NEWS-REVIEW

EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 • (715) 479-4421 • www.vcnewsreview.com VOL. 126, NO. 35

VILAS COUNTY

Section

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$1.25

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

Gun deer season opens Saturday
Herd on rebound following buck-only hunts
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BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

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Dragging out a nice buck is the dream of every deer hunter.

A rebounding deer herd will mean improved harvest opportunities when hunters take to northern forests for the start of the nine-day gun season this Saturday, Nov. 19. After the buck harvest plummeted in Vilas, Oneida and Forest counties from 2007 through 2009, the 2010 buck harvest took a surprisingly high jump in 2010 — up 38% in Vilas County and up 34% in Oneida County. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) wildlife experts are predicting another promising deer season starting Saturday, especially after two straight sea-

sons of buck-only hunting in several units here. “We have experienced two generally mild winters back-to-back,” said Mike Zeckheister, DNR Northern District wildlife supervisor. “In addition, the two corresponding springs have been favorable for fawn production.” Because eight northern Wisconsin deer management units are still below goal, the DNR has made those buck-only units again in 2011. In this area, Unit 35 across the northern tier of Vilas County and Unit 39 in Forest County will remain buck only. The only exceptions to the zero antlerless harvest are certain disabled hunting permit holders and members of the Armed Forces. In

addition, in a new rule this year, hunters between the ages of 10 and 17 who purchased a gun deer license will receive an antlerless tag for any unit in the state. With the rebounding deer herd, several units in this area have limited antlerless permits available, including units 36, 37 and 38. These regular quota units still have antlerless tags available, including 5,163 in Unit 36, 1,354 in Unit 37, 1,702 in Unit 38. “The 2011 deer season structure reflects the rebounding deer herd, especially in northern Wisconsin,” said Zeckheister. “We have fewer zero-quota units, more herd control units (in central and western WisTo DEER HUNT, Pg. 2A

Hunters hope that bucks will still be rutting on opening weekend.

Three resorts get new owners, management
No interruption in service expected, says firm official
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BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

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THANK YOU — Eagle River area veterans and auxiliary members were honored with flowers during the Veterans Day program at

Northland Pines Middle School last Friday. See more photos inside and on page 1B. --Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

Three North Woods resorts — Wild Eagle Lodge in Eagle River and Black Bear Lodge and Rustic Manor Lodge, both in St. Germain — are now owned and managed by new firms, according to company officials. The properties are now owned by WIMI Holdings, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of River Valley Bank in Wausau, and the resorts are now being managed by IDM Group LLC. Concerning ownership, officials said the two parties came to an agreement which settled their obligations to each other and transferred the assets to River Valley Bank. There was no foreclo-

sure proceedings at any time in the process, officials said. IDM Group, based in Fort Atkinson, specializes in the management of independent boutique hotels around the Midwest. A company official said the public will see few changes at the resorts, especially when it comes to employees. “We believe in keeping employees when we begin management of a property and especially so in this case,” said Craig Neddersen, IDM Group co-founder and president. “After all, it’s that collective talent and know-how that contributed to such a loyal following for these resorts and To RESORTS, Pg. 4A

City won’t post signs prohibiting weapons
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Winning the battle against AIS
But Chain group warns ‘we can’t get too complacent’
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BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

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BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

The Eagle River City Council decided it will not post city buildings with signs prohibiting carrying concealed weapons, but will make language changes on an ordinance that would prohibit throwing snowballs, stones and other projectiles in the city. As communities react to the state’s new concealed carry law, the council last week asked Police Chief Mark Vander Bloomen if his recommendation was to post signs prohibiting concealed carry. His one-word answer was “no.”

“A sign won’t stop anybody who wants to be bad,” said Vander Bloomen. “I feel 99.9% of the people won’t be affected; only the good guys get to carry guns now.” Mayor Jeff Hyslop also said it would simply be “false security” to put up a sign. The police chief went on to describe his thought on the subject. “If I had a child in a daycare center, I would like an employee to be armed,” he said. “We were the 49th state To CONCEALED, Pg. 2A

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WELCOME HUNTERS!
Hunters offered tips in Outdoors
I Information on the uncased gun law and a list of registration stations are featured. Pgs. 8A-10A

The effectiveness of Eurasian water milfoil (EWM) control treatments on the lower Eagle River Chain of Lakes and management options for 2012 were presented to the Unified Lower Eagle River Chain of Lakes Commission (ULERCLC) last week. The “report card” concluded that the objectives of the program have been a huge success, according to Eddie Heath of Onterra LLC, consultants to the commission. “When we first started in 2007, there were 278 acres of EWM colonies identified, with 245 colonies classified as dominant or greater,” Heath told the commission. “As of 2011, there were only 24 acres of colonies mapped and less than 2.5 acres classified as dominant. “We had an 87% reduction and met our goal of 50% reduction and all areas dropped at least one density rating, from 13.7% to 1.7%,” said Heath. The project to identify and control milfoil over the past

four years has been a 50-25-25 public-private partnership among the state, local municipalities and lakeshore property owners. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) grants

covered 50% of the costs, while municipalities covered 25% and private contributions covered 25%. For the spring of 2012, 38 acres are being proposed for

treatment and no treatment areas are proposed for Duck, Lynx, Scattering Rice or Voyageur lakes. Heath indicated one area they are conTo AIS, Pg. 4A

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEATHER CORNER
Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.

NEWS
ONE YEAR AGO
Lo 32 35 39 24 30 29 26 Prec. None None .04"R None 2"S Tr.S .8"S

LAST SEVEN DAYS
Hi Wed., Nov. 9 ...........36 Thurs., Nov. 10 .......35 Fri., Nov. 11.............39 Sat., Nov. 12 ...........45 Sun., Nov. 13 ..........49 Mon., Nov. 14..........50 Tues., Nov. 15 .........48 Lo 30 27 18 23 38 23 24 Prec. None 3.2"S 1"S None None None None

Hi Tues., Nov. 9 ...........59 Wed., Nov. 10 .........60 Thurs., Nov. 11 .......52 Fri., Nov. 12.............44 Sat., Nov. 13 ...........37 Sun., Nov. 14 ..........36 Mon., Nov. 15..........38

LAST YEAR

The average daily high at this time last year for the next seven days was 35, while the average overnight low was 24. There was rain on two days measuring .07 of an inch and a trace of snow on two other days. Days precipitation recorded since Oct. 1, 2011, 21 days; 2010, 19 days. Average high of past 30 days, 2011, 48; 2010, 50. Average low of past 30 days, 2011, 29; 2010, 30.

COMPARISON

FOREST CONDITIONS STREAMS AND LAKES OUTLOOK

Most of the snow that fell last week is gone, except on northfacing slopes. The public forests will be busy this weekend with the opening day of the gun deer season Saturday. With water temperatures dropping into the upper 30s, anglers are still pursuing fall muskies. The approaching cisco spawn could trigger action by the larger fish. Wednesday there will be light lake-effect snow, with a high of 31 and a low of 24.Thursday will be a chilly morning and partly sunny, with a high of 28 and a low of 13. Friday should be mostly cloudy and maybe light flurries, with a high of 36 and a low of 19. The forecast for Saturday is morning rain, afternoon snow and windy, with a high of 37 and a low of 27. Sunday expect morning snow with falling temperatures, with a high of 31 and a low of 23.

VETERANS REMEMBERED — Veterans from across the North Woods were honored in Veterans Day services last Friday. At

Eagle River, veterans attended a program at Northland Pines Middle School. --Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

(PORTIONS OF THE WEATHER CORNER ARE THROUGH THE COURTESY OF KEVIN BREWSTER, EAGLE RIVER and NEWSWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST.)

Deer hunt: earlier opener means rut activity
FROM PAGE 1A
consin) and an increase in the number of available bonus antlerless tags.” Antlerless permits are available at $12 each for residents and $20 each for nonresidents at the rate of one per day. Registration figures from last year show hunters took 928 bucks in Vilas, up from 669 in 2009, and 1,560 bucks in Oneida, up from 1,159 in 2009. In Forest County, where it is mostly public forest, hunters registered 943 bucks last year, up from 749 in 2009. The antlerless harvest was extremely low last year because no antlerless tags were available to the general public in the three counties. “All indications are that the deer herd is on the rebound in areas where they were fewer in the past,” said Zeckmeister. “Although populations are growing, local conditions still determine what you will see from your hunting spot. Deer are not evenly distributed across the landscape.” The dismal herd and hunter complaints in 2008 and 2009 prompted the DNR to decide in 2009, for the first time, to eliminate the opportunity for gun hunters to shoot antlerless deer in units where the herd was 20% or more below goal. The buckonly hunt meant one of the most traditional deer seasons since the 1970s. The big question this year is if there will be tracking snow for hunters. Snow almost always improves hunter success as deer are easier to see, shoot and track in snow. It also aids hunters in terms of scouting and finding the best areas to hunt. WJFW TV-12 meteorologist Matt Serwe said snow flurries and lake-effect snow are in the forecast for several days this week, which could give hunters some tracking snow. Following 3 to 8 inches of snow last week, most of that snow has melted except in pine plantations and northfacing slopes. Saturday’s forecast calls for a low temperature of 27 degrees and a high of 37. There is a chance of rain in the morning, with afternoon snow showers and windy conditions. The forecast for Sunday is morning snow with fall temperatures, with a low of 23 and high of 31. Zeckmeister said preseason scouting is always important for deer hunters. “Deer change their habits, sometimes on an annual basis, based on habitat,” said Zeckmeister. “For example, the area that you have hunted for years may be on the downward spiral as good deer habitat. If this is the case, you may want to consider a change and redirect your efforts to areas offering better deer habitat.” Because there are several buck- only units here, including 35 and 39, along with 34 and 29B in western Vilas County, Zeckmeister recommends that hunters check the deer hunting regulations booklet to make sure they know which unit they are hunting in and know the season structure for that unit. “The more time put into scouting, planning your hunt and hunting your plan, the more you will enjoy your overall hunting experience,” said Zeckmeister. “The top priority is always a safe hunt.” Hunters will be faced with the third-earliest opening date possible, so it is too soon to tell at what level rutting activity might still be occurring to boost buck movement. Biologists say once rutting is over, exhausted bucks tend to disappear into seclusion to recover. The nine-day hunt will run through Sunday, Nov. 27, and will be followed by a 10-day muzzleloader season Nov. 28 to Dec. 7 that is open to anyone with an unused carcass tag. The four-day antlerless hunt Dec. 8-11 will be open for those hunters that have antlerless tags in regular quota units, but not the buck-only units. Uncased gun law Gun deer hunters will have a new rule concerning uncased guns in a vehicle starting this year. The new legislation modifies the state law concerning the manner in which long-barreled firearms, bows and crossbows can be transported in motor vehicles or placed in or on stationary vehicles. The new law will be published in time to take effect this Saturday, Nov. 19, opening day of the 2011 nine-day gun deer season. In its essence, the new law can be boiled down to a single statement, said Tim Lawhern, DNR division of enforcement and science administrator. “Unless otherwise prohibited, you can carry a long gun uncased and unloaded in or on a motor vehicle in Wisconsin at any time,” Lawhern said. The DNR has prepared a frequently asked questions list on Act 51 on the law enforcement pages of the DNR website at dnr.wi.gov. While the law has changed, Lawhern said there will still be many people who continue to use a carrying case to transport unloaded firearms in motor vehicles, as hunters have been and will continue to be advised in hunter education courses. “It’s a great way to protect your investment in your firearms,” Lawhern said. As is always the case with a new law, Lawhern said, the first year is an educational opportunity. DNR chief warden Randy Stark has already provided the state’s warden force with detailed instructions on the new law and its enforcement. Wardens will use a mix of enforcement, communication and education to help hunters understand and comply with the new law, Lawhern said. “We are always ready to help people in the field, to answer their questions and to provide advice,” Lawhern said. In another new rule in 2011, youth hunters ages 10 through 17 who purchase a firearm deer license will automatically be issued an antlerless permit that can be used with a gun in any deer management unit statewide. Starting in 2009, Wisconsin’s mentored hunting program allows 10- and 11-year-olds to hunt with an adult within arm’s reach. Tourism boost While hunter numbers might be down in northern units compared to the glory day of deer hunting in the 1990s, DNR officials estimate 40,000 hunters will still take to the woods this Saturday in Vilas, Oneida and Forest counties. Last year, Wisconsin hunters purchased more than 607,000 gun deer licenses by opening day. Many hunters wait until that last minute to purchase their license, as the DNR reported selling more than 89,000 licenses Friday last season. Many northern hunters will come to cabins, resorts and motels in the tri-county area, home to massive tracts of public forestland and industrial forestland that harbor deer in varying densities. Public forests here include the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, the Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest and county forests. There are also thousands of acres of privately owned industrial timberlands enrolled in forest crop management that are open to public hunting.

Concealed:
to pass this (concealed carry law) and not one (state) has repealed it. I’m not going to put a sign on the Police Department door.” A motion to abide by the state law with a local ordinance but do nothing at the local level was adopted by unanimous vote of the council. Throwing snowballs The city ordinance prohibiting the throwing or shooting of any object, arrow, stone, snowball or other missile or projectile within the city limits was again discussed. Vander Bloomen explained he was absent from the last meeting when the ordinance was discussed, but understood questions were raised about the ordinance that included snowballs and other objects. He explained that portion of the ordinance was already in existence and he simply quoted what was in the present language. Indicating he didn’t want to see 5-year-olds in a playground breaking the ordinance, maybe it should be taken out of the language. “Who will be committing this offense?” asked Vander Bloomen. “Kids. Usually dragging them to their moms solves the problem. I don’t anticipate much enforcement.” Hyslop said former Police Chief Sig Hjemvick interpreted the ordinance if the snowball was thrown from one property to another. Councilman Jerry Burkett admitted he may be guilty of violating the present ordinance. “Once a week, I throw a rock at a doe eating my wife’s flowers,” he said. “We should bring it (the ordinance) back next month.” Additional language should include an exemption for ceremonies, Vander Bloomen said.

FROM PAGE 1A

This would include such things as military salutes when a rifle is discharged even though the “bullets” are blanks. Language changes will be reviewed at the December council meeting. Silver Lake Road A contract was approved for the preliminary design of the Silver Lake Road upgrade with MSA Professional Services at a cost of $64,000. The proposed project will include 1,700 feet of urban roadway including curb, gutter, sidewalk, stormwater sewer and a bike path. The preliminary design will be returned to the council to determine final road width, which tentatively was going to be 41 feet, but could be narrower. According to city administrator Joe Laux, the city could get a U.S. Department of Agriculture project loan for 40 years at 3% interest. “The sewer side for Highway 70 West could be included in the package and is grant eligible, although the water won’t be,” Laux indicated. He said a sidewalk (bike path) was added to the project, though it’s not eligible for reimbursement. A joint meeting with the light and water department to go over the project is planned. Other action In other business, the council: — approved a list for the election poll workers; — heard a report from Vander Bloomen on the success of the unused drug drop-off system at City Hall, who said 293 pounds of prescriptions have been deposited in the latest round; and — received a notice from Ministry Eagle River Memorial Hospital stating the ambulance subsidy will be $12,986 in 2012, $15,583 in 2014 and $18,700 in 2015.

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

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NEWS

Commission seeks additional flexibility in land-use plan
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BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

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DONATION TO VETERANS — River Valley Bank in Eagle River donated $500 to Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 8637 in Eagle River last week. Bank President Nancy Schuller and her staff

presented the check to VFW Commander Tom Unti. The bank donates $25 for each account opened at the bank by a veteran to the local VFW post. --Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

Vilas supervisors vote 12-7 to move health department
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BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

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The Vilas County Health Department will be moved out of the courthouse and into leased space in Eagle River, the Vilas County board decided on a 12-7 vote at its meeting last week. Meanwhile, the board rejected a resolution to fill two of four vacant Highway Department positions that were open due to retirements, amid concerns that the winter snowplow season is just around the corner. While moving the Health Department out of the courthouse will “buy us time,” county board Chairman Steve Favorite said the move still will not solve all the county’s space needs. “We still have space issues,” Favorite told the board. “This will give us about 2,000 square feet to work with.” The Health Department is being moved to 302 W. Pine Street, in the Eliason building at the intersection of highways 45 and 70 in the city. The fiveyear lease would cost approximately $2,789 a month, depending on the size of a storage building yet to be built. Supervisor Mary Platner supported the move, as did Supervisor Jim Behling. “When I see mothers dragging two or three children into the courthouse and up stairs to the Health Department, we need to make this move,” said Platner. “We’re shuffling people around to make space and we’re about to the point of using hallways for office space,” Behling said. “The cost is quite reasonable.” But Supervisor Erv Teichmiller said it was a pre-mature move due to not receiving the results and recommendations of the $60,000 consultant study on county employee numbers and possible merging or consolidating departments. “We’re making decisions without the consultants’ findings and we need to find $1.5 million in cuts (to balance the 2012 budget). This seems to me not to be the year to be spending more money,” said Teichmiller. “My inclination is to say this is way premature and, with today’s economy, I’m voting against it. Everyone is cutting back and we’re spending more money.” That consultants’ report is expected to be presented to the Finance Committee Nov. 18, according to Favorite. Highway workers While the resolution to fill

two general highway worker positions failed on a 14-5 vote, the board agreed to hire limited-term employees. Previous attempts to fill four general worker vacancies for the Highway Department were defeated, but this time around, the resolution requested to fill two of the four. “We’re at bare minimum staff to maintain our level of service,” interim highway commissioner and road superintendent Jared Maney told the board. “If one gets sick or injured, we’ll be short.” He noted it comes at a time when winter is fast approaching and having enough staff is critical. Supervisor Fred Radtke pointed out the county provides winter snowplowing of town roads for the towns of Cloverland and Lincoln and “we’ll be hiring people away from what private enterprise could be doing.” Maney said it takes three employees to snowplow roads in those two towns, but they also do other work. He said the highway department made an $11,000 profit last season plowing those town roads. Favorite said limited-term employees rather than full time has “not even been discussed.” Behling said the only way to do things differently is “to force the issue on ourselves.” An amendment to hire an undetermined number of limited-term employees, not to exceed $39,707, was approved 16-3, with Supervisor Christopher Mayer saying, “We need to plow the roads.” In another hiring discussion, the board voted 12-7 to override Chairman Favorite’s decision not to allow introduction of a resolution to hire a full-time law enforcement clerk due to a vacancy. The original ruling was that the resolution had to be introduced by a supervisor whose signature was on the resolution. Law Enforcement Committee Chairman Bob Egan’s name was the only signature on the resolution and he was absent from the board meeting. After Favorite was overruled, the board approved on a 16-3 vote to hire one full-time deputy sheriff due to a resignation. Highway M project A proposal from the state Department of Transportation to reconstruct 9.5 miles of Highway M from Highway 51 to Boulder Junction over a sixyear period was rejected on a

5-14 vote of the board. The cost estimate for the project would be $6.5 million, with an 80/20 split between the state and county. The design costs for the county were estimated at $129,000. If the county agreed to the design phase, it would be committed to its 20% cost of construction. Saying everyone needs roads, Highway Committee member Charles Rayala supported the project. “The intersection of 51 and M needs complete reconfiguration; it’s for safety reasons,” Rayala said. Favorite pointed out the cost estimate is $750,000 a mile, when other road improvements are only $200,000 a mile. “This will be built to state highway standards; it’s triple the cost of a county road,” Favorite said. Maney said there were better ways the county could spend $2 million on county roads. Supervisor Sig Hjemvick agreed, pointing out the east end of Highway K is “the worst county highway in our system.” The contract for preliminary design costs was defeated, effectively ending the project at this time. Other action In other action, the county board: — adopted a resolution honoring Supervisor Jack Harrison of Presque Isle for his 14 years of service to the county. Harrison submitted a letter of resignation due to health concerns; — named Supervisor Fred Radtke to fill the vacancy on the Highway Committee created with Harrison’s resignation; — postponed until January filling the vacancy of financial manager for the Social Services department;
VILAS COUNTY

— approved a County-Tribal Law Enforcement agreement to seek a $60,251 state grant; — expressed displeasure on management of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest and the failure to comply with harvest goals in the 2004 Forest Plan; and — approved petitioning the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to withdraw 40 acres from the county forest program to trade for 23 acres from the Oldenburg Group to obtain a key section of former railroad corridor for recreational trail purposes. The county also would enter an additional 61 acres into the county forest program.

A future comprehensive land-use plan for the city of Eagle River that contains a “mixed-use” category would provide flexibility to property owners who may want a variety of zoning classifications was discussed last week by the city’s Plan Commission. According to city administrator Joe Laux, the new category would be intended to customize development, particularly for properties currently vacant or those that do not have an active use. “This would give the city maximum flexibility and could be intended to apply to a variety of districts including commercial, office, entertainment, institutional, residential and planned unit development,” Laux explained. The mixed-use category was immediately questioned by commission member Bill Doerr, who said that, without specific language, it may not be appropriate for all parts of the city. “I don’t think we need to go to that extent,” said Doerr. “Property owners west of the fairgrounds wanted specific zoning and they haven’t come back and wanted changes, so I don’t think we should bring uncertainty by changing categories. We just can’t throw these districts into mixed use without ordinance language.” Commission members Kim Schaffer and Mike Duening responded to Doerr. Schaffer pointed out that “mixed use is not zoning, but a plan.” Duening said the advantage is for the property owner as well as the city. “It allows us the flexibility to zone those properties when someone comes and wants to do something,” said Duening. Mayor Jeff Hyslop agreed that a property owner in the mixed-use plan “would still have to come to the Plan Commission and City Council to make their case for a specific

zoning classification under this flexibility.” Schaffer stressed it would simply be a category on a landuse map. “It has nothing to do with zoning; it allows you to pick a zoning category,” she said. “Our comprehensive plan does not throw out our zoning ordinance.” Hyslop said those areas currently being used for specific activity could be set aside from consideration and the focus should be on undeveloped areas. “For bigger tracts of land, this would seem logical,” the mayor said. “For large undeveloped parcels, this wouldn’t be all that bad and remember all the town of Lincoln land that borders the city is zoned all purpose.” The mayor reminded the commission members they have had persons come in with an idea needing a zoning change and were informed the “chance of any change would be zero,” but if they wanted to continue the process, it was up to them. “We have to be straight with them and tell them the Plan Commission wouldn’t recommend the change,” said Hyslop. Doerr suggested language be placed in the comprehensive plan that says the intent (of mixed use) is to avoid changing the comprehensive plan when a zoning change was requested, but Duening said the plan doesn’t need to go that far. “Just say in the plan the following zoning districts shall be part of this (mixed-use) area. We’re trying to fix a problem that doesn’t exist and probably won’t exist,” said Duening. “We’re not changing anybody’s zoning; there won’t be a zoning district called ‘mixed use.’ “We want to make it as easy as we can to help them develop the property with as few roadblocks and still protect their neighbors,” said Duening.

NEWS-REVIEW
Published weekly by Eagle River Publications, Inc. Eagle River, WI 54521 www.vilascountynewsreview.com Consolidation of the Vilas County News, the Eagle River Review and The Three Lakes News
Publication #659480
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association

Entered as periodical mail matter at the post office, Eagle River, WI 54521, under act of March 3, 1879. Subscription price in Wisconsin, Vilas and Oneida counties only, is $50.00 per year, all of Wisconsin except for Vilas and Oneida counties, $57.00 per year. Out of Wisconsin, $68.00 per year. Subscription payable in advance. Published every Wednesday. POSTMASTER: Send address changes, form 3579, to Vilas County News-Review, Inc., P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521, phone 715-479-4421, fax 715-479-6242.

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OBITUARIES
Linda Lou Haefner
Linda Lou Haefner went to heaven on Nov. 6, 2011, after a long and very courageous battle with lung cancer. She was HAEFNER born on April 24, 1944, in Watertown, Wis., to the late William and Adeline (Wahl) Jacobs. Linda did waitress work most of her life and was a real people person. She enjoyed fishing and loved making jewelry and crafting. On Dec. 20, 1968, she married the love of her life, Charles (Chuck) Haefner. Survivors include her husband, Chuck; three sons, Charles Jr. (Pam), Rick (Julie) and Jeff (Amy); brother, Marvin Jake Jacobs (Jean), sister, Joanne Lauersdorf (Dewey); grandchildren, Krystal (Matt), Rachel (Eric) and Andrew; and great-grandson, Jordan; and a very special niece, Linda Lauersdorf (Robert). She was preceded in death by her parents; stepdaughter, Lisa Haefner; and sister, Phyllis Jannke. There will be a memorial to celebrate her life in the summer of 2012 at Conover. Memorials can be made to the family in lieu of flowers at 2700 County Road 721 Loop, Moore Haven, FL 33471. The family would like to thank the James Beck Center of Rhinelander and Hope Hospice of Florida.
PAID OBITUARY
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NEWS

‘Into the Outdoors’ awarded 8th Emmy
“Into the Outdoors,” a TV series dedicated to educating children on Wisconsin’s natural, economic and cultural resources and activities, earned its eighth Emmy award last week for “The Art and Science of Cheesemaking” and “Tater Tales.” The award was in the category of outstanding achievement in children’s/teen program or series and was presented by the Chicago/Midwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in Chicago, Ill. Produced by Eagle Riverbased Discover Mediaworks Inc., “Into the Outdoors” is now in its 11th year, and has been nominated for an Emmy every year since its broadcast debut in 2001. The show built its reputation on the respectful and direct way it educates and informs youths on important topics, according to Discover Mediaworks public relations specialist Keara Lahiff. Executive producers Mark and Lisa Rose, as well as producers Amy Wallace and Steve Nelson, received the honor. “We’re overjoyed,” said Mark Rose. “We work extremely hard on creating this show. This award is an acknowledgement of our effort. I’m incredibly proud of the entire team that makes ‘Into the Outdoors’ possible and look forward to working on many more episodes for years to come.” The nominated episodes were created in conjunction with the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board (WMMB) and

Myron ‘Mike’ Mueller
Myron “Mike” Mueller, a 50-year resident of Phelps, formerly of Wausau, died Monday, Nov. 7, 2011, in Woodruff. He was 87. He was born March 14, 1924, in Wausau, the son of Carl and Cecelia (nee Beckman) Mueller. He served in the U.S. Marines during World War II and was a member of the Phelps American Legion and the Bear Hunters Club. Mr. Mueller served as sheriff and under-sheriff in Marathon County. He also worked for the U.S. Forest Service, Smoky Lake Reserve, Nicolet Shores and Asplundh. His hobbies included playing baseball and waterskiing. He was an avid hunter. Mr. Mueller was preceded in death by his wife, Arleyn; his parents; one brother, Frederick “Fritz”; and a sister-inlaw, Doris Mueller. Survivors include one stepdaughter, Pauleyn (Steve Waier) Nystrom of Phelps; two stepsons, Steve (Kathy) Ray and Dale (Shelly) Ray, both of Phelps; one brother, Dave (Shirley) of Appleton; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandson. A memorial service will be held Friday, Nov. 18, at 1 p.m. at Twin Lakes Bible Church in Phelps. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service at the church.

Discover Mediaworks executive producers Mark and Lisa Rose were all smiles after receiving

their eighth Emmy for the children’s show, “Into the Outdoors.” --Contributed Photos

Francis ‘Laura’ Hughes Raddatz
Francis “Laura” Hughes Raddatz, formerly of Eagle River, died Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011, at Aurora Sheboygan Hospital in Sheboygan. She was 78. She was born Aug. 30, 1933, in Toe City, N.C., and married Virgil Raddatz June 14, 1954, in Eagle River. Mrs. Raddatz was an avid card and bingo player. She was preceded in death by her husband March 6, 1991; and her grandson, Jesse Raddatz. Survivors include five sons, Ralph (Kim), Richard and Larry (Bonnie), all of Eagle River, Steve of Burlington and Randy of Sheboygan; two daughters, Debra (Bruce) Dhein of Elkhart Lake and Kathy (Steve) Reed of Sheboygan; 19 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held Nov. 12 at Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Eagle River.

the Wisconsin Potato and Vegetable Growers Association. The focus of the episodes was to educate children about the production and variety of cheeses available in Wisconsin, as well as the different types of potatoes produced in the Badger state. “We’re thrilled to receive this prestigious award — recognition of the hard work and creativity of our staff and a reflection of the good work happening on Wisconsin’s dairy farms and in our state’s dairy industry,” said Patrick Geoghegan, WMMB senior vice president of corporate

communications. “Into the Outdoors” airs in markets in Wisconsin and throughout the Midwest. A complete listing of stations is available at intotheoutdoors. org. To view the winning episodes, visit kiddidel.com. Discover Mediaworks Inc. also produces Emmy-nominated “Discover Wisconsin,” created in 1987 by Dick Rose. The company also received an Emmy nomination for “Family Inc.,” a TV show profiling Wisconsin family-owned companies. For more information, visit discovermediaworks.com.

“Into the Outdoors” producer Amy Wallace displays the Emmy.

AIS:

FROM PAGE 1A
over what the future holds. Member Bill Lochte said the future is bittersweet, suggesting that at some point control efforts will probably be handled without state grants. “In five more years, will EWM be back in abundance again?” he asked Heath. “We have a risk of reintroduction on the Chain due to heavy use.” Heath said there are many variables. “We could get a different strain or hybrid. We just don’t know,” Heath said. “We’re now down to 38 acres to be treated. What if people become complacent and volunteers go away? That’s a worry.” The concern over densities of milfoil coming back was also expressed by the DNR’s Kevin Gauthier. “Six years ago, we didn’t know if we could get down to this level. We had no clue,” Gauthier said. “Now that we’re here, do we treat or not and, if not, how quickly would it come back? Some other lakes have not responded as well as on the Eagle River Chain. “I don’t know, but my initial thoughts of it rebounding are not as great as I once thought,” said Gauthier. Lochte had the last word of the evening, cautioning about complacency. “We can’t become apathetic,” he said. “We will need a new strategy for the next five years. This report card is both good news and bad news; we’ve reduced it 90%, but what’s next? We can’t get too complacent.”

Santa, ice shanty parade planned downtown Nov. 26
The Eagle River Business Association (ERBA) will sponsor its annual parade with Santa Claus and his reindeer Saturday, Nov. 26, beginning at 1 p.m. in the parking lot across the street from The Christmas House on Wall Street. Participants will walk to the Eagle River Depot Museum, located in the old train depot, where children will be able to share their Christmas wish list with Santa. Parade participants may wear costumes and holiday hats and create Christmas banners or signs. Milk and cookies will be available and the staff from Rocking W Stables will provide free hayrides in conjunction with visits with Santa Claus. Businesses in downtown Eagle River plan to expand hours and feature sales for Christmas shoppers. That day, the association also will host its third annual Ice Shanty Contest. Prizes will be awarded for the best entries. Judging will take place at the beginning of the parade route in the parking lot across from the old Christmas House. For more information about either event or to register an ice shanty for the parade, contact Katie Hayes at (715) 8914929 or Michelle Rubo at 8915423.

Resorts:
we greatly appreciate that.” Neddersen said the resorts are important to the communities of Eagle River and St. Germain. “These are more than resorts; they are a point of pride for this area, and we’re proud to be entrusted with seeing them through this transition and into the future,” he said. Neddersen said it will be “business as usual” now, as employees gear up for the start of the busy snowmobile season. There will be no interruption of service, reservations or change in amenities as a result of the management change. He said all of the previous websites and telephone contacts will remain unchanged. Wild Eagle Lodge is a fullservice resort located on the Eagle River Chain of 28 Lakes in the town of Washington. Accommodations there include one- and two-bedroom condominium luxury suites with fireplaces and full kitchens. The resort’s amenities and recreational opportunities include a private beach and boat launch, tennis court, indoor pool, restaurant lounge and gift shop. Black Bear Lodge, located on Little St. Germain Lake in St. Germain, offers guests a variety of lodging options from luxury homes, cottages

FROM PAGE 1B

and one- and two-bedroom suites with fireplaces and full kitchens. Also included in this complex are two smaller resorts, Cedaroma Lodge and Bay View Resort. There’s a restaurant lounge and gift shop on the premises. Rustic Manor Lodge, near downtown St. Germain, has guest rooms, indoor pool, gift shop, a large outdoor picnic area and snowmobile trail access, along with access to Black Bear Lodge’s lakefront amenities. IDM Group is a purveyor of boutique hotel development and management services in the Midwest, including familiar hotel brands in the northern half of the state like the Jefferson Street Inn in Wausau, Hotel Mead in Wisconsin Rapids and Edgewater Resort in Door County. Neddersen said the company offers clients expertise in acquisition, development, repositioning and management. Its portfolio also includes historic downtown properties like the Hotel Julien Dubuque in Dubuque, Iowa, and The Beloit Inn in Beloit. Most recently coming under IDM Group’s management is HotelRED in Madison, located across from Camp Randall on the University of Wisconsin campus.

cerned about is Watersmeet Lake in the area of the Wisconsin River. It contains a wild rice population and management of that area needs further study, he suggested. He outlined other plans for 2012, including plant surveys and boater education. Earlier this fall, the ULERCLC learned it received $90,508 for phase five of its AIS project to chemically treat milfoil on the Chain in 2012. “We want to do a health check on the entire Chain for both native and non-native plants,” said Heath. “There will also be UW-Oshkosh interns checking three boat landings under the Clean Boats, Clean Waters program. They will be at three boat landings — the Tdocks, Braywood and Eagle Lake Park.” There will be point intercept samples taken on the entire Chain. These points will determine statistically the effects of treatments on both milfoil and native species. The number of sample points is 3,400. “Did EWM increase or decrease?” Heath asked. “Did native plants increase? There is some evidence native plants are expanding into the EWMtreated areas. EWM is a pioneer species, so the more diverse native plant communities can reclaim EWM- treated areas.” Concerns expressed While the commission applauded the success of Onterra’s efforts to control EWM in the lower Chain, there were some concerns expressed

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VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

5A

NEWS

POLICE REPORT
Vilas County Sheriff A total of 288 complaints were entered by Vilas County Sheriff ’s Department dispatchers last week. In addition to those with sufficient detail to report below, a review shows at least 24 vehicle accidents, two ambulance requests, two reports of animal problems, two attempts to locate, one report of battery, five burglar alarms, five requests for citizen assistance, six reports of criminal damage to property, six disturbances, one fire, one report of found property, one report of fraud, one report of harassment, five reports of hazardous conditions, four juvenile problems/runaways, two reports of lost property, one report of suspicious circumstances, eight thefts, one threat, six traffic violations, three reports of trespassing, one vacation check, four welfare checks and nine 911 hang-ups. At least 16 calls were referred to the Eagle River Police Department and there were at least 23 informational or procedural entries. In the past week, at least 17 people were booked at the Vilas County Jail, including three for battery, five for operating while intoxicated, four for probation violations, one for possession of a firearm, one for resisting arrest and one for possession of drug paraphernalia. During the week, the inmate population ranged from 80 to 86. As of Nov. 13, there were 86 inmates. Friday, Nov. 11 - 4:45 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on Highway 51 and Shucha Road in Arbor Vitae, involving Cecilia A. Prickett of Fond du Lac. - 5:08 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on Highway 70 near South Bay Road in St. Germain, involving Pete A. Heller of Eagle River. Thursday, Nov. 10 - 8:07 a.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway B near Red Bass Lake Road in Presque Isle, involving Morgan M. Dunbar of Presque Isle. - 12:39 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Razorback Road near Big Muskellunge Lake Road in the town of Plum Lake, involving Bonita M. Eliason of St. Germain. - 12:53 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway W near Boot Lake Road in the Presque Isle, involving M.E. Norton of Presque Isle. - 6:41 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway 70 near Cloverland Drive in the town of Cloverland, involving Barbara J. Elbe of Sayner. - 6:23 p.m. - A one-vehicle rollover was reported on Highway 45 near Highway E in Land O’ Lakes, involving Ryan G. Tahtinen of Bergland, Mich. - 6:26 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on East Bass Lake Road in the town of Washington, involving Linda A. Link of Watseka, Ill. The driver was cited for operating while intoxicated. - 11:13 p.m. - A one-vehicle rollover was reported on Deep Lake Road near East Hunter Lake Road in Conover, involving Kurtis C. Punzel of Conover. Wednesday, Nov. 9 - 1:55 p.m. - A one-vehicle rollover was reported at the intersection of Highway 45 and Ski Hill Road in Conover, involving Mark G. Wanous of Owatonna, Minn. - 2:00 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway 45 near Pine Lake Road in the town of Lincoln, involving Domingo J. Figueroa of Eagle River. - 2:20 p.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported on Highway 17 near Monheim Road in Conover, involving Jason A. Spooner of Eagle River. - 5:38 p.m. - A one-vehicle rollover was reported on Highway 17 near Indian Road in Phelps, involving Wayne A. Schilling Jr. of Eagle River. Tuesday, Nov. 8 - 7:20 a.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on Highway 17 near Big Sky Drive in the town of Washington, involving Janet E. Boone of Eagle River. - 4:06 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on Highway 51 near North Farming Road in Arbor Vitae, involving Marsha L. Larson of Wisconsin Rapids. - 4:57 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported at 1588 Highway 155 in St. Germain, involving Jean A. Maines of St. Germain. Monday, Nov. 7 - 6:50 a.m. - A one-vehicle accident was reported at the intersection of Highway 70 and Whitehorse Lane in St. Germain, involving Linda E. Healy of St. Germain. - 3:25 p.m. - A two-vehicle accident was reported at 1800 Pleasure Island Road in the town of Lincoln, involving Eric H. Goldberger and Emily R. Piszor, both of Eagle River. Piszor was cited for a seat belt violation. -5:32 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on S. Farming Road near Highway 47 in Arbor Vitae, involving Renee S. Metz of Eagle River. Eagle River Police Among the calls received by Vilas County dispatchers were at least 16 calls for the Eagle River Police. These included four vehicle accidents, one ambulance request, two reports of criminal damage to property, one burglar alarm, one disturbance, one report of harassment, one vacation check and one theft.

DANGEROUS CONDITIONS — Deteriorating road conditions during last Wednesday’s snowstorm led Jason Spooner of Eagle River to lose control of his truck, rolling it over into the northbound

ditch of Highway 17 near Monheim Road in the town of Conover around 2:20 p.m. There were no injuries reported and the driver was wearing his seat belt. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Vilas County Court report

Man faces three jury trials in child sexual assault cases
Three separate jury trials were set in Vilas County Circuit Court last week for a 22year-old Eagle River man charged with four counts of sexual assault of a child under 16 years of age. Joshua D. Leach also is charged with intimidation of a victim, two counts of exposing himself and felony bail jumping. According to court records, there will be no plea agreement and Vilas County Circuit Judge Neal A. Nielsen III set three jury trials for Leach, who is alleged to be involved in the incidents October 2010 in the city of Eagle River, December 2010 and January 2011 in Eagle River and December 2010 in Vilas County. The first jury trial will be Feb. 8-10, 2012, at 8:30 a.m., with a motion hearing set for Jan. 9 at 9 a.m. The second jury trial will be March 7-9 at 8:30 a.m. with a motion hearing set for Feb. 20 at 1:30 p.m. The third jury trial will be May 9-11 at 8:30 a.m. with a motion hearing set for April 16 at 2 p.m. In other felony cases, Jeffrey P. Rupert, 25, of Eagle River, entered pleas of no contest and was found guilty of identity theft for financial gain and two counts of burglary of a building or dwelling. Dismissed were two charges of fraudulent use of a credit card, a charge of theft by acquisition of a credit card, two charges of misdemeanor theft and two charges of felony bail jumping. A presentence investigation was ordered and sentencing for Rupert was set for Jan. 9, 2012, at 3 p.m. His bond was revoked. The incidents occurred Jan. 6 and Aug. 17 in Eagle River. Nicholas W. Martinson, 19, of Eagle River, charged with burglary of a building or dwelling and attempted misdemeanor theft, had a preliminary hearing set for Dec. 5 at 11:15 a.m. It’s alleged that Martinson stole gasoline from a garage in the town of Cloverland July 26. Jason C. Jensen, 34, of Sugar Camp, charged with stalking from March 17 to June 22 in the town of Arbor Vitae, had a preliminary hearing set for Nov. 21 at 2 p.m. Eric J. Benson, 35, of Eagle River, charged with felony bail jumping, operating a vehicle with a restricted controlled substance in his blood, third offense, and operating a motor vehicle after revocation, sixth offense, entered a plea of not guilty and a pretrial conference was set for Dec. 6 at 10:45 a.m. A motion to modify his bond to $500 cash was approved, with the following conditions: he is not to possess or consume intoxicants, have no prescriptions unless prescribed and no time at taverns. According to the criminal complaint, Benson was arrested Oct. 30 in the town of Lincoln and is alleged to have Vicodin in his blood. Dave M. Cook, 37, of St. Germain, charged with operating while intoxicated causing injury, second offense; operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration causing injury, second offense; operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated, fourth offense, and operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration, fourth offense; had a motion and plea hearing set for Feb. 6, 2012, at 2 p.m. Judge Nielsen was told the felony may be dropped, but the district attorney’s office will proceed with the fourth offense operating while intoxicated charge. Cook was arrested Aug. 13 in the town of St. Germain. Michael N. Larson, 26, of Conover, charged with attempting to flee or elude a traffic officer and seconddegree reckless endangerment, had a preliminary hearing set for Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. Larson’s attorney, David Penn, requested to withdraw from the case, which was granted. The public defender’s office will appoint a new attorney for Larson. Christopher A. Kappeler, 29, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with robbery with use of force, party to a crime, waived his preliminary hearing and was bound over for arraignment. Kappeler entered a not-guilty plea and a pretrial conference was set for Dec. 13 at 10:45 a.m. Kappeler is alleged to be involved in a robbery of Ojibwe Market in Lac du Flambeau Sept. 3. Buzzy J. Brisk, 25, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with escape and obstructing an officer Oct. 23, will have a motion hearing Nov. 16 at 1 p.m. His attorney, David Penn, filed a motion to dismiss. According to Penn, the defendant was in the custody of the Department of Corrections and such custody does not meet the definition in the escapee statute. Brisk’s $2,500 cash bond was continued and he is not to possess or consume intoxicants and not to possess firearms. Arlene M. Poupart, 41, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with two counts of manufacturing/delivery of marijuana, party to a crime, and possession of drug paraphernalia, party to a crime, Sept. 9 had a preliminary hearing set for Dec. 19 at 8:45 a.m. Andrew C. Meshigaud, 25, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with substantial battery, party to crime, entered a notguilty plea and a pretrial conference was set for Nov. 22 at 11:15 a.m. According to the criminal complaint, Meshigaud allegedly hit a 26-yearold Lac du Flambeau man on the left side of his face with an object other than a fist Sept. 27, knocking the man unconscious. In the same incident, Gabriel T. Thompson, 20, of Lac du Flambeau, is charged with substantial battery, party to a crime, and strangulation and suffocation of the same man. Thompson entered a not guilty plea and a pretrial conference was set for Nov. 29 at 11:15 a.m. Wenonah L. Soulier, 20, of Lac du Flambeau, entered a plea of no contest and was found guilty of attempted armed robbery, party to a crime, and bail jumping at a plea and sentencing hearing. Judge Nielsen withheld sentencing and approved a deferred entry of judgment. He placed Soulier on probation for 36 months. Conditions of Soulier’s probation include to continue alcohol and other drug abuse counseling, not to possess or consume intoxicants, no taverns, obtain high school equivalency diploma or GED, fulltime employment or education, no contact with any member of a gang and no contact with Leonard Chosa and Clyde Martins, who were alleged to be involved in the incident Oct. 7, 2010, in Lac du Flambeau when they took money and credit cards from a man valued at $565, according to the criminal complaint. Charges of armed robbery, substantial battery, attempted armed robbery and misdemeanor bail jumping, and two felony bail jumping charges were dismissed in the plea agreement with Soulier. Thomas Y. Walsh, 20, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with burglary of a building or dwelling, misdemeanor theft and criminal trespass, as well as a felony bail jumping charge, had a preliminary hearing set for Nov. 21 at 2:45 p.m. Stanley G. Cross, 58, of Lac du Flambeau, entered a nocontest plea to a charge of delivery of a schedule I, II or III nonnarcotic drug. Judge Nielsen found Cross guilty and approved a deferred entry of judgment. If Cross completes the 24-month deferred entry of judgment, the charges will be dismissed. Conditions include that Cross undergo alcohol and other drug abuse assessment and follow-through, that he commits no crimes and submits to random urine analysis. Cross also pleaded guilty to obtaining a prescription drug with fraud and was fined $137.50, due Jan. 7, 2012. He also was given 10 days in the county jail to start Jan. 7. Darren L. Lube, 46, of Ironwood, Mich., charged with four counts of failure to support a child for more than 120 days, appeared for a deferred prosecution agreement hearing. District Attorney Albert Moustakis asked for the hearing to be adjourned for six months because Lube has been making some payments. A new hearing was set for May 7, 2012 at 2 p.m. Joseph W. Negani, 21, of Lac du Flambeau, had a motion hearing to revoke a deferred entry of judgment set for Nov. 21 at 9:45 a.m. Negani was originally charged with second-degree reckless endangerment. For two charges of misdemeanor bail jumping and one charge of disorderly conduct, Negani was given six months in the county jail.

November 13-19

6A

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

NEWS

O’Briens lead new library campaign
They see facility as a cultural, intellectual center
___________

Sno-Eagles schedule membership meeting
The Sno-Eagles Snowmobile Club will hold a membership meeting Thursday, Nov. 17, at Boomers Grill & Pub in Eagle River at 7 p.m. Nonmembers are welcome to attend Sno-Eagles events. Refreshments will follow the business meeting. The group will discuss trail preparation for the upcoming season. The club’s brushing crew has been working for almost two months and the trails are nearly ready to go. The state-funded trails must be inspected by Vilas County snowmobile coordinator Dale Mayo before they can open. A countywide opening date will be determined at the Vilas County Snowmobile Alliance meeting and will be announced at the Sno-Eagles meeting Thursday. The Sno-Eagles also will seek ideas from club members about ordering new clothing items. Club members can wear Sno-Eagles clothing to the meeting. The Sno-Eagles two-for-one dinner books are now available for purchase at the Eagle River Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Center, Trig’s, Parsons, Eagle River Tire, The Flour Sack, Kathan Inn, Trackside, Buckshots, ICO station on Highway 70 West and Smiley’s in Lake Tomahawk. The books, which cost $20 apiece and contain 36 coupons from area businesses, will also be available for purchase at the meeting.

BY BERNIE HUPPERTS
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW

___________

The Library Foundation Campaign has named Jack and Jane O’Brien as cochairpersons leading a group who will solicit donations for the $3.26 million new library project in Eagle River. Jack O’Brien, a partner in the law firm of O’Brien, Anderson, Burgy & Garbowicz LLP, and Jane O’Brien, an artist and art teacher throughout the area, accepted the co-chairman position of the Pace Committee. The committee is charged with seeking major donations from Eagle River area residents for the “Right Before Your Eyes” campaign. Jack recalls that when he was asked to chair this committee with his wife, his initial thought was “no.” However, he quickly responded, “The exterior fits into the North Woods, but when you walk into the library, you quickly learn that it’s crowded and in need of serious repairs.” After his tour with library staff, Jack enthusiastically entered the campaign because the library is “the cultural and intellectual center of this community and the new library has been designed by an architect who understands the needs of the community, as well as the aesthetics.” Jane sees the library as the vital heart of the com-

JACK O’BRIEN

JANE O’BRIEN

munity. “Exposure to all the arts and technology is vital to the growth of the area,” she said. “It would be wonderful to have more exposure through workshops and lectures, as well as concerts through the meeting room that is planned in the new building.” They both agree that the computer section of the memorial library is too crowded and busy, hardly giving enough time for all those who seek technological services in the library. “The new design includes enough computer workspace while still paying attention to other important areas of a library, such as a children’s department, a young adult department, and a full adult collection,” said Jane. Cabinet members noted that the library campaign

focuses on the library as a place with something for everyone — working families, retirees, summer residents and year-round visitors. Jane is “hoping that the wall space will be filled with art. We have Children in Art Month in March and a regional artists exhibit as well as Artists of the Month now. However, mounting each of these exhibits takes space away from the tech and seating areas. The new library will provide less invasive space for art, and allow more work to be displayed,” commented Jane. Jack added that the new library will add to how tourists and people considering buying a home in the area will see the city. “The exterior fits the area; the interior is made with an open design, need-

ing no more employees than we have now,” he said. “In addition,” Jane mentioned, “by moving the library to the north, we gain off-street parking and beautification to the lot with greenery and landscaping.” They both see chances for the library to become even more the center of the community with special library weeks and weekends that go beyond the current featured book sales. “How will this happen?” asks Jack. “The cabinet has designed three- to five-year pledges which will get everyone involved, not only large donors. We can’t afford to be complacent, when we know we have a chance here to build a cultural center that solves our current space limitations and increases the current service potential of the library,” he said. To further encourage interest by donors, the cabinet has listed designated giving opportunities, where people can donate the amount of a book stack. A donor plaque will be located near the specific area. Jane’s final comment was about the magic that is happening every day in the library because of the fine staff and opportunities. “All this magic will get bigger, but we are not looking for an increase in taxes, just as the News-Review banner reported several weeks ago,” she said.

Three Pines students expelled
___________

BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

___________

Walker administration to hold summit
MINOCQUA — Gov. Scott Walker and members of his cabinet will tackle job creation and the economy when they meet with businesses and community leaders at the fifth annual Governor’s Northern Wisconsin Economic Development Summit Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 13-14, at The Waters of Minocqua. “Northern Wisconsin has its own unique set of economic challenges and opportunities,” said Walker. “The summit presents a forum for my administration to meet with the business community and area leaders to discuss how we can collaborate at local and state levels to boost the economy and job creation in this region.” The summit is the combined work of several state agencies and aims to stimulate discussion of key issues specific to northern Wisconsin, including growing the economy, jobs and workforce development, technology, transportation, clean and renewable energy, smallbusiness development and natural resources. The summit will kick off Tuesday and, include a “Conversation with Leadership,” three- to five-minute briefings on key issues within several state agencies as they pertain to northern Wisconsin. Scheduled to participate in the two cabinet panel discussions are Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Secretary Cathy Stepp; Department of Tourism Secretary Stephanie Klett; Department of Transportation Deputy Secretary Mike Berg; Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. (WEDC) CEO Paul Jadin; Department of Revenue (DOR) Secretary Rick Chandler; Department of Workforce Development (DWD) Secretary Reggie Newson, Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection Secretary Ben Brancel; and Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority Executive Director Wyman Winston. Breakout sessions and workshops will be offered following the opening session. Workshops Tuesday will include a round-table discussion with Stepp and labor market outlook from the DWD. Wednesday will feature a keynote address from Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, sessions addressing jobs, the progress of renewable energy in Wisconsin, programs offered by the new WEDC and a discussion about the expansion of broadband throughout Wisconsin. Registration for the twoday summit is $75. For more information, visit northwoodssummit.com.

The Northland Pines School Board expelled three high school students last week, all on drug-related allegations. According to information from District Administrator Mike Richie, a 12th-grade male student was expelled through age 21, with the earliest possible re-enrollment set for Jan. 23, 2012. “The expulsion was for (possessing) prescription drugs not belonging to the male student,” Richie said. “If the student is allowed to reenroll, there will be strict contingencies in place.” Those contingencies include random drug testing and allowing any high school staff member to search his person, locker or his vehicle at any time. The second student was a male in 10th grade expelled through July 1, 2014, for possession of an empty marijua-

na pipe. His earliest re-enrollment is Jan. 23, 2012. He also will be subject to random drug testing and allowing staff to search his person, locker and vehicle at any time. The third student was in ninth grade and was expelled through July 1, 2015, for possessing prescription drugs not belonging to him. His possible re-enrollment is Jan. 23, 2012, and he will be subject to random drug tests, allowing search of his person, locker and vehicle at any time. All three were referred to juvenile authorities.

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VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

7A

NEWS

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
The real estate transactions listed below are being published at the request of many of our readers. The information is public record and reflects an index of each week’s transactions. Property transactions exceeding $10,000 recorded at the Vilas County Courthouse the past week and the transfer fee (at $3 per $1,000): Nov. 7, 2011 Nellie Herrmann, Pers. Rep. and Estate of Robert R. Jungck to Jeffrey J. Knauf, prt NE SW in 19-43-7, gov lot 5, $270 Besgrove Revocable Living Trust to Christopher G. Berg and wife, prt NW SW in 16-40-9, gov lot 5, $396 Janet L. Rouse to Walter James Truettner and wife et al and Kendyl Butler-Truettner and husband et al, prt NE SW in 3142-7, gov lot 4, $2,835 Anastasios Flamburis to Mark A. Osiecki and wife, lot 26 of plat 840 in Voyageur Crossings Condominium, $720 Margaret F. Stec and Margaret F. Engle to David John Sadenwasser, prt SE NW in 9-4110, $162 J. Leander Revocable Living Trust to Sean Scott O’Donnell and wife, prt NW SW in 31-4010, gov lot 6, $1,050 Nov. 8, 2011 Jerome J. Krajewski and wife to Jeremiah J. Fuller, lot 2 of plat 129 in Harmony Acres, $345 Nov. 9, 2011 Zent Holdings LLC to 2007 Hallick Joint Revocable Trust and Hallick Joint Revoc. Trust 11/21/07, prt SW SE in 2-41-9, gov lot 1, $1,605 Nov. 10, 2011 Wilma J. Reinke to James S. Young and wife, prt SE SE in 339-10, gov lot 5, $864 Joyce Sadauskas to Gerald L. Beer, prt NW NE in 34-40-10, $405 Gerald L. Beer to Lloyd Setzer and wife, prt NW NE in 34-40-10, $405 BMO Harris Bank to Robert P. Klein et al, prt NW NE in 12-4110, $108 Richard P. Draper to Mark Wagner and wife, lot 120 of plat 263 in Rest Lake; prt NE NW in 9-42-5, gov lot 2, $42 Nov. 11, 2011 Terry J. Urban and spouse to Marc C. Groth and wife, lots 78, 79 and 115 of plat 163 in Keystone Park; prt SW NW in 22-4010, gov lot 2, $1,680 Sandra M. Paulus to Harlan M. Krafft and wife, lot 6 of plat 184 in Long Lake Condo, $540 Alder Lake Cranberry Corp. et al and Indermuehle Cranberries LLC et al to Orange Farms LLC, prt NE SW, prt SE SW in 26-425; SE NE, prt SW NE in 34-42-5; prt NW SE in 34-42-5, gov lot 3; prt SW NE, prt NE NE, prt NW NE, prt SE NE, prt NE NW, prt NW NW, prt SW NW, prt SE NW in 35-42-5, $9,619.20 Estate of Marilyn Colar to David Feit and wife, prt SE NW in 30-40-10, gov lot 3, $756 Ronald Schoessow and wife to Joan M. Heenahan, lot 5, blk 2 of plat 248 in Plantation Subd., $390

WONDERLAND — The North Woods landscape was covered with 3 to 8 inches of snow last Wednesday, with the greatest snow depths recorded south and east of Eagle River and Three Lakes. The snow highlighted lakeshore trees and covered woodpiles and mailboxes. --STAFF PHOTOS

Vilas leadership program application deadline nears
The Vilas Institute for Leadership and Sustainability, also known as the VILAS Vision Leadership Program, will continue accepting applications for the 2011-’12 program until Friday, Nov. 18. The program offers an indepth learning opportunity for citizens who want to develop their leadership skills, explore community issues, learn about Vilas County’s resources, institutions and cultures and expand their networks. Open to all community members, the program helps participants of all ages in their community and nonprofit work, business and working environments and family life. Almost 90 Vilas County residents are graduates of the program, which began in 2003. The program is developed and implemented by Vilas County and Lac du Flambeau UW-Extension educators. To participate in VILAS Vision, applicants must commit to attending seven daylong sessions the first Wednesday of each month from December through June 2012. The fee for the entire program is $150, which will include all program materials and meals. Several businesses in the area have used the program as professional development for their employees, enrolling participants each year. The program also has inspired participants to create community projects, such as the Eagle River Farmers Market, tax preparation assistance for seniors, a support group for grieving parents and a Northwoods Children’s Museum program for families with special-needs children. An application form and more information on the program is available on the Vilas County UW-Extension website at uwex.edu or by calling the UW-Extension office at (715) 479-3648. Those interested can also visit the office, located on the ground floor of the Vilas County Courthouse in Eagle River.

Vilas balances 2012 budget with cuts, segregated funds
___________

BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT

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The Vilas County Board wrangled over proposed 2012 spending for nearly four hours at its budget hearing last Tuesday, making cuts and using segregated accounts to balance the budget. The adopted 2012 budget calls for spending of $25,974,224, the same as last year, with a tax levy of $13,053,828 and a projected tax rate of $1.78 per $1,000 of assessed value. Last year’s levy was $13,095,526. To help balance the budget, the county will take $284,053 from the general fund, $593,782 from the highway segregated fund, and $105,706 from the segregated health insurance fund. Finance Committee Chairman Chris Mayer addressed the board at the start of the budget deliberations, cautioning the supervisors on spending and saying they will be doing things differently for 2012. “We were $1.5 million short, and we’re the only ones that can fix it,” Mayer announced. “We will fulfill our mandates. Public safety and roads are major issues. We will have to streamline and share services.” County Board Chairman Steve Favorite echoed Mayer’s view. “We spent two days listening to department requests. The services we provide have merit and, generally speaking, we need these services,” said Favorite. “The question is, how do we fund it; how do we make up a $1.5 million shortfall? Even if we’re a little short, it won’t occur in January but at the end of the year.” Supervisor Ed Bluthardt said he was concerned about talks of borrowing to balance the budget. That was echoed by Supervisor Linda Thorpe,

saying “to borrow to balance is not in the best interest of the county or the taxpayers.” According to County Clerk Dave Alleman, the county has $6.42 million in the unencumbered general fund. In the past, some of those additional funds have been used to “buy down” the levy, thereby reducing the cost to property taxpayers. Several supervisors expressed opposition to tapping this source of taxpayer dollars that have accumulated. “The habit of taking dollars out of the general fund to balance the budget is not to do it,” said Supervisor Jim Behling. Supervisor Ed Bluthardt pointed out that, in 2006, the county had $9 million in the general fund, and the recommendation of auditors is not to go below $7 million. Cutting costs In budget decisions, employee contributions for health insurance were raised from zero for a single employee to 8%, and for a family from 8% to 10%. The health insurance deductible was increased to $500 for a single and $1,000 for a family. This is estimated to save the county close to $93,000. Favorite made a motion to reduce zoning deputies to a 30-hour week in winter months and to eliminate one deputy zoning administrator position, reducing the deputies from six to five. It was adopted over the objection of Supervisor Fred Radtke. “While I felt we had too many deputies, I do have a problem,” Radtke said. “We’re taking pay away with the 30hour week, and I see one department sacrificing, reducing both deputies and wages; I have a problem with that.” Mayer said the workload will be monitored, and “nobody wants to do this but it’s the reality we’re at.”

Supervisors learned the county communications project had an excess of $350,000 and is out of projects. Supervisor Ron De Bruyne asked to carry the funds over, so EMTs and local fire departments can use it for radios. But it was noted the projects were funded with borrowed money, and a motion to eliminate the carryover and apply the money to debt retirement was adopted. Supervisors rejected a motion by Radtke to eliminate all 2012 pay raises along with the corporation counsel raise. Another motion by Radtke to eliminate the $70,000 for moving the county Health Department out of the courthouse was defeated 6-11. A motion by Behling to eliminate a confidential secretary position, saving $29,000, was approved. A proposed highway reconstruction project on Highway M from Highway 51 to Boulder Junction, with an initial county cost of $129,200 for the design phase, was eliminated. Interim highway commissioner Jared Maney said there were other county roads that needed reconstruction more. Another decision to replace two of four Highway Department vacancies with limited term employees, rather than full time workers, was approved, with an estimated savings of $91,000. A motion by Mayer to reduce the Sheriff’s Department overtime budget by $100,000 was approved 13-5. Additional spending After the cuts were made and adjustments were made to the budget, Alleman announced the county was now $878,989 under the levy limit. Supervisors then scrambled to return items to the budget, but none that included adding employees. Favorite moved to add $5,000 to the cost of moving

the Health Department to the Eliason building; that was approved 14-4. A motion by De Bruyne to put $83,000 back into the budget for parking lot and sidewalk repair, along with voice over identification phones, was approved. Also approved, on a 10-4 vote, was placing $59,000 into the Sheriff’s Department budget for protective vests and $130,000 for lights at Oldenburg Sports Park. When a request for a new truck for the Emergency Management Department was rejected, the board approved placing $3,000 into a maintenance line item for the existing vehicle, up from the $1,000 requested. Further additions to the budget included $2,800 for a “walk behind” sidewalk sweeper and $7,368 for a new radio for the coroner. Supervisor Charles Rayala, a member of the Highway Committee, moved to return $593,782 back into the highway segregated account for road construction. It failed to receive a second. That was followed by a motion to return $467,000 back into the highway segregated fund for road construction, which was defeated 7-8. That prompted Rayala to accuse the supervisors of “stealing it ($593,782) from us out of the segregated highway fund, and now you’re taking $467,000 from our working budget.” With that, Supervisor Linda Thorpe moved to reconsider the previous motion, putting back the $467,000; it was approved 12-2. After all the budget additions, there was $141,321 remaining that was placed in a contingency account.

8A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

OUTDOORS
Buck fever takes over as the big hunt arrives
OUTSIDERS not familiar with Wisconsin’s deer hunting tradition would probably be shocked to learn of the time and effort that goes into preparations for the nine-day deer hunt that opens this Saturday, Nov. 19. Why, they would ask, do hundreds of thousands of hunters coordinate everything from scouting and stand construction to fulfilling their shopping list, planning pre-hunt parties, clearing their work schedules and getting permission to miss school or other previous commitments? The answers are quite simple for those of us who know the joys of the state’s most popular outdoor sporting tradition, and there are many. There is no single outdoor event bigger than the nine-day deer hunt. Hunting offers an incredible combination of draws when you stop to think it over. Nothing beats the camaraderie of deer camp, which comes with unique traditions in every family or group. It’s all about hunters coming together, as part of a team, to chase the state’s premier big game animal. Despite all the hoopla over the social aspects of deer camp, the scribbler truly believes that the deer hunt piques the optimism in every hunter — piques the hope that it may be their turn for some big-buck magic. What nobody can discount in this sport is that anyone, regardless of age, gender, nationality or even shooting skills, can stumble into a trophy of a lifetime during this nine-day season. Hunters have heard all the stories and they know, by putting their time in, they may qualify for that magical moment when a truly

In the Outdoors
By Kurt Krueger
impressive whitetail buck meanders past their stand or blind. For the most part, hunters are dreamers who can’t stop thinking about the next buck they might encounter. You never know if or when that buck might show, but for sure, you know anything is possible. I truly hope the general public doesn’t believe that most hunters go to deer camp just to party. Even the most casual of hunters gets wound up in the prehunt frenzy, and buck fever takes over. I’d say 99.8% of the hunters are in the woods opening morning, despite a lack of sleep and other obstacles they may be encountering. Good deer hunters have more than patience going for them. They have hope. They have confidence. They know that, if their wait pays off, it will certainly have been worth it. Scouting and stand preparation for the hunt can be an event all its own. Such duties can take dozens or even hundreds of hours, for the chase is an art — a battle of wits between hunters and the animals they seek. Meanwhile, deer hunters also have to deal with unknowns like the weather and, in many cases, other hunters sharing the same public forests or private forest crop lands. The nine-day hunt is a short time frame, and hunters have little choice but to take what they get

from Mother Nature. The scribbler was too busy chasing grouse to get wrapped up in the pre-hunt mood until I sat in a tree for the first time last week. All it took was 30 minutes in a tree stand and the sight of two grunting whitetail bucks to change it all. And then a five-point buck gave me an opportunity I couldn’t pass up, and my tag was filled. There’s fresh venison in the freezer. Last week’s snowfall has entirely changed my outlook. The transition from grouse hunting to deer hunting is complete. I spent last weekend combing the ground and building blinds in areas where I ran across a lot of deer sign while chasing birds. I’m modeling this season’s scouting efforts and hunt strategy after last year, when I didn’t decide where my carcass was going to be planted opening morning until a day or two before the season. That strategy produced a nice eight-point buck at the crack of dawn opening day last year, so it’s worth another try. Wind direction could be a determining factor. So could seeing a big buck chasing a doe sometime later this week — or at least the tracks telling that such a chase occurred. Besides all that, I can’t complete a prehunt column without a couple words on gun safety. Keep in mind that more than 60% of the time, hunting accidents involve members of the same party. That’s right, the most likely person to shoot you is your hunting buddy. That’s why every hunter needs to exercise extreme caution when guns are being loaded and unloaded. There is nothing more dangerous than deer drives. Spell out the

Heavy-antlered bucks with large, “rutiful” necks are what hunters are dreaming about this week as the gun season opens Saturday. --STAFF PHOTO

rules and if you don’t know where your hunting partners are located, don’t shoot at a running deer. The popularity of tree stands makes it essential that hunters never raise or lower rifles that are loaded. And to prevent dropping a rifle from a tree, make sure the back of the sling or stock is tied to something. Lastly, and the one that bugs me the most, is never believe it’s OK for someone to point a

gun at you — even momentarily. Duck, jump out of the way or at least say something. When you meet another hunter in the woods, the gun at his or her side should not be pointed at your stomach. If a group is walking single file, there should be no guns pointed at someone’s back. I hope you all have a quality hunt, and a safe hunt, regardless of whether you are among the one in five who tags a buck.

Gun deer hunt starts Saturday Uncased gun rule
It’s still buck-only in units 35 and 39 here
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takes effect Nov. 19
New legislation modifies the state law concerning the manner in which long-barreled firearms, bows and crossbows can be transported in motor vehicles or placed in or on stationary vehicles. The new law will be published in time to take effect this Saturday, Nov. 19, opening day of the 2011 nine-day gun deer season. In its essence, the new law can be boiled down to a single statement, said Tim Lawhern, Department of Natural Resources (DNR) division of enforcement and science administrator. “Unless otherwise prohibited, you can carry a long gun uncased and unloaded in or on a motor vehicle in Wisconsin at any time,” Lawhern said. The DNR has prepared a frequently asked questions list on Act 51 on the law enforcement pages of the DNR website at dnr.wi.gov. While the law has changed, Lawhern said there will still be many people who will continue to use a carrying case to transport unloaded firearms in motor vehicles, as hunters have been and will continue to be advised in hunter education courses. “It’s a great way to protect your investment in your firearms,” Lawhern said. As is always the case with a new law, Lawhern said, the first year is an educational opportunity. DNR chief warden Randy Stark has already provided the state’s warden force with detailed instructions on the new law and its enforcement. Wardens will use a mix of enforcement, communication and education to help hunters understand and comply with the new law, Lawhern said. “We are always ready to help people in the field, to answer their questions and to provide advice,” Lawhern said. Here are a few things hunters might need to know about the new law: A caveat to the uncased long gun rule, the new legislation does not change Wisconsin law regulating the practice of shining (illuminating) wild animals at night with artificial light. It will still be illegal to possess a firearm of any kind, loaded or unloaded, while shining wild animals. The new law allows individuals to hunt from a stationary nonmotorized vehicle, such as a hay wagon, so long as it is not attached to a motor vehicle. Previously, hunting from any vehicle was prohibited, without the distinction of whether the vehicle was motorized or stationary. This change previously had been sought by warden administrators. It will be legal to possess and transport uncased bows and crossbows in a vehicle. However, bows may not have an arrow nocked. A crossbow may not be cocked unless it is unloaded (meaning the bolt or arrow is removed) and cased. When on the top or exterior of a vehicle which is stationary, long guns can be both uncased and loaded. A stationary vehicle can have the motor running. Stationary means not moving, regardless of whether the motor is running. This allows a hunter at a stationary vehicle to place a loaded gun on a clean, dry surface. “Our hunters have established an enviable safety record,” Lawhern said. “We fully expect the vast majority of hunters in Wisconsin will continue to use common sense and safe practices when handling firearms. For most of us, these practices have become second nature.” Other safety rules Lawhern also reminded hunter of the four basic rules of gun safety, as taught in hunter education: Treat every firearm as if it is loaded. Always point the muzzle in a safe direction. Be certain of your target and what’s beyond. Keep your finger outside the trigger guard until ready to shoot.

BY NEWS-REVIEW STAFF
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The 2011 gun deer season opens this Saturday, Nov. 19, and barring bad weather, wildlife officials say all the pieces are in place for a good season as the herd continues to grow. The traditional nine-day gun deer hunt will run through Nov. 27 and will be followed by a muzzleloader deer hunt from Nov. 28 to Dec. 7. A four-day December antlerless-only deer hunt will be held Dec. 8-11 in most units. For the 2011 season, most regular units will have a limited number of unit-specific antlerless deer carcass tags available. Department of Natural Resources wildlife experts say regular units have deer populations that are at or near goal in these deer management units (DMUs). In this area, those include units 36, 37 and 38. Hunters may purchase one antlerless tag per day. Fees are $12 each for residents and $20 each for nonresidents. Units with lower numbers of available permits can be expected to sell out quickly. The supply of available permits in units with high numbers can be expected to last longer. Hunters may want to monitor permit availability online which is updated periodically. As of Sunday, Unit 36 still had 5,338 tags remaining, Unit 37 was at 1,476 and Unit 38 was at 1,824. Hunters must purchase a 2011 Wisconsin deer hunting license before purchasing a unit-specific antlerless tag. Eight regular units that will not have any unit-specific antlerless tags available in 2011 are: DMUs 3, 7, 29B, 34, 35, 39, 44 and 45. These units are below deer population goals, according to the DNR. Some hunters can still shoot an anterless deer in these buck-only units, including qualified members of the U.S. Armed Forces who are

While units 35 and 39 are buck-only, a hunter with the proper anterless deer permit will be able

to harvest a doe in units 36, 37 and 38 in this area. --Staff Photo By KURT KRUEGER

home on furlough or leave, Class A and C disabled permit hunters and youths ages 10 through 17 who have an unused DMU anterless tag. According to the new rule in 2011, youth hunters ages 10 through 17 who purchase a firearm deer license will automatically be issued an antlerless permit that can be used with a gun in any DMU statewide. Licenses and tags for all hunters can be purchased by phone at 1-(877) 945-4236 or at the DNR Online Licensing Center. The DNR reminds hunters that coyote hunting is closed in approximately the northern third of the state if any gun or muzzleloader deer hunt is in progress.

As with all hunting seasons, hunters also are reminded to be absolutely sure of their target before they shoot. Antlerless gun hunt Hunters are reminded the Dec. 8-11 antlerless-only hunt will still be held statewide. Unlike the October antlerless-only gun hunt, this hunt will take place in all DMUs statewide, except state parks outside of the chronic wasting disease management zone and non-quota (buck-only) areas with a few exceptions. Hunters will need to possess or be in a group that has at least one antlerless deer carcass tag valid for the unit which they will be hunting in. Unit specific tags will not be available for the eight reg-

ular units in northern Wisconsin that are buck only. Exceptions apply to qualified members of the U.S. Armed Forces who are home on furlough or leave, Class A and C disabled permit hunters and youths between the ages of 10-17 who have an unused antlerless tag they received with their gun deer license for any DMU in the state. All gun and archery deer hunters, and small-game hunters are required to meet blaze orange requirements during this hunt statewide. Venison donations Wisconsin’s Venison Donation Program is a partnership between local charitable orgaTo DEER HUNT, 9A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

9A

OUTDOORS
2011 gun deer registration stations
Vilas County Boulder Junction Conover Eagle River Land O’ Lakes Manitowish Waters Phelps Presque Isle St. Germain Star Lake Oneida County Hazelhurst Lake Tomahawk McNaughton Minocqua Monico Pier Lake Station Name Gooch’s A-1 Bar Northern Waters Angling & Archery Wild Eagle Corner Store Black Oak Inn Dietz’s Service Phillips 66 Phelps Convenience Center Thoma’s Mini Mart St. Germain Sport Marine Errington’s Resort ICO Amoco BP Gas-Up Tamarack Tap Island Sport Center Monico Short Stop Indian Point Resort Hodag Pump & Pantry West Side Shell DNR Service Center Marathon Station Three Lakes Convenience Store Moran’s Landing Main Street Ed’s The Corner Store Northern Sport Shop The Hiles Outpost Laona Shell Backhaus’ Sportsmen’s Retreat Hours 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. daily 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving Day. 6 a.m. - 7 p.m. daily 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday thru Thursday, 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. Monday thru Saturday, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Nov. 20-21, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving Day. 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving Day. 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. daily 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily 1 p.m. - 8 p.m. daily 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. daily, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Thanksgiving Day 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. daily 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Tuesday thru Sunday, closed Monday. 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. daily. No reg. opening weekend. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily. No reg. opening weekend. 8 a.m.- 7 p.m. opening weekend only 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Monday thru Sunday 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. daily 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily 6 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sunday thru Thursday, 6 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday thru Sunday 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Tuesday thru Sunday

Deer hunt
FROM PAGE 8A
nizations, counties, the Department of Natural Resources, meat processors and hunters. This effort has provided high-quality protein to thousands of families over the years. In addition to donating deer to the program, since 2002, hunters have chipped in an additional $127,000 to the pantry program on top of the fee they pay for deer harvest permits. 2010 marked the 11th anniversary of Wisconsin’s Venison Donation Program. In 11 years, the program distributed nearly 3.5 million pounds of ground venison from more than 77,000 deer donated by hunters, processed by participating meat processors and distributed by volunteers to state food pantries. A list of participating meat processors is available on the DNR website at dnr.wi.gov and searchable by county. Rules of the program are simple. Hunters harvest, tag, field dress and register a deer the same as they always have. After registration, the hunter can drop off the carcass at a participating processor. There is no cost to the hunter other than transporting the carcass. Hunters are advised to call ahead to a processor to check on business hours and if the processor currently has space to accept the carcass.

DANDY EIGHT — Joe Bucher of Eagle River shot this 8-point buck with his bow Nov. 5. The rack green-scored at 138 2/8 inches. --Contributed Photo

Rhinelander Rhinelander Rhinelander Sugar Camp Three Lakes Tomahawk Forest County Argonne Armstrong Creek Crandon Hiles Laona Wabeno

WPS reminds hunters about heating safety
MEMORABLE HUNT — Ed Richter, left, of Eagle River, shot this bull elk with a 120-yard shot while hunting in 20 inches of snow in the southern Rockies with his son Guy Richter, an Eagle River native, on Oct. 27. --Contributed Photo

Raptor group, wildlife center seek deer hearts this season
The Raptor Education Group Inc. (REGI), a nonprofit 501(c)(3) raptor rehabilitation facility in Antigo will accept donations of deer hearts during hunting season. The group rehabilitates and cares for 500 to 700 raptors and other birds a year. Deer hearts offer a natural low-fat, high-protein food source for the hawks, eagles, owls and falcons of REGI. Gun deer season offers an opportunity for hunters to help REGI by donating deer hearts. “Hunters, instead of leaving your deer heart in the woods, place it in a bag and drop it off at one of REGI’s donation sites,” said director of education Molly McKay. Donations will be accepted throughout the 2011 gun deer season, from Nov. 19-27. Collection sites in the area include the following: — Antigo, Ken’s Highway 45 Meat Market, N2220 Highway 45; — Land O’ Lakes, The Tackle Box, 4267 Highway B; and — Rhinelander, YMCAMinistry Rehabilitation Services, 2003 Winnebago St. E. For information regarding the program or to start a new donation area, contact McKay at mollym.regi@gmail.com or (715) 623-2563. Additional information about REGI is available at raptoreducationgroup.org. Also accepting venison The Northwoods Wildlife Center has announced it will accept donations of venison hearts and any venison remaining in area residents’ freezers. The hearts provide a good source of nutrients for the center’s animals. Donations can be dropped off at the center, located at 8683 South Blumenstein Road in Minocqua across from Trig’s on Highway 70 West.

Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) officials advise gun deer hunters who will soon return to their cabins, campers and tents to be extra careful when restarting their heating system. A careful inspection should be done before each heating season to make sure heating equipment is working efficiently and venting properly, according to Leah Van Zile, WPS community relations leader for the Eagle River area. “It’s also important to install quality smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and make sure they are working properly,” said Van Zile. When there is incomplete burning or combustion of the fuel source in the heating unit in combination with insufficient venting, a buildup of potentially lethal amounts of carbon monoxide can occur. “Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas and can be produced by any

heat source that burns fuels such as wood, propane, kerosene or gasoline,” said Van Zile. Safety experts said carbon monoxide is the most common cause of fatal poisoning in Wisconsin; in most deaths, the victims died in their sleep. Initial signs of carbon monoxide poisoning include flulike symptoms of headache, dizziness, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea and confusion, according to Van Zile. “Fresh air is immediately required, so if carbon monoxide is suspected, people should go outdoors and open windows and doors to get fresh air inside and contact 911 emergency responders,” she said. Venting on all heat sources like fireplaces, woodstoves, gas stoves and furnaces are designed to carry gas and other combustion products to the outdoors, according to safety experts. Chimneys and vents can get plugged by animal or bird nests, leaves or snow and

ice. Small propane heaters and stoves, kerosene, wood-burning and charcoal grills also produce carbon monoxide buildup when not vented. A gas or charcoal grill must never be used inside for heating purposes. A gas oven should also not be used for heating, reminded safety experts.

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Estimating weight of whitetail deer
Hunters can estimate the weight of their deer in the field by measuring the chest circumference. Measure the deer just behind the front legs and then use the chart below to get its approximate weight in pounds. Deer Weight Table
Chest Pounds Girth (Dressed) 35" ..............................................102.03 36" ..............................................107.63 37" ..............................................113.23 38" ..............................................118.84 39" ..............................................124.44 40" ..............................................130.04 41" ..............................................135.65 42" ..............................................141.25 43" ..............................................146.86 44" ..............................................152.46 45" ..............................................158.08 46" ..............................................163.67 47" ..............................................169.27 48" ..............................................174.87 49" ..............................................180.48 50" ..............................................186.08 51" ..............................................191.69 52" ..............................................197.29 53" ..............................................202.89 54" ..............................................208.50 55" ..............................................214.10 56" ..............................................219.70 57" ..............................................225.31 58" ..............................................230.91 59" ..............................................236.52 60" ..............................................242.12 61" ..............................................247.72 62" ..............................................253.33 63" ..............................................258.93 

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10A

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OUTDOORS Wallenfang appointed big-game ecologist
Kevin Wallenfang has been appointed as the state’s big game ecologist, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced last week. Wallenfang, 44, of Middleton, is expected to assume his new duties in mid-December. “We are absolutely thrilled to have Kevin heading up the big game program,” said Tom Hauge, director of the DNR Bureau of Wildlife Management. “Kevin’s an avid biggame hunter, and he understands and respects the passion Wisconsin has for our deer, bear and elk populations.” A Wisconsin native hailing from Green Lake, Wallenfang holds a bachelor’s degree in wildlife ecology from UWMadison and has worked in professional wildlife management for more than 20 years. He is currently Wisconsin’s regional wildlife biologist for Pheasants Forever and also spent several years as a biologist and initiative director for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Wallenfang is not a newcomer to, DNR, as he previously held the position of assistant big-game ecologist before his stints with Pheasants Forever and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. “Everyone knows deer management is a real hotbutton issue in Wisconsin,” said Wallenfang. “But that just shows how important it is to our state, both for individuals as hunters and to our economy. I’ve really hated to see the loss of some of the passion that some deer hunters have had in Wisconsin in recent years because of issues like chronic wasting disease. I’m hoping that together, with the help of hunters and the various groups out there, we can bring back the excitement and traditions that are missing for some people.” “Kevin has an excellent reputation as a leader in Wisconsin conservation and as a biologist, but his real strength is his likable personality,” said Hauge. “He is a good communicator and has the knack of working with partners to get things accomplished and in finding middle ground on tough issues. Big-game management, especially deer, has always been a challenge, and I think these traits will serve the public and him very well.” Wallenfang’s work with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation focused on preserving land and habitat for elk, and providing public access and permanent habitat protection through purchases and conservation easements. “I’m proud that I was here in the beginning of Wisconsin’s elk reintroduction and spent several years of my career working on various aspects of that effort,” he said. And about bears, he added, “Wisconsin has an incredible bear resource, both numbers and trophies. I’ve enjoyed a lot of great bear hunts from Wisconsin to Alaska, and hope I can put that experience to work on behalf of not only the bear resource, but for hunters as well.”

Outdoors Calendar
11/17/11 — Early archery deer season closes statewide. Reopens Nov. 19 through Jan. 8. 11/18/11 — It is illegal to hunt with a firearm or bow the day before the gun deer season opens, except for waterfowl hunting. 11/19/11 — Regular gun deer season opens through Nov. 27. — Late archery season opens through Jan. 8, 2012. 11/22/11 — Northern zone duck season closes. 11/27/11 — Regular gun deer season closes. 11/28/11 — Muzzleloader deer season opens through Dec. 7. — Fall turkey season extension opens in zones 1 to 5 through Dec. 31. (No late season in zones 6 and 7.) 11/30/11 — Muskellunge season closes. 12/1/11 — Lake trout season on Lake Superior opens, through Sept. 30. 12/7/11 — Muzzleloader deer season closes. 12/812/11/11 — Antlerless-only firearm hunt in Herd Control, chronic wasting disease management and quota units. 12/9/11 — Canada goose season in the north exterior zone closes. 12/10/11 — Spring turkey permit application deadline. — Application deadline for bear hunting kill permit. 12/26/11 — Period 2 hunting and trapping season for bobcat north of Highway 64 through Jan. 31. 12/31/11 — — — — Pheasant season closes. Fall turkey season extension in zones 1 to 5 closes. Bobcat hunting and trapping season closes. Fisher trapping season closes.
Compiled by the Wisconsin DNR dnr.wi.gov

NICE MUSKIE — Steve Engel, right, of Appleton recently caught this 46-inch muskie on a Vilas lake with fishing partner A.J. Looker. --Contributed Photo

Fishing with the Guides
By George Langley

Expect larger muskies with cisco spawn starting
North Woods anglers are still engaged in late fall fishing, but as the days go by, outdoors people are thinking more and more of the gun deer season and the ice fishing to come. Late fall anglers certainly have a lot to look forward to this week, especially if the weather cooperates. The water temperatures are going down through the 40s and getting into the 30s, which means the freeze isn’t too far away. On some mornings, the smaller lakes have had skim ice. It’s the time of year that trophy muskie hunters dream of, especially when the cisco spawn starts. The muskie season runs through Nov. 30. For the deer hunters, they’d like to see a fresh covering of snow combined with temperatures in the 20s and 30s. The deer are in rut right now and the reports of sightings, especially in the evenings and early mornings, have been much higher than earlier in the fall. This is a good sign. Muskie action has been a mixed bag, with the action seeming to coincide with the temperatures. When the water temperatures drop, the muskie action picks up. When the temperatures go up, it seems to slow down significantly until the next drop. So far, it has not been a fall with a lot of big fish. Most anglers are reporting a lot of midsized fish in the 20-pound range, but the real “big heavies” are few and far between. As always at this time of year, live suckers are the most effective baits. Slow-moving baits such as Bulldawgs, Suicks, Eddie Baits and other jerk baits are also still working. The cisco spawn is coming soon, and that will provide a great chance at really big muskies throughout the area. Fish the dropoffs right off the spawning areas during the daytime for the big fish just holding out there waiting for the cisco to come up in the evening to spawn. Walleye fishing is still quite productive, with good fishing reported areawide. The fishing on the Chain has been good for numbers, with only a few bigger fish being reported. The fish are in the holes, and large fatheads are the bait of choice for these fall fish. Best lakes have been Catfish, Cranberry and Yellow Birch. On the larger lakes, the walleyes have been significantly deeper. There are reports of fish consistently providing action in 30 to 40 feet of water on North Twin. Again, jigs and minnows are the best bet for these fish. Panfishing has slowed to a trickle as there are only a few anglers out there looking for perch, crappies and bluegills. They are mostly catching perch using minnows. Some crappies are also being caught on the Chain mixed right in with the walleyes in the holes. Most panfish anglers are waiting for ice fishing. If you’re not fishing, have a great deer season starting this weekend! Good luck and good fishin’ — and good huntin’.

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

11A

SPORTS
Sports Sidelines
By Gary Ridderbusch

New season under way for Eagle hockey teams
The changing of the season from fall to winter also means a new season for high school sports, with hockey getting under way first for players and coaches. There were some exciting sports stories during the fall, including the Northland Pines football team completing its second season in the Western Peninsula Athletic Conference and making the playoffs. But now it’s time for a new chapter on the high school sports scene. On tap this winter are girls and boys hockey and basketball at Northland Pines, girls and boys basketball at Three Lakes and Phelps, and wrestling at Three Lakes. Hockey teams started practicing last Monday and will kick off their schedules during the next week. Boys basketball practice started Monday at Northland Pines, Three Lakes and Phelps, while girls basketball at the three schools will start today (Wednesday). The Eagles boys hockey team is under the direction of fourth-year coach Charlie DePuydt. The Eagles are coming off a Great Northern Conference title and have a lot of talent returning, 17 letterwinners to be exact, and a lot of tradition playing at the historic Sports Arena. The Eagles are looking for a repeat at conference champs. The boys hockey team will open their schedule with a nonconference game at Kingsford, Mich., next Tuesday, Nov. 22, at 6 p.m. The Eagles first home game will be a dandy, facing Stevens Point Thursday, Dec. 1, in the Dome. The girls hockey team, with head coach Al Moustakis, had an excellent season last year and will be an exciting team to watch this winter. With 12 returning letterwinners, the team hopes to make a run at a Great Northern Conference championship. The girls hockey team will open at Fond du Lac this Friday, Nov. 18, at 7:45 p.m. and then will play a doubleheader in Waupun on Saturday, Nov. 19. The first home game will be Monday, Nov. 28, against Marshfield at 5:30 p.m. While they are not a high school team, the Eagle River Falcons men’s hockey team will provide plenty of action at the Sports Arena this winter. The Falcons have challenged for the Great Lakes Hockey League championship the past two seasons and coach Mike Adamovich is looking for another upper-level finish in the league. So if you are worried about the long winter ahead, get out of the house and catch some exciting winter sports as the high school hockey season kicks off this week.

Returning letterwinners for the Northland Pines boys hockey team include, front row from left, Jacob Stephan, Matt Kaitchuck, Duncan Hosking, Devin Sauvola, Jeromy Skibinski; back row, head coach Charlie DePuydt, Dylan Weber, Austin Ramesh, Adam Kresl, Leif Offerdahl, Alex Kornely, Matt Meyer, Zach Kennedy, Tay-

lor Greene-Adamovich, Dakota Klessig, Trevor Laszczkowski, Brandon Hunt and assistant coach Don Czarapata. Missing from the photo were sssistant coach Bob McDonald and senior forward Brett Hughes. The Eagles will open the season next Tuesday at Kingsford, Mich. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Ready to repeat
Eagles return 17 letterwinners this season
___________

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

___________

Expectations are high for the Northland Pines boys hockey team this season, as the Eagles return 17 letterwinners from a team that won the Great Northern Conference championship last year. The Eagles finished 9-3-2 in the conference last season, but Northland Pines was upset in the opening round of the playoffs by D.C. Everest and finished 14-8-2. Returning letterwinners for head coach Charlie DePuydt include seniors Matt Kaitchuck, Duncan Hosking, Matt Meyer, Dakota Klessig, Brett Hughes and Taylor Greene-Adamovich; juniors Austin Ramesh, Adam Kresl,

Dylan Weber, Leif Offerdahl, Alex Kornely, Trevor Laszczkowski, Jeromy Skibinski and Devin Sauvola; and sophomores Jacob Stephan, Zach Kennedy and Brandon Hunt. DePuydt says he expects big things from all of the returnees, including secondteam all-conference goaltender Stephan and senior All-State defenseman Kaitchuck. “Matt creates many opportunities because of his speed and vision on the ice,” said DePuydt. “His leadership will also be something that will be leaned on as the season progresses.” The Eagles also are returning a very talented junior class in Ramesh, Kresl, Weber, Offerdahl, Laszcz-kowski and Kornely.

“Ramesh, Weber and Kresl played together as a line last year and gave us a scoring threat every time they touched the ice,” said DePuydt. “Offerdahl’s speed and grit combined with the vision of sophomore Zach Kennedy and senior Matt Meyer allow us to have a second wave of scoring as well.” Also returning is the majority of the Eagles’ defensemen from last season. Kornely and Laszczkowski have logged a lot of ice time over the last two years. “They have played significant roles on our power play and penalty kill and we expect them to do the same this season,” said DePuydt. The coach said every player has the capability of doing all the small things which play a big role in the success of the

team. “But we cannot solely rely on one player when a big play needs to happen,” said DePuydt. “However, we have so many players that we expect to make a big play when needed and it will be exciting to have that spread around a little more.” DePuydt said he is expecting big things from the defense. “We were right at the top of the conference with Mosinee last season allowing the least amount of goals in the conference, so our team defense will be an added strength with the majority of them back,” said DePuydt. “We also have strong goaltending returning from last season. We can play a physical game, which tends to work well in the small Dome To EAGLES, Pg. 14A

Speedway crowns 2011 class champs
Class champions were crowned recently at the Eagle River Speedway awards banquet at Club Denoyer, including three-time Modifieds champion Jason Zdroik of Eagle River, Pure Stocks repeat champ Dustin Miller, and Jeff Klopstein of Baraga, Mich., who won his first Street Stocks championship. Mike Hicks took home the Micro Sprints championship, and Ty Springer won the Junior Sprints title. Ryan Glembin of Eagle River Speedway announced the special award winners, which included 2011 Sportsmanship Award winner Jesse Aho of Toivola, Mich. Winning the Rookie of the Year award was Ty Springer of Eagle River. Pete Paulus was given the Move of the Year award for his narrow avoidance of a multicar accident in the Modifieds class, a move that potentially prevented serious injury to other drivers. The Hard Luck award went to Jered Cech of Rhinelander, who managed to advance each race, despite a season marred by mechanical issues. Glembin thanked the drivers and reported on continued improvements at the track for the 2012 season, which will kick off the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend and conclude the Sunday of Labor Day weekTo SPEEDWAY, Pg. 15A

Returning to the Northland Pines girls hockey team for the 2011’12 season will be, front row from left, Kim VanBrunt, Ali Plese, Kelly McGinnis and Whitney Richards; back row, Jesse Wilkins, Lau-

ren Czarapata, Winter Nielsen, Alex Dean, Claire Decker, Paige Healy, Jessica Roach and Sydney Moustakis. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Darton joins Carroll Pioneers
___________

BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

Pines girls return 12 in hockey
___________

___________

BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

___________

The Northland Pines High School girls hockey team will return 12 letterwinners to the ice for the 2011-’12 season. Among those returning to the team are seniors Kim VanBrunt, Kelly McGinnis, Ali Plese and Whitney Richards; juniors Paige Healy, Sydney Moustakis, Claire Decker, Alex Dean and Winter Nielsen; and sophomores Lauren Czarapata, Jessica Roach and Jesse Wilkins. The Eagles will benefit from the return of VanBrunt, who was named second team

all-conference last season. Nielsen, who made the first team last year, will return to make big plays for the defense. Pines coach Al Moustakis said Plese will contribute skating power, while he expects Healy to be a leading scorer this year. Sydney Moustakis will bring her speed to the ice, he said. The overall strengths for the Eagles are depth, talent and speed, according to Moustakis. “This may be the best allaround team since the inception of the program,” he said. “There was a great freshmen turnout with great potential.”

With the new recruits, the coach said it could be a challenge to get the team unified and bring the younger players up to the level of state competition. “We look to be at the top of the conference,” said Moustakis. “Pines should be fighting it out for the top spot in the conference and sectional based on the experience and talent that the team has to work with.” The Eagles should fare exceptionally well this season, as Central Wisconsin Storm is no longer in the Great Northern Conference and Marshfield has lost some key players to graduation.

“It would be great to see more of the community out at the games supporting these fine athletes from our area,” said Moustakis. “Fan support has increased over the years, but we know that if the community would come out strong that the girls would give them a lot to cheer for.” Northland Pines will open its season by traveling to Fond du Lac Friday, Nov. 18. The girls are slated to hit the ice at 7:45 p.m. at the Fond du Lac Blue Line Ice Center. The Eagles will also travel to compete in a doubleheader at Waupun High School Saturday, Nov. 19, with games at 10:15 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Bridgette Darton, a 2011 graduate of Northland Pines High School, was recently named to the Carroll University Pioneers women’s basketball team. Darton led the Eagles last season in scoring, and was third in the Great Northern Conference for three-point scoring. Carroll University is in the Midwest Conference and competes against other Division 3 colleges, including St. Norbert; Ripon; Lake Forest, Ill.; Beloit; Grinnell, Iowa; and Illinois College, along with several University of Wisconsin schools in nonconference matches. The Pioneers will opened the women’s basketball season with a nonconference game against UW-Whitewater Tues-

BRIDGETTE DARTON

day, Nov. 15. Darton is the daughter of Garth and Lisa Darton of Eagle River. She majors in physical therapy at Carroll University.

12A

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS
EAGLE RIVER SQUIRT B’s
Results of 11/12/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-1-3 — 4 Tomahawk — 2-4-1 — 7 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: Zachary Maillette Third period: Adam Sima, Zachary Maillette, Zachary Maillette Saves: 7 (Matthew Szafranske) Shots on goal: 14 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-0 — 2 Tomahawk — 1-0-0 — 1 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Cameron Ramesh (Adam Sima) Second period: Zachary Maillette Saves: 10 (Matthew Szafranske) Shots on goal: 15 Results of 11/13/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-0-1 — 1 North Lakeland — 3-1-1 — 5 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Third period: Jake Martin Saves: 9 (Matthew Szafranske) Shots on goal: 17 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-0-1 — 1 North Lakeland — 1-2-4 — 7 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Third period: Jacob Martin Saves: 10 (Matthew Szafranske) Shots on goal: 17 Eagle River — 3-2-2 — 7 De Pere — 3-0-0 — 3 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Bobby Schilling, Tucker Wittkopf, Carter Staege Second period: Tucker Wittkopf, Eric Saltenberger Third period: Bobby Schilling (Eric Saltenberger), Jack Brown Saves: 20 (Wesley Pearce) Shots on goal: 41 Results of 11/12/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 4-3-3 — 10 De Pere — 1-0-1 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Eric Saltenberger (Carter Staege), Tucker Wittkopf, Bobby Schilling (Tucker Wittkopf), Tucker Wittkopf Second period: Bobby Schilling (Burke Anderson), Tucker Wittkopf, Jack Brown Third period: Jack Brown, Bobby Schilling (Eric Saltenberger), Jack Brown (Carter Staege) Saves: 33 (Michael John) Shots on goal: 36 Results of 11/13/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-0-0 — 0 Green Bay — 0-1-4 — 5 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Saves: 31 (Wesley Pearce) Shots on goal: 13 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-0-0 — 0 Green Bay — 1-3-1 — 5 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Saves: 23 (Wesley Pearce) Shots on goal: 12 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Colton Raymond, Nick Dean (Connor Cox), Nick Dean (Noah Weber, Ryon Ritzer) Second period: Joe Maillette (Hans Luebke) Third period: Noah Wittkopf (Noah Weber), Noah Weber (Noah Wittkopf) Saves: 19 (Dillon Gagliano) Shots on goal: 28 Results of 11/13/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-2 — 4 De Pere — 1-0-0 — 1 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Connor Cox Second period: Ryon Ritzer (Colton Raymond, Nick Dean) Third period: Ryon Ritzer (Colton Raymond), Nick Dean (Colton Raymond, Connor Cox) Saves: 31 (Dillon Gagliano) Shots on goal: 32 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-3-1 — 4 De Pere — 0-0-2 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: Nick Dean (Colton Raymond), Nick Dean (Colton Raymond), Noah Weber Third period: Noah Weber (Noah Wittkopf) Saves: 29 (Dillon Gagliano) Shots on goal: 24

EAGLE RIVER MITE A’s
Results of 11/13/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-3-1 — 4 North Lakeland — 0-3-3 — 6 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: J.J. Albee (Hunter Bill), Roen McGee (Julia Nesbitt), Cooper Fink (Roen McGee) Third period: Hunter Bill Saves: 10 (Andrew Hartwig) Shots on goal: 16 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-0 — 2 North Lakeland — 1-1-0 — 2 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: J.J. Albee (Hunter Bill) Second period: Hunter Bill (Zachary Szafranski) Saves: 12 (Andrew Hartwig) Shots on goal: 14

EAGLE RIVER PEE WEE A’s
Results of 11/13/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-1-0 — 1 Wausau — 1-1-3 — 5 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: Mikey Alfonso (Max Zingler) Saves: 17 (Nick Edwards) Shots on goal: 20 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 0-1-0 — 1 Wausau — 2-1-2 — 5 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Second period: Max Zingler (Jack Rhode) Saves: 18 (Ethan Polich) Shots on goal: 19

EAGLE RIVER BANTAMS
Results of 11/12/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-1-1 — 3 Green Bay — 2-5-0 — 7 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Noah Wittkopf (Noah Weber) Second period: Noah Weber (Noah Wittkopf) Third period: Nick Dean (Colton Raymond, Ryon Ritzer) Saves: 28 (Dillon Gagliano) Shots on goal: 16 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 3-1-2 — 6 Green Bay — 3-0-2 — 5

EAGLE RIVER PEE WEE B’s
Results of 11/12/11 SCORE BY PERIODS

To YOUTH HOCKEY, Pg. 13A

VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

Football
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Week 11 (Nov. 19-20 games) winner will be announced in the Wednesday, Nov. 23, newspaper.
WEEK 11 DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOV. 18, AT NOON
This year’s contest is the same as in 2010. Simply circle the winner of each game listed. Game 1 has added importance. See Game of the Week notes. Each game represents one point. A perfect score is 16 points. Be sure to fill in the Tiebreaker section. For any game ending in a tie, or if a game is delayed, postponed or rescheduled for any reason, the point will be thrown out. See rules below. You must be at least 8 years old to enter. To enter, clip along the dotted line, then place game entry in the container at the co-sponsor’s retail outlet. Entrants must list name, address and phone number clearly . . . information must be legible. Illegible entries will be thrown out. Decisions of the Contest Judge (News-Review) are final. Deposit your entry forms at the participating businesses listed below, or at the Vilas County News-Review office. Deadline is noon Friday unless otherwise stated.
Please cut along dotted line

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Week 11 Games of Nov. 19 & 20

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Game of the Week

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Dallas at Washington
Tennessee at Atlanta Jacksonville at Cleveland Carolina at Detroit Tampa Bay at Green Bay Buffalo at Miami Oakland at Minnesota Cincinnati at Baltimore Arizona at San Francisco Seattle at St. Louis San Diego at Chicago Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants Nebraska at Michigan U. So. California at Oregon Wisconsin at Illinois Penn State at Ohio State
CIRCLE THE WINNING TEAM

Game of the Week
You must correctly pick the winner of Game No. 1 to proceed in the contest. If you miss Game 1, you cannot win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, NOV. 18 DEADLINE: NOON
TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both teams) in Game of the Week Total offensive yards (both teams) in game.

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TIEBREAKER 2

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Deposit your entry at these sponsors
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wild eagle corner store
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HOURS: 6 A.M. TO 11 P.M. DAILY

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Address ___________________________ City _______________________________ State, ZIP __________________________ Day Ph. ( ______ ) __________________ Night Ph. ( ______ ) __________________

Congratulations Week 10 Winner
Mitch Raatz Name _______________________ Three Lakes _______________________ Winning Score 13 Points ________________
1st Tiebreaker - 42 Total Pts. ________________

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•••• FOOTBALL CONTEST OFFICIAL RULES ••••

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and be a sponsor of the Football Contest.

1. The object is to pick the winner of 16 games. Games will include professional and college games played Friday, Saturday or Sunday. The weekly winner will be the entrant with the most points… 16 being the most possible. The weekly winner must have the Game of the Week correct. If there is a tie, it goes to Tiebreaker I, the total points scored by both teams in the week’s designated game. If that fails to determine a winner, the judges will go to Tiebreaker 2, total offensive yardage from scrimmage in the designated game. If there is still as tie, a drawing at the News-Review, Eagle River, will be used. 2. No points are awarded on tie games, or in case any game is not played for any reason during the scheduled week. Should the

News-Review make an error listing a game/games, those games will be thrown out, not counted. 3. Entering the Football Contest constitutes permission by the entrant for his or her name and photograph to be used for news and reasonable promotion purposes at no charge. 4. Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are ineligible to participate. No entries will be accepted after the posted deadline. 5. Any inquiry about a protest of weekly results must be made by noon on the Friday following the announcement of the winner.The decision of the Contest Administrator is final. 6. No purchase is necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be

accepted. Enter contest by dropping entry forms into the Contest Container at participating co-sponsors, or by faxing to 715-4796242. 7. Weekly deadline for entry will be noon Friday, except when noted otherwise on the weekly entry form. 8. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be responsible for illegible entry forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in any way. 9. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must represent the original work of one entrant; group entries, systems or other attempts to enter multiple entries will be disqualified. Filling out extra forms and putting your friends’ or relatives’ names on them violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior to grading.

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VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

13A

SPORTS
EAGLE RIVER WOMEN’S POOL LEAGUE
Results of 11/8/11 Results: Tiny Tap 5, Uncle Kent’s II 4; Uncle Kent’s I 6, Bucktale Inn 3; Smuggler’s Lounge 4, Buckshots 5. Five-ball runs: Missy Madl, Sarah Stebbeds, Vicky Muth. Eight-ball runs: Missy Madl, Kathy Sherry. STANDINGS W TINY TAP.................................38 UNCLE KENT’S I....................30 BUCKSHOTS...........................25 UNCLE KENT’S II ..................24 BUCKTALE INN .....................23 SMUGGLER’S LOUNGE ........22 L 16 24 29 30 31 32 Allen, Tom Muench, Scott McCain, Ryan Sarkauskas, Joe Garcia. STANDINGS W UNCLE KENT’S I .....................34 PINE ISLE .................................35 BOOMERS .................................25 CLUB DENOYER......................29 MUD CREEK SALOON............23 UNCLE KENT’S II....................22 TINY TAP ..................................26 JAKE’S II ...................................19 EAGLE LANES .........................24 ONEIDA VILLAGE ...................15 JAKE’S I.....................................15 L 17 19 20 25 22 23 28 23 30 30 30 STANDINGS W BONNIE’S LAKESIDE .........50 JAKE’S II ...............................60 WONDER’S PIT STOP..........45 ONEIDA VILLAGE ...............51 IRISH WATERS II.................50 LEGION RAVENS .................48 IRISH WATERS I ..................46 PINE ISLE I ..........................44 PINE LAKE PUB ..................36 BRIGGS BAR .........................43 BLACK FOREST ...................35 LEGION EAGLES .................32 JAKE’S I.................................36 PINE ISLE II .........................26 LOON SALOON ....................28 L 25 30 30 39 40 42 44 46 39 47 40 43 54 49 62

Youth hockey
FROM PAGE 12A
EAGLE RIVER U-14 GIRLS
Results of 11/12/11 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 2-2-0 — 4 Green Bay — 0-0-3 — 3 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Natalie Decker (Allison Sauvola, Katy Gwyn), Amber Heidenreich Second period: Amanda Sergent (Anna Hartwig), Allison Sauvola (Natalie Decker) Saves: 22 (Jenna Paez) Shots on goal: 12 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 1-0-0 — 1 Green Bay — 0-0-1 — 1 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Amanda Sergent (Mariah Satran) Saves: 17 (Jenna Paez) Shots on goal: 15 Results of 11/13/11

THREE LAKES POOL
Results of 11/9/11 Team results: Wonder’s Pit Stop 11, Pine Lake Pub 4; Black Forest 10, Jake’s I 5; Bonnie’s Lakeside 10, Irish Waters I 5; Irish Waters II 9, Loon Saloon 6; Legion Ravens 9, Pine Isle II 6; Pine Isle I 8, Briggs Bar 7; Jake’s II 8, Oneida Village 7; Legion Eagles bye. Eight-ball run: Tom Muench. Hot shots: Kurt Krueger and Eddie Starke 19, Kristina Parker 15, Mike Thrall and Terry Moe 13, Paul Jenkins and Matt VanSkyhawk 12.

NORTHWOODS NINE-BALL LEAGUE
Results of 11/7/11 Team results: Boomers 8, Jake’s I 1; Uncle Kent’s I 7, Eagle Lanes 2; Club DeNoyer 6, Oneida Village 3; Pine Isle 6, Tiny Tap 3; Uncle Kent’s II 5, Mud Creek Saloon 4; Jake’s II bye. Nine-ball runs: Randy Bender, Ron Schilling. Nine-ball breaks: Dan Klessig, Chris

SUGAR CAMP WEDNESDAY NIGHT POOL
Results of 11/9/11 STANDINGS W KATHAN INN B.........................17 KATHAN INN A.........................12 GATOR’S LANDING ....................9 KLINGEN’S IDLEWILDE ...........8 MOONDANCE..............................8 Eight-ball run: Jeff Bergeman. L 10 15 9 10 10

SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 4-4-3 — 11 Medford — 0-0-0 — 0 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Joi Crass (Gabby Herfindahl), Gabby Herfindahl (Mary Beth Tienhaara, McKenzie Ebert), Natalie Decker (Amber Heidenreich), Joi Crass (Natalie Decker) Second period: Mikala Rubo (Amanda Sergent), Joi Crass, Amanda Sergent (Allison Sauvola), Amber Heidenreich (Mikala Rubo, Mariah Satran) Third period: Anna Hartwig, Katy Gwyn (Mariah Miller), Mariah Miller (Allison Sauvola) Saves: 9 (Jenna Paez) Shots on goal: 20 SCORE BY PERIODS Eagle River — 2-4-4 — 10 Medford — 0-0-0 — 0 INDIVIDUAL SCORING First period: Jenna Paez (Mariah Miller, Gabby Herfindahl), Mariah Satran (Mikala Rubo) Second period: Katy Gwyn (Mikala Rubo, Mariah Satran), Mariah Satran, Natalie Decker, Mikala Rubo (Joi Crass)

Third period: Anna Hartwig, Katy Gwyn (Mikala Rubo), Amanda Sergent, Mikala Rubo (Katy Gwyn, Natalie Decker) Saves: 2 (Sallie Spencer) Shots on goal: 18

pen a page to the

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VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

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Week 12 entries due by noon Wednesday, Nov. 23, allowing for Thanksgiving Day games. Games Played Nov. 24-27
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Week 12 Games of Nov. 24-27

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

New England at Philadelphia
Minnesota at Atlanta Cleveland at Cincinnati Tampa Bay at Tennessee Carolina at Indianapolis Arizona at St. Louis Buffalo at N.Y. Jets Houston at Jacksonville Chicago at Oakland Washington at Seattle Denver at San Diego Pittsburgh at Kansas City Iowa at Nebraska Alabama at Auburn Florida at Florida State Georgia at Georgia Tech
CIRCLE THE WINNING TEAM

Game of the Week
You must correctly pick the winner of Game No. 1 to proceed in the contest. If you miss Game 1, you cannot win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23 DEADLINE: NOON
TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both teams) in Game of the Week Total offensive yards (both teams) in game.

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•••• FOOTBALL CONTEST OFFICIAL RULES ••••

(715) 479-4421
and be a sponsor of the Football Contest.

1. The object is to pick the winner of 16 games. Games will include professional and college games played Friday, Saturday or Sunday. The weekly winner will be the entrant with the most points… 16 being the most possible. The weekly winner must have the Game of the Week correct. If there is a tie, it goes to Tiebreaker I, the total points scored by both teams in the week’s designated game. If that fails to determine a winner, the judges will go to Tiebreaker 2, total offensive yardage from scrimmage in the designated game. If there is still as tie, a drawing at the News-Review, Eagle River, will be used. 2. No points are awarded on tie games, or in case any game is not played for any reason during the scheduled week. Should the

News-Review make an error listing a game/games, those games will be thrown out, not counted. 3. Entering the Football Contest constitutes permission by the entrant for his or her name and photograph to be used for news and reasonable promotion purposes at no charge. 4. Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are ineligible to participate. No entries will be accepted after the posted deadline. 5. Any inquiry about a protest of weekly results must be made by noon on the Friday following the announcement of the winner.The decision of the Contest Administrator is final. 6. No purchase is necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be

accepted. Enter contest by dropping entry forms into the Contest Container at participating co-sponsors, or by faxing to 715-4796242. 7. Weekly deadline for entry will be noon Friday, except when noted otherwise on the weekly entry form. 8. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be responsible for illegible entry forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in any way. 9. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must represent the original work of one entrant; group entries, systems or other attempts to enter multiple entries will be disqualified. Filling out extra forms and putting your friends’ or relatives’ names on them violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior to grading.

HEATING – VENTILATION – AIR-CONDITIONING – ELECTRICAL – REFRIGERATION

1029 E. WALL ST. BOX 458 EAGLE RIVER, WIS.

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715-479-6919 1-800-359-0286

www.rogerscontrol.com

14A

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS

Snomo Hall of Fame to auction collectible Team Arctic machine
The Snowmobile Hall of Fame in St. Germain will auction off, via eBay, a 2012 Arctic Cat F1100 Sno Pro signed by every Team Arctic racer in attendance at Arctic Cat’s 50th anniversary celebration in Thief River Falls, Minn. The one-of-a-kind snowmobile, the very first from the production line, will be auctioned beginning Thursday, Nov. 24, to raise money for the Snowmobile Hall of Fame. There is no other Arctic Cat snowmobile in the world with as many autographs from Team Arctic racers, along with five autographed boards that document the signatures and the years the racers were with Team Arctic. Some of the legends whose names are signed on this machine include Roger Skime, Larry Coltom, Jim Dimmerman, Kirk Hibbert, Roger Janssen, Dave Thompson, Brian Sturgeon, Aaron Scheele, Chester Boman, Tucker Hibbert, Brad Pake, Paul and Brian Dick, Brian Nelson, P.J. Wanderscheid and more. For more information on the upcoming auction, visit snowmobilehalloffame.com. About the sled The F1100 Sno Pro is built to swallow bumps and pumps out 120-class horsepower through its 1100 four-stroke engine. Built on the all-new ProCross chassis, the ultralight, ultrarigid foundation has uncompromised handling and control. Up front, the new ARS front suspension attacks the bumps with its extra tall spindles, wide A-arm spacing and one-piece ski spindles. At the back, the FasTrack Slide-Action rear suspension helps absorb rough trails. The sled also features calibrated, lightweight Fox Float 2 shocks up front, a low windshield, electric heated seats, a 1.25-inch Ripsaw track and a retro graphics package that mimics the sleek, black Sno Pro race sleds of the late 1970s. Arctic Cat Inc., based in Thief River Falls, Minn., designs, engineers, manufactures and markets all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles under the Arctic Cat® brand name, as well as related parts, garments and accessories. More information about Arctic Cat and its products is avail-

SIXTH-GRADE VOLLEYBALL — The Northland Pines sixthgrade volleyball team this season included, front row from left, Kali Kolehouse, Hadley Burns, Payton Calix and Kennedy Thomas; middle row, Caroline Riley, Kelsey Bellman, Rebecca Beyersdorf, Carisa Scanlon, Hadley Kruse and Briana Vail; back row, Megan Scholl, Candice Helf and Ashlin Messner. --Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW

This Arctic Cat snowmobile will be the top prize in the hall of fame fundraiser this winter. --Contributed Photo

able at arcticcat.com. About the Hall of Fame The Snowmobile Hall of Fame is dedicated to preserving and showcasing the history of snowmobiling at both the recreational and competitive levels through the operation of a museum, Hall of Fame and library for the sport. Annual inductions honor the men and women who have

played significant roles at the racing venues, design and manufacturing arenas, local clubs, state associations and national organizations. The Snowmobile Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that has operated a museum and Hall of Fame for the sport since its establishment in 1982. It is located on Highway 70 West in St. Germain.

Eagles:
SEVENTH-GRADE VOLLEYBALL — The Northland Pines seventh-grade volleyball team this season included, front row from left, Bria Rubo, Tillie Wells; middle row, Gail VanderBloomen, Anna Hayes, Shelby Foster, Amy Camadeca; back row, Hailey Ruth, Hanna Long, Hannah Tilley, Lindsey Hartley, Mariah Miller and MaryBeth Tienharra.

FROM PAGE 11A
will Mosinee,” said DePuydt. “I think you will see us in the mix along with Mosinee, Waupaca and Tomahawk fighting for first place, much like last year.” The Eagles will get their first test of the season with a nonconference game at Kingsford, Mich., Tuesday, Nov. 22, at 6 p.m. The first home game will be Thursday, Dec. 1, against Stevens Point. Both are nonconference games. DePuydt said the coaching staff and players are excited for this season. “We feel that our team is hungry and ready to play another couple of weeks into the post season. Our boys have the right attitude, continuing to show up for strength training and conditioning all summer and fall,” said DePuydt. “We have had some good leadership in the off-season from our returners,” said the coach. “We have improved greatly over the past four seasons and now it is time to take the next step to hopefully play in a Sectional final game and extend our season into March to play in Madison. We are a capable team and we are now starting to believe it.”

Carney-Nadeau Early Bird basketball tourney planned
The fourth annual CarneyNadeau Early Bird Invitational Men’s Basketball Tournament will be held Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 3 and 4, at the Carney-Nadeau High School Gym. This year’s tournament will feature a double-elimination format with a limit of 12 teams. The winning team will be awarded a first-place trophy and 10 T-shirts, while the second-place finishers will receive a team trophy and T-shirts. Third place will earn a trophy. There also will be a Most Valuable Player and an AllTournament Team named in the event. Michigan High School Athletic Association rules apply, except for the following: — there will be a fiveminute halftime; — 25-point rule with four minutes left; and — games will be 20-minute running clock, except the last two minutes of the first half and last three minutes of the second half. The entry fee is $85 and should be mailed with a roster to Paul Polfus, Box 55, Carney, MI 49812. Participants can make phone registrations at (906) 639-2866, (906) 7480184 (cell) or (906) 639-2171, ext. 116 (school). The registration deadline will be Sunday, November 27. For more information, contact Polfus via phone or email polfus@uplogon.com. All proceeds will go to the basketball program.
With your help, MDA is building a tomorrow without neuromuscular diseases.

EIGHTH-GRADE VOLLEYBALL — The Northland Pines eighth-grade volleyball team this season included, front row from left, Sophia Svetnicka, Anna Hartwig and Tara Vanden Boom; middle row, Hailee Klausegger and Madison Ludwig; back row, Lexi Smith, Sammy Hytry, Hannah Eibner, Makayla Hayes, Annie Fuller, Mariah Karpinski and Lexi Vinnedge.

here in Eagle River. If the Eagles could improve on one aspect of the game this season, it would be scoring, according to DePuydt. “Last season, we struggled with scoring. We struggled with getting pucks through to the net and specifically when traffic is in front,” he said. “ We have worked to improve in this area and time will tell if it pays off. We know we can play good team defense, but in big games we haven’t proven that we can bury the biscuit.” Helping DePuydt mold the team this season are assistant coaches Bob McDonald, Don Czarapata and Mike DePuydt. The DePuydt brothers and McDonald are all former Eagles. Looking at the Great Northern Conference, DePuydt says the Eagles’ goal is to repeat. “As defending conference champs, we will strive to repeat, which will not be an easy task,” he said. “Mosinee will be returning a large number of the players as will Tomahawk and Waupaca. “Lakeland will prove to be yet again another exciting game because of the rivalry, as

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DARTS
EAGLE RIVER DARTBALL
Results of 11/9/11 Team results: Bucktale Inn II 3, BBT’s I 0; Club DeNoyer I 0, Bucktale Inn I 3; Club 45 II 2, Club DeNoyer II 1; BBT’s II 3, Club 45 I 0; BBT’s III bye. Top women shooters: Liz Butler 5/15, Audrey Flaherty 5/14, Marsha Newkirk 4/12, Kristin Zdroik 4/16, Maggie Geis 3/9, Sheri Shoberg 2/15. Top men shooters: Gary Brainard 6/11, Len Johnson 5/14, Bob Michaels 5/15, Mark Nagy 4/15, Dennis Eastman 3/9, Ed Falcetta 2/14. Home runs: Maggie Geis, Shane Graff. STANDINGS W BUCKTALE INN I ..................14 CLUB DENOYER I ...................7 CLUB DENOYER II..................8 BBT’S II ...................................10 CLUB 45 II ................................7 BBT’S I.......................................9 BBT’S III ....................................6 BUCKTALE INN II...................8 CLUB 45 I..................................3 L 1 5 7 8 8 9 9 10 15 STANDINGS W ONEIDA VILLAGE II ...........14 OV TRIPLE DIAMONDS ......11.5 AMERICAN LEGION I .........10.5 AMERICAN LEGION A ........10 OV WILDCATS ........................8 OV NOMADS ...........................7 ONEIDA VILLAGE I...............6.5 VILLAGE PEOPLE .................4.5 L 4 6.5 7.5 8 10 11 11.5 13.5

DON SCHARF AUTOMOTIVE
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Results of 11/7/11 Team results: Kathan Inn 3, Club 45 10; Club DeNoyer 0, Sweetwater II 13; House of Boo’s I 8, House of Boo’s II 5; Sweetwater I 13, Uncle Kent’s 0; O’Brien’s Pub 12, Smuggler’s Lounge 1. Six-dart out: Bob Burnett. Seven-dart out: Chris Blicharz. Eight-dart out: Jon Gosda, Josh Doyen. Nine-dart out: Eric Bolte (2), Jay Rabenberg, Bob Dutz, Ralph Daring. Hat tricks: Bob Dutz (3), Bob Burnett (2), Jay Rabenberg, Chris Blicharz, Peter Blicharz, Jon Gosda, John Garsow, Josh Doyen, Ralph Daring, Eric Bolte, Mike Jones, Melissa Jones, Jason Frizzell. STANDINGS W O’BRIEN’S PUB .........................47 SWEETWATER I........................47 SWEETWATER II ......................47 CLUB 45 .....................................42 KATHAN INN ............................38 HOUSE OF BOO’S II .................27 SMUGGLER’S LOUNGE...........25 HOUSE OF BOO’S I ..................24 CLUB DENOYER.......................16 UNCLE KENT’S.........................12 L 18 18 18 23 27 38 40 41 49 53 NOW DELIVERING FUEL OIL & BULK GAS. CALL FOR PRICING. WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD! ALL ORDERS C.O.D.

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NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION
Town of Lincoln April 3, 2012
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the town of Lincoln on Tuesday, April 3, 2012, the following offices are to be elected to succeed the present incumbents listed. The term for all offices is for two years beginning on Tuesday, April 10, 2012. OFFICE Town Board Supervisor #2 Town Board Supervisor #4 INCUMBENT Leon Kukanich Bruce Richter

THREE LAKES DARTBALL
Results of 11/9/11 Team results: American Legion I 3, Wildcats 0; OV Nomads 3, Oneida Village I 0; Oneida Village II 2, OV Triple Diamonds 1; American Legion A 2, Village People 1. Top women shooters: Denise Voss 4/8, Sally Willman 4/10, Doe Muench 3/12, Rosie Obukowicz 1/6, Debbie Hintz 1/9. Top men shooters: Mark Theisen 7/14, Bob Wojtusik 5/9, Stan Wargolet 5/10, John Effa 5/11, Warren Yahr 4/10, Larry Weinbrod 3/7, Morse Hintz 2/8. Home runs: Bob Mather, Gil Wank, Patti Harris.

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, that the first day to circulate nomination papers is Dec. 1, 2011, and the final day for filing nomination papers is 5:00 p.m., on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012, in the office of the town clerk. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN, that if a primary is necessary, the primary will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012. Done in the town of Lincoln, on Nov. 9, 2011
4992

WEEK 10 WINNER — Scott Oatman of Trig’s Grocery in Eagle River presented a $100 award to Mitch Raatz, week 10 winner of the Vilas County News-Review Football Contest. Raatz was declared the winner of the week’s contest after picking 13 correct winning teams in NFL and NCAA football games. Contestants can drop of their own picks for week 11 at the NewsReview or participating businesses with drop-box locations throughout the area. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Give the Gift of Life . . . Donate Blood
®

American Red Cross®

/s/ Shelly D. Sauvola, Town Clerk

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

15A

SPORTS
PROBABLE WINNERS PREDICTED HERE IN THE “EAGLE LINE”
Gary Ridderbusch N-R Editor Overall Record Winningest Percentage Last Week’s Tally 107-48 .690 10-7 Paula Hendrickson Tailgater 102-53 .658 10-7 “Painless” Pete Dentist 105-50 .677 7-10 Larry Snedden Youth Coach 104-51 .670 8-9 Rich Bruce Javenkoski Weber Sports Analyst Big B Grocer 104-51 .670 8-9 103-52 .664 8-9

Winning trophies in the Pure Stocks class this season were, from left, third place, Don Scharf;

first place, Dustin Miller; and second place, Ryan Valeria. --Contributed Photos

Speedway
FROM PAGE 11A
end. Weekly races will take place Tuesday nights. Eagle River Speedway will open the track for a day of test driving before the season opener. Trophies were given to the top three points drivers in each class, while awards were given in all divisions from first to fourth place. The season results for each class is as follows: — Modifieds: First, Jason Zdroik; second, Jesse Aho; third, Rob Rodziczak; fourth, Mike Bukovic; — Street Stocks: First, Jeff Klopstein; second, Ben Pitlik; third, Kevin Hartman; fourth, Denny LaCrosse. — Micro Sprints: First,

The winners of the Junior Sprints trophies were, from left, second place, Tanner Resch; first place, Ty Springer; and third place, Tommie Jo Springer.

Mike Hicks; second, Robby Resch; third, Jered Cech; fourth, Jake Reiff. — Pure Stocks: First, Dustin Miller; second, Ryan Valerie; third, Don Scharf;

fourth, Tyler Lundberg. Junior Sprints: First, Ty Springer; second, Tanner Resch; third, Tommie Springer; fourth, Wyatt McIntyre.

Tampa Bay at Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay N.Y. Jets at Denver N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets Denver N.Y. Jets Cincinnati at Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Jacksonville at Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Jacksonville Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Carolina at Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Tennessee at Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Buffalo at Miami Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Miami Dallas at Washington Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Washington Dallas Oakland at Minnesota Minnesota Oakland Oakland Oakland Oakland Minnesota Arizona at San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco Seattle at St. Louis St. Louis Seattle St. Louis Seattle St. Louis Seattle San Diego at Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants N.Y. Giants Kansas City at New England New England New England New England New England New England New England Open: Indianapolis, New Orleans, Pittsburgh, Houston COLLEGE Wisconsin at Illinois Wisconsin Wisconsin
391. STANDINGS W TEAM NO. 2 .......................................6 TEAM NO. 1 ....................................5.5 TEAM NO. 3 ....................................4.5

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

SATURDAY YOUTH LEAGUE

BOWLING
THURSDAY SPORTSMEN
Eagle Lanes Results of 11/10/11 Team results: Hiawatha Hide Away 7, Miller Sportsmen 0; XXX Outs 5, Daniel’s Distinctive Design 2; Wild Eagle Corner Store 5, Club DeNoyer 2; Dyna Manufacturing 5, BBT’s 2; Grembans 5, Leinenkugel’s 2; Boone’s Building Supply 5, Harry’s Market 2. High team game: Hiawatha Hide Away 1015. High team series: Hiawatha Hide Away 2906. High games: Don Tess 277, Karl Stardy 235, Glenn Lasowski 234. High series: Don Tess 669, Bob Burnett 611, Tim Richards 605. STANDINGS W DANIEL’S DISTINCTIVE DESIGN..39 HARRY’S MARKET ...........................38 HIAWATHA HIDE AWAY..................37 LEINENKUGEL’S ..............................37 BBT’S ..................................................34 CLUB DENOYER...............................33 DYNA MANUFACTURING...............32 GREMBANS .......................................31 WILD EAGLE CORNER STORE......28 MILLER SPORTSMEN .....................26 XXX OUTS ..........................................26 BOONE’S BUILDING SUPPLY ........20

THURSDAY NITE MEN’S LEAGUE
T&M Lanes Results of 11/10/11 Team results: Northern Carpets 5, Northern Exposure 2; FMN Floral 5, Black Bear Industries 2. High team game: Black Bear Industries 881. High team series: Northern Carpets 2352. High games: Dick Owen 232, Mike Froemming 225, Craig Mansfield 212, Dan Grosso 193. High series: Mike Froemming 572, Dick Owen 554, Karl Boehm 547, Craig Mansfield and Gary Goral 544. STANDINGS W L FMN FLORAL.............................44 26 BLACK BEAR INDUSTRIES...40 30 NORTHERN CARPETS ............32 38 NORTHERN EXPOSURE.........24 46

High games: Jason Wehrmeyer 256, Ron Buell Jr. 210, Dave Kelly 192, Gunk Buell Sr. 188, Mike Froemming 184. High series: Jason Wehrmeyer 602, Ron Buell Jr. 546, Mike Froemming 525, Dave Kelly 508, Doug Horstman 504. STANDINGS W L NORTHERN EXPOSURE .......54 16 LANNY’S FIRESIDE ...............41 29 GREAT LAKES STONE..........39 31 RAMESH MOTORSPORTS ....37 33 RUSTY NAIL ..........................25 45

Eagle Lanes Results of 11/12/11 Team results: Team No. 1 3.5, Team No. 3 .5; Team No. 2 bye. High games, boys: Judd Klotz 177, Joseph Pobjoy 168, Seth Daniel 161. High games, girls: Morgan Gurka 142. High series, boys: Seth Daniel 477, Judd Klotz 442, Joseph Pobjoy 423. High series, girls: Morgan Gurka

THURSDAY SENIORS
Eagle Lanes Results of 11/10/11 High games, women: Marie Baumann 161, Karen Grace 151, Sara Klein 147. High games, men: Earl Newton 192,

Jim Grace 188, Don Baumann 163, John Klein 157, Frank Borkowicz 147. High series, women: Karen Grace 428, Marie Baumann 413, Sara Klein 407. High series, men: Jim Grace 528, Earl Newton 512, John Klein 433, Don Baumann 427, Frank Borkowicz 417.

®

American Red Cross®

LADIES’ NIGHT OUT
Eagle Lanes Results of 11/9/11 Team results: Darrell’s Dummies 5, Boone’s Building Supply 2; Twelve Pines 2, Wild Eagle Corner Store 5; Rockettes 2, Harry’s Market 5. High team game: Darrell’s Dummies 1036. High team series: Darrell’s Dummies 2758. High games: Kathy Lyczak 215, Susie Erickson 214, Mary Simac 196, Lynne Behrendt 184. High series: Susie Erickson 589, Sue Soderberg 512, Mary Simac 504, JoAnn Bathel and Sandy Kwietnewski 471. STANDINGS W L DARRELL’S DUMMIES.................44 19 WILD EAGLE CORNER STORE..39 24 HARRY’S MARKET .....................31 32 BOONE’S BUILDING SUPPLY....28 35 TWELVE PINES ..........................26 37 ROCKETTES................................21 42

SATURDAY COUPLES
T&M Lanes Results of 11/5/11 Team results: Ally-Oops 0, Drinking Devils 7; Wrongsiders 0, Noo Problem 7; Lane 7 0, FUBAR 7. High team game: FUBAR 782. High team series: FUBAR 2258. High games, women: Amy Froemming 205, Karen Koskelin 187, Renee Horst 180, Jodi Hook 169. High series, women: Amy Froemming 520, Karen Koskelin and Renee Horst 472, Roni Kopanski 457. High games, men: Mike Froemming 225, Dale Grosso 200, Rob Kopanski 197, Ron Keller 183. High series, men: Mike Froemming 609, Rob Kopanski 544, Dale Grosso 538, Carl Reidy 518. STANDINGS W L DRINKING DEVILS ................19 9 FUBAR ......................................18 10 NOO PROBLEM.......................16 12 ALLY-OOPS ..............................15 13 WRONGSIDERS.......................10 18 LANE 7........................................6 22

SUNDAY COUPLES
Eagle Lanes Results of 11/6/11 Team results: This Week in the Northwoods 2, Bowling Oldies 5; Wheeler Dealers 7, Underdawgs 0; Bucktales 5, Rolling Thunder 2; Why Nots 5, Twinkle Toes 2; To Be Determined 4, Head Pins 3. High team game: Why Nots 858. High team series: Bucktales 2461. High games, women: Susie Erickson 187, Saly Ayers 173, Bonnie Godleske 170. High series, women: Susie Erickson 532, Sally Ayers 471, Karen Landvatter 444. High games, men: Roger Brisk 244, Rick Vande Hei 232, Del Fleming 202. High series, men: Roger Brisk 590, Rick Vande Hei 584, Cliff Erickson 528. STANDINGS W L WHY NOTS .............................10 4 BOWLING OLDIES ................10 4 WHEELER DEALERS..............9 5 TO BE DETERMINED .............9 5 HEAD PINS...............................8 6 BUCKTALES.............................7 7 THIS WEEK ..............................6 8 ROLLING THUNDER ..............5 9 TWINKLE TOES.......................4 10 UNDERDAWGS ........................2 12

TUESDAY NIGHT LADIES
T&M Lanes Results of 11/8/11 Team results: Tackle Box 2, Bent’s Camp 5; T&M Lanes 7, All in the Family Hair Care 0; Land O’ Lakes Pharmacy 5, Sparo Coin 2. High team game: T&M Lanes 835. High team series: T&M Lanes 2323. High games: Kyha Buell 244, Linda Youngquist 196, Karen Koskelin 192, Ronee Horst 181, Amy Froemming 180. High series: Kyha Buell 554, Karen Koskelin 524, Kari Bartleme 498, Linda Youngquist 489, Amy Froemming 482. Split conversions: Linda Sparks 5-10, Carol Horst 5-7. STANDINGS W L T&M LANES..........................50 20 ALL IN THE FAMILY ...........45.5 24.5 BENT’S CAMP.......................30.5 39.5 TACKLE BOX ........................28 42 LOL PHARMACY ..................28 42 SPARO COIN .........................28 42

WEDNESDAY GOODFELLOWSHIP
T&M Lanes Results of 11/9/11 Team results: Ramesh Motorsports 2, Rusty Nail 5; Great Lakes Stone Works 5, Northern Exposure 2; Lanny’s Fireside bye. High team game: Northern Exposure 804. High team series: Great Lakes Stone Works 2302.

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16A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

EDITORIAL
VILAS COUNTY
Eagle River Vindicator Established 1886 Eagle River Review 1890 ~ Vilas County News 1892
Publisher Editor Assistant Editor Lifestyle Editor Production Manager Assistant Production Manager Photo Technician Copy Editor/Lead Typesetter Proofreader Circulation Manager Accounting Manager Advertising Consultants
KURT KRUEGER GARY RIDDERBUSCH ANTHONY DREW MARIANNE ASHTON JEAN DREW ELIZABETH BLEICHER SHARINA ADAMS JEAN DEDITZ JEAN FITZPATRICK ELIZABETH SCHMIDT TERRY POSTO MARY JO ADAMOVICH DIANE GLEASON MARCIA HEYER MADELINE MATHISEN JULIE SCHIDDEL

OPINION/COMMENTARY

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER SINCE 1985

NEWS-REVIEW Along life’s road, are we missing any rewards?
FOLLOWING IS an old story with a timely message. Over any period of time there are things that go right and things that don’t go right. How we react or respond to those situations makes all the difference. During this holiday season, see if there is something you might be missing. An elderly Chinese woman had two large pots, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her neck. One of the pots had a crack in it, while the other pot was perfect and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walks from the stream to the house, the cracked pot arrived only half full. For a full two years, this went on daily, with the woman bringing home only one and a half pots of water. Of course, the perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments. But the poor cracked pot was ashamed of its own imperfection, and miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do. After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream. “I am ashamed of myself, because this crack in my side causes water to leak out all the way back to your house.” The old woman smiled, “Did you notice that there are flowers on your side of the path, but not on the other pot’s side?

People Make the Difference
By Byron McNutt
“That’s because I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path, and every day while we walk back, you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to grace the house.” Each of us has our own unique flaw. But it’s the cracks and flaws we each have that make our lives together so very interesting and rewarding. You’ve just got to take each person for what they are and look for the good in them. So, to all of my cracked pot friends, have a great day and remember to smell the flowers on your side of the path! * * * FOR ALL OF US who feel only the deepest love and affection (or is it hate and disdain?) for the way computers have enhanced our lives, read on. Some time ago, at a computer expo (COMDEX), Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft, reportedly compared the computer industry with the auto industry and stated, “If Ford had kept up with technology like the computer industry has, we would all be driving $25 cars that got 1,000 miles to the gallon!” But wait. Ford issued a press release challenging Gates’ assessment. It said if Ford had developed technology like Microsoft, we would all be driving cars with the following characteristics: 1. For no reason whatsoever, your car would crash — twice a day! 2. Every time they repainted the lines on the road, you would have to buy a new car. 3. Occasionally your car would die on the freeway for no reason. You would have to pull to the side of the road, close all of the windows, shut off the car, restart it, and reopen the windows before you could continue. For some reason, you would simply accept this? 4. Occasionally, executing a maneuver such as a left turn would cause your car to shut down and refuse to restart, in

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Our View
Milfoil success story here shows power of volunteers
There is an enormous success story associated with the volunteer work done in recent years by everyone connected to the Unified Lower Eagle River Chain of Lakes Commission, which has treated and knocked down colonies of invasive Eurasian water milfoil to the point where the weed is becoming difficult to find. Ecologists mapped some 278 acres of milfoil colonies just four years ago, and most of the infestation was in the range of dominant, high dominant or was matting on the surface. But between 2007 and 2011, careful monitoring and effective treatment brought the totals down to 24 total acres of milfoil, and only 2.5 acres with any sort of dominance. The resolve of the commission members and the partnerships they formed between local units of government, lake associations and the general public were truly amazing. It resulted in the recruitment of many volunteers to help monitor the lakes prior to professional surveys, and that proved to be incredibly effective.

which case you would have to reinstall the engine. 5. Macintosh would make a car that was powered by the sun, was reliable, five times as fast and twice as easy to drive, but would run on only 5% of the roads. 6. The oil, water temperature and alternator warning lights would all be replaced by a single “this car has performed an illegal operation” warning light. 7. The airbag system would ask “Are you sure?” before deploying. 8. Occasionally, for no reason, your car would lock you out and refuse to let you in until you simultaneously lifted the door handle, turned the key and grabbed hold of the radio antenna. 9. Every time a new car was introduced, car buyers would have to learn how to drive all over again because none of the controls would operate in the same manner as the old car. 10. You’d have to press the start button to turn the engine off. P.S. I’d like to add that when all else fails, you would have to call customer service in some foreign country and be instructed in very broken English how to fix your car yourself. * * * As the Congressional Super Committee prepares to give its To McNUTT, Pg. 17A

Andy Rooney

The deer season, hunting important for many reasons
With the annual nine-day gun deer season at hand, the sport of hunting in the Badger State emerges into its brightest spotlight once again. It can accurately be described as the single mostpopular sporting event in state history, drawing some 630,000 people to the forests opening day this Saturday, Nov. 19. That is one reason why this newspaper devotes a lot of attention to the deer hunt and just about every season for hunting, trapping and fishing, but we have sound reasons for doing so. These sports are some of the state’s most important recreational pursuits. They were founded in tradition and are well established in law. The deer hunt, specifically, is the foundation of the state’s deer management system — conservation at its finest. The North Woods and its nearly 2 million acres of public hunting grounds draw tens of thousands of hunters each year. Figures aren’t available on what they spend, but nationally, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service reports that hunters spent $24 billion pursuing their sport in 2010. Of course, dollars and cents alone do not represent hunting’s true worth. It is a sport that puts people in touch with the environment and gives them intricate knowledge of the game they pursue. Its challenges build stamina and character. The sport provides millions of teenagers an exciting alternative to drugs, crime and sex. The sport has an even brighter future now that the mentored hunting program is under way, giving thousands of 10- and 11-year-olds a chance to experience the hunt in a safe manner. Hunting is one of the oldest family sports the state has ever known. Deer camp serves as a homecoming of sorts for family and friends, pulling together generations of people who have this wholesome sport as part of their heritage. While we wish hunters the best of luck, more importantly, we hope they have a safe hunt.

So many things, so little space
(We are reprinting a classic Andy Rooney column originally published March 3, 1985.) IT SEEMS as though the rooms we live in are getting smaller, with fewer places to store things, and the things we have to store are getting bigger and more numerous. Take the kitchen, for example. It’s OK for inventors to keep inventing gadgets, but when are they going to start inventing some new places to put them? The drip coffeemaker may be handier than the old coffeepot, but it takes up twice as much room and it’s all counter space. We now have, on various surfaces in our kitchen, a food processor, a toaster oven, a juice squeezer, an electric can opener, a small television set and a radio. Note that each of these six appliances has to be plugged into an electrical outlet. It’s gotten so you can’t find room to roll a pie crust or cut up vegetables. There’s been an explosion in the space being taken up by winter clothes in the downstairs closet, too. Yesterday, I noticed that all the hangers were taken and the coat rod was jam-packed. You could take the hanger out from under any coat in there and it wouldn’t fall to the floor. I hate the job of squeezing another coat onto a coat rod that’s already full. The space revolution in the coat closet can be attributed to two causes. First, after you’ve lived in a house for 10 or 15 years, there are items of clothing that are fixtures in any closet. You don’t wear them; you just have them. There are coats in our closet that may have been there before Columbus asked Isabella for the money to discover America. They are never worn, never thrown out. Like the closet door, they’re just there. This category of coat closet To ROONEY, Pg. 17A

November brings variety of weather

Snow clinging to the trees and ground near open water brings to mind a specific time of year in the North Woods. November is a month during which anything goes. Heavy, wet snowfalls followed by bouts of warm sunshine aren’t unusual this time of year --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Trusted companions make the hunt
GUESS WHAT time of year it is? If you said autumn, give yourself one point. If you said the beginning of deer season, give yourself three points and a solid attaboy. Yes, folks, come Saturday morning at 6:33 a.m. local time, Wisconsin’s gun deer season, without question this state’s most revered hunting season, will officially begin. As usual, I will be present and accounted for when the opening bell sounds. As I sit there on my folding chair topped with a 3inch thick foam pad, waiting through the last minutes of darkness for the season to begin, I will reflect on many things. As always, I will remember my very first deer season opener, the morning when I

Trails & Tales
By Will Maines
had a chance to put my tag on a beautiful eight-point buck. I missed that buck with two shots as it fled full tilt through scattered pines and thick hazel brush — spooked by another hunter coming up a ridge toward me — my flirtation with early deer hunting glory squashed in a matter of mere seconds. It wasn’t until three years later that I had a chance at redemption and, on a glorious Thanksgiving morning in 1964, a day I will also reflect

Behind the editorial ‘we’
Members of the Vilas County News-Review editorial board include Publisher Kurt Krueger, Editor Gary Ridderbusch and Assistant Editor Anthony Drew.

upon in those last moments before this year’s season begins, I finally killed my first buck. It was no eight-pointer, but to this day I have the “rack,” long curving twin spikes of over 8 inches each, mounted and hanging on my basement wall. Just like a first legal muskie, you can only kill your first buck once, and that rack, mounted on a lacquered birch plaque, skull bone covered with red velvet pinned to the plaque with shiny brass tacks, is perhaps the most treasured trophy I possess. And there are the hunting partners with whom I’ve shared the deer woods over the years; partners like Grandpa Maines, my dad, To MAINES, Pg. 17A

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

17A

OP-ED/READER OPINION Concerned about liability Maines 16A FROM PAGE of ATVs on public roads
Dear Editor: I’ve been reading about the Phelps all-terrain vehicle (ATV) route plan with interest since there are such divergent opinions involved. Initially I felt it did not affect most of the residents of Vilas County, but more recently I noted one item of discussion that could come back to affect all of us. The item is the question of who would be liable to pay possible judgment in favor of a party that suffers personal property, or injury, damages involving an ATV user on many portions of the proposed route. I understand that the ATV manufacturers (and their retailers) have protected themselves from all liability by prominently advising ATV buyers that the product should not be used on paved roads. The state of Wisconsin also does not allow them on state highways. Hence, it would seem reasonable that any insurer of parties that might suffer personal property damage, or injury, would also take the position that they were not liable to pay any financial claims for personal property or injury suits by taking the position that all parties involved were forewarned against this practice. It would then seem reasonable that the individuals voting to give this authorization should be parties that would bear this liability. But are they willing to sign legal documents personally bearing responsibility for payment of any financial claims that might be awarded if the above scenario should occur? Or will such payment be passed on to all of the citizens of the municipalities and towns that provided the authority to permit this activity to occur? And if Vilas County is a party of this authorization, could all of us potentially see an increase in our tax bills to provide the payment of a financial settlement? Before passage of any ordinance on this subject, I personally would like to see written commitments from all of the affected liability insurers guaranteeing that the policies they provide (or will provide in the future) will fully pay for any scenario such as described above. In short, I do not want to see any possibility of a possible personal tax increase to pay for a judgment that would not have happened if elected officials had not passed an ordinance in direct contradiction to the stated advice of the manufacturer. Sincerely, Ray Rubin Eagle River Uncle John, my brothers, several cousins, Dirty Doug McDrew and, of course, my son, Brooks. I’d give anything if Brooks could share this season with me, but he is carrying a different kind of rifle these days, serving his country for a second tour of duty in Afghanistan, so this time around I’ll have to settle for closing my eyes during those last moments before dawn Saturday and mentally conjuring up his company on stand. As the season gets under way, I’ll wait for and take note of the time of the first shot fired within my hearing range. I’ll wonder if the shot was true or perhaps no better aimed than the two I fired on the first morning of my first season. Alert but nonetheless pleasantly relaxed, I’ll sit on my chair, my rifle across my lap — depending on the temperature, a warm blanket wrapping me from knee to chin — waiting for Mr. Buck to come my way. The woods will be quiet, yet full of the noise of squirrels scampering across brittle leaves, woodpeckers tapping on dying trees, ravens croaking and maybe a million or more other sounds of the forest lulling me into a state of total contentment. It will be just me, along with one trusted companion, one of only two companions who have faithfully accompanied me to the deer woods from my first hunt on. This year it will be my Savage Model 99C, a lever action chambered in .308 Winchester that remains the only deer rifle I have bought in my life. I bought the gun when I was 18, replacing the venerable Savage 1899 in .303 Savage passed down to me at age 12 by my dad. Long out of production now — both the rifle model and cartridge — my dad shot his first buck with it years before I got mine. I passed it on to Brooks on his 12th birthday and, after missing his first chance at a

buck at age 12, he killed his first deer with it — a big doe — a year later, and his first buck with it a few years later. Not long after that, he bought a fancy bolt-action rifle in .308, and for the past 15 years or so the old .303 has been retired, except for one October afternoon a number of years ago when we had one of those T-Zone seasons. That afternoon, on a whim and a sudden overdose of nostalgia, I took the .303 and sat on a stump on the back side of a swamp not far from my house. I spent the better part of two hours thinking about that rifle and the joy it had brought to three generations of hunters in my family. I would look down at it from time to time, give it a loving pat or two and remind it that though it might be mostly retired, it would never be forgotten. Fittingly, a half-hour before quitting time, a fat doe came out of the pine thicket in front of me and one last time — maybe, who knows when nostalgia might strike again — it

spoke and the doe was ready to be turned into venison in the fry pan. That rifle meant and still means the world to me, and though you may think it strange, odd or even stupid that a man could have such feelings for a cold, inanimate object, a true hunter understands. I do. It is much the same with my .308, over 40 years old now, and still my companion of choice every deer season. That rifle has unerringly taken down the three biggest bucks of my career, not to mention a whole bunch of spikes, forks and such. I own a .30/06 and a .270, both impressive rifles won at Ducks Unlimited dinners, but one has never been out of the box and the other used on only two occasions, mostly just to say I used it. Other than that, it has just been me, the .303 and the .308. Personally, that’s the way I think it should always be — a hunter, a treasured rifle and a new deer season on the horizon. Sounds good to me.

Basketball event displayed support for youth sports
Dear Editor: I wanted to take the opportunity to recognize this wonderful community for all of the hard work that went into the first annual Northwoods Basketball All-Star Event held Nov. 5 at Northland Pines High School. This event was hosted by the Northland Pines Basketball Association. All of the kids in the surrounding areas from Lakeland, Eagle River, Lac du Flambeau, and even the Upper Peninsula of Michigan were invited. They had an absolute blast enjoying a day of basketball and other events. We recently moved to St. Germain, and I am so impressed with the community involvement supporting the kids and youth sports here. I was amazed at how the entire community came together to offer a fun and supportive day celebrating basketball. There were so many volunteers, sponsors and businesses supporting this event. It was great to see so many leaders in the community helping to support athletic achievement and development. Plus, it was really fun! I would like to give a huge thank you to everyone. Kelly McGill St. Germain making the national debt $14.3 trillion. Recent budget cuts: $38.5 billion. Let’s remove eight zeros and pretend it’s a household budget. Annual family income: $21,700. Money the family spends: $38,200. New debt on the credit card: $16,500. Outstanding balance on the credit card: $143,000. Total budget cuts: $385.

Astounded by columnist’s characterization
Dear Editor: I was astounded last week by Mary Friedel-Hunt’s glowing characterization of the Occupy Wall Street protests in her Reflections column and it left me wondering whether she was just carelessly parroting the narrative of the media, or if her portrayal was intentionally designed to help check diminishing support. In “Freedom to Speak,” Ms. Friedel-Hunt paints a rosy picture of the Occupy movement by praising the protesters for their “peaceful presence,” and quotes their website occupywallst.org as a “leaderless resistance movement.” But in fact, “Occupy” is anything but “leaderless” as proven by video evidence and credible journalistic sources that expose the well-known Working Families Party (an ACORN front group) and the high-powered public labor union SEIU as both the architects and organizers from day one. Furthermore, there are disclosures in plain sight on the website Friedel-Hunt touts that thoroughly contradict her partisan view in damning and eye-opening ways. For starters, in bold letters on the home page of the website is the provocative proclamation “the only solution is World Revolution.” It also states that Occupy Wall Street is “using the revolutionary Arab Spring tactic to achieve our ends” along with a direct link to Wikipedia’s “Arab Spring” page. Arab Spring is then defined as “a revolutionary wave of demonstrations and protests” and a link to “revolutionary wave” is provided. Further investigation finds “revolutionary wave” explained as “a concept important to Marxists, who see revolutionary waves as evidence that a world revolution is possible.” Using the link to the “world revolution” page, we find world revolution described as “the Marxist concept of overthrowing capitalism in all countries through the conscious revolutionary action of the organized working class.” And last, but no less compelling, is the common dictionary definition of “revolution” (in Marxist theory) which is “the violent and historically necessary transition from one system of production in a society to the next.” Now, take the words straight from the horse’s mouth and couple them with the facts on the ground which good enough for Saturday mornings at the grocery store. One has a lining that can be put in on cold, rainy days, and the third is one I switched with someone by accident in a restaurant one night. It’s made for a man 6feet-2 and weighing 155 pounds. This does not fit my description by 5 inches and 50 pounds so I don’t wear it. Table and bookshelf space is at a premium in the house. There are more things arriving to be read than there are places to put them. Between books, magazines, catalogues, junk mail, real mail, bills, receipts, bank statements and newspapers, there isn’t a place left to put something down. Every flat surface is covered with paper with some kind of printing on it. I couldincludes arrests of more than 3,500 revolutionaries nationwide since the anti-capitalist Arab Spring-like movement began Sept. 17. The majority of these arrests mimics the orchestrated chaos in the Arab uprisings earlier in the year and includes: civil disobedience, battery, melees to standoffs with police, and targeted vandalism and violence in cities all across the country. This orchestrated chaos is all part of the Arab Spring tactic known as the “strategy of tension” which is intended to “divide and control public opinion.” Clearly, “World Revolution” using Marxist theory and “Arab Spring tactics” paints quite a strikingly different reality than the flowery artwork presented by Ms. FriedelHunt for consumption by her readers. Frank Gabl Prospect Heights, Ill. and Eagle River n’t read it all in 10 years if I started this evening, but some of it must be interesting, important, or vital to my tax return. There are too many items we all own that defy being neatly stored. The chief offender, the vacuum cleaner, is closely followed by such things as the wheelbarrow, the garden hose in winter, a variety of shovels and rakes, mops, brooms and brushes. Two buckets, several dozen clay pots and three large garbage pails don’t get lost easily. Some nights, it would be easier to book a room in a hotel than make my way through the garage. I fail to understand why, in this age of miniaturization and microchips, everything I own seems to take up, not less space than it used to, but more.

McNutt
FROM PAGE 16A
report next week, here is a simple explanation why S&P downgraded the United States a few months ago. U.S. tax revenue is about $2.17 trillion. The federal budget is $3.82 trillion, resulting in new debt of $1.65 trillion,

VOICES

F R O M A C R O S S T H E Compiled by Jean Fitzpatrick HEADWATERS REGION

Question: How do you feel about the new law

allowing uncased guns in vehicles?

Rooney
FROM PAGE 16A
clothing also includes jackets and miscellaneous items that belonged to our children, who no longer live at home. We want to retain the affection of our kids and preserve, to some small degree, the illusion that ours is still their home, so we don’t throw out their antique coats. The second reason there’s less space in the closet is that coats are taking up more room. I have a new down coat and I have a sheepskin coat and a down vest, all three of which take up as much room as six regular coats. I also own three raincoats or trench coats. One of them is more than 20 years old and the lining is torn but it’s still

Tom Sparks, 22 Driver Sugar Camp “I don’t think it is really that safe; there’s less time to maybe think things through and more of a chance of something happening.”

Bob Krieger, 71 Retired firefighter Eagle River “I think a gun should be in its case. The uncased gun law may lead to trouble like poaching. They should be in a case.”

Dale Ayers, 52 Carpet cleaner Eagle River “For those using safe guncontrol practices, I don’t see anything wrong with it. I hunt with safe people, and we all have to watch against being unsafe when you see a deer.”

18A

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

READER OPINION

Stand with Wisconsin’s public educators
Dear Editor: As Wisconsin’s public education system continues to face unprecedented challenges, it is important that residents have facts about how the current state budget and other legislative changes are impacting school districts statewide. Certainly, a lot of information has been disseminated about the new “tools,” but unfortunately, much of that information has been misleading, if not completely false. Having the best and brightest educators at the head of the class in every school should be a Wisconsin priority. That’s always been the No. 1 goal of my union — the Northland Pines Education Association. We are proud of ourselves and our profession. Continuous improvement of educators and the state’s public education system has always been at the forefront of our organization. Our teachers are highly qualified and trained. Most of our staff have advanced degrees in either our content area or in the science and art of teaching. Numerous teachers within our district are actively involved at the state and national levels, leading trainings and providing educational opportunities for other teachers. Wisconsin’s teachers are trying everything possible to do more with less, but frankly we are losing the battle. As a result of the $1 billion cut to Wisconsin’s education system — the largest cut in the country — we have fewer teachers, larger class sizes and reduced programs for students. Granted, some districts have been harder hit than others. There have been a significant number of teacher layoffs, pay cuts and losses. In the Northland Pines School District, we experienced the retirement and resignation of nearly 20% of our staff, resulting in the loss of some of our best and most experienced teachers. This is typical of many districts across the state. It is simply impossible for Wisconsin’s public school system to absorb a loss of a billion dollars without loss of leadership in the classroom and programs. Educators like me care about our students and our public schools. Wisconsin has consistently ranked among the nation’s leaders in academics and test scores. We want to maintain that status and continue to advocate for having the best schools in the nation. After seeing him do the talk show circuit around the country, I don’t believe our governor has the same interest at heart. He’s put up roadblocks to prevent educators — the people who work with students day in and day out — from having a voice about policies in their schools. Instead, school policies, procedures and directives can be arbitrarily set without our input. That is not empowerment. If we want to continue to improve Wisconsin’s public schools, we must include the voice of classroom teachers in the discussion. In attempting to silence the voice of educators, what the governor and other politicians have done is create a situation that is cruelly ironic since we are in the best position to know what students’ needs are and how to best meet those needs. It is unfortunate that educators like me have become targets for political gain. Nonetheless, despite the current turmoil, Wisconsin’s educators continue to do our best to inspire and help students succeed. Please continue to support your local teachers in our work to educate the next generation and ignore the spin of politicians looking to further their own aspirations. Deb Foster Educator and president Northland Pines Education Association

RED-TAILED HAWK — Though usually found soaring over large fields, this red-tailed hawk was hunting from a perch on top of low telephone poles. --Staff Photo By KURT KRUEGER

Cranberry Fest volunteers are amazing, appreciated
Dear Editor: On behalf of the volunteer coordinators, we are deeply moved by this community’s commitment to staffing and working diligently to put on the 2011 Cranberry Festival. More than 400 volunteers gave their time and energy throughout the week and weekend and, we assure you, it was appreciated and your efforts were noticed. As an outside observer, I have attended this event for years and was always amazed at what was accomplished. However, I truly had no idea what went into it until I became a part of it this year. My eyes have been opened in a new way. Nancy, Amy and myself checked in hundreds of people throughout the weekend and they all arrived on time, happy and ready to donate a couple of hours to this fantastic event. We had children, teenagers and adults, both local and transient, sign up, and, trust me, not all to do glamorous jobs. This experience has renewed in me the spirit of community. We also want to recognize the wonderful people who helped us feed these volunteers throughout the weekend. So a special thanks to Eagle Waters, Riverstone Restaurant, Twelve Pines, Buck’s Pizza, Ogren Electronics, NAPA Auto Parts, and all the volunteers who supplied us with baked goods. I would also encourage everyone to stop and thank the chamber staff for all that they do. We are blessed in the North Woods with events like this and the people who make them look seamless. Thank you again and we will be contacting you next year. That’s a promise! Sincerely, Cranberry Fest volunteer coordinators, Julie Paez, Nancy Ellis and Amy Young

Landowners with railroad right of way may be entitled to compensation
Dear Editor: Much of the following information was verbally presented to the Vilas County Forestry Committee in the summer of 2011. The county has kept quiet; therefore, in the best interests of our neighbors, we are releasing it. We have done extensive research regarding the railroad right of way (RROW) from Monico to Watersmeet, Mich. We discovered that significantly, on this particular stretch of RROW, no federal land grants were involved and abandonment took place years before the Rails-to-Trails act of 1988, so Rails-to-Trails does not apply. We discovered that Wisconsin only allowed railroads to obtain easements, not the physical land itself. When any quitclaims or deeds were issued, no physical land was granted to the railway companies; they only secured an easement running over the land. We also discovered that the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) released their rights to the easements running over almost all of the land parcels involved in Vilas County. All of the RROW was released between Brown Road located one mile south of the Vilas-Oneida county line in Clearwater Lake, and Willow Drive which intersects with Loon Lake Road one mile south of the Pine Street bypass. A number of RROW sections north of Eagle River were also released. Anyone who owns property that has RROW running through it may want to find out if it was released by the DOT. It is entirely probable that landowners with RROW are entitled to compensation in regard to the city or county granting utility easements without the property owner’s permission and correction on the RROW issue on their titles. One of America’s greatest freedoms for its citizens is the ability of the people to own their own land and live peaceably on it. The city and the county have violated this sacred right by taking the RROW from the adjoining landowners. Affected landowners may want to consult with an attorney who specializes in property rights (not real estate) issues. We welcome anyone to contact us for further information. Uno and Jodi Bloom Eagle River

Support new EPA initiative to reduce mercury by 90%
Dear Editor: Mercury, a dangerous neurotoxin, especially in the human fetus, is increasing in our air and water. This increase is caused by mercury and other heavy metals emitted from coal-fired power plants. In Wisconsin, you have mercury advisories on fish consumption from every single lake. Now you have the opportunity to show your support for new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protections that would reduce mercury nationwide by over 90%. The U.S. House has already voted to block stronger EPA regulation of mercury and other toxic metals in our air. According to Paul Krugman in the N.Y. Times, “rolling back regulations to allow more air and water pollution is not a viable jobs plan. Research from Yale and Middlebury College put a dollar value on air pollution. The study revealed that coal-fired electricity generation inflicts environmental damage that is worth more than the sum of the wages they pay and the profits they earn.” This means environmental regulations aren’t strict enough. Allowing coal-fired power plants the freedom to emit excess quantities of mercury and other toxic chemicals will just make all of us poorer and sicker. We must ask the U.S. Senate and President Obama to uphold public health. Please contact Senators Kohl and Johnson and ask them to support the EPA initiative to enact stronger pollution limits on mercury. Sue Drum Presque Isle

Letters policy
The Vilas County NewsReview/The Three Lakes News welcomes letters from its readers. Letters should be written legibly, or typed, and must include the name, address and telephone number of the writer. No letters will be published without the writer’s name. Initials and/or pseudonyms will not be used. Unsigned letters will be disregarded. While the maximum limit is 700 words, writers should note that shorter letters will receive top priority. No political letters will appear in the last issue prior to an election. They should be mailed to us at P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521.

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