water emergency response system that uses codes and other relevant information so that emergency teams, police and fire departments can respond more quickly.

Eckley Miners’ Village

Tour Guide Sign
62

Auto Trail Stop

Vehicular Directionals

Main Entrance Identification – Large

Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan

Main Entrance Identification – Small

Pedestrian Historical Marker

Pedestrian Trail Entrance

NPS Interpretive and Wayside Displays
63

Wallace Roberts & Todd with

right. Vehicular visibility Night visibility Located perpendicular to main thoroughfares Located 100-150 feet in advance of decision points Directional arrows Destinations Parking symbols Delaware & Lehigh logo • The D&L system is used in the interstitial spaces between the Landmark Towns. 3 1/2" Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Frank Buchman House Lehigh County Museum Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Tour Guide Sign 64 Vehicular Directionals Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan . Destinations should be listed by order of movement: left. D&L Revised Vehicular Directional Signs Once the motorist enters the town the Revised Vehicular Directional Sign • Increased message size (Shown) town color is used for the vehicular • Increased panel size and height directional background color helping the motorist identify that they are within the • Break-away footer town proper. Directional information signs direct visitors from interstates and neighboring areas to primary and essential destinations.L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Vehicular Directional Delaware & Lehigh Signage DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria • • • meSSage CONteNt • • • • Single-faced post and panel sign provide timely information to help the traveler make decisions. ahead.

during design development. This color will be used throughout their sign system. Each town.Vehicular Directional Town Signage To create continuity. vehicular wayfinding signs within the communities will use the existing architecture of the D&L system. The color has to be dark enough that when reflective type is placed on it the signs will meet ADA’s contrast and legibility requirements. Fewer resources will be used by building on the existing D&L system. Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Frank Buchman House Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Frank Buchman House Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Frank Buchman House Lehigh County Museum Trout Hall Frank Buchman House Wallace Roberts & Todd with 65 . will establish a signature background color that works well with the D&L base color.

HISTORIC Yardley HISTORIC HISTORIC HISTORIC .Morrisville New Hope Morrisville K LAN D MAR HISTORIC TOWNS Morrisville BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC LA N D M A R K TOW N S Banner Free-standing Banner Gateway Free-standing Gateway – Large 66 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan Bristol Borough Colors for each town will be developed during the design development phase with stakeholder input.

Vehicular visibility Night visibility Located perpendicular to main thoroughfares Located at perceived entrances to the center of town Banners • • • • Town name Historic Landmark Towns D&L logo • Post and Panel Signs • • • • Town symbol Town name Historic Landmark Towns Bucks County Option: Adding period photographs as an underlay on the signs can help tell a story about each town’s rich history. The different sizes accommodate the different length names of the towns and different site conditions found at each gateway location. Freestanding Double-post Gateway—This sign may be used at primary entrances to the town where landscaped locations allow. Banners are used in locations where the site lines to smaller post and panel signs would be blocked. Locate signs with maximum visibility from thoroughfares. New Hope LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC New Hope BUCKS COUNT Y H I STORIC LA N D M A R K TOW N S New Hope LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y H ISTORIC Free-standing Gateway – Small Free-standing Gateway – large with Image Gateway – Low Wallace Roberts & Todd with 67 .L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Vehicular Directional Gateway Identification DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria • • • meSSage CONteNt Banner Gateways—Double-faced permanent banners. Freestanding Single–post Gateways— Four sizes of single-faced post and panel signs may be used at main and secondary entrances to the town.

or double-faced post and panel sign provides identification for municipal buildings. Locate at entrances with maximum vehicular visibility from thoroughfares. or Parallel to road in front of building Town seal Town name Building name Landmark Towns Bucks County wordmark • Optional • Street number Morrisville Municipal Building Municipal LA N D M A R K TOW N S LA N D M A R K T BUCKS COUNT Y BUCKS COUNT Morrisville Municipal Building LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y Morrisville Municipal Building LA N D M A R K TOW N S BUCKS COUNT Y 68 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Municipal Building Identification Signs DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria • • • meSSage CONteNt • • • • Medium-size single. Vehicular visibility Night visibility Located perpendicular to main thoroughfares near entrances.

The sign identifies bus stops and gives route information. Local points of interest may also be indicated on the map. Located along bus routes or train platforms Night visibility for identification signs Regional Rail signs are located along access roads to stations or at rail station parking lot entrances. Regional Rail Station Identification Banners— Freestanding banner signs identify Landmark Towns with the Regional Rail station. Rail Station Identification Panels—These panels are attached to existing Regional Rail Sign System standards along the train platform. Town name Landmarks Towns Bus symbol or regional rail number Route map with highlighted points of interest (bus stop signs only) • • • LA N D M A R K TOW NS LA N D M A R K TOW NS Bristol R7 R7 Bristol R7 Bristol L A N A N D AR AD T O TR NW T O W N S L D MLAMNK R M AWO S N S K K L A N A N D AR AD T O TR NW T O W N S L D MLAMNK R M AWO S N S K K Yardley R3 R3 Yardley R3 Yardley BusBus Stop/Stop/ Stop/ Bus Route Map RouteRoute Map Map Signs Signs Signs Retrofit Panels for Regional Regional RailSystem Retrofit Panels for Regional Rail Sign Sign System Retrofit Panels for Rail Sign System Town/ RailRail Station Town/ Station Station Town/ Rail Identification Sign Identification Sign Sign Identification 69 Wallace Roberts & Todd with Bristol Bristol Bristol R7 R7 R7 LA N D M A R K TOW NS Yardley .Transportation Identification/Information Signs DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria • meSSage CONteNt • • • Bus Stop/Route Map Sign—Double-faced sign that attaches to existing posts.

towns and neighborhoods. A key map and legend would accompany the map detail. it is the programming and management of information that will determine if it is an effective source of information for visitors. the size of the kiosk may be adjusted. The map detail would show access to the multi-modal journeys. trails. Lighting can help visitors locate the structure. make it readable and provide a beacon of welcome and safety. town center or train station. Located at entry points the marker may stand alone or be used in combination with a selection of interpretive components. 70 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan Morrisville . related visitor sites. The appropriate entities will need to work closely to develop an effective management plan for upkeep. While designing such a kiosk is a relatively simple matter.L a N Dm a rk tOw N S wayF i N Di Ng S ig N SySt e m Pedestrian Orientation/Information/Interpretive Kiosk DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria meSSage CONteNt • • • A double-faced freestanding pedestrian kiosk provides orientation information at the towpath trail. In some situations it may be desirable to have these kiosks illuminated at night or placed in a well illuminated area. Information on where the visitor may acquire take-away maps and other information would also be posted. Community name Landmarks Town and D&L logo Map detail of local area with key map to entire D&L area Pedestrian directional information Interpretive information Directions for how to get additional information about the area Local safety information and related emergency phone numbers • • • • • • • Pedestrian visibility Perpendicular to directed path of travel Located at entry points to towpath Welcome Welcome Welcome Morrisville Morrisville Bristol Borough LA N D M A RK TOW N S H I S TO RI C Morrisville LA N D M A RK TOW N S Morrisville LA N D M A RK TOW N S As information is gathered from the community.

S. Clymer is buried at the Friends Burying Ground in Trenton. Congress in 1789. Located along pedestrian walk ways Notable story Relevant images Town name Landmark Towns Sponsor names TOW N S Fun Facts Fun Facts George Clymer (March 16. George Clymer Morrisville Clymer was born in Whiteville orphaned at a young age. He was (March 16. Constitution. (Robert Morris and George Clymer) LA N D M A R K LA N D M A R K Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Clymer was. Clymer is buried at the Friends Burying Ground in Trenton. He was one of the first Patriots to advocate complete independence from Britain. a Revenue Officer. and was elected to the Continental Congress 1776-1780. As a Pennsylvania representative. (Robert Morris and George Clymer) TOW N S 71 . in the state of Pennsylvania. Morrisville Morrisville elected to the first U. He was the first president of the Philadelphia Bank. a signatory of both the Declaration of Independence and the U. along with only five others. and a Federal Indian Commissioner from 1781-1796. Pennsylvania. As a Pennsylvania representative. and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He became a member of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety in 1773. He was also one of the commissioners to negotiate a treaty with the Creek Indian confederacy at Coleraine. –Robert Morris and George Clymer Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. He is considered the benefactor of Indiana Borough. in the state of Pennsylvania. the first Treasurer of the United States. Georgia on June 29. Clymer was. He was a Member of the Pennsylvania Legislature. When Congress passed a bill imposing a duty on spirits distilled in the United States in 1791. He was a patriot and leader in the demonstrations in Philadelphia resulting from the Tea Act and the Stamp Act. and was elected to the Continental Congress 1776-1780. –Robert Morris and George Clymer Fun Facts TOW N S was an American politician and Founding Father. notable characters or natural phenomena and wildlife to name a few. the first Treasurer of the United States. V was placed as head of the excise department. He attended the Continental Congress and served in political office until the end of his life. 1739 – January 23. and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 1796.S. Stories can be told about the history of the town or region. He became a member of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety in 1773. Georgia on June 29. 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father. V was placed as head of the excise department. 1796. When Congress passed a bill imposing a duty on spirits distilled in the United States in 1791. and apprenticed to his paternal uncle in preparation for a career as a merchant. and a Federal Indian Commissioner from 1781-1796. Clymer shared the responsibility of being treasurer of the Continental Congress with Michael Hillegas. He was elected to the first U. Pennsylvania. New Jersey. He was the first president of the Philadelphia Bank.Interpretive Signs DeSCriptiON LOCatiON Criteria • meSSage CONteNt • • • • • Stories and opportunities abound for engaging visitors and residents. He attended the Continental Congress and served in political office until the end of his life. He was also one of the commissioners to negotiate a treaty with the Creek Indian confederacy at Coleraine. Constitution. as it was he who donated the property for a county seat in Indiana County.S. and vice-president of the Philadelphia Agricultural Society. Clymer was born in Whiteville orphaned at a young age. and vice-president of the Philadelphia Agricultural Society. Interpretive panels can also be used to activate an area. He is considered the benefactor of Indiana Borough. Illustrated below are poster size panels with fun facts about the town that could be displayed in buildings under renovation. 1739 – January 23. as it was he who donated the property for a county seat in Indiana County. He was a Member of the Pennsylvania Legislature. He was a patriot and leader in the demonstrations in Philadelphia resulting from the Tea Act and the Stamp Act. a signatory of both the Declaration of Independence and the U. 1813) TOW N S Fun Facts to his paternal uncle in preparation for a career as a merchant. Congress in 1789.S. and apprenticed Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. along with only five others. Can you find their signatures? Can you find their signatures? Wallace Roberts & Todd with Morrisville Morrisville Morrisville LA N D M A R K LA N D M A R K Morrisville is the only town in America to have two signers of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. He was one of the first Patriots to advocate complete independence from Britain. Clymer shared the responsibility of being treasurer of the Continental Congress with Michael Hillegas. a Revenue Officer. New Jersey.

4 storefront interpretive displays.320 32.760 570 467 79 320 300 250 1.920 30.800 19.720 231.133.417 65.300.960 84.432 6.med Interpretive panels .560 57.200 3. Morrisville. 6 large. qty Section A .410 7.2/9/09 s I gLandmark Towns r IC aTCounty b u dg e T n ag e fab of Bucks Io n Bristol Borough.644 166.800 3.medium Vehicular directional .585 total 62.oversized Town vehicular trailblazer Town banner . Removal of existing signs.135 2.600 90.existing pole-mnted .430.568 36.5% Subtotal cost for 4 towns (approx $45. Sign quantities are based on the following formula for each town: Section A .600 3.306 19.000 15.912 183.950 104.large Vehicular directional .021 $1.110 525 2. 1 medium building id.320 78.222 8.222 $ 180.656 16.866 2.560 11.380 918 665 1.400 52.post-mounted Parking lot identification Sub-total Contingency .485 127.400 73.600 4.000 per town) Single-faced Single-faced Double-faced Double-faced Double-faced Single-faced Single-faced Double-faced Single-faced Single-faced Single-faced 8 12 8 24 36 16 40 8 48 16 16 24 256 unit price 6. 6 pedestrian orientation stations.200 9.5% General conditions .960 1.800 68.222 per town) Double-faced Double-faced Single-faced Single-faced Double-faced 4 4 32 32 16 88 3.040 109.444 8.450 14.600 25.600 146.684 15. Estimates assume aluminum construction with Coraflon fluoropolymer paint.Optional 1 main building id.021 65.5% Subtotal cost for 4 towns Section B . Section B .storefront Pedestrian orientation & map Sub-total Contingency .5% General conditions .minor Town gateway .552 111.940 2.840 66.smSingle-faced Estimates are approximate and based on "ballpark" proposals from regional sign contractors.020 630 1.933 16.160 7.520 10.696 125.790 total price 54.small Parking trailblazer .200 12.240 8.600 1.120 4.800 4. 4 sm train station banners.458 Tain station banner .200 6.640 168.major Town gateway . sales tax and consolidation of interstate signs into one simplified format have not been included in this estimate.existing pole-mnted .custom pole Vehicular directional .248 4.032 23.888 (approx $360.800 201.lrge Town banner .810 60. 8 post-mounted parking id.040 22.400 50.880 159.640 350 13.832 unit install 1.240 25. 12 medium and 4 oversized vehicular directional. 10 veh trailblazers.existing pole-mnted . 4 parking id 72 Landmark Towns sTraTegic wayfi ndi ng PLan .600 57.800 164.Optional 13 14 15 16 17 Main/large building identification Medium building identification Parking trailblazer . 8 small parking trailblazers. payment of performance bonds. 4 large banner (2 towns only) structures each.604 1.440 16.Basic 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Town gateway .041 410 990 630 540 240 569 total install 8.000 144. New Hope & Yardley Signage & Wayfinding System — Fabrication & Installation Estimate est.banner.Basic 2 major & 3 minor gateways.735 6.

222 8. 10 veh trailblazers.000 144. Sign quantities are based on the following formula for each town: Section A .444 8.post-mounted Parking lot identification Sub-total Contingency . Removal of existing signs. 4 parking id Wallace Roberts & Todd with 73 .520 10.000 12.small Parking trailblazer . Estimates assume aluminum construction with Coraflon fluoropolymer paint. 4 sm train station banners.222 per town) $ 180. 8 small parking trailblazers.800 19.440 16.306 19.684 14.14 15 16 17 Medium building identification Parking trailblazer .110 525 2.800 164.Basic 2 major & 3 minor gateways. payment of performance bonds. 6 pedestrian orientation stations.568 36. 4 large banner (2 towns only) structures each.248 4. 6 large.5% Subtotal cost for 4 towns Double-faced Single-faced Single-faced Double-faced 4 32 32 16 88 3.5% General conditions .866 2.760 467 79 320 300 1. 1 medium building id. sales tax and consolidation of interstate signs into one simplified format have not been included in this estimate.800 68.Optional 1 main building id. 8 post-mounted parking id.320 78. Section B .888 Estimates are approximate and based on "ballpark" proposals from regional sign contractors. 4 storefront interpretive displays.222 (approx $45.320 32.135 2. 12 medium and 4 oversized vehicular directional.

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P R E PA R E D BY Wallace Roberts & Todd. LLC WITH .