TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF THE PHILIPPINES 1338 ARLEGUI STREET, QUIAPO MANILA COMPUTER ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

ASSIGNMENT 2 TYPES OF MEMORY

JASPER G. SUAREZ ES 12FA2 BS CHE 1ST YEAR

JENNALYN G. NICOLAS

NOVEMBER 16, 2011

TYPES OF MEMORY Computer Memory are internal storage areas in the computer used to either temporarily or permanently store data or instructions to be processed. There are four basic types of computer memory: Cache Memory, RAM, Virtual Memory and Hard Drives. With modern CPU’s running at speeds of 1 gigahertz or higher, it is hard for computer memory to keep up with the extreme amount of data being processed. Computer engineers fixed the problem by "tiering" memory. By using this tiering effect, engineers use a small amount of more expensive memory and a large amount of low cost memory. Types of Computer Memory 1. Computer RAM: Computer RAM is the best known form of memory your computer uses. Every file or application opened is placed in RAM. Any information the computer needs or uses becomes part of a continuous cycle where the CPU requests data from RAM, processes it and then writes new data back to RAM. This can happen millions of times a second. However, this is usually just for temporary file storage, so unless the data is saved somewhere, it is deleted when the files or applications are closed. 2. Hard Drive: A Hard Drive is a form of computer memory that allows you to permanently store data. This is where all of your permanent files and programs are stored. On computers running with Microsoft windows the Hard Drive is often called C-Drive. The size of a Hard Drive is typically measured in gigabytes. 3. Virtual Memory: Virtual memory typically comes into place when applications are too large for the RAM to handle. The operating System uses the hard drive to temporarily store information and take it back when needed. This is normally a lot slower than actual RAM and can possibly degrade performance if used to heavily. 4. Cache Memory: Cache Memory is used in-between the CPU and the RAM and holds the most frequently used data or instructions to be processed. There are three different grades of Cache. Some systems will only have level 1 and level 2. More advanced systems will include the level 3.    Level 1 (L1) - Is the primary and is on or very close to the processor. This is used for the most frequently used data and instructions. Level 2 (L2) - Is second closest to the CPU and is more common to be on the motherboard. Depending on your motherboard it might be able to be updated. This is used for the most frequently used data and instructions. Level 3 (L3) - This is the most advanced cache and will speed up the memory even further. This is used for the most frequently used data and instructions.

COMPUTER MEMORY AND STORAGE DEVICES Blu-ray a computer disc that can store large amounts of information and that produces very high quality pictures and sounds, used especially for computer games and films. Boot Disk
a disk that contains a program for starting a computer and the operating system software Buffer an area in a computer’s memory where information is kept temporarily when you are sending it from one system or program to another Cache an area of a computer’s memory for storing information that is regularly needed Cache Memory an area of a computer’s memory for storing information that is regularly needed CD compact disc: a small round piece of hard plastic with sound recorded on it or computer information stored on it CDE compact disc erasable: a CD that can have its information removed and something else recorded onto it CD-R compact disc recordable: an empty CD you can use only once to record music or information from a computer CD-ROM compact disc read-only memory: a CD that stores large amounts of information for use by a computer Disc a computer disk; a CD Diskette a floppy disk Double-destiny a double-density disk holds twice the amount of information as a standard disk DVD-A Contactless Card a card containing electronic information that can be read from a distance with special equipment that uses radio waves CD-RW compact disc rewritable: a CD you can use as many times as you want to record music or information from a computer CD-Video a CD used for playing video pictures Compact Disc a CD Contact Card a card containing electronic information that you can read by touching the card with a special piece of equipment

a music DVD that contains more songs than a CD and has better sound quality DVD-R a DVD that you can use only once to record information, especially images DVD-ROM a computer DVD that can hold a lot more information than a CD DVD-RW a DVD that you can use as many times as you want to record information, especially images EPROM erasable-programmable read-only memory: computer memory that can be changed by a user to correct a problem in the program or to add to what the program can do Flash Drive a small plastic disk drive that stores information and that you can carry around with you. You connect the flash drive to a computer when you want to use the information. Flash Memory a type of computer memory that does not lose information when electrical power stops being available and from which you can erase (=get rid of) information and then program it again Floppy Disk a small square plastic object that you use for copying information from a computer. A floppy disk is often simply called a floppy. The part of the computer where you put the floppy disk is called a disk drive. Gold Disc

the original disc from which other copies of a CDROM are made Hard Disk the part inside a computer that stores the information it needs to work Hard Drive a hard disk Mailbox a part of a computer’s memory where email is stored Medium a substance or an object on which computer information is stored or printed Memory the size of this part of a computer; the part of a computer in which information, instructions, and programs are stored Memory Bank the part of a computer where information is stored Memory Stick a small disk drive that can store information for use in electronic equipment and that you carry around with you Optical Disk a thin flat round piece of plastic that stores information such as music or written words that can be read using a laser (=powerful narrow light). Optical disks include cd-roms and laserdiscs. Photo CD a CD containing photographs that you can look at on a computer or television screen

RAM random access memory: the part of a computer that programs are put into while you are using them Root Directory the main directory (place where files are stored) that contains all the other directories in a system of organizing information SIMM single inline memory module: a part that is attached to the motherboard of a computer to add memory Space the area that is available on a computer for storing information Spool a part of a computer’s memory where information is kept for a short period Stack a system for storing information on a computer Storage the ability of a computer to store information, or the process of doing this Subdirectory one small area in a computer where information is stored, or a list of the files and programs stored there. A subdirectory is in a directory, often with other subdirectories System Disk a disk that holds the system software Virtual Memory

space on a computer’s hard drive that the software can use as a temporary place to store information

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.