Autodesk Inventor 8

®

Essentials

Official Training Courseware

52708-010000-1710A

January 23, 2004

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
This publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose. AUTODESK, INC., MAKES NO WARRANTY, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE REGARDING THESE MATERIALS, AND MAKES SUCH MATERIALS AVAILABLE SOLELY ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. IN NO EVENT SHALL AUTODESK, INC., BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR SPECIAL, COLLATERAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES IN CONNECTION WITH OR ARISING OUT OF PURCHASE OR USE OF THESE MATERIALS. THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE LIABILITY TO AUTODESK, INC., REGARDLESS OF THE FORM OF ACTION, SHALL NOT EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE MATERIALS DESCRIBED HEREIN. Autodesk, Inc., reserves the right to revise and improve its products as it sees fit. This publication describes the state of this product at the time of its publication, and may not reflect the product at all times in the future.

Autodesk Trademarks
The following are registered trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries: 3D Props, 3D Studio, 3D Studio MAX, 3D Studio VIZ, 3DSurfer, ActiveShapes, ActiveShapes (logo), Actrix, ADI, AEC Authority (logo), AEC-X, Animator Pro, Animator Studio, ATC, AUGI, AutoCAD, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Map, Autodesk, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk (logo), Autodesk MapGuide, Autodesk University (logo), Autodesk View, Autodesk WalkThrough, Autodesk World, AutoLISP, AutoSketch, Biped, bringing information down to earth, CAD Overlay, Character Studio, Cinepak, Cinepak (logo), Codec Central, Combustion, Design Your World, Design Your World (logo), Discreet, EditDV, Education by Design, gmax, Heidi, HOOPS, Hyperwire, i-drop, Inside Track, Kinetix, MaterialSpec, Mechanical Desktop, NAAUG, ObjectARX, PeopleTracker, Physique, Planix, Powered with Autodesk Technology (logo), RadioRay, Revit, Softdesk, Texture Universe, The AEC Authority, The Auto Architect, VISION*, Visual, Visual Construction, Visual Drainage, Visual Hydro, Visual Landscape, Visual Roads, Visual Survey, Visual Toolbox, Visual TugBoat, Visual LISP, Volo, WHIP!, and WHIP! (logo). The following are trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries: 3ds max, AutoCAD Architectural Desktop, AutoCAD Learning Assistance, AutoCAD LT Learning Assistance, AutoCAD Simulator, AutoCAD SQL Extension, AutoCAD SQL Interface, Autodesk Map, Autodesk Streamline, AutoSnap, AutoTrack, Built with ObjectARX (logo), Burn, Buzzsaw, Buzzsaw.com, Cinestream, Cleaner, Cleaner Central, ClearScale, Colour Warper, Content Explorer, Dancing Baby (image), DesignCenter, Design Doctor, Designer's Toolkit, DesignProf, DesignServer, Design Web Format, DWF, DWG Linking, DXF, Extending the Design Team, GDX Driver, gmax (logo), gmax ready (logo),Heads-up Design, IntroDV, jobnet, ObjectDBX, onscreen onair online, Plans & Specs, Plasma, PolarSnap, ProjectPoint, Reactor, Real-time Roto, Render Queue, Visual Bridge, Visual Syllabus, and Where Design Connects.

Autodesk Canada Inc. Trademarks
The following are registered trademarks of Autodesk Canada Inc. in the USA and/or Canada, and/or other countries: discreet, fire, flame, flint, flint RT, frost, glass, inferno, MountStone, riot, river, smoke, sparks, stone, stream, vapour, wire. The following are trademarks of Autodesk Canada Inc., in the USA, Canada, and/or other countries: backburner, backdraft, MultiMaster Editing.

Third Party Trademarks
All other brand names, product names or trademarks belong to their respective holders.

Third Party Software Program Credits
ACIS Copyright © 1989-2001 Spatial Corp. Portions Copyright © 2002 Autodesk, Inc. Copyright © 1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. International CorrectSpell™ Spelling Correction System © 1995 by Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products, N.V. All rights reserved. InstallShield™ 3.0. Copyright © 1997 InstallShield Software Corporation. All rights reserved. PANTONE ® and other Pantone, Inc., trademarks are the property of Pantone, Inc. Portions Copyright © 1991-1996 Arthur D. Applegate. All rights reserved. Portions of this software are based on the work of the Independent JPEG Group. Typefaces from the Bitstream ® typeface library copyright 1992. Typefaces from Payne Loving Trust © 1996. All rights reserved.

GOVERNMENT USE
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in FAR 12.212 (Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights) and DFAR 227.7202 (Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software), as applicable.

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Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Starting an Autodesk Inventor Design Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Autodesk Inventor Workflow Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Autodesk Inventor Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Part Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Assembly Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Presentation Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Drawing Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Using Templates Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Projects in Autodesk Inventor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Project Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Project Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Project Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Creating Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Editing Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Exercise: Projects in Autodesk Inventor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 The User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 The Panel Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Menu Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 3D Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Exercise: The User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Online Help and Tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Help Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 How To Popups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 What's New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Visual Syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Help For AutoCAD Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Autodesk Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Exercise: Online Help and Tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Challenge Exercise: Introducing the Modeling Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Creating Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Sketch Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Sketch Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

i

Rules for Creating Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Sketch Coordinate System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Precise Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Editing Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Sketch Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Exercise: Creating Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Constraining Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Constraining Sketches in Autodesk Inventor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Geometric Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Planning Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Showing and Deleting Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Show All Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Use Construction Geometry in the Sketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Exercise: Constraining Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Dimensioning Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Parametric Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Driven Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Additional Options for Applying Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Automatic Dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Displaying Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Guidelines for Dimensioning Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Exercise: Dimensioning Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Sketching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

Chapter 3: Creating Simple Sketched Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Introduction to Sketched Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simple Sketched Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Consumed and Unconsumed Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sketches and Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharing Sketch Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Introduction to Sketched Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with Sketch Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Sketch Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using a Part Face to Define a Sketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Direct Model Edge Referencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Reference Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Working with Sketch Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Extruded Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of Extruded Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Extrude Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feature Relationships - Join, Cut, and Intersect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifying Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Creating Extruded Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Revolved Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of Revolved Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Revolve Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 133 134 136 137 139 140 141 143 145 148 152 153 154 155 159 160 163 165 166 167 168

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Contents

Feature Relationships - Join, Cut, and Intersect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Editing Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Exercise: Creating Revolved Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Challenge Exercise: Creating Simple Sketched Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Work Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Default Work Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 The Work Plane Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Examples of Work Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Work Plane Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Exercise: Work Planes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Work Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Default Work Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 The Work Axis Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Example of Work Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Work Axis Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Exercise: Work Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Work Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Center Point Work Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 The Work Point Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Grounded Work Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Additional Examples of Work Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Exercise: Work Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Work Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217

Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Fillet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 The Fillet Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Exercise: Fillet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Chamfer Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 The Chamfer Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Exercise: Chamfer Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Hole and Thread Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 The Hole Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Thread Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Exercise: Hole and Thread Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Shell Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 The Shell Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Exercise: Shell Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Pattern Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 The Rectangular Pattern Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 The Circular Pattern Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Exercise: Pattern Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 Face Drafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265

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The Face Draft Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Face Drafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating and Using Color Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating and Using Color Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Creating and Using Color Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Placed Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

266 269 270 271 273 274 275

Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Introduction to Assembly Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Modeling Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Panel Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Introduction to Assembly Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In-Place Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visibility Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Resequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assembly Restructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Browser Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Browser Display Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabled Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grounded Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Assembly Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placing Components in an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Place Component Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sources of Placed Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dragging Components into an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Placing Components in an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Components in an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Parts in Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Work Features in Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using 2D Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Projected Edges and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Creating Components in an Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moving Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Degrees of Freedom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Unconstrained Drag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constrained Drag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constraint Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moving and Rotating Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Moving Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constraining Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placing Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 279 285 286 287 288 289 291 292 292 295 296 297 298 299 301 302 303 305 307 309 312 313 314 318 319 321 324 325 326 328 328 329 332 334 335 336 340 344

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Editing Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 Using ALT-Drag to Place Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Exercise: Constraining Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Adaptive Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Introduction to Adaptive Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Methods for Creating Adaptive Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Adaptive Sketches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Adaptive Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Adaptive Occurrence in Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Applying Assembly Constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Tips and Considerations for Using Adaptivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Exercise: Adaptive Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 Assembly Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 The Analyze Interference Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 The Analyze Faces Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 Locating Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 Exercise: Assembly Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Creating a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Creating Tweaks and Trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Animating a Presentation View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Exercise: Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Challenge Exercise: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388

Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Setting Drafting Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Drafting Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Dimension Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Drawing Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Exercise: Setting Drafting Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Drawing Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 Editing the Default Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Using a Sheet Format for Sheet Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 Creating Multiple Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Creating Sheet Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Defining a Border . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 Defining a Title Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 Editing Title Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Exercise: Drawing Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 Projected Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Creating a Base View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 Creating Projected Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 Editing Projected Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 Exercise: Projected Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 Creating Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Assembly Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detail Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Detail Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Detail Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Detail Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auxiliary Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Auxiliary Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Auxiliary Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Auxiliary Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Broken Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Broken Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Broken Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Broken Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Break Out Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating Break Out Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editing Break Out Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Break Out Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Views and Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aligning Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Views between Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moving Views between Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Managing Views and Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dimensioning a Drawing View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Retrieving Model Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placing Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: Dimensioning a Drawing View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Annotation Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annotating Holes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annotating Centerlines and Center Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Notes and Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parts Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placing Balloons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise: General Annotation Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 8: Project Exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
Irrigation Control Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526

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Contents

Preface .

The primary objectives of the manual are to help you become productive quickly with the features and functionality of Autodesk Inventor 8. you will be able to: Prerequisites This course is designed to teach new users of Autodesk Inventor the essential elements of using Autodesk Inventor 8 for Mechanical Design. 2 Preface . Course Objectives At the end of this course. or Windows XP.Preface Preface Preface Introduction Welcome to Autodesk Inventor 8 Essentials Courseware. Although this manual is designed to be used as a teaching tool for instructor-led courses. Windows NT 4. It is recommended that you have a working knowledge of Microsoft Windows 98. a training manual for use in Authorized Training Centers and in corporate training and classroom settings. Note Instructor-led training in either short or long courses is an effective method to learn computer application software. and to encourage self-learning through the use of the Autodesk Inventor Design Support System (DSS). This manual is part of the Autodesk Official Training Courseware (AOTC) series designed primarily for instructorled classes. Each exercise is taskoriented and is based on real-world examples of mechanical engineering. The integrated Design Support System (DSS) provides you with ongoing support as well as access to online documentation. Autodesk Inventor is designed for easy learning.0/Windows 2000. Each chapter in this manual has instructional design so that it is easy to follow and understand. and a working knowledge of parametric solid modeling concepts. 2D Drafters wanting to learn the basics of 3D design techniques are also encouraged to attend this course. it can also be used for self-paced learning.

constraints or warnings about the topic. Note Exercise Data Files Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Each topic contains an Introduction. Provides an introduction to the chapter theme and states specific learning objectives for the chapter. • Notes and Tips Throughout this courseware. Inc. there are Notes and Tips included for special attention. All Rights Reserved 3 . Concepts. Tip Notes can contain information that provides guidelines. Summary. Tips provide special information that will enhance your productivity within the topic. Objectives. Topics. Prerequisite and Summary. Each chapter is a collection of topics that together form the theme of the chapter. Summarizes the chapter.Chapter Flow • • Introduction and Objectives.

To work on a different project. Installing the Exercise Data Files To install the files: Step 1. you set a new project active in the Project Editor. By default. To accommodate this. 2. 3. Autodesk Inventor uses projects to help organize related files and maintain links between files. Autodesk Inventor uses the paths in the current project file to locate other necessary files. 4 Preface . and each project may consist of a number of files.exe. Insert the Autodesk Inventor 8 Essentials CD-ROM into your computer and follow the instructions in the setup wizard. If the wizard does not automatically start. Projects Most engineers work on several projects at a time.exe on the Autodesk Inventor 8 Essentials CD attached to the back cover of your book. The Essentials folder contains the files necessary to complete each exercise in the training manual. the exercise files will be installed to the C:\Program Files\Autodesk\AOTC\Inventor 8\Essentials folder unless you use the Browse button to specify a different folder. browse to the root directory of the CD and double-click Setup. When you attempt to open a file. Each exercise has a project file that stores the paths to all the files related to the exercise.Exercise Data Files The exercise data files for this manual are supplied in a self-installing file called Setup.

you will be able to. Access the help system and other online resources for learning Autodesk Inventor software. • • • • • • • • • . Project files in Autodesk Inventor. and other interface features that are common to all Autodesk Inventor design environments. The Browser. different assembly modeling concepts. The online help and tutorials available for learning. The typical workflow on a design session in Autodesk Inventor.. Creating and editing project files. Identify the main interface components found in Autodesk Inventor software. The help system and tutorials available to Autodesk Inventor users.. • • In this chapter After completing this chapter. Create and edit project files for use in different environments and situations. • • File types in Autodesk Inventor. Different types of project files and the environments in which they should be used. The main interface components found in Autodesk Inventor software. Create a design using various methods and workflows. and the types of files you can create and use with Autodesk Inventor software..Introduction to the Modeling Process Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about. The Design Support System or DSS.. Panel Bar. • • Start an Autodesk Inventor design session.

6 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Understand the typical design workflow when using Autodesk Inventor. Understand the concept of Parametric Modeling.Getting Started Overview Overview Overview In this lesson you will learn the Autodesk Inventor software interface. Understand the available file types in Autodesk Inventor. you will be able to: • • • • • Start an Autodesk Inventor design session. Objectives After completing this lesson. workflow. and file types. Understand how to use template files.

Creating Assemblies. Learn about AutoCAD to Inventor Help: This option launches a help file specifically designed for AutoCAD users making the transition to Autodesk Inventor. Learn how to build models quickly: This option opens the main page to a series of helpful tutorials such as Using Constraints. Inc.Getting Started Pane Getting Started • • • See "What's New" in Autodesk Inventor: This link opens a help file containing all the new features in this release. and Advanced Topics. this screen will present you with links to some helpful information. Learn about constraints: This option launches a multi-media presentation that will teach you about constraints. with focus on the Autodesk Inventor Projects help links. Procedure Open Dialog Box . the open dialog box will appear showing the Getting Started screen with links to various resources.Starting an Autodesk Inventor Design Session The first time you start an Autodesk Inventor design session. Each link • • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Learn about projects: This option presents the Autodesk Inventor Help Site Map. Creating a Part. Features include slide graphics with links to specific help files and other information related to the differences between the software applications. All Rights Reserved 7 . If you are new to Autodesk Inventor or if you have just upgraded to the most current release.

click New and a list of all available templates for creating Autodesk Inventor files will be displayed. in the What To Do area.presents a help topic with specific information on each project. Open Dialog Box .Open Pane Open In the Open dialog box. 8 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process .New Pane New In the Open dialog box. Metric Tab: Lists the available Metric Unit templates. click Open and the three main areas of the Open dialog box will be displayed. English Tab: Lists the available English Unit templates. in the What To Do area. • • • Default Tab: Lists the default templates based upon the default units type you select during installation. Open Dialog Box .

The active project will have a check mark next to the project name. Main Window: All files and folders contained in the selected location are listed in this window.Projects Pane Projects In the Open dialog box. • List of Available Projects: Double click on the project to make it active. in the What To Do area. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.• Locations: This window presents the folders defined in the active project file. The Project Location column displays the path where the project is stored. click Projects and Projects . Each folder icon represents a shortcut you can select to list its files and subfolders. Project Definition Pane: This window displays the project categories and paths defined for each category. Standard Windows Navigation Buttons: Autodesk Inventor uses standard Microsoft Windows®navigation tools in all of its file related dialog boxes. • • • Open Dialog Box .Select a project file areas will be displayed. Preview Window: This window will display a preview of the selected Autodesk Inventor file. • More detailed information on Projects will follow later in this chapter. All Rights Reserved 9 .

the geometry to which it has been applied will also change to reflect the new value of the parameter. As you create these dimensions.Before and After Dimensions 10 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Adaptivity enables you to create dynamic relationships between parts in an assembly.Autodesk Inventor Workflow Concepts Autodesk Inventor is a parametric modeler. After you create the sketch you place the required dimensions and the sketch geometry will update to reflect the dimension values you enter. If the parameter changes. adaptive capabilities in Autodesk Inventor will enable the related parts to change without the need to create complex cross-part parametric equations. This means that the geometry is controlled by the parameters and/or constraints that you apply. you focus only on the shape of the sketch. Concept Another key aspect to Inventor is it ability to create adaptive parts. When one part changes. As opposed to non-parametric systems whose dimension values are representative of the size of the geometry. when you create a 2D sketch in a parametric modeler. You do not need to draw your lines and circles at specific lengths or diameters. For example. Sketch . they are stored as individual parameters which you can change at a later time.

These parameters are created automatically and are used by the application to resolve geometry as new features are added. Constraint properties such as Offset and Angle values are stored as parameters within the assembly.The parametric capability then extends beyond the sketch level to the 3D feature level. Note: Is is possible to change these parameters to include formulas or use recognizable names such as Length and Width. After you create the part. you may use it in an assembly file along with other parts. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. When you extrude your 2D sketch. the parameters are stored in a table that you can access later and change if necessary. All Rights Reserved 11 . the depth of the extrusion is also stored as a parameter and is then used to drive the geometry representing the extrusion. As you create your parametric model. The parametric capabilities are now extended to the assembly environment by using 3D Constraints to constrain the parts together. Inc.

If changes occur in the part or assembly files. Basic Parametric File Relationships 12 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . the parametric technology is extended to the drawing environment. Drawing views are created and maintain an associative link to the part and assembly.After you create the parts and assembly. those changes will be reflected in the drawing. The image below represents the basic file references that exist in a typical parametric design. It is possible to retrieve the parametric dimensions used in creating the geometry as well as additional dimensions as required.

As the designer. Use one of the templates provided to create your new part. As you proceed through this course. within each step further variations will occur.Autodesk Inventor Workflow Autodesk Inventor has been designed to facilitate the typical workflow you will encounter in the design process. presentations. The overall workflow of any Autodesk Inventor design will involve the following steps. draw the profile of the parts base feature. Use both Sketched and Placed Features to create the 3D geometry you require for your design. the workflow for creating designs in Autodesk Inventor is flexible. Projects are used to resolve file references for assemblies. there is no set workflow for creating designs using Autodesk Inventor. All Rights Reserved 13 . Because typical design workflow changes and evolves with the design. and drawings. On the initial sketch you create. you will choose the appropriate path based upon your design intent. Procedure In this lesson you will learn the typical workflow of an Autodesk Inventor design session. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. Place and constrain the parts in the 3D Assembly (required only when the component is part of a larger assembly of components). you learn more about each of the steps listed below. • • • • • Be aware of your current Autodesk Inventor Project. With the exception of a couple of fundamental rules. Typical Autodesk Inventor Design Workflow Overall Workflow of a Typical Autodesk Inventor Design Session.

create the Presentation representing the exploded assembly.• • If the design requires an exploded view. • • • • Use one of the part templates provided to create a new part. You create Additional Sketched and/or Placed features as required to generate the necessary 3D geometry. You then use sketched features such as Extrude and Revolve to create your Base Feature. Use standard assembly constraints such as Mate. Tangent and Insert to position and constrain the parts to other parts in the assembly. 14 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Assembly Creation Workflow The following steps represent the overall workflow for creating assemblies using Autodesk Inventor software. • • • • Create a new assembly using one of the assembly templates provided. Place existing parts into the assembly or create new parts in the context of the assembly. Create the profile of your geometry on the initial sketch. Creating 2D Drawings. Angle. All new parts you create will have a blank sketch automatically placed. Part Design Workflow The following steps represent the overall workflow for creating parts using Autodesk Inventor software. Repeat the steps above until all components are added to the assembly.

All Rights Reserved 15 . Use the annotation tools to create the required annotation. Part Files Part files represent the foundation of all designs using Autodesk Inventor. Use standard view creation tools to create the required 2D drawing views. You use the part file to describe the individual parts which make up an assembly.Drawing Creation Workflow The following steps represent the overall workflow for creating drawings using Autodesk Inventor software. The file extension is *. Repeat the steps above to create additional sheets and views as required.ipt Principle Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. • • • • Use one of the drawing templates provided to create a new drawing.

File extension: *.iam Presentation Files You use presentation files to create exploded views of the assembly. File extension: *. It is also possible to animate the exploded views to simulate how the assembly should be put together or taken apart. The assembly file contains references to all of its component files. You use assembly constraints to constrain all of the parts to each other.ipn Principle 16 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process .Assembly Files Principle Assembly files consist of multiple part files assembled in a single file to represent your assembly.

Drawing files include dimensions. All Rights Reserved 17 . When you use a drawing file to create 2D views of an existing 3D model. the views are associative to the 3D model and changes in model geometry are automatically reflected in the drawing. annotations. Inc. File extension: *.Drawing Files You use drawing files to create the necessary 2D documentation of your design. and views required for manufacturing. You can also use drawing files to create simple 2D drawings in much the same way you would use other 2D drawing programs.idw Principle Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Templates To create a new Autodesk Inventor file. By using the template files you create. 18 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . inch and feet and (b) Metric. The Default tab presents templates based upon the default unit you select during installation. snap spacing. The next time you create a new Autodesk Inventor file. and default tolerances are automatically applied to your new file. The Open dialog box offers three tabs: (a) Default. Need Your Own Custom Template Tab? Tip Create a new folder containing at least one file in the templates folder of your Autodesk Inventor installation. Template files are categorized into two main groups: (a) English for english units. while the English and Metric tabs present template files for their respective units. a new tab will appear in the Open dialog box with the name of your new folder. then select the appropriate template and click Open.Using Templates Files Template files serve as the basis for all new files you create using Autodesk Inventor software. and (c) Metric. click the tab representing the required unit type. for metric units such as millimeter and meter. (b) English. Open Dialog Box . Principle Autodesk Inventor offers template files for each type of file. properties such as units.

In this lesson you will learn the concept and implementation of Autodesk Inventor software Project files. When an assembly file is loaded. you will be able to: • • • • • Understand the concept of Projects Understand the concept of Autodesk Inventor project files Setup Autodesk Inventor Projects Create Autodesk Inventor Projects Edit Autodesk Inventor Project files Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the location of the part files must be resolved. All Rights Reserved 19 . Inc.Projects in Autodesk Inventor Overview Overview Overview You use project files to resolve path locations of Autodesk Inventor software files. Active Project Objectives After completing this lesson. The same is true when loading a drawing or presentation files.

This is the sole purpose of project files. By storing path information for each project. presentation. 20 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . (b) part files. The design and documentation of assembly models will require a minimum three different file types: (a) assembly files. or presentation file. The below image represents file dependencies that exist in a typical assembly design. Project Concepts Using separate files for each file type is critical for performance and is common among most parametric modeling systems. and (c) drawing files. or drawing file. the active project file is used to resolve path locations to the referenced files. Autodesk Inventor software knows exactly where to look for the required files when opening an assembly.Project Concepts When you use Autodesk Inventor software to create designs. drawing. Typical File Dependencies When you open an assembly. each one will consist of multiple files and file types. The design and documentation of a single part file will require at least two separate files: (a) a part file and (b) a drawing file.

and vault modes. semi-isolated. but only one project can be active at any time. The same is true for Autodesk Inventor Project files. Project Files . Local Search Paths: Avoid using a local search path except for design exploration. You will generally create one project file for each design you create.Project Files When you create designs you probably organize them in different folder locations. the workspace should be the only defined editable location. Workspace: A personal location where you edit your personal copy of design files in single-user. Do not make a local search Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Only one designer should use a project with a defined workspace in a single session of Autodesk Inventor at a time.Concept There is no limit to the number of project files you can create. All Rights Reserved • • 21 . the master project shared by the design team is included in individual projects so that all data in the workgroup folder are accessible and managed from a single project. Example List of Available Projects Project File Categories Each Project file is divided into separate categories in which you will define different paths. Inc. A typical Autodesk Inventor design will make use of some or all of these categories depending on the structure of your assembly and the environment in which you are working. For single-user and vault modes. the active project is identified by the check mark. In the below image. Do not use it for design project data. Project File Categories • Included File: In a semi-isolated environment.

change. The common factors in all Libraries is that the path is considered by Autodesk Inventor software to be read-only and parts stored within a library search path rarely. When Autodesk Inventor software needs to locate referenced files. The below image represents a typical Project file with path locations defined in each category. Part libraries can consist of standard off-the-shelf components that you use in your designs. • • Component files exist in the Components folder.path a subfolder of the workspace folder. changing the library name later will break library references. Libraries 2. Workgroup Search Paths A simple way to remember the search order is to remember Libraries first. 1. each needs a descriptive name that should not change. Because the library name is stored in the reference. or can also include common parts that you design. Libraries: You use this category to define search paths for part libraries. If library folders are defined.Search Order Knowing and remembering the category search order is critical to properly implementing and managing project files. Assembly files exist in the Robot Assembly folder. then the order each category appears in the Project window. • • Project Categories . 22 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Local search paths are searched after the workspace is searched. Local Search Paths 4. if ever. you will see the assembly file is stored in a different location from the component files. Options: You use these properties to set specific options for the Project file. Project Category Search Order When examining this diagram. it will search for files using paths contained in each category using the following order. • Workgroup Search Paths: Workgroup folder locations are defined in the project workgroup search path and are the master project locations used by shared and semi-isolated modes for file check out and check in. Workspace 3.

it is used to resolve the component locations.Because the Components folder is a sub-folder of the defined workspace. All Rights Reserved 23 . File Resolution Example Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The Hex Cap Screw is stored in a folder defined as a Library category. Inc.

Procedure In this lesson you will learn how to setup Project files for both a single-user and multiuser environment.Project Pane The Projects portion of the Open dialog box is divided in to two panes. When you edit search paths they are divided into two sections: (a) Named Shortcut and (b) Category Search Path. Typical Single-User Project Select Project Pane: Select a Project to edit or double-click on a Project to activate it. Open Dialog Box . setting up Projects for a single user environment will differ from multi-user environment. Note: You cannot edit the active Project or activate a different project. if there are files open in Autodesk Inventor software. enabling you to easily navigate to the search path. Edit Project Pane: Select the category or right-click on the option you want to change. For example. 24 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . The Category Search Path stores the path location.Project Setup How you setup your Projects will depend largely on the type of environment in which you are working. • • The Named Shortcut will appear in the Open dialog box.

Open Dialog Box . Inc. All Rights Reserved 25 . Using Relative Paths in Your Project Files It is possible to set your Project file to use relative paths instead of storing the complete path in each category.ipj file is stored in the folder C:\Designs\Robot Assembly.\ followed by the folder location relative to the physical location of the Project file. Relative Paths On/Off Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Using relative paths enables greater portability of your Project Files and datasets. the path settings begin with .Location Shortcuts When you Open files. the Robot-Assembly. the Locations area of the dialog box displays all of the Named Shortcuts contained in the active Project. When you enable the Use Relative Paths setting. In the following example.

Typical File Structure . Rather than search every folder on your computer or network. The default Projects Folder option is will be set to your My Documents folder. On the Tools menu. Autodesk Inventor will be able to resolve the files as required. enter or browse a new location. Autodesk Inventor software uses Windows®shortcuts to point to the project files that have been accessed on your computer. click Application Options. then click the Files tab. If you would like to use a different path for your Project files. As long as the folders maintain their relative location to the storage location of the Project file. This will help to keep your project file organized with your designs and will simplify portability issues. it is possible to physically move the entire folder structure to another location or storage device. Project File Location We recommend that you store your project file in the upper level folder of your project design folders.Projects Folder 26 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Options Dialog Box . you need an efficient way of locating them.When you use relative paths in your Project file.Project File Location Projects Folder Option Because you can store your project files in a number of different locations.

Because references are stored as relative paths from project folders. the My Documents folder is selected to list all files. • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. To reduce the possibility of file resolution problems. Avoid storing more than one hundred files in a single folder. you are likely to break file references. or electrical components. Inc. Keep the subfolder structure relatively flat and do not store files that are unrelated to the project under the root folder. or define a library in your project that locates the root folder of the project in which the parts were released. making it a logical way to organize the files used in a design project. You can keep all your design files for a project in the subfolders. copy them to a library folder. and off-the-shelf components such as fasteners. standard components unique to your company. it is a good idea to set up subfolders under your project workspace or workgroup folder. If you plan to edit files from existing designs. copy them to the desired workspace or workgroup subfolder. Listing of Project File Shortcuts Setting Up Folder Structures A typical project might have parts and assemblies unique to the project. set up a folder structure before you create a project and start saving files. If you intend to reference existing design files. if you change the folder structure. To help organize your design files. They are Windows®shortcuts to the actual project files. fittings. or rename files.In the below image. The Project file shortcuts in the right-hand pane of the Explorer window are not the actual project files. move. Always save new files in the workspace or workgroup defined for your project or one of its subfolders. Use these guidelines as you create a folder structure for files associated with a project: • • • Follow your company standards and naming conventions for the project folders. All Rights Reserved 27 .

) Not defined. Typical Multi-User Off (single) project setup Included File Workspace search paths Local search paths Workgroup search paths Library Locations Not defined. and locate the Workgroup at . changing the library name later will break library references. You do not have to check out files. If one designer is doing most of the work. Set the project to Use Relative Paths = True. A shared project defines a workgroup location and one or more library locations. If library folders are defined. • Off (Single User): You use this option for a single-user environment where Check-In and Check-Out capabilities are not required because the data is not shared with others in a workgroup. Because the library name is stored in the reference. The file check-out status is not available in the browser.\.\.Multi-User Project Settings There are four Multi-User settings that you can use to control the type of Project. except for files referenced from libraries. One defined at . The setting you choose will largely depend upon your working environment. Place the project Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process Options 28 . you can locate the workgroup on his or her computer and make it available as a network share to other team members. (Same location as project file. Multi User = Off Use relative path = True Old versions to keep on save = 1 (the higher the number the more disk space required). shared is the least flexible because all design team members share a single workgroup location. Not defined. • Shared: Shared user mode is only appropriate for small design groups with well-defined roles for editing design files. each needs a descriptive name that should not change. One or more defined. Of the multi-user modes. All design files are in one folder (the workspace) and its subdirectories. Original files are stored in a personal workspace that is intended to be used by only a single user.

semi-isolated mode is the most powerful of the multi-user options. work on. Unlike the vault. Design team members share the workgroup location. You can check files in and out from the file status browser. If library folders are defined. A file status browser shows the check-out status of project files that are in the workgroup and workspace locations. and save the original files directly in the workgroup folders where they are stored. Semi-isolated mode is useful when you need to isolate a part or subassembly.\. copied. If necessary. you have access to only the number of file versions you specify in the project. you can cancel the Options Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.(. where they make and save file changes. Multi User = Shared Use relative path = True Old versions to keep on save = 1 (the higher the number the more disk space required). and cannot access vault advanced database query and configuration capabilities. Because the library name is stored in the reference. All Rights Reserved 29 .) Not defined. Designers can see when someone has a file checked out and are prevented from replacing the work of one another. Design team members open. Note that checking out a file does not protect it from being moved.ipj) in the workgroup folder. (Same location as project file. or work with copies of parts and assemblies to evaluate design variations. each needs a descriptive name that should not change. Design team members always have access to the most up-to-date versions when they open files or refresh them. rather than copy them locally. One defined at . Typical Shared mode project setup Included File Workspace search paths Local search paths Workgroup search paths Library Locations Not defined. changing the library name later will break library references. One or more defined. or deleted using Microsoft®Windows Explorer. after you make design changes and decide to discard them. • Semi-Isolated: If Autodesk Vault is not available. Inc. Not defined. Canceling a check out makes it available to other designers but does not restore it to its state before check out.

check out to revert the file back to the original file. One advantage semi-isolated mode has over vault mode is that each designer needs only enough workspace storage for files he or she is actively editing, and there is no need to update the workspace to see changes other designers have checked in. Each designer always has access to the latest checked-in changes, plus any personal changes. All design team members share a master project, which is included in their personal project, and defines the workgroup and library locations of the design project data files. Checking out files automatically copies them from the workgroup to your personal workspace for editing. Checked-out files are saved to your personal workspace after editing. Files not checked out continue to be referenced from the central work group location and cannot be saved. Design team members do not see changes to files saved by others until the files are checked in to the workgroup location. A file status browser shows the check-out status of project files that are in the workgroup and workspace locations. You can check files in and out from the file status browser. Upon file check in, the file is automatically copied from your personal workspace to the workgroup removed from your personal workspace, and the previous version moved to the OldVersions folder. The workgroup uses this new version when the file is opened or checked out in the future. Canceling a check out removes the file reservation, deletes the workspace version, and leaves the original file in the workgroup. No changes are saved to the file. When you save a file, the previous version is moved to the OldVersions folder. Any designer that already had the file open will continue to access that version until they refresh or close and reopen the file.

Master Project (shared by entire group) setup
Included File Workspace search path Local search paths Workgroup search paths Not defined. Not defined. Not defined. One defined at .\.

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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process

Master Project (shared by entire group) setup
Library Locations When library locations are defined, each must have a descriptive name that does not change and a UNC-based location. The library name is stored as part of the references to files it contains. Library locations can be defined to be in a subfolder of the workgroup, particularly for cases such as the content library. For example, the name would be Content Library and the location would be ./Content Library. Options Multi User = Semi-Isolated Use relative path = True Old versions to keep on save = 1 (the higher the number the more disk space required).

Personal Project (one for each user) setup
Included File Location of the workgroup project using a UNC path. You can browse to the included file from the project editor or enter the path. Location of your personal workspace. Locate the personal project at .\(your personal workspace folder). Not defined. Not defined. It is inherited from the group project file. Not defined. It is inherited from the group project file. Use relative path = True Other options are inherited from the master project. • Vault: (You must install Autodesk®Vault to use this mode.)

Workspace search paths

Local search paths Workgroup search paths Library Locations Options

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Creating Projects
You begin to create project files via a wizard type interface. You are prompted to fill in the relevant information such as Type of Project, Project Name, Workspace Folder, and Libraries to import from other Projects. After the initial creation is complete, you proceed to adding the required paths to the categories you will use.
Procedure

In this lesson you will learn how to create a project file.

Access Methods
You can use either the Autodesk Inventor internal project editor or the standalone project editor to create new projects. Menu Standalone Project Editor File > Projects Start > Programs > Inventor 8 > Tools > Project Editor

Process Overview - Creating Single User Projects
The following steps represent an overview for creating a Single User Project. 1. 2. In the Open dialog box, in the Project Pane, click New. In the Autodesk Inventor project wizard dialog box, click New Single User Project and click Next.

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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process

3.

In the Name field, enter Flange-Assembly and in the Project (Workspace) Folder field, enter C:\Designs\FlangeAssembly. Click Next.

4.

If you have any projects with Libraries defined, they will appear in this list. This enables you to copy Library Paths from other project files. Click Finish to create the project. If you are prompted to create the path, click OK.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Process Overview - Creating Semi-Isolated Projects
The following steps represent an overview for creating a Semi-Isolated Project. Your begin by creating a Master Project. 1. 2. In the Open dialog box, in the Project Pane, click New. In the Autodesk Inventor project wizard dialog box, click New Semi-Isolated Master Project and click next.

3.

In the Name field, enter a name for the Master Project. In the Project (Workgroup) Folder, enter a path to the Workgroup folder and click Next.

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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process

4.

If you have any projects with Libraries defined, they will appear in this list. This enables you to copy Library Paths from other project files. Click Finish to create the project. If you are prompted to create the path, click OK.

After you create your Master Project you create a Personal Project. 1. In the Open dialog box, in the Project Pane, select the Master Project to use for your Personal Project, then click New.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

35

2.

In the Autodesk Inventor project wizard dialog box, click New Semi-Isolated Workspace and click Next.

3.

In the Name field, enter a name for your Workspace Project and enter a path for your workspace. Verify the Master Project File is listed correctly and click Finish. If you are prompted to create the path, click OK.

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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process

Editing Projects
You can use the internal Project Editor or the Standalone Project Editor located on the Windows®Start menu to edit projects. In the Select Project Pane, select the Project to edit. In the Edit Project Pane select the category or option you need to edit. Depending on the item you edit, different options will be available on both the shortcut menu and to the right of the Edit Project Pane.
Procedure

Command Access
There are two methods available for editing projects. Menu Standalone Project Editor File > Projects Start > Programs > Inventor 8 > Tools > Project Editor

Project Pane - Open Dialog Box

When editing projects, right-clicking on the various categories or options will display the following shortcut menus.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Included File Options

Open: This option opens the project file used in the included file link. Edit: This option edits the link to the included project file. Delete: This option deletes the link to the included project file.

Workspace and Library Category Options

Add Path: This option adds a path to the workspace category. Enter a named shortcut and search path in the fields below the category. Add Paths from File...: This option adds the workspace path contained in another project file. A dialog box will appear for you to select the project file. Paste Path: This option pastes a path that was copied to the clipboard. Delete Section Paths: This option deletes all paths from the category.

Local and Workgroup Category Search Path Options

Add Path: This option adds a path to the workspace category. Add Paths from File...: This option adds the workspace path contained in another project file. A dialog box will appear for you to select the project file. Add Paths from Directory...: Select this option to add the path of a selected directory including all sub-directories. Paste Path: Select this option to paste a path that was copied to the clipboard. Delete Section Paths: Select this option to delete all paths from the category.

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Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process

Multi-User Options

Off: Use this option for a single-user environment where Check-In and Check-Out capabilities are not required because the data is not shared with others in a workgroup. Shared: Use this option in a workgroup environment where multiple users may access the same data files. This option enables you to take advantage of the Check-Out/CheckIn features. When you edit any file, you will be prompted to check the file out at which time, the file will remain in its current folder but will be locked from editing by other users. Semi-Isolated: Use this option in a workgroup environment where multiple users may be accessing the same data files. When you edit a file, you will be prompted to check the file out at which time the file will be copied to the workspace defined in your project. The original file remains in its original location, but it is locked from editing until you check-in the version contained in your workspace folder. Vault: Only available if Autodesk Vault is installed.

Edit and Position Buttons
Edit and Position Buttons appear on the right-side of the Projects dialog box. Move Up: Select this option to move the selected path up in the search order within its category. Move Down: Select this option to move the selected path down in the search order within its category. Add Path: Select this option to add a path to the selected category. Edit Path: Select this option to edit the selected path.

Editing the Active Project
You must close all files in Autodesk Inventor before attempting to edit the active project.
Note

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Exercise: Projects in Autodesk Inventor In this exercise. Completed Active Project File 40 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . click Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process From the table of contents for Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process. From the Main table of contents page. click Exercise: Projects in Autodesk Inventor 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. You are creating a Single User Project file with a Workspace and Library. you will create the Project file to be used for the remainder of this course.

and Drawing environments Identify the Panel Bar Identify the Standard toolbar and groups of standard tools Understand how the menu structure is context sensitive based upon the environment you are using Identify and use Keyboard Shortcuts Identify the 3D Indicator and what it represents Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you will be able to: • • • • • • Identify the Browser in the Assembly. Autodesk Inventor Interface Objectives After completing this lesson.The User Interface Overview Overview Overview In this lesson you will learn about the Autodesk Inventor 8 software interface. Part. Inc. All Rights Reserved 41 . Presentation.

If you select an assembly constraint. Features are listed in the order in which they are created. Nested under each part you will see the assembly constraints.Position View When you use the browser in the Assembly Modeling Environment. 42 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . the browser displays information that is relevant to part modeling. it displays the origin folder containing the default X. an edit box will appear at the bottom of the browser enabling you to edit the offset or angle value for the constraint. and Z Planes. Browser . and Z Planes. you will use the various browser modes. It will also list all features you use to create the part. Y. Procedure As you progress through this course. It is context sensitive with the environment you use. For example. Axes.The Browser The Browser is one of your main interface components. It will also list all parts you use in the assembly. Part Modeling Environment When you use the browser in the Part Modeling Environment. and Center Point. Axes. While you use the Part Modeling environment. it will display the origin folder containing the default X. and Center Point. Y. when you work on an assembly you use the browser to present information specific to the assembly environment.Part Modeling Assembly Modeling Environment .

Presentation View Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Assembly Modeling Presentation Environment When you use the browser in the Presentation environment. When you expand each weak you will see the part(s) included in each one. It is also possible button to switch the browser mode from Tweak View to Sequence View to select the or Assembly View. Browser . All Rights Reserved 43 . This is useful when performing part modeling functions in the context of the assembly. Browser .Note: If you select the Position View drop-down button you can select Modeling View to switch the browser to display the part features nested under the parts instead of the assembly constraints. Inc. it will display the Presentation views you create followed by the tweaks you use for the explosion.

borders. Browser . It will also display each sheet in the drawing along with the views you create for each. the browser displays the Drawing Resource folder containing sheet formats.Drawing Environment In the Drawing Environment. title blocks and sketched symbols.Drawing Modeling 44 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process .

Procedure The Assembly Panel Bar is displayed below in the default Learning mode. Assembly Panel Bar . This mode allows more area for the browser window. All Rights Reserved 45 . Inc. Note: You can also access the Expert mode. when you switch from assembly modeling to part modeling.The Panel Bar The panel bar is your primary interface to the tools available while you design. Tools are displayed with icons only.Learning Mode Select the Assembly Panel drop-down menu and click Expert. The tool icons. the panel bar will automatically switch to display the correct tools for the context where you work. Assembly Panel . names. For example. The context sensitive design presents the relevant tools based upon the current context of your design session. The Panel Bar switches to Expert mode. and keyboard shortcuts are displayed.Expert Mode Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Right-click anywhere on the Panel Bar and select Expert.

and constraints.You use the Part Modeling Panel Bar to create sketched and placed features in the modeling environment. dimensions. Sketch Panel Bar 46 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Part Modeling Panel Bar You use the Sketch Panel Bar in the modeling environment and for assembly based sketching to create 2D parametric sketches.

Drawing Views Panel Bar Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. All Rights Reserved 47 . and animate geometry in the presentation environment.You use the Presentation Panel Bar to create presentation views. Presentation Panel Bar You use the Drawing Views Panel Bar in the drawing environment to create drawing views on the sheet. tweaks.

Drawing Annotation Panel Bar 48 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process .You use the Drawing Annotation Panel Bar in the drawing environment to add reference dimensions and other annotation objects.

Procedure Customizing toolbars is beyond the scope of this course. Standard Toolbar The Standard toolbar is displayed here in three separate images. Rotate. Please refer to the Autodesk Inventor help system for more information.File and Modeling Tools This area of the toolbar displays standard viewing tools such as Zoom All. and others.Appearance Tools Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. This area of the toolbar displays tools for standard file and modeling operations. It is organized into groups based upon functionality. Standard Toolbar . Standard Toolbar .Toolbars There are several toolbars available for you to use. Inc.Viewing Tools This area of the toolbar displays appearance related tools for controlling your model's appearance. but by default only the Standard toolbar is displayed. Zoom Window. All Rights Reserved 49 . Standard Toolbar .

Assembly Modeling Environment Insert Menu . The menu structure is context sensitive based upon the environment and mode you are using. you should take the time to familiarize yourself with the different options that appear on the menu while working in different environments.Part Modeling Environment Insert Menu . Procedure As you are learning Autodesk Inventor.Menu Structure Autodesk Inventor software utilizes the standard pull-down menu structure common in all Windows application.Drawing Environment 50 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Insert Menu .

Inc. Y.Keyboard Shortcuts On the panel bar and menus. and Presentation environments. Part Modeling. Procedure Where applicable. Shortcut Keys Displayed on Panel Bar 3D Indicator While using the Assembly. the keyboard shortcuts will be listed for the tools as they are explained. The indicator displays your current view orientation in relation to the X. N for Create Component. P for Place Component. Procedure 3D Indicator Red: X-Axis Green: Y-Axis Blue: Z-Axis Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Entering the keyboard shortcut is the same as clicking the tool on the panel bar or menu. For example. Z axis of the coordinate system. All Rights Reserved 51 . the 3D Indicator is displayed in the lower left area of the graphics window. you will use keyboard shortcuts to access tools.

part modeling. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 52 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . From the Main table of contents page. click Exercise: The User Interface 2. click Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process From the table of contents for Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. and sketching environments. You will experiment with different interface objects in the assembly.Exercise: The User Interface Open an assembly and explore the Autodesk Interface.

All Rights Reserved 53 . In this lesson you will learn about the different resources available for learning Autodesk Inventor. you will be able to: • • • • • • • Understand Help Topics Use the How To Popups Access the Help Topic containing information on the new features in this Autodesk Inventor release Access tutorials Access the Visual Syllabus Access the Help for AutoCAD Users Access Autodesk Online Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Visual Syllabus Objectives After completing this lesson.Online Help and Tutorials Overview Overview Overview Autodesk Inventor software offers several types of online help and tutorial references. context sensitive How-To presentations. and Tutorials are all available. Standard Help files. Inc.

Click the icon to start the tool. You can access the Help Topics window by using the F1 key or any of the other methods listed below. Menu Toolbar Help > Help Topics Keyboard Shortcut F1 Use standard point and click navigation techniques to navigate the help system. icons may appear in the help topics representing specific tools. Help Topics .Help Topics A comprehensive Help Topics section installs by default. Help Topics . The Help Topics window is only one component of the Help System.Command Launch 54 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Procedure Access Methods You can use either of the following methods to launch the help topic.Main Page As you navigate to specific topics in the help system. You can also enter search words in the left pane of the Help Topics window.

Shortcut Menu Right-click in the graphics window and on the shortcut menu. Show Me Help Window The below image represents the type of information that is available in the context sensitive How To Popups. click How To. The animated sequence will play automatically and you can select the navigation buttons to navigate to specific sequence numbers. All Rights Reserved 55 .How To Popups The Help System is context sensitive. Right-click in the graphics window. A help topic. Animated Tangent Line Show Me Presentation Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Procedure Access Methods You can use the following method to launch the How To Popups. Inc. It presents information to you in a manner relevant to each task. and on the shortcut menu. or in some cases the Show Me help window. click How To. will be displayed containing information on the selected tool in an animated sequence.

Menu Help > What's New What's New .What's New The What's New help topic contains information on all new features in the current release of Autodesk Inventor. and Sheet metal. All changes are organized into main categories such as Drawings.Help Window What's New .Specific Topic 56 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Expand the category of interest and use standard point and click navigation to learn about the new features. Part Modeling. Procedure Access Methods You can use the following method to launch the What's New help topic.

use standard point and click navigation techniques to select the topic of interest. Procedure Access Methods You can use the following method to access the tutorials. From the main tutorial window. Menu Help > Tutorials Inventor Tutorials .Tutorials There are several tutorials available covering a wide range of topics from Introduction to Advanced.Main Window and Working with Projects Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The tutorials present step by step information on performing certain tasks in Autodesk Inventor. All Rights Reserved 57 . Inc.

Information on the features you select will be presented to you in an animation.Main Window and Animated Presentation 58 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . Procedure Access Methods You can use the following method to access the Visual Syllabus. Start the Visual Syllabus.Visual Syllabus The Visual Syllabus presents topic specific information in an animated presentation. Standard Toolbar Visual Syllabus . select the main topic. then select specific feature tools available.

Inc.Inventor Command Map Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Menu Help > Help for AutoCAD Users The below image represents the main window of the Help for AutoCAD Users help topic. All Rights Reserved 59 .Main Window AutoCAD . Help for AutoCAD Users . Use standard point and click navigation options to navigate to the topic of choice. Procedure Access Methods You can use the following method to access the Help for AutoCAD Users.Help For AutoCAD Users AutoCAD users can use the Help Topic designed specifically for them as they make the transition to Autodesk Inventor software.

Select the Autodesk Inventor Skill Builders link. Access Methods You can use the following method to access the Autodesk Online.com website dedicated to providing e-learning materials and tutorials for the Autodesk Inventor user. The information is presented via HTML. you will be arrive at a special area of the Autodesk.Skill Builders Link Autodesk Online 60 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . and other web-friendly formats. PDF. Procedure The Autodesk Online portal contains dynamic and new information. Menu Help > Autodesk Online Autodesk Online . It is updated regularly.Autodesk Online Autodesk Online is an e-learning portal to training information available for Autodesk software users.

Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1.Exercise: Online Help and Tutorials In this exercise you will use the online help and tutorials to create a new part with a simple sketch and features. click Exercise: Online Help and Tutorials 2. From the Main table of contents page. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 61 . click Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process From the table of contents for Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process. Inc. The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

Challenge Exercise: Introducing the Modeling Process Challenge Exercise: Introducing the Modeling Process Print Exercise Reference In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. (a) Create a new Semi-Isolated Project to be used as a Master Project. then create a Personal Workspace Project and use the Included file option to include the Master Project. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Challenge Exercise: Introducing the Modeling Process 2. you will create two new Autodesk Inventor Project files. Completed Project File 62 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process . click Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process From the table of contents for Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process. Utilize the information contained in this chapter as well as the information contained in the Help System to create the required projects.

Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • Starting a design session using Autodesk Inventor software. The concept of project files and how they are used to maintain file references between Autodesk Inventor files. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Accessing different tools. and which types of projects are used for particular situations. The user interface for Autodesk Inventor software. Creating and editing project files. through the use of keyboard shortcuts. Inc. The file types created by Autodesk Inventor and how to use them in your designs. Accessing several different resources for learning Autodesk Inventor software. The typical workflow of creating a design in Autodesk Inventor as well as different assembly modeling concepts. All Rights Reserved 63 .

64 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Modeling Process .

Use the Sketch Doctor to assist in fixing problems with sketches. Using the sketch coordinate system. you will be able to. • Create 2D sketches for use in 3D designs. . Using construction geometry to assist you in creating 2D sketches. Rules for creating efficient sketches. Applying dimensions manually and automatically. Planning and viewing constraints that have been applied to geometry. Using the Precise Input toolbar. • • • • • • • • • In this chapter After completing this chapter. Placing parametric dimensions to control the size of sketch elements. Guidelines for dimensioning sketches.. Use construction geometry to assist in creating 2D sketch geometry. Plan and implement constraints on 2D sketches. Edit sketches. Dimensioning 2D sketches.. Create sketches using the Precise Input toolbar. Geometric constraints and how they can be used. Apply dimensions to sketch geometry.. Apply dimensions using both manual and automatic methods. Constraining sketches using both automatic and manual 2D constraints. The sketch environment and available sketch tools.Introduction to Sketching Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Different aspects of creating sketches in Autodesk Inventor software.. Options for displaying dimensions. Apply constraints manually and automatically. View and delete constraints that have been applied to geometry. Editing sketches and using the Sketch Doctor to fix problems with sketches.

Creating Sketches Overview Overview Overview The fundamental basis for all three-dimensional (3D) designs begins with a sketch. The two-dimensional (2D) geometry contained in the sketch is used to create base features as well as secondary features. you will be able to • • • • • • • Understand the sketch environment Create sketch geometry Understand the rules for creating sketches Understand the Sketch Coordinate System Utilize the Precise Input interface to create sketch geometry Edit sketches Use the Sketch Doctor to fix sketch geometry 66 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Sketching using the Precise Input toolbar Objectives After completing this lesson.

All Rights Reserved 67 . Each sketch contains different geometry. Sketch1: The first sketch in the part. it is critical that you become comfortable with the environment in which they are created. Sketch axes: Aligned with the sketch origin indicator. This is automatically created when you create a new part. Although the geometry varies from part to part. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the environment in which the geometry is created is always consistent.Sketch Environment When you create sketches. Because sketches represent the most fundamental part of your design. you work in an environment designed specifically for the creation of 2D geometry. Autodesk Inventor sketch environment Following are some important features in the sketch environment: Sketch panel bar: Displays the 2D sketching tools available. Concept A typical part generally includes multiple sketches positioned along various planes. Sketch origin indicator: Used to identify the current location and orientation of the sketch origin and axes. Inc. represents the X and Y axes of the sketch.

If you require additional sketches. you must create them manually. A new sketch can be created on a part face. and on the shortcut menu click New Sketch. Shortcut Menu Right-click the face of a part or a work plane. Access Methods Toolbar Select the Sketch tool > Select a face or plane to orient the sketch. Creating additional sketches 68 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .Creating Additional Sketches The first sketch in a new part is automatically created. origin plane. or work plane.

Fillet. the Panel Bar automatically switches to display the available sketch tools. and Chamfer. Inc. Panel Bar Shortcut Key L Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Procedure In this lesson you learn about the most common sketch tools: Line. Rectangle. If necessary. The 2D Sketch Panel contains all of the tools to assist in creating sketch geometry. Arc. Circle. All Rights Reserved 69 . refer to the Help Topics for more information about sketch tools.Sketch Tools In the sketch environment. Editing tools are covered in a later chapter. Sketch Panel Bar Line Tool The Line tool enables you to create line segments on the sketch.

Pick a point to end the line segment. 1. 70 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Drag the cursor in the direction of the next line segment.Process Overview . click the Line tool and pick a starting point for the line segment. 4. again paying attention to the Constraint Glyph indicating the automatic constraint. the first image shows that the third line segment is being constrained parallel to the first segment. If the Constraint Glyph represents a constraint that you would like to change. Pick a point to end the line segment. scrub geometry on the sketch for the constraint to be applied and continue drawing the line segment. the second image demonstrates by scrubbing a different sketch element. 3. 2. Continue drawing line segments as required.Creating Lines The following steps represent an overview for creating lines in your sketch. Drag your cursor in the direction you want to draw the line. On the Panel Bar. In the image sequence below. Note the appearance of the Constraint Glyph. and the third image shows that the constraint is now inferred to the sketch element being scrubbed. This glyph indicates the type of constraint that is being applied automatically to the line segments.

5. Panel Bar Shortcut Key SHIFT+C Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. and click Done on the shortcut menu. Continue drawing line segments as required. Right-click in the graphics window. Circle Tool The Circle tool enables you to create circles on the sketch. Inc. 6. All Rights Reserved 71 .

To create a center point circle. To create a 3-Point Tangent Circle. click the Tangent Circle tool.Creating Circles The following steps represent an overview for creating circles in your sketch. Right-click in the graphics window. Drag your cursor to a location representing the outside perimeter of the circle and pick that point to create the circle. 4.Process Overview . Select three parts of the geometry that the circle will be tangent to. and click Done on the shortcut menu. 6. on the Panel Bar click the Center Point Circle tool and select the center point of the circle. 2. 1. Right-click in the graphics window. and click Done on the shortcut menu. on the Panel Bar. 72 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . 5. 3.

Inc. Note: Arcs are created in a counterclockwise direction so pick your start point accordingly. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 73 . Creating Center Point Arcs: • On the Panel Bar. Panel Bar Process Overview . click the Center Point Arc tool then pick a point representing the center of the arc.Arc Tool The Arc tool enables you to create arcs on the sketch. • Pick a point representing the start point of the arc.Creating Arcs The following steps represent an overview for creating arcs in your sketch.

• Drag your cursor and pick the endpoint of the arc. Note the Center Point Projection as you approach a 90-. or 270-degree arc. • Right-click in the graphics window. 180-. and on the shortcut menu click Done. click the Tangent Arc tool and pick the geometry being used for the arcs tangency. and click Done on the shortcut menu. • Right-click in the graphics window.• Pick a point representing the endpoint of the arc. Creating Tangent Arcs: • On the Panel Bar. 74 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .

Depending upon existing geometry and arc size. constraint glyphs may appear. • Right-click in the graphics window. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc.Creating 3-Point Arcs: • On the Panel Bar. • Pick a point for the endpoint of the arc. All Rights Reserved 75 . click the Three Point Arc tool and pick the start point of the arc. • Drag your cursor to size the arc appropriately. and on the shortcut menu click Done.

2. On the Panel Bar. click the Three Point Rectangle tool. 76 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Right-click in the graphics window. 3. Creating a Two-Point Rectangle: 1. and click Done on the shortcut menu Creating a Three-Point Rectangle: To create rectangles at angles other than 0 and 90 degrees.Creating Rectangles The following steps represent an overview for creating rectangles in your sketch. Pick a point representing the first corner of the rectangle. On the Panel Bar. Pick a point representing the first corner of the rectangle.Rectangle Tool The Rectangle tool enables you to create rectangles on the sketch. click the Two Point Rectangle tool. 4. 5. then pick a point representing the opposite corner of the rectangle. Panel Bar Process Overview .

1. Inc.6. On the Panel Bar. All Rights Reserved 77 . Then drag the cursor to size the rectangle. and on the shortcut menu click Done. Applies an equal constraint to all fillets you create during the current session of the Fillet tool. Process Overview . click the Equal option. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Panel Bar 2D Fillet Dialog Box Radius: Enter a radius for the fillet feature. If you are creating multiple fillets of equal sizes. Right-click in the graphics window. click the Fillet tool and enter a radius for the fillet. Pick a point representing the second point of the rectangle. 7.Creating Fillets The following steps represent an overview for creating fillets in your sketch. Fillet Tool The Fillet tool enables you to create fillets on the sketch. 8.

Panel Bar 2D Chamfer Dialog Box This option will cause dimensions to be placed representing the chamfer. a dimension appears on only the first fillet you create. Pick the corner of the geometry being filleted or select each line separately. right-click in the graphics window. and click Done on the shortcut menu. 4. Chamfer Tool The Chamfer tool enables you to create chamfers on the sketch. Continue selecting geometry or corners to be filleted. 3. Notice with the Equal option set. 78 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .2. When you are finished adding fillets.

Inc.This option will constrain secondary chamfers by referencing dimension parameters from the first chamfer created during this session of the Chamfer tool. All Rights Reserved 79 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Distance: Enter a value for one side of the chamfer. Distance: Enter a distance for the chamfer to be applied equally to both sides.Creating Chamfers The following steps represent an overview for creating chamfers in your sketch. click the Chamfer tool. In the 2D Chamfer dialog box. Distance1: Enter a value for one side of the chamfer. 2. adjust the options as required and select a point to chamfer or select the two entities separately. 1. On the Panel Bar. Distance2: Enter a value for the second side of the chamfer. Angle: Enter a value for the angle of the chamfer. Process Overview .

80 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . you can draw regular line segments using the standard Line tool. If necessary. 4. Using centerlines in your sketch will assist in creating revolve features and placing diametric profile dimensions. When you are finished adding chamfers. click the Line tool and draw a standard line segment where the centerline will be. On the Panel Bar.Creating Centerlines The following steps represent an overview for creating centerlines in your sketch. Creating Centerlines You cannot draw centerlines. Process Overview . change the options in the dialog box and continue selecting points or geometry to create additional chamfers. click Done. in the 2D Chamfer dialog box. Instead. 1.3. You then change the line segment to represent a centerline style.

The centerline can now be used to place diametric profile dimensions.2. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 81 . from the Styles drop-down list. select Centerline. The selected line will be converted to a centerline style. Select the line segment and on the Standard toolbar.

Repeat simple shapes to build more complex shapes. You can use tools such as the rectangle. • • • • • Creating Sketches . This lesson focuses on creating closed profiles.Rules for Creating Sketches Creating sketch geometry is as easy as drawing a closed shape using Autodesk Inventor Sketch tools. Draw the profile sketch roughly to size and shape. Use closed loops for profiles. or polygon or you can constrain sketch geometry so that separate sketch elements come together to create a closed shape. Do not fillet the corners of a sketch if you can apply a fillet to the edges of the finished 3D feature and achieve the same effect. Principle Following are some rules for successful sketching: • Keep the sketch simple. Accept default dimensions until the shape is stabilized. Complex sketch geometry can be difficult to manage as designs evolve. There are several ways to create closed shapes. Use 2D constraints to stabilize sketch shape before size. circle. for example a path for a sweep feature or to create a surface.Example 82 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . There will be times when you need to create sketch geometry that is not closed.

In the event you need to edit the sketch coordinate system. Principle In most cases. showing its current origin and orientation. click Edit Coordinate System. exit the sketch and in the Browser.Sketch Coordinate System Each sketch you create has its own independent coordinate system. right-click the sketch and click Edit Coordinate System on the shortcut menu. All Rights Reserved 83 . Independent Sketch Coordinates Editing the Sketch Coordinate System The following steps represent an overview for editing the Sketch Coordinate System. This coordinate system is based upon the location and method you use when you create the sketch and is completely independent from the 3D part model's coordinate system. 1. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you can right-click the sketch in the browser and on the shortcut menu. you will not need to edit the sketch coordinates but if required. You must exit the sketch before you edit the coordinate system so you can change the orientation of the axes and reposition the origin. The sketch coordinate icon appears. Inc.

The change the direction of the X or Y axis. To change the sketch coordinate's origin. click the axis then select a new edge to align the axis to. 84 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . and then select a new point for the origin. 3.2. select the origin of sketch coordinate icon.

select a data format. enter the desired values. enter the desired values. XY: This format specifies a coordinate relative to the origin. In the X and Y boxes. enter the desired values. Inc. Relative Orientation: This option is used when moving faces on a base solid. This enables you to create sketch geometry at specific lengths or angles prior to placing parametric dimensions. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Precise Input When creating sketch geometry it is possible to use the Precise Input toolbar to enter precise values or coordinates. The first point is relative to the origin. Relative Orientation is not available while sketching. In the X and ° boxes. It is also possible to use this tool to create sketch geometry based on relative coordinates from other model geometry. In the Y and ° boxes. Subsequent points are relative to the last point picked or entered. Delta Input: This option sets the inputs as a delta to the last point picked or entered. Y°: This format specifies a coordinate by y coordinate and angle from the positive X axis. All Rights Reserved 85 . Input Type: From the drop-down list. It will rotate the axes of the active coordinate system. X°: This format specifies a coordinate by x coordinate and angle from the positive X axis. Procedure Access Methods Use the following method to access the Precise Input tool: Toolbar View menu > Toolbars > Inventor Precise Input Precise Input Toolbar Relative Origin: This option enables you to enter coordinates relative to a point you select.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Precise Input tool. On the 2D Sketch Panel Bar. On the View menu. click Toolbars > Inventor Precise Input to display the Inventor Precise Input toolbar. 3.d°: This format specifies a coordinate by a distance and angle from the positive X axis. (Optionally enter offset values for the selected point. 2. click the icon and pick a point on the sketch geometry. In the D and ° boxes. 1. click a sketch tool such as Line. To set your relative Precise Relative point. enter the desired values. Create a new sketch. 4.) 86 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Click to accept the point. Continue to enter additional input values as required. Click the Delta X Delta Y button to move the origin indicator to the last point.The point is previewed. Click to accept the position. All Rights Reserved 87 . 6. 5. Inc. select the desired Input Type and enter the appropriate values in the corresponding boxes. The point is previewed. From the Input Type drop-down list.

Continue to enter additional input values as required. 88 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . The point is previewed. 8.The point is previewed. 7. Click to accept the point. Click to accept the point. Right-click in the graphics window and click done on the shortcut menu.

Right-click the feature and click Edit Sketch. Browser Browser Browser Double-click the sketch. Revolve. Procedure In this lesson you learn how to edit sketches. As you edit the sketches. where only the features existing at the time this sketch was created are visible. you are returned to the sketch environment and the Panel Bar changes. The ability to edit these features is fundamental to any parametric modeling session. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 89 . When the sketch is used by a feature such as Extrude. Note the change in appearance in the browser as the background color changes indicating the active feature. You can expand the Extrusion1 feature to expose the consumed sketch. In the image below. the sketch becomes consumed by the feature and appears under the feature in the Browser. Sketch1 has been consumed by Extrusion1. You can see each of the sketches in the Browser by expanding the particular feature(s). you will be creating multiple sketches. providing you with access to all the sketch tools initially used in creating the sketch. Right-click the sketch and click Edit Sketch. or Hole. Inc. Editing the sketch places the model in a rolled back state. Access Methods The following methods can be used to edit sketches.Editing Sketches As you build your parametric model. When you edit sketches. the changes are applied to the features based upon those sketches.

Editing Sketches On the Standard toolbar. 90 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . click the Return tool to exit the sketch environment.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for editing sketches. 1. and constraints. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. In the Browser. Once the sketch has been activated for editing. Inc. right-click the feature or sketch and click Edit Sketch on the shortcut menu. you can make changes to geometry. All Rights Reserved 91 . dimensions.

The changes in the sketch are applied to the 3D features of the part. 92 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . click the Return tool to exit the sketch and return to the part model.2. 3. on the Standard toolbar. When you are done editing the sketch. Continue to make edits to the sketch as required.

missing coincident constraints. Common problems include redundant points. Extrude Dialog Box .Sketch Doctor The Sketch Doctor is a tool that assists you in fixing common problems that can occur in your sketches. while other problems may require manual editing and correction. Inc. the presence of the Red Cross icon indicates that problems have been detected with the sketch. While a sketch is activated. which will diagnose and assist you in fixing the problems detected. All Rights Reserved 93 . Access Methods The following methods can be used to access the Sketch Doctor. The Sketch Doctor can correct some problems. You click this button to start the Sketch Doctor.Sketch Problems Detected Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. right-click and click Sketch Doctor. and open loops. Browser In the Extrude dialog box. Sketched Feature Dialog Box This icon is available in the Sketched Feature dialog box if a problem with the sketch is detected. Procedure In this lesson you learn how to use the Sketch Doctor to fix common problems in sketches.

Diagnose Sketch Dialog Box Detected problems are listed in the Sketch Doctor dialog box. Sketch Doctor Dialog Box In the Diagnose Sketch dialog box. all tests are selected. By default. click Diagnose Sketch to start the diagnosis. You select the problem to recover and click Next.In the Sketch Doctor dialog box. Sketch Doctor Dialog Box 94 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . you select the diagnostic tests to perform.

Inc.A problem diagnosis/description is displayed. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Read the import options closely while importing geometry. Sketch Doctor Dialog Box Sketch Problems Tip Most sketch problems occur when you import 2D geometry from other applications. Sketch Doctor Dialog Box You select the appropriate treatment option and click Finish. All Rights Reserved 95 . and import only the geometry required for the sketch. Information about potential fixes is included.

From the Main table of contents page. you create some basic sketch geometry use the sketch to create 3D features. click Exercise: Creating Sketches The completed exercise is shown in the following image. 3D Part Created Using Sketches 96 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . 2.Exercise: Creating Sketches In this exercise. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching From the table of contents for Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching.

applied to a line segment. 2D Constraints on Part Sketch Objectives After completing this lesson. a vertical constraint. A tangent constraint added to an arc forces that arc to remain tangent to the geometry that it has been constrained. you will be able to: • • • • • • Understand the concept of constraining sketches Understand geometric constraints Understand how to plan constraints Show and delete constraints applied to 2D sketch geometry Use the Show All tool to show all constraints applied to a sketch Create and use construction geometry in the sketch Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. For example.Constraining Sketches Overview Overview Overview You use geometric constraints to control the sketch geometry to which they have been applied. All Rights Reserved 97 . Inc. forces that line segment to always be vertical. In this lesson you learn how to work with constraint sketches.

you are adding a level of intelligence to the 2D geometry. Principle As you create sketches. some constraints are inferred (applied automatically). or dimensions. horizontal. that line is forced to be horizontal at all times. if a horizontal constraint is applied to a line. The sketch on the left was purposely drawn utilizing only some of the inferred constraints. Sketch Before and After Constraining 98 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . As you continue to develop the sketch. In most cases the inferred constraints are sufficient for your initial constraints. For example. The sketch on the right is the result of adding additional constraints such as vertical. you may need to add additional constraints to properly stabilize the sketch geometry. Constraints stabilize sketch geometry by placing limits on how the geometry can change as the result of constraint dragging. The following image illustrates the effect of constraints on sketch geometry.Constraining Sketches in Autodesk Inventor When you add constraints to 2D geometry. and colinear.

Access Methods The following methods can be used to access the 2D geometric constraints. Each constraint type offers a unique capability and is used to create a specific constraint condition. 2D Sketch Panel Shortcut Menu In the graphics window.Geometric Constraints Procedure Geometric Constraints You can apply several different types of geometric constraints to your sketch geometry. right-click and click Create Constraint. Inc. The following image shows the 2D geometric constraints available from the 2D Sketch Panel. All Rights Reserved 99 . Available Geometric Constraints Constraint Potential Sketch Elements Line Constraint Condition Created Constrained geometry is perpendicular to each other Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. In this lesson you learn about the different constraints available and how they can be used.

Endpoint of Line. Point. Points. Points. Arcs Lines.Constraint Potential Sketch Elements Line Constraint Condition Created Constrained geometry is parallel to each other Constrained geometry is tangent to each other Constrains two points together. Arc Lines. Pairs of Points (including Midpoints) Lines. Arcs Lines. Circles. Arc Line. Can constraint a line to a point Constrains circles or arcs to share the same center point location Constrains the geometry to lie along the same line Constrains the geometry to lie parallel to the X axis of the sketch coordinate system Constrains the geometry to lie parallel to the Y axis of the sketch coordinate system Constrains the geometry to have equal radii or lines to have the same length Constrains the geometry to fixed at its current position relative to the sketch coordinate system Constrains geometry to be symmetrical about a selected centerline Line. Circles. Arcs 100 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Center Point Circle. Ellipse Axes Lines. Circles. Circle. Pairs of Points (including Midpoints) Lines.

4. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. On the Panel Bar. On the Panel Bar.Process Overview The following steps present an overview to applying different types of geometric constraints. Select a circle. Apply an Equal Constraint 1. click the Horizontal constraint tool and select the geometry to be constrained. The selected geometry is now constrained to be Equal in size. All Rights Reserved 101 . you have an opportunity to place additional types of constraints. 3. Apply a Horizontal Constraint between a point and a midpoint 1. or arc. Apply a Horizontal Constraint 1. line. click the Equal constraint tool. Select the circle. click the Horizontal constraint tool. Inc. line. On the Panel Bar. In the exercise portion of this lesson. or arc to apply the Equal constraint. 2.Applying Constraints .

Select the midpoint of an existing line. Select a point such as the endpoint of a line or center of a circle. 3. The geometry is now constrained horizontally based upon the two points selected. 102 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .2.

Inc. 5.Apply a Symmetrical Constraint 1. click the Symmetric constraint tool. All Rights Reserved 103 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Select the first sketch element for the constraint. 3. Tip: You only need to select the symmetry line once during the current session of the Symmetric Constraint tool. On the Panel Bar. Continue selecting other sketch elements to apply the Symmetric constraint. 2. Select a sketch element to be used for the symmetry line. 4. Select the second sketch element for the constraint.

delete the automatically applied constraints and apply constraints to remove the degrees of freedom. determine how sketch elements relate to each other and apply the appropriate sketch constraints. you should determine whether any degrees of freedom remain on the sketch. Concept In this lesson you learn how to plan constraints for your 2D sketch geometry. During the sketch creation process. constraints are automatically applied. you must add constraints or delete existing constraints. Therefore. If required. Following are some key concepts regarding constraint planning. 104 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . those constraints do not always completely represent your design intent. As you create sketch geometry.Planning Constraints As you create sketch geometry. • Analyze automatically applied constraints. some constraints are automatically applied. • Determine sketch dependencies. However. After the sketch is created.

you should constrain the sketch to prevent the geometry from distorting. you will be able to predict the effect the dimensions will have on the sketch geometry. When you apply constraints to your sketch geometry.• Use only needed constraints. Before you place dimensions on your sketch elements. • Stabilize shape before size. All Rights Reserved 105 . As you place the parametric dimensions. the sketch elements update to reflect the correct size. In some situations you may be required to leave sketch geometry underconstrained. By stabilizing the geometry with constraints. Inc. It is not necessary to fully constrain sketch geometry in order to create 3D features. take into account the design intent and the degrees of freedom remaining on the sketch. If necessary use the Fix constraint to fix portions of the sketch. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You can use the constraint-drag technique to see the remaining degrees of freedom on the sketch.

you can correct this distortion and generate a sketch that is properly constrained and meets your design intent. By using a combination of geometric constraints and parametric dimensions. you can minimize distortion on the sketch as it updates to reflect the dimensioned values. 106 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching .• Place dimensions on large elements before small ones. By placing dimensions on larger elements first. It is important to understand that constraints and dimensions work together to constrain the geometry. Some constraint combinations may distort underconstrained portions of your sketch. • Use both geometric constraints and dimensions.

This will allow the feature to change as the design evolves. In the case of adaptive parts. take into account features that may change as the design evolves. When you identify sketch features that may change. When constraining sketches. All Rights Reserved 107 . leave those features underconstrained. you will intentionally leave features underconstrained to enable them to adapt to other parts in the assembly.• Identify sketch elements that might change size. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc.

The Show Constraints tool enables you to view the constraints applied to the selected geometry and if necessary. 2D Sketch Panel Show/Delete Constraints Toolbar Viewing Constraints. On the Show Constraints toolbar. Click the PushPin icon on the Show Constraints toolbar to leave the toolbar displayed until you close it. you may need to view and possibly delete some constraints. 108 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Deleting Constraints. select the constraint symbol and press DELETE. On the Show Constraints toolbar. select the constraint(s) and delete them. Procedure Access Methods The following method can be used to access the Show/Delete Constraints tool. Lock the Constraint Toolbar. click the constraint. The geometry referenced by the selected constraint will be highlighted. or right-click the selected constraint and click Delete.Showing and Deleting Constraints As you create and constrain your 2D sketches.

To delete the constraint. Selecting the geometry will display the toolbar permanently until you close it.Locked Mode Select the constraint symbol to view the geometry referenced by the constraint. You can lock the temporary toolbar by selecting the PushPin icon. Inc. click the Show Constraints tool. or right-click the constraint symbol and click Delete. 1. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 109 . Show Constraints Toolbar . 4.Temporary Mode 3. Pause over. On the Panel Bar. or select the geometry. press DELETE. Show Constraints Toolbar . 2. Pausing over the geometry will display the Show Constraints toolbar temporarily until you move your cursor away from the toolbar.Process Overview The following steps present an overview for using the Show/Delete Constraints tool.

Pause over or select the constraint symbol to highlight the constrained geometry. When you select the Show All Constraints tool.Show All Constraints The Show All Constraints tool enables you to see all constraints applied to the active sketch geometry.) F8 . (Sketch must be active. Click and drag on the vertical bars of the toolbars to move them to another location. Select the constraint symbol and press DELETE to delete the constraint.Hide all constraints The Constraint toolbars will appear next to each sketch element. Keyboard Shortcut Sketch Showing All Constraints 110 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Procedure Access Methods The following methods can be used to access the Show All Constraints tool. Show/Delete Constraint toolbars are displayed next to each sketch element. Shortcut Menu Right-click in the graphics window and click Show All Constraints.Show all constraints F9 .

you create. Create a new sketch or activate an existing sketch. Inc. Sketch Containing Construction Geometry Process Overview . Standard Toolbar In the following image below. All Rights Reserved 111 . the construction geometry is ignored. 1.Creating Construction Geometry The following steps present an overview for creating construction geometry. Access Methods Use the following method to access the Construction geometry style. construction lines are used to position the slot from the center of the circle and along the angled construction line. and dimension construction geometry just like any other 2D sketch geometry but when a 3D feature is created. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. constrain.Use Construction Geometry in the Sketch There may be times when you need to place geometry in your sketch that you do not want to be included in the 3D feature. Concept You can use construction geometry as a reference for dimensions to other normal sketch geometry as well as to constrain normal sketch geometry. To do this. In this lesson you learn how to create and constrain construction geometry.

select Normal from the Styles drop-down list.2. Converting Normal Geometry to Construction Geometry Tip You can convert normal geometry to construction geometry by selecting the geometry. select Construction. On the Sketch Panel Bar. 112 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . 3. select Construction from the Styles drop-down list. On the Standard toolbar. then on the Standard Toolbar in the Styles drop-down list. Continue sketching geometry as required. As you sketch the geometry it will be created as construction geometry. 5. click one of the sketch tools to create the geometry. 4. 6. on the Standard toolbar. To switch back to normal geometry creation. Constrain and dimension the geometry as required.

Sketched features are used in this exercise. Inc. you create and constrain sketch geometry. From the Main table of contents page. 2. click Exercise: Constraining Sketches The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Simple Part with Constrained Sketches Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Exercise: Constraining Sketches In this exercise. click Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching From the table of contents for Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching. All Rights Reserved 113 . More information on these features is presented in the next chapter. you create and constrain both normal and construction geometry. Using the concepts and procedures learned in this lesson.

you will be able to: • • • • • • Create various types of parametric dimensions Create and use driven dimensions on your sketch Use additional options when applying dimensions Create and apply dimensions to your sketch using the Automatic Dimensioning tool Use different formats when displaying dimensions on your sketch Understand best practices for dimensioning your sketch 114 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . 3D Part with Parametric Dimensions Objectives After completing this lesson. In this lesson you learn how to create and use various types of dimensions on your 2D sketch geometry.Dimensioning Sketches Overview Overview Overview Dimensioning your sketches is a major part of constraining the 2D geometry. While geometric constraints stabilize the sketch and make it predictable. dimensions size the sketch according to your design intent.

This technology enables you to quickly change a dimension and immediately see the effect the change has on the geometry. Sketch Elements with Various Dimensions Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Parametric Dimensions Adding parametric dimensions is the final step in fully constraining your sketch geometry. All Rights Reserved 115 . the shortcut menu displays additional options for placing the dimension. Autodesk Inventor places the appropriate type of dimension based on the geometry that you select. When placing dimensions. Inc. the sketch element changes size to reflect the value of the dimension. Procedure Unlike 2D CAD applications where dimensions are simply numeric representations of the size of the geometry. in a parametric 3D modeling application. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the General Dimension tool: Standard Toolbar Keyboard Shortcut D The following image shows various types of dimensions that you can apply to sketch geometry. dimensions are used to drive the size of the geometry. When you apply a parametric dimension to a sketch element. Several types of parametric dimensions are available but only one dimension tool is used to create them.

Applying Parametric Dimensions This section presents the processes for applying different types of parametric dimensions. b. click the General Dimension tool.Process Overview . Select the sketch element for the linear dimension and follow the sequence below. Select the sketch element for the radial/diameter dimension and follow the sequence below. Place the dimension Select the dimension and enter a new value Geometry changes to reflect new dimension c. click the General Dimension tool. or continue placing additional dimensions. Right−click in the graphics window and click Done on the shortcut menu. Place the dimension Select the dimension and enter a new value Geometry changes to reflect new dimension c. Linear Dimension: a. On the Panel Bar. Right−click in the graphics window and click Done on the shortcut menu. Radial/Diameter Dimension: a. b. 116 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . On the Panel Bar. or continue placing additional dimensions.

click the General Dimension tool. On the Panel Bar. Aligned Dimension: a. or continue placing additional dimensions. Click when the Aligned Dimension icon is displayed c. When creating an angular dimension select each line at a point on other than their endpoints. On the Panel Bar. Position the cursor near the geometry.Angular Dimension: a. Inc. or continue placing additional dimensions. c. Place the dimension Select the dimension and enter a new value Geometry changes to reflect new dimension Right−click in the graphics window and click Done on the shortcut menu. Tip: You could also right-click before positioning the dimension and click Aligned on the shortcut menu to set the dimension type as an Aligned dimension. Select the sketch element for the aligned dimension and follow the sequence below. Place the dimension Select the dimension and enter a new value Geometry changes to reflect new dimension d. b. Right−click in the graphics window and click Done on the shortcut menu. Select the sketch each element for the angular dimension and follow the sequence below. click the General Dimension tool. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 117 . b.

Autodesk Inventor evaluates the values as you enter them. • Display Edit Dimension dialog box automatically: While placing a dimension. • Linear dimension options: When you place a linear dimension to a line or 118 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Unit suffixes and parameters are case-sensitive. you would enter 50 cm. To specify a value of 50 centimeters in the same part. Values shown in red indicate an improper value or format. • Radial/Diameter dimension options: When you place a dimension on a arc or circle. inch. click Diameter or Radius to switch the default mode of the current dimension. Additional Dimension Options The following list represents additional options available on the shortcut menu when you place dimensions. the default mode is Diameter. If your part consists of multiple units of measurement you must enter the non-default unit suffixes. while values shown in black are considered to be valid. you would enter a value of 50 millimeters as 50 with no suffix.Entering Values Autodesk Inventor understands specific units of measurement such as millimeter. right-click in the graphics window and on the shortcut menu. For example. the default mode is Radius. and foot. For example 50 cm would be evaluated correctly while 50 CM is not valid. When dimensioning a circle. it must be entered in lowercase. centimeter. click Edit Dimension. if the default unit of measurement is millimeters. When you enter a unit suffix. meter. It is not necessary to enter the suffix of the default unit. right-click in the graphics window and on the shortcut menu. the Edit Dimension dialog box will appear automatically after each dimension is placed. When dimensioning an arc. With this option set.

d5 and so on. its parameter is also deleted and the original dimension name is not used again in the current part file. Inc. You can rename the default dimension names and modify their values in the Parameters dialog box. If you delete a dimension. These names are automatically generated each time a dimension is placed. right-click in the graphics window and on the shortcut menu. All Rights Reserved 119 .two points at an angle. Dimensions Stored as Parameters Each dimension you create is automatically named and stored as a parameter in the current part file. Selecting the Parameters tool will display the Parameters dialog box listing the Model Parameters. • Dimensioning to quadrants: When you need to place a dimension to the quadrant of a circle. Dimensions Listed as Model Parameters Notice the parameter names d3. place the cursor near the quadrant and look for the quadrant dimension glyph. click the desired dimension type. Select the arc or circle at the point where the glyph appears. d4. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

when you create a driven dimension. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the General Dimension tool and apply driven dimensions. The value of a driven dimension changes if the geometry it has been applied to changes. Unlike parametric dimensions which force the geometry to change size based on the dimension value. However. On the Standard toolbar. these dimensions will be parametric by default. Once all the degrees of freedom have been removed. the sketch is considered fully constrained and you are not allowed to place any additional constraints or parametric dimensions. Each parametric dimension you apply reduces the degrees of freedom available on each sketch. This option is available only if the General Dimension tool is active or one or more existing dimensions are currently selected. driven dimensions are driven by the geometry.Driven Dimensions As you apply dimensions to your sketch geometry. select Driven. Standard Toolbar Keyboard Shortcut D Fully Constrained Sketch Containing a Driven Dimension 120 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Because driven dimensions do not force the geometry to change. from the Styles drop-down list. Principle You create driven dimensions with the same dimension tool used for parametric dimensions. they do not remove any degrees of freedom from the sketch. you must set the dimension style to Driven.

Inc. enabling you to control the display of the dimensions. if you attempt to apply a dimension that would overconstrain the sketch. additional options such as tolerances. Click Accept to create a driven dimension based on your selection. you can reference an existing dimension by selecting the dimension in the graphics window.Automatic Driven Dimensions Note As you place dimensions on your sketch. The dimension parameter name is automatically entered in the Edit Dimension dialog box. you will be given the option to create the dimension as a driven dimension. When you want to reference other dimensions in a new dimension. The preceding image shows dimension d25 being created equal to dimension d24. Additional Options for Applying Dimensions When you apply dimensions to your sketch elements. select an existing dimension to reference. are available. Also available are tools designed to assist you in creating dimensions referenced from other features and/or dimensions. Procedure Referencing Other Dimensions When you create a new dimension. with the Edit Dimension dialog box open. The cursor Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 121 .

Flyout Options When applying parametric dimensions. Recently Used Values: Displays a list of recently used values. This option appears only if User Parameters have been created. Edit Dimension Flyout Measure: Enables you to measure another sketch element or 3D feature. the following options are available on the Edit Dimension flyout. Tolerance: Displays the Tolerance dialog box enabling you to assign a tolerance to the parametric dimension. After the dimensions are displayed you can select a dimension for use in the existing dimension. the parameter name of the dimension you selected is entered in the Edit Dimension dialog box. Show Dimensions: Enables you to select a feature on the 3D part to display the underlying dimensions. 122 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Select any value for use in the current dimension. List Parameters: Lists the current User Parameters in a window. When you select the existing dimension. Edit Dimension Dialog Box . The dimension being referenced can be used alone or in a formula. enabling you to select a User Parameter for use in the current dimension.changes to indicate that you are referencing an existing dimension. The resulting value is placed in the Edit Dimension dialog box.

This will not remove dimensions and/or constraints that you applied manually. Although you can use the tool to dimension all sketch elements automatically by not selecting any elements and clicking the Apply button. All Rights Reserved 123 . Dimensions Required: Displays the number of dimensions required to fully constrain the sketch. The Auto Dimension tool is intended to be used in conjunction with the General Dimension tool and manually added or inferred constraints. Remove: Removes the dimensions and/or constraints applied by the Auto Dimension tool. Apply: Applies dimensions and constraints to the selected geometry. Manually applied dimensions and/or constraints will affect this number. consider using at least one fix constraint or constrain the geometry to the origin of the sketch. Inc. Dimensions: When selected. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Tip: When this number is 2. all elements are considered for dimensioning. Standard Toolbar Auto Dimension Dialog Box The following options are available in the Auto Dimension dialog box: Curves: Select the sketch elements to be automatically dimensioned. applies constraints to the sketch elements. Constraints: When selected. Access Methods Use the following method to access the Auto Dimension tool. If no sketch elements are selected. applies dimensions to the sketch elements. you should select the geometry based on how you want the automatic dimensions applied.Automatic Dimensioning The Auto Dimension tool applies constraints and dimensions to the entire sketch or only those sketch elements that are selected. Procedure For best results you should apply constraints and any dimensions you would prefer not be automatically calculated.

1. 124 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . click the Auto Dimension tool and select the geometry to be automatically dimensioned. Create a new sketch and add the constraints and dimensions that you prefer not be automatically calculated. Process Overview . On the Panel Bar. 2.Automatic Dimensioning The following steps represent an overview for using the Auto Dimension tool.Done: Closes the dialog box. Notice the constraints that have been added manually. This ensures that critical constraints do not need to be automatically calculated.

click the Apply button to apply dimensions and constraints to the selected geometry. Click Done to close the dialog box. Use standard dimension editing techniques to adjust the dimension values as required. 5. Move the dimensions as required to clean up the automatic placement. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 125 .3. 4. In the Auto Dimension dialog box.

Expression: Dimension is displayed as an expression. click Dimension Display. Name: Dimension is displayed as a parameter name. right-click in the graphics window and on the shortcut menu. 126 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . Procedure Dimension Display Options The following options are available on the Dimension Display submenu: Value: Dimension is displayed as nominal value. You then select a dimension display option. While in an active sketch.Displaying Dimensions You can control how dimensions are displayed in the graphics window by using different dimension display options.

Incorporate relationships between dimensions.Tolerance: Dimension is displayed with tolerance values. Guidelines for Dimensioning Sketches Consider the following guidelines when adding dimensions to your sketch: Principle • • • • Use the General Dimension tool to place critical dimensions. Consider both dimensional and geometric constraints to meet the overall design intent. Inc. All Rights Reserved 127 . For example. • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the other dimension changes as well. if the first dimension changes. reference one dimension to the other. Use geometric constraints when possible. For example. place a perpendicular constraint instead of an angle dimension of 90 degrees. and then use the Auto Dimension tool to speed up the dimensioning process. Place large dimensions before small ones. Precise Value: Dimension is displayed as precise value regardless of precision setting. if two dimensions are supposed to be the same value. With this relationship.

Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 2. 3D Part with Parametric Dimensions 128 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . click Exercise: Dimensioning Sketches The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Using the techniques learned in this lesson.Exercise: Dimensioning Sketches In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. apply a combination of parametric and driven dimensions to the sketch geometry. you apply dimensions to a sketch. click Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching From the table of contents for Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching.

and dimension a sketch as show here. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. constrain.Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Sketching Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Sketching Print Exercise Reference In this exercise. click Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching From the table of contents for Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching. Fully Constrained and Dimensioned Sketch Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 2. All Rights Reserved 129 . Inc. click Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Sketching The completed exercise is shown in the following image. create. you create a new part file and using the techniques and concepts learned in this chapter. From the Main table of contents page.

130 Chapter 2: Introduction to Sketching . How to create and edit 2D sketches.Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • • • Basic rules for creating sketches. How to apply parametric dimension to 2D sketches. Fix common problems associated with sketches. How to display dimensions Guidelines and best practices for dimensioning sketches. About the types of constraints available and what types of geometry they can be applied to. How to use construction geometry when creating 2D sketches. What makes parametric and driven dimensions different. How to constrain 2D sketches in Autodesk Inventor.

Create extruded features using the Extrude tool. Creating profiles containing multiple closed loops. Specify termination options when you create extruded features. • • • • • • • In this chapter After completing this chapter. Creating sketch planes. • • • • • • • • • • • • • Sketched features.. Use the Sketch tool to create new sketches.Creating Simple Sketched Features Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about. Use existing part faces to define new sketch planes. Using the Extrude tool to create extruded features. Consumed and unconsumed sketches. Base and secondary features. Edit extruded features. Edit revolved features. Create revolved features using the Revolve tool.. Using the Revolve tool to create revolved features. .. you will be able to. Sharing sketch geometry. Create reference geometry from existing part geometry.. Specifying different termination options for extrude features Editing features after you have created them. Cut. The Join. and Intersect feature relationships. Using part faces to define a sketch Application options that enable you to automatically project edges on a new sketch. • • Create sketches and profiles for use in sketch features.

Part Created Using a Single Shared Sketch Objectives After completing this lesson. In this lesson you learn the concept of sketched features and how they are created. you will be able to • • • • Understand the concept of simple sketched features Identify consumed and unconsumed sketches in your model Identify the two different types of profiles and options for working with closed loop profiles Share sketch features 132 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .Introduction to Sketched Features Overview Overview Overview Three-dimensional (3D) features that you create in Autodesk Inventor fall into one of two categories: sketched features or placed features. The term "sketched feature" refers to a 3D feature that is based on a 2D sketch.

Typical Sketched Feature Creation The image below represents a typical workflow for creating a 3D part based upon sketched features. additional sketched and/or placed features are added to the 3D model. For simple sketched features. The base sketch is created which is used to create the base feature. Simple Sketched Features . For more complex sketched features. Used for both base and secondary features. All Rights Reserved 133 . Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Creation of Sketched Features Sketched Feature Attributes The key attributes of sketched features are as follows: • • • Requires an unconsumed sketch.Simple Sketched Features As the name implies. The result of the sketched feature can add or remove mass from the 3D geometry. After you create the base feature. you begin by first creating the sketch or profile for the 3D feature. sketched features are 3D features that are created from an existing 2D sketch. When you create a sketched feature. As you add the additional sketched features. options are available that control whether the secondary sketched features will add or remove material from the existing 3D geometry. multiple sketches can be created and used within one sketch feature. The first sketch feature you create is considered the base feature. These features serve as the basis for most of your designs using Autodesk Inventor. Secondary sketches and features are then added to the 3D model.Concept You create your 3D model by using multiple sketches representing various profiles of the 3D part and building on those sketches with sketch features. this profile usually represents a 2D section of the 3D feature being created.

the sketch itself becomes consumed by the 3D sketched feature. the initial sketch is created for you automatically. the sketch is considered unconsumed and can be used for any sketched feature. In the browser. Consumed Sketches 134 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . the sketches are nested below the sketched feature in which they were used. Prior to this time.Consumed and Unconsumed Sketches When you create a new part. you create a sketched feature. In most cases you use this default sketch for the basis of your 3D geometry. to create 3D geometry from the initial sketch. such as Extrude or Revolve. Unconsumed Sketch Consumed Sketches The following image shows sketches consumed by the sketched features. Unconsumed Sketch The image below shows the initial sketch before it is consumed by the sketched feature. After the sketch is created. When you create the 3D sketched feature.

Inc. For example. Sketch Shortcut Menu The following options are available on the Sketch shortcut menu: Edit Sketch: Activates the sketch environment for editing. This option sets the visibility of the sketch to On. All Rights Reserved 135 . In the browser. you could change the direction of the current X or Y axes. Redefine: Enables you to redefine the plane on which the sketch was created. Edit Coordinate System: Activates the sketch enabling you to adjust the sketch coordinate system. Create Note: Attaches a note to the sketch using the Engineer's Notebook interface. or reposition the sketch origin. Any changes you make to the sketch are reflected in the 3D geometry. Any changes you make are reflected in the 3D geometry. you still have access to the sketch for editing and other operations. Share Sketch: Shares the sketch making it available for additional sketch features. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Options for Consumed Sketches After the sketch has been consumed. right-click on the sketch to access these options. its visibility is automatically turned off. Visibility: When a sketch is consumed by a feature.

In this situation you have one sketch containing multiple closed profiles. When you create sketched features from these types of profiles. Closed profiles are the most common and are used to create 3D geometry. Sketch Containing Multiple Closed Loop Profiles 136 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . note the ability to select only the profiles you want included in the sketched feature. There are two different types of profiles: open and closed. The closed profiles in some cases may intersect each other. In the bottom image.Sketches and Profiles When you create sketches it is possible to create sketch geometry that contains multiple profiles. Open profiles are used to create paths and surfaces and can also appear as the result of projecting reference geometry. a sketch containing multiple closed loop profiles is used to create an extruded feature. Multiple Closed Loop Profiles In the following image. Concept As you build more complex sketches. you are able to select any individual closed profile or multiple closed profiles to be included in the feature. you may end up with multiple closed loop profiles.

When you share the sketch its geometry becomes available for an unlimited number of additional sketched features.Share Sketch Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Procedure Under certain circumstances. Shortcut Menu . Inc.Sharing Sketch Features You can reuse an existing sketch after it as been consumed by the sketched feature--this is referred to as sharing a sketch. Sharing Sketch Features . All Rights Reserved 137 . you can share the sketch thereby making it available for additional sketched features. If your sketch contains geometry that is meant to define separate features on the part. Shortcut Menu In the Browser. Access Methods Use the following method to share a sketch. sharing the sketch is an alternative to creating multiple sketches. right-click on a consumed sketch and click Share Sketch.

After you share a sketch. even after being consumed by the sketched feature. The icon is colored indicating that the sketch (and any dimensions added) will remain visible. Part/Assembly Browser . be certain this is the method you want to use to accomplish your design intent.The following image shows a sketch that has been shared and is being used in two sketched features. You must manually turn off visibility for a shared sketch. there is no way to "un-share" or delete the shared sketch. Share with Caution! Tip Before you share a sketch. 138 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .Shared Sketch • • • The hand indicates the sketch has been shared.

click Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features From the table of contents for Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features. click Exercise: Introduction to Sketched Features 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. All Rights Reserved 139 . Part Created Using a Single Shared Sketch Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. From the Main table of contents page. You then share the sketch to make it available for additional features. you create some simple sketched features from a sketch consisting of multiple closed loop profiles. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1.Exercise: Introduction to Sketched Features In this exercise.

and you learn about creating and referencing sketch geometry. In this lesson you learn how to work with sketch planes. you will be able to • • • • Use the Sketch tool to create new sketch planes Define a new sketch plane based upon an existing part face Reference existing model edge geometry when you create sketches Create reference geometry 140 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .Working with Sketch Planes Overview Overview Overview Every sketch you create defines a 2D plane on which your sketch geometry is created. Completed Pillar Block Objectives After completing this lesson.

select an existing sketch. • Activate an existing sketch On the Standard toolbar. The existing sketch is activated for editing. You can select planes or sketches in the graphics window or in the browser. All Rights Reserved 141 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.The Sketch Tool You use the Sketch tool to create new sketches or to activate existing sketches. When you select the Sketch tool on the Standard toolbar. click the Sketch tool and in the browser. you are prompted to select a plane to create a sketch or an existing sketch to edit. Procedure Standard Toolbar Using the Sketch Tool The following examples show potential uses of the Sketch tool. Inc.

click the Return button or.• Create a new sketch On the Standard toolbar. click the Sketch tool and select a plane or face on the part. use one of the following methods: On the Standard toolbar. 142 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . • • • • To exit the sketch. Right-click in the graphics window and click Finish Sketch on the shortcut menu. click the Sketch tool or On the Standard toolbar. aligned to the selected face. A new sketch is created.

The sketch plane is created on the selected face. Creating Sketch Planes on a Part Face The following examples demonstrate how to create sketch planes on a part face. Using this method. • Create a new sketch plane aligned to a selected face Right-click on a face of the part click New Sketch on the shortcut menu. You can create new sketch planes on any flat surface of an existing part. Procedure Standard Toolbar Shortcut Menu Right-click on a part face and click New Sketch. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Using a Part Face to Define a Sketch One of the most common methods for creating new sketches is to use a part face to define your sketch plane. the new sketch plane can be created directly on the selected face or offset from the selected face to a specified distance. All Rights Reserved 143 . Inc.

An offset dialog box is displayed. The sketch plane is created offset from the selected face at the distance you specified. click the Sketch tool 2.Click on the face and drag the sketch plane away from the selected face. 144 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .• Create a new sketch plane.On the Standard toolbar. offset from a selected face 1. enter a value for the offset and click the green checkmark. 3.In the Offset dialog box.

This geometry is known as reference geometry. All Rights Reserved 145 . Without this reference geometry. the edges of the selected face are projected onto the new sketch when you create a new sketch plane on an existing face. the edges of the selected face are automatically projected onto the new sketch. When you create new sketch planes on existing model faces. Options Dialog Box .Direct Model Edge Referencing Direct model edge referencing refers to a process in which you reference existing model edge geometry in the creation of new sketch geometry. it would be otherwise impossible to dimension or constrain new sketch geometry to existing features on the 3D part. Procedure Uses for Direct Model Edge References Following are potential uses for edge references: • • • For dimensions to new sketch geometry For relational constraints to new sketch geometry As the basis for new sketched features Application Options .Sketch Tab Referencing Model Edge Geometry The following examples demonstrate how to reference model edge geometry when creating new sketches. The edges of the existing part face Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Sketch Tab When you select the Autoproject Edges for Sketch Creation and Edit option on the Sketch tab in the Options dialog box. Inc. • Create a new sketch on an existing part face.

Create new sketch geometry and use the projected reference geometry for dimensions and/or constraints. This concept is known as 146 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . On the Panel Bar. • • Direct model edge referencing in the context of an assembly: Create a new sketch on a face of the active part. click the Project Geometry tool and select a face on another part in the assembly. The new sketch geometry is created by projected the edges of the selected face. If the source geometry projected onto the new sketch changes. Note the appearance of the Adaptive indicator. This icon indicates the feature is adaptive to the referenced part in the assembly. this feature will automatically update to reflect the changes.are automatically projected onto the new sketch.

Inc. To demonstrate Adaptivity. As a result. All Rights Reserved 147 . the projected geometry updates to reflect the changes in the source part.Adaptivity and is covered in greater detail later in this course. the source geometry on the first part in the assembly has been modified. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

the reference geometry is still created. it is projected onto the current sketch plane and is created as reference geometry. As you select the geometry. it is always associative to the original source geometry. however. Access Methods You can use the following tools to create reference geometry: Panel Bar Panel Bar Reference Geometry Attributes Following are some key attributes for reference geometry: • • • • • • Can be used as the basis for dimensions to new sketch geometry Can be used to apply relational constraints to new sketch geometry Cannot be dimensioned Cannot be trimmed Can be mirrored Cannot be drawn. The only way to create it is by using the Project Geometry tool. you are prompted to select geometry to project onto the current sketch plane.Creating Reference Geometry You cannot draw reference geometry. If you project geometry from another part in the assembly. it is not associative to the original source geometry. When you select this tool. Adaptivity is beyond the scope of this chapter but is covered in greater detail later in this course. the geometry is associative only if the Cross Part Geometry Projection option is selected. If the source geometry changes. If this option is not selected. This option is found on the Assembly tab in the Options dialog box. Procedure When you project geometry from the same part. the reference geometry will also change. can only be created by using Project Geometry tool or by selecting the Autoproject Edges option 148 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .

Assembly Tab Application Options . Applications Options Dialog Box .Application Options . Inc. All Rights Reserved 149 . projecting geometry from other parts in the assembly will create associative (adaptive) reference geometry.Sketch Tab When the Autoproject Edges During Curve Creation option is selected.Assembly Tab With the Enable Associative Edge/Loop Geometry Projection During In-Place Modeling option selected on the Assembly tab in the Options dialog box.Sketch Tab Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you can autoproject geometry by hovering the pointer over the geometry to be projected while sketching. Application Options .

Sketching Shortcut Menu While sketching. click the Project Geometry tool and select the geometry to project onto the current sketch. 150 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . On the Panel Bar. 1. Create a new sketch on the existing part. Shortcut Menu .Process Overview The following procedures represent an overview for creating reference geometry.AutoProject Creating Reference Geometry . This will enable you to hover over geometry to automatically project onto the current sketch plane. 2. right-click in the graphics window and click AutoProject on the shortcut menu.

4. It will be automatically projected to the current sketch plane. Create a new sketch on the existing part. Right-click in the graphics window and click AutoProject on the shortcut menu. This will prevent the accidental projection of geometry while sketching over existing part features. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 3. 2. All Rights Reserved 151 . Hover over the geometry to project.To autoproject geometry during curve creation: 1. Begin sketching the required geometry. Tip: You may consider turning off the AutoProject option until it is needed again. Continue sketching the required geometry as required. Inc.

click Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features From the table of contents for Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Completed Pillar Block 152 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . For each sketch you will be required to create reference geometry and use direct model edge referencing. From the Main table of contents page. click Exercise: Working with Sketch Planes 2. Print Exercise Reference Note: Some 3D features are used in this exercise that will be covered in greater depth later in the course. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. you create several sketched features based upon different sketch planes.Exercise: Working with Sketch Planes In this exercise.

As you create these features you can adjust the feature relationship options for Join. you will be able to • • • • • Understand extruded features and how to create them Use the Extrude tool to create extruded features Understand the concept of using the Join. Index Slide Objectives After completing this lesson. you can also edit the underlying sketch profiles used in the extruded feature. Cut.Creating Extruded Features Overview Overview Overview One of the most common sketched features is the extruded feature. and Intersect. Cut. Inc. In this lesson you learn how to create extruded features using different termination options and how to edit the feature and profiles used to create them. After the feature is created. and Intersect options when you create extruded features Use the various termination options when you create extruded features Edit extruded features and the profiles used to create them Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 153 .

If the profile being extruded is closed. the extrusion direction is always perpendicular to the sketch profile being used. the sketch contains multiple closed loop profiles selected to form a single extruded feature. the extrusion will result in a surface. Examples of Simple Extruded Profiles In this example. Example of Extruded Features In this example. Example of Extruded Feature 154 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .Overview of Extruded Features An extruded feature is a sketched feature in which a profile is extruded to a distance specified by a value or based upon different termination options. you can choose between a solid or surface for the result of the extrusion. the sketch contains multiple closed loop profiles selected to form a single extruded feature with holes. Procedure Although it is possible to taper the faces of the extruded feature. If the profile being extruded is open.

A red arrow indicates that no profiles have been selected for the extrusion feature. extrude features require an unconsumed and visible sketch to be available.The Extrude Tool You use the Extrude tool to create extruded features from existing sketch profiles. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu The Extrude dialog box is opened when you start the Extrude tool.Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Extrude tool. Considered a sketched feature. Solid or Surface. Procedure Extrude Tool . If the sketch contains a single closed profile. All Rights Reserved 155 . If the sketch contains more than one profile. Inc. you are required to select the profiles to be included in the extruded feature. that profile is selected automatically when you start the Extrude tool. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Output: Specify the desired output option. Extrude Dialog Box The following features and options are available in the Extrude dialog box: Profile: Click this button to select geometry to be included in the extrusion.

Process Overview Following is an overview of the process for creating extruded features. The extruded feature is created. 1. click the Extrude tool. 3. Creating Extruded Features . 156 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .Direction: Select the direction icon or click and drag the preview of the extrusion in the desired direction. Create a new sketch. Adjust the options as required and click OK. 2. On the Panel Bar.

6. 5. 7. The additional extruded feature is added to the part.4. Create additional sketch geometry. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Adjust the options as required and click OK. All Rights Reserved 157 . On the Panel Bar. click the Extrude tool. Create additional sketch geometry as required.

9. The additional extruded feature is added to the part. click the Extrude tool. 158 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . Adjust the options as required and click OK.8. On the Panel Bar.

Note the red preview indicating material is being removed. Concept The feature relationship options are available in the Extrude dialog box.Feature Relationships . Inc. Dialog Box . Using this option results in material being removed from the existing part.Join.Feature Relationship Options Join: This option joins the result of the extruded feature being created to existing part geometry. Note the green preview indicating material is being added. All Rights Reserved 159 . Cut. Using this option results in material being added to the existing part. These options are not available for the first feature of the part. and Intersect When you create extruded features you have the ability to adjust feature relationship options to control the effect of the current feature on existing features. Cut: This option cuts the result of the extruded feature being created from the existing part. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Note the blue preview indicating an Intersect relationship. different interface options are available. Specifying termination options enables you to control where the feature starts and ends. 160 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . Specifying Termination When you create extruded features. Procedure Extrude Dialog Box . Depending on the option you choose.Intersect: This option removes material from the existing part by comparing the volume of the existing features and the feature being created and leaving only the volume shared between the existing features and the new feature.Termination Options Distance: This option extrudes the profile according to the distance specified. you can specify termination options for the feature in the Extrude dialog box.

If necessary. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Use the Terminator icon to select a solid or surface on which to terminate the extrusion. From To: This option extrudes the profile by starting the extrusion at the face selected in the From option and ending the extrusion at the second face selected.To Next: This option extrudes the profile to the next possible face or plane. To: This option extrudes the profile to terminate on the selected face or plane. If the selected termination face does not completely enclose the extrusion profile. All Rights Reserved 161 . use the extend face options. select the extend face option to terminate the feature on the extended face.

the extruded feature will continue to go all the way through the part. If the part changes.All: This option extrudes the profile all the way through the part. 162 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .

Inc. All Rights Reserved 163 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Edit Sketch: Select this option to activate the sketch for editing. you are able to change the parameters such as distance. All sketch tools are available for editing the geometry. locate the feature you want to edit. 1. When you edit the feature. All options used in creating the feature can be modified.Editing Features After you create an extruded feature. While editing the sketch. feature relationships. Feature Shortcut Menu Editing Extrude Features . you may be required to edit the extruded feature. To edit the sketch. and termination options and also reselect geometry to be included in the feature. Because it is a sketched feature. Depending on the changes made at the sketch level. you can edit it at any time. you can change dimensions and constraints. The following options are available on the Feature shortcut menu: Edit Feature: Select this option to open the Extrude dialog box. you are presented with the same dialog box that you used when you created the feature. When you edit an extruded feature. there are two potential items that can be edited: the feature itself or the underlying sketch that was used to create the feature. Procedure When you right-click on a feature. All changes are reflected in the extruded feature. and add or remove geometry from the sketch.Process Overview Following is an overview of the process for editing extruded features. In the Browser. right-click the feature and click Edit Sketch on the shortcut menu. the shortcut menu is displayed.

adjust the options as required to edit the feature and click OK. On the Standard toolbar. 3. In the Browser. make the changes required to the sketch. 164 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . 4.2. 5. Using standard sketch tools. right-click the feature and click Edit Feature on the shortcut menu. In the Extrude dialog box. click the Return button to exit the sketch.

click Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features From the table of contents for Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features. while you will be required to create other sketch geometry. From the Main table of contents page. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Exercise: Creating Extruded Features 2. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Index Slide Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you will build an Index Slide part file using several extrude features. Inc. Some initial geometry has been created.Exercise: Creating Extruded Features In this exercise. All Rights Reserved 165 .

Creating Revolved Features Overview Overview Overview You create revolved features by revolving a profile about an axis. you can adjust the feature relationship options for Join. you can also edit the underlying sketch profiles used in the revolved feature. Indexer Part File Objectives After completing this lesson. Cut. In this lesson you learn how to create revolved features using different feature relationship options and how to edit the feature and profiles used to create them. and Intersect options when you create revolved features Edit revolved features and the profiles used to create them 166 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . you will be able to • • • • Understand revolved features and how to create them Use the Revolve tool to create revolved features Understand the concept of using the Join. Cut. and Intersect. As you create these features. After you create the feature.

If the profile being extruded is closed. you can choose between a solid or surface for the result of the extrusion. Example of Revolved Feature Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 167 . the sketch contains a closed profile and one centerline. Example of Revolved Features In this example. The profile is revolved with the Cut feature relationship. Inc. reference geometry. the extrusion results in a surface.Overview of Revolved Features A revolved feature is a sketched feature in which a profile is revolved about an axis. When you start the Extrude tool. If the profile being extruded is open. the centerline is automatically selected as the axis of revolution. You can revolve the profile at a full 360 degrees or at an angle specified. Procedure Examples of Simple Revolved Profiles In this example. and one centerline. the sketch contains a single closed loop profile.

Extents: Select the desired option from the drop-down list. A red arrow indicates that no profiles have been selected for the revolved feature. Axis: Click this icon to select the line segment to use as the axis for the revolve feature. The Revolve tool requires an unconsumed and visible sketch to be available. If the sketch contains a centerline. it will be selected automatically as the axis for the revolved feature. 168 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . Angle: This option enables you to specify an angle and direction for the revolution.Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Revolve tool. that profile is selected automatically. If the sketch contains more than one profile. you are required to select the profiles to be included in the feature. if the sketch contains a single closed profile. When you start the Revolve tool. Tip: If the sketch contains a centerline it is selected automatically as the axis. Procedure Revolve Tool . Output: Select the desired output option: Solid or Surface.The Revolve Tool You use the Revolve tool to create revolved features from existing sketch profiles. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Revolve Dialog Box The following options are available in the Revolve dialog box: Profile: Click this button to select geometry to be included in the revolved feature.

All Rights Reserved 169 . Direction: Select the direction icon or click and drag the preview of the revolve in the desired direction. 2. Create a new sketch containing a profile to revolve. click the Revolve tool. This option is available only if the Extents option is set to Angle. Inc. On the Panel Bar. If the profile is being revolved about a centerline. adjust the options as required and click OK.Full: This option revolves the profile 360 degrees. Creating Revolved Features . 1. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. In the Revolve dialog box. consider using the Centerline style on the line segment.Process Overview The following steps present an overview for creating revolved features.

3. 170 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . Select the geometry to be included in the revolved feature and adjust the options as required. 4. click the Revolve tool. Create additional sketch geometry as required. On the Panel Bar. Click OK.

and Intersect. Note the green preview indicating material is being added. Cut. Concept Revolve Dialog Box . Cut: This option cuts the result of the revolved feature being created from the existing part. These options are not available for the first feature of the part. Cut. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. and Intersect When you create revolved features you have the ability to adjust feature relationship options to control the effect of the current feature on existing features. Using this option results in material being removed from the existing part. Using this option results in material being added to the existing part.Feature Relationship Options Join: This option joins the result of the revolved feature being created to existing part geometry. The feature relationship options are Join.Feature Relationships . All Rights Reserved 171 . Inc. Note the red preview indicating material is being removed.Join.

Note the blue preview indicating an Intersect relationship.Intersect: This option removes material from the existing part by comparing the volume of the existing features and the feature being created and leaving only the volume shared between the existing features and the new feature. 172 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .

and even add or remove geometry from the sketch. Depending on the changes made at the sketch level. All changes will be reflected in the revolved feature. Inc. you may be required to edit the revolved feature. you can change dimensions and constraints. All Rights Reserved 173 . you can edit it at any time. Feature Shortcut Menu Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you are able to change the parameters such as angle and feature relationships. you are presented with the same dialog box that was used when you created the feature. Edit Sketch: Activates the sketch for editing.Editing Features After the revolved feature is created. When you edit a revolved feature. and also reselect geometry to be included in the feature. Because it is a sketched feature. there are two potential items that can be edited: the feature itself or the underlying sketch that was used to create the feature. Edit Feature: Displays the Revolve dialog box. While editing the sketch. All sketch tools are available for editing the geometry. When you edit the feature. All options used in creating the feature can be modified. Procedure The following options are available on the shortcut menu when you right-click on a revolved feature.

click Return to exit the sketch. right-click the feature and click Edit Feature on the shortcut menu. 2. On the Standard toolbar. 5. 4.Editing Revolve Features . Right-click the feature and click Edit Sketch on the shortcut menu. locate the feature you want to edit. In the Browser. In the Browser.Process Overview The following steps present an overview for editing revolved features. adjust the options as required and click OK. 3. In the Revolve dialog box. 1. make the changes required to the sketch. Using standard sketch tools. 174 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .

Inc.Exercise: Creating Revolved Features In this exercise. Indexer Part File Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 175 . From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features From the table of contents for Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. You use the Project Geometry and Project Cut Edges tools to create different profiles to be revolved. The origin Z axis is projected on the first sketch and changed to a centerline. you create a simple Indexer part file using the Revolve tool. click Exercise: Creating Revolved Features 2.

Name your part file Rack-Slide.Challenge Exercise: Creating Simple Sketched Features Challenge Exercise: Creating Simple Sketched Features Print Exercise Reference In this exercise. click Challenge Exercise: Creating Simple Sketched Features 2. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Create a new part file and using the concepts and techniques learned in this chapter. create a 3D model of the geometry described below. you create a 3D Rack Slide part using the dimensions and geometry shown below.ipt. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features From the table of contents for Chapter 3: Creating to Simple Sketched Features. Rack Slide Dimensions 176 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features . From the Main table of contents page.

Different ways to create reference geometry from existing part edges. The effect of feature relationships on geometry. How to identify consumed and unconsumed sketches. To create and edit extrude features using the Extrude tool. To use the Sketch tool to create new sketches. How to specify termination options when using the Extrude tool. Inc. The effect of feature relationships on geometry when using the Revolve tool. To create and edit revolve features using the Revolve tool. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 177 . How to create new sketches on existing part faces.Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • • • The concept of creating sketched features and sharing sketches.

178 Chapter 3: Introduction to Sketched Features .

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • Locating and utilizing the default work planes. Controlling the appearance of work planes Editing work planes. Locating and utilizing the default work point. you will be able to.. • • • • • • Locate and utilize the default work features. . Create work planes. Controlling the appearance of work axes. Redefining a work axis after you have created it. Redefining a work point after you have created it. Control the appearance of work features.Introduction to Work Features Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about.. Create work points. In this chapter After completing this chapter. Create work axes.. Different methods for defining work axes.. Creating new work planes using several different methods. Locating and utilizing the default work axes Create work axes. Redefine work features. Creating work points. Different methods for defining work points Controlling the appearance of work points.

In this lesson you learn to create and use work planes. You can use them to assist in creating geometry. There are two main types of work planes: default work planes and user-defined work planes. display and use the default work planes in part and assembly files How to use the Work Plane tool to create additional work planes Identify examples of work planes Control the visibility of work planes.Work Planes Overview Overview Overview Work planes are planes that extend infinitely. placing constraints. and completing other modeling tasks. Control Valve with Work Planes Objectives After completing this lesson. 180 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . you will be able to • • • • Locate.

Browser Expand the Origin folder in the browser. each representing a different coordinate plane. The default work planes extend infinitely from the origin point. The three planes represented are the YZ plane. Access Methods Use the following method to access the default work planes. There are three default work planes.Default Work Planes Every part and assembly file contains default work planes. XZ plane. Concept When you create a new part file. These work planes are located in the Origin folder of the Part/Assembly Browser. and XY plane. Default Work Planes Potential Uses for Default Work Planes Following are some potential uses for default work planes: Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the initial sketch is created on one of these default planes. Inc. You can create additional sketches and/or features using the model or the default work planes. All Rights Reserved 181 .

To prevent the work plane from resizing. • • Visibility: This property is off by default.• • • • Basis for new sketches Basis for assembly constraints Feature termination options Basis for new work features Default Work Plane . The following image represents the work plane size before and after creating geometry.Appearance Properties The following options are available to control the appearances of work planes. All work planes with this option enabled are resized equally. 182 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . select this option and clear the check mark. Right-click on the work plane and click Visibility on the shortcut menu to turn on the work plane visibility. Auto-Resize: This property is on by default and enables the visible size of the work plane to adjust according to the geometry in the current file.

When you create a work plane using features of existing geometry. Work planes are parametrically attached to the model geometry and/or default work planes. Procedure In the image below. the work plane will also change. Inc. the work plane is created at a 30 degree angle from part face. the work plane updates to maintain the 30 degree angle. the work plane will move to retain the tangent relationship with the cylinder. and circular feature changes with the work plane. For example. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Work Plane tool. if you create a work plane that is tangent to a cylindrical surface with a radius of 2 mm. As the angle of the part face changes. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut ] Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. if the geometry changes.The Work Plane Tool You use the Work Plane tool to create work planes in the current part or assembly file. All Rights Reserved 183 . The circular extrusion is created from the work plane extruding to meet the part face. and that radius later changes to 5 mm. Work planes are used to define planar surfaces when the existing geometry does not represent the required plane.

Select the feature or plane. Each selection represents either an orientation or position. there is no dialog box to create a planar offset work plane.Creating Work Planes When you create work planes.Repeating the Work Plane Tool If you need to create multiple work planes. Select the second feature or plane. For example. Process Overview . 184 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . 1. The following steps represent an example for creating a work plane that is aligned with the Origin XY plane and tangent to the outside of the cylinder. The Work Plane tool is repeated until you cancel the command. 2. the type of work plane is based completely on the geometry you select. right-click in the graphics window and click Repeat Command on the shortcut menu. While the Work Plane tool is active. All work planes are created based on two or three selections. you can activate the Repeat Command option.

You can select this option to recreate the work plane using any valid method. however they are not edited in the same way as other parametric features. they appear in the browser just like other parametric features. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Any geometry that was based on the work plane being redefined updates to reflect the changes in the work plane. Inc. the Redefine Feature option is available. Redefining Work Planes As you create work planes. If you right-click the work plane in the browser or graphics window. All Rights Reserved 185 .The resulting work plane is created.

Part Face • Offset from plane or surface Selection 2 .Examples of Work Planes Several methods are available for creating work planes. When you create work planes. Concept • Aligned to origin plane/tangent to cylindrical surface Selection 2 . you select geometry and/or other work features.Release the mouse and enter an offset distance Result Selection 1 .Part Face Result Selection 1 .Click and drag from plane or surface 186 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . Following are some of the most common methods used to create work planes. Each selection will define either orientation or position for the new work plane.Cylindrical Surface Result Selection 1 .Origin Work Plane • Aligned to face/midpoint between two faces Selection 2 .

Vertex on Geometry Result Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Vertext on Geometry Selection 1 . Inc.Planar Surface on Part. All Rights Reserved 187 . Enter Angle Result Selection 1 .Part Face • Work plane on 3 points Selection 2 .Vertex on Geometry Selection 3 .• Angle from face/along an edge Selection 2 .

188 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .• Parallel to face/midpoint of edge Selection 2 . View Menu > Object Visibility Individual Work Plane Visibility To control individual work plane visibility.Part Face Work Plane Appearance The appearance of work planes is controlled in a number of different ways. You can control the visibility of the work planes and move and/or resize them.Part Face Result Selection 1 . right-click the work plane and click Visibility on the shortcut menu. Procedure Controlling Global Visibility You can toggle the visibility of work features and sketches by using the options on this menu. in the browser. Select the appropriate option or use the keyboard shortcuts.

Resizing Work Planes Place your cursor over the corner of the work plane. Inc. click and drag the corner of the work plane to resize it. When the move indicator appears. Moving Work Planes Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. When the resize indicator appears. click and drag the work plane to a new location. Resizing Work Planes Moving Work Planes Place your cursor over an edge of the work plane. All Rights Reserved 189 .

Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 2. click Exercise: Work Planes The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features From the table of contents for Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features. From the Main table of contents page. you create a cylindrical control valve using both origin planes and work planes.Exercise: Work Planes In this exercise. Control Valve with Work Planes 190 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .

There are two main types of work axes: default work axes and user-defined work axes. Inc. All Rights Reserved 191 . display and use the default work axes in part and assembly files Create additional work axes using the Work Axis tool Identify examples of work axes Control the visibility of work axes Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Work Axes Overview Overview Overview A work axis is an axis that extends infinitely and is used to assist you in creating geometry. placing constraints. Simple Part Created Using Work Axes Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • • Locate. and completing other modeling tasks. In this lesson you learn to create and use work axes.

Concept Access Methods Use the following methods to access the default work axes. each representing a different coordinate axis. These default work axes. Browser Expand the Origin folder and right-click on one of the default work axes. There are three default work axes. located in the Origin folder of the Part/Assembly Browser. Default Work Axes 192 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . The three axes represented are the X axis. and Z axis.Default Work Axes Every part and assembly file contains default work axes. extend infinitely from the origin point. Y axis.

• Visibility: This property is off by default. Inc. Right-click on the work axis and click Visibility on the shortcut menu to turn on the work axis visibility. All Rights Reserved 193 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Appearance Properties Right-click on an origin axis to access the following options.Potential Uses for Default Work Axes Following are some potential uses for default work axes: • • • • Basis for assembly constraints Axis of revolution for circular pattern Basis for new work features Representation of centerlines on sketches Default Work Axes .

the work axis updates to reflect those changes. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut / Repeating the Work Axis Tool If you need to create multiple work axes. Work axes are parametrically attached to the model geometry and/or default work features. the type of work axis is based completely on the geometry you select. When you create a work axis using features of existing geometry. The following steps represent some examples for creating a work axis. Procedure Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Work Axis tool. if the geometry changes.The Work Axis Tool The Work Axis tool is used to create work axes in the current part or assembly file. The Work Axis tool is repeated until you cancel the command. Process Overview .Creating Work Axes When you create a work axis. 194 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . All work axes are created by selecting existing geometric features or other work features. Work axes are used to define an axis when the existing geometry does not represent the required axis. there is no dialog box to create an axis at the intersection of two planes. For example. While the Work Axis tool is active. right-click in the graphics window and click Repeat Command on the shortcut menu. you can activate the Repeat Command option.

Inc. click the Work Axis tool and select a Plane or Planar Surface. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. • Select another Plane or Planar Surface. • The work axis is created at the intersection of the two planes.• Work Axis at Center of Circular Feature: • • Work Axis at Intersection of Two Planes: On the Panel Bar. All Rights Reserved 195 .

Redefining Work Axis As you create work axes. Any geometry that was based on the work axis being redefined updates to reflect the changes in the work axis. Select this option to recreate the work axis using any valid method. If you rightclick on the work axis in the browser or graphics window. they appear in the browser just like other parametric features. the Redefine Feature option is available. however they are not edited in the same way as other parametric features. 196 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .

Plane or Planar Surface Result Selection 1 .Creating Work Axes Several methods are available for creating work axes. you select geometry and/or other work features. • Work Axis at Center of Circular Feature: Selection 1 . Inc. Following are some of the most common methods used to create work axes. All Rights Reserved 197 .Circular Feature Result • Work Axis at Intersection of Two Planes: Selection 2 . When you create work axes.Plane or Planar Surface Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Example of Work Axes Concept Process Overview .

Plane or Planar Surface • Work Axis Through Two Points: Selection 2 .Point or Midpoint 198 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .Point Result Selection 1 .Point or Midpoint Result Selection 1 .• Work Axis Through Point/Normal to Plane: Selection 2 .

Select the appropriate option or use the keyboard shortcuts. Controlling Global Visibility You can toggle the visibility of work features and sketches by using the options on this menu. in the browser. right-click the work axis and click Visibility on the shortcut menu. Inc. All Rights Reserved 199 . View Menu > Object Visibility Individual Work Axis Visibility To control individual work axis visibility.Work Axis Appearance Procedure Work Axis Appearance You can turn on or off the appearance of work axes individually or globally in the part or assembly file. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

2. You will utilize both origin work axes as well as new work axes to create the additional features required for the part. From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features From the table of contents for Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features. you use work axes to add features to an existing part.Exercise: Work Axes In this exercise. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Simple Part Created Using Work Axes 200 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . click Exercise: Work Axes The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

Inc. you will be able to • • • • Utilize the Center Point work point when creating geometry Create parametric work points Create grounded work points Identify methods used to create work points Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. PC Speaker Base Component Objectives After completing this lesson. You can create other work points that are parametrically attached to the geometry or grounded to a location specified. In this lesson you learn how to create and use both grounded and parametric work points.0 coordinate.0. All Rights Reserved 201 . Each part and assembly file contains one center point work point representing the 0.Work Points Overview Overview Overview Work points are used to represent a single point on the geometry or in space.

0. this point represents the 0. Work planes and work axes extend outward from this point.Center Point Work Point Each part and assembly file contains a Center Point work point. The Center Point work point appears at the bottom of the list. visibility for the center point is turned off. Concept In this lesson you learn how to access and use the Center Point work point in your designs. Located under the Origin folder in the Part/Assembly browser. Isometric View of Origin Axes and Center Point Identifying the Center Point Work Point Expand the Origin folder to expose the origin work features. Right-click on the center point and click Visibility on the shortcut menu to display the center point.0 coordinate. Center Point Work Point 202 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . By default.

you can create your initial sketch geometry relative to its position. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The default sketch is automatically created.Initial Use for Center Point Work Point It is recommended that all designs initially reference the Center Point work point by constraints or dimensions. The following steps describe how to reference the Center Point work point in your design. expand the Origin folder and select the Center Point. On the Panel Bar. Now that the center point is projected onto the sketch. 2. 1. Inc. All Rights Reserved 203 . click the Project Geometry tool and in the browser. Create a new part file.

the sketch geometry stays in the same position relative the origin center point. expand the Origin folder and select it. the geometry is still centered around the projected center point. This technique also positions your geometry relative to the other origin work planes and axes for later use. Center Point Visibility Note You do not need to turn on the visibility of the center point to reference it in your design features. Next add constraints and/or dimension referencing the center point work point. After changing the dimensions on the sketch. 204 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . in the browser.3. To project the center point. This insures that when the dimensions change.

Either method creates a work point that is parametrically attached to the geometry or other work features. Repeating the Work Point Tool If you need to create multiple work points. the work point changes accordingly. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut . Procedure Work points are used as construction geometry to assist in the creation of other geometry and features. While the Work Point tool is active. you can activate the Repeat Command option. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Several methods are available for creating these work points. Inc. Potential Uses for Work Points Following are some potential uses for work points: • • • • Basis for assembly constraints Projection onto sketches Basis for new work features Creation of 3D sketches by drawing lines between work points Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Work Point tool. If this geometry changes.The Work Point Tool You use the Work Point tool to create parametric construction points on part features. right-click in the graphics window and click Repeat Command on the shortcut menu. All Rights Reserved 205 . The Work Point tool will be repeated until you cancel the command.

click the Work Point tool and select a vertex on the part • Creating a work point the midpoint of an edge The work point is created on the midpoint of the selected edge On the Panel Bar. The work point position is determined by the geometry or other work features that are selected. The following steps represent some examples for creating a work points. click the Work Point tool and select the of an edge 206 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .Creating Work Points Several methods are available for creating work points.Process Overview . • Creating a work point on a vertex The work point is created on the selected vertex On the Panel Bar.

they appear in the browser just like other parametric features. Any geometry that was based on the work point being redefined updates to reflect the changes in the work point. Selecting this option enables you to recreate the work point using any valid method. Inc. If you right-click on the work point in the browser or graphics window.• Creating a work point at the intersection of a edge and plane Select a plane or surface The work point is created at the intersection of the edge and plane On the Panel Bar. click the Work Point tool and select an edge or axis Redefining Work Points As you create work points. the Redefine Feature option is available. All Rights Reserved 207 . however they are not edited in the same way as other parametric features. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Grounded Work Point tool. Procedure After the grounded work points position has been set. you are presented with the 3D Move/Rotate dialog box. Unlike standard work points which update their position to reflect changes in model geometry. 3D Move/Rotate Dialog Box 208 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut . grounded work points can be placed anywhere in 3D space. you must select existing geometry for the initial placement. however after the initial placement is selected. the work point can be moved and/or rotated in any direction. and can be used in the same way as a standard work point. 3D Move/Rotate Dialog Box After you select the initial location for the grounded work point. grounded work points remain in their set position until manually moved. The interface in the dialog box changes depending on which type of transformation you are doing on the grounded work point. it appears in the graphics window the same as a standard work point. Grounded work points differ from standard work points in that they are not parametrically attached to the model geometry. When you execute the Grounded Work Point tool.Grounded Work Points Unlike standard work points which must be placed somewhere on the geometry or at an intersection of geometry and/work features.

When you select a Triad element for a move transformation. you must select an element of the triad according to the Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.The image above describes the transformation options when moving a grounded work point. the fields available in the dialog box are based on the triad element selected. The work point triad appears at the selected location. the dialog box changes to enable you to input or drag an angle value. Inc. 2. On the Panel Bar. 1. When you select an axis element on the Triad.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating grounded work points. Grounded Work Points . click the Grounded Work Point tool and select a vertex or other work point to define the initial position. All Rights Reserved 209 . To transform the grounded work point.

transformation desired. and then the angled edge on the part is selected. 210 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . In this image. 3. the triad Y Axis is selected. The previous steps results in the triad being aligned to the selected edge. Select the More tab to see additional options. Select the Redefine Alignment or Position option to realign the triad.

Click Apply or OK to create the work point at the current location. note the slightly different icon for grounded work points in the browser. All Rights Reserved 211 . the triad Y axis arrow element is selected enabling you to move the work point along the Y axis by entering a value or clicking and dragging the distance in the graphics window. However. In this image. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The work point is displayed in the graphics window just like a standard work point. 5.4.

In the image below.Process Overview After you create the grounded work point. 212 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . enabling you to transform the work point from a point other than its current position. The following steps represent an overview for using the 3D Move/Rotate dialog box to transform an existing grounded work point. right-click on the grounded work point and click 3D Move/Rotate on the shortcut menu. Redefining a work point is the same as redefining other work features. In the browser. in the 3D Move/Rotate dialog box select the More tab and then select the Move Triad Only option. To move the triad only. the triad is being relocated to the center of the part. 2. you have options to redefine or move/rotate the work point.Moving and Rotating Grounded Work Points . where a standard work point exists. This would enable you to move or rotate the grounded work point from the new location. 1. Select the Redefine alignment or position option and select an element of the triad.

Click Apply or OK to position the grounded work point at the current location. Clear the Move Triad Only option and click the Transform tab.3. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Select an axis element on the triad and enter or drag and angle of rotation. Inc. All Rights Reserved 213 .

Concept • Work point at the intersection of a line or axis and a surface: Selection 2 .Curve Result Selection 1 .Surface Result Selection 1 .Additional Examples of Work Points Following are some additional methods for creating work points.Line or Axis • Work point at the intersection of a plane and a curve: Selection 2 .Plane or Face 214 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .

All Rights Reserved 215 . Inc. From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features From the table of contents for Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features. the sketch geometry has already been created. you create a PC speaker base component by using sketched features and work points. PC Speaker Base Component Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 2.Exercise: Work Points In this exercise. To save time. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Exercise: Work Points The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

From the Main table of contents page. click Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Work Features The completed exercise is shown in the following image.Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Work Features Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Work Features Print Exercise Reference In this exercise you create the Offset-Rod-Guide part by using the concepts and procedures you learned in this chapter. sketched features. Offset-Rod-Guide 216 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features . You create different types of work features. click Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features From the table of contents for Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. and hole features. 2.

How to control the appearance of work planes in your part and assembly files. Inc. How to redefine and control the appearance of work points in your model. both parametric and grounded. How to create new work points. All Rights Reserved 217 .Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • How to locate and utilize the default work planes contained in every part and assembly file. How to create new work planes using different methods to define them. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. How to use the default center point work point. How to use the default work axes as well as create new work axes. Y How to redefine and control the appearance of work axes in your model.

218 Chapter 4: Introduction to Work Features .

• • • • In this chapter After completing this chapter.Introduction to Placed Features Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about. Create and edit hole and thread features. Create and edit rectangular and circular patterns. • • Create and edit fillet features... Create and edit thread features on your part by using the Thread tool. Create and use custom color styles on a part model. Using the Hole and Thread tools.. Different types of fillets that can be created. Creating rectangular and circular patterns of features on your part. • • • • • • • • • • • Creating and editing Fillet features. Setting the draft angle and pull direction. Create and edit chamfer features. Apply face drafts to a part model by using the Face Draft tool. Use the options on each tab of the Fillet dialog box to control how a fillet is created.. you will be able to. Representing external and/or internal threads on a part. Create and edit shell features to remove material from a part. Creating and editing chamfer features. Use the options contained in the Shell dialog box. Creating Shell features to remove material from your part model. The three different methods for defining chamfer features. • • • • • . Use the three available methods for creating chamfer features. Adding Face Drafts to a model. Applying custom color styles to a part model.

Fillets are commonly used when parts are designed to remove sharp edges and reduce the potential of stress cracking. you will be able to • Use the Fillet tool to create constant and variable radius fillets 220 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . however certain situations may call for the use of variable radius fillets. Pillar Block with Fillets Objectives After completing this lesson. and also for aesthetic purposes.Fillet Features Overview Overview Overview Fillet features are among the most widely used features on any three-dimensional (3D) part. In this lesson you learn how to create both constant and variable radius fillets. The most common type of fillet feature is a constant radius fillet. They can exist on geometry in various sizes and shapes.

Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 221 .Constant Tab Edge Sets: An edge set consists of selected edges and a radius value.The Fillet Tool You use the Fillet tool to create fillets and rounds on existing 3D geometry. You can create both constant radius and variable radius fillets with the Fillet tool. Procedure Before and After Fillet Features Access Methods You can use the following methods to access the Fillet tool. Edges: Displays the number of edges selected for this edge set. The arrow icon indicates you are in the selection mode and can continue to select the required edges. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut SHIFT+F Constant Radius Tab Fillet Dialog Box .

• Edge: Enables you to select or remove individual edges for the fillet. select the edges to be removed. Although each edge set can have a different radius value. Select mode area: Determines how edges are selected. The pencil icon indicates that the radius value is being edited. Click to add: Select this area of the dialog box to create a new edge set. • Loop: Enables you to select or remove the edges of a closed loop on a face.Radius: Specify a value for the radius of the fillet for each edge set. You cannot select additional edges until you select the edges field of the edge set. Each edge set consist of selected edges and a specific radius. To remove selected edges from the edge set. they are all treated as one fillet feature. • Feature: Enables you to select or remove all edges of a feature at once. 222 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . select the appropriate edge set in the dialog box. then while holding the CTRL or SHIFT key.

The manually selected edges are not included in the new edge set. Inc. All Rights Reserved 223 . You cannot remove individual edges from the All Rounds edge set.Variable Tab Edges: Select the edge to place a variable radius fillet. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Use the Click to Add area for additional edges. The manually selected edges are not included in the new edge set. a new edge set is created for the remaining edges. If some edges are already selected. You cannot remove individual edges from the All Fillets edge set. All Rounds: Select this option to automatically select all convex edges and corners. Variable Radius Tab Fillet Dialog Box . If some edges have already been selected.All Fillets: Select this option to automatically select all concave edges and corners. a new edge set is created for the remaining edges. Only one edge is allowed per selection.

Smooth radius transition: Select this option to gradually blend the radius between points. Select additional points along the edge for more control over the variable radius. The point selected in the dialog box is highlighted on the edge. Values represent the percentage from the start point.Point: List the start point and endpoint of the selected edge. . Clear this option to create fillets with a linear transition between the points.25 represents a distance 25% of the length of the edge from the start point. Position: Specify a position along the selected edge for the selected point. For example. Radius: Enter a radius value for the selected point. On Off 224 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features .

Setbacks Tab Fillet Dialog Box . All Rights Reserved 225 . The value specified represents a distance along the selected edge from the vertex.Setbacks Tab Vertex: Select the vertex of three selected edges. Inc. The following images represent the result of using the Setbacks tab. using the Setbacks tab is optional. Edge/Setback: Select each edge and specify a setback value for the edge. When you create fillets on three edges that meet at a vertex. Not Using Setbacks Using Setbacks Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Expanded Roll along sharp edges: This option sets the solution method for the fillet when conditions would cause adjacent edges to be extended in order to maintain the radius. Fillet Dialog Box .Options To access the following options. the fillet radius remains constant and adjacent edges are extended as required to maintain the radius. If this option is selected. the fillet radius varies when necessary to preserve the adjacent faces. 226 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . If this option is not selected.Fillet Dialog Box . click the [>>] button to expand the Fillet dialog box. Rolling ball where possible: This option sets the corner style for the fillets.

In the image below. On the Panel Bar. in the graphics window. Only the selected edge is calculated during the fillet operation. In the following images. Inc. Editing the fillet feature and enabling the Preserve All Features option fixes the problem and the fillet and cut features remain valid. The first edge set contains two edges to receive a 2 mm fillet and the second set contains three edges to receive a 1 mm fillet. all edges tangent to the selected edge are selected automatically. If this option is not selected. 2. All Rights Reserved 227 . the cut feature would intersect the fillet feature. With the Fillet dialog box displayed. two edge sets have been created. Create an edge set for each different radius. Feature Intersecting Fillet Creating Constant Radius Fillets . features that intersect the fillet feature are checked and their intersections are calculated. An error results when creating the fillet feature.Automatic Edge Chain: When this option is selected. select the edges to be filleted and specify a radius for each edge set. features that intersect with the fillet are not calculated.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating constant radius fillet features. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Preserve All Features: When this option is selected. click the Fillet tool. 1.

3.

Click OK to create the fillet feature. Note in the browser only one fillet feature appears even though five edges were filleted in this example.

Creating Variable Radius Fillets - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for creating variable radius fillet features. 1. 2. On the Panel Bar, click the Fillet tool. With the Fillet dialog box displayed, select the Variable tab, and in the graphics window, select the edge(s) to apply the variable radius fillet. In the Fillet dialog box, click the Start point to modify and in the Radius field enter the radius for the Start point then click the End point to modify the radius End point.

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3.

To add an additional point along the selected edge, drag the cursor along the selected edge and left click to add the point.

4.

After the additional point(s) is added, in the Radius box specify a radius for the fillet at the selected point and in the Position box specify a position along the edge for the new point.

5.

Click OK to create the fillet.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

229

Editing Fillet Features
After you have created a Fillet feature, you can edit it using the same dialog box. In the browser, right-click the Fillet feature and click Edit Feature on the shortcut menu. The Fillet dialog box is displayed enabling you to change the fillet parameters, add or remove selections, and change options.

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Exercise: Fillet Features
In this exercise, you create fillet features on the existing Pillar-Block-Rev-2 component. You will create both constant and variable radius fillets.
Print Exercise Reference

To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook:
1. From the Main table of contents page, click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features, click Exercise: Fillet Features

2.

The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

Pillar Block with Fillets

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

231

Chamfer Features
Overview Overview

Overview
You can place chamfer features on parts to serve different purposes from functional to aesthetic. Chamfers can exist on parts in various sizes and angles. In this lesson you learn how to create and edit chamfer features.

Rod-Bearing-Mount Complete with Chamfers

Objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to • Use the Chamfer tool to create and edit chamfers

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The Chamfer Tool
You use the Chamfer tool to add chamfer features to edges on your part. These features, like other features, are fully parametric and easily editable after you create them. When you create chamfer features, you can choose from three different methods which determine how the chamfer is specified. With any of the methods, the end result is the replacement of the selected edge(s) with a face(s) at an angle specified either directly or indirectly through the use of distances.
Procedure

Before and After Chamfer Features

Access Methods
Use the following methods to access the Chamfer tool. Panel Bar

Keyboard Shortcut

SHIFT+K

When you use any of the above listed methods to access the Chamfer tool, the following options are available. There are three methods for creating chamfers, Single Distance, Distance/Angle, and Distance/Distance. Each method presents different options in the Chamfer dialog box.

Chamfer Dialog Box - Single Distance Option

Edges: Select the edges to be chamfered

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

233

Distance: Specify a distance for the chamfer. The distance is applied to both sides of the selected edge resulting in a 45-degree chamfer.

Chamfer Dialog Box - Distance/Angle Option

Edges: Select the edge(s) to be chamfered. This option is disabled until you select a face. The edge(s) selected must be adjacent to the selected face. Face: Select a face adjacent to the edge you are chamfering. The angle is measured from this face. Distance: Specify a distance for the chamfer. The distance is measured from the selected edge along the selected face. Angle: Enter an angle for the chamfer. The angle is measured from the selected face.

Chamfer Dialog Box - Distance/Distance Option

Edge: Select the edge to be chamfered. When you use this method, only one edge can be chamfered at a time. Click this button to flip the sides of the selected edge for calculating Distance1 and Distance2. Distance1: Specify the first distance of the chamfer. This distance is measured along one of the adjacent faces. Distance2: Specify the second distance of the chamfer. This distance is measured along the opposite adjacent face.

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You can expand the Chamfer dialog box by clicking the [>>] button. Expanding the Chamfer dialog box presents the following options.

Chamfer Dialog Box - Expanded Area

Edge Chain: The options control how the edges are selected. The edge selected and all tangentially connected edges. Only the edge selected. Setback: This option is available only when using the single distance method. When chamfering three edges that meet at a corner, this option determines the result of the corner.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

235

Creating and Editing Chamfer Features - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for creating and editing chamfer features. 1. 2. On the Panel Bar, click the Chamfer tool. In the Chamfer dialog box, select the desired method to create the chamfer. • For a single distance chamfer, select the edge(s) to be chamfered, enter a distance for the chamfer and click OK.

The resulting chamfer is created

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For the Distance/Angle method, select the Distance/Angle option. Select the face, and then select the edge(s) to be chamfered. Enter a distance and angle for the chamfer and click OK.

The resulting chamfer is created

For the Distance/Distance method, select the Distance/Distance option. Select the edge to be chamfered. Enter distance values in the Distance1 and Distance2 fields.

Optionally flip the direction of the chamfer by clicking the Flip Direction icon.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

237

The resulting chamfer is created. Right-click the feature and click Edit Feature on the shortcut menu. Editing Chamfer Features After the chamfer feature is created. The Chamfer dialog box is displayed enabling you to edit the feature the same way it was created. 238 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features .Click OK to create the chamfer. it will appear in the browser.

you will edit the chamfer features and view the result. From the Main table of contents page. All Rights Reserved 239 . Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Rod-Bearing-Mount Complete with Chamfers Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. After the features have been created. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features.Exercise: Chamfer Features In this exercise. you will add chamfer features to an existing part. click Exercise: Chamfer Features 2.

In this lesson you learn how to use the Hole tool to create parametric hole features and how to use the Thread tool to create parametric thread features on existing geometry. they do require an unconsumed sketch representing the center point locations for the holes.Hole and Thread Features Overview Overview Overview Hole features enable you to create parametric holes on your part. You use the Thread tool to place both internal and external thread features on the part. you will be able to • • Use the Hole tool to create and edit hole features Use the Hole tool to create internal thread features and use the Thread tool to create external thread features 240 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . Although Hole features are considered to be placed features. Hydraulic Valve Component Objectives After completing this lesson.

The Hole Tool You use the Hole tool to create parametric hole features on parts. you must create a sketch containing the hole center points. Part with Various Types of Holes Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Hole tool. Inc. All Rights Reserved 241 . you are presented with different options for the type of hole being created. Additional options for the drill point and thread options are also available. rather than having to manually edit or create geometry to achieve the same result. countersink. such as counterbore. the endpoints of sketched lines. With the Hole tool you can create the various hole types in a single dialog box. Although you can create holes by extruding a circle with a Cut feature relationship. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Keyboard Shortcut H Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. and threads. When you start the Hole tool. Procedure When you create holes using the Hole tool. You can create standard drilled holes. counterbored holes. the Hole tool provides greater flexibility in the variations and types of holes. or points projected from other geometry in the part. and countersunk holes. You can create center points using the Point/Hole Center sketch tool.

Thread Type: From the drop-down list. You can also clear hole centers from the selection set by holding the CTRL key and selecting the center points. Other acceptable points include endpoints of lines.Holes Dialog Box .Expanded The Holes dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Centers: Select the center points to use for the hole(s). projected centerpoints of circles and arcs. and projected work points. 242 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . the center points will be selected automatically. To: This option enables you to specify a face or plane to terminate the hole. • Optionally specify an angle other than the standard 118-degree drill point. Through All: This option enables the hole to go all the way through the part. Tapped: This option enables tapped threads in the hole and expands the Hole dialog box. Type: Click the button representing the desired hole type: drilled. Termination: Select one of the following Termination types: • • • Distance: This option enables you to specify a depth for the hole in the preview area of the dialog box. Click this button to flip the direction of the hole. and countersink. If you create the sketch using the Point/Hole Center objects. select the thread type. counterbore. Drill Point: Select either a flat bottom drill or standard tapered drill point.

• • • • Minor: Creates the hole using the Minor Diameter of the selected thread size. Creating and Editing Holes . Class: From the drop-down list. Left Hand: Select this option for a left-hand thread. Inc. Right Hand: Select this option for a right-hand thread. Diameter: Select the actual diameter used to create the hole. select the Class of thread. select the nominal hole size. select the thread pitch. Create a new sketch containing the center point location for the hole features. Pitch: Creates the hole using the Pitch diameter of the selected thread size. Tap Drill: Creates the hole using the Tap Drill diameter of the selected thread size.Full Depth: This option creates the threads at the full depth of the hole. 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Return to exit the sketch. Available pitches are based on the selected Nominal Size. Nominal Size: From the drop-down list.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating and editing holes. Major: Creates the hole using the Major Diameter of the selected thread size. All Rights Reserved 243 . On the Standard toolbar. you must specify a thread depth in the preview area of the dialog box. 1. If this option is not selected. Pitch: From the drop-down list.

Click OK to create the hole(s).3. Remember. 4. Adjust the options in the dialog box depending on the type of hole(s) you need to create. the endpoints of lines can be used to locate hole features. 244 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . click Return to exit the sketch. On the Standard toolbar. On the Panel Bar. click the Hole tool. If you use the Point/Hole Center sketch object. the hole centers will be automatically selected. In some situations it may be easier to draw construction line segments to locate the center points of the holes.

set the Diameter option to Major. This creates the hole at the major diameter of the thread.5. On the Panel Bar. Click OK to create the threaded hole. click the Hole tool and then select the endpoints of the line segments. In the image below the endpoints are being selected and the Tapped option is being used. Select the Thread type from the drop-down list and adjust the other thread options as required. Left-hand versus right-hand threads are also depicted correctly. Note the bitmap representing a threaded hole. The bitmap will change according to the thread specification. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 245 . Preventing Interference Between Holes and Fasteners Tip In the Threads area. thus preventing an interference being returned between the fastener and the hole. Inc. Fine threads will appear fine while coarse threads appear coarse.

246 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . the Thread tool does not require an unconsumed sketch. Procedure Example of External Thread Features Access Methods Use the following method to access the Thread tool. Threads are considered a placed feature. Many of the same options available for internal threads using the Hole tool are also available when you use the Thread tool.Thread Features The Thread tool enables you to create thread features on external and internal surfaces. therefore. All that is required is existing cylindrical surfaces to apply the thread feature. Panel Bar Thread Feature Dialog Box .Location Tab The Location tab in the Thread Feature dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Face: Click the icon to select the face(s) to apply thread features.

Right Hand: Select this option to generate a right hand thread. Selecting a nominal size other than the size automatically selected may result in an error when you click OK. Pitch: Select the appropriate thread pitch from the drop-down list. Click this button to flip the direction of the thread feature.Specification Tab The Specification tab in the Thread Feature dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Thread Type: Select the required thread type. Nominal Size: The nominal thread size is automatically selected based upon the diameter of the selected face. • Offset: Specifies the distance from the start face of the thread feature. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Thread Feature Dialog Box . the following options become available. Left Hand: Select this option to generate a left hand thread. the thread feature is created but is not displayed on the geometry. Class: Select the appropriate thread class from the drop-down list. When this option is not selected. • Length: Specifies the length of the thread feature on the selected face. All Rights Reserved 247 .Display in Model: Select this option to display the thread bitmaps on the model. Inc. If this option is not selected. Full Length: Select this option to apply the thread feature to the entire length of the selected face.

select the appropriate thread type and adjust the other settings as required by your design intent. On the Specification tab. On the Panel Bar. Just like other parametric features. 2. 1. 248 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . The thread feature appears on the model geometry as well as in the browser.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating external thread features using the Thread tool. adjust the Thread Length options as required. click the Thread tool and select a cylindrical face on the part. you can right-click the thread feature and click Edit Feature on the shortcut menu to edit the feature using the same dialog box used in creating the feature. On the Location tab.Creating Thread Features . Click OK to create the thread feature.

you open the Hyd-Valve-Housing part file and create new hole features. Inc. click Exercise: Hole and Thread Features 2. You then use the Thread tool to add thread features to the component.Exercise: Hole and Thread Features In this exercise. Hydraulic Valve Component Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features. From the Main table of contents page. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. All Rights Reserved 249 . You will use the Hole tool to add the necessary hole features.

By using shell features. you can create the overall shape of your part and then create a cavity in the part by specifying a wall thickness for the faces. Complete Part Containing Shell Features Objectives After completing this lesson.Shell Features Overview Overview Overview You use shell features to remove material from existing solid features. In this lesson you learn how to create and edit shell features. you will be able to: • Use the Shell tool to create shelled features 250 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features .

One key advantage to using the Shell tool is that you can create differing wall thickness for each face of the part. Procedure Before and After Shell Feature Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Shell tool. you can remove material from an existing part and create a cavity in the part by specifying a wall thickness for the faces. Inc. With the Shell tool. you select at least one face on the part to be removed from the shell feature leaving the remaining faces as the shell walls.The Shell Tool You use the Shell tool to create shelled features on existing solid geometry. Panel Bar Shell Dialog Box Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 251 . Generally.

Select the face(s) and specify a unique wall thickness for the face. 252 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . Thickness: Specify value for the wall thickness. This value overrides the default thickness for the selected face(s) only. • Outside: The thickness is applied to the outside of the existing faces. Unique face thickness: Select the Click to Add area of the dialog box to create unique face thicknesses for the shell feature. Create a part representing the overall shape required. • Inside: The thickness is applied to the inside of the existing faces. it will result in a cavity in the part with no open faces. click the Shell tool and select the faces to remove from the shell operation. Direction: Click one of the direction buttons. 1. In the Thickness box enter a wall thickness. If you do not remove any faces from the shell feature. Creating Shell Features . The remaining faces serve as walls for the shell feature.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating shell features. • Both: Half of the thickness is applied to each side of the face.Remove Faces: Click this icon to select the face(s) to remove from the shell feature. On the Panel bar. 2.

All Rights Reserved 253 . Under Unique Face Thickness. The shell feature is created. specify a thickness for the selected face(s). Inc. Click OK to create the shell feature. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click the [>>] button to expand the dialog box and select the Click to Add area and select the face(s) to assign a unique wall thickness. To assign unique wall thicknesses.3.

Exercise: Shell Features In this exercise. click Exercise: Shell Features 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. From the Main table of contents page. You will then edit the shell feature to include unique wall thicknesses on different features. applying a common wall thickness to all faces. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features. Complete Part Containing Shell Features 254 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . you will create a shell feature for the part.

If the original feature changes. Inc. Each type offers different options for creating the pattern. Completed Face Plate with Patterned Features Objectives After completing this lesson. the patterned features update to reflect those changes. When you pattern a feature.Pattern Features Overview Overview Overview Pattern features are used to parametrically duplicate selected features. All Rights Reserved 255 . In this lesson you learn how to create and edit Rectangular and Circular Pattern features. you will be able to • • Create and edit rectangular patterns Create and edit circular patterns Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. There are two types of patterns: Rectangular and Circular. you are creating parametric copies of that feature.

with options to control feature spacing. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut SHIFT+R 256 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features .The Rectangular Pattern Tool You use the Rectangular Pattern tool to duplicate one or more features in a rectangular pattern. You can pattern a feature along one or two directions and/or paths. There are several options to control how the feature(s) will be patterned. so any changes in the original feature are reflected in the pattern occurrences. Procedure When you create these patterns. Example of Rectangular Patterns Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Rectangular Pattern tool. they are associative to the original feature.

Expanded The Rectangular Pattern dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Features: Select the feature(s) to be patterned. All Rights Reserved 257 .Rectangular Pattern Dialog Box . Inc. Distance: Distance value represents the total pattern distance. Select one of the following options from the drop-down list: Spacing: Distance value represents the spacing between each occurrence. Start: Sets the start point for the first occurrence. Use the Flip Direction button to flip the path direction. This value represents either total distance of the pattern or spacing between each feature. Pattern can start at any selected point. Enter the number of occurrences for the pattern. Enter a value for the pattern distance. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. This can be the edge of a part or a 2D sketch representing the path for the pattern. This number includes the original feature. Direction 2: This column is optional and contains the same options as Direction 1. Direction 1: Path: Select the path for Direction 1. Curve Length: Disables the Distance field and divides the curve length by the number of occurrences.

The first Occurrence represents the initial feature used in the pattern followed by the number of occurrences created. Located under the pattern feature. each occurrence uses an identical termination method regardless of where they intersect other features. Identical: Occurrence orientation is identical to the first feature. you immediately see the difference. Finally you will see an Occurrence item for each occurrence in the pattern. Right-click on an occurrence and click Suppress on the shortcut menu to suppress the selected occurrence. Orientation Method: These options control the orientation of the patterned features. This method requires more processing and can increase computational time on large patterns. If you expand a rectangular or circular pattern. Browser Appearance of Rectangular/Circular Patterns When you create patterns. Adjust to Model: This method enables each occurrence termination to be calculated. 258 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . Using this method.Termination Method: Identical: This is the default method which provides the best performance for large patterns. you will find any sketches used as a path. the way they appear in the browser is unique compared to other features. This option is not available on the first occurrence. Adjust to Direction 1 or Direction 2: Occurrences will be rotated as the path changes directions. along with a folder containing the features used in the pattern.

On the Panel Bar. To create a pattern along a path. click the Rectangular Pattern tool and select the feature to be patterned. 1. 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Optionally include information for Direction 2 and click OK. Adjust the number of occurrence. distance. or origin axis for the pattern. On the Panel Bar. 4. Inc. Click the Path button under Direction 1 and select the path for the pattern. All Rights Reserved 259 . Click the Path button under Direction 1 and select a path.Creating Rectangular Patterns . Optionally provide information for Direction 2. create a 2D sketch containing the path for the pattern. 3. Create a part with a feature(s) to be patterned. part edge. and spacing options as required and click OK.Process Overview The following steps can be used to create a rectangular pattern. Enter the number of occurrences and distance values and adjust the Spacing method accordingly. click the Rectangular Pattern tool and select the feature(s) to be patterned.

Example of a Circular Pattern Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Circular Pattern tool. they are associative to the original feature. You then select a rotation axis which serves as the center of the pattern. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut SHIFT+O 260 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . so any changes in the original feature are reflected in the pattern occurrences. There are also options for controlling the creation method and positioning method. Next you set the pattern properties such as number of occurrences and angle. When you create these patterns.The Circular Pattern Tool You use the Circular Pattern tool to duplicate one or more features in a circular pattern. Procedure When you start the Circular Pattern tool. you must first select a feature to pattern.

each occurrence uses an identical termination method regardless of where they intersect other features. All Rights Reserved 261 .Circular Pattern Dialog Box . Positioning Method: Incremental: Sets the angle value to represent the angle between occurrences. Using this method. This method requires more processing and can increase computational time on large patterns.Expanded The Circular Pattern dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Features: Select the feature(s) to be patterned. The result of this angle is based on the Positioning Method chosen. Valid selections include circular faces. Inc. Creation Method: Identical: This the default method which provides the best performance for large patterns. This number includes the original feature. Fitted: Sets the angle value to represent the total rotational angle of the pattern. : Specify the angle for the pattern. or part edges. Adjust to Model: This method enables each occurrence termination to be calculated. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. work axes. Placement: : Specify the number of occurrences for the pattern. : Flips the rotational direction of the pattern. Rotation Axis: Select the rotation axis for the pattern.

Finally you will see an Occurrence item for each occurrence in the pattern. This option is not available on the first occurrence. Located under the pattern feature. along with a folder containing the features used in the pattern. If you expand a rectangular or circular pattern. you will find any sketches used as a path. you immediately see the difference. 262 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . The first Occurrence represents the initial feature used in the pattern followed by the number of occurrences created. the way they appear in the browser is unique compared to other features. Right-click on an occurrence and click Suppress on the shortcut menu to suppress the selected occurrence.Browser Appearance of Rectangular/Circular Patterns When you create patterns.

Optionally click the [>>] button to expand the dialog box and adjust the options as required. Click OK to create the pattern. Create a part containing the feature(s) to be patterned.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating circular patterns. 3.Creating Circular Patterns . Then click the Rotation Axis icon and select the feature representing the rotation axis for the pattern. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. On the Panel Bar. 2. All Rights Reserved 263 . Inc. click the Circular Pattern tool and select the feature(s) to be patterned. 1.

Exercise: Pattern Features In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. Completed Face Plate with Patterned Features 264 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. you open a face plate component and create both rectangular and patterned features. You then edit the patterned features to suppress occurrences within each. click Exercise: Pattern Features 2.

you need to apply draft angles to the faces to allow for the part to be pulled from the mold. Indexer Component with Face Drafts Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • Use the Face Draft tool to create and edit face drafts Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Depending on the design and manufacturing intent. or to single selected faces.Face Drafts Overview Overview Overview When you create designs for casting or molds. you might apply the draft angle to all faces. All Rights Reserved 265 . Inc. In this lesson you learn how to apply draft angles to faces using the Face Draft tool. This draft angle is referred to as a face draft.

Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut SHIFT+D 266 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . the draft angles in this lesson may be exaggerated. Before and After Face Draft Feature Face Draft Angles In reality. After you define the Pull Direction. edge. Note Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Face Draft tool.The Face Draft Tool You use the Face Draft tool to apply draft angles to selected faces on the part. or origin plane or axis. For visual clarity. you must specify the Pull Direction. you can also choose between a Fixed Edge face draft or Fixed Plane face draft. When you create a face draft feature. In this lesson you learn how to create face drafts using each of these methods. draft angles are generally very small. you select the faces to apply the draft angle. The result of the draft angle depends on the orientation of the face in relation to the Pull Direction. A draft angle applied to faces on the part allows the part to be pulled away from the mold. which can be based on a face. Procedure When you create the face draft feature.

plane. use the CTRL or SHIFT key and reselect the edge to remove it from the selection set. Inc.The Face Draft dialog box includes the following options and specifications: Fixed Edge Method: This method creates a face draft on the selected face(s) and the selected edge remains fixed in place. or axis to define the direction the part is pulled away from the mold. Fixed Plane Method: This method creates a face draft calculated from the location of the selected plane. The Pull Direction is normal to the selected plane. Depending on the position of the selected plane this method causes material to be added on one side of the plane and subtracted from the opposite side of the plane. you can use the Flip Direction button to flip the Pull Direction. Faces: Select the faces to apply the face draft feature. After you make the selection. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. If using the Fixed Edge method. Draft Angle: Specify an angle value for the face draft. Pull Direction: Select a face. All Rights Reserved 267 . edge. be certain to select the edge you want to remain fixed. Note: If you select an incorrect edge.

select the Fixed Edge or Fixed Plane method and then select a face. Click OK to create the face draft. Create a new part containing the features requiring face drafts. In the Draft Angle box. 2. click the Face Draft tool. plane. The face drafts are applied to the selected faces. 268 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . On the Panel Bar.Creating Face Drafts . enter an angle value.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating face drafts. or axis to define the Pull Direction. If you are using the Fixed Edge method. select the face at a point closest to the fixed edge. 3. Select the faces to apply the face draft. edge. 1. In the Face Draft dialog box.

You will experiment with both the Fixed Edge method and Fixed Plane method for creating the face draft. you create and edit face drafts on the part. Inc. Indexer Component with Face Drafts Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Exercise: Face Drafts 2. From the Main table of contents page.Exercise: Face Drafts In this exercise. All Rights Reserved 269 . click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features.

Creating and Using Color Styles Overview Overview Overview As you create new parts using Autodesk Inventor. a default color style is assigned. You can assign different colors to parts and even create new custom color styles. you will be able to • Change and assign color styles to parts 270 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . Assigning a New Color Style Objectives After completing this lesson. In this lesson you learn how to create and assign color styles to parts.

the color style name will appear here. Appearance: Use the sliders to adjust the Shiny and Opaque color properties. is four color properties. and Ambient. it is available only in the part or assembly in which it was created. Procedure Color styles are stored within each part or assembly file. Select the color swatch next to each properties and select a color from the Custom Color dialog box. The list will update to reflect the closest match. Inc. If you create a new color style. Use the following methods to create and apply color styles.Standard Toolbar Format > Colors Color Dialog Box Style Name: Enter a color style name. they are assigned the Default color style.Creating and Using Color Styles When you create new parts. Pull-Down Menu To Assign Colors . Specular. When selecting a material from the list. Emissive. Save: Click to save the changes to the selected color style. Color Tab: Located on this tab. Other color styles are available and can be accessed from the Style drop-down list on the Standard toolbar. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You can copy these custom color styles to templates or other part files by using the Organizer tool. Diffuse. which is located on the Format pull-down menu. All Rights Reserved 271 .

%Scale: Adjust the slider to scale the texture map.Delete: Click to delete the selected color style. Remove: Click to remove the selected texture from the color style. Close: Click to close the dialog box. and leave the dialog box open. Colors Dialog Box . Apply: Click to apply the changes to the color style. Texture Library: • • Application Library: Select this option to display textures from the Application library.Texture Tab Choose: Click to display the Texture Chooser dialog box. 272 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . Project Library: Select this option to display textures stored within the current project. New: Click to create a new color style. Rotation: Adjust the slider to rotate the texture map. Texture Chooser Dialog Box Select a texture by dragging the slider in the preview window.

The completed exercise is shown in the following image. you will create a new color style and apply it to your part. From the Main table of contents page. All Rights Reserved 273 .Exercise: Creating and Using Color Styles In this exercise. Assigning a New Color Style Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Exercise: Creating and Using Color Styles 2. Inc. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features.

To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Plastic Handle 274 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features . The handle is a two piece design for which you are creating one half of the handle. From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features From the table of contents for Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features.Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Placed Features Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Placed Features Print Exercise Reference In this exercise you will utilize the procedures and concepts learned in this lesson to create a plastic handle. click Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Placed Features 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

How to add thread features to a model. Why face drafts are typically used and how these manufacturing methods correlate to options in the dialog box such as Pull-Direction. How to create and use custom color styles on a part model. How to adjust options in the Colors dialog box to effect the appearance properties of a new color style. All Rights Reserved 275 . How to create and edit Hole and Thread features on a part model. How to edit a pattern and suppress feature occurrences in the pattern if required. How to use the options in the Shell dialog box and how they effect the shell feature. How to create a custom color style that includes a texture map. How to use the options on each tab of the Fillet dialog box to control how a fillet feature is created. The different options available in the Holes dialog box and how to use these options to create different types of holes. The options available for each type of pattern and the effect of these options on the pattern features. How to create and edit rectangular and circular patterns on a part model. How to use the Face Draft tool to apply draft angles to selected faces on a part model. Three methods available for creating chamfers and how to use each method. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. How to remove material from your part by using the Shell tool. Inc.Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • How to create and edit fillet features on a part file.

276 Chapter 5: Introduction to Placed Features .

Degrees of freedom Simulating motion in an assembly Placing assembly constraints. Top Down. and Middle Out assembly techniques Use the browser to control different aspects of the assembly environment Activate components inplace within the assembly. The Assembly Browser. • Apply Bottom Up.. Adaptivity and how it can be used in the assembly.. you will be able to. The Place Component tool.. Controlling the appearance of parts and features in the browser and using Design Views to save assembly views. Locating components in and out of the assembly by using different versions of the Find tool.. Dragging components into the assembly and replacing components in the assembly. Assembly based work features Using geometry projected from other parts in the assembly to help create new parts. • • • The assembly modeling environment and interface used to create assembly models. resequence and reorder the assembly and use browser filters Create Design Views to save assembly views with specific display related characteristics Place components in an assembly using the Place Component tool Drag components into an assembly Replace existing components in an assembly Create new components in the context of the assembly Place assembly constraints Create basic adaptive features for parts used in an assembly • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . Creating components in the context of the assembly. Analyzing components of an assembly. In this chapter After completing this chapter.Assembly Modeling Fundamentals Overview Overview Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about.

you will learn the concept of assembly modeling and the tools you use to create an assembly. You create new geometry.Introduction to Assembly Modeling Overview Using Assembly modeling you bring individual components into a common environment and use various tools to assemble them. In this lesson. Completed Assembly Objectives After completing this lesson. and manage the relationships between the parts in the assembly. place existing parts and/or assemblies. you will be able to • • • Understand the concept of assembly modeling and the procedures you use to create an assembly model Navigate the assembly environment and identify the assembly coordinate system Use the Assembly Panel Bar 278 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .

Concept These relationships can range from simple constraint based relationships that determine a components position in the assembly.Assembly Modeling Concepts You create an assembly by combining multiple components and/or assemblies into a single environment. All Rights Reserved 279 . Typical Assembly Model Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. to advanced relationships such as adaptivity. which enables a component to change size based upon its relationship to other components in the assembly. Inc. Parametric relationships are created between each component that determine component behavior in the assembly.

and are making changes to parts based upon their relationships to other components in the assembly. then design each component while still in the assembly environment.Assembly Modeling Methods Before you create assembly models you must understand the three basic methods you use to create them and how to choose the correct assembly modeling approach. then while working in the context of the assembly. 280 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . As you design each component. The initial part is created. You create a blank assembly. • Top Down Assembly Modeling: All assembly components are designed in the context of the assembly. The image below represents a Top-Down approach to assembly modeling. additional parts are created. you are applying the required assembly constraints. You create and edit all geometry while working in the overall assembly.

Each part is designed separate from the assembly and other components. Each part file is designed separate from the assembly and other parts. All Rights Reserved 281 . they are placed into the assembly. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.• Bottom Up Assembly Modeling: Individual components for an assembly are designed outside of the assembly where they will be placed. The image below represents a typical Bottom-Up approach to assembly modeling. After the components are designed. they are made outside of the assembly and will automatically be reflected in the assembly model. After you create the parts they are placed into the assembly and constrained to other parts. If changes to the parts are required. Inc.

Some components are being placed in the assembly. You can use all of the methods above and switch between them at anytime. The image below represents a Middle Out approach to assembly modeling. a typical assembly would generally consist of components that are designed specifically for the assembly. while others are being designed in the context of the assembly. For example. and understand the benefits to each modeling approach. 282 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . you have essentially switched to Middle Out approach because you have included parts in the assembly that were created outside of the assembly. So even if you design all of the non-standard components using a Top-Down approach. bolts. and other standard off-the-shelf components such as nuts. you will be able to choose the best approach for a given task. You can begin the assembly using one method and change to a different one. or other standard hardware. As you become more proficient with the application.• Middle Out Assembly Modeling: This flexible approach closely represents the actual real-world design process. as soon as you insert the standard off-the-shelf components.

Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. or axes.Assembly Constraints You use Assembly constraints to create parametric relationships between parts in the assembly. Just as you use 2D constraints to control 2D geometry. Applied by selecting a circular edge on each part. Generally applied to bolts. Tangent Constraint: Used to define a tangential relationship between two parts. you use 3D constraints in an assembly to position parts in relation to other parts. or axis. edges. Each of these constraint types will be described in greater detail later in this chapter. One of the selected faces must be circular. This constraint effectively combines a mate axis/axis and a mate face/face constraint. or any part that needs to be inserted into a hole on another part. Insert Constraint: Used to insert one component into another. There are four basic assembly constraints. or pins. Applied to faces. each with unique solutions and options. Angle Constraint: Used to specify an angle between two parts. Generally applied to circular faces and planar faces. Mate/Flush Constraint: Used to align part features such as faces. edges. All Rights Reserved 283 .

Components within the subassembly are constrained to each other. Assembly Sketching You use Assembly sketching to create assembly based features such as holes. The use of assembly features would enable you to create these motor-specific features at the assembly level. In the context of the overall assembly. and chamfers on parts in the assembly. To do so you activate the subassembly by double-clicking on the subassembly in the browser. you create an assembly which was designed to accommodate several different electric motors. For example. 284 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . A subassembly is essentially an assembly placed into another assembly. thus leaving the parts that are common to all assemblies. the subassembly behaves as a single part. while the subassembly is constrained to the overall assembly as a single component. The features however are not stored within the parts that are affected but are local to the current assembly and only effect the parts in the context of the current assembly.Subassemblies You use Subassemblies to organize large assemblies into smaller groups. extrusions. Each motor type requires a different hole pattern and other cutouts for routing the wiring harness. You must edit constraints within the assembly where they were created. You can use these features in situations where assemblies share common parts but with features that are unique to the assembly. unaffected by the feature. Assembly based sketches serve as the basis for assembly features.

the browser functions are identical to the part modeling environment. Note: This only applies if the first part in the assembly is placed into. Assembly Coordinate Elements: Identical to the part environment. each assembly also contains an independent coordinate system. Principle Assembly Modeling Environment Assembly Panel Bar: Contains tools specific to assembly modeling. Inc. Expand the components to expose the assembly constraints that have been applied. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Assembly Coordinate System Each assembly file contains an independent coordinate system. axes. the origin point of the part file will be matched to the origin point of the assembly file. When you place the first part into the assembly. and center point. All Rights Reserved 285 . Default coordinate system elements are aligned with the 0. and not created from scratch in the context of the assembly. 3D Indicator: Displays the current view orientation relative to the assembly coordinate system. Assembly Browser: Lists all parts and their constraints. Assembly Components: Each component in the assembly is listed.Assembly Environment The assembly environment in Autodesk Inventor software is virtually the same as the part modeling environment with the exception of tools that are unique to assembly modeling.0 point in the assembly and can be used as you build the assembly. Expand the Origin folder to expose the origin planes.0. When a part is activated for editing.

Enter these key sequences to start the related tool. By setting the Panel Bar to expert mode. the Assembly Panel Bar contains the tools specific to assembly modeling. select the Assembly Panel drop-down.Assembly Panel Bar Similar to the Part Modeling Panel Bar. 286 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . you will make more room available for the Assembly/Part browser. Procedure Note the keyboard shortcuts next to each icon. the Panel Bar will automatically switch between Assembly. Assembly Panel Bar After you become familiar with the assembly tool icons. As you create your assembly model. and Sketch modes depending on the context you are using. you can switch the panel bar to expert mode. Part. then select Expert. At the top of the panel bar.

The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Inc. Completed Assembly Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. you will create a basic assembly model using some of the concepts mentioned in this lesson. Some techniques performed during this lesson will be covered in greater detail later in this chapter.Exercise: Introduction to Assembly Modeling In this exercise. click Exercise: Introduction to Assembly Modeling 2. From the Main table of contents page. All Rights Reserved 287 .

5-Axis Robot Assembly Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • • • • • Activate and edit parts in the context of the assembly Control the visibility of parts in an assembly Resequence and Restructure an assembly Create browser filters and utilize them in an assembly Enable and disable components in an assembly Identify grounded components in an assembly and how they effect other assembly components Create and use Design Views 288 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .Assembly Browser Overview Overview Overview The Assembly Browser offers several options for working in the assembly environment and is your primary tool for interacting with the assembly components and features. In this lesson you will learn about the various options available through the Assembly Browser.

In order to edit a part in the context of the assembly. All Rights Reserved 289 .In-Place Activation In-Place Activation means you activate a part in the context of the assembly.Shortcut Menu Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Any changes to the part are automatically reflected in the assembly. In the Browser or graphics window. In-Place Activation . double-click on the part. In the Browser or graphics window. There are a few options available for activating a part in-place. Inc. Procedure • • • In the Browser or graphics window. right-click on the part and on the shortcut menu click Open. This option will open the part in a separate window. you must activate the part. right-click on the part and on the shortcut menu click Edit.

In the graphics window. the non-active parts are dimmed.Active Part and Active Part in the Context of the Assembly 290 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Assembly Browser . • • • • In the Browser.Result of In-Place Activation When a part is activated in the context of the assembly. The Panel Bar switches to display the modeling tools. the assembly environment changes. In the Browser. the part is automatically expanded to expose the part features. the background behind all other parts is greyed.

parts with the visibility property turned off appear grey. While you work in the context of the assembly. Check mark indicates the part is currently visible. Procedure Browser Appearance In the Assembly browser. Browser Part Visibility Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. right-click on an element in the assembly and select Visibility on the shortcut menu. in the Assembly Browser or graphics window. Inc.Visibility Control It is possible to control the visibility of all elements in the assembly. All Rights Reserved 291 .

Procedure Access Methods The following methods are available for restructuring your assembly. Procedure To resequence the assembly. Resequencing the assembly enables you to place the parts in a more logical order. By restructuring the assembly you are creating subassemblies and placing existing parts into the subassembly. Assembly Resequencing Assembly Restructure As you create your assembly. Parts are displayed in the browser in the order in which they are placed or created. in the browser. Shortcut Menu In the browser or graphics window.Assembly Resequence It is possible to resequence the order of parts in the assembly. click and drag on the part and release the mouse at its new position. select one or more parts then right-click on a part and select Demote Keyboard Shortcut Select one or more parts and press TAB 292 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . at some point you may need to organize the assembly by placing components into subassemblies.

New File Location: Enter or browse the location for the new subassembly. Assembly Restructure Constraint Warning Assembly Restructure Constraint Warning Dialog Box When restructuring parts into subassemblies. Constraints applied to parts residing in different assemblies and subassemblies will not be maintained.When you restructure an assembly using the Demote tool. Constraints applied to parts residing in the same assembly will be maintained if they are restructured into a new subassembly at the same time. select all the parts in the browser or graphics window and then select the Demote tool. Create In-Place Dialog Box New File Name: Enter a file name for the subassembly. If you restructure the parts separately you will loose the assembly constraints and will need to recreate them. Inc. there is a potential that you will loose some assembly constraints during the restructuring process. at the same time. When possible. the Create In-Place Component dialog box appears. To restructure all parts in one step. All Rights Reserved 293 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. This will place all selected parts into the new subassembly and maintain the constraints. you should restructure all parts to be included in the subassembly. Template: Select a template to use for the new subassembly.

you may loose assembly constraints using this method. it is possible to restructure the assembly by dragging parts from the top level assembly to the subassembly. Depending on the constraint conditions. It is also possible to drag and drop parts from the subassembly to the top level assembly.Drag and Drop Restructuring If a subassembly already exists. Drag and Drop Restructuring 294 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .

As your assembly grows in complexity. Hide Warnings: Hides warning symbols attached to constraints in the browser. Hide Notes: Hides all notes attached to features. All Rights Reserved 295 . Inc. Show Children Only: Displays only first level children. Hides parts contained within a subassembly when the top-level assembly is active. the browser filters can assist you by streamlining its information. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. At the top of the Assembly Browser. click the Filter button and the filter menu is displayed. Procedure Hide Work Features: Hides all work features including the Origin folders. Hide Documents: Hides inserted documents.Browser Filters You can filter the display of information in the browser by using the browser filters.

Procedure Assembly Browser Display Modes When you examine the images above. Expand this folder to expose the assembly constraints. This mode enables you to identify part features and activate them for editing without having to activate the part. The Modeling View will display the parts and their features. You can change the display mode to Modeling View by selecting the Position Mode drop-down menu at the top of the browser. note the appearance of the assembly constraints while in the Position View and the part features while in Modeling View. 296 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .Browser Display Mode When you work in an assembly the Assembly browser display mode defaults to Position View. note also the Constraints folder at the top. While in the Modeling View. It displays the parts and assembly constraints.

they are enabled. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Concept When you open an assembly. When a component is not enabled.Enabled Components By default. Inc. A check mark indicates the part is currently enabled. it appears dimmed in the graphics window and its icon color in the browser changes to green. When a component is enabled you have access to the component for editing and applying constraints. the data structure of enabled components is available while components that are not enabled. Assembly with Component Not Enabled In the browser or graphics window. For large assemblies this is beneficial to increasing overall system performance. when you place components into an assembly. click Enabled. right-click on the part and on the shortcut menu. All Rights Reserved 297 . only the graphics information is loaded.

When you ground parts you can use them to mimic real-world situation where some parts are fixed in position. click Grounded. the non-grounded component will move to validate the constraint while the grounded component remains fixed in its position. the first part in each assembly is grounded. right-click on the part and on the shortcut menu. Grounded components appear in the browser with the Push Pin icon. You can also remove the grounded property from the first part in the assembly.Grounded Components By default. while others will move relative to the parts to which they have been constrained. there is no limit to the number of grounded parts that you can have in an assembly. In the browser or graphics window. Concept Although the first part is grounded. Grounded Components in Browser 298 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . All degrees of freedom are removed from the component and it cannot be moved. When you apply constraints to a grounded component.

• • • • • • Component visibility (visible or not visible) Sketch and work feature visibility Component enabled status Color and style properties applied in the assembly Zoom and viewing angle Browser display mode (Position or Modeling) Access Methods The following methods are available for accessing Design Views. All Rights Reserved 299 .Design Views When you create a new assembly file. You can also use Design views as the basis for Drawing and Presentation views.idv extension The following properties are stored within design view. system. you can recall that configuration by activating the design view. Inc. • • • system. as you work on an assembly. Procedure Several different properties are stored within the design view. If you save the display configuration as a new design view. For example.nothing visible: Built-in design view that when activated will turn the visibility of all components off. a separate Design View file is automatically created.all visible: Built-in design view that when activated will turn the visibility of all components on. you may need to turn the visibility off of several components to work on parts internally. Design Views are used to store assembly display configurations that you can recall the next time you work on the assembly. UserName.default: This design view is automatically created and is based Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. By default there will be three design views created. Browser Menu Area Pull Down Menu View > Design Views Each Design View file can contain multiple design views. Design Views are stored in the same directory as the assembly and by default have the same name as the assembly with an *.

Design Views Dialog Box Storage Location: Represents the current storage location for the design view file. Apply: Click to activate the selected design view. Design View: Lists the name of the currently selected design view. Save: Click to save the current display configuration as a design view. 300 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Enter a new design view name. New: Click to create a new design view file. Browse: Click to browse for a design view file. Delete: Click to delete the selected design view.upon your system user name.

you will open an assembly file and use the Assembly Browser to perform several tasks. All Rights Reserved 301 . Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Inc. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. From the Main table of contents page. 5-Axis Robot Assembly Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Exercise: Assembly Browser 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image.Exercise: Assembly Browser In this exercise.

Completed Robot Assembly Objectives After completing this lesson.Placing Components in an Assembly Overview Overview Overview As you create assemblies you place component geometry that represents the assembly's individual parts. you will be able to • • • • Use the Place Component tool to place parts into an assembly Utilize sources other than Autodesk Inventor software to place components Drag components into an assembly Replace components in an assembly 302 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . In this lesson you will learn about several different ways you can place components into an assembly.

The Place Component Tool You use the Place Component tool to place components into the assembly. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. however the end result is the selected file will be placed into the assembly file instead of opened for editing. The same options for opening files are available. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Keyboard Shortcut P Open Dialog Box Select the file to place into the assembly and click Open. right-click in the graphics window and click Done on the shortcut menu. Inc.0. You can place additional occurrences of the part by clicking different locations in the graphics window. Select this tool and the Open dialog box will be displayed. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Place Component tool. select the file type in the Files of type drop-down list. To place files other than Autodesk Inventor software files.0) and will be grounded. Procedure The first component you place into the assembly will be automatically placed at the assembly's origin point (0. All Rights Reserved 303 . After you place the part into the assembly.

select the file you want to place into the assembly. In the Open dialog box. On the Panel Bar. The first component in the assembly is positioned automatically and is grounded. click the Place Component tool. 304 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . 2. Optionally place additional components by clicking other locations in the graphics window. or press ESC to cancel. 3. 5. and click Open. Open or create a new assembly file. click the Place Component tool and continue to place components into the assembly. 1.Placing Components .Process Overview The following steps are an overview for using the Place Component tool to place components into the assembly. 4. On the Panel Bar.

(*. *.dwg) SAT files (*.prt. Some formats will be converted to Autodesk Inventor files when placed into an assembly.sat) (ACIS/ShapeManager) IGES files (*. *. Inc.stp. would be reflected in the assembly.asm) Different capabilities are available with each of these formats. The following list represents the supported formats that you can place into an assembly.ste.ige. *.ipt.iges) STEP files (*. select the Files of type drop-down list to display the supported file types.iam) Autodesk Mechanical Desktop (*. All Rights Reserved 305 .dwg) AutoCAD (*. Any changes in the Autodesk Mechanical Desktop file. *.igs. Concept • • • • • • • Autodesk Inventor parts and assemblies.Sources of Placed Components As you use Autodesk Inventor software to build assemblies you can use geometry from other applications as parts in your assembly.step) Pro Engineer (*. *. *. Supported Formats Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Supported File Types In the Open dialog box. but others such as Autodesk Mechanical Desktop will be linked to the assembly.

306 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Changes to the part would be reflected in the assembly. Right-click on the part and then select Open to open the part in Autodesk Mechanical Desktop.Mechanical Desktop Parts in an Autodesk Inventor Assembly The image above represents an Autodesk Mechanical Desktop part used in an Autodesk Inventor assembly.

a component is being dragged into the assembly from a Windows Explorer window. Inc. This results in the component being placed into the assembly just as if you had used the Place Component tool. All Rights Reserved 307 .ipt is being dragged into the nonactive but open assembly. Procedure In the image below. Dragging Components from Windows Explorer Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Dragging an Open Part File into an Assembly In the image below. the active part file.Dragging Components into an Assembly You can drag components into an assembly from other open part files or from Windows Explorer. robo_hand.

As a result Autodesk Inventor may not be able to locate the file the next time the assembly is opened.When you drag components from a Windows Explorer window. the following message will appear. 308 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . The message means that the current location is not referenced in the Project file. If you place the component in the assembly. make certain the location of the component is referenced in the current Project file. If not. Click OK to place the component in the assembly. you must edit the Project paths before re-opening the assembly to include component location or move the component to a location identified within the current project.

Replacing Components As you build assemblies. The origin of the new component is coincident with the origin of the component being replaced.Replaces only the selected component. the new version is placed in the same location as the existing version. you may not have access to all the required parts. Click OK to continue and replace the selected component. All Rights Reserved 309 .Replaces all occurrences of the selected component. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut CTRL+H > Replace SHIFT+H > Replace All Possible Constraint Loss Dialog Box When you replace components in an assembly the Possible Constraint Loss dialog box will appear. you may need to replace components. For example when you start the assembly. There are two versions of the Replace component tool: . you can use the Replace tool to replace the proxy part with the final version. In the meantime you place a proxy part in place of the final part. or click Cancel to cancel the operation. When the component is replaced. . but the result depends largely on the differences in geometry between the existing component and the replacement component. After you receive the required geometry. Autodesk Inventor software will attempt to retain the constraints. some assembly constraints will be lost and need to be recreated. Access Methods The following methods are available for access the Replace component tool. Procedure When you replace components in an assembly.

Replacing Components . select the component to be replaced. 310 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . In the browser or graphics window. click the Replace component tool and in the Open dialog box. 2. 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for replacing components. click OK to replace the component. On the Panel Bar. double-click on the replacement component. If the Possible Constraint Loss dialog box appears.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. select one of the occurrences and on the Panel Bar. In the Open dialog box. All occurrences of the selected component are replaced.3. click the Replace All tool. 5. 4. Click OK in the Possible Constraint Loss dialog box. To replace multiple occurrences of the same part. All Rights Reserved 311 . 6. double-click on the replacement component.

After you place the components. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. From the Main table of contents page.Exercise: Placing Components in an Assembly In this exercise. you use the techniques covered in this lesson to place components into a new assembly. click Exercise: Placing Components in an Assembly 2. you will use the Replace Component tool to replace components in the assembly. Completed Robot Assembly 312 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .

Inc. Components Created In-Place Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • • Create parts in the context of the assembly Use work features in assemblies Use 2D sketches in an assembly Use projected edges and features Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Creating Components in an Assembly Overview Overview Overview Creating components in an assembly enables you to design parts in the context of the assembly in which they will reside. All Rights Reserved 313 . This technique enables you to take advantage of other part features in the assembly to create new geometry and validate this new geometry based upon the design intent. In this lesson you will learn how to create components in the context of an assembly.

Ability to create adaptive relationships between parts. Commonly referred to as Top-Down assembly modeling. Ability to validate function within the assembly. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut N 314 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . • • • • Ability to reference other parts in the assembly. Example of Creating a Part in Place Access Methods The following methods are available for accessing the Create Component tool. this approach enables you to design new parts in the assembly environment in which they will reside. Procedure Benefits to Creating Parts in Place The following list represents some of the benefits of creating parts in the context of the assembly. Presents a better picture of the overall design intent.Creating Parts in Place Creating parts in the context of the assembly enables you to take advantage of other geometry in the assembly by referencing the features of other parts to assist in the creation of new parts.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating parts and subassemblies in place. 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Open an existing.Create In-Place Component Dialog Box New FIle Name: Enter a name for the new file. Assembly: Select to create subassembly. assembly. • • Part: Select to create a new part file. 1. Template: Select a template to use for the new part or assembly file. File Type: Select the file type in the drop-down list. All Rights Reserved 315 . Constrain sketch plane to selected face or plane: Selecting this option will place a flush constraint between the new part and the selected face. Inc. or create a new. click the Create Component tool and enter the required values in the Create In-Place Component dialog box. Click OK to create the new part. On the Panel Bar. Browse: Click to browse for a template file. Creating Parts and Subassemblies in Place . New File Location: Enter the location for the new part or assembly file.

Use the sketching tools available to create new sketch geometry or project geometry from other parts in the assembly. Select a face or plane to define the initial sketch plane on the new part. Use part modeling tools to create the 3D geometry.3. To create a subassembly in-place: 316 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . 6. 4. 5.

Select a face or plane to orient the new subassembly's origin.7. 8. 9. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 317 . On the Panel Bar. You can now create new parts in the context of the subassembly or place components that have already been created. The subassembly is automatically activated. click the Create Component tool and enter the required values in the Create In-Place Component dialog box. Click OK to create the new subassembly. Inc.

Concept You will also find the Work Plane. and Work Point tools to create new assembly based work features.Using Work Features in Assemblies As you create components in the context of the assembly. Work Axis. Assembly Work Feature Being Used 318 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . remember that the assembly file contains it own coordinate system and origin work features. You can use them to orient sketch planes on new parts and they can serve as the basis for additional work features in new parts.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using 2D Sketches in an assembly. 1. Create a new part in the context of the assembly and use the sketching tools to create only the geometry required to validate function. You can create the fundamental sketch geometry you need to validate certain features and then exit the part and assign assembly constraints to the 2D parts in the same way you apply constraints to 3D features. Procedure Using this technique enables you to validate the part's intended function before spending the time required to develop the parts final form. Constraint Dragging 2D Parts in an Assembly Using 2D Sketches in the Assembly . As you do.Using 2D Sketches You can use 2D sketches in the assembly while you create new parts and validate design intent. it is not necessary to create 3D features in the initial design phases. All Rights Reserved 319 . Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

320 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .2. Validate the components by constraint dragging the 2D parts and/or editing dimensions and/or other constraints. The 2D parts will react in the assembly the same way as a fully developed 3D part. Apply assembly constraints between the new 2D part and the existing parts. create additional parts containing 2D geometry and constrain as required. Exit the part and return to the assembly environment. 3. 4. If required. 5.

All Rights Reserved 321 . Panel Bar Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Associative Reference Receiving part is adaptive Degrees of freedom on receiving part are reduced. Associative reference geometry maintains a link to the original part and changes if the feature from which it was projected changes. refer to the Autodesk Inventor Help system. Projecting Edges and Features The follow methods are available for accessing the tools to project edges and features. Using this technique. you can project edges and features from other parts in the assembly. Static reference geometry is not linked back to the originating part and will not change if the source features change.Using Projected Edges and Features Using the same tools to project edges and features in a single part file. Procedure When you project 2D geometry across parts in the assembly. the resulting geometry will either be associative reference geometry or static reference geometry. Each type offers unique benefits and drawbacks. Inc. The following table represents some key differences between Associative Reference geometry and Static Reference geometry. Geometry cannot be trimmed or dimensioned Static Reference Receiving part is not adaptive Degrees of freedom on receiving part are not effected. some of which are beyond the scope of this course. you can create parts within the assembly with matching or uniform features. The biggest difference between associative or static reference geometry is what happens to the projected geometry if the originating feature changes. You can also use this projected geometry to create features on the current part. Geometry cannot be trimmed or dimensioned For more information on the use of projected geometry.

Options Dialog Box .Assembly Tab (Partial) Cross Part Geometry Projection: Selecting this option will create associative reference geometry. on the Tools menu click Application Options. it also adds a certain level of complexity to managing the geometry. If this option is chosen Autodesk Inventor will assign an Adaptive status to the current part and active sketch. Projected Associative Reference Geometry 322 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .To enable or disable the associative reference geometry. click the Assembly tab and adjust the option accordingly. the projected geometry is associative. feature and part. Clearing this option will create static reference geometry. Adaptivity will be introduced later in this chapter. Although this adds a degree of flexibility in regards to the design process. Note the appearance in the browser and the adaptive icon associated with the adaptive sketch. In the Options dialog box. In the image below.

Inc. When projecting cross-part geometry. projected geometry is static.In the image below. There is no adaptive icon or linked reference to the sketch. Note the appearance of the sketch in the browser. static reference geometry is magenta. Projected Static Reference Geometry Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. while associative reference geometry is black. All Rights Reserved 323 .

You will use the 2D sketch geometry to validate assembly function before creating the 3D features. From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. The completed exercise is shown in the following image.Exercise: Creating Components in an Assembly In this exercise. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Components Created In-Place 324 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . You will create additional parts in place and project geometry from other parts in the assembly. click Exercise: Creating Components in an Assembly 2. you will open an assembly and create new components using the techniques learned in this lesson.

In this lesson you will learn how to move components in an assembly. Robot Assembly Before Driving Constraints Objectives After completing this lesson.Moving Components Overview Overview Overview There are several methods available for moving components in an assembly. All Rights Reserved 325 . you will be able to • • • • • Identify the remaining degrees of freedom on a part. The method you choose will largely depend upon the constraint condition of the components and/or the task you need to accomplish. Inc. and how they are affected by constraints Perform an unconstrained drag Perform a constrained drag Drive assembly constraints Move and rotate components in an assembly Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

if you have an assembly with components that are designed to move along a given axis. click Properties. In some cases you do not want to fully constrain a component. is Translational freedom. while the degrees of freedom that enable a part to rotate about an axis is Rotational freedom. Concept As you apply assembly constraints to components. How to View a Components Degrees of Freedom There are two methods available for viewing the DOF symbol on components in the assembly. Degrees of Freedom Symbol The image above represents the DOF symbol that can be viewed on each part in the assembly. They represent how you can move the component along or rotated about each of the X. 326 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . • • To view the DOF symbols on all components in the assembly. click Degrees of Freedom or enter SHIFT+E. To view individual component's DOF symbol. Y. then you should leave the degrees of freedom to allow that movement. and Z axes. click the Occurrence tab and select the Degrees of Freedom option. For example. on the View menu. and on the shortcut menu.Degrees of Freedom Each component in an assembly will initially have six degrees of freedom (DOF). you reduce the degrees of freedom for the components being constrained. right-click on the component. it is considered to be fully constrained. In the Properties dialog box. When a part has no degrees of freedom remaining. The degrees of freedom that enable a component to move along an axis. You do not have to fully constrain any component in the assembly.

Because the first part in each assembly is automatically grounded. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Flush constraint being applied. Three degrees of freedom are removed. A grounded component has no degrees of freedom. 4. all degrees of freedom are removed. Flush constraint being applied. 3.Grounded Components Note When components are grounded in an assembly. Part is fully constrained. 2. Two degrees of freedom removed. 1. it has no degrees of freedom remaining. No remaining degrees of freedom. three remain. Inc. The unconstrained component has all six degrees of freedom remaining. one remains. The Effect of Constraints on Degrees of Freedom The following steps represent the effect of assembly constraints on degrees of freedom. Mate constraint being applied. All Rights Reserved 327 .

Unconstrained Drag You can move unconstrained components by dragging them in the graphics window. It is sometimes necessary to move components in order to place assembly constraints. You are able to drag the component in the directions allowed by the remaining degrees of freedom. Procedure Unconstrained Drag Constrained Drag To perform a constrained drag you click and drag on a component that is constrained in the assembly. Procedure 328 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Other components constrained to the selected component will also move based upon their remaining degrees of freedom.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. While you drive the constraint. this value will represent a distance. each constraint type contains a property representing an offset or angle value. For angular constraint. Access Methods The following methods are available for accessing the Drive Constraints tool. Inc. Shortcut Menu Right-click on a constraint and select Drive Constraint Drive Constraint Dialog Box Start: Enter a minimum value for the current constraint. End: Enter a maximum value for the current constraint. You animate the assembly by driving the constraints through the range specified. Procedure When you create assembly constraints. other assembly constraints are constantly evaluated and the assembly components are only allowed to move through the available degrees of freedom for each component. All Rights Reserved 329 . these values are assigned a Start and End value. Pause Delay: Enter a delay in seconds to be applied between steps. for all other constraints. you may need to visualize the assembly in motion to see how the components interact with each other. this value will be an angle format. When you drive a constraint. Driving constraints makes this visualization possible.Constraint Drivers As you build assemblies and add constraints to the parts.

Total # of steps: Uses the value below for the total number of steps for the sequence. Value: Enter a value for the increment method. Start/End/Start: Runs the sequence from its Start position to its End position and back to its Start position. 330 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . • • • Amount of value: Uses the value below to increment each step of the sequence. the motion is stopped at the point of interference. Increment: Select the method for calculating the increment of simulation. Repetitions: • • Start/End: Runs the sequence from its Start position to its End position. AVI rate: Specifies frame rate when recording the simulation. If a collision is detected. Minimize dialog during recording: When selected. the dialog box will be minimized while recording the sequence.Player Controls: Use the standard player controls to drive the constraint through its sequence. will allow adaptive parts to update if necessary based upon changes in the assembly. the assembly is analyzed for interference as each component moves through its sequence. Collision Detection: When selected. Click to record the sequence to a standard AVI format. Drive Adaptivity: When selected.

3. for more information. adjust other settings as required and click the Play button to drive the constraint. Driving More Than One Constraint Note Although it is beyond the scope of this course. Refer to the Advanced Assembly Modeling course from Autodesk. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. through the use of parameters and formulas it is possible to drive more than one constraint at a time.Driving Constraints . The assembly constraint is driven through its Start and End positions. click Drive Constraint. Inc. In the browser. In the Drive constraint dialog box. 1. 2.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for driving assembly constraints. Inc. right-click on the constraint and on the shortcut menu. enter a Start and End value. All Rights Reserved 331 .

Access Methods The following methods are available for accessing the Move and Rotate Component tools. When you use these tools on a component in the assembly.Moving and Rotating Components To move constrained components in an assembly to facilitate adding additional constraints you use either Move Component or Rotate Component tools. enabling you to move or rotate the components independently from the degrees of freedom that may be remaining on the part. Procedure To move or rotate a component in the assembly. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcuts V = Move G = Rotate Rotating Components . the assembly constraints are temporarily ignored.Potential Cursors 332 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . you can move components in the assembly just as if they were not constrained at all. After you move or rotate the component click the Update button on the Standard toolbar to reapply the assembly constraints. select the appropriate tool then click and drag on the part being moved or rotated. Using these tools.

Click and drag in the appropriate location to rotate the component. Moving or Rotating Grounded Components Note If you move or rotate a grounded component. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the 3D Rotate symbol appears similar to the 3D Rotate symbol when rotating views. All Rights Reserved 333 .When you rotate components. it will not move back to its original location after performing an Update. Inc.

Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Exercise: Moving Components 2. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. From the Main table of contents page. Robot Assembly Before Driving Constraints 334 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . You will then use the techniques learned in this lesson to move the components and drive assembly constraints.Exercise: Moving Components In this exercise. you will open an assembly and view the available degrees of freedom on different components.

realistically mimics real-world situations and operating conditions of the assembly components. After you apply the constraints. Inc.Constraining Components Overview Overview Overview When you build assemblies you define parametric relationships between the parts in the assembly. and if necessary edit the constraints. All Rights Reserved 335 . there are a couple of ways to view the constraints in the browser. view. You apply assembly constraints to the parts to define their position and available degrees of freedom. you will be able to • • • • Understand how assembly constraints effect individual parts in the assembly Apply and edit basic assembly constraints in the assembly View assembly constraints in the browser Use the ALT-Drag method to apply assembly constraints Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You use the Constraint tool or the ALT-Drag method to apply constraints without using the Place Constraint dialog box. LCD-Mount Assembly Objectives After completing this lesson. In this lesson you will learn how to apply. and edit assembly constraints. The relationships created between parts using assembly constraints.

after you select the type of constraint.Placing Constraints You apply each assembly constraint to either two components in the assembly or to one component and one assembly origin feature. Using this approach enables you to develop an assembly of parts that interact as intended with other parts in the assembly. The features to which the constraints are applied can be geometric part features. but parts should not be left unconstrained. Example of Assembly Constraint Simple but complete When you apply assembly constraints to parts. then it should be grounded or constrained to assembly level work features. or with constraint conditions that do not fully represent the intended function of the part in the assembly. Concept There are four types of assembly constraints that can be applied between parts: mate. The geometry that you choose is dependent upon the type of constraint you apply. You are not required to fully constrain parts in the assembly. angle. mimic the real world conditions of the parts in the assembly by using assembly constraint solutions that most closely resemble how the parts will be assembled after manufacturing. or work features (work planes. The constraint type chosen will depend upon the part features and the design intent. or points) at the assembly or part level. tangent. you will select one feature on each part to apply it. 336 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . axes. If a component in an assembly is not intended to be constrained to other components. When you start the Constraint tool. you should apply the constraints using the simplest approach possible while using constraint solutions that will constrain the parts as completely as required by the design intent. As you plan the constraints. an insert.

Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.In the image below. Example of Proper Constraint Planning Placing Constraints on Obstructed Geometry Tip When placing constraints on obstructed geometry or features. on the Standard toolbar. However after analyzing how the components will be put together. select the Hidden Edge Display options to display all edges on the parts. All Rights Reserved 337 . the proper constraint is used to mimic the real world process of assembling the two components. you could use a variety of different constraint solutions to assemble these two components.

2. you are given a preview of how the constraint will be applied. and the geometry chosen. the overall process of applying constraints is the same. On the Panel Bar. Depending on the type of constraint. Select the features to apply the constraints. click the Constraint tool and select the type of constraint to apply.How to Place Constraints . 338 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . 3. The following steps represent an overview for applying constraints. 1.Process Overview Although each type of constraint will create a different result. Open or create an assembly.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.4. Additional constraints being applied. All Rights Reserved 339 . Click apply to create the constraint then continue to add additional constraints as required. Inc. 5. If necessary adjust the solution option and enter an offset or angle value. 6.

Pick Part First: This option limits the feature selections to the selected part.Basic Constraints There are four basic assembly constraints. The components will move into position. The offset or angle value is calculated based upon the 340 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . this option automatically inserts the angle or offset value if the offset field is blank. Procedure Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut C Place Constraint Dialog Box Type: Select the type of constraint to create. Enter a value for the offset or angle of the constraint. Solution: Each constraint type offers different solutions. Each are designed to create a certain constraint condition between the components in the assembly. Predict Offset and Orientation: Only available for Mate and Angle constraints. Preview Constraint: This option previews the constraint before applying. the selection1 and selection2 buttons are automatically activated. Refer to the section below for available solution options for each. Offset/Angle: The label for this field will change depending on the type of constraint you select. If you need to change a selected feature. enabling you to preview the constraint and confirm or change the constraint settings. click the appropriate selection button and reselect the geometry. then select the feature for the constraint. This option is usually used in situations where the feature you are attempting to constrain is obstructed by other parts in the assembly. Selections: As you select features. You must first select the part.

To override this setting. enter the offset/angle value manually.Face/Face Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You can also enter an offset value to offset the geometry.Axis/Axis Mate Constraint/Mate Solution . Mate Constraint You use the mate constraint to mate selected geometry.part's current position and is inserted into the offset/angle field. Inc. This is useful in applying constraints without moving the geometry from its current position. The following represents examples using the Mate constraint. Mate Constraint/Mate Solution . and points. Valid selections include faces. Flush: Selected faces will be coplanar. Solution Options: Mate: Selected geometry will be mated to each other. planes. edges. axes. All Rights Reserved 341 .

Face/Face Angle Constraint Use the angle constraint to specify an angle between faces.Face/Face 342 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .Mate Constraint/Mate Solution . Solution Options: Directed Angle: Using this solution option. Angle Constraint . the angle is measured by using the right-hand rule. planes. Undirected Angle: This is the default solution and it allows either orientation of the angle constraint. This helps resolve situations in which the component's orientation flips during a constraint drive or drag. or lines.Point/Point Mate Constraint/Flush Solution .

Solution Options: Opposed: This solution will force the face normals to be opposed. Outside: Creates an outside tangent solution.Circular Face: Insert Constraint Use the insert constraint to insert a circular part feature into another circular part feature. The center point of the edge is calculated and the result is a constraint in which the center lines are aligned and the selected edges are made coplanar. Insert Constraint Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 343 . This requires the selection of two circular edges. Solution Options: Inside: Creates an inside tangent solution.Tangent Constraint Use the tangent constraint to define a tangency condition between one circular feature and plane or face. or between two circular features. Aligned: This solution will align the face normals.Circular Face . Tangent Constraint/Outside Solution . Inc.

suppress. Viewing Assembly Constraints in the Browser 344 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . This image displays how the assembly constraint appears under each part that it has been applied. when the browser is in the default Position View. Procedure Constraint Geometry Highlighted Browser . If you select a constraint in the browser it will highlight the geometry referenced by the constraint. each part or origin feature is associated with one-half of the constraint. If you need to edit. Each constraint is listed twice in the browser.Viewing Constraints After you create the assembly constraints you can view them in the browser different ways.Position View When you create assembly constraints. for example. or delete a constraint. you can access the constraint under either part.

Browser - Modeling View
If you change the browser view to Modeling View, the constraints appear under the Constraints folder. You can expand the folder to access the constraints. Using this view places all the constraints in one location however, it can be difficult to identify constraints on specific parts in larger assemblies.

Assembly Constraints in Browser - Modeling View

Shortcut Menu Options
In the browser, if you right-click on a constraint the following shortcut menu is displayed. Find in Window: Zooms the current view to geometry containing the selected constraint. This assists you in identifying the constraint graphically. Other Half: This option highlights the other half of the constraint, by expanding the other component to which it has been applied and highlighting the constraint. This option helps identify which components the constraint has been applied to.

Constraint Shortcut Menu Options

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Editing Constraints
You can edit the constraint much the same way you edit placed features. Locate the constraint in the browser, then right-click on the constraint and on the shortcut menu, click Edit.
Procedure

Editing Constraints

When you edit a constraint, all edits are done in the same dialog box used to create the constraint. All options can be changed including the type of constraint.

Editing Constraints

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Changing the Constraint Offset/Angle Value
There are two methods to change the constraint offset/angle value without using the Edit Constraint dialog box. • Using the Edit Box at the bottom of the browser: Selecting a constraint will cause the Edit Box to appear at the bottom of the browser. Enter a new offset/angle value for the constraint and press ENTER.

Using the Edit Dimension dialog box: In the browser, right-click on the constraint and on the shortcut menu, click Modify. The Edit Dimension dialog box will appear. Enter a new offset/angle value and press ENTER or click the green check mark.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Using ALT -Drag to Place Constraints
The ALT-Drag method is an alternate method for placing assembly constraints. Hold the ALT key down, then click and drag on the feature receiving the constraint. A constraint glyph will appear indicating the type of constraint being applied. Continue to drag the cursor to another part in the assembly and touch another valid feature. Then release the mouse button to create the assembly constraint.
Procedure

ALT-Drag Constraint Glyph

ALT-Drag Constraint Types
When you use the ALT-Drag method to apply constraints, the constraint type is based upon the geometry you select. You can change the constraint type by pressing the appropriate key. Release the ALT key but you must continue to hold down the left mouse button. • Mate: M or 1 • Angle: A or 2 • Tangent: T or 3 • Insert: I or 4

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ALT-Drag to Place Constraints - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for using the ALT-Drag method to apply assembly constraints. 1. While holding the ALT key, select the feature to be constrained and while holding the left mouse button down, drag the part. You can release the ALT key but you must hold the mouse button down.

2.

While holding the mouse button down, drag the part to the next feature to assign the constraint and release the mouse when the part is in place.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Exercise: Constraining Components
In this exercise, you use the concepts and techniques learned in this lesson to constrain components in the assembly. After you apply the constraints you will edit some constraints to see the effect on the assembly.
Print Exercise Reference

To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook:
1. From the Main table of contents page, click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals, click Exercise: Constraining Components

2.

The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

LCD-Mount Assembly

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Adaptive Components
Overview Overview

Overview
Adaptivity is intended to give the designer a way to create parts that can adapt to the assembly in which they are being used. Historically, parametric modeling systems required the use of complex cross-part parametric equations in order for one part to change size if another part in the assembly changed. One problem with this technique, is that cross-part parametric equations could become so complex, that even the original designer could have problems managing the relationship and equations used in such an environment. With the introduction of Adaptivity, Autodesk Inventor enables the designer to create adaptive relationships between parts in an assembly, that do not require the use of complex cross-part parameters. Largely based upon assembly constraints, Adaptivity enables a part to change based upon changes in other parts in the assembly to which it has been constrained. Furthermore, with Autodesk Inventor you can mix both Parametric dimensions and adaptivity within the same part and/or assembly. Thus, you can control the design intent by using the most appropriate technique. Although an in depth discussion of Adaptivity is beyond the scope of the course, you will learn the essential aspects of creating adaptive assemblies using Autodesk Inventor.

Completed Assembly with Adaptive Parts

Objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to • • • Understand adaptive features and how you use them Create adaptive features and sketches Use adaptive occurrences in an assembly and control them with constraints
Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Introduction to Adaptive Features
Adaptivity is not intended to be used in all parts and assemblies. The key to using adaptive features effectively is knowing when to use them.
Concept

When you create a part containing adaptive features, their size is allowed to change when the assembly conditions require them to do so in order to successfully resolve constraints and associative sketches. You can use different approaches to create adaptive features, for example, you can design the part outside of the assembly and make specific features adaptive for later use, or create a part in the context of the assembly, and project geometry from other parts in the assembly, to automatically create adaptive features. In the example below, the gasket component was created by using an adaptive crosspart projection from the flange component. By changing dimensions on the flange component, the gasket features change to match the changes on the flange.

Adaptive Component - Before and After

Identifying Adaptive Parts and Features
Parts and features are identified in the browser with an adaptive icon indicating the adaptive status. It must be present at each level in order for adaptivity to function. At minimum you will have two adaptive indicators: (a) at the part level in the assembly, and (b) at the feature level. The adaptive indicator only appears at the sketch level if the sketch contains associative geometry or has been set to be adaptive.

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When to Use Adaptive Features
The following list represents some of the occasions to use adaptivity. • • • Your part contains features that are largely dependent for size or position, with other parts in the assembly. Your parts share common sketch geometry such as mating flanges. You need an easy way to update parts in the assembly when changes are required.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Methods for Creating Adaptive Features
There are two methods available for creating adaptive features. The method you choose depends upon the design intent and which aspects of the geometry needs to be adaptive. While some adaptive features may only require certain parameters, such as extrusion distance, to change others may require the underlying sketch geometry to change as well.
Procedure

Using an associative reference sketch to create a feature. When you create parts in the context of the assembly, you can project geometry from other parts onto the current sketch. Depending upon the current Application Options settings, this geometry will either be associative reference or static. When the result of the geometry you project is associative reference geometry, the sketch is automatically set to be adaptive and any changes to the originating geometry will reflect in the reference geometry. To access this setting, on the Tools menu, click Application Options and click the Assembly tab.

Use Associative Reference Sketches to • Create a new component with features that need to mate with other features in the assembly. • Create a new component with features whose size and position are dependent upon the features of other parts in the assembly. For example a flange and end cap. • Create features that mate with a zero clearance. Create an underconstrained feature, and then make it adaptive. You create the sketch geometry and intentionally leave the geometry underconstrained. In order for a sketch feature to adapt, it must be underconstrained specifically on the elements of the sketch that you require to be adaptive. After you create the feature, in the browser, right-click on the

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Inc. • • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. For example. All Rights Reserved 355 . Each feature you create has specific properties can be set as adaptive. Adapt a feature to a component in another assembly level. Assign specific feature properties as adaptive. Creating mating features and control assembly clearances with constraint offset values. a hole feature has the following properties that can be set as adaptive.feature and click Adaptive on the shortcut menu. Create adaptive relationships before you know which parts in the assembly you will constrain the adaptive features to. Create adaptive relationships when there is no existing geometry to project. Use Underconstrained Adaptive Features to • • • • • Create adaptive relationships with 2D layout sketch geometry. • Sketch (must be underconstrained) • Hole Depth • Nominal Diameter • Counterbore Diameter • Counterbore Depth Any or all of these features can be set as adaptive in the Feature Properties dialog box.

If the originating geometry changes.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating adaptive sketches. On the Tools menu. If changes to the flange's sketch geometry occur. the changes are automatically reflected in the referencing associative sketch. Procedure Adaptive Sketch Example In the image above. With sketch activated. Creating Adaptive Sketches . Create a new part in the context of the assembly and activate the sketch to receive to associative reference geometry. they will be automatically reflected in the projected adaptive sketch. click the Assembly tab and confirm that the Enable Associative Edge/Loop Geometry Projection During In-Place Modeling is selected. In the Options dialog box. on the Panel Bar. the Adaptive-Gasket's base feature sketch geometry is projected from the underlying flange part. 2.Adaptive Sketches You create adaptive sketches by projecting cross-part geometry as associative reference geometry. 1. click Application Options. click the Project Geometry tool and select the edges or loops to be projected onto the new 356 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . then click OK. 3. Open or create an assembly containing at least one part.

4. to project a loop. 5. All Rights Reserved 357 . 6. Inc. select a point inside the edges. select the edges specifically. To project single edges.part. The projected geometry will appear on the sketch and in the browser as an adaptive reference. If necessary make changes to the original part and view the changes reflected in the adaptive part. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Use the projected sketch geometry to create the required sketched features.

Adaptive Feature Example In the browser. You do this by leaving dimensions and/or constraints off of sketch geometry. such as an extrusion distance. the adaptive part is created with the initial sketch intentionally underconstrained. Feature Properties Dialog Box 358 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . The options available will depend upon the type of feature selected.Adaptive Features You create Adaptive features by leaving certain aspects of the feature underconstrained. the adaptive part is driven through a series of updates and changes in size. Using Mate and Flush assembly constraints. The feature properties dialog box contains an Adaptive section enabling you to determine which aspects of the feature are allowed to adapt. Procedure In the image below. adaptive. By leaving the geometry underconstrained. right-click on a feature and select Properties on the shortcut menu. it is able to adapt to other features based upon assembly constraints. or by making specific feature properties.

3. Create the part as required using standard sketch features.Creating Adaptive Features . 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. right-click on the feature and select Adaptive from the shortcut menu. Create a new part in the assembly with an underconstrained sketch. All Rights Reserved 359 . 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating adaptive features. In the browser.

click Application Options. The part feature updates to validate the assembly constraint. Continue to add assembly constraints as required by the design intent. Add assembly constraints according to the design intent. Setting Initial Adaptive Feature Status Note You can set part features to be adaptive automatically as soon as they are created. In the Options dialog box. The part feature updates to validate the assembly constraint. 5. 360 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Continue to add assembly constraints as required by the design intent. 6. click the Assembly tab and select the Features are initially adaptive option. On the Tools menu. The adaptive part will update to validate the assembly constraint.4.

When a component is being used adaptively in one assembly. then click Adaptive on the shortcut menu. or other modifications. Procedure When you constrain the adaptive part to fixed features on other components. it cannot be used adaptively in this assembly. right-click on the part.iam file. To set the part as adaptive. Because it is used adaptively in the AdaptiveOccurrences. It is important to note that any changes to the adaptive part. in the browser or graphics window. Also. In the Adaptive-Occurrence. each containing a reference to the PinA component. note that only one occurrence of the Pin-A component is set to be adaptive. the under constrained features on the adaptive part will resize to validate the assembly constraints.iam file. In an assembly containing multiple occurrences of an adaptive part. Any changes made to the adaptive occurrence will be automatically reflected in other occurrences. In the Tri-Assembly. you can use the Save Copy As command and save the part with a unique name for each adaptive occurrence you require in other assemblies. changes to the Pin-A component forced by adaptivity in the first assembly.iam file. in this example. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. are also reflected in the second assembly. only one occurrence can be specified as adaptive. All Rights Reserved 361 . the part's adaptive status is not initially set. the same Pin-A component is being referenced. it cannot be used adaptively in another. Inc. caused by adaptivity.ipt.Adaptive Occurrence in Assemblies When you add a part to an assembly that was created outside of the assembly and contains adaptive features. If you require the same part to be adaptive in multiple assemblies. All other occurrences in the assembly will update to reflect the adaptive changes. As a result. the Pin-A component no longer fits the hole size of the Tri-Base. The image below represents two assembly files. will be reflected in every assembly in which the part is used.

turn off the adaptive status of the part in the assembly. Procedure • • Adaptivity is not intended to be the cure all for all cross-part design challenges. additional processing is required. When this message appears. Although the message does not give details about the specific problem. the component will move according to the remaining degrees of freedom before it adapts. After you resolve the adaptive issue. you will have to reapply the constraint.Applying Assembly Constraints You apply Assembly constraints to adaptive parts the same way you apply constraints to non-adaptive components. Depending on the complexity of the assembly and parts. For each adaptive part in an assembly. If your assembly contains hundreds (if not thousands) of parts. Common Assembly Constraint Error Tips and Considerations for Using Adaptivity The following list represents some tips and consideration for using Adaptivity. An adaptive change will only occur when there are no remaining degrees of freedom that can be used to validate the constraint. • 362 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . If you click Accept. Procedure The image below represents a common error that can occur when you apply constraints to adaptive components. assembly performance can be effected. and investigate the adaptive component's features. and sketch geometry. the constraint will be saved in an error state. If you click Cancel. it means that either some aspect of the feature's properties is not specified to be adaptive. then performance could be seriously effected. Cancel or Accept the message. This step is critical for performance. or a constraint or dimension is preventing the adaptive change to occur. When you apply assembly constraints to adaptive components. After the adaptive changes have been applied. when you use adaptive parts. as any changes to a feature will force Autodesk Inventor to evaluate the adaptivity. the constraint will be validated automatically.

From the Main table of contents page. You will then modify the AdpReservoir component and view the effects on the adaptive components in the assembly. you will create three adaptive components in the assembly using both associative reference edges and adaptive features.Exercise: Adaptive Components In this exercise. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Exercise: Adaptive Components 2. Inc. All Rights Reserved 363 . The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Completed Assembly with Adaptive Parts Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals.

You will also learn to perform different surface analyses on parts as well as using the Find option in the open dialog box to locate components based upon certain search criteria.Assembly Analysis Overview Overview Overview There are different tools available to assist you in analyzing components that are used in an assembly. In this lesson you will learn to analyze the assembly for interference between parts. and finding existing components. Completed Interference Analysis Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • Analyze components in the assembly for interference Analyze faces on the part using the Zebra Style analysis Locate components using the Find option 364 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .

The Analyze Interference tool enables you to check for interference between components in the assembly. select all components for Set #1 and leave Set #2 empty. Define Set #2: Click this button then select the components to include in the second set. Including components in this set is optional. All Rights Reserved 365 . Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. To check for interference by comparing each component to each other component. You can select components in the browser or in the graphics window. Components within this set will be compared against components in Set #1. If you define both sets and components within the same set interfere with each other. the interference will not be detected. You can select components in the browser or in the graphics window. Components within this set will be compared against components in Set #2. Procedure Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Analyze Interference tool. Pull Down Menu Tools > Interference Analysis Dialog Box Define Set #1: Click this button then select the components to include in the first set. When the interference analysis is performed.The Analyze Interference Tool As you design components for your assembly. components in Set #1 are checked for interference with components in Set #2. you may need to determine whether or not components in the assembly interfere with each other.

Interference Detected Dialog Box Analyzing Interference .Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for analyzing the assembly for interference between components. the Interference Detected dialog box appears. click Analyze Interference and select the components to be included in Set #1. You can copy this information to the clipboard and then paste it into another application. indicating the components and locations of interference. On the Tools menu. 2.If interferences are detected. 366 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Open an assembly. 1. You can also print it for further review.

Tip To prevent interference between threaded holes and fasteners.3. The areas of interference are indicated in red in the graphics window. You can expand the dialog box for more information and to copy and/or print the results. Then click OK. Click the Define Set #2 button and select the components to be compared against the components in Set #1. All Rights Reserved 367 . 4. Interference Between Threaded Holes and Standard Parts. If an interference is found. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. use the major diameter option to create the threaded hole. the Interference Detected dialog box appears giving a total number of interferences and the total volume.

You use this style to check the continuity between surfaces. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Analyze Faces tool. In this lesson you will learn how to perform each of these analyses. Zebra Analysis The Zebra Analysis analyzes the selected part or faces by checking for continuity between surfaces. Procedure Each style is designed to perform specific analysis and will present the results of the analysis in a unique way. thickness of the stripes. New: Click to define a new selection set of faces.Zebra Analysis In the Style area click the left button to activate the Zebra Analysis.The Analyze Faces Tool The Analyze Faces tool offers two different analysis styles. Pull Down Menu Tools > Standard Toolbar Toggles the analysis display on/ off. Delete: Click to delete the selection set. Analyze Faces Dialog Box . Definition: Use these options to control the orientation of the pattern. 368 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . click the arrow button to select the part or faces. You use the Zebra Analysis to analyze consistency between faces and use the Draft Analysis style to analyze the suitability of a part for casting. and opacity of the pattern. Selection: In the Selection area.

the selected faces are being analyzed for continuity along their common edge. In the example above. The colors represent the draft angle range between angles specified. Analyze Faces Dialog Box . Inc. When you design parts for casting. 90 degree angles can cause problems when trying to pull the mold away from the part. Draft Analysis You use the Draft Analysis style to check the suitability of a part for casting. the Zebra Stripe pattern would indicate this with a non-uniform transition from one face to the next.Draft Analysis Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Click OK or Apply to display the results. Face drafts are generally used to alleviate this problem by applying slight draft angles between faces. Faces: Enables you to select individual faces for analysis. indicating surface continuity.Part: Enables you to select the entire part for analysis. If there were gaps between the selected faces. The Draft Analysis style analyzes the selected part or faces and presents the results in a range of colors on the selected part or faces. All Rights Reserved 369 . The Zebra Stripes make a uniform transition from one face to the other.

Faces: Enables you to select individual faces for analysis. 370 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .In the Style area click the right button to activate the Draft Analysis. In the example above. In the Selection area. The green areas indicate safe draft angles while the red areas indicate 90 degree conditions. Delete: Click to delete the selection set. have acceptable draft angles. You can define individual selection sets with separate pull-directions. Faces represented in Blue or Green. Definition: Enter the draft angle range to use for the analysis. Part: Enables you to select the entire part for analysis. the a draft analysis as been performed on the selected faces. The color ranges from blue (negative angle specified) to red (0 degree draft angle) to Green (positive angle specified). Selection: In the Selection area click the arrow button to select the part or faces. New: Click to define a new selection set of faces. and if necessary flip the pull direction for the current selection set. while Red indicates 0 degree draft angles which could cause problems when trying to pull the mold away from the part. Click OK or Apply to display the results. click the arrow to define.

Locating Components You can use the Find tool to locate files or components within the active assembly. Access Methods Use the following methods to access tools for locating files Autodesk Inventor files. Open Dialog Box Edit Menu (Assemblies Only) Locates components within the active assembly only. Both tools function the same way. The Find Assembly Components dialog box is accessed by clicking Find on the Edit menu. You access the Find: Autodesk Inventor Files dialog by clicking the Find button on the Open dialog box. You then select the appropriate condition and if necessary. and highlights and selects the matching components in the browser. provide a value. the only difference is that the latter only searches the active assembly file. You create the search criteria by selecting the property from the Property drop-down list. Find Find CTRL+F The main window in each of these dialog boxes lists the current search criteria. Procedure There are two slightly different versions of the Find dialog box. Click the Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You can create different searches by defining criteria based upon various file properties and save these custom searches for later use. Keyboard Shortcut (Assemblies Only) Locates components within the active assembly only. All Rights Reserved 371 . Inc. while working in the context of the assembly.

and the Open Search button to load previously saved searches. Components that meet the criteria will be highlighted in the browser. where it would be difficult to manually locate components in the browser. Build and optionally save the search criteria. Find Assembly Components 372 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . then click Find Now to search for Autodesk Inventor files that meet the criteria defined.Add to list button to add the criteria to the main window list. Use the Save Search button to save the search for later use. then click Find Now to search for components in the active assembly that meet the defined criteria. You use this tool for large assemblies. Find Autodesk Inventor Files Dialog Box Build and optionally save the search criteria.

You will use the Analyze Faces tool to analyze faces on a part file and complete the exercise by using the Find tool to find various files. From the Main table of contents page. click Exercise: Assembly Analysis 2. click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. Inc. you will use the concepts and techniques learned in this lesson to perform an interference analysis on an assembly. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1.Exercise: Assembly Analysis In this exercise. All Rights Reserved 373 . The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Completed Interference Analysis Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

You can also use the Presentation environment to: • Help explain and visualize components in the assembly that would otherwise be obstructed from view when the assembly is shown in its assembled condition. Assembly Exploded View Objectives After completing this lesson.Presentations Overview Overview Overview You use Presentations files to create exploded views of the assembly. If you require exploded views in your drawing you will first need to create the exploded view in a Presentation file. you will be able to • • • Create a Presentation View Create Tweaks and Trails in a Presentation View Animate a Presentation View 374 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . • The Presentation file is stored as a separate *. In this lesson you will learn to create exploded views and animations. Visualize the interaction between parts in the assembly by animating the exploded view to show the assembly's transition between the assembled and exploded states.ipn file which references the assembly and part files for the geometry.

the graphics window displays the assembly geometry you use in the presentation views. All Rights Reserved 375 . Presentation Environment The Presentation Environment is similar to the part modeling and assembly environment. The Panel Bar contains the tools you use to create the Presentations. and the browser displays view names and other information relevant to the Presentation environment. select Presentation.ipn file.Creating a Presentation Before you create a Presentation View. you must create a Presentation File. Presentation Environment Creating a Presentation View You use a Presentation View to create exploded views of the assembly. Default templates are available for Presentation files. There is no limit to the number of presentation views you can create. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You store the Presentation in an *. Procedure On the Standard toolbar. Inc. on the New fly-out menu. but you can only reference one assembly in each Presentation file.

Automatic: This option creates the exploded view by automatically moving the components in the assembly based on the distance you enter in the Distance field. Create Trails: This option will create trails indicating the path of each component from its assembled position to the exploded position. Explosion Method: Select the explosion method from the following options.Access Methods Use the following methods to access to Create View tool. and Insert. This option is only available if you select Automatic. will be moved automatically. you will need to enter the path for the assembly or select the browse button to browse for the assembly file. Select Assembly Dialog Box File: If you already have an assembly file open. it will be listed automatically in the File field. 376 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . If you do not currently have an assembly file open. Click the browse button to browse for a different design view file. Only components with certain assembly constraints such as Mate. Panel Bar When you select the Create View tool. Design View: Select the Design View to use as the basis for the Presentation View. Manual: This option creates the Presentation View without exploding the assembly components. the Select Assembly dialog box is displayed. You explode the view later by adding tweaks to move each component. Distance: Enter an explosion distance to move each component.

2. To create trails on the components.The image below represents a typical presentation containing two Presentation Views. Create a new Presentation file. If necessary you can rename the view by performing a slow double-click on the name in the browser. click the Create Trails option. Each Presentation View is displayed in the browser. Presentation View Creating a Presentation View . To activate a view. In the Select Assembly dialog box.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a Presentation View. To automatically explode the components. On the Panel Bar. All Rights Reserved 377 . Inc. double-click on the view in the browser. enter or browse for the assembly file to use in the Presentation View. You can expand it to display the assembly components. The view names listed here are the same view names available to create a 2D drawing view later. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 1. click the Create View tool. select the Automatic explosion method and enter a distance in the Distance field. Accept the default Design View or select one from the drop-down list. then click OK to create the Presentation View. Other options are available for filtering the information presented in the browser.

enter a new value in the Edit Box at the bottom of the browser.3. Continue to create presentation views as required. 4. 378 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . Expand the view to see the components and tweaks automatically applied. The Presentation View is created accordingly and appears in the Presentation Browser. If you need to edit the tweak.

Creating Tweaks and Trails After you create the presentation view. Trails help clarify how a component in an exploded view fits into the overall assembly. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Tweak Components tool. to its assembled location. The blue axis indicates the current transformation axis. Select a face or edge on any component to display the Triad icon. which represent a path from the components current location after tweaks have been applied. you may need to add tweaks to the components to move them to new locations in the exploded view. Even if you have chosen the automatic explosion method. Inc. Procedure When you tweak a component you can move and/or rotate the component in any direction. When the tweaks are created you also have the option of displaying the trails. most exploded views will require manual tweaks. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut T Tweak Component Dialog Box Direction: Click the Direction button to define the direction of the tweak. All Rights Reserved 379 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you can select elements of the triad to control the transformation. Once the direction triad appears. The direction does not have to be defined from a feature on the part you tweak.

Enter a distance or angle value for the tweak and click the green check mark button. or Z here is the same as selecting each axis on the triad in the graphics window. 380 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . in the Transformations area you can set the transformation options for the tweak. Clicking the X. Inadvertently selecting a point over a component will add that component to the tweak. Transformations: In the Tweak Component dialog box. If you select a component by mistake. You can select the option to move or rotate the component. Display Trails: Select this option to display trails showing the path of the tweak. Components: Click the Components button to select the components to tweak.You can switch the active direction by: • • Choosing another axis in the Tweak Component dialog box. You can use the value field for tranlational and rotational tweaks. Note: When you drag the tweak distance. Trail Origin: Click the Trail Origin button to select a different trail origin. start dragging the distance with the cursor away from existing components. This option enables you to rotate the component around the selected axis. This option enables you to move the component along the selected axis. deselect it by holding down the CTL key and reselecting the component. Y. Selecting the axis on the Triad to make it current.

Creating Tweaks and Trails . In the same area. Clear: Click to clear the current tweak and continue adding tweaks. click the green check button to finish tweaking the triad. 1. On the Panel Bar. Inc. click the Tweak Components tool and select face or edge to define the tweak direction.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating tweaks and trails. 2. Triad Only: Select this option to rotate the triad only.Edit Existing Trail: Click the Edit Existing Trail button to edit an existing trail. This option is only available when the rotational transformation is selected. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Select the components to be included in the tweak. Create a Presentation View. By rotating the triad. All Rights Reserved 381 . 3. Close: Click to close the dialog box. you can tweak the component in different angles. You will select the trail then adjust the tweak value.

4. Repeat the steps above to continue tweaking components. Confirm the Transformation settings then click and drag in a blank area of the screen. Click Clear to apply the tweak and continue. Select a face or edge to define the direction. When finished. and confirm the transformation direction. Select the components to include in the tweak. 6. 5. Click and drag in a blank area of the graphics window and then click Clear to apply the tweak and continue. 382 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . 7. click Close.

you can use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to change the animation sequence of the selected tweak. they appear as a group in the sequence list. in the Motion area. In the Animation dialog box. All Rights Reserved 383 .Animating a Presentation View After you create the Presentation View. If you select items in the sequence list. some of which are beyond the scope of this course. or pause. Panel Bar After you start the Animate tool. Select items in the list and use the Group and Ungroup buttons to move items in and out of sequence groups. After you play the animation. click the Record button to record the animation to an standard AVI file. Expand the dialog box to examine the tweak sequence. You can record the animation to a standard AVI format for use on other computers. By default the animation will play in the reverse order that you applied the tweaks. In this lesson you will learn the basics for animating a Presentation View. Inc. use the standard player controls to play. click Reset to reset the sequence back to the beginning. All items in a sequence group are animated at the same time. Animation Dialog Box Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. it is possible to animate the explosion sequence and visualize the components in the assembly moving into or out of their assembled position. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Animate tool. Procedure There are several options available to animate the presentation view. rewind. When you tweak multiple components at the same time.

Browser Sequence View Click the Filter button at the top of the browser and select Sequence View on the flyout menu. Using this view it is possible to drag and drop component tweaks from one sequence to another. Browser Sequence View 384 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . This will display the tweaks in the sequence order that will be played during the animation sequence.

click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals. click Exercise: Presentations 2. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. you will create a new presentation file of an assembly. you will create an exploded view of the components and then animate that exploded view. All Rights Reserved 385 .Exercise: Presentations In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. Inc. After creating the presentation. Assembly Exploded View Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

click Challenge Exercise: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals 2. you will use the concepts and techniques learned in this chapter to create the assembly pictured in the image below. From the Main table of contents page.Challenge Exercise: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals Challenge Exercise: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals Print Exercise Reference In this exercise. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Completed Assembly Challenge 386 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals . click Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals From the table of contents for Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals.

Resequencing and restructuring an assembly. Potential outside sources of geometry not created with Autodesk Inventor. Perform several different assembly related operations using the assembly browser. Using assembly based work features to constrain components and using parts consisting of only 2D geometry to validate design intent.Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • • • • • • • What constitutes an assembly model and the overall process used to create them. Alternative methods for placing constraints on components in the assembly. Replacing existing components in the assembly. The different approaches that can be used when creating assembly models and the environment and interface used as you create the assembly. Creating new parts in the context of the assembly. Projecting geometry from other parts in the assembly when creating new components. Tips and considerations for using Adaptive parts in your assembly. Activating components and controlling the appearance properties of the browser. Placing assembly constraints on components in your assembly. Degrees of Freedom and how they effect each part in the assembly. Simulating motion in an assembly by driving constraints and temporarily repositioning components in the assembly by using the Move Component and Rotate Component tools. All Rights Reserved 387 . Inc. Creating Design Views to save custom views and display characteristics of the assembly. Methods for creating adaptive features and sketches and how to control the adaptive status of these features. while understanding the potential effect on assembly constraints when doing so. • • • • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Placing components in the assembly using the Place Component tool.

388 Chapter 6: Assembly Modeling Fundamentals .

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . Copy and/or move drawing views between sheets in the drawing. Creating and editing auxiliary views on your sheet. Create and edit section views.Introduction to Drawings Chapter Introduction In this chapter you learn about. Retrieve model dimensions for use in the drawing. Creating detail views to magnify portions of your drawing view. Creating and using text styles and dimension styles. Perform several functions involving drawing resources.. Creating general types of annotation on your drawing. Create and use text styles and dimension styles. Creating and editing broken views. Retrieving model dimensions for use in the drawing. Creating and editing break out views as an alternative to standard section views. Create base and projected views. Create and edit broken views on your sheet. • • • • • • • • • In this chapter After completing this chapter. Creating base and projected views of your part or assembly files. Create and edit detail views... Using various drawing resources. Copying and/or moving views between sheets in the drawing. Create and edit auxiliary views on your sheet. Placing reference dimensions on the sheet. Creating and editing section views on your drawing. • Creating and utilizing the available drafting standards to control several properties of your drawing. Project isometric views from the section to create an isometric section view.. you will be able to. Editing projected views and the options that are available. • Create and utilize the available drafting standard to control properties of your drawing. Managing views and sections after they have been created.

GB. In this lesson you will learn how to use drafting standards to control the appearance of drawing features. The default standard is determined by the option you select during installation and can be changed for each drawing. and JIS. BSI. you will be able to • • • • Use Drafting Standards to control the appearance of drawing features Create and use text styles in your drawing Create and use dimension styles in your drawings Create drawing templates 390 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . and Parts Lists. You use them to control the appearance of drawing features such as Balloons. DIN. drafting standards. Drafting Standards and Styles Objectives After completing this lesson.Setting Drafting Standards Overview Overview Overview Autodesk Inventor software supports ANSI. ISO. Weld Symbols.

the default drafting standard is determined by the options chosen during installation. Inc. Pull Down Menu Format > Drafting Standards Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. or create a new standard based upon one of the default standards.Drafting Standards You use the Drafting Standards dialog box to control several different drawing feature properties. When you create or modify drafting standards. If you want the changes to be available to all new drawings. Principle Default Drafting Standards The following list represents the available default drafting standards. modify them. You can use these standard as they are. the changes apply only to the current drawing. • • • • • • ANSI BSI DIN GB ISO JIS Access Methods Use the following method to access the Drafting Standards dialog box. You can create a new standard or modify an existing standard for the current drawing. When you create a new drawing. All Rights Reserved 391 . you must save the current drawing as template in your template directory.

Click the [>>] button to expand the Drafting Standards dialog box. each containing different options for controlling properties stored within the drafting standard are available. Several tabs. Drafting Standards Dialog Box 392 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Drafting Standards Dialog Box Select the active drafting standard or click the Click to Add area to create new drafting standard based upon one of the existing standards.

All Rights Reserved 393 . • Common Tab: This tab controls common drawing properties such as default text style. • Terminator Tab: This tab controls the type and size of leader and dimension terminators. and line properties. • Sheet Tab: The options on this tab controls sheet specific properties such as labels and colors. view projection. Inc.Drafting Standard Properties Each tab in the Drafting Standards dialog box contains properties for drawing features that are stored within the drafting standard. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

• Control Frame Tab: Use the options on this tab for Control Frame properties.• Dimension Style Tab: Select the active dimension style for the current standard. The characters must be selected to be available for dimensions. Only the selected symbols will be available for GD&T features. 394 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Unselected characters will not be available for dimensions.

Heading. All Rights Reserved 395 .• Datum Target Tab: These options control Datum Target feature properties such as point size. and units. linetypes. Inc. and Columns to be included. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. • Parts List Tab: This tab controls Parts Lists properties such as Text Style.

Only the selected Hatches will be available when you create new hatch areas or modify existing hatch patterns. Balloon Type. • Center Mark Tab: These options control the center mark properties. • Hatch Tab: These options set the default hatch pattern for section views. and Offset Spacing.• Balloon Tab: These options control properties for Balloon features such as Text Style. 396 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

Only the selected symbols will be available when you place surface texture features. • Surface Texture Tab: These options control surface texture symbol properties. Only the selected symbols will be available in the drawing. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. • Weld Bead Recovery Tab: This tab controls the weld bead properties for weld features. All Rights Reserved 397 .• Welding Symbols Tab: These options control weld symbol properties. Inc.

3. 4. 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a new drafting standard. Continue to modify other properties as required. The new drafting standard will be listed among the default drafting standards and should appear selected in the Current column. and select the base standard from the drop-down list. enter a name for your standard. select the Click to add new standard area. click Drafting Standards.Creating a new Drafting Standard . 2. 398 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . On the Format menu. In the New Standard dialog box. Click OK to close the Drafting Standards dialog box. In the Drafting Standards dialog box.

the default text style is set within the current drafting standard. you will need to save the current drawing containing the text style as a drawing template in your template directory. Different Text Styles Default Text Styles Note Within each drawing is a default text style for each drafting standard. Inc. If you modify or create new text styles.Text Styles You create and use text styles to control the appearance of text features for annotation objects in your drawings. Pull Down Menu Standard Toolbar Text Styles Select to change the active text style. All Rights Reserved 399 . and you want them available in other drawings. Access Methods Use the following methods to access Text Style related functions. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. or apply a different text style to the selected text. If you select one of these text styles in the Text Styles dialog box. Concept The image below represents the same text object with different text styles applied. all options will be grayed out. Stored within the drawing. These text styles are named DEFAULT-Standard Name and cannot be modified or deleted.

select the line spacing for the text style. or enter a new value. Center. 0.Text Styles Dialog Box You can adjust the following properties for all but the DEFAULT-Standard Name text styles. Style Name: Enter a name for the text style. Format/Justification/Color: Select the options to control the format (Bold. Justification (Left. Middle. select the size for the font. Value: Enter a line spacing value. Standard: In the drop-down list. 270. Bottom) and color. Right. Top. Size: In the drop-down list. %Stretch: Specifies the width of the text. 180. Italic. Underline). select the text font for the style. select the drafting standard to display text styles. Font: In the drop-down list. Only available for the Exactly. or Multiply options. Line Spacing: In the drop-down list. 400 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Rotation: Click to set the default rotation of the text. or 90 degrees.

Applying a different text style . Select an annotation object. All Rights Reserved 401 . then on the Standard toolbar. 1. select the Text Style.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for applying a different text style to an annotation object. The selected annotation object updates to reflect the changes in the text style. 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. in the Style drop-down list. Inc.

The default dimension style is set in the current drafting standard and each drafting standard includes a number of predefined dimension styles. you must save the drawing as a template or use the drawing orgranizer to copy dimension styles from an existing drawing to the current one. In order to make your custom dimension styles available for other drawings. Access Methods Use the following methods to access dimension style functions. Each dimension contains a number of different properties that you can modify and save in a dimension style. Pull Down Menu Standard Toolbar Format > Dimension Styles Select to set the active dimension style or change the dimension style of a selected dimension. Concept The following image shows several dimensions applied to the geometry using different dimension styles. 402 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Dimension Styles You create and use dimension styles to control the appearance properties of dimension objects in the drawing. Dimension styles are stored within the drawing.

Inc.The Dimension Styles dialog box contains several tabs. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Dimension Styles Dialog Box Default Dimension Style Note Dimension styles named DEFAULT-Standard Name exist for each drafting standard and cannot be modified. the Style drop-down list reflects the current dimension style. each with a unique set of properties that you can adjust. Because the Style drop-down list is used for controlling other style related options. the dimension style is only displayed when one of the dimension tools is active. Select the dimension style to modify and adjust the properties as required. All Rights Reserved 403 . They can be used as the basis for new dimension styles by selecting the dimension style and clicking New. Using Dimension Styles As you create dimensions in your drawing.

When a setting being changed is common to one found in the Drafting Standards or the Dimension Style dialog boxes. Dimension Style settings supersede the Drafting Standard settings. the rule of thumb is: • • Override settings supersede the Dimension Style settings. As you place the dimension.If you want to change the current dimension style. Overriding Dimension Styles Dimension styles can be overridden by right-clicking on the dimension and then selecting Options or Tolerance on the shortcut menu. 404 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . select a different style from the drop-down list. it assumes the properties of the current dimension style. The selected style will become the current dimension style until it is changed.

Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Note Copying Dimension Styles The drawing organizer enables you to copy dimension styles from a source drawing to the current drawing. the overrides on that dimension will be lost. To copy a dimension style. Select the dimension style(s) to copy and click the Copy button. The drawing organizer works exactly like the organizer for materials. enter or browse for the path of the source drawing containing the dimension style. color styles and lighting but only contains options specific to the drawing environment. All Rights Reserved 405 .Dimension Overrides If you apply a dimension style to a dimension containing overrides.

Partial 406 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . By saving the drawing as a template. Save your drawing in this location or a subfolder to make it available as a template when you create new drawings. The File Tab of the Options dialog box contains a field setting for the template location. you can create new drawings based on the template which will contain the custom settings created earlier. • • • • • • • Drafting Standards Dimension Styles Text Styles Sheet Formats Borders Title Blocks Sketched Symbols Access Method Use the following method to create a drawing template. and other settings specific to your environment. Procedure The following list represents settings or properties that are saved within a drawing template. determine the location for your template files. you should save the drawing as a template. text styles. dimension styles. Options Dialog Box . Pull Down Menu File > Save Copy As Before you save your drawing file as a template.Drawing Templates After you modify and create custom drafting standards.

All Rights Reserved 407 . Drafting Standards and Styles Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you create a new drawing and define a new drafting standard. From the Main table of contents page. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings.Exercise: Setting Drafting Standards In this exercise. and dimension style. click Exercise: Setting Drafting Standards The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 2. text style. Inc. You will then save the drawing as a template a create a new drawing using the new template.

In this lesson you learn how to utilize the various drawing resources available in a typical drawing environment. you will be able to • • • • • • • Edit the default sheet by changing its size. orientation and other options Create drawings containing predefined views by using Sheet Formats Create drawings containing multiple sheets Create sheet formats to enable you to easily create drawings containing predefined views Define a sheet border for use in future drawings Create a custom title block for use in future drawings Edit existing title blocks that are automatically placed on the drawing 408 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Drawing Created Using Drawing Resources Objectives After completing this lesson. and views are all used to present information that meet typical drawing standards. Features such as sheets. borders. title blocks.Drawing Resources Overview Overview Overview A typical Autodesk Inventor drawing contains several features that are not directly related to the 3D geometry they are used to represent.

Shortcut Menu Right-click on the sheet in the browser > Edit Sheet Edit Sheet Dialog Box The following options are available in the Edit Sheet dialog box. Procedure Access Method Use the following method to access the Edit Sheet tool. and title block position that you can edit. Width: Available only when Custom is selected in the Size drop-down list. Each sheet contains properties for size. Size: Select a predefined sheet size or select the custom size option in the drop-down list. Name: Enter a sheet name or accept the default. Inc. Orientation: Select a title block position option and the orientation of the sheet Portrait or Landscape. Exclude from printing: Selecting this option will exclude the current sheet from printing when you select the All Sheets option in the Print Drawing dialog box. it is created with one default sheet. Height: Available only when Custom is selected in the Size drop-down list. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Selecting this option will exclude the current sheet from the count and thereby not counted in the title block area showing the sheet number. enter a width for the sheet. All Rights Reserved 409 . orientation.Editing the Default Sheet When you create a new drawing. Exclude from count: By default each sheet is counted and its number displayed in the title block. enter a height for the sheet.

Editing the Default Sheet . Adjust the options as required in the Edit Sheet dialog box and click OK. In the drawing browser.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for editing the default sheet. 3. 1. The sheet in the graphics window and browser updates to reflect the new information. 2. right-click on the sheet and click Edit Sheet on the shortcut menu. 410 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

or use the Browse button to browse for the file. A new sheet is created with the predefined views of the selected file. Procedure A sheet format is defined for common sheet sizes. You can expand this folder to expose predefined sheet formats to automatically create pre-defined drawing views. Access Methods Use the following method to access pre-defined sheet formats. The view scale is set to 1 and may require editing after placement. the Select Component dialog box will appear.Using a Sheet Format for Sheet Layout Included in each new drawing. Inc. is a Sheet Formats folder. Double-click on a sheet format to create a new sheet using the pre-defined sheet size and views. Drawing Browser Selecting the Component When you double-click on the sheet format. In the drop-down list you can select from the list of currently open Autodesk Inventor files. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. located under the drawing resources folder in the drawing browser. All Rights Reserved 411 . Each sheet format will consist of one view based upon a predefined orientation such as Front and other projected views.

You can only view one sheet at a time. Pull Down Menu Drawing Browser Keyboard Shortcut Insert > Sheet Right-click in a blank area and click New Sheet SHIFT + N 412 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . To activate a sheet.Creating Multiple Sheets Although each new drawing is created with a single sheet. you are not limited to the amount of sheets that can be included in a single drawing. Procedure When you create a new sheet in the drawing. The latter result only occurs when creating a new sheet by right-clicking in the browser and selecting New Sheet on the shortcut menu. you will either be presented with the New Sheet dialog box or the sheet size and properties will be duplicated from the current sheet. depending on the method chosen to create the new sheet. Access Methods Use the following methods to add new sheets to the drawing. double-click on the sheet in the browser. The image below represents multiple sheets in the browser.

Inc. All Rights Reserved 413 . Height: Available only when Custom is selected in the Size drop-down list. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.New Sheet Dialog Box The following options are available in the New Sheet dialog box. Size: Select a predefined sheet size from the drop-down list. enter a width for the sheet. or click Custom to enter a custom sheet size. enter a height for the sheet. either Portrait or Landscape. Width: Available only when Custom is selected in the Size drop-down list. Orientation: Select the appropriate orientation option.

If the drawings you create utilize the same view configuration and sheet size. Unlike Dimension Styles and Text Styles. consider creating custom sheet formats. Procedure Custom sheet formats are stored in the current drawing. You can also define custom sheet formats that represent sheet sizes and view positions that are common to your drawings. sheet formats cannot be copied from another drawing using the Drawing Organizer. Access Methods Use the following method to access the Create Sheet Format tool. Drawing Browser 414 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Creating Sheet Formats Each drawing contains predefined sheet formats that you can use to automatically create drawing views on a new sheet. After you create the new sheet format. it will appear in the Sheet Formats folder in the drawing browser. Save the current drawing as a template to have access to the sheet formats later.

In the browser. 1. Create a drawing containing the sheet size and views common to other drawings that you create. All Rights Reserved 415 . 2. right-click on the sheet and select Create Sheet Format dialog box. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Create Sheet Format Dialog Box Name: Enter a sheet format name and click OK. Inc.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating sheet formats. Creating Sheet Formats .

416 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Your custom sheet format will appear in the Sheet Formats folder in the browser. 4. Enter a descriptive name in the Create Sheet Format dialog box and click OK.3. Double-click on the sheet format to use it to create new sheets.

The default border is used on all new sheets and can resize dynamically when the sheet size is changed. When creating a new border. consider these two items.Defining a Border Procedure • Each drawing you create will contain a Default Border item listed in the Borders folder in the drawing browser. After you create the border geometry. To define a new border. • • Custom borders do not resize automatically if the sheet size changes. • • • Use standard sketching tools to sketch the border geometry. • Enter a name in the Border dialog box and click OK. you should create a new sheet based upon the size the new border will be designed to fit. All Rights Reserved 417 . Inc. expand the Drawing Resources and right-click on the Borders folder and click Define New Border on the shortcut menu. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. right-click in the graphics window and click Save Border on the shortcut menu. You can define a custom border for use on your drawings. If you decide to create a custom border.

• To use the new border. After the border is deleted from the sheet. 418 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . you must first delete the existing border from the sheet. To insert a different border. or add a new sheet to the existing drawing. Inserting a Border When you create a new drawing. double-click on it in the browser. you can double-click on a border in the Borders folder or right-click on a border and click Insert Drawing Border. it will automatically contain a border.

right click in the graphics window and click Save Title Block on the shortcut menu. or Author.Defining a Title Block You can define custom title blocks for use in your drawings. while Prompted Entry fields are populated by prompting you for the values to use in the dialog box. Enter a name for the new Title Block in the Title Block dialog box. therefore you should save the file containing the drawing as a template in order to have access to the custom title block later. Property fields are automatically populated based up file properties such as Part Number. You can include special text items such as Property fields or Prompted Entry fields in the title block. Procedure To define a new title block. All Rights Reserved 419 . right-click on the Title Blocks folder and select Define New Border on the shortcut menu. Inc. the default title block definition displays standard sketch geometry and dimensions as well as different types of text. The new title block will be displayed in the browser under the Title Blocks folder. Text between < > indicates a non-static text entity. Double-click on the title block to use it on the sheet. Use standard sketch tools to create the geometry and text features for the title block. some static text while others are property fields. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. In the image below. Title blocks are stored within the current drawing. After creating the geometry and text for the title block.

To insert a different title block. 420 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . it will automatically contain a title block.Inserting a Title Block When you create a new drawing. After the title block is deleted from the sheet. you can double-click on a title block in the Title Blocks folder or right-click on a Title Block and click Insert. or add a new sheet to the existing drawing. you must first delete the existing title block from the sheet.

Browser Browser Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. In most cases the default title block will only require minimal modifications to include information required by your company.Editing Title Blocks Each drawing template will contain at least one default title block that will be placed on each new sheet in the drawing. Access Methods Use the following methods to edit a title block. title blocks are stored in the current drawing so save the drawing as a template in order to have access to the revised title block at a later date. Procedure Like other drawing resource items. All Rights Reserved 421 .

1. 2. Editing Title Blocks . Selecting this tool will display a different version of the Format Text dialog box as shown below. in order to include property fields or prompted entry items. use the Property Field tool on the Panel Bar. 422 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Format Field Text Dialog Box Select the appropriate property type based upon the text element you are creating. For more information on these property types refer to the Autodesk Inventor software help system.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for editing title blocks.When you add text elements to the title block. right-click on the title block and select Edit Definition on the shortcut menu. A new sheet containing the title block definition is displayed. In the browser.

Add sketch geometry. Click Yes in the Save Edits dialog box. text. and property fields as required. Inc. Right-click in the graphics window and click Save Title Block on the shortcut menu. 4.3. Changes to the title block definition are applied to the sheet and the title block definition in stored in drawing resources. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 423 . 5.

click Exercise: Drawing Resources The completed exercise is shown in the following image. you will use the features available in the drawing resources folder to perform common tasks in the drawing environment. Drawing Created Using Drawing Resources 424 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. From the Main table of contents page. 2. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings.Exercise: Drawing Resources In this exercise.

Projected Views Overview Overview Overview After you complete the 3D design of your part or assembly. Inc. you will be able to • • • Create a base view Create projected views from the base view Edit orthographic views and understand how other projected views may be affected Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. manufacturing will require dimensioned drawings in order to build your design. The first step in creating production drawings is to create the required orthographic and isometric views. All Rights Reserved 425 . In this lesson you learn how to create projected views of your part or assembly files. Assembly Drawing with Projected Views Objectives After completing this lesson.

the view is placed onto the sheet and an associative link between the drawing and the part. After you specify this information. and style. The base view establishes the original view orientation and scale where the latter projected views will be based. Access Method Use the following method to access the Base View tool.Creating a Base View You create a base view to begin creating orthographic views. Panel Bar 426 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . assembly. or presentation file is established. scale. you specify the file to be used for the view. Procedure When you create the base view. the view orientation. If the part geometry changes. those changes will reflect in the drawing. The image below is a base view of a part placed in the drawing.

it will be the default file listed. You use it when you edit projected views. you select them in the drop-down list. Orientation: Select the orientation for the base view. The standard view orientations are based upon the origin planes of the file you select. Move your cursor away from the dialog box to see a preview of the view before it is created. If multiple files are open. Weldment: Available only when creating a view of an Autodesk Inventor weldment assembly. If you have a part. Design View: Available only when you create a view of an Autodesk Inventor assembly. Scale from Base: Not available when you create a base view. Show Scale: This option displays the scale on the sheet under the view. this option makes the view associative to the design view. assembly. You select the Design View to use for the initial view creation. This option is not available for default.Drawing View Dialog Box File: Enter or browse for the file to create its view. Change View Orientation: Select this icon to open the model's 3D viewing window. Style: Select the rendering style for the view: • Hidden Line . or presentation file open. The view label is displayed in the drawing browser. All Rights Reserved 427 . You use standard view tools to define a custom view orientation. • Associative: When you create a view of an Assembly. Label: Enter a label for the view or accept the default view label. Show Label: This option displays the view label on the sheet under the view.Hidden lines are displayed.user design views. Scale: Enter a scale or select a predefined scale on the flyout menu. Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

and style. click the Base View tool. 2. 4. Enter or browse for the Autodesk Inventor file to create the view and adjust the options such as orientation.View is shaded using the same colors used in the assembly or part file Creating a Base View .Hidden lines are removed. 3. On the Panel Bar.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a base view in the drawing.• • Hidden Line Removed . Left click on the sheet to place the view. Create a new drawing. 428 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Shaded . scale. The base view is placed on the sheet according to the options specified. 1.

Creating Projected Views The Projected View tool enables you to create projected views from any existing view on the sheet. When you create projected views. right-click. If you place the projected view to the right of the base view. I you right-click on a view and select Create View > Projected. Procedure If you select the Projected View tool you must select the base view. then after the view positions have been placed. you drag the projected views to the desired position. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. it will generate a right-side projection of the base view. it will generate an isometric view based upon the relative position from the base view. All Rights Reserved 429 . If you place the projected view at an angle from the base view. the view orientation is automatically determined based upon its position on the sheet relative to the base view. and select create on the shortcut menu. All view positions are previewed by a bounding box prior to the views being created. By default the following view properties are carried over from the base view: • • Scale Style (Orthographic Only) The following image represents a typical drawing with a base view and three projected views. It presents no options or dialog box. Drafting Standards Projection Setting Note The description above is based upon a Third Angle projection setting in the Drafting Standards dialog box. Inc. First Angle projection method is also available. then position each projected view.

On the Panel Bar. 2. 1. A bounding box of the view will appear at the placement location. click the Projected View tool and select the base view.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating projected views.Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Projected Creating Projected Views . Move the cursor to the location of the projected view and left-click. 430 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

3. Right-click in the graphics window and click Create on the shortcut menu. 4. Inc. All Rights Reserved 431 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 5. Continue to select positions on the sheet for projected views. The projected views are created based upon the positions selected on the sheet.

Procedure When you edit a Base view.Editing a Base View 432 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . you can edit any option that is not greyed out. Access Methods Use the following method to edit views. On a projected view. you can edit the view properties using the Drawing View dialog box. you can change the Scale and Style properties. If you change the scale factor on the base view. all projected views with the Scale from Base option selected. Drawing View Dialog . these properties are linked to the base view to ensure the same scale across views. and the same rendering style. you can only change these properties if you clear the options Scale from Base and/or Style from Base. Base or Projected. Editing a Base View While you edit a base view. will update to reflect the new scale factor. however while editing a projected view. Shortcut Menu Right-click on a view and click Edit View.Editing Projected Views After you create base and projected views. Depending on the type of view. different options are available for editing.

Drawing Dialog Box . you can edit any option that is not greyed out. Clear the check mark for the Scale from Base and Style from Base options to change the view scale or rendering style.Editing a Projected View Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. All Rights Reserved 433 .Editing a Projected View While you edit a projected view.

click Exercise: Projected Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. you will create a new drawing and place a base view and three projected views on the sheet. From the Main table of contents page.Exercise: Projected Views In this exercise. Assembly Drawing with Projected Views 434 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 2. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings.

In this lesson you learn how to create section views of part and assembly drawings. Inc. important internal details are sometimes obscured by other features or parts. All Rights Reserved 435 .Section Views Overview Overview Overview When you create drawings of parts and assemblies. Completed Section Views Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • Create section views in the drawing Create section views of the assembly in the drawing while controlling which parts are sectioned Edit section views by modifying the section line and editing the hatch pattern Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. are drawn with continuous lines with hatch patterns representing the section plane. Features that were obstructed or displayed as hidden lines. Section views enable you to better visualize these important details by removing the parts or features that are obstructing the view.

you must have at least one view on the drawing on which the section line is drawn. you pick a side of the current view for the section view. In order to create a section view.Creating Section Views You create section views with the Section View tool. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Section 436 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . The section view is generated based upon the direction of sight in relation to the view being sectioned. After drawing the section line. Procedure Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Section View tool.

All Rights Reserved 437 . and midpoints. 2D constraints are being inferred the same as when sketching in the 3D modeling environment. You can constrain the sketch line to elements within the drawing view such as centers. Style: Select a rendering style for the view. Scale: Enter a scale factor for the section view. Visible: When selected the view label will be visible on the sheet. but can also make moving the section line later. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. • • • Hidden Line Hidden Line Removed Shaded Section Lines and Constraints When you draw the section line. Constraining the section line to elements in the drawing view assist you in accurate positioning of the section line. Label: Enter a label for the section view. Visible: When selected the scale factor will be visible on the sheet. Inc. more difficult.Section View Dialog Box The following options are available in the Section View dialog box. When creating the section line. endpoints. This technique is the same used to prevent constraints from being inferred in the modeling environment. you can hold the CTRL key down to prevent constraints from being inferred.

Isometric Section View Tip You can use Projected View tool to project an isometric view from a section view the same way you would project a standard view.Follow the image sequence below to see the effect of constraints being inferred. 438 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating section views. A red border will highlight the view. After drawing the section line. Sketch the section line. All Rights Reserved 439 . right-click in the graphics window and click Continue on the shortcut menu. 3. On the Panel Bar. click the Section View tool and select the view to be sectioned. Inc. 1.Creating Section Views . Note: You can draw the section line in one or more directions. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 2.

440 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 5. If necessary. adjust the section view options in the Section View dialog box and select a point on the screen to section the view. Drag the section view to one side of the view being sectioned.4. The section view is created.

each part in the assembly section view will be hatched with different properties for visual clarity as the section plane passes through each part. Inc. parts from the standard parts library are not sectioned. Controlling Component Sectioning When you create a section view of an assembly drawing view. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. This can be done in the graphics window or in the browser. You can also control which parts are sectioned. Procedure You create section views for assembly drawings using the same techniques as single part section views. you can control which components are sectioned by right-clicking on the view being sectioned and clicking Show Contents on the shortcut menu. All Rights Reserved 441 . By default.Assembly Section Views When you create section views of assembly drawings. however you can manually turn on sectioning for standard parts.

right-clicking on the components will present options on the shortcut menu. Parts appearing with a gray icon indicate that the parts visibility is currently turned off. not the section view. After the contents of the assembly are displayed in the drawing browser.This results in the assembly and parts being listed under the view in the browser. To prevent a part from being sectioned. Tip 442 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . In order to prevent a component from being sectioned in the section view. clear the check mark next to the Section option. you must turn off the section property on the view being sectioned.

All Rights Reserved 443 . This will present the Sketch Panel Bar. enabling you to edit the sketch geometry in the same way you would edit sketch geometry in the modeling environment. You can apply/remove constraints. Inc. modify the sketch geometry. apply dimensions to the sketch geometry. You can edit the section line by dragging elements of the section line to new positions.Editing Section Views After you create the section view. This can only be done on elements of the section line that are not constrained to drawing geometry. it can be edited a number of ways. Procedure • Right-click on the view and click Edit View on the shortcut menu. This will present the Drawing View dialog box enabling you to edit the view in the same way to would edit other projected views. • • Constraint Drag the section line. Edit the sketch used for the section line. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Right click on a hatch pattern in the section view. This will present the Modify Hatch Pattern dialog box. 444 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . enabling you to change the hatch pattern properties.• Editing the hatch pattern.

Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. you will turn off sectioning for some components and edit the section by moving the section line and changing the hatch pattern applied to some components. Completed Section Views Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 445 . After creating the section view. Inc.Exercise: Section Views In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. click Exercise: Section Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. 2. you will create section views of the assembly.

Drawing with Detail Views Objectives After completing this lesson. you magnify an area of the drawing while creating an associative link between the original view and the detail view. In this lesson you learn to create detail views. you will be able to • • Create detail views to magnify areas of your drawing Edit detail views 446 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . changes in the original view.Detail Views Overview Overview Overview As you create 2D drawings for manufacturing. When you create a detail view. those changes also reflect in the detail view. If the geometry being magnified. and apply dimensions that would otherwise be difficult to clearly show. it may be necessary to magnify drawing areas to show small details.

Inc. you are prompted to select a location for the view. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Detail Detail View Dialog Box The following options are available in the Detail View dialog box. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All geometry contained within the detail view circle will be included in the detail view. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Detail View tool. you are prompted to select a view then select a start point of the fence. When you start the tool. All Rights Reserved 447 . The start point of the fence is the center of the detail view. just like other scaled views. you drag the cursor away from the start point which will preview the detail view circle.Creating Detail Views You use the Detail View tool to create detail views of an existing view in the drawing. After you select the end point of the fence. Although the view is scaled. the dimensions will reflect the actual geometry size. The detail view will be positioned on the sheet at the selected point and will be scaled and labeled according to the options specified in the Detail View dialog box. Procedure The resulting view is associated with the main view and any changes effecting geometry within the detail view will be automatically reflected in the detail view. when you place dimensions on geometry within the view. After you select the start point.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating detail views. Select the view then select the center point of the detail view. Drag the detail view fence outwards and select a point that will include all required geometry within the fence circle and left click to designate the end point of the 448 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 3. In the Detail View dialog box. adjust the options as required. Style: Select a rendering style for the view. but do not click OK. click the Detail View tool.Label: Enter a label for the detail view. • • • Hidden Line Hidden Line Removed Shaded Creating Detail Views . 2. Visible: When selected the scale factor will be visible on the sheet. 1. Scale: Enter a scale factor for the detail view. Visible: When selected the view label will be visible on the sheet. on the Panel Bar. Clicking OK will end the tool without creating the view. With at least one view on the drawing.

Inc. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 4. 5. Position the detail view as required and left-click to place the view.fence circle. The detail view is created accordingly. All Rights Reserved 449 .

Editing Detail Views You can edit detail views in the same way you would edit other types of views. label. Click and drag on the label to place it in a new location along the detail fence circle. In the image below. Movement of the label is restricted to be along the diameter of the circle. enabling you to change the scale. grip points will appear as shown in the image below. while selecting a grip point on the circle will enable you to change the size of the fence circle and thereby effect the area included in the detail view. 450 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . It is also possible to edit the location of the view label located on the detail view circle. Procedure You can also edit the detail view by editing the fence circle used to define the area of the detail view. the detail view has been moved to a different area as well as resized. rightclick on the detail view and click Edit View on the shortcut menu. Selecting the center grip point will enable you to move the fence circle. The Drawing View dialog box is displayed. If you select the detail view fence and label on the main view. and style options.

you create and edit detail views. Drawing with Detail Views Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. All Rights Reserved 451 . click Exercise: Detail Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. Inc. 2.Exercise: Detail Views In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page.

Auxiliary Views Overview Overview Overview When you create drawings of parts some features on the geometry are positioned in a way that they cannot be accurately represented based upon the standard planes of projection. Auxiliary views enable you to create additional views on the drawing that are projected at a perpendicular angle from the selected edge. Drawing Containing Rotated Auxiliary Views Objectives After completing this lesson. This results in a view that is normal to the selected edge and therefore the features along that edge are represented correctly. In this lesson you learn to create auxiliary views. you will be able to: • • Create auxiliary views Edit and/or realign auxiliary views 452 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

When this occurs. Inc. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Auxiliary View tool. creating 2D views of these features results in the features not being displayed at an angle normal to the face or feature. you may not be able to clearly dimension and/or represent the features.Creating Auxiliary Views Occasionally a situation may arise in the drawing in which some features cannot be accurately represented by the standard projection planes. As a result of the feature orientation. you can use the Auxiliary View tool to create drawing views that are projected and an angle that is perpendicular or parallel to the selected edge. Procedure To resolve this situation. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Auxiliary Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. This situation generally occurs when features on the part lie alone planes other than the standard XYZ planes on the part. All Rights Reserved 453 .

Visible: When selected the scale factor will be visible on the sheet.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating auxiliary views. on the Panel Bar.Auxiliary View Dialog Box The following options are available in the Auxiliary View dialog. The Auxiliary View dialog box appears. • • • Hidden Line Hidden Line Removed Shaded Creating Auxiliary Views . Label: Enter a label for the auxiliary view. Adjust the options as required and select an edge in the view to base the auxiliary view on. Scale: Enter a scale factor for the auxiliary view. Style: Select a rendering style for the view. With at least one view on the sheet. 454 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 2. click the Auxiliary View tool and select the view. Visible: When selected the view label will be visible on the sheet. 1.

Drag the auxiliary view to the desired location and left-click to position the view. 3. The auxiliary view is created accordingly. the scale value will be the same as the selected view. Inc.Note: By default. 4. All Rights Reserved 455 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

456 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Procedure 1. In this lesson you learn how to break the view alignment and realign the auxiliary view. You can right-click on the view and select Edit View to use the Drawing View dialog box to make changes to the view just as you would other projected views. 1. The following steps represent an overview for breaking the view alignment of an auxiliary view. You can break the alignment of the view to position it differently on the sheet. 2. You can right-click on the view and select Realign Auxiliary Views to reselect the edge used to define the auxiliary view direction. you are free to move the auxiliary view anywhere on the sheet.Editing Auxiliary Views After you create the auxiliary view it can be edited in different ways. Breaking the Auxiliary View Alignment One drawback to creating auxiliary views is that by restricting the view placement to be perpendicular or parallel to the selected edge. Right-click on the auxiliary view and click Alignment > Break on the shortcut menu. You can now drag the auxiliary view to any location on the sheet. Note the appearance of the view direction lines with labels matching the view label. 3. finding a suitable placement on the sheet at these angles can sometimes be difficult. 2. By breaking the alignment of the view.

Realigning the Auxiliary View It is possible to realign the auxiliary view by reselecting the edge originally used in defining the view direction. In most cases these dimensions and/or annotations will need to be repositioned. 2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 457 . Select a different edge for the auxiliary view alignment. One benefit to using this method to realign the view is that dimensions and annotations associated with the view will move with the view as it is realigned. 1. Inc. The following steps represent an overview for realigning an auxiliary view. Right-click on the auxiliary view and click Realign auxiliary views on the shortcut menu.

Reposition and/or delete the dimension and annotations as required. Drag the auxiliary view to its new position and left-click to place the view. 4.3. 458 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

Inc. Drawing Containing Rotated Auxiliary Views Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Exercise: Auxiliary Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings.Exercise: Auxiliary Views In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page. All Rights Reserved 459 . Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 2. you will create and edit auxiliary views on the drawing.

You can use broken views when areas of the view can be removed without sacrificing the display of part features. In this lesson you learn to create broken views. Drawing Containing Broken Views Objectives After completing this lesson.Broken Views Overview Overview Overview You use Broken views to shorten the view of elongated objects. you will be able to • • Use the Broken View tool to shorten elongated views Edit a broken view by moving the grip points defining the break 460 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Broken Broken View Dialog Box You can adjust the following options in the Broken View dialog box. All Rights Reserved 461 . Copyright © 2004 Autodesk./Max. slider to adjust the display scale of the break lines. Style: Select the break line style. Gap: Enter a value for the gap between break lines on the sheet. Note the appearance of the break lines and the break symbol on the dimension. Display: Use the Min. you use the Broken View tool to break the view.Creating Broken Views You create broken views by creating a base or projected view. all parent or child views associated with the view being broken will also appear as broken views. After you create the view to be broken. If dimensions have been placed on the drawing. Procedure The image below represents a shift linkage rod displayed in a broken view format. the dimension lines will appear with a break symbol indicating the dimension is attached to a broken view. The dimension value will always represent the actual length being dimensioned. When you create a broken view. Inc. Rectangular or Structural.

With the Broken View dialog box still open. Orientation: Click the desired orientation. vertical or horizontal. The view is broken and the area removed. Adjust the options in the Broken View dialog box as required. sets the number of structural break symbols along the break lines.Symbols: Available only when the Structural style is selected. 462 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . select the first and second break points. Creating Broken Views . With at least one view on the sheet. 3. click the Broken View tool. Do NOT click OK. on the Panel Bar. 2. 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating broken views. The area between these two points will be removed from the view.

the break lines can be selected and will appear with a grip point at the center of the view as shown here. This has the effect of increasing or decreasing the area being removed by the break. Procedure When you create a broken view. You can also resize the break by clicking and dragging on the break lines. drag one break line over to the other side of the opposite break line. Labels. You use the Edit View tool to change properties such as Scale. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. and Style.Editing Broken Views After you create the broken view you can edit it like other views. You can also edit the broken view using methods specific to broken views. Inc. All Rights Reserved 463 . To decrease the effective area of the view. Click and drag on the grip point to move the break to a new location.

click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. click Exercise: Broken Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. you create and edit broken views of the shifter linkage part. 2. Drawing Containing Broken Views 464 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Exercise: Broken Views In this exercise. From the Main table of contents page.

you will be able to • • Create break out views to show internal part features Use different methods to edit a break out view Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. you are cutting a window into the part or assembly to view features and/or parts that are obstructed by geometry. or prevent important features on the outside of the part from being ideally represented. Drawing Containing Break Out Views Objectives After completing this lesson. When you create a break out view. Inc. All Rights Reserved 465 . In this lesson you learn to create and edit break out views. Break Out views can help to alleviate this problem by limiting the section view to an area encompassed by a sketch boundary and sectioned to a specified depth.Break Out Views Overview Overview Overview Sometimes section views remove too much information.

To do this you select the drawing view prior to selecting the Sketch tool on the Standard toolbar. the sketch must be attached to the drawing view. it will appear nested under the view in the browser. Procedure To create break out views. As an indication that the sketch is attached to the view. or attach it to a drawing view. When you select the view it will appear with a green bounding box. Select the view in the drawing browser.Creating Break Out Views Before you create a break out view you must sketch a closed profile representing the area to be cut from the view. • • Select the view on the sheet. But in the drawing environment you can place your sketch on the sheet. 466 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . There are two methods for selecting the view prior to creating the sketch. You can create sketches in the drawing the same way you create sketches in the modeling environment.

You can select a point in the current view or an adjacent projected or parent view. it will be automatically selected. If only one closed profile exists. Use standard sketching tools such as Lines. All Rights Reserved 467 . Boundary: Select the sketch to use as the boundary for the break out view. Inc. After you create the close profile. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Break Out View tool. and Circles to create the closed profile. Depth: Select the following options in the drop-down list. From Point: Select a point to set the depth of the break out view. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. enter an offset value from the selected point. Splines.After you create the sketch you create a closed profile representing the area to be broken out from the view. click Return to exit the sketch. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Create View > Break Out Break Out View Dialog Box The following options are available on the Break Out View dialog box. Optionally. on the Standard toolbar.

this option will break though the part in the area enclosed by the boundary. Isometric Break Out View You can project an isometric view of a break out view in the same way you project other isometric views.To Sketch: Select a sketch line in an adjacent view to set the break out view depth. Show Hidden Edges: Temporarily displays hidden lines on a view in which they are not shown. Tip 468 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . To Hole: Select a hole in the current or adjacent view to set the break out view depth. Through Part: When you create a break out view on an assembly. This enables you to select geometry that is hidden to set the view depth.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Editing Break Out Views After you create the break out view. Inc. aside from the standard Edit View option on the shortcut menu. right-click on the sketch used for the boundary to edit the sketch geometry. This will display the Break Out View dialog box enabling you to redefine how the view is created. you can edit the break out view using two additional methods that are unique to break out views. Edit Sketch: In the browser. All Rights Reserved 469 . Procedure Edit Definition: Right-click on the Break Out View in the browser and click Edit Definition on the shortcut menu.

you create a break out view of the part and then project an isometric view of the break out view. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. From the Main table of contents page. 2. Drawing Containing Break Out Views 470 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1.Exercise: Break Out Views In this exercise. you will edit the break out view. click Exercise: Break Out Views The completed exercise is shown in the following image. After creating the views.

Inc. As you begin to apply dimensions and other annotations to the drawing. often times the views need to be moved.Managing Views and Sections Overview Overview Overview As you create drawing it is often difficult to know exactly how many sheets will be required and exactly what the best position of the views will be. In this lesson you learn to manage drawing views and sections. you will be able to • • • • Use the different methods available to align drawing views Delete a drawing view from the sheet Copy a view from one sheet to another Move views in the drawing from one sheet to another Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 471 . It is important you become proficient with managing your drawing views. in some cases copied as well as deleted. Drawing Containing Typical Views Objectives After completing this lesson.

• • • • Horizontal . enabling you to move the view in any direction. Vertical . 472 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Aligning Views As you create drawing views they automatically align to the parent view from which they were projected. Procedure There are four options related to aligning drawing views. To realign the two views horizontally. Click the parent view for the alignment. Break . In the following example the alignment between the two views has been broken.Aligns views In Position. right-click on the view to be aligned and click Alignment > Horizontal on the shortcut menu. Aligning Views Horizontally 1.Breaks the alignment between views.Aligns views vertically.Aligns views horizontally. In Position . 2. The Horizontal alignment option will align the selected view horizontally with another view on the sheet. but there may be times when you need to change the alignment of drawing views to make better use of the available area on the sheet.

right-click on the view to be aligned and click Alignment > Vertical on the shortcut menu. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 2. All Rights Reserved 473 . The Vertical alignment option will align the selected view vertically with another view on the sheet. The horizontal view alignment is established. In the following example the alignment between the two views has been broken. Click the parent view for the alignment. To realign the two views vertically.3. Inc. Aligning Views Vertically 1.

right-click on the view to be aligned and click Alignment > In Position on the shortcut menu.3. 474 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . In the following example the alignment between the two views has been broken. The In Position alignment option will align the selected view based upon an axis that is neither vertical or horizontal. In Position Alignment 1. To realign the two views in position. The vertical view alignment is established.

2. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The In Position view alignment is established. 3. All Rights Reserved 475 . Click the parent view for the alignment. Inc.

476 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .Deleting a View You can delete views from the sheet by right-clicking on View on the sheet or in the browser. you will be prompted to confirm the deletion of any existing dependent views. Procedure If you select a parent view for deletion. and clicking Delete on the shortcut menu. Expand the Delete View dialog box and click the Yes/ No field in the Delete column.

The view is copied onto the other sheet and appears in the browser with a new view name.Copy Views between Sheets You can copy a view from one sheet to another by right-clicking on the view and clicking Copy on the shortcut menu. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. All Rights Reserved 477 . Procedure Double-click on the destination sheet and right-click on the sheet and click Paste on the shortcut menu.

Procedure 1. 2. You can right-click on the views with shortcut icons and click Go To on the shortcut menu. Note the change in appearance of the moved view in the browser. to activate the sheet of the selected view. The selected view and all associated annotation is moved to the destination sheet. Parent or dependent views of the moved view appear with shortcut icons with each view name indicating the sheet on which they are placed. Look for the position indicator showing the position of the view in the browser. click and drag on the view being moved to the destination sheet.Moving Views between Sheets You can move a view from one sheet to another by dragging the view in the drawing browser. The destination sheet is automatically activated. In the browser. 478 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

2. From the Main table of contents page. All Rights Reserved 479 . Drawing Containing Typical Views Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. you will manage the drawing views by aligning. deleting.Exercise: Managing Views and Sections In this exercise. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. Inc. copying and moving views. click Exercise: Managing Views and Sections The completed exercise is shown in the following image.

you will be able to • • Retrieve model dimensions for use in the drawing and understand the effect of editing these dimensions in the drawing Place dimensions on the drawing using different dimensioning tools 480 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . There are several different ways to place dimensions on the drawing. one of the first things you will do is begin to place the dimensions required to manufacture the part.Dimensioning a Drawing View Overview Overview Overview A requirement common to all drawings are dimensions. In this lesson you learn how to utilize model dimensions in the drawing and how to place general dimensions. After you place the drawing views. Drawing Containing Dimensions Objectives After completing this lesson.

Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Right-click on a view and select > Retrieve Dimensions Retrieve Dimensions Dialog Box The following options are available on the Retrieve Dimensions dialog box. All Rights Reserved 481 . Select View: Select the view to retrieve the model dimension into. Procedure The Retrieve Dimensions tool enables you to retrieve dimensions from the model for use in the drawing. When possible. Select Parts: Select this option to retrieve dimensions from the entire part. you should utilize these dimensions on the drawing. Only required when you start the Retrieve Dimensions tool from the Panel Bar. Inc. When you start the tool. you can select the dimensions that you want to retrieve while leaving others off. When you retrieve model dimensions. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. You can do this on both part and assembly drawing views.Retrieving Model Dimensions When you create your 3D model. you select a view for the dimensions. You can only retrieve those dimensions that were created on the same plane as the selected view. Select Dimensions: Select the dimensions in the drawing view to retrieve. Only those dimensions that are selected will be retrieved. Select Source: Select Features: Select this option to retrieve dimensions from selected features. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Retrieve Dimensions tool. you place parametric dimensions on sketches and features.

Retrieving Model Dimension . 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for retrieving model dimensions into the view. On the Drawing Annotation Panel Bar. 2. 482 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . click the Retrieve Dimension tool and select the view to retrieve dimensions into. Select the Part or Features to retrieve dimensions from.

Inc. Click the Select Dimensions button and select the dimensions in the graphics window to retrieve. Click OK to retrieve the dimensions and close the dialog box.3. Editing Model Dimensions After retrieving the model dimensions you may be required to edit the dimension's position. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Click and drag on the dimension value to adjust the dimensions position. All Rights Reserved 483 . 4. The image below shows the dimensions in the positions in which they were retrieved. Only those dimensions that are selected here will be retrieved and placed in the view.

Right-click on a model dimension in the drawing and select Edit Model Dimension on the shortcut menu. Changing Model Dimension Values If enabled during installation. 484 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Options available in the Hole Dimensions dialog box are based upon the options used when creating the hole feature. This will present the same Edit Dimension dialog box as presented in the modeling environment. you have the option of editing model dimensions while in the drawing environment. Editing a hole dimension will present the following dialog box.Represented below is the same area of the drawing after dragging the dimensions to new locations.

Changing the dimension in the drawing environment will have the same effect as changing the dimension in the modeling environment. All Rights Reserved 485 . Inc.After changing the dimension value. Proceed with Caution! Note When you edit model dimensions in the drawing. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. the geometry will update and the new value is reflected in the retrieved dimension. it is important to clarify that you are indeed changing the parametric dimension of the model. Constraints will be re-evaluated and the geometry will update in the 3D model and drawing to reflect the new value.

and aligned. Panel Bar Keyboard Shortcut D Placing Dimensions . the dimensions are nonparametric and do not control geometry size as in the modeling environment. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the General Dimension tool. Autodesk Inventor will place the correct type of dimension based upon the geometry selected. Procedure You use the same dimension tool for all types of general dimensions. 1. horizontal. When you place dimensions in the drawing. on the Panel Bar. radius. diameter. Place the dimension or select another line or point to dimension to. click the General Dimension and select a line or point being dimensioned. vertical. 2. 486 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . These dimensions are associative and will update to reflect correct values if changes occur on the geometry where they were applied.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview to placing different types of dimensions in the drawing environment.Placing Dimensions You place dimensions on the drawing using the same tool you use in the modeling environment. To place a linear type dimension.

3. Place the dimension on the sheet. To dimension to an apparent intersection. 5. 6. before placing the dimension. To place a radial or diameter dimension. you are currently at the default offset spacing for the dimension. select a linear element. When the dimension preview is dotted. 7. 4. Inc. then right-click Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Position the dimension on the sheet. select a circular feature. All Rights Reserved 487 . right-click and select Dimension Type > Click Type of Dimension. To change the dimension type. Use this dotted preview to space your dimensions uniformly on the sheet.

8. 9. Extension lines to the apparent intersection are 488 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Select the endpoint or another element to end the dimension. 10.and select Intersection on the shortcut menu. Select the next linear element to calculate the apparent intersection. Place the dimension on the sheet.

Editing Dimension Text When you place dimensions on the drawing. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.automatically added. Inc. This will present the Format Text dialog box. Right-click on the dimension and click Text on the shortcut menu. you can edit the text to add text to the dimension. The dimension value is indicated by <<>> characters and cannot be deleted. All Rights Reserved 489 . User placed text can be entered before or after the dimension value placeholder.

click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. you will retrieve model dimensions into the drawing and use the General Dimension tool to add dimensions to different views. 2. click Exercise: Dimensioning a Drawing View The completed exercise is shown in the following image. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1.Exercise: Dimensioning a Drawing View In this exercise. Drawing Containing Dimensions 490 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . From the Main table of contents page.

In this lesson you learn to use additional annotation tools such as part lists and balloons when documenting your assembly.General Annotation Placement Overview Overview Overview Annotating a typical drawing generally consists of more than just adding dimensions to features. Drawing Containing Typical Annotation Elements Objectives After completing this lesson. you will be able to • • • • • Use hole tables to annotate holes Annotate centerlines and centermarks using both manual and automatic methods Create note and leader based annotation to the drawing Add a parts list to the drawing to further annotate the assembly Add balloons to parts in the assembly drawing Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. you will typically have other annotation requirements such as parts lists and balloons. All Rights Reserved 491 . When documenting an assembly.

Creates a Hole Table of only those holes that are identical to the selected hole.Selection .Creates a Hole Table based upon the holes you select.View . each version of the tool enables you to select the holes to include using a different method. accompanied by a typical hole table. which are placed next to each hole. (b) the Hole Table containing a row for each hole including the Hole Tag. and (c) the Origin Indicator which identifies the 0. Procedure Three different versions of the Hole Table tool are available: • • • Hole Table . Panel Bar 492 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . When you place a hole table on your drawing. Although the use of each of these tools will result in a Hole Table.0 location from which the hole locations are measured. Hole Table . The image below represents an example of a drawing view containing a series of holes. Hole Table . there are three main elements: (a) Hole Tags. and Size of each hole. Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Hole Table tools.Annotating Holes Aside from standard dimensions to annotate hole placement.Selected Type .Creates a Hole Table based upon all holes in the view. you can also use Hole Tables to annotate the location and size of holes in a drawing view. Hole Position.

Inc. You can select the holes individually or by dragging a selection window around the holes to include.Selection tool. Position the origin indicator within the view allowing a coincident constraint to be inferred. 1. Then position the hole table on the sheet. On the Panel Bar. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 4. All Rights Reserved 493 .Selection Tool .Selection tool and select the view containing the holes to include in the table. Select the holes to include in the table.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a hole table using the Hole Table . click the Hole Table . 2.Hole Table . 3. Right-click in the graphics window and click Create.

Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a hole table with the Hole Table . 3.View tool and select the view containing the holes to include in the table. click the Hole Table . Hole Table .View Tool . 494 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . The Hole Table and Tags appear on the drawing. Position the Hole Table on the sheet.5. On the Panel Bar. 2.View tool. Position the origin indicator within the view allowing a coincident constraint to be inferred. It is not necessary to select the holes as all holes in the view will be included in the Hole Table. 1.

4.Selected Type . 3. 4.Selected Type tool. Inc. Select one hole of each type you want to include in the hole table. Right-click and select Create on the shortcut menu. Position the origin indicator within the view allowing a coincident constraint to be inferred.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for creating a hole table using the Hole Table . The Hole Table and Tags appear on the sheet. All Rights Reserved 495 .Selected Type tool and select the view containing the holes to be included in the hole table. On the Panel Bar. then position the hole table on Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 1. click the Hole Table . 2. Hole Table .

Editing Hole Tables After you create the hole table.the sheet. Only the holes matching the type of hole selected are included in the hole table. To split the hole table. you can edit the table in a number of different ways. Right-click on the hole table to reveal several different options to edit the appearance and information contained within the table. right-click on the row you would like to split and click Table > Split 496 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 5.

The table is split into two and can be moved to a different location. Inc. All Rights Reserved 497 . Selecting Add will enable you to select another hole previously not included in the table and add it to the list. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. right-click on the hole table and click Row > Add or Remove. Selecting Remove will remove the hole in the selected row from the Hole Table. To add or remove holes from the table.

Presents the Edit Hole Table dialog box.Controls the visibility of the origin indicator Tag . See below for more information.Enables you to edit the text used for the hole tag.Hides all Tags Show All Tags . The tag will change in the table and in the drawing view.Controls the visibility of the selected tag.You can control the visibility of hole table elements by right-clicking on the hole table and selecting Visibility > • • • • Origin .Shows all Tags Right-click on the hole table and select Edit > • • Edit Tag . 498 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Hide All Tags . Options .

Available Properties: Select the available properties to include in the list by selecting the property and clicking the Add button. Rollup: This option combines the hole's table rows of the same type in the hole table. All Rights Reserved 499 . Title Position: Select a title position of Top. Combine Notes: This option combines the notes cells for identical holes. You cannot delete a default column New Field: Select to create a custom column that you can use to add data to the hole table.Edit Hole Table Dialog Box The following options are available in the Edit Hole Table dialog box. Bottom. Inc. Select the inside or outside button to set properties for each. Remove properties by selecting the property in the Selected Properties list and clicking Remove. Numbering: This option replaces the alphanumeric tags with sequential hole numbers. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. or None. Delete: Select to delete a custom column. Only the first hole of each hole type is listed in the table. Selected Properties: Lists the currently selected properties appearing as columns in the table. Move Up/Move Down: Adjust the order of the selected properties. Line Weight: Enter line weights and colors for the table. The position in the list represents the order of columns in the table left to right.

500 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . Only the features matching the type(s) selected and meeting the threshold settings will receive automatic centerlines. The Centerline Settings dialog box enables you to set various criteria for the automated centerlines.Annotating Centerlines and Center Marks Several tools are available to annotate your drawing with centerlines and centermarks. Panel Bar Shortcut Menu Right-click on a view and select Automated Centerlines Placing Centerlines and Center Marks Automatically You can place centerlines and centermarks automatically in a view by using the Automated Centerline tool. You can place these annotations manually using the different tools available or place them automatically using the Automated Centerline tool. Procedure Access Methods Use the following methods to access centerline and centermark tools. Right-click on a view and select Automated Centerlines from the shortcut menu.

Centerline Settings Apply To: Select the types of features you would like to automatically apply centerlines or centermarks Projection: Select the view projection. Note: These settings can also be set in the Document Settings for the drawing. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Precision: Set the precision to be used when analyzing the features against the threshold values. click Document Settings. Inc. alleviating the task of having to set these options each time. Threshold: • • • Fillet: Set the minimum and maximum thresholds for fillets to receive automatic centerlines. Setting these options in the Document Settings will store the settings in the drawing or template. Circular Edges: Set the minimum and maximum thresholds for circular edges to receive automatic centerlines. On the Tools menu. then click the Drawing Tab and select the Automated Centerline Settings button. All Rights Reserved 501 .

502 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . 1.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for applying centerlines automatically to a drawing view.Creating Automatic Centerlines . Right-click on the drawing view and click Automated Centerlines. 3. The automatic centerlines are applied to features matching the selected type and threshold settings. 2. Adjust the feature type and threshold options and click OK.

1. Select a circular shape or feature. click the Center Mark tool.Using the Center Mark Tool . All Rights Reserved 503 . 4. Inc. On the Panel Bar. 3. 2.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Center Mark tool. Continue selecting circular features or right-click and select Done. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. The center mark is added to the drawing view.

The midpoint of the edge is automatically calculated. 1. Then centerline is created passing through the midpoint of each selected edge. 3.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Centerline tool to add centerlines to your drawing view.Using the Centerline Tool . Select the next edge for the centerline to pass through. Again the midpoint of the edge is automatically calculated. 2. click the Centerline tool and select an edge. Right-click in the graphics window and click Create on the shortcut menu. On the Panel Bar. 504 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

3. On the Panel Bar. click the Centerline Bisector tool and select the first edge to bisect. 2. 1. The centerline is calculated and drawn by bisecting the angle of the two edges selected.Using the Centerline Bisector Tool . Select the second edge. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Centerline Bisector tool to add centerlines to your drawing views. Inc. All Rights Reserved 505 .

then right-click and select Create on the shortcut menu.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Centered Pattern tool to place centerlines on your drawing view. the circular centerline will appear. 3. 1.Using the Centered Pattern Tool . 506 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . click the Centered Pattern tool. 4. Continue selecting features as required. As soon as you select two features. Select the features of the pattern. On the Panel Bar. Click the location representing the center of the pattern. 2.

color. Format Text Dialog Box The following options are available in the Format Text dialog box. Panel Bar Panel Bar Common to both the Text and Leader Text tools. All Rights Reserved 507 . use the Format Text dialog box to add text to your drawing. Procedure Access Methods Use the following methods to access the Text and Leader Text tools. Inc. and width as required. the Leader Text tool attaches a leader with text to the geometry within the view.Select the component to be used for parameters. Text Format: Adjust the text formatting options such as justification. Component: Optional . Style: Select a text style for the text or accept the default text style listed.Notes and Leaders You use the Text and Leader Text tools to add notes and leaders to the drawing views. While you use the Text tool to place paragraph style text on the sheet. The leaders are associative to the view and will move if the view moves. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

Source: Optional - Select Model Parameters or User Parameters. Parameter: Optional - Select the parameter to use in the text. Precision: Optional - Enter a precision for the parameter value. d0 Button: Optional - Click to add the selected parameter to the text window. Text Font: Select a font from the drop-down list. Height: Enter or select a text height. If you enter a text height once, it will be available in the list for future text in this drawing. Symbols Flyout: Select a special symbol to insert into the text.

Adding Text - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for adding text to the drawing. 1. On the Panel Bar, click the Text tool and click and drag the rectangle text boundary.

2.

In the Format Text dialog box, enter the text, adjust options as required and click OK.

Adding Leader Text - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for adding leader text to your drawing.

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1.

On the Panel Bar, click the Leader Text tool then select a start point and second point for the leader.

2.

Right-click in the graphics window and click Continue on the shortcut menu.

3.

Enter the text for the leader and click OK.

4.

The leader text is attached to the drawing geometry.

Copyright © 2004 Autodesk, Inc. All Rights Reserved

509

Editing Text
Right-click on a text object to access text editing options.

Text Shortcut Menu

Edit Text: Displays the Format Text dialog box. Rotate 90 CW: Rotates the selected text 90 degrees clockwise. Rotate 90 CCW: Rotates the selected text 90 degrees counter clockwise.

Editing Leader Text
Right-click on a leader text object to access the text editing options.

Leader Text Shortcut Menu Options

Edit Leader Text: Displays the Format Text dialog box. Edit Arrowhead: Displays the Change Arrowhead dialog box. In the drop-down list, select a different arrowhead. Add Vertex / Leader: Select to add a vertex to the leader. Delete Leader: Select this option to delete the leader.

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Parts Lists
You use Parts lists to annotate an assembly drawing by creating a table of parts included in the drawing. When you create a parts list you must first select a view. The parts list is based upon components in the selected view.
Procedure

Access Methods
Using the following method to access the Parts List tool. Panel Bar

The first time you create a parts list or balloon on the drawing you are presented with the Parts List - Item Numbering dialog box. The options in this dialog box enable you to control which components appear in the Parts List and how they are numbered. The options you choose apply to all parts lists and balloons in the drawing. The options in this dialog box are only set once in the current drawing, unless all balloons and parts lists are deleted.

Parts List - Item Numbering Dialog Box

The following options are available and can be edited. First-Level Components: This option numbers all first-level parts and subassemblies. You can display parts residing within a subassembly in the parts list and their numbers will be prefixed with the number of the item number of the subassembly. For example, if a subassembly in the parts list has an item number of 2, the parts residing within the parts list will be numbered 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3. Only Parts: This option numbers all first-level parts and parts within subassemblies, using standard item numbers. Subassemblies will not be listed or numbered in the parts list table.
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All: When selected, all parts in the assembly are numbered and listed. Not applicable or available when ballooning. Items: Only available when the Only Parts level option is chosen, enter a range of parts to include in the parts list. Valid syntax is as follows: Not applicable or available when ballooning. • Entering 1-4,6,8,10 - would list items 1-4 and items 6, 8, and 10 in the assembly.

Table Wrapping: The following section is not available when ballooning. Number of Sections: Enter the number of sections to wrap the table. For example, if you enter 2, a 10 part list will be wrapped into two columns with 5 rows each. Direction to Wrap Table: Select the direction to wrap the table, left or right.

Creating a Parts List - Process Overview
The following steps represent an overview for adding a parts list to your drawing. 1. On the Panel Bar, click the Parts List tool and select a drawing view.

2.

Adjust the options in the Parts-List - Item Numbering dialog box as required and click OK.

3.

Left-click to position the parts list on the drawing.

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4.

The parts list appears on the drawing.

Editing Parts Lists
After you create the parts list you can edit it to add/remove columns, merge rows, expand the display of subassemblies, and change other properties that control the display and content of the parts list. To edit a parts list, right-click on the parts list and select Edit Parts List on the shortcut menu.

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The Edit Parts List dialog box enables you to modify several different properties of the parts list. For more information on editing a parts list, refer to the Autodesk Inventor Help system.

Edit Parts List Dialog Box

To add a column to the parts list, click the Column Chooser button. This will display the Parts List Column Chooser dialog box. Select from the available properties and click the ADD button to add the property to the selected property list.

Click OK to exit each dialog box. The new column will appear in the parts list on the drawing.

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Updating the Parts List
If changes occur in the assembly model being referenced by the parts list, the parts list may not automatically update. If the parts list requires an update, it is indicated by a red lightning bolt next to the parts list in the drawing browser. Right-click on the parts list in the browser or graphics window and click Update on the shortcut menu.

Note: Updating the parts list will remove any information manually input into the parts list columns or cells that have not been frozen. To protect a cell from being overwritten, in the Edit Parts List dialog box, right-click on the cell and select Freeze Value on the shortcut menu.

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Placing Balloons
You place balloons on assembly drawings to identify parts in the drawing and relate them to rows in the parts list. When you place a balloon on a part, the item number of the part will appear in the balloon. This item number is the same item number used in the parts list.
Procedure

Balloons and parts lists are associative. If an item number in the parts list changes, the change will also be reflected in the balloon. This associativity is unidirectional only. If you override the item number in the balloon, the new value is not reflected in the parts list.

Access Methods
Use the following methods to access the Balloon and Balloon All tools. Panel Bar

Keyboard Shortcut

B

The first time you create a parts list or balloon on the drawing you are presented with the Parts List - Item Numbering dialog box. The options in this dialog box enable you to control which components appear in the Parts List and how they are numbered. The options you choose apply to all parts lists and balloons in the drawing. The options in this dialog box are only set once in the current drawing, unless all balloons and parts lists are deleted.

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Parts List - Item Numbering Dialog Box

The following options are available and can be edited. First-Level Components: This option numbers all first-level parts and subassemblies. You can display parts residing within a subassembly in the parts list and their numbers will be prefixed with the number of the item number of the subassembly. For example, if a subassembly in the parts list has an item number of 2, the parts residing within the parts list will be numbered 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3. Only Parts: This option numbers all first-level parts and parts within subassemblies, using standard item numbers. Subassemblies will not be listed or numbered in the parts list table. All: When selected, all parts in the assembly are numbered and listed. Not applicable or available when ballooning. Items: Only available when the Only Parts level option is chosen, enter a range of parts to include in the parts list. Valid syntax is as follows: Not applicable or available when ballooning. • Entering 1-4,6,8,10 - would list items 1-4 and items 6, 8, and 10 in the assembly.

Table Wrapping: The following section is not available when ballooning. Number of Sections: Enter the number of sections to wrap the table. For example, if you enter 2, a 10 part list will be wrapped into two columns with 5 rows each. Direction to Wrap Table: Select the direction to wrap the table, left or right.

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Continue selecting component and placing balloons as required. 518 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . click the Balloon tool and select a component in the drawing view. right-click and select Continue on the shortcut menu.Placing Individual Balloons .Item Numbering dialog box will appear. 2. 1. Adjust the options as required and click OK. and there is no parts list in the drawing. Right-click in the graphics window and click Done when completed.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for placing individual balloons on your drawing. On the Panel Bar. Left-click to position the balloon then. the Parts List . If this is the first balloon. 3.

Note: Balloons are only placed on the first occurrence of each part. the Parts List . Click and drag on each balloon to reposition them as required. 1. All Rights Reserved 519 . click the Balloon All tool and select a drawing view. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. 3.Process Overview The following steps represent an overview for using the Balloon All tool to balloon all components in the drawing view at once. The balloons are automatically applied to the assembly components. Adjust the options as required and click OK. Inc. You will also have to manually adjust the position of the balloons. On the Panel Bar. 2.Item Numbering dialog box will appear.Placing Balloons Using the Balloon All Tool . If there is no parts list in the drawing.

520 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . The Edit Balloon dialog box enables you to change the balloon type. Balloon Value: Enter an override value in the override column. the new value is not reflected in the Parts List. To use the override value. select the cell and click OK Click the Item cell to use the original item number in the balloon. Note: If you override the balloon value.Editing Balloons After you place the balloons on the sheet. you can edit them by right-clicking on the balloon and selecting Edit Balloon on the shortcut menu. Balloon Type: Clear this option in order to select a different balloon type. Symbols: If your drawing contains sketched symbols. as well as override the balloon value. you can select a sketched symbol to use for the balloon.

you open the drawing file and use the tools learned in this lesson to annotate the drawing with centerlines. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. leaders. From the Main table of contents page. Print Exercise Reference To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. All Rights Reserved 521 . parts lists and balloons. click Exercise: General Annotation Placement The completed exercise is shown in the following image. 2.Exercise: General Annotation Placement In this exercise. Inc. notes. Drawing Containing Typical Annotation Elements Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

you will open a drawing and assume this drawing must meet your own company standards. To navigate to the exercise in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. 2.Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Drawings Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Drawings Print Exercise Reference In this exercise. You will edit the drawing by modifying or creating views. click Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings From the table of contents for Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings. drawing standards. Challenge Exercise Drawing 522 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings . click Challenge Exercise: Introduction to Drawings The completed exercise is shown in the following image. annotation. dimensions styles and any other properties that would be required to complete the drawing to your company's standards. title blocks. From the Main table of contents page.

You also learned how to edit these views by changing the scale.Chapter Summary Summary You learned the following in this chapter: Summary • • • • • • • • • How to create and utilize drafting standards. How to apply different types of annotation objects to your drawing. • • • • • • • • Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. How to create and edit Break Out views. How to create and edit base views and projected views. How to place additional reference dimensions on the sheet. How to retrieve model dimensions for use in the drawing. You learned about the options available in the Break Out View dialog box and how to use these options to generate the required view. How to create section views of parts and assemblies. You also learned how the available options in the Broken View dialog box can effect the view as it is created. How to create and edit broken views on your sheet. area effected. How to create and use text styles and dimension styles. How to perform several functions related to managing drawing resources. and annotation associated with the detail view. How to magnify a specific area on your drawing by creating detail views. The options available in the Drawing View dialog box and how they effect the drawing views when you create them. How to create and edit auxiliary views. How to save text and dimension styles within a drawing template for later use. How to manage drawing views and sections by adjusting the alignment options as required. All Rights Reserved 523 . How to create sketch geometry representing the section path and how to project isometric section views. Inc. How to delete drawing views and copy and/or move views from one sheet to another in the current drawing.

524 Chapter 7: Introduction to Drawings .

you will be able to. 3. click Overview Review the goals for the exercise and use the navigation buttons in the Electronic Student Workbook to work through the exercises. Create and assemble a number of parts based on parameters defined in 2D drawings.. To navigate to the exercises in the Electronic Student Workbook: 1. In this chapter After completing this chapter. click Chapter 8: Project Exercise From the table of contents for Chapter 8: Project Exercise. Create a presentation file that documents assembly instructions for a completed assembly.. • Create an assembly based on parameters defined in a 2D drawing. 2. You can find guidelines to aid in completing the models for the drawing files using the Electronic Student Workbook. From the Main table of contents page. Create 2D documentation on a created assembly file. • • • .Project Exercise Review the goals and images of the drawings that follow.

It incorporates the design and documentation of seven separate parts and an assembly of 14 components. assembly instructions.Irrigation Control Unit Overview Overview Overview In this exercise you build the Irrigation Control Unit shown below. After you model and detail each part. perform interference detection. you create the assembly model for the ICU. Completed Irrigation Control Unit Objectives This all-inclusive exercise requires more than the design of a single part. analyzing. The approach shown here is intended to illustrate the use of Autodesk Inventor software for modeling. and generating drawings of individual parts and the assembly of those parts. The approach outlined in this exercise is not the only way to approach the design of this Irrigation Control Unit. and a bill of materials. 526 Chapter 8: Project Exercise . You will design each part of the Irrigation Control Unit (ICU) from scratch. During this process you assembly the parts you design. and generate a drawing of the assembly showing part interaction. calculate mass properties.

Components (other than the rubber O-Rings) must not interfere. Individual part design goals are provided as that portion of the exercise is presented to you. When the Valve is in the open position. By completing this exercise you will explore the following Autodesk Inventor capabilities: Using Feature Patterns Defining Tapped Holes Using Hole Notes Using Parameters and Linking Mirroring Parts Using Construction Lines Part Drawing Creation Presentation File Creation Attaching Balloons to Components Generating Mass Properties Assembly Drawing Creation Constraining Components Using Projected Edges Copying Sketches Using To-Face Terminations Shelling Parts Interference Detection Tweaking and Applying Trails Generating a Bill of Materials Part Modification in an Assembly It is recommended that you create all of the parts contained in the Irrigation Control Unit by following the instructions in this exercise. the solution from the main flow tube is restricted from flowing through the Valve and out the exit tubes. the solution from the main flow tube of the ICU flows through the exit tube. All Rights Reserved 527 . You will gain the greatest benefit from this exercise by completing the design and documentation of each part as well as the assembly. The following is a list of goals or rules for the creation of the Irrigation Control Unit. Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. Inc. All parts must be created in Metric (mm) units. left. Design Goals The Irrigation Control Unit documented in this project controls the flow of a solution to two separate locations through the use of Right and Left Buttons. Parts must be designed to match the following drawings. or both gates provided in the Valves and out the exit tubes. the solution flows through the right. When a button is pressed. When the Valve is in the closed position. Solution flow is controlled by Valves located in the main cavities of the ICU. This list describes your design criteria for the entire ICU exercise. • • • • All parts must be fully parametric and have individual part drawings. but should take no longer than 6-8 hours.The average time required to complete this exercise varies.

Irrigation Control Unit .Closed Position 528 Chapter 8: Project Exercise .

Open Position Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.Irrigation Control Unit . All Rights Reserved 529 . Inc.

Valve Housing 530 Chapter 8: Project Exercise .

Completed Irrigation Control Unit Copyright © 2004 Autodesk. All Rights Reserved 531 . Inc.

Valve 532 Chapter 8: Project Exercise .

Inc. All Rights Reserved 533 .Left and Right Buttons Copyright © 2004 Autodesk.

534 Chapter 8: Project Exercise .

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